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Sample records for human neutrophil interactions

  1. Characterization of Yersinia pestis Interactions with Human Neutrophils In vitro

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    Sophia C. Dudte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram-negative, zoonotic, bacterial pathogen, and the causative agent of plague. The bubonic form of plague occurs subsequent to deposition of bacteria in the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Neutrophils are recruited to the site of infection within the first few hours and interactions between neutrophils and Y. pestis have been demonstrated in vivo. In contrast to macrophages, neutrophils have been considered non-permissive to Y. pestis intracellular survival. Several studies have shown killing of the vast majority of Y. pestis ingested by human neutrophils. However, survival of 10–15% of Y. pestis after phagocytosis by neutrophils is consistently observed. Furthermore, these surviving bacteria eventually replicate within and escape from the neutrophils. We set out to further characterize the interactions between Y. pestis and human neutrophils by (1 determining the effects of known Y. pestis virulence factors on bacterial survival after uptake by neutrophils, (2 examining the mechanisms employed by the neutrophil to kill the majority of intracellular Y. pestis, (3 determining the activation phenotype of Y. pestis-infected neutrophils, and (4 characterizing the Y. pestis-containing phagosome in neutrophils. We infected human neutrophils in vitro with Y. pestis and assayed bacterial survival and uptake. Deletion of the caf1 gene responsible for F1 capsule production resulted in significantly increased uptake of Y. pestis. Surprisingly, while the two-component regulator PhoPQ system is important for survival of Y. pestis within neutrophils, pre-induction of this system prior to infection did not increase bacterial survival. We used an IPTG-inducible mCherry construct to distinguish viable from non-viable intracellular bacteria and determined the association of the Y. pestis-containing phagosome with neutrophil NADPH-oxidase and markers of primary, secondary and tertiary granules. Additionally, we show that inhibition of

  2. Use of CFSE staining of borreliae in studies on the interaction between borreliae and human neutrophils

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    Hytönen Jukka

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the tick-transmitted spirochete group Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi cause Lyme borreliosis. Acute borrelial infection of the skin has unusual characteristics with only a mild local inflammatory response suggesting that the interaction between borreliae and the cells of the first-line defence might differ from that of other bacteria. It has been reported that human neutrophils phagocytose motile borreliae through an unconventional mechanism (tube phagocytosis which is not observed with non-motile borreliae. Therefore, it would be of great interest to visualise the bacteria by a method not affecting motility and viability of borreliae to be able to study their interaction with the cells of the innate immunity. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFSE labelling has been previously used for studying the adhesion of labelled bacteria to host cells and the uptake of labelled substrates by various cells using flow cytometry. Results In this study, CFSE was shown to efficiently stain different genospecies of B. burgdorferi without affecting bacterial viability or motility. Use of CFSE staining allowed subsequent quantification of borreliae associated with human neutrophils with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. As a result, no difference in association between different borrelial genospecies (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, or between borreliae and the pyogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, with neutrophils could be detected. Borrelial virulence, on the other hand, affected association with neutrophils, with significantly higher association of a non-virulent mutant B. burgdorferi sensu stricto strain compared to the parental virulent wild type strain. Conclusion These results suggest that the flow cytometric assay using CFSE labelled borreliae is a valuable tool in the analysis of the interaction between borreliae and human neutrophils. The

  3. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

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    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...

  4. The effects of activin A on the migration of human breast cancer cells and neutrophils and their migratory interaction.

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    Xie, Dongxue; Liu, Zhonghui; Wu, Jiandong; Feng, Wenfang; Yang, Ke; Deng, Jixian; Tian, Ganghong; Santos, Susy; Cui, Xueling; Lin, Francis

    2017-08-01

    Activin A belongs to the superfamily of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and is a critical regulatory cytokine in breast cancer and inflammation. However, the role of activin A in migration of breast cancer cells and immune cells was not well characterized. Here, a microfluidic device was used to examine the effect of activin A on the migration of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 cells and human blood neutrophils as well as their migratory interaction. We found that activin A promoted the basal migration but impaired epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced migration of breast cancer cells. By contrast, activin A reduced neutrophil chemotaxis and transendothelial migration to N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Finally, activin A promoted neutrophil chemotaxis to the supernatant from breast cancer cell culture. Collectively, our study revealed the different roles of activin A in regulating the migration of breast cancer cells and neutrophils and their migratory interaction. These findings suggested the potential of activin A as a therapeutic target for inflammation and breast cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

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    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  6. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

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    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  7. Innate Immune Interactions between Bacillus anthracis and Host Neutrophils

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    Janet Z. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has been a focus of study in host-pathogen dynamics since the nineteenth century. While the interaction between anthrax and host macrophages has been extensively modeled, comparatively little is known about the effect of anthrax on the immune function of neutrophils, a key frontline effector of innate immune defense. Here we showed that depletion of neutrophils significantly enhanced mortality in a systemic model of anthrax infection in mice. Ex vivo, we found that freshly isolated human neutrophils can rapidly kill anthrax, with specific inhibitor studies showing that phagocytosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation contribute to this efficient bacterial clearance. Anthrax toxins, comprising lethal toxin (LT and edema toxin (ET, are known to have major roles in B. anthracis macrophage resistance and systemic toxicity. Employing isogenic wild-type and mutant toxin-deficient B. anthracis strains, we show that despite previous studies that reported inhibition of neutrophil function by purified LT or ET, endogenous production of these toxins by live vegetative B. anthracis failed to alter key neutrophil functions. The lack of alteration in neutrophil function is accompanied by rapid killing of B. anthracis by neutrophils, regardless of the bacteria's expression of anthrax toxins. Lastly, our study demonstrates for the first time that anthrax induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation.

  8. Effect of sevoflurane on human neutrophil apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tyther, R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Both chronic occupational exposure to volatile anaesthetic agents and acute in vitro exposure of neutrophils to isoflurane have been shown to inhibit the rate of apoptosis of human neutrophils. It is possible that inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis arises through delaying mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. We assessed mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in unexposed neutrophils and neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo. METHODS: A total of 20 mL venous blood was withdrawn pre- and postinduction of anaesthesia, the neutrophils isolated and maintained in culture. At 1, 12 and 24 h in culture, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was assessed by dual staining with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Mitochondrial depolarization was measured using the dual emission styryl dye JC-1. RESULTS: Apoptosis was significantly inhibited in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane in vivo at 24 (exposed: 38 (12)% versus control: 28 (11)%, P = 0.001), but not at 1 or 12 h, in culture. Mitochondrial depolarization was not delayed in neutrophils exposed to sevoflurane. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are that sevoflurane inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in vivo and that inhibition is not mediated primarily by an effect on mitochondrial depolarization.

  9. Neutrophil Evolution and Their Diseases in Humans

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    Jennifer W. Leiding

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytes have been preserved and have evolved across species, developing into cells that provide one of the first lines of host defense against pathogens. In humans, neutrophils are involved in early recognition and killing of infectious pathogens. Disruption in neutrophil production, emigration, chemotaxis, and function cause a spectrum of primary immune defects characterized by host susceptibility to invasive infections.

  10. Comparative evaluation of the role of the adhesion molecule CD177 in neutrophil interactions with platelets and endothelium.

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    Pliyev, Boris K; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-01

    Neutrophil-specific glycoprotein CD177 is expressed on a subset of human neutrophils and has been shown to be a counter-receptor for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31). Previous studies have demonstrated that the interaction of CD177 with endothelial PECAM-1 supports neutrophil transendothelial migration resulting in preferential transmigration of the CD177-expressing neutrophil subset. As PECAM-1 is also abundantly expressed on platelets, we addressed a follow-up suggestion that CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction may mediate platelet-neutrophil interactions and CD177-positive neutrophils may have a competitive advantage over CD177-negative neutrophils in binding platelets. Here, we report that CD177-positive and CD177-negative neutrophils do not differ significantly in their capacity to form platelet-neutrophil conjugates as assayed in whole blood and in mixed preparations of isolated platelets and neutrophils. Under flow conditions, neither platelet nor neutrophil activation resulted in preferential binding of platelets to CD177-expressing neutrophils. Furthermore, no significant difference was found in the ability of both neutrophil subsets to adhere to and migrate across surface-adherent activated platelets, whereas predominantly CD177-positive neutrophils migrated across HUVEC monolayers. In addition, we demonstrated that S(536) N dimorphism of PECAM-1, which affects CD177/PECAM-1 interaction, did not influence the equal capacity of the two neutrophil subsets to interact with platelets but influenced significantly the transendothelial migration of CD177-expressing neutrophils. Thus, CD177/PECAM-1 adhesive interaction, while contributing to neutrophil-endothelial cell interaction in neutrophil transendothelial migration, does not contribute to or is redundant in platelet-neutrophil interactions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Human anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) bind to neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rossum, AP; van der Geld, YM; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    Human anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) bind to neutrophils. Background. Recently, the in vivo pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in ANCA-associated vasculitis has been challenged by Abdel-Salam et al. In their report, they observed

  12. A novel bacterial transport mechanism of Acinetobacter baumannii via activated human neutrophils through interleukin-8.

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    Kamoshida, Go; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Nakano, Ryuichi; Hikosaka, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Higashi, Shouichi; Ono, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired infections as a result of Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. Although neutrophils play a critical role in early protection against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. To elucidate the interactions between A. baumannii and human neutrophils, we cocultured these cells and analyzed them by microscopy and flow cytometry. We found that A. baumannii adhered to neutrophils. We next examined neutrophil and A. baumannii infiltration into Matrigel basement membranes by an in vitro transmigration assay. Neutrophils were activated by A. baumannii, and invasion was enhanced. More interestingly, A. baumannii was transported together by infiltrating neutrophils. Furthermore, we observed by live cell imaging that A. baumannii and neutrophils moved together. In addition, A. baumannii-activated neutrophils showed increased IL-8 production. The transport of A. baumannii was suppressed by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration by blocking the effect of IL-8. A. baumannii appears to use neutrophils for transport by activating these cells via IL-8. In this study, we revealed a novel bacterial transport mechanism that A. baumannii exploits human neutrophils by adhering to and inducing IL-8 release for bacterial portage. This mechanism might be a new treatment target. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica induces human neutrophils to form NETs.

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    Ventura-Juarez, J; Campos-Esparza, Mr; Pacheco-Yepez, J; López-Blanco, J A; Adabache-Ortíz, A; Silva-Briano, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica invades the intestine and other organs during the pathogenesis of amoebiasis. In the early stages, the host organism responds with an inflammatory infiltrate composed mostly of neutrophils. It has been reported that these immune cells, activated by E. histolytica, exert a protective role by releasing proteolytic enzymes and generating reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and antimicrobial peptides. It is now known that neutrophils also produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are able to damage and kill pathogens. Studies have shown that intracellular protozoan pathogens, including Toxoplasma gondi, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania spp, induce neutrophils to release NETs and are damaged by them. However, the action of this mechanism has not been explored in relation to E. histolytica trophozoites. Through scanning electron, epifluorescence microscopy and viability assays, we show for first time that during in vitro interaction with E. histolytica trophozoites, human neutrophils released NETs that covered amoebas and reduced amoebic viability. These NETs presented histones, myeloperoxidase and decondensed chromatin. The results suggest that NETs participate in the elimination of the parasite. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

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    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  15. Immunoglobulin A: Fc(alpha)RI interactions induce neutrophil migration through release of leukotriene B4.

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    van der Steen, Lydia; Tuk, Cornelis W; Bakema, Jantine E; Kooij, Gijs; Reijerkerk, Arie; Vidarsson, Gestur; Bouma, Gerd; Kraal, Georg; de Vries, Helga E; Beelen, Robert H J; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2009-12-01

    Exacerbations of ulcerative colitis (UC) are dominated by massive neutrophil influx in the lamina propria with concomitant mucosal ulceration. The prevalent antibody in this area is immunoglobulin A (IgA). Interestingly, the IgA Fc receptor (Fc(alpha)RI) potently activates neutrophils. As such, we investigated whether IgA-Fc(alpha)RI interaction contributes to tissue damage in UC. Response of neutrophils to bovine serum albumin-, IgG-, or IgA-coated beads and Escherichia coli was investigated with 3-dimensional culture systems, real-time video microscopy, and (fluorescence) microscopy. In vivo studies were performed using human Fc(alpha)RI transgenic mice or nontransgenic littermates. Microscopic slides of UC patients were stained for IgA, Fc(alpha)RI, and neutrophils. In vitro and in vivo cross-linking of Fc(alpha)RI on neutrophils by serum IgA or uptake of IgA-coated E coli led to neutrophil migration. The responsible chemotactic factor was identified as leukotriene B4. Moreover, dimeric IgA (dIgA), which is produced in the lamina propria, but neither secretory IgA nor IgG, was equally capable of inducing neutrophil recruitment. We furthermore showed that Fc(alpha)RI(+)-neutrophils in the colon of UC patients had phagocytosed IgA-antigen complexes. Neutrophils are the first cells that arrive at inflammatory sites once pathogens have crossed the epithelial barrier. Fc(alpha)RI-dIgA interactions therefore may constitute an essential activation step to recruit more neutrophils, hereby eradicating impending infections. However, excessive IgA-antigen complexes can sustain a perpetuating inflammatory loop in UC, hereby seriously aggravating morbidity. Novel therapeutic strategies that block dIgA-Fc(alpha)RI interactions, and therefore diminish neutrophil migration and activation, may dampen the uncontrolled inflammatory processes in these patients.

  16. Dual effect of neutrophils on secretory component production by human bronchial epithelial cells

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    C. Pilette

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A decreased bronchial expression of secretory component (SC was demonstrated in severe COPD, and correlated with neutrophils. Mechanisms of epithelial cell/neutrophils interactions remain however poorly understood. Calu-3 (human bronchial epithelial cells were incubated after confluence (in triplicate conditions with various ratios of activated neutrophils (0.5:1 to 15:1, neutrophils: Calu-3 cells. After 48hrs of co-culture supernatants were assayed for SC by ELISA. SC production by Calu-3 cells increased at intermediate neutrophil numbers (316±32 versus 193±19ng·ml–1, ratio of 5:1 versus control, mean±SEM of 3 experiments, p = 0.05. In contrast, a trend for decrease in SC was observed with high neutrophil numbers (111±19 versus 193±19ng·ml–1, ratio of 15:1 versus control, p = 0.06. The addition of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor further increased SC upregulation at intermediate ratios, and inhibited the SC decrease at high neutrophil numbers. The mechanism of SC up-regulation by neutrophils did not implicate TNF-alpha or IL-1beta. This study provides direct evidence of a dual effect of neutrophils on epithelial SC. Our data suggest that neutrophils could differently affect epithelial immune secretory function according to the extent of neutrophil influx and/or to the reactivity of airway epithelial cells.

  17. Distinct Trypanosoma cruzi isolates induce activation and apoptosis of human neutrophils.

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    Luísa M D Magalhães

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are critical players in the first line of defense against pathogens and in the activation of subsequent cellular responses. We aimed to determine the effects of the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with human neutrophils, using isolates of the two major discrete type units (DTUs associated with Chagas' disease in Latin America (clone Col1.7G2 and Y strain, DTU I and II, respectively. Thus, we used CFSE-stained trypomastigotes to measure neutrophil-T. cruzi interaction, neutrophil activation, cytokine expression and death, after infection with Col1.7G2 and Y strain. Our results show that the frequency of CFSE+ neutrophils, indicative of interaction, and CFSE intensity on a cell-per-cell basis were similar when comparing Col1.7G2 and Y strains. Interaction with T. cruzi increased neutrophil activation, as measured by CD282, CD284, TNF and IL-12 expression, although at different levels between the two strains. No change in IL-10 expression was observed after interaction of neutrophils with either strain. We observed that exposure to Y and Col1.7G2 caused marked neutrophil death. This was specific to neutrophils, since interaction of either strain with monocytes did not cause death. Our further analysis showed that neutrophil death was a result of apoptosis, which was associated with an upregulation of TNF-receptor, TNF and FasLigand, but not of Fas. Induction of TNF-associated neutrophil apoptosis by the different T. cruzi isolates may act as an effective common mechanism to decrease the host's immune response and favor parasite survival.

  18. Distinct Trypanosoma cruzi isolates induce activation and apoptosis of human neutrophils

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    Magalhães, Luísa M. D.; Viana, Agostinho; de Jesus, Augusto C.; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia; Gomes, Juliana A.; Gollob, Kenneth J.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical players in the first line of defense against pathogens and in the activation of subsequent cellular responses. We aimed to determine the effects of the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with human neutrophils, using isolates of the two major discrete type units (DTUs) associated with Chagas’ disease in Latin America (clone Col1.7G2 and Y strain, DTU I and II, respectively). Thus, we used CFSE-stained trypomastigotes to measure neutrophil-T. cruzi interaction, neutrophil activation, cytokine expression and death, after infection with Col1.7G2 and Y strain. Our results show that the frequency of CFSE+ neutrophils, indicative of interaction, and CFSE intensity on a cell-per-cell basis were similar when comparing Col1.7G2 and Y strains. Interaction with T. cruzi increased neutrophil activation, as measured by CD282, CD284, TNF and IL-12 expression, although at different levels between the two strains. No change in IL-10 expression was observed after interaction of neutrophils with either strain. We observed that exposure to Y and Col1.7G2 caused marked neutrophil death. This was specific to neutrophils, since interaction of either strain with monocytes did not cause death. Our further analysis showed that neutrophil death was a result of apoptosis, which was associated with an upregulation of TNF-receptor, TNF and FasLigand, but not of Fas. Induction of TNF-associated neutrophil apoptosis by the different T. cruzi isolates may act as an effective common mechanism to decrease the host’s immune response and favor parasite survival. PMID:29176759

  19. Coxiella burnetii Interaction with Neutrophils and Macrophages In Vitro and in SCID Mice following Aerosol Infection

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    Elliott, Alexandra; Peng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute and chronic Q fever in humans. Human Q fever is mainly transmitted by aerosol infection. However, there is a fundamental gap in the knowledge regarding the mechanisms of pulmonary immunity against C. burnetii infection. This study focused on understanding the interaction between C. burnetii and innate immune cells in vitro and in vivo. Both virulent C. burnetii Nine Mile phase I (NMI) and avirulent Nine Mile phase II (NMII) were able to infect neutrophils, while the infection rates were lower than 29%, suggesting that C. burnetii can infect neutrophils, but infection is limited. Interestingly, C. burnetii inside neutrophils can infect and replicate within macrophages, suggesting that neutrophils cannot kill C. burnetii and C. burnetii may be using infection of neutrophils as an evasive strategy to infect macrophages. To elucidate the mechanisms of the innate immune response to C. burnetii natural infection, SCID mice were exposed to aerosolized C. burnetii. Surprisingly, neutrophil influx into the lungs was delayed until day 7 postinfection in both NMI- and NMII-infected mice. This result suggests that neutrophils may play a unique role in the early immune response against aerosolized C. burnetii. Studying the interaction between C. burnetii and the innate immune system can provide a model system for understanding how the bacteria evade early immune responses to cause infection. PMID:24082077

  20. Epithelial Cell-Neutrophil Interactions in the Alimentary Tract: A Complex Dialog in Mucosal Surveillance and Inflammation

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    Sean P. Colgan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory diseases of mucosal organs as diverse as the lung, kidney, and intestine, inevitably require the intimate interactions of neutrophils with columnar epithelia. The physiologic consequences of such interactions often determine endpoint organ function, and for this reason, much recent interest has developed in identifying mechanisms and novel targets for the treatment of mucosal inflammation. Elegant in vitro model systems incorporating purified human neutrophils and human epithelial cells grown in physiologic orientations have aided in discovery of new and insightful pathways to define basic inflammatory pathways. Here, we will review the recent literature regarding the interactions between columnar epithelial cells and neutrophils, with an emphasis on intestinal epithelial cells, structural aspects of neutrophil transepithelial migration, molecular determinants of neutrophil-epithelial cell interactions, as well as modulation of these pathways. These recent studies highlight the dynamic nature of these pathways and lend insight into the complexity of treating mucosal inflammation.

  1. Transcriptome kinetics of circulating neutrophils during human experimental endotoxemia.

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    Stan de Kleijn

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear cells (neutrophils play an important role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the development of sepsis. These cells are essential for the defense against microorganisms, but may also cause tissue damage. Therefore, neutrophil numbers and activity are considered to be tightly regulated. Previous studies have investigated gene transcription during experimental endotoxemia in whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the gene transcription response of the circulating pool of neutrophils to systemic inflammatory stimulation in vivo is currently unclear. We examined neutrophil gene transcription kinetics in healthy human subjects (n = 4 administered a single dose of endotoxin (LPS, 2 ng/kg iv. In addition, freshly isolated neutrophils were stimulated ex vivo with LPS, TNFα, G-CSF and GM-CSF to identify stimulus-specific gene transcription responses. Whole transcriptome microarray analysis of circulating neutrophils at 2, 4 and 6 hours after LPS infusion revealed activation of inflammatory networks which are involved in signaling of TNFα and IL-1α and IL-1β. The transcriptome profile of inflammatory activated neutrophils in vivo reflects extended survival and regulation of inflammatory responses. These changes in neutrophil transcriptome suggest a combination of early activation of circulating neutrophils by TNFα and G-CSF and a mobilization of young neutrophils from the bone marrow.

  2. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

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    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  3. Synchronisation of glycolytic oscillations in a suspension of human neutrophils

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    Brasen, Jens Christian; Poulsen, Allan K.; Olsen, Lars Folke

    Neutrophils are known to be able to synchronize their production of superoxide. We show that glycolysis is also synchronized in human neutrophils being in suspension and suggest that oscillations in glycolysis are driving the pulsatile production of superoxide. The synchronising agent remains so...... far unknown, however, much evident points to that it might be hydrogen peroxide or an intermediate in glycolysis....

  4. Regulation of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The objectives of the current study were to: (i) present an integrated model for the restoration of calcium homeostasis in activated human neutrophils based on current knowledge and recent research; and (ii) identify potential targets for the modulation of calcium fluxes in activated neutrophils based on this model ...

  5. Social networking of human neutrophils within the immune system.

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    Scapini, Patrizia; Cassatella, Marco A

    2014-07-31

    It is now widely recognized that neutrophils are highly versatile and sophisticated cells that display de novo synthetic capacity and may greatly extend their lifespan. In addition, concepts such as "neutrophil heterogeneity" and "neutrophil plasticity" have started to emerge, implying that, under pathological conditions, neutrophils may differentiate into discrete subsets defined by distinct phenotypic and functional profiles. A number of studies have shown that neutrophils act as effectors in both innate and adaptive immunoregulatory networks. In fact, once recruited into inflamed tissues, neutrophils engage into complex bidirectional interactions with macrophages, natural killer, dendritic and mesenchymal stem cells, B and T lymphocytes, or platelets. As a result of this cross-talk, mediated either by contact-dependent mechanisms or cell-derived soluble factors, neutrophils and target cells reciprocally modulate their survival and activation status. Altogether, these novel aspects of neutrophil biology have shed new light not only on the potential complex roles that neutrophils play during inflammation and immune responses, but also in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders including infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  7. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q D; Wang, J H; Condron, C; Bouchier-Hayes, D; Redmond, H P

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  8. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, Michael D. [Leukocyte and Ion Channel Research Laboratory, School of Health and Biosciences, University of East London, Stratford Campus, London E15 4LZ (United Kingdom); Ahluwalia, Jatinder, E-mail: j.ahluwalia@uel.ac.uk [Leukocyte and Ion Channel Research Laboratory, School of Health and Biosciences, University of East London, Stratford Campus, London E15 4LZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  9. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  10. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Molecular docking analysis of curcumin analogues as human neutrophil elastase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Narayanaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we aimed to dock 17 different ligands of curcumin analogues with that of human neutrophil elastase. Molecular descriptors analysis using Molinspiration online tool was carried out including investigation on human neutrophil elastase putative binding sites using Discovery Studio. The molecular physicochemical analysis revealed that all of the curcumin analogues complied well with the five rules of thumb. With regard to bioact-ivity score, compound 17 has exhibited least score towards nuclear receptor ligand (0.05 and enzyme inhibitor (0.10 compared to all other ligands. Compounds 2, 4 and 13 exhibited the maximum interaction energy (-40 kcal/mol. Interestingly, seven compounds namely 3, 11-14, 16 and 17 interacted well with Arg147 amino acid residue. The present study outcomes therefore might provide new insight in understanding these 17 curcumin analogues as potential candidates for human neutrophil elastase inhibitory agents.

  12. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuk Lee

    Full Text Available Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis. This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores.

  13. Chemotactic Activity on Human Neutrophils to Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate chemotactic activity o neutrophil to S. mutans. Chemotaxis assay was performed in blind well chambers. Materials and Methods: Hanks balanced salt solution (HBSS containing 106 S. mutans,  108 S. mutans, 10-8 M fMLP, or HBSS alone were placed in the lower wells of the chamber and covered with polycorbonate membrane filter. Neutrophils suspension (2x105 cells was then placed in the upper compartment. After incubation for 60 mins at 37ºC in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO2, the filters were removed and stained with Giemsa. Result: ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences among groups (p<0.05, indicating that S. mutans induced neutrophils chemotaxis. The number of neutrophils migration in response to 108 S. mutans and 106 S. mutans were signifiantly greater compared to fMLP (p<0.05. Conclusion: S. mutans may activate human neutrophils, resulting in the chemotaxis of the neutrophils.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.99

  14. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoz-Beneytez, J; Elemans, M; Zhang, Y.; R. Ahmed; Salam, A.; Block, M.; Niederalt, C; Asquith, B; Macallan, D

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4-18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n=4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n=9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results we developed...

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  16. Technical advance: immunophenotypical characterization of human neutrophil differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora-Jensen, Helena Isabel; Jendholm, Johan; Fossum, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports a flow cytometry-based protocol for the prospective purification of human BM populations representing six successive stages of terminal neutrophil differentiation, including early promyelocytes and late promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, band cells, and PMN...... differentiation in vivo in the human setting and constitutes an important alternative to models that are based on in vitro differentiation of myeloid cell lines and HPCs....

  17. Activated host neutrophils in the larval midgut lumen of the human bot fly Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Antônio C R; Evangelista, L G

    2002-04-01

    Light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to observe activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils from mammalian hosts as well as invading bacteria in the midgut lumen of larvae of the human bot fly Dermatobia hominis. Other resident or recruited cells associated with dermal myiasis were fed on by larvae and digested more rapidly than neutrophils. The latter were observed moving towards bacteria and particles of food, extending the filopodia and engulfing material to be digested within phagosomes. The larval midgut lumen, thus, appears to be a suitable environment to produce neutrophil activation at least for short periods, as seen in mammalian hosts. Although interactions between phagocytes and bacteria in the midgut lumen may be important in bot fly larval development, further studies are required to confirm this.

  18. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Eva E; Salaiza, Norma; Pulido, Julieta; Rodríguez, Mayra C; Díaz-Godínez, César; Laclette, Juan P; Becker, Ingeborg; Carrero, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce the formation of NETs and the outcome of their interaction with the parasite. Our data show that live amoebae and EhLPPG, but not fixed trophozoites, induced NET formation in a time and dose dependent manner, starting at 5 min of co-incubation. Although immunofluorescence studies showed that the NETs contain cathelicidin LL-37 in close proximity to amoebae, the trophozoite growth was only affected when ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) was present during contact with NETs, suggesting that the activity of enzymes requiring calcium, such as DNases, may be important for amoeba survival. In conclusion, E. histolytica trophozoites and EhLPPG induce in vitro formation of human NETs, which did not affect the parasite growth unless a chelating agent was present. These results suggest that NETs may be an important factor of the innate immune response during infection with E. histolytica.

  19. Pathogenic Neisseria hitchhike on the uropod of human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Söderholm

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs are important components of the human innate immune system and are rapidly recruited at the site of bacterial infection. Despite the effective phagocytic activity of PMNs, Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections are characterized by high survival within PMNs. We reveal a novel type IV pilus-mediated adherence of pathogenic Neisseria to the uropod (the rear of polarized PMNs. The direct pilus-uropod interaction was visualized by scanning electron microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. We showed that N. meningitidis adhesion to the PMN uropod depended on both pilus-associated proteins PilC1 and PilC2, while N. gonorrhoeae adhesion did not. Bacterial adhesion elicited accumulation of the complement regulator CD46, but not I-domain-containing integrins, beneath the adherent bacterial microcolony. Electrographs and live-cell imaging of PMNs suggested that bacterial adherence to the uropod is followed by internalization into PMNs via the uropod. We also present data showing that pathogenic Neisseria can hitchhike on PMNs to hide from their phagocytic activity as well as to facilitate the spread of the pathogen through the epithelial cell layer.

  20. Effects Of Gelatine-Coated Vascular Grafts On Human Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frank; Buerger, Thomas; Halloul, Zuhir; Lippert, Hans; König, Brigitte; Tautenhahn, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the immune-modulatory potential of commercially available PTFE and polyester vascular grafts with and without gelatine-coating. The biomaterial-cell-interaction was characterized by changes of established parameters such as PMN-related receptors/mediators, phagocytosis potential and capacity as well as the effect of an additional plasma-dependent modulation. By means of a standardized experimental in vitro model, various vascular graft material (PTFE/polyester/uncoated/gelatine-coated) was used for incubation with or without plasma and co-culturing with human neutrophile granulocytes (PMN) followed by analysis of representative receptors and mediators (CD62L, CD11b, CXCR2, fMLP-R, IL-8, Elastase, LTB4). Oxidative burst assessed phagocytosis capacity. Comparing the vascular grafts, un-coated PTFE induced the lowest magnitude of cell stimulation whereas in case of gelatine-coating, cell response exceeded those of the other vascular grafts. This was also found comparing the polyester-based prosthetic material. Gelatine-coated polyester led to a more pronounced release of elastase than gelatine-coated PTFE and the uncoated materials. The results of oxidative burst indicated a reduced phagocytosis capacity in case of gelatine-coated polyester. Plasma incubation did also provide an impact on the cellular response. While in case of gelatine-coating, PMN-related receptor stimulation became lower, it increased by native polyester. The latter one did also induce more mediators such as IL-8 and LTB4 than gelatine-coated material. There have been no extensive data on cell-cell interactions, cytokines and general histo-/hemocompatibility of human cells by the new generation of vascular grafts. It remains still open whether healing process and infectious resistance can be compromised by material-dependent over-stimulation or reduced phagocytosis potential of the immune cells of the primary unspecific immune response induced by gelatine

  1. Mechanism Underlying Levofloxacin Uptake by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Vazifeh, Doina; Bryskier, André; Labro, Marie-Thérèse

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of radiolabeled levofloxacin ([3H]levofloxacin) uptake by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was investigated by a classical velocity centrifugation technique. PMNs were incubated with levofloxacin for 5 to 180 min under various conditions before centrifugation through an oil cushion. Radioactivity was measured in the cell pellet to determine the amount of cell-associated drug. The uptake of levofloxacin was moderate with a cellular concentration/extracellular concentrat...

  2. Tumor Associated Neutrophils in Human Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    isolated from the samepatientwithNSCLC.Tcellproliferation in responsetoCD3/CD28wasperformedasdescribed inMaterials andMethods. Cell proliferationwas...PMNswere isolated as described inMaterials andMethods and then added to allogeneic MLR in the presence of neutralizing mouse anti-human LOX-1 antibody (10 mg

  3. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits the adhesion of flowing neutrophils to cytokine stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Clara M; Tull, Samantha P; Madden, Jackie; Calder, Philip C; Grimble, Robert F; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2011-07-01

    The (n-3) PUFA, DHA, is widely thought to posses the ability to modulate the inflammatory response. However, its modes of interaction with inflammatory cells are poorly understood. In particular, there are limited data on the interactions of DHA with vascular endothelium, the cells that regulate the traffic of leukocytes from the blood into inflamed tissue. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) cultured in a flow-based adhesion assay and activated with TNFα, we tested whether supplementing human umbilical vein EC with physiologically achievable concentrations of DHA would inhibit the recruitment of flowing neutrophils. DHA caused a dose-dependent reduction in neutrophil recruitment to the EC surface, although cells that became adherent were activated and could migrate across the human umbilical vein EC monolayer normally. Using EPA as an alternative supplement had no effect on the levels of neutrophil adhesion in this assay. Analysis of adhesion receptor expression by qPCR demonstrated that DHA did not alter the transcriptional activity of human umbilical vein EC. However, DHA did significantly reduce E-selectin expression at the human umbilical vein EC surface without altering the total cellular pool of this adhesion receptor. Thus, we have identified a novel mechanism by which DHA alters the trafficking of leukocytes during inflammation and demonstrate that this involves disruption of intracellular transport mechanisms used to present adhesion molecules on the surface of cytokine-stimulated EC.

  5. Flow Cytometric Evaluation of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis During Nitric Oxide Generation In Vitro: The Role of Exogenous Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Sulowska

    2005-01-01

    in vitro. The effect of exogenous supply of NO donors such as SNP, SIN-1, and GEA-3162 on the course of human neutrophil apoptosis and the role of extracellular antioxidants in this process was investigated. Isolated from peripheral blood, neutrophils were cultured in the presence or absence of NO donor compounds and antioxidants for 8, 12, and 20 hours. Apoptosis of neutrophils was determined in vitro by flow cytometric analysis of cellular DNA content and Annexin V protein binding to the cell surface. Exposure of human neutrophils to GEA-3162 and SIN-1 significantly accelerates and enhances their apoptosis in vitro in a time-dependent fashion. In the presence of SNP, intensification of apoptosis has not been revealed until 12 hours after the culture. The inhibition of GEA-3162- and SIN-1-mediated neutrophil apoptosis by superoxide dismutase (SOD but not by catalase (CAT was observed. Our results show that SOD and CAT can protect neutrophils against NO-donors-induced apoptosis and suggest that the interaction of NO and oxygen metabolites signals may determine the destructive or protective role of NO donor compounds during apoptotic neutrophil death.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 23 weakens chemotaxis of human blood neutrophils in microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Wu, Jiandong; Zhu, Ling; Cui, Xueling; Zhang, Michael; Rigatto, Claudio; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking in tissues critically regulates the body?s immune response. Neutrophil migration can either play a protective role in host defense or cause health problems. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a known biomarker for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and was recently shown to impair neutrophil arrest on endothelium and transendothelial migration. In the present study, we further examined the effect of FGF23 on human blood neutrophil chemotaxis using two new microfluidic dev...

  7. Thrombin contributes to protective immunity in pneumonia-derived sepsis via fibrin polymerization and platelet-neutrophil interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claushuis, T A M; de Stoppelaar, S F; Stroo, I; Roelofs, J J T H; Ottenhoff, R; van der Poll, T; Van't Veer, C

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Immunity and coagulation are linked during sepsis but the role of thrombin is not fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of thrombin inhibition on murine Klebsiella pneumosepsis outcome. Thrombin is crucial for survival and limiting bacterial growth in pneumonia derived sepsis. Thrombin improves host defense via fibrin and enhancement of platelet-neutrophil interactions. Background Innate immunity and coagulation are closely linked during sepsis. Their interaction can be detrimental to the outcome because of microvascular failure but can also enhance host defense. The role of thrombin therein has not been fully elucidated. Objective We aimed to investigate the contribution of thrombin to the host response during pneumonia-derived sepsis. Methods Mice treated with the specific thrombin inhibitor dabigatran or control chow were infected with the common human sepsis pathogen Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae via the airways. In subsequent infection experiments, mice were additionally treated with ancrod to deplete fibrinogen. Ex vivo Klebsiella growth was assessed by incubating human whole blood or specific blood components in various conditions with Klebsiella. Results Thrombin inhibition by dabigatran enhanced bacterial outgrowth and spreading, and accelerated mortality. Thrombin inhibition did not influence neutrophil recruitment to the lung or activation or neutrophil extracellular trap formation. Dabigatran reduced D-dimer formation and fibrin deposition in the lung. Fibrin depletion also enhanced bacterial outgrowth and spreading, and thrombin inhibition had no additional effect. Both thrombin and fibrin polymerization inhibited ex vivo Klebsiella outgrowth in human whole blood, which was neutrophil dependent, and the effect of thrombin required the presence of platelets and platelet protease activated receptor-1. In vivo thrombin inhibition reduced platelet-neutrophil complex formation and endothelial cell activation, but did not prevent sepsis

  8. Staphylococcus epidermidis Strategies to Avoid Killing by Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Rigby, Kevin; Wang, Rong; Queck, Shu Y.; Braughton, Kevin R.; Whitney, Adeline R.; Teintze, Martin; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a leading nosocomial pathogen. In contrast to its more aggressive relative S. aureus, it causes chronic rather than acute infections. In highly virulent S. aureus, phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) contribute significantly to immune evasion and aggressive virulence by their strong ability to lyse human neutrophils. Members of the PSM family are also produced by S. epidermidis, but their role in immune evasion is not known. Notably, strong cytolytic capacity of S. epidermidis PSMs would be at odds with the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus, prompting us to examine the biological activities of S. epidermidis PSMs. Surprisingly, we found that S. epidermidis has the capacity to produce PSMδ, a potent leukocyte toxin, representing the first potent cytolysin to be identified in that pathogen. However, production of strongly cytolytic PSMs was low in S. epidermidis, explaining its low cytolytic potency. Interestingly, the different approaches of S. epidermidis and S. aureus to causing human disease are thus reflected by the adaptation of biological activities within one family of virulence determinants, the PSMs. Nevertheless, S. epidermidis has the capacity to evade neutrophil killing, a phenomenon we found is partly mediated by resistance mechanisms to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including the protease SepA, which degrades AMPs, and the AMP sensor/resistance regulator, Aps (GraRS). These findings establish a significant function of SepA and Aps in S. epidermidis immune evasion and explain in part why S. epidermidis may evade elimination by innate host defense despite the lack of cytolytic toxin expression. Our study shows that the strategy of S. epidermidis to evade elimination by human neutrophils is characterized by a passive defense approach and provides molecular evidence to support the notion that S. epidermidis is a less aggressive pathogen than S. aureus. PMID:20949069

  9. Anti-inflammatory sesquiterpene lactones from Tithonia diversifolia trigger different effects on human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneli E. Abe

    Full Text Available Abstract The tagitinins isolated of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl. A. Gray, Asteraceae, are the most studied sesquiterpene lactones due to their wide spectrum of pharmacologic activities, especially related with nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition. Nevertheless, detailed studies about the mechanism of action of its active compounds are still lacking. Neutrophils perform a fundamental role in the inflammatory response to several etiologic factors. However, the effect of tagitinins on human neutrophil is not yet clearly known. We investigated the role of tagitinin C (1, tagitinin F (2 and tagitinin A (3 in activation and survival of human neutrophils to establish possible effects in their mechanisms of inflammation. Human neutrophils were purified from the peripheral blood and cultivated with tagitinins C (1, F (2 and A (3 in the presence or not of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. The enzymatic activity, apoptosis and secretion of cytokines rate were determined after 18 h. Lipopolysaccharide-induced myeloperoxidase activity of human neutrophils was significantly inhibited only by tagitinin F (2. Apoptosis of neutrophils was increased in the presence of tagitinin C (1, and it occurred independently of the presence of lipopolysaccharide or dexamethasone. Tagitinins C (1, F (2 and A (3 decrease lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and Tumor necrosis factor alpha production by human neutrophils. Together, these results indicate that tagitinins exhibit anti-inflammatory action on human neutrophils. However, tagitinin F (2 was the only sesquiterpene lactone that decreased secretion of inflammatory products by neutrophils without inducing neutrophil apoptosis.

  10. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  11. Toxicity of thienopyridines on human neutrophil granulocytes and lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseneni, Swarna; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Brecht, Karin; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2013-06-07

    Thienopyridines can cause neutropenia and agranulocytosis. The aim of the current investigations was to compare cytotoxicity of ticlopidine, clopidogrel, clopidogrel carboxylate and prasugrel for human neutrophil granulocytes with the toxicity for lymphocytes and to investigate underlying mechanisms. For granulocytes, clopidogrel, ticlopidine, clopidogrel carboxylate and prasugrel were concentration-dependently toxic starting at 10μM. Cytotoxicity could be prevented by the myeloperoxidase inhibitor rutin, but not by the cytochrome P450 inhibitor ketoconazole. All compounds were also toxic for lymphocytes, but cytotoxicity started at 100μM and could not be prevented by rutin or ketoconazole. Granulocytes metabolized ticlopidine, clopidogrel, clopidogrel carboxylate and prasugrel, and metabolization was inhibited by rutin, but not by ketoconazole. Metabolism of these compounds by lymphocytes was much slower and could not be inhibited by ketoconazole or rutin. In neutrophils, all compounds investigated decreased the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane, were associated with cellular accumulation of ROS, mitochondrial loss of cytochrome c and induction of apoptosis starting at 10μM. All of these effects could be inhibited by rutin, but not by ketoconazole. Similar findings were obtained in lymphocytes; but compared to neutrophils, the effects were detectable only at higher concentrations and were not inhibited by rutin. In conclusion, ticlopidine, clopidogrel, clopidogrel carboxylate and prasugrel are toxic for both granulocytes and lymphocytes. In granulocytes, cytotoxicity is more accentuated than in lymphocytes and depends on metabolization by myeloperoxidase. These findings suggest a mitochondrial mechanism for cytotoxicity for both myeloperoxidase-associated metabolites and, at higher concentrations, also for the parent compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactions between Neutrophils and Leishmania braziliensis Amastigotes Facilitate Cell Activation and Parasite Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Eric D; Jie, Zuliang; Liang, Yuejin; Henard, Calvin A; Hay, Christie; Sun, Jiaren; de Matos Guedes, Herbert; Soong, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania amazonensis are both causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in South America. However, patient prognosis and the host immune response differ considerably depending on the infecting parasite species. The mechanisms underlying these differences appear to be multifactorial, with both host and parasite components contributing to disease outcome. As neutrophils are a prominent component of the inflammatory infiltrate in chronic cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesions, we examined neutrophil activation and microbicidal activity against amastigotes of L. amazonensis and L. braziliensis. We found that murine neutrophils internalized L. braziliensis amastigotes with greater efficiency than did L. amazonensis amastigotes. Additionally, L. braziliensis infection was a potent trigger for neutrophil activation, oxidative burst, degranulation and the production of interleukin (IL)-22 and IL-10, while L. amazonensis amastigotes poorly induced these responses. Finally, neutrophils were able to kill L. braziliensis amastigotes, especially when cells were activated with phorbol myristate acetate. L. amazonensis amastigotes, however, were highly resistant to neutrophil microbicidal mechanisms. This study reveals, for the first time, differential neutrophil responsiveness to distinct species of Leishmania amastigotes and highlights the complexity of neutrophil-amastigote interactions during chronic leishmaniasis.

  13. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carollinie Dias KNOB

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells.

  14. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  15. Interactions between Neutrophils and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects 70,000 patients worldwide. Morbidity and mortality in CF is largely caused by lung complications due to the triad of impaired mucociliary clearance, microbial infections and chronic inflammation. Cystic fibrosis airway inflammation is mediated by robust infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils). Neutrophils are not capable of clearing lung infections and contribute to tissue damage by releasing their dangerous cargo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa is a main respiratory pathogen in CF infecting most patients. Although PMNs are key to attack and clear P. aeruginosa in immunocompetent individuals, PMNs fail to do so in CF. Understanding why neutrophils cannot clear P. aeruginosa in CF is essential to design novel therapies. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms by which PMNs attack and eliminate P. aeruginosa. It also summarizes current advances in our understanding of why PMNs are incapable of clearing P. aeruginosa and how this bacterium adapts to and resists PMN-mediated killing in the airways of CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28282951

  16. Human neutrophil cytoskeletal dynamics and contractility actively contribute to trans-endothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Hayenga, Heather N; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2013-01-01

    Transmigration through the endothelium is a key step in the immune response. In our recent work, the mechanical properties of the subendothelial matrix and biophysical state of the endothelium have been identified as key modulators of leukocyte trans-endothelial migration. Here, we demonstrated that neutrophil contractile forces and cytoskeletal dynamics also play an active biophysical role during transmigration through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Using our previously-established model for leukocyte transmigration, we first discovered that >93% of human neutrophils preferentially exploit the paracellular mode of transmigration in our in vitro model, and that is independent of subendothelial matrix stiffness. We demonstrated that inhibition of actin polymerization or depolymerization completely blocks transmigration, thus establishing a critical role for neutrophil actin dynamics in transmigration. Next, inhibition of neutrophil myosin II-mediated contractile forces renders 44% of neutrophils incapable of retracting their trailing edge under the endothelium for several minutes after the majority of the neutrophil transmigrates. Meanwhile, inhibition of neutrophil contractile forces or stabilization of microtubules doubles the time to complete transmigration for the first neutrophils to cross the endothelium. Notably, the time to complete transmigration is significantly reduced for subsequent neutrophils that cross through the same path as a previous neutrophil and is less dependent on neutrophil contractile forces and microtubule dynamics. These results suggest that the first neutrophil induces a gap in endothelial cell-cell adhesions, which "opens the door" in the endothelium and facilitates transmigration of subsequent neutrophils through the same hole. Collectively, this work demonstrates that neutrophils play an active biophysical role during the transmigration step of the immune response.

  17. Human neutrophil cytoskeletal dynamics and contractility actively contribute to trans-endothelial migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Stroka

    Full Text Available Transmigration through the endothelium is a key step in the immune response. In our recent work, the mechanical properties of the subendothelial matrix and biophysical state of the endothelium have been identified as key modulators of leukocyte trans-endothelial migration. Here, we demonstrated that neutrophil contractile forces and cytoskeletal dynamics also play an active biophysical role during transmigration through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Using our previously-established model for leukocyte transmigration, we first discovered that >93% of human neutrophils preferentially exploit the paracellular mode of transmigration in our in vitro model, and that is independent of subendothelial matrix stiffness. We demonstrated that inhibition of actin polymerization or depolymerization completely blocks transmigration, thus establishing a critical role for neutrophil actin dynamics in transmigration. Next, inhibition of neutrophil myosin II-mediated contractile forces renders 44% of neutrophils incapable of retracting their trailing edge under the endothelium for several minutes after the majority of the neutrophil transmigrates. Meanwhile, inhibition of neutrophil contractile forces or stabilization of microtubules doubles the time to complete transmigration for the first neutrophils to cross the endothelium. Notably, the time to complete transmigration is significantly reduced for subsequent neutrophils that cross through the same path as a previous neutrophil and is less dependent on neutrophil contractile forces and microtubule dynamics. These results suggest that the first neutrophil induces a gap in endothelial cell-cell adhesions, which "opens the door" in the endothelium and facilitates transmigration of subsequent neutrophils through the same hole. Collectively, this work demonstrates that neutrophils play an active biophysical role during the transmigration step of the immune response.

  18. Olfactomedin 4 defines a subset of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Bohr, Christina T; Rørvig, Sara

    2012-01-01

    blood neutrophils demonstrated complete colocalization of OLFM4 with the specific granule protein NGAL, and stimulation of neutrophils with PMA resulted in corelease of NGAL and OLFM4, proving that OLFM4 is a genuine constituent of neutrophil-specific granules. In accordance with this, OLFM4 mRNA peaked...... at the MY/MM stage of maturation. OLFM4 was, however, present in only 20-25% of peripheral blood neutrophils, as determined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, whereas mRNA for OLFM4 was present in all MY/MM, indicating post-transcriptional regulation as a basis for the heterogeneous expression...... of OLFM4 protein....

  19. Two lytic transglycosylases in Neisseria gonorrhoeae impart resistance to killing by lysozyme and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Stephanie A; Schaub, Ryan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Dillard, Joseph P; Criss, Alison K

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) produces a potent inflammatory response, resulting in a neutrophil-rich exudate. A population of Gc can survive the killing activities of neutrophils for reasons not completely understood. Unlike other Gram-negative bacteria, Gc releases monomeric peptidoglycan (PG) extracellularly, dependent on two nonessential, nonredundant lytic transglycosylases (LTs), LtgA and LtgD. PG released by LtgA and LtgD can stimulate host immune responses. We report that ΔltgAΔltgD Gc were decreased in survival in the presence of primary human neutrophils but otherwise grew equally to wild-type Gc. Adding PG monomer failed to alter ΔltgAΔltgD Gc survival. Thus, LTs protect Gc from neutrophils independently of monomer release. We found two reasons to explain decreased survival of the double LT mutant. First, ΔltgAΔltgD Gc was more sensitive to the neutrophil antimicrobial proteins lysozyme and neutrophil elastase, but not others. Sensitivity to lysozyme correlated with decreased Gc envelope integrity. Second, exposure of neutrophils to ΔltgAΔltgD Gc increased the release of neutrophil granule contents extracellularly and into Gc phagosomes. We conclude that LtgA and LtgD protect Gc from neutrophils by contributing to envelope integrity and limiting bacterial exposure to select granule-localized antimicrobial proteins. These observations are the first to link bacterial degradation by lysozyme to increased neutrophil activation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Catherine W M; Elkington, Paul T; Brilha, Sara; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Tome-Esteban, Maite T; Tezera, Liku B; Pabisiak, Przemyslaw J; Moores, Rachel C; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Patel, Vimal; Gilman, Robert H; Porter, Joanna C; Friedland, Jon S

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB), are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease.

  1. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine W M Ong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB, are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8 secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease.

  2. Neutrophil-Derived MMP-8 Drives AMPK-Dependent Matrix Destruction in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Catherine W. M.; Elkington, Paul T.; Brilha, Sara; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Tome-Esteban, Maite T.; Tezera, Liku B.; Pabisiak, Przemyslaw J.; Moores, Rachel C.; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Patel, Vimal; Gilman, Robert H.; Porter, Joanna C.; Friedland, Jon S.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary cavities, the hallmark of tuberculosis (TB), are characterized by high mycobacterial load and perpetuate the spread of M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of matrix destruction resulting in cavitation is not well defined. Neutrophils are emerging as key mediators of TB immunopathology and their influx are associated with poor outcomes. We investigated neutrophil-dependent mechanisms involved in TB-associated matrix destruction using a cellular model, a cohort of 108 patients, and in separate patient lung biopsies. Neutrophil-derived NF-kB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) secretion was up-regulated in TB and caused matrix destruction both in vitro and in respiratory samples of TB patients. Collagen destruction induced by TB infection was abolished by doxycycline, a licensed MMP inhibitor. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contain MMP-8 and are increased in samples from TB patients. Neutrophils lined the circumference of human pulmonary TB cavities and sputum MMP-8 concentrations reflected TB radiological and clinical disease severity. AMPK, a central regulator of catabolism, drove neutrophil MMP-8 secretion and neutrophils from AMPK-deficient patients secrete lower MMP-8 concentrations. AMPK-expressing neutrophils are present in human TB lung biopsies with phospho-AMPK detected in nuclei. These data demonstrate that neutrophil-derived MMP-8 has a key role in the immunopathology of TB and is a potential target for host-directed therapy in this infectious disease. PMID:25996154

  3. Additive antifungal activity of anidulafungin and human neutrophils against Candida parapsilosis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, Aspasia; Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Georgiadou, Elpiniki; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the activities of two newer triazoles and two echinocandins combined with human phagocytes against Candida parapsilosis biofilms. An in vitro model of C. parapsilosis biofilms was used. Biofilms were grown on silicone elastomer discs in 96-well plates at 37°C for 72 h. Biofilms or planktonic cells were incubated with voriconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin or anidulafungin, at clinically relevant concentrations, and human phagocytes (neutrophils or monocytes) alone or in combination with each of the antifungal agents for a further 22 h. Fungal damage induced by antifungal agents and/or phagocytes was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] metabolic assay. Each of the antifungal agents alone and in combination with human phagocytes induced less damage against C. parapsilosis biofilms compared with planktonic cells. No antagonistic interactions between antifungal agents and phagocytes were found. Furthermore, anidulafungin, but not caspofungin, and neutrophils exerted additive activity against C. parapsilosis biofilms. Besides a lack of antagonistic interactions between newer antifungal agents and phagocytes, anidulafungin exerts additive immunopharmacological activity against C. parapsilosis biofilms.

  4. Subcellular Fractionation of Human Neutrophils and Analysis of Subcellular Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine Novrup; Udby, Lene; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The neutrophil has long been recognized for its impressive number of cytoplasmic granules that harbor proteins indispensable for innate immunity. Analysis of isolated granules has provided important information on how the neutrophil grades its response to match the challenges it meets on its...

  5. Computer-assisted image analysis assay of human neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P; Kharazmi, A

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a computer-based image analysis system to measure in-filter migration of human neutrophils in the Boyden chamber. This method is compared with the conventional manual counting techniques. Neutrophils from healthy individuals and from patients with reduced chemotactic activity we...

  6. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Mothes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment.

  7. Hematological indices, inflammatory markers and neutrophil CD64 expression: comparative trends during experimental human endotoxemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, W. van der; Pickkers, P.; Scott, C.S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Gunnewiek, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    CD64 is a high-affinity Fc(gamma)RI receptor expressed by activated neutrophils that has been recently evaluated as a potential sepsis parameter. In the present study, the kinetics of neutrophil membrane CD64 expression were examined during a standardized inflammatory response, using a human

  8. NO signaling in exercise training-induced anti-apoptotic effects in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Hui; Jen, Chauying J; Chen, Hsiun-ing

    2011-02-04

    Short-lived neutrophils play a predominant role in innate immunity, the effects of exercise training on neutrophil survival is unclear. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of training effects on human neutrophil apoptosis. Healthy male subjects were trained on a cycling ergometer for 8 weeks and followed by 4 weeks of detraining. Blood neutrophils were collected before exercise, after training, and after detraining. Comparing with pre-exercise specimens, neutrophils collected after training showed reduced apoptosis rate, which partially returned after detraining. Various intracellular proteins, including iNOS, Mcl-1, A1, Grp78, and IL-8, were upregulated by training, and they remained high after detraining. Upregulated iNOS was closely correlated with these anti-apoptotic molecules in neutrophils. Furthermore, the possible mechanism by which iNOS suppressed apoptosis was explored. Neutrophil apoptosis was accelerated by blocking and retarded by stimulating the endogenous iNOS activity. As an anti-apoptosis mediator of NO signaling, the Mcl-1 level dropped by depletion of the major NO downstream molecule cGMP and such loss of Mcl-1 was avoidable when supplying exogenous NO. Upon activation of NO-cGMP signaling, neutrophils held increased Mcl-1 expression and delayed apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggested that exercise training may retard neutrophil apoptosis by upregulating the iNOS-NO-cGMP-Mcl-1 pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CFTR Expression in Human Neutrophils and the Phagolysosomal Chlorination Defect in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Richard G.; Valentine, Vincent G.; Lanson, Nicholas A.; Leidal, Kevin; Zhang, Qiang; Lombard, Gisele; Thompson, Connie; Viswanathan, Anand; Nauseef, William M.; Wang, Guangdi; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in neutrophils, a critical oxidant involved in bacterial killing, requires chloride anions. Because the primary defect of cystic fibrosis (CF) is the loss of chloride transport function of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), we hypothesized that CF neutrophils may be deficient in chlorination of bacterial components due to limited chloride supply to the phagolysosomal compartment. Multiple approaches, including RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining, and immunoblotting, were used to demonstrate that CFTR is expressed in resting neutrophils at the mRNA and protein levels. Probing fractions of resting neutrophils isolated by Percoll gradient fractionation and free flow electrophoresis for CFTR revealed its presence exclusively in secretory vesicles. The CFTR chloride channel was also detected in phagolysosomes, a special organelle formed after phagocytosis. Interestingly, HL-60 cells, a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, upregulated CFTR when induced to differentiate into neutrophils with DMSO, strongly suggesting its potential role in mature neutrophil function. Analyses by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that neutrophils from CF patients had a defect in their ability to chlorinate bacterial proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolically pre-labeled with 13C-L-tyrosine, unveiling defective intraphagolysosomal HOCl production. In contrast, both normal and CF neutrophils exhibited normal extracellular production of HOCl when stimulated with phorbol ester, indicating that CF neutrophils had the normal ability to produce this oxidant in the extracellular medium. This report provides the evidence to suggest that CFTR channel expression in neutrophils and its dysfunction affects neutrophil chlorination of phagocytosed bacteria. PMID:16922501

  10. Human Metapneumovirus Attachment Protein Contributes to Neutrophil Recruitment into the Airways of Infected Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna R. Cheemarla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human Metapneumovirus (HMPV is a leading respiratory pathogen that causes lower respiratory tract infections worldwide. Acute HMPV infection induces an exacerbated inflammatory neutrophilic response leading to bronchiolitis and pneumonia. However, the mechanism by which the virus regulates neutrophil infiltration into the airways still remains unexplored. In this work, we used an experimental mouse model of HMPV infection to demonstrate that the attachment (G protein of HMPV contributes to the recruitment of neutrophils into the airways and modulate the production of neutrophil chemoattractants and Type I IFN responses, specifically IFN-α. These findings provide the first evidence that the HMPV G protein contributes to the in vivo neutrophilic response to HMPV infection and furthers our understanding on virus induced inflammatory responses in the airways.

  11. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages...... and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD m......RNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA...

  12. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  13. Human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1: a new anti-leishmanial drug candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Dabirian

    Full Text Available The toxicity of available drugs for treatment of leishmaniasis, coupled with emerging drug resistance, make it urgent to find new therapies. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have a strong broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity with distinctive modes of action and are considered as promising therapeutic agents. The defensins, members of the large family of AMPs, are immunomodulatory molecules and important components of innate immune system. Human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1, which is produced by neutrophils, is one of the most potent defensins. In this study, we described anti-parasitic activity of recombinant HNP-1 (rHNP-1 against Leishmania major promastigotes and amastigotes. Furthermore, we evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of rHNP-1 on parasite-infected neutrophils and how neutrophil apoptosis was affected. Our result showed that neutrophils isolated from healthy individuals were significantly delayed in the onset of apoptosis following rHNP-1 treatment. Moreover, there was a noteworthy increase in dying cells in rHNP-1- and/or CpG-treated neutrophils in comparison with untreated cells. There is a considerable increase in TNF-α production from rHNP-1-treated neutrophils and decreased level of TGF-β concentration, a response that should potentiate the immune system against parasite invasion. In addition, by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR, we showed that in vitro infectivity of Leishmania into neutrophils is significantly reduced following rHNP-1 treatment compared to untreated cells.

  14. Effects of areca nut extracts on the functions of human neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S L; Chen, Y L; Wan, H C; Liu, T Y; Chen, Y T; Ling, L J

    2000-08-01

    Aqueous extracts of ripe areca nut without husk (ripe ANE) and fresh and tender areca nut with husk (tender ANE) were examined for their effects on the defensive functions of human neutrophils. Exposure of peripheral blood neutrophils to ripe ANE and tender ANE inhibited their bactericidal activity against oral pathogens, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans, in a dose-dependent manner. At the concentrations tested, ripe and tender ANEs did not significantly affect the viability of neutrophils as verified by their ability to exclude trypan blue dye. However, both ANEs inhibited the production of bactericidal superoxide anion by neutrophils as measured by cytochrome c reduction. Moreover, the ripe ANE inhibited neutrophils more effectively than did tender ANE. Arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, only exhibited an inhibitory effect on the functions of neutrophils when high concentrations were used. Therefore, arecoline could not be used to explain the inhibitory effects observed for ANEs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ripe and tender ANEs reduced the antibacterial activity and the superoxide anion production of neutrophils. This effect may contribute to a less efficient elimination of bacteria from the periodontal environment. Inhibition of the antimicrobial functions of neutrophils may alter the microbial ecology of the oral cavity, and this may be one possible mechanism by which areca nut compromises the oral health of users of areca nut products.

  15. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Sharpe, Matthew R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  16. Doxycycline induced photodamage to human neutrophils and tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, S.; Glette, J.; Hopen, G.; Solberg, C.O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway))

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophil function were studied following irradiation (340-380 nm) of the cells in the presence of 22 ..mu..M doxycycline. At increasing light fluence the locomotion, chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation (by the hexose monophosphate shunt) of the neutrophils steadily decreased. The photodamage increased with increasing preincubation temperature and time and was enhanced in D/sub 2/O, reduced in azide and abolished in anaerobiosis. Superoxide dismutase, catalase or mannitol did not influence the photodamage. Photooxidation of tryptophan in the presence of doxycycline was increased 9-10-fold in D/sub 2/O and nearly abolished in the presence of 0.25 mM NaN/sub 3/, indicating that singlet oxygen is the most important reactive oxygen species in the doxycycline-induced photodamage. The results may explain some of the features of tetracycline-induced photosensitivity and why other authors have obtained diverging results when studying the influence of tetracyclines on neutrophil functions.

  17. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Andersson

    Full Text Available Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  18. Characterization of the Na+/HCO3- Cotransport in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam S. Giambelluca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bicarbonate transport has crucial roles in regulating intracellular pH (pHi in a variety of cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its participation in the regulation of pHi in resting and stimulated human neutrophils. Methods: Freshly isolated human neutrophils acidified by an ammonium prepulse were used in this study. Results: We demonstrated that resting neutrophils have a bicarbonate transport mechanism that prevents acidification when the Na+/H+ exchanger is blocked by EIPA. Neutrophils acidified by an ammonium prepulse showed an EIPA-resistant recovery of pHi that was inhibited by the blocker of the anionic transporters SITS or the Na+/HCO3- cotransporter (NBC selective inhibitor S0859, and abolished when sodium was removed from the extracellular medium. In western blot and RT-PCR analysis the expression of NBCe2 but not NBCe1 or NBCn1 was detected in neutrophils Acidified neutrophils increased the EIPA-insensitive pHi recovery rate when its activity was stimulated with fMLF/ cytochalasin B. This increase in the removal of acid equivalents was insensitive to the blockade of the NADPH oxidase with DPI. Conclusion: It is concluded that neutrophils have an NBC that regulates basal pHi and is modulated by chemotactic agents.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty acids and inflammation: novel interactions reveal a new step in neutrophil recruitment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha P Tull

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a physiological response to tissue trauma or infection, but leukocytes, which are the effector cells of the inflammatory process, have powerful tissue remodelling capabilities. Thus, to ensure their precise localisation, passage of leukocytes from the blood into inflamed tissue is tightly regulated. Recruitment of blood borne neutrophils to the tissue stroma occurs during early inflammation. In this process, peptide agonists of the chemokine family are assumed to provide a chemotactic stimulus capable of supporting the migration of neutrophils across vascular endothelial cells, through the basement membrane of the vessel wall, and out into the tissue stroma. Here, we show that, although an initial chemokine stimulus is essential for the recruitment of flowing neutrophils by endothelial cells stimulated with the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transit of the endothelial monolayer is regulated by an additional and downstream stimulus. This signal is supplied by the metabolism of the omega-6-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6-PUFA, arachidonic acid, into the eicosanoid prostaglandin-D(2 (PGD(2 by cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes. This new step in the neutrophil recruitment process was revealed when the dietary n-3-PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, was utilised as an alternative substrate for COX enzymes, leading to the generation of PGD(3. This alternative series eicosanoid inhibited the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells by antagonising the PGD(2 receptor. Here, we describe a new step in the neutrophil recruitment process that relies upon a lipid-mediated signal to regulate the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells. PGD(2 signalling is subordinate to the chemokine-mediated activation of neutrophils, but without the sequential delivery of this signal, neutrophils fail to penetrate the endothelial cell monolayer. Importantly, the ability of the dietary n-3-PUFA, EPA, to inhibit this process not

  20. Omega-3 Fatty acids and inflammation: novel interactions reveal a new step in neutrophil recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Samantha P; Yates, Clara M; Maskrey, Benjamin H; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Madden, Jackie; Grimble, Robert F; Calder, Philip C; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2009-08-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response to tissue trauma or infection, but leukocytes, which are the effector cells of the inflammatory process, have powerful tissue remodelling capabilities. Thus, to ensure their precise localisation, passage of leukocytes from the blood into inflamed tissue is tightly regulated. Recruitment of blood borne neutrophils to the tissue stroma occurs during early inflammation. In this process, peptide agonists of the chemokine family are assumed to provide a chemotactic stimulus capable of supporting the migration of neutrophils across vascular endothelial cells, through the basement membrane of the vessel wall, and out into the tissue stroma. Here, we show that, although an initial chemokine stimulus is essential for the recruitment of flowing neutrophils by endothelial cells stimulated with the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transit of the endothelial monolayer is regulated by an additional and downstream stimulus. This signal is supplied by the metabolism of the omega-6-polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6-PUFA), arachidonic acid, into the eicosanoid prostaglandin-D(2) (PGD(2)) by cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. This new step in the neutrophil recruitment process was revealed when the dietary n-3-PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), was utilised as an alternative substrate for COX enzymes, leading to the generation of PGD(3). This alternative series eicosanoid inhibited the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells by antagonising the PGD(2) receptor. Here, we describe a new step in the neutrophil recruitment process that relies upon a lipid-mediated signal to regulate the migration of neutrophils across endothelial cells. PGD(2) signalling is subordinate to the chemokine-mediated activation of neutrophils, but without the sequential delivery of this signal, neutrophils fail to penetrate the endothelial cell monolayer. Importantly, the ability of the dietary n-3-PUFA, EPA, to inhibit this process not only

  1. Physiological concentrations of leptin do not affect human neutrophils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, V.M.; Langereis, J.D.; Aalst, C.W. van; Linden, J. van der; Ulfman, L.H.; Koenderman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that is thought to be important in many inflammatory diseases, and is known to influence the function of several leukocyte types. However, no clear consensus is present regarding the responsiveness of neutrophils for this adipokine. In this study a 2D DIGE proteomics approach

  2. Nitric oxide regulates the aggregation of stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, T; Nilsson, H M; Sundqvist, T

    2000-08-02

    Neutrophil aggregation is mediated by both CD18 integrin and L-selectin. Nitric oxide attenuates the integrin-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to collagen and to endothelium and may therefore affect aggregation as well. FMLP-stimulated neutrophils exposed to l-arginine showed increased and prolonged aggregation, whereas cells pretreated with L-NAME did not differ from FMLP-stimulated controls. Nitric oxide is known to induce ADP ribosylation of G-actin, which inhibits polymerization. We detected equivalent levels of total F-actin in cells pretreated with l-arginine or L-NAME and non-pretreated controls. However, neutrophils pretreated with l-arginine and stimulated by CD18 integrin cross-linking exhibited a more limited increase in total F-actin, compared to control and L-NAME-pretreated cells. Thus at least two signaling pathways may be involved FMLP-stimulated aggregation, mediated by CD18 integrins. More specifically, it is plausible that FMLP-receptor signaling upregulates CD18 integrins and endogenous NO subsequently modulates CD18-mediated signaling to prolong aggregation, possibly through ADP-ribosylation of actin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Effect of Legionella pneumophila cytotoxic protease on human neutrophil and monocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular metalloprotease of Legionella pneumophila, also called tissue-destructive protease or major secretory protein, has been proposed as one of the virulence factors of this organism. Considering the decisive role played by the phagocytic cells in host defense against Legionella infe....... pneumophila protease on neutrophil chemotaxis and on the listericidal activity of human neutrophils and monocytes demonstrated in this study provides evidence for a role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease....

  4. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    2013-01-01

    granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in...... subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes....

  5. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G; Enghild, Jan J; Praetorius, Jeppe; Borregaard, Niels; Petersen, Steen V

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD mRNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide in the extracellular space, but does not affect the capacity to generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Consequently, our data signifies that EC-SOD released from activated neutrophils affects the redox conditions of the extracellular space and may offer protection against highly reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals otherwise generated as a result of respiratory burst activity of activated neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prednisolone inhibits cytokine-induced adhesive and cytotoxic interactions between endothelial cells and neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbürger, M; Lärfars, G; Bratt, J

    2000-03-01

    We assessed whether prednisolone influenced the ability of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to adhere to and cause lysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro (as measured by the release of 51Cr). Pretreatment of the endothelium with IL-1beta or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) caused prominent endothelial E-selectin expression and endothelial hyperadhesiveness for neutrophils, as well as PMN-mediated cytotoxicity. All these processes were dose-dependently reduced when prednisolone was added to the assay system. This protective effect remained when HUVEC alone were pretreated with the drug prior to washing and cytokine activation. Likewise, when HUVEC cytotoxicity was induced by the nitric oxide (NO) donor S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), prednisolone reduced cell injury significantly. In contrast, prednisolone did not interfere with signalling systems between TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC and quiescent PMN such as IL-8 generation and release of cytosolic Ca2 + in the PMN. Thus, in this in vitro model of vasculitis, prednisolone dose-dependently reduced cytokine-induced E-selectin expression and HUVEC hyperadhesiveness for neutrophils, as well as reducing neutrophil-dependent cytotoxicity against HUVEC via NO-dependent steps.

  7. Entamoeba histolytica Trophozoites and Lipopeptidophosphoglycan Trigger Human Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Eva E Ávila; Norma Salaiza; Julieta Pulido; Mayra C Rodríguez; César Díaz-Godínez; Juan P Laclette; Ingeborg Becker; Carrero, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil defense mechanisms include phagocytosis, degranulation and the formation of extracellular traps (NET). These networks of DNA are triggered by several immune and microbial factors, representing a defense strategy to prevent microbial spread by trapping/killing pathogens. This may be important against Entamoeba histolytica, since its large size hinders its phagocytosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether E. histolytica and their lipopeptidophosphoglycan (EhLPPG) induce th...

  8. Synergistic Interaction of the Triple Combination of Amphotericin B, Ciprofloxacin, and Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils against Aspergillus fumigatus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulou, Theodouli; Meletiadis, Joseph; Sein, Tin; Papaioannidou, Paraskevi; Walsh, Thomas J.; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus is damaged by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) by means of nonoxidative and oxidative mechanisms, which may be affected by antifungal and antibacterial agents that patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis often receive. The pharmacodynamic interactions among deoxycholate amphotericin B (AMB), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and human PMNs against Aspergillus fumigatus growth are unknown. We therefore studied the interactions between 0.032 to 2.0 μg/ml of AMB, 0.1 to 50 μg/ml of CIP at a fixed AMB/CIP ratio of 1:3.125, and PMNs from six donors at an effector-to-target (E:T) ratio of 400:1 against a clinical A. fumigatus isolate using an XTT metabolic assay and the Bliss independence pharmacodynamic-interaction model. CIP exhibited no antifungal activity alone or in combination with PMNs. Synergy was found between AMB and PMNs, with interaction indices (II) of 0.06 to 0.21; the highest interaction of 21% ± 3.6% was observed at 0.22 ± 0.09 μg/ml of AMB. The AMB and CIP (AMB+CIP) combination was synergistic (II = 0.39) at low AMB concentrations and antagonistic (II = 1.39) at high AMB concentrations, with a maximal synergistic interaction of 16% ± 3.7% observed at 0.16 ± 0.08 μg/ml of AMB. The triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs was synergistic, with interaction indices of 0.05 to 0.20, and a maximal synergistic interaction of 24% ± 4% was observed at 0.20 ± 0.07 μg/ml of AMB. The increased percentage of Bliss synergy of the triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs (24% ± 4%) was the product of those of the constituent double combinations AMB+PMNs (21% ± 3.6%) and AMB+CIP (16% ± 3.7%). Thus, the antifungal activity of AMB, at clinically relevant concentrations, was enhanced in combination with PMNs and CIP against A. fumigatus growth in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:21911564

  9. TNF-α potentiates uric acid-induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokose, Kohei; Sato, Shuzo; Asano, Tomoyuki; Yashiro, Makiko; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Eiji; Sato, Chikako; Kozuru, Hideko; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-09-14

    Monosodium urate (MSU) has been shown to promote interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in human monocytes, but the priming signals for NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on MSU-mediated IL-1β induction in human neutrophils. Human neutrophils were stimulated with MSU, in the presence or absence of TNF-α priming. The cellular supernatants were analyzed for IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Pro-IL-1β mRNA expressions in human neutrophils were analyzed by real-time PCR method. TNF-α stimulation induced pro-IL-1β mRNA expression; however, MSU stimulation did not induce pro-IL-1β mRNA expression in human neutrophils. TNF-α alone or MSU stimulation did not result in efficient IL-1β secretion in human neutrophils, whereas in TNF-α-primed neutrophils, MSU stimulation resulted in a marked IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. TNF-α-primed neutrophils secreted cleaved caspase-1 (p20), in response to MSU stimulation. Our data demonstrate that priming of human neutrophils with TNF-α promotes uric acid-mediated IL-1β secretion in the absence of microbial stimulation. These findings provide insights into the neutrophils-mediated inflammatory processes in gouty arthritis.

  10. The role of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and neutrophil extracellular traps in the interaction between neutrophils and the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K; Demirel, I; Khalaf, H; Bengtsson, T

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophils are regarded as the sentinel cells of innate immunity and are found in abundance within the gingival crevice. Discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) within the gingival pockets prompted us to probe the nature of the interactions of neutrophils with the prominent periopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Some of the noted virulence factors of this Gram-negative anaerobe are gingipains: arginine gingipains (RgpA/B) and lysine gingipain (Kgp). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of gingipains in phagocytosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, NETs and CXCL8 modulation by using wild-type strains and isogenic gingipain mutants. Confocal imaging showed that gingipain mutants K1A (Kgp) and E8 (RgpA/B) induced extracellular traps in neutrophils, whereas ATCC33277 and W50 were phagocytosed. The viability of both ATCC33277 and W50 dwindled as the result of phagocytosis and could be salvaged by cytochalasin D, and the bacteria released high levels of lipopolysaccharide in the culture supernatant. Porphyromonas gingivalis induced reactive oxygen species and CXCL8 with the most prominent effect being that of the wild-type strain ATCC33277, whereas the other wild-type strain W50 was less effective. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed a significant CXCL8 expression by E8. All the tested P. gingivalis strains increased cytosolic free calcium. In conclusion, phagocytosis is the primary neutrophil response to P. gingivalis, although NETs could play an accessory role in infection control. Although gingipains do not seem to directly regulate phagocytosis, NETs or oxidative burst in neutrophils, their proteolytic properties could modulate the subsequent outcomes such as nutrition acquisition and survival by the bacteria. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization of neutrophil subsets in healthy human pregnancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Ssemaganda

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that in successful pregnancies increased arginase activity is a mechanism that contributes to the suppression of the maternal immune system. We identified the main type of arginase-expressing cells as a population of activated low-density granulocytes (LDGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in term placentae. In the present study, we analyzed the phenotype of LDGs and compared it to the phenotype of normal density granulocytes (NDGs in maternal peripheral blood, placental biopsies and cord blood. Our data reveal that only LDGs but no NDGs could be detected in placental biopsies. Phenotypically, NDGs and LDGs from both maternal and cord blood expressed different levels of maturation, activation and degranulation markers. NDGs from the maternal and cord blood were phenotypically similar, while maternal, cord and placental LDGs showed different expression levels of CD66b. LDGs present in cord blood expressed higher levels of arginase compared to maternal and placental LDGs. In summary, our results show that in maternal and cord blood, two phenotypically different populations of neutrophils can be identified, whereas in term placentae, only activated neutrophils are present.

  12. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  13. Equol Effectively Inhibits Toxic Activity of Human Neutrophils without Influencing Their Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pažoureková, Silvia; Lucová, Marianna; Nosál, Radomír; Drábiková, Katarína; Harmatha, Juraj; Šmidrkal, Ján; Jančinová, Viera

    2016-01-01

    Equol (7,4'-dihydroxy-isoflavan, or 4',7-isoflavandiol) is a chroman derivative produced by intestinal bacteria in response to soy isoflavone intake in some, but not in all, humans. Equol shows strong anti-oxidant, anti-estrogenic, anti-cancerous and anti-inflammatory properties. The antioxidative capacity of equol has recently received considerable attention, and it has been used for preventing and treating several diseases. We investigated the effect of equol on human neutrophils, extra- and intracellular formation of oxidants, the phosphorylation of protein regulating NADPH oxidase and its effect on apoptosis. Neutrophils, isolated from blood from healthy subjects, were tested upon activation with various stimulants, proper for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and treated by equol. Equol has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. With increasing concentrations, equol decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. The phosphorylation of p40(phox) (a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular membranes) was reduced in the presence of equol. The experiments showed that equol did not change the number of viable, apoptotic or dead neutrophils significantly in all concentrations used. These results indicate the promising effect of equol in the operation of ROS in different mechanisms in the model of inflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A bovine whey protein extract can enhance innate immunity by priming normal human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Daniel; Drouin, Réjean; Pouliot, Yves; Gauthier, Sylvie; Poubelle, Patrice E

    2009-02-01

    Bovine milk-derived products, in particular whey proteins, exhibit beneficial properties for human health, including the acquired immune response. However, their effects on innate immunity have received little attention. Neutrophils are key cells of innate defenses through their primary functions of chemotaxis, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and degranulation. A whey protein extract (WPE) purified from bovine lactoserum was evaluated for its direct and indirect effects on these primary functions of normal human blood neutrophils in vitro. Although WPE had no direct effects on primary functions, a 24-h pretreatment of neutrophils with WPE was associated with a significant and dose-dependent increase of their chemotaxis, superoxide production, and degranulation in response to N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine, as well as of their phagocytosis of bioparticles. The pretreatment increased the surface expression of CD11b, CD16B, and CD32A receptors. The major WPE protein components beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) were the main active fractions having an additive effect on human neutrophils that became more responsive to a subsequent stimulation. This effect on NADPH oxidase activity was associated with translocation of p47(phox) to plasma membrane. Glycomacropeptide, a peptide present in measurable amounts in WPE products, was able to enhance the individual effect of beta-LG or alpha-LA on neutrophils. The present data suggest that WPE, through beta-LG and alpha-LA, has the capacity to enhance or "prime" human neutrophil responses to a subsequent stimulation, an effect that could be associated with increased innate defenses in vivo.

  15. Cultured rat and purified human Pneumocystis carinii stimulate intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Aliouat, E M; Lundgren, B

    1998-01-01

    The production of free radicals in human neutrophils was studied in both Pneumocystis carinii derived from cultures of L2 rat lung epithelial-like cells and Pneumocystis carinii purified from human lung. Using the cytochrome C technique, which selectively measured extracellular superoxide...... generation, hardly any free radical production was observed after stimulation with cultured rat-derived P. carinii. A chemiluminescence technique, which separately measured intra- and extracellular free radical production, was subsequently employed to differentiate the free radical generation....... It was established that 1) P. carinii stimulated intra- but not extracellular free radical production in human neutrophils, 2) opsonized cultured rat-derived P. carinii stimulated human neutrophils to a strong intracellular response of superoxide production, and 3) opsonized P. carinii, purified from human lung also...

  16. Opacity proteins of neisseria gonorrhoeae in lipooligosaccharide mutants lost ability to interact with neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Tu, Ya-Ting; Cai, Hua-Hua; Ding, Hong-Hui; Li, Qiao; He, Ying-Xia; Liu, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin; Hu, Feng; Chen, Tie; Chen, Hong-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Lipooligosacharide (LOS) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci, GC) is involved in the interaction of GC with host cells. Deletion of the alpha-oligosaccharide (alpha-OS) moiety of LOS (lgtF mutant) significantly impairs invasion of GC into epithelial cell lines. GC opacity (Opa) proteins, such as OpaI, mediate phagocytosis and stimulate chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils in part through interaction with members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family, which includes CEACAM3 (CD66d), a human neutrophil specific receptor for phagocytosis of bacteria. In the present work, we examined the effects of OpaI-expressing lgtF mutant on phagocytosis by HeLa-CEACAM3 cells and chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. The results showed that lgtF mutant even expressing OpaI completely lost the ability to promote either phagocytosis mediated by CEACAM3 interaction in HeLa cells or chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. These data indicated that Opa proteins in the lgtF mutant, which might result from the conformational change, cannot be functional.

  17. Selective and direct activation of human neutrophils but not eosinophils by Toll-like receptor 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Markus; Poth, Jens; Wimmenauer, Vera; Giese, Thomas; Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Schlee, Martin; Hartmann, Gunther

    2009-05-01

    Granulocytes represent the largest fraction of immune cells in peripheral blood and are directly exposed to circulating Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Although highly relevant for TLR-based therapies, because of the technical challenge, activation of the granulocyte subsets of neutrophils and eosinophils by TLR ligands is less well studied than activation of other immune cell subsets. The aim of this work was to study direct versus indirect neutrophil and eosinophil activation by TLR7 and TLR8 ligands. We used a new whole-blood assay, single cell-based cytokine detection, and highly purified primary human neutrophils and eosinophils to separate direct and indirect effects on these blood cell subsets. We found indirect but not direct activation of neutrophils but not eosinophils in whole blood by using unmodified immunostimulatory RNA (isRNA; TLR7/8 ligand). In contrast, direct activation and stimulation of the respiratory burst and degranulation was seen with nuclease-stable isRNA and with the small-molecule TLR8 agonist 3M002 but not 3M001 (TLR7). Neutrophils expressed TLR8 but none of the other 2 RNA-detecting TLRs (TLR3 and TLR7). Together, these results demonstrate that neutrophils are directly and fully activated through TLR8 but not TLR7. Furthermore, the results predict that the clinical utility of small-molecule TLR8 ligands or nuclease-stable RNA ligands for TLR8 might be limited because of neutrophil-mediated toxicity and that no such limitation applies for unmodified isRNA, which is known to induce desired T(H)1 activities in other immune cell subsets.

  18. In vitro inhibition of human neutrophil histotoxicity by ambroxol: evidence for a multistep mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonello, Luciano; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Dapino, Patrizia; Mancini, Marina; Dallegri, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are major culprits for the protease/antiprotease imbalance during various lung diseases, that is, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Thus, these cells are presently considered an ideal target for the pharmacologic control of tissue injury during these diseases. This study was planned in order to investigate if ambroxol and its precursor bromhexine are actually capable of preventing alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) inactivation by stimulated neutrophils and possibly to look into the mechanisms underlying this event. Ambroxol inhibited the production of superoxide anion by activated neutrophils, whereas bromhexine had no inhibitory effect. Ambroxol decreased the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from activated neutrophils with high efficiency, whereas bromhexine had a modest activity. Ambroxol and bromhexine were capable of limiting the chlorination of monochlorodimedon by HOCl, displaying the capacity of directly scavenging the oxidant. Ambroxol decreased the release of elastase and myeloperoxidase from activated neutrophils, whereas bromhexine was ineffective. Ambroxol prevented the A1AT inactivation by neutrophils, whereas bromhexine was completely ineffective. Among drugs currently available for in vivo use in humans, ambroxol is unique by virtue of its ability to prevent neutrophil-mediated A1AT inactivation via inhibition of HOCl production as well as HOCl scavenging. Also taking into account its capacity for curbing elastase release, the drug displays the potential to lessen the burden of oxidants/proteases and to increase the antiprotease shield at the site of inflammation. Thus, ambroxol appears to be a good candidate for raising attempts to develop new therapeutic histoprotective approaches to inflammatory bronchopulmonary diseases. PMID:14534155

  19. CXCL9-Derived Peptides Differentially Inhibit Neutrophil Migration In Vivo through Interference with Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Vanheule

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases are driven by accumulation of activated leukocytes due to enhanced chemokine expression. In addition to specific G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling, chemokine–glycosaminoglycan (GAG interactions are important for chemokine activity in vivo. Therefore, the GAG–chemokine interaction has been explored as target for inhibition of chemokine activity. It was demonstrated that CXCL9(74-103 binds with high affinity to GAGs, competed with active chemokines for GAG binding and thereby inhibited CXCL8- and monosodium urate (MSU crystal-induced neutrophil migration to joints. To evaluate the affinity and specificity of the COOH-terminal part of CXCL9 toward different GAGs in detail, we chemically synthesized several COOH-terminal CXCL9 peptides including the shorter CXCL9(74-93. Compared to CXCL9(74-103, CXCL9(74-93 showed equally high affinity for heparin and heparan sulfate (HS, but lower affinity for binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS and cellular GAGs. Correspondingly, both peptides competed with equal efficiency for CXCL8 binding to heparin and HS but not to cellular GAGs. In addition, differences in anti-inflammatory activity between both peptides were detected in vivo. CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity and to the knee joint were inhibited with similar potency by intravenous or intraperitoneal injection of CXCL9(74-103 or CXCL9(74-93, but not by CXCL9(86-103. In contrast, neutrophil extravasation in the MSU crystal-induced gout model, in which multiple chemoattractants are induced, was not affected by CXCL9(74-93. This could be explained by (1 the lower affinity of CXCL9(74-93 for CS, the most abundant GAG in joints, and (2 by reduced competition with GAG binding of CXCL1, the most abundant ELR+ CXC chemokine in this gout model. Mechanistically we showed by intravital microscopy that fluorescent CXCL9(74-103 coats the vessel wall in vivo and that CXCL9

  20. Binding of human serum albumin to single-walled carbon nanotubes activated neutrophils to increase production of hypochlorous acid, the oxidant capable of degrading nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2014-06-16

    Previous studies have shown that carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be catalytically biodegraded by hypochlorite (OCl-) and reactive radical intermediates of the human neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, the importance of protein-SWCNT interactions in the biodegradation of SWCNTs was not stressed. Here, we used both experimental and theoretical approaches to investigate the interactions of SWCNTs with human serum albumin (HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in blood circulation) and found that the binding was involved in the electrostatic interactions of positively charged Arg residues of HSA with the carboxyls on the nanotubes, along with the π-π stacking interactions between SWCNTs and aromatic Tyr residues in HSA. Compared with SWCNTs, the binding of HSA could result in a reduced effect for OCl- (or the human MPO system)-induced SWCNTs degradation in vitro. However, the HSA-SWCNT interactions would enhance cellular uptake of nanotubes and stimulate MPO release and OCl- generation in neutrophils, thereby creating the conditions favorable for the degradation of the nanotubes. Upon zymosan stimulation, both SWCNTs and HSA-SWCNTs were significantly biodegraded in neutrophils, and the degree of biodegradation was more for HSA-SWCNTs under these relevant in vivo conditions. Our findings suggest that the binding of HSA may be an important determinant for MPO-mediated SWCNT biodegradation in human inflammatory cells and therefore shed light on the biomedical and biotechnological applications of safe carbon nanotubes by comprehensive preconsideration of their interactions with human serum proteins.

  1. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the

  2. Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 Limits Hypercholesterolemia-induced Atherosclerosis by Increasing Hepatic LDL Clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulin, Nicole; Döring, Yvonne; Kooijman, Sander; Blanchet, Xavier; Viola, Joana R.; de Jong, Renske; Mandl, Manuela; Hendrikse, Jeffrey; Schiener, Maximilian; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Vogt, Anja; Weber, Christian; Bdeir, Khalil; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Drechsler, Maik; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Increases in plasma LDL-cholesterol have unequivocally been established as a causal risk factor for atherosclerosis. Hence, strategies for lowering of LDL-cholesterol may have immediate therapeutic relevance. Here we study the role of human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1) in a mouse model of

  3. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  4. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    will be exposed to bacterial components, either expressed on the surface of the organisms or released in the environment upon cell lysis. In this study, we have investigated the effect of water-soluble bacterial components present in L. pneumophila sonicate on the phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of human...... polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes. Preincubation of neutrophils with L. pneumophila sonicate did not affect phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes, whereas Listeria killing was significantly inhibited at sonicate concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/ml. The phenol phase of a phenol-water extraction, containing most...... of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), had no inhibitory effect on the listericidal activity of neutrophils. Killing of Listeria by monocytes was inhibited in a similar manner. The inhibitory activity was mainly recovered in the sonicate fraction above 100 kDa, suggesting that components organized in larger molecular complexes...

  5. Nucleobindin co-localizes and associates with cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Leclerc

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The inducible cyclooxygenase isoform (COX-2 is associated with inflammation, tumorigenesis, as well as with physiological events. Despite efforts deployed in order to understand the biology of this multi-faceted enzyme, much remains to be understood. Nucleobindin (Nuc, a ubiquitous Ca(2+-binding protein, possesses a putative COX-binding domain. In this study, we investigated its expression and subcellular localization in human neutrophils, its affinity for COX-2 as well as its possible impact on PGE(2 biosynthesis. Complementary subcellular localization approaches including nitrogen cavitation coupled to Percoll fractionation, immunofluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy collectively placed Nuc, COX-2, and all of the main enzymes involved in prostanoid synthesis, in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum of human neutrophils. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated a high affinity between Nuc and COX-2. Addition of human recombinant (hr Nuc to purified hrCOX-2 dose-dependently caused an increase in PGE(2 biosynthesis in response to arachidonic acid. Co-incubation of Nuc with COX-2-expressing neutrophil lysates also increased their capacity to produce PGE(2. Moreover, neutrophil transfection with hrNuc specifically enhanced PGE(2 biosynthesis. Together, these results identify a COX-2-associated protein which may have an impact in prostanoid biosynthesis.

  6. Nucleobindin Co-Localizes and Associates with Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in Human Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Patrick; Biarc, Jordane; St-Onge, Mireille; Gilbert, Caroline; Dussault, Andrée-Anne; Laflamme, Cynthia; Pouliot, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The inducible cyclooxygenase isoform (COX-2) is associated with inflammation, tumorigenesis, as well as with physiological events. Despite efforts deployed in order to understand the biology of this multi-faceted enzyme, much remains to be understood. Nucleobindin (Nuc), a ubiquitous Ca2+-binding protein, possesses a putative COX-binding domain. In this study, we investigated its expression and subcellular localization in human neutrophils, its affinity for COX-2 as well as its possible impact on PGE2 biosynthesis. Complementary subcellular localization approaches including nitrogen cavitation coupled to Percoll fractionation, immunofluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy collectively placed Nuc, COX-2, and all of the main enzymes involved in prostanoid synthesis, in the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum of human neutrophils. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated a high affinity between Nuc and COX-2. Addition of human recombinant (hr) Nuc to purified hrCOX-2 dose-dependently caused an increase in PGE2 biosynthesis in response to arachidonic acid. Co-incubation of Nuc with COX-2-expressing neutrophil lysates also increased their capacity to produce PGE2. Moreover, neutrophil transfection with hrNuc specifically enhanced PGE2 biosynthesis. Together, these results identify a COX-2-associated protein which may have an impact in prostanoid biosynthesis. PMID:18493301

  7. Human Neutrophil Clearance of Bacterial Pathogens Triggers Anti-Microbial γδ T Cell Responses in Early Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth W.; Heuston, Sinéad; Brown, Amanda C.; Chess, James A.; Toleman, Mark A.; Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Hill, Colin; Parish, Tanya; Williams, John D.; Davies, Simon J.; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Human blood Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells, monocytes and neutrophils share a responsiveness toward inflammatory chemokines and are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. Studying their interaction in vitro and relating these findings to in vivo observations in patients may therefore provide crucial insight into inflammatory events. Our present data demonstrate that Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells provide potent survival signals resulting in neutrophil activation and the release of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL8 (IL-8). In turn, Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells readily respond to neutrophils harboring phagocytosed bacteria, as evidenced by expression of CD69, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. This response is dependent on the ability of these bacteria to produce the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP), requires cell-cell contact of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with accessory monocytes through lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and results in a TNF-α dependent proliferation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, which targets the HMB-PP biosynthesis pathway, not only has a direct antibacterial effect on most HMB-PP producing bacteria but also possesses rapid anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting γδ T cell responses in vitro. Patients with acute peritoneal-dialysis (PD)-associated bacterial peritonitis – characterized by an excessive influx of neutrophils and monocytes into the peritoneal cavity – show a selective activation of local Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells by HMB-PP producing but not by HMB-PP deficient bacterial pathogens. The γδ T cell-driven perpetuation of inflammatory responses during acute peritonitis is associated with elevated peritoneal levels of γδ T cells and TNF-α and detrimental clinical outcomes in infections caused by HMB-PP positive microorganisms. Taken together, our findings indicate a direct link between invading pathogens, neutrophils, monocytes and microbe-responsive γδ T cells in early

  8. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is produced by human neutrophil granulocytes and their precursors and liberated during granule exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Stine N; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rørvig, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is an important inhibitor of neutrophil proteases including elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. Transcription profiling data suggest that A1AT is expressed by human neutrophil granulocytes during all developmental stages. A1AT has hitherto only been found associate...

  9. Novel Human Cytomegalovirus Viral Chemokines, vCXCL-1s, Display Functional Selectivity for Neutrophil Signaling and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J; Pitt, Elisabeth A; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J; Sparer, Tim E

    2015-01-01

    Human CMV (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable

  10. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma...

  11. Vitamin E prevents neutrophil accumulation and attenuates tissue damage in ischemic-reperfused human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formigli, L; Ibba Manneschi, L; Tani, A; Gandini, E; Adembri, C; Pratesi, C; Novelli, G P; Zecchi Orlandini, S

    1997-07-01

    Neutrophil accumulation and the consequent production of oxygen-derived free radicals are involved in the pathogenesis of Ischemia-Reperfusion syndrome. In this study we investigated whether a treatment with Vitamin E, which has antioxidant properties, could attenuate the tissue damage by interfering with the influx of neutrophils within the ischemic and reperfused human skeletal muscle. To this purpose, patients undergoing aortic cross-clamping during the surgical repair of aortic abdominal aneurysm were studied as a model of ischemia-reperfusion of the lower limb muscles. Muscle biopsies from the right femoral quadriceps of patients not receiving and receiving Vitamin E pretreatment before surgery were taken: a) after the induction of anaesthesia, as control samples, and b) after a period of ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The tissue samples were either routinely processed for morphological study and immunohistochemical analysis to detect an altered expression of specific endothelial adhesion proteins, such as E-selectin and ICAM-1. The results obtained showed that Vitamin E administration was able to prevent the accumulation of neutrophils within the ischemic and reperfused muscle. This beneficial effect of Vitamin E was due to its ability to hinder the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1, molecules known to increase the adhesiveness of endothelium to circulating neutrophils. After treatment with Vitamin E a marked attenuation of the reperfusion injury was also evident. In conclusion, Vitamin E treatment may be considered a valuable tool for protection against the ischemia-reperfusion damage of human skeletal muscle.

  12. ANNEXIN A1 N-TERMINAL DERIVED PEPTIDE AC2-26 EXERTS CHEMOKINETIC EFFECTS ON HUMAN NEUTROPHILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesmond eDalli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that peptides derived from the N-terminal region of Annexin A1, a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, could act as biomimetics of the parent protein. However, recent evidence, amongst which the ability to interact with distinct receptors other then that described for Annexin A1, suggest that these peptides might fulfil other functions at variance to those reported for the parent protein. Here we tested the ability of peptide Ac2-26 to induce chemotaxis of human neutrophils, showing that this peptide can elicit responses comparable to those produced by the canonical activator formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (or FMLP. However, whilst disruption of the chemical gradient abolished the FMLP response, addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top well of the chemotaxis chamber did not affect (10 µM or augmented (at 30 µM the neutrophil locomotion to the bottom well, as elicited by 10 µM peptide Ac2-26. Intriguingly, the sole addition of peptide Ac2-26 in the top wells produced a marked migration of neutrophils. A similar behaviour was observed when human primary monocytes were used. Thus, peptide Ac2-26 is a genuine chemokinetic agent towards human blood leukocytes.Neutralization strategies indicated that engagement of either the GPCR termed FPR1 or its cognate receptor FPR2/ALX was sufficient to sustain peptide Ac2-26 induced neutrophil migration. Similarly, application of pharmacological inhibitors showed that cell locomotion to peptide Ac2-26 was mediated primarily by the ERK, but not the JNK and p38 pathways.In conclusion, we report here novel in vitro properties for peptide Ac2-26, promoting neutrophil and monocyte chemokinesis, a process that may contribute to accelerate the resolution phase of inflammation. Here we postulate that the generation Annexin A1 N-terminal peptides at the site of inflammation may expedite the egress of migrated leukocytes thus promoting the return to homeostasis.

  13. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yang-Chang [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lan, Yu-Hsuan [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chang, Fang-Rong [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ya-Wen [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Tsong-Long, E-mail: htl@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  14. The roles of integrins in function of human neutrophils after their migration through endothelium into interstitial matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ding; McGettrick, Helen M; Stone, Phil C; Rainger, George E; Nash, Gerard B

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes in neutrophil phenotype and function after transendothelial migration, and the roles played by integrin receptors in their behaviour. Neutrophils were tracked microscopically as they migrated through endothelial cells into collagen gels, and were retrieved at desired times. When endothelial cells were treated with increasing doses of tumour necrosis factor-α, neutrophils not only migrated in greater number, but also to a greater depth in the gel. Apoptosis was barely detectable in neutrophils retrieved after 24h, and many remained viable and motile at 48h. Neutrophils retrieved after 1h had increased oxidative capacity and at 24h had similar capacity as freshly-isolated neutrophils. However, by then they had impaired ability to phagocytose bacteria. Compared to fresh neutrophils, total mRNA was halved by 24h, but while β2-integrin expression decreased, β1- and β3-integrin increased along with ICAM-1. Studies of integrin blockade indicated that while β2-integrins were needed to cross the endothelial barrier, no integrins were required for migration within the gel. β2-integrins also contributed to phagocytosis, but their binding was not required for prolonged survival. These results demonstrate a model for integrated analysis of neutrophil migration and function, and describe development of effector functions and the roles of integrins in human neutrophils for the first time.

  15. The roles of integrins in function of human neutrophils after their migration through endothelium into interstitial matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Luo

    Full Text Available We investigated the changes in neutrophil phenotype and function after transendothelial migration, and the roles played by integrin receptors in their behaviour. Neutrophils were tracked microscopically as they migrated through endothelial cells into collagen gels, and were retrieved at desired times. When endothelial cells were treated with increasing doses of tumour necrosis factor-α, neutrophils not only migrated in greater number, but also to a greater depth in the gel. Apoptosis was barely detectable in neutrophils retrieved after 24h, and many remained viable and motile at 48h. Neutrophils retrieved after 1h had increased oxidative capacity and at 24h had similar capacity as freshly-isolated neutrophils. However, by then they had impaired ability to phagocytose bacteria. Compared to fresh neutrophils, total mRNA was halved by 24h, but while β2-integrin expression decreased, β1- and β3-integrin increased along with ICAM-1. Studies of integrin blockade indicated that while β2-integrins were needed to cross the endothelial barrier, no integrins were required for migration within the gel. β2-integrins also contributed to phagocytosis, but their binding was not required for prolonged survival. These results demonstrate a model for integrated analysis of neutrophil migration and function, and describe development of effector functions and the roles of integrins in human neutrophils for the first time.

  16. The hederagenin saponin SMG-1 is a natural FMLP receptor inhibitor that suppresses human neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wang, Chien-Chiao; Kuo, Yao-Haur; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Wu, Yi-Hsiu

    2010-10-15

    The pericarp of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn is traditionally used as an expectorant in Japan, China, and Taiwan. Activated neutrophils produce high concentrations of the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and elastase known to be involved in airway mucus hypersecretion. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory functions of hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-di-acetyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (SMG-1), a saponin isolated from S. mukorossi, and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in human neutrophils. SMG-1 potently and concentration-dependently inhibited O(2)(*-) generation and elastase release in N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)-activated human neutrophils. Furthermore, SMG-1 reduced membrane-associated p47(phox) expression in FMLP-induced intact neutrophils, but did not alter subcellular NADPH oxidase activity in reconstituted systems. SMG-1 attenuated FMLP-induced increase of cytosolic calcium concentration and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, and AKT. However, SMG-1 displayed no effect on cellular cAMP levels and activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase. Significantly, receptor-binding analysis showed that SMG-1 inhibited FMLP binding to its receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, neither phorbol myristate acetate-induced O(2)(*-) generation and MAPKs activation nor thapsigargin-caused calcium mobilization was altered by SMG-1. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SMG-1 is a natural inhibitor of the FMLP receptor, which may have the potential to be developed into a useful new therapeutic agent for treating neutrophilic inflammatory diseases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocytosis is required for exocytosis and priming of respiratory burst activity in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-10-01

    Neutrophil generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced by exposure to pro-inflammatory agents in a process termed priming. Priming is depending on exocytosis of neutrophil granules and p47 phox phosphorylation-dependent translocation of cytosolic NADPH oxidase components. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was recently reported to be necessary for priming, but the mechanism linking endocytosis to priming was not identified. The present study examined the hypothesis that endocytosis regulates neutrophil priming by controlling granule exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis by isolated human neutrophils was inhibited by chlorpromazine, monodansylcadaverine, and sucrose. Exocytosis of granule subsets was measured as release of granule components by ELISA or chemiluminescence. ROS generation was measured as extracellular release of superoxide as reduction of ferrocytochrome c. p38 MAPK activation and p47 phox phosphorylation were measured by immunoblot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA with the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test. Inhibition of endocytosis prevented priming of superoxide release by TNFα and inhibited TNFα stimulation and priming of exocytosis of all four granule subsets. Inhibition of endocytosis did not reduce TNFα-stimulated p38 MAPK activation or p47 phox phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked TNFα stimulation of secretory vesicle and gelatinase granule exocytosis. Endocytosis is linked to priming of respiratory burst activity through ROS-mediated control of granule exocytosis.

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps form predominantly during the organizing stage of human venous thromboembolism development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, A S; Martinod, K; Seidman, M A; Wong, S L; Borissoff, J I; Piazza, G; Libby, P; Goldhaber, S Z; Mitchell, R N; Wagner, D D

    2014-06-01

    A growing health problem, venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), requires refined diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Neutrophils contribute to thrombus initiation and development in experimental DVT. Recent animal studies recognized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as an important scaffold supporting thrombus stability. However, the hypothesis that human venous thrombi involve NETs has not undergone rigorous testing. To explore the cellular composition and the presence of NETs within human venous thrombi at different stages of development. We examined 16 thrombi obtained from 11 patients during surgery or at autopsy using histomorphological, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses. We classified thrombus regions as unorganized, organizing and organized according to their morphological characteristics. We then evaluated them, focusing on neutrophil and platelet deposition as well as micro-vascularization of the thrombus body. We observed evidence of NET accumulation, including the presence of citrullinated histone H3 (H3Cit)-positive cells. NETs, defined as extracellular diffuse H3Cit areas associated with myeloperoxidase and DNA, localized predominantly during the phase of organization in human venous thrombi. NETs are present in organizing thrombi in patients with VTE. They are associated with thrombus maturation in humans. Dissolution of NETs might thus facilitate thrombolysis. This finding provides new insights into the clinical development and pathology of thrombosis and provides new perspectives for therapeutic advances. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Propofol Treatment Inhibits Constitutive Apoptosis in Human Primary Neutrophils and Granulocyte-Differentiated Human HL60 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis regulation is essential for neutrophil homeostasis. We previously demonstrated that a process involving glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β determines neutrophil apoptosis. As for this apoptotic process, an overdose of propofol (2,6-Diisopropylphenol; 25 μg/ml or 140 μM) also causes GSK-3β-mediated macrophage apoptosis; however, the early deactivation of GSK-3β with low-dose propofol has been shown. Therefore, we hypothesize that low-dose propofol may induce neutrophil survival via GSK-3β inactivation. Following in vitro culture, the therapeutic concentration of propofol (10 μg/ml or 56 μM) treatment decreased constitutive apoptosis in isolated human primary neutrophils and in granulocyte-differentiated HL60 cells after all-trans retinoic acid (1 μM) treatment. The inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/AKT and the activation of GSK-3β results in myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) down-regulation, the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and caspase-3 activation in these cells, which is accompanied by apoptosis. Notably, propofol treatment attenuates these effects in a PI3-kinase-regulated manner. We found that propofol initiates PI3-kinase/AKT-mediated GSK-3β inactivation and Mcl-1 stabilization, rescuing the constitutive apoptosis in primary neutrophils and granulocyte-differentiated acute promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. PMID:26061531

  20. Lipoxin A4 modulates transmigration of human neutrophils across intestinal epithelial monolayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Colgan, S P; Serhan, C N; Parkos, C A; Delp-Archer, C; Madara, J L

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) migration across intestinal epithelial barriers, such as occurs in many disease states, results in modifications in epithelial barrier. Here, we investigated the impact of lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an eicosanoid with counterregulatory inflammatory roles, on PMN migration across cultured monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84. Transepithelial migration of PMN was assessed in the apical-to-basolateral direction and in the basolateral-to-apical direction. In the ap...

  1. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  2. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binet, Francois; Chiasson, Sonia [Laboratoire de recherche en inflammation et physiologie des granulocytes, Universite du Quebec, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, QC (Canada); Girard, Denis, E-mail: denis.girard@iaf.inrs.ca [Laboratoire de recherche en inflammation et physiologie des granulocytes, Universite du Quebec, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, QC (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2{alpha} are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  3. ARQ 092, an orally-available, selective AKT inhibitor, attenuates neutrophil-platelet interactions in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungho; Li, Jing; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan; Youn, Seock-Won; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Yu, Yi; Schwartz, Brian; Andrews, Robert K; Gordeuk, Victor R; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase, AKT, as a therapeutic target in thrombo-inflammatory diseases. Here we report that specific inhibition of AKT with ARQ 092, an orally-available AKT inhibitor currently in phase Ib clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug, attenuates the adhesive function of neutrophils and platelets from sickle cell disease patients in vitro and cell-cell interactions in a mouse model of sickle cell disease. Studies using neutrophils and platelets isolated from sickle cell disease patients revealed that treatment with 50-500 nM ARQ 092 significantly blocks αMβ2 integrin function in neutrophils and reduces P-selectin exposure and glycoprotein Ib/IX/V-mediated agglutination in platelets. Treatment of isolated platelets and neutrophils with ARQ 092 inhibited heterotypic cell-cell aggregation under shear conditions. Intravital microscopic studies demonstrated that short-term oral administration of ARQ 092 or hydroxyurea, a major therapy for sickle cell disease, diminishes heterotypic cell-cell interactions in venules of sickle cell disease mice challenged with tumor necrosis factor-α. Co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 further reduced the adhesive function of neutrophils in venules and neutrophil transmigration into alveoli, inhibited expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in cremaster vessels, and improved survival in these mice. Ex vivo studies in sickle cell disease mice suggested that co-administration of hydroxyurea and ARQ 092 efficiently blocks neutrophil and platelet activation and that the beneficial effect of hydroxyurea results from nitric oxide production. Our results provide important evidence that ARQ 092 could be a novel drug for the prevention and treatment of acute vaso-occlusive complications in patients with sickle cell disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Expression of sialyltransferase activity on intact human neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Rifat, Salahaldin; Kang, Tae Jin; Mann, Dean; Zhang, Lei; Puche, Adam C.; Stamatos, Nicholas M.; Goldblum, Simeon E.; Brossmer, Reinhard; Cross, Alan S.

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-associated sialidase activity enhances PMN adhesion to and migration across the endothelium through the removal of sialylated cell-surface residues. We tested the hypothesis that PMNs also express sialyltransferase (ST) activity that restores sialyl residues to the PMN surface. We developed a highly sensitive fluorometric assay to demonstrate that intact human PMNs can mediate and accept sialyl residue transfer. This ST activity is inhibited by a S...

  5. Human neutrophil migration and activation by BJcuL, a galactose binding lectin purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil migration to an inflamed site constitutes the first line of the innate immune response against invading microorganisms. Given the crucial role of endogenous lectins in neutrophil mobilization and activation, lectins from exogenous sources have often been considered as putative modulators of leukocyte function. Lectins purified from snake venom have been described as galactoside ligands that induce erythrocyte agglutination and platelet aggregation. This study evaluated human neutrophil migration and activation by C-type lectin BJcuL purified from Bothrops jararacussu venom. Results Utilizing fluorescence microscopy, we observed that biotinylated-BJcuL was evenly distributed on the neutrophil surface, selectively inhibited by D-galactose. Lectin was able to induce modification in the neutrophil morphology in a spherical shape for a polarized observed by optical microscopy and exposure to BJcuL in a Boyden chamber assay resulted in cell migration. After 30 minutes of incubation with BJcuL we found enhanced neutrophil functions, such as respiratory burst, zymozan phagocytosis and an increase in lissosomal volume. In addition, BJcuL delays late apoptosis neutrophils. Conclusion These results demonstrate that BJcuL can be implicated in a wide variety of immunological functions including first-line defense against pathogens, cell trafficking and induction of the innate immune response since lectin was capable of inducing potent neutrophil activation.

  6. Minocycline affects human neutrophil respiratory burst and transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Astrid; Indorato, Boris; Paccosi, Sara

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activity of minocycline and doxycycline on human polymorphonuclear (h-PMN) cell function. h-PMNs were isolated from whole venous blood of healthy subjects; PMN oxidative burst was measured by monitoring ROS-induced oxidation of luminol and transendothelial migration was studied by measuring PMN migration through a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Differences between multiple groups were determined by ANOVA followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test; Student's t test for unpaired data for two groups. Minocycline (1-300 µM) concentration dependently and significantly inhibited oxidative burst of h-PMNs stimulated with 100 nM fMLP. Ten micromolar concentrations, which are superimposable to C max following a standard oral dose of minocycline, promoted a 29.8 ± 4 % inhibition of respiratory burst (P minocycline impaired PMN transendothelial migration, with maximal effect at 100 µM (42.5 ± 7 %, inhibition, n = 5, P minocycline exerted on innate immune h-PMN cell function.

  7. Amburanins A and B from Amburana cearensis: daphnodorin-type biflavonoids that modulate human neutrophil degranulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canuto, Kirley M.; Silveira, Edilberto R., E-mail: edil@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Leal, Luzia K.A.M.; Lopes, Amanda A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (CEFAC/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Centro de Estudos Farmaceuticos e Cosmeticos. Departamento de Farmacia; Coleman, Christina M.; Ferreira, Daneel [Department of Pharmacognosy and the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, MS (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Two new biflavonoids 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-(2→O→4':3→3')-2',4',6',4- tetrahydroxydihydrochalcone (1) and 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-(2→O→7:3→8)-3,4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (2), named as amburanin A and amburanin B, respectively, were isolated from the trunk bark of Amburana cearensis, and their structures elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with literature data. The effects of 1 and 2 on the pro-inflammatory response of human neutrophils were investigated (0.1; 1; 25; 50 e 100 μg mL{sup -1}). At concentration higher than 25 μg mL{sup -1}, both compounds suppressed nearly 92% of the neutrophil degranulation and 53% of myeloperoxidase activity, thus indicating that they are potential anti-inflammatory lead compounds. (author)

  8. Immunomodulatory effects of Santolina chamaecyparissus leaf extracts on human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoukha, Chahra; Bouriche, Hamama; Ortega, Eduardo; Senator, Abderrahmane

    2016-01-01

    Santolina chamaecyparissus L. (Asteraceae) is an aromatic plant wide spread in the Mediterranean region. It is used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory properties. The effects of S. chamaecyparissus aqueous extract (SCAE) and polyphenolic extract (SCPE) on human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) degranulation, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and microbicidal capacity were examined in vitro. Aqueous and polyphenolic extracts were prepared from S. chamaecyparissus leaves. The elastase release was used as a marker for measuring PMN degranulation, while chemotaxis was performed using a 48-microwell chemotaxis chamber. The phagocytosis and the microbicidal capacity were evaluated using fresh cultures of Candida albicans. The treatment of neutrophils with different concentrations (10-200 µg/ml) of SCAE and SCPE caused a significant (p functions support the anti-inflammatory activity and show new mechanisms of action and effectiveness of S. chamaecyparissus leaf extracts. This plant may be considered as an interesting source of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents.

  9. Phospholipase A2 Inhibitor from Crotalus durissus terrificus rattlesnake: Effects on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and human neutrophils cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Caroline V; da S Setúbal, Sulamita; Lacouth-Silva, Fabianne; Pontes, Adriana S; Nery, Neriane M; de Castro, Onassis Boeri; Fernandes, Carla F C; Soares, Andreimar M; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo L; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2017-12-01

    Crotalus Neutralizing Factor (CNF) is an inhibitor of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), present in the blood plasma of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake. This inhibitor neutralizes the lethal and enzymatic activity of crotoxin, the main neurotoxin from this venom. In this study, we investigated the effects of CNF on the functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and human neutrophils. The following parameters were evaluated: viability and proliferation, chemotaxis, cytokines and LTB4 production, cytosolic PLA2s activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and superoxide anion (O2-) production. CNF showed no toxicity on PBMCs or neutrophils, and acts by stimulating the release of TNF-α and LTB4, but neither stimulates IL-10 and IL-2 nor affects PBMCs proliferation and O2- release. In neutrophils, CNF induces chemotaxis but does not induce the release of both MPO and O2-. However, it induces LTB4 and IL-8 production. These data show the influence of CNF on PBMCs' function by inducing TNF-α and LTB4 production, and on neutrophils, by stimulating chemotaxis and LTB4 production, via cytosolic PLA2 activity, and IL-8 release. The inflammatory profile produced by CNF is shown for the first time. Our present results suggest that CNF has a role in activation of leukocytes and exert proinflammatory effects on these cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of sialyltransferase activity on intact human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Salahaldin; Kang, Tae Jin; Mann, Dean; Zhang, Lei; Puche, Adam C; Stamatos, Nicholas M; Goldblum, Simeon E; Brossmer, Reinhard; Cross, Alan S

    2008-10-01

    Endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-associated sialidase activity enhances PMN adhesion to and migration across the endothelium through the removal of sialylated cell-surface residues. We tested the hypothesis that PMNs also express sialyltransferase (ST) activity that restores sialyl residues to the PMN surface. We developed a highly sensitive fluorometric assay to demonstrate that intact human PMNs can mediate and accept sialyl residue transfer. This ST activity is inhibited by a ST inhibitor, CMP, which also inhibits the transendothelial migration of PMNs in response to IL-8 in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that intact PMNs express sialidase and ST activities that permit rapid modulation of their surface sialylation and their ability to adhere to and migrate across the endothelium.

  11. Aggregation of beta2 integrins activates human neutrophils through the IkappaB/NF-kappaB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2004-02-01

    Neutrophils are now considered central to the pathogenesis of most forms of acute lung injury. Neutrophils do not cause damage while suspended in the bloodstream; however, a release of cytotoxic agents occurs when neutrophils are adherent to endothelium, epithelium, or extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitium. Such neutrophil adherence is mediated predominantly through beta(2) integrins (CD11/CD18) on its surface. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the IkappaB/nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB cascade is involved in this beta(2) integrin-mediated activation of human neutrophils. beta(2) Integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) aggregation was induced by antibody cross-linking of the integrins on the cell surface. beta(2) Integrin aggregation induced interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, which suggests the activation of neutrophils by beta(2) integrin. IkappaBalpha was markedly degraded at 1 h, and NF-kappaB-DNA-binding activity markedly increased 2 h after beta(2) integrin aggregation, which activated IkappaB kinase activity at 1 h. beta(2) Integrin-induced cytokine production was suppressed by MG132 or SN50 pretreatment, which blocked the activation of NF-kappaB. These findings suggest that the activation of human neutrophils by beta(2) integrin aggregation is mediated through the activation of the IkappaB/NF-kappaB pathway.

  12. Aggregation of β2integrins activates human neutrophils through the IκB/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Choon-Taek; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2004-02-01

    Neutrophils are now considered central to the pathogenesis of most forms of acute lung injury. Neutrophils do not cause damage while suspended in the bloodstream; however, a release of cytotoxic agents occurs when neutrophils are adherent to endothelium, epithelium, or extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitium. Such neutrophil adherence is mediated predominantly through β 2 integrins (CD11/CD18) on its surface. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the IκB/nuclear factor (NF)-κB cascade is involved in this β 2 integrin-mediated activation of human neutrophils. β 2 Integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) aggregation was induced by antibody cross-linking of the integrins on the cell surface. β 2 Integrin aggregation induced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α production, which suggests the activation of neutrophils by β 2 integrin. IκBα was markedly degraded at 1 h, and NF-κB-DNA-binding activity markedly increased 2 h after β 2 integrin aggregation, which activated IκB kinase activity at 1 h. β 2 Integrin-induced cytokine production was suppressed by MG132 or SN50 pretreatment, which blocked the activation of NF-κB. These findings suggest that the activation of human neutrophils by β 2 integrin aggregation is mediated through the activation of the IκB/NF-κB pathway. © 2004 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Human neutrophil elastase degrades SPLUNC1 and impairs airway epithelial defense against bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD are a significant cause of mortality of COPD patients, and pose a huge burden on healthcare. One of the major causes of AECOPD is airway bacterial (e.g. nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae [NTHi] infection. However, the mechanisms underlying bacterial infections during AECOPD remain poorly understood. As neutrophilic inflammation including increased release of human neutrophil elastase (HNE is a salient feature of AECOPD, we hypothesized that HNE impairs airway epithelial defense against NTHi by degrading airway epithelial host defense proteins such as short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1.Recombinant human SPLUNC1 protein was incubated with HNE to confirm SPLUNC1 degradation by HNE. To determine if HNE-mediated impairment of host defense against NTHi was SPLUNC1-dependent, SPLUNC1 protein was added to HNE-treated primary normal human airway epithelial cells. The in vivo function of SPLUNC1 in NTHi defense was investigated by infecting SPLUNC1 knockout and wild-type mice intranasally with NTHi. We found that: (1 HNE directly increased NTHi load in human airway epithelial cells; (2 HNE degraded human SPLUNC1 protein; (3 Recombinant SPLUNC1 protein reduced NTHi levels in HNE-treated human airway epithelial cells; (4 NTHi levels in lungs of SPLUNC1 knockout mice were increased compared to wild-type mice; and (5 SPLUNC1 was reduced in lungs of COPD patients.Our findings suggest that SPLUNC1 degradation by neutrophil elastase may increase airway susceptibility to bacterial infections. SPLUNC1 therapy likely attenuates bacterial infections during AECOPD.

  14. Antagonism of selectin-dependent adhesion of human eosinophils and neutrophils by glycomimetics and oligosaccharide compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M K; Brandley, B K; Anderson, M B; Bochner, B S

    1998-11-01

    Early in inflammation, adhesion occurs between leukocytes and endothelium when selectins bind to sialyl Lewis X (sLex) and related oligosaccharides. We tested novel compounds that mimic sLex for their ability to inhibit selectin-mediated adhesion of human eosinophils and neutrophils in vitro. Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated by density gradient centrifugation, and eosinophils were further purified by immunomagnetic negative selection. Adhesion to unstimulated or interleukin-1beta-stimulated (5 ng/ml, 4-6 h) umbilical vein endothelial monolayers was tested under static or rotating conditions, where adhesion is primarily E- or L-selectin dependent, respectively. P-selectin-dependent adhesion was tested on immobilized platelets treated with or without phorbol myristate acetate (10(-7) M, 10 min). Stimulus-induced adhesion was always at least 4-fold higher than without stimulus, and selectin dependence was confirmed with specific blocking monoclonal antibodies. E-selectin-dependent adhesion of eosinophils and neutrophils was inhibited by compound GM2296 (the concentration producing 50% inhibition of adhesion [IC50] approximately 0.5-1 mM). E-selectin-dependent adhesion of neutrophils, but not eosinophils, was also inhibited by another compound, sLex with a lipid tail (30 +/- 6% inhibition at 3 mM), whereas compound GM1292 slightly inhibited adhesion of both (23 +/- 5 and 20 +/- 6% inhibition, respectively, at 1 mM). L-selectin-dependent adhesion was more effectively inhibited by GM2296 (IC50 approximately 0.2-0.5 mM), although P-selectin-dependent adhesion was also inhibited (IC50 approximately 1 mM). Inhibition was reversible without affecting viability, and no effect was seen with these compounds in assays testing neutrophil adhesion to immobilized intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Thus, compound GM2296, a carbon-fucosylated derivative of glycyrrhetinic acid, inhibits E-, L-, and P-selectin-dependent eosinophil and neutrophil adhesion. The ability of these

  15. Leishmania major surface protease Gp63 interferes with the function of human monocytes and neutrophils in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A L; Hey, A S; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    In the present study the effect of Leishmania major surface protease Gp63 on the chemotaxis and oxidative burst response of human peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils was investigated. It was shown that prior incubation of cells with Gp63 inhibited chemotaxis of neutrophils but not monocytes...... by heat inactivation of the protease at 70 degrees C for 15 min. Neither neutrophil nor monocyte chemiluminescence was inhibited by Gp63 when cells were stimulated with PMA. Our data suggest that the major surface protease Gp63 might play an important role in the initial stages of Leishmania...

  16. Production of interleukin 27 by human neutrophils regulates their function in response to bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchai, Darawan; Khaenam, Prasong; Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Buddhisa, Surachat; Pankla, Rungnapa; Chaussabel, Damien; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-01-01

    Septicemia is the most severe form of melioidosis caused by the Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here, we showed that levels of IL-27p28 transcript and protein were both significantly elevated in patients with sepsis, particularly melioidosis and in patients with unfavorable disease outcome. Moreover, monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils were the major source of IL-27 during infection. Addition of exogenous IL-27 in vitro resulted in significantly increased bacterial survival, reduced B. pseudomallei-induced oxidative burst and enhanced IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production by purified neutrophils from healthy subjects. Finally, blockade of endogenous IL-27 in neutrophils using soluble IL-27 receptor antagonist prior to infection led to significantly reduced survival of bacteria and decreased IL-1beta, but not TNF-alpha production. These results indicate a potential role of IL-27 in suppression of antibacterial defense mechanisms that might contribute to disease severity in sepsis. The targeting of this cytokine may be beneficial in the management of human sepsis. PMID:22965735

  17. Quantification of heterotypic granule fusion in human neutrophils by imaging flow cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halla Björnsdottir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human neutrophils are filled with intracellular storage organelles, called granules and secretory vesicles, which differ in their content of soluble matrix proteins and membrane-bound molecules. To date, at least four distinct granule/vesicle subsets have been identified. These organelles may secrete their content extracellularly following mobilization to and fusion with the plasma membrane, but some of them may also fuse with internal membrane-enclosed organelles, typically a plasma membrane-derived phagosome. There are also instances where different granules appear to fuse with one another, a process that would enable mixing of their matrix and membrane components. Such granule fusion enables e.g., myeloperoxidase-processing of intragranular oxygen radicals, a key event in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (Björnsdottir et al., 2015 [1]. Described herein are data that show the quantification of such heterotypic granule–granule fusion by the use of imaging flow cytometry, a technique that combines flow cytometry with microscopy. The analysis described is based on immunofluorescent staining of established granule markers (lactoferrin and/or NGAL for one granule subset; the specific granules, and CD63 for another granule subset, the azurophil granules and calculation of a colocalization score for resting and PMA-stimulated neutrophils.

  18. Human neutrophil elastase-mediated goblet cell metaplasia is attenuated in TACE-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Ah; Sharif, Asma S; Shiomi, Tetsuya; Kobzik, Lester; Kasahara, David I; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Voynow, Judith; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2013-05-15

    Neutrophilic inflammation is associated with chronic airway diseases. It has been observed that human neutrophil elastase (HNE), which is secreted by active neutrophils during inflammation, induces both mucin overproduction and goblet cell metaplasia. Several in vitro studies suggest that tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) regulates the signaling axis that mediates HNE-induced mucin overproduction; however, it is unknown whether TACE performs a similar function in HNE-induced goblet cell metaplasia in vivo. We conducted this study to determine whether the inactivation of Tace gene expression attenuates HNE-induced goblet cell metaplasia in mice. Deletion of Tace is lethal shortly after birth in mice; therefore, we utilized Tace(flox/flox)R26CreER(+/-) mice and induced conditional deletion of Tace using a tamoxifen injection. Wild-type mice were given tamoxifen to control for its effect. Tace conditional deletion mice and wild-type mice were exposed to HNE via nasal instillation three times at 3-day intervals, and the lungs were harvested on day 11 after initial HNE exposure. Using periodic acid-Schiff staining and MUC5AC immunohistochemical staining to visualize goblet cells in the lungs, we found that HNE induced goblet cell metaplasia in the wild-type mice and that HNE-induced goblet cell metaplasia was significantly attenuated in the Tace conditional deletion mice. These findings suggest that TACE could be a potential target in the treatment of goblet cell metaplasia in patients with chronic airway diseases.

  19. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in human neutrophils by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandford Andrew J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reference genes, which are often referred to housekeeping genes, are frequently used to normalize mRNA levels between different samples. However the expression level of these genes may vary among tissues or cells, and may change under certain circumstances. Thus the selection of reference gene(s is critical for gene expression studies. For this purpose, 10 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in isolated human neutrophils. Results Initial screening of the expression pattern demonstrated that 3 of the 10 genes were expressed at very low levels in neutrophils and were excluded from further analysis. The range of expression stability of the other 7 genes was (from most stable to least stable: GNB2L1 (Guanine nucleotide binding protein, beta polypeptide 2-like 1, HPRT1 (Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, RPL32 (ribosomal protein L32, ACTB (beta-actin, B2M (beta-2-microglobulin, GAPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and TBP (TATA-binding protein. Relative expression levels of the genes (from high to low were: B2M, ACTB, GAPD, RPL32, GNB2L1, TBP, and HPRT1. Conclusion Our data suggest that GNB2L1, HPRT1, RPL32, ACTB, and B2M may be suitable reference genes in gene expression studies of neutrophils.

  20. Modulation of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oils from Ferula akitschkensis and Their Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Sinharoy, Pritam; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Abidkulova, Karime T; Özek, Temel; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Kovrizhina, Anastasia R; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Damron, Derek S; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-09-28

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the umbels+seeds and stems of Ferula akitschkensis (FAEOu/s and FAEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fifty-two compounds were identified in FAEOu/s; the primary components were sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, eremophilene, and 2-himachalen-7-ol, whereas the primary components of FAEOstm were myristicin and geranylacetone. FAEOu/s, β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, isobornyl acetate, and (E)-2-nonenal stimulated [Ca(2+)]i mobilization in human neutrophils, with the most potent being geranylacetone (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM) and isobornyl acetate 6.4 ± 1.7 (EC50 = 7.6 ± 1.9 μM). In addition, treatment of neutrophils with β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate desensitized the cells to N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)- and interleukin-8 (IL-8)-induced [Ca(2+)]i flux and inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis. The effects of β-pinene, sabinene, γ-terpinene, geranylacetone, and isobornyl acetate on neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux were inhibited by transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blockers. Furthermore, the most potent compound, geranylacetone, activated Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. In contrast, myristicin inhibited neutrophil [Ca(2+)]i flux stimulated by fMLF and IL-8 and inhibited capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells. These findings, as well as pharmacophore modeling of TRP agonists, suggest that geranylacetone is a TRPV1 agonist, whereas myristicin is a TRPV1 antagonist. Thus, at least part of the medicinal properties of Ferula essential oils may be due to modulatory effects on TRP channels.

  1. Inactivation of human antithrombin by neutrophil elastase. Kinetics of the heparin-dependent reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R E; Nelson, R M; Kilpatrick, J; Newgren, J O; Esmon, P C; Fournel, M A

    1989-06-25

    Human neutrophil elastase catalyzes the inactivation of antithrombin by a specific and limited proteinolytic cleavage. This inactivation reaction is greatly accelerated by an active anticoagulant heparin subfraction with high binding affinity for antithrombin. A potentially complex reaction mechanism is suggested by the binding of both neutrophil elastase and antithrombin to heparin. The in vitro kinetic behavior of this system was examined under two different conditions: 1) at a constant antithrombin concentration in which the active anticoagulant heparin was varied from catalytic to saturating levels; and 2) at a fixed, saturating heparin concentration and variable antithrombin levels. Under conditions of excess heparin, the inactivation could be continuously monitored by a decrease in the ultraviolet fluorescence emission of the inhibitor. A Km of approximately 1 microM for the heparin-antithrombin complex and a turnover number of approximately 200/min was estimated from these analyses. Maximum acceleratory effects of heparin on the inactivation of antithrombin occur at heparin concentrations significantly lower than those required to saturate antithrombin. The divergence in acceleratory effect and antithrombin binding contrasts with the anticoagulant functioning of heparin in promoting the formation of covalent antithrombin-enzyme complexes and is likely to derive from the fact that neutrophil elastase is not consumed in the inactivation reaction. A size dependence was observed for the heparin effect since an anticoagulantly active octasaccharide fragment of heparin, with avid antithrombin binding activity, was without effect on the inactivation of antithrombin by neutrophil elastase. Despite the completely nonfunctional nature of elastase-cleaved antithrombin and the altered physical properties of the inhibitor as indicated by fluorescence and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the inactivated inhibitor exhibited a circulating half

  2. Ultraviolet light A irradiation induces immunosuppression associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunbo Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet blood irradiation has been used as a physical therapy to treat many nonspecific diseases in clinics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Neutrophils, the first line of host defense, play a crucial role in a variety of inflammatory responses. In the present work, we investigated the effects of ultraviolet light A (UVA on the immune functions of human neutrophils at the single-cell level by using an inverted fluorescence microscope. N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP, a classic physiological chemotactic peptide, was used to induce a series of immune responses in neutrophils in vitro. FMLP-induced calcium mobilization, migration, and phagocytosis in human neutrophils was significantly blocked after treatment with 365nm UVA irradiation, demonstrating the immunosuppressive effects of UVA irradiation on neutrophils. Similar responses were also observed when the cells were pretreated with H2O2, a type of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, UVA irradiation resulted in an increase in NAD(PH, a member of host oxidative stress in cells. Taken together, our data indicate that UVA irradiation results in immunosuppression associated with the production of ROS in human neutrophils.

  3. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  4. Porphyromonas gingivalis participates in pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm by neutrophil activation. Proof of concept in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Delbosc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs represent a particular form of atherothrombosis where neutrophil proteolytic activity plays a major role. We postulated that neutrophil recruitment and activation participating in AAA growth may originate in part from repeated episodes of periodontal bacteremia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our results show that neutrophil activation in human AAA was associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET formation in the IntraLuminal Thrombus, leading to the release of cell-free DNA. Human AAA samples were shown to contain bacterial DNA with high frequency (11/16, and in particular that of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, the most prevalent pathogen involved in chronic periodontitis, a common form of periodontal disease. Both DNA reflecting the presence of NETs and antibodies to Pg were found to be increased in plasma of patients with AAA. Using a rat model of AAA, we demonstrated that repeated injection of Pg fostered aneurysm development, associated with pathological characteristics similar to those observed in humans, such as the persistence of a neutrophil-rich luminal thrombus, not observed in saline-injected rats in which a healing process was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the control of periodontal disease may represent a therapeutic target to limit human AAA progression.

  5. Clickable 4-Oxo-β-lactam-Based Selective Probing for Human Neutrophil Elastase Related Proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruivo, Eduardo F P; Gonçalves, Lídia M; Carvalho, Luís A R; Guedes, Rita C; Hofbauer, Stefan; Brito, José A; Archer, Margarida; Moreira, Rui; Lucas, Susana D

    2016-09-20

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a serine protease associated with several inflammatory processes such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The precise involvement of HNE in COPD and other inflammatory disease mechanisms has yet to be clarified. Herein we report a copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, or 'click' chemistry) approach based on the 4-oxo-β-lactam warhead that yielded potent HNE inhibitors containing a triazole moiety. The resulting structure-activity relationships set the basis to develop fluorescent and biotinylated activity-based probes as tools for molecular functional analysis. Attaching the tags to the 4-oxo-β-lactam scaffold did not affect HNE inhibitory activity, as revealed by the IC50 values in the nanomolar range (56-118 nm) displayed by the probes. The nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-based probe presented the best binding properties (ligand efficiency (LE)=0.31) combined with an excellent lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE=4.7). Moreover, the probes showed adequate fluorescence properties, internalization in human neutrophils, and suitable detection of HNE in the presence of a large excess of cell lysate proteins. This allows the development of activity-based probes with promising applications in target validation and identification, as well as diagnostic tools. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. TLR4 ligation induces expression of APRIL molecule in human neutrophils — a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jabłońska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigate the consequences of TLR4 activation by LPS for the synthesis of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL by human neutrophils (PMNs, and the possible role of the ERK1/2 kinases signaling pathway. In order to make a comparison, the same examinations were carried out on autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. The levels of mRNA for APRIL and TLR4 were measured using the real-time PCR method. Western blot analysis was used to assay the expressions of APRIL and ERK1/2 in cell lysates. We discovered an increased expression of APRIL accompanying the increased expression of TLR4 in the LPS-stimulated PMNs and PBMCs. Furthermore, stimulation with LPS triggered similar changes in phospho-ERK1/2 proteins expression in those cells. The present study suggests that LPS plays a role in TLR4-ligation in APRIL induction through ERK1/2 pathway activation in human neutrophils and mononuclear cells of peripheral blood. The association between TLR4 activation and APRIL expression in examined leukocytes might have important implications for the  mmune response of the host exposed to TLR4 ligands such as LPS.

  7. PU.1 regulates the expression of the human neutrophil elastase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, S; Rado, T A

    1998-06-16

    PU.1 is a transcription factor present in B-cells and macrophages. Here, we report our studies on the role of PU.1 in myelopoiesis using human neutrophil elastase (HNE) as a model. HNE, a component of the primary granules of mature granulocytes, is a serine protease which is transcriptionally restricted to the late promyelocytic stage of granulocytic maturation. The first 200 bp of the HNE promoter directs myeloid specific expression of a reporter gene and a 30-bp element within this region was been identified as the major determinant of myeloid specific expression [S. Srikanth, T. Rado, A 30-bp element is responsible for the myeloid specific activity of the human neutrophil elastase promoter, J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 32626-32632.]. We now show that the B-cell and macrophage specific transcription factor, PU.1, binds to the PU.1 consensus site within the 30-bp element to activate transcription. Substitution mutations within this recognition sequence results in the loss of PU.1 binding and in a 90% decrease in promoter activity in myeloid cells. Cotransfection of PU.1 and a reporter gene controlled by the HNE promoter into non-myeloid HeLa cells resulted in activation of reporter gene transcription.

  8. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  9. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications........ The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  10. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  11. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathy-Hartert

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−. In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M, this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC. Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2− generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2 was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon. So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis.

  12. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  13. Severe exercise and exercise training exert opposite effects on human neutrophil apoptosis via altering the redox status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Da Syu

    Full Text Available Neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, a process crucial for immune regulation, is mainly controlled by alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondria integrity. Exercise has been proposed to be a physiological way to modulate immunity; while acute severe exercise (ASE usually impedes immunity, chronic moderate exercise (CME improves it. This study aimed to investigate whether and how ASE and CME oppositely regulate human neutrophil apoptosis. Thirteen sedentary young males underwent an initial ASE and were subsequently divided into exercise and control groups. The exercise group (n = 8 underwent 2 months of CME followed by 2 months of detraining. Additional ASE paradigms were performed at the end of each month. Neutrophils were isolated from blood specimens drawn at rest and immediately after each ASE for assaying neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis (annexin-V binding on the outer surface along with redox-related parameters and mitochondria-related parameters. Our results showed that i the initial ASE immediately increased the oxidative stress (cytosolic ROS and glutathione oxidation, and sequentially accelerated the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, the surface binding of annexin-V, and the generation of mitochondrial ROS; ii CME upregulated glutathione level, retarded spontaneous apoptosis and delayed mitochondria deterioration; iii most effects of CME were unchanged after detraining; and iv CME blocked ASE effects and this capability remained intact even after detraining. Furthermore, the ASE effects on neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis were mimicked by adding exogenous H(2O(2, but not by suppressing mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, while ASE induced an oxidative state and resulted in acceleration of human neutrophil apoptosis, CME delayed neutrophil apoptosis by maintaining a reduced state for long periods of time even after detraining.

  14. Sulfhydryl modification induces calcium entry through IP₃-sensitive store-operated pathway in activation-dependent human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiting Pan

    Full Text Available As the first line of host defense, neutrophils are stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines from resting state, facilitating the execution of immunomodulatory functions in activation state. Sulfhydryl modification has a regulatory role in a wide variety of physiological functions through mediation of signaling transductions in various cell types. Recent research suggested that two kinds of sulfhydryl modification, S-nitrosylation by exogenous nitric oxide (NO and alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, could induce calcium entry through a non-store-operated pathway in resting rat neutrophils and DDT₁MF-2 cells, while in active human neutrophils a different process has been observed by us. In the present work, data showed that NEM induced a sharp rising of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca²⁺](c without external calcium, followed by a second [Ca²⁺](c increase with readdition of external calcium in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA-activated human neutrophils. Meanwhile, addition of external calcium did not cause [Ca²⁺](c change of Ca²⁺-free PMA-activated neutrophils before application of NEM. These data indicated that NEM could induce believable store-operated calcium entry (SOCE in PMA-activated neutrophils. Besides, we found that sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a donor of exogenous NO, resulted in believable SOCE in PMA-activated human neutrophils via S-nitrosylation modification. In contrast, NEM and SNP have no effect on [Ca²⁺](c of resting neutrophils which were performed in suspension. Furthermore, 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, a reliable blocker of SOCE and an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP₃ receptor, evidently abolished SNP and NEM-induced calcium entry at 75 µM, while preventing calcium release in a concentration-dependent manner. Considered together, these results demonstrated that NEM and SNP induced calcium entry through an IP₃-sensitive store-operated pathway of human neutrophils via sulfhydryl

  15. Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Judson Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration. PMID:24956451

  16. Arbutin and decrease of potentially toxic substances generated in human blood neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečivová, Jana; Nosál', Radomír; Sviteková, Klára

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, highly motile phagocytic cells, constitute the first line of host defense and simultaneously they are considered to be central cells of chronic inflammation. In combination with standard therapeutic procedures, natural substances are gaining interest as an option for enhancing the effectiveness of treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effect of arbutin and carvedilol and of their combination on 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate- stimulated functions of human isolated neutrophils. Cells were preincubated with the drugs tested and subsequently stimulated. Superoxide (with or without blood platelets, in the rate close to physiological conditions [1:50]) and HOCl generation, elastase and myeloperoxidase release were determined spectrophotometrically and phospholipase D activation spectrofluorometrically. The combined effect of arbutin and carvedilol was found to be more effective than the effect of each compound alone. Our study provided evidence supporting the potential beneficial effect of arbutin alone or in combination with carvedilol in diminishing tissue damage by decreasing phospholipase D, myeloperoxidase and elastase activity and by attenuating the generation of superoxide and the subsequently derived reactive oxygen species. The presented data indicate the ability of arbutin to suppress the onset and progression of inflammation. PMID:26109900

  17. Binding of human IgG to single-walled carbon nanotubes accelerated myeloperoxidase-mediated degradation in activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Tian, Rong; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Jianfa; Lu, Naihao

    2016-11-01

    The binding of protein to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was believed to play an important role in the biological effects of nanotubes. However, the effects of protein-SWCNTs interactions on the oxidative degradation of nanotubes were not stressed enough. Here, we investigated the binding of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) to SWCNTs, and found that the preferred binding site was located in the Fc region of IgG. The hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions might be the crucial factors in stabilizing the binding of SWCNTs with IgG. Through the competitive binding of IgG and myeloperoxidase (MPO) to nanotube surfaces, the binding of IgG could impair MPO-induced SWCNTs biodegradation in vitro. However, both SWCNTs and IgG-SWCNTs were significantly degraded in zymosan-stimulated neutrophils, and the degradation degree was more for IgG-SWCNTs. These results suggest that the binding of IgG may be an important determinant for MPO-mediated SWCNTs biodegradation in activated human inflammatory cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of ethanol and N-nitrosodimethylamine on the iNOS-dependent NO production in human neutrophils. Role of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Karolina; Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Garley, Marzena; Jabłońska, Ewa

    2017-06-30

    1. The objective of study was to determine the influence of ethanol and/or N-nitrosodimethyloamine (NDMA) on the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production by human neutrophils and determination of the role of NF-κB in this process. 2. Isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) derived from 15 human volunteers were incubated in the presence of ethanol and/or NDMA. Expression of the tested proteins were evaluated using the Western blot method. Total NO metabolites was assayed in the cell cultures by Griess reaction. 3. In neutrophils exposed to ethanol or NDMA was observed an increased NF-κB-dependent NO production mediated by iNOS with the contribution of MAP kinases: p38 and JNK. An inhibiting effect of NF-κB signaling pathway on the MAP kinases was observed, which are involved in the iNOS-dependent NO production. By the simultaneous effect, ethanol and NDMA caused stronger generation of NO by neutrophils without the contribution of iNOS. Inhibition of NF-κB in cells simultaneously exposed to the xenobiotics caused a decreased expression of MAP kinases. 4. Individual and simultaneous effect of ethanol and NDMA may cause disorders in the response of immune system. However, the joint effect of the tested substances results in uncontrolled interactions, leading to cascading disorders of signal transduction.

  19. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  20. Inhibition of monocyte, lymphocyte, and neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells by human milk oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Lars; Kunz, Clemens; Muhly-Reinholz, Marion; Mayer, Konstantin; Seeger, Werner; Rudloff, Silvia

    2004-12-01

    Excessive leukocyte infiltration causes severe tissue damage in a variety of inflammatory diseases. The initial step in leukocyte extravasation is mediated by selectins and oligosaccharides on their glycoconjugate ligands. Human milk is a rich source of lactose-derived oligosaccharides that are partly absorbed in the intestine and excreted with the urine. As these components contain binding determinants for the selectins we investigated whether human milk oligosaccharides are able to affect leukocyte rolling and adhesion to endothelial cells under dynamic conditions. Therefore, monocytes, lymphocytes, or neutrophils isolated from human peripheral blood were passed over TNF-alpha-activated HUVEC under shear stress. The influence of different oligosaccharide fractions was determined by video-microscopy and compared with the effects of various individual oligosaccharides. Within a physiological range (12.5 - 125 microg/ml) the acidic fraction significantly inhibited leukocyte rolling and adhesion (up to 24.0% and 52.8%, respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were even more pronounced than those achieved by soluble sialyl-Lewis x, a physiological binding determinant for selectins. Several active components within the oligosaccharide fraction of human milk were identified, e.g. 3'-sialyl-lactose and 3'-sialyl-3-fucosyl-lactose. These results indicate that specific oligosaccharides in human milk may serve as anti-inflammatory components and might therefore contribute to the lower incidence of inflammatory diseases in human milk-fed infants.

  1. Measurement of the metabolic burst in human neutrophils: a comparison between cytochrome c and NBT reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, J G

    1984-02-01

    Stimulation of human neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate results in a metabolic burst, which can be measured as an enhanced cytochrome c reduction or NBT reduction. There is more NBT reduction than cytochrome c reduction. When cytochrome c and NBT are simultaneously present the reduction of each is about the same as when either cytochrome c or NBT is present. Whereas cytochrome c reduction is completely annihilated by externally added superoxide dismutase, NBT reduction is diminished to a lesser extent under the same conditions. It is concluded that cytochrome c reduction only measures extracellularly released superoxide, whereas NBT may be reduced by extracellular superoxide or other molecules as well; thus NBT measures another aspect of the metabolic burst.

  2. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, Frederica; Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID framework, and a sample of 54 HWID related papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009–2014. We group the papers into six topical groups....... Furthermore, much focus has been on studying design sketching or implemented systems-in-use, while little attention has been paid to mature design (prototypes) or early implementation (content templates). In conclusion, we recommend an update to the framework so that it can be also useful for research...

  3. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, Frederica; Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then at....... Furthermore, much focus has been on studying design sketching or implemented systems-in-use, while little attention has been paid to mature design (prototypes) or early implementation (content templates). In conclusion, we recommend an update to the framework so that it can be also useful for research...

  4. Extracellular lipase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: biochemical characterization and effect on human neutrophil and monocyte function in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, K E; Kharazmi, A; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    concentrations of this lipase preparation were preincubated with human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. The chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of these cells were then determined. It was shown that lipase inhibited the monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence, whereas it had no or very little effect...

  5. Human neutrophil elastase detection with fluorescent peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part II, structure/function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is one of a number of proteases that is receiving increased attention as a marker for inflammatory diseases and sensor-based point of care diagnostics. Integral to sensor-based detection is the transducer surface which is the platform of the sensor's signal transmitta...

  6. Human neutrophil elastase peptide sensors conjugated to cellulosic and nanocellulosic materials: part I, synthesis and characterization of fluorescent analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of peptide conjugated cellulose and nanocellulose materials as sensors for fluorescent detection of human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The cellulose sensor surfaces selected are filter paper (FP) and print cloth (PC) fabric, which are composed of pro...

  7. Involvement of toll-like receptor 4 and Fc receptors gamma in human neutrophil priming by endotoxins from escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Prokhorenko, I R

    2013-02-01

    By using the fMLP-induced respiratory burst approach, the involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in human neutrophil priming by S- or Re-glycoforms of endotoxin from Escherichia coli has been elucidated. The priming effect of Re-glycoform is more pronounced than that of the S-glycoform. Unexpectedly, fMLP-triggered generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by endotoxin primed neutrophils was amplified by preincubation of the cells with anti-TLR4 (HTA125) antibodies or with isotype-matched immunoglobulin IgG2a. The most significant finding of our study is that neutrophils exposed to anti-TLR4 antibodies retain their ability to distinguish between S- or Re-glycoforms being primed, respectively. Moreover, differentiated effect of HTA125 antibodies on functional responses of neutrophils during their priming and fMLP stimulation was revealed. Taking these results into consideration, it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution of Fcγ receptors to fMLP-induced ROS generation by neutrophils preincubated with HTA125 or IgG2a and primed by endotoxins.

  8. CFP-10 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis selectively activates human neutrophils through a pertussis toxin-sensitive chemotactic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welin, Amanda; Björnsdottir, Halla; Winther, Malene; Christenson, Karin; Oprea, Tudor; Karlsson, Anna; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Bylund, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, neutrophils are massively recruited to the lungs, but the role of these cells in combating the infection is poorly understood. Through a type VII secretion system, M. tuberculosis releases a heterodimeric protein complex, containing a 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6) and a 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP-10), that is essential for virulence. Whereas the ESAT-6 component possesses multiple virulence-related activities, no direct biological activity of CFP-10 has been shown, and CFP-10 has been described as a chaperone protein for ESAT-6. We here show that the ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex induces a transient release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores in human neutrophils. Surprisingly, CFP-10 rather than ESAT-6 was responsible for triggering the Ca(2+) response, in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting the involvement of a G-protein-coupled receptor. In line with this, the response was accompanied by neutrophil chemotaxis and activation of the superoxide-producing NADPH-oxidase. Neutrophils were unique among leukocytes in responding to CFP-10, as monocytes and lymphocytes failed to produce a Ca(2+) signal upon stimulation with the M. tuberculosis protein. Hence, CFP-10 may contribute specifically to neutrophil recruitment and activation during M. tuberculosis infection, representing a novel biological role for CFP-10 in the ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex, beyond the previously described chaperone function. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The Resolution of Inflammation: A Mathematical Model of Neutrophil and Macrophage Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Dunster, J. L.

    2014-07-23

    © 2014, Society for Mathematical Biology. There is growing interest in inflammation due to its involvement in many diverse medical conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, arthritis and asthma. The traditional view that resolution of inflammation is a passive process is now being superceded by an alternative hypothesis whereby its resolution is an active, anti-inflammatory process that can be manipulated therapeutically. This shift in mindset has stimulated a resurgence of interest in the biological mechanisms by which inflammation resolves. The anti-inflammatory processes central to the resolution of inflammation revolve around macrophages and are closely related to pro-inflammatory processes mediated by neutrophils and their ability to damage healthy tissue. We develop a spatially averaged model of inflammation centring on its resolution, accounting for populations of neutrophils and macrophages and incorporating both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Our ordinary differential equation model exhibits two outcomes that we relate to healthy and unhealthy states. We use bifurcation analysis to investigate how variation in the system parameters affects its outcome. We find that therapeutic manipulation of the rate of macrophage phagocytosis can aid in resolving inflammation but success is critically dependent on the rate of neutrophil apoptosis. Indeed our model predicts that an effective treatment protocol would take a dual approach, targeting macrophage phagocytosis alongside neutrophil apoptosis.

  10. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J.; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  11. Neutrophil granulocytes promote the migratory activity of MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cells via ICAM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strell, Carina; Lang, Kerstin; Niggemann, Bernd; Zaenker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating neutrophil granulocytes do not only exhibit tumor eliminating functions but also promote tumor progression. We have recently shown that neutrophil granulocytes can serve as linking cells for the adhesion of MDA-MB-468 breast carcinoma cells to pulmonary endothelium. Neutrophil granulocytes but not MDA-MB-468 cells express beta(2)-integrins, the ligands of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, whereas ICAM-1 is strongly expressed on MDA-MB-468 cells. Consequently, the herein presented study was performed to investigate if this interaction has also an influence on the migratory activity of the tumor cells and whether ICAM-1 signaling plays a role in this process, too. We found that the continuous release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and GRO-alpha by MDA-MB-468 cells increases the migratory activity of neutrophil granulocytes and attracts these cells towards the tumor cells which enables direct cell-cell interactions. These interactions in turn increase the migratory activity of the tumor cells in an ICAM-1 clustering-dependent mechanism since transfection of the tumor cells with specific siRNA against ICAM-1 abolished the effect. Moreover, ICAM-1 cross-linking on tumor cells induces the phosphorylation of focal adhesion components such as focal adhesion kinase and paxillin via src kinase as well as the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway via Rho kinase in a time-dependent manner. Our results provide evidence that ICAM-1 is coupled to intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor cell migration. Thus, neutrophil granulocytes can act as modulators of the metastatic capability of tumor cells by ligation of ICAM-1.

  12. Phagocytosis and killing of Candida albicans by human neutrophils after exposure to structurally different lipid emulsions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Naber, A.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To test the hypothesis that structurally different lipid emulsions have distinct immune-modulating properties, we analyzed the elimination of Candida albicans by neutrophils after exposure to various emulsions. METHODS: Neutrophils from 8 volunteers were incubated in physiologic 5 mmol/L

  13. HUMAN INTERACTION WITH MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alin Zamfiroiu; Emanuel Herteliu; Bogdan Vintila

    2012-01-01

    Computing - human interaction is a very important paradigm because informatics applications are created to be used by people via human interaction. Nowadays mobile applications are more used so is necessarily to talk about mobile - human interaction. In this paper types of mobile devices are presented. Citizen oriented character of mobile application and his utility are described. Different means of interactions with mobile devices are analyzed and in the end of the paper direction of mobile ...

  14. New Selective Peptidyl Di(chlorophenyl) Phosphonate Esters for Visualizing and Blocking Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Diseases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Carla; Legowska, Monika; Epinette, Christophe; Kellenberger, Christine; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Zoidakis, Jérôme; Vlahou, Antonia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Jenne, Dieter E.; Lesner, Adam; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The function of neutrophil protease 3 (PR3) is poorly understood despite of its role in autoimmune vasculitides and its possible involvement in cell apoptosis. This makes it different from its structural homologue neutrophil elastase (HNE). Endogenous inhibitors of human neutrophil serine proteases preferentially inhibit HNE and to a lesser extent, PR3. We constructed a single-residue mutant PR3 (I217R) to investigate the S4 subsite preferences of PR3 and HNE and used the best peptide substrate sequences to develop selective phosphonate inhibitors with the structure Ac-peptidylP(O-C6H4-4-Cl)2. The combination of a prolyl residue at P4 and an aspartyl residue at P2 was totally selective for PR3. We then synthesized N-terminally biotinylated peptidyl phosphonates to identify the PR3 in complex biological samples. These inhibitors resisted proteolytic degradation and rapidly inactivated PR3 in biological fluids such as inflammatory lung secretions and the urine of patients with bladder cancer. One of these inhibitors revealed intracellular PR3 in permeabilized neutrophils and on the surface of activated cells. They hardly inhibited PR3 bound to the surface of stimulated neutrophils despite their low molecular mass, suggesting that the conformation and reactivity of membrane-bound PR3 is altered. This finding is relevant for autoantibody binding and the subsequent activation of neutrophils in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener disease). These are the first inhibitors that can be used as probes to monitor, detect, and control PR3 activity in a variety of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25288799

  15. Neutrophil influx measured in nasal lavages of humans exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, D.; Henderson, F.; House, D.

    1988-05-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) obtained by nasal lavage were counted to determine if ozone, an oxidant air pollutant, induces an acute inflammatory response in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of humans. Background data were obtained by the nasal lavages from 200 nonexperimentally exposed subjects. Then, using a known inflammatory agent for the URT, rhinovirus-type 39, the induction, peak, and resolution of an acute inflammatory response was shown to be documented by the nasal lavage PMN counts. To determined if ozone induces this response, 41 subjects were exposed to either filtered air or 0.5 ppm ozone for 4 hr, on 2 consecutive days. Nasal lavages were taken pre-, immediately post each exposure, and 22 hr following the last exposure. Lavage PMN counts increased significantly (p = .005) in the ozone-exposed group, with 3.5-, 6.5-, and 3.9-fold increases over the air-exposed group at the post 1, pre 2, and post 2 time points, respectively. Ozone induces an inflammatory response in the URT of humans, and nasal lavage PMN counts are useful to assay the inflammatory properties of air pollutants.

  16. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Novick, Richard P; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  17. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Nielsen

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs. Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  18. A 30-base pair element is responsible for the myeloid-specific activity of the human neutrophil elastase promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, S; Rado, T A

    1994-12-23

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a serine protease, is expressed only in the promyelocytic stages of granulocyte maturation. We examined several regions of the promoter for transcriptional activity and report that a 30-base pair (bp) element located between -76 and -106 in the 5'-flanking region of HNE is sufficient for myeloid-specific expression of HNE. Gel shift assays using nuclear extracts from myeloid and non-myeloid cells reveal several myeloid-specific complexes binding to the 30-bp element. Examination of DNA-protein interactions shows that at least two myeloid-specific proteins of 38 and 55 kDa bind to this element. DNase I protection analysis reveals two distinct footprints between -80 to -91 and -94 to -104 within this element. Transient expression studies using deletion constructs of the HNE 5'-flanking region show that the 30-bp element is active in myeloid cells K 562 and U 937 but not in HeLa cells. Internal deletion of this element results in a 60-85% loss of promoter activity in myeloid cells. Additional functional studies also show that a 19-bp region between -112 and -131 contributes to transcriptional activity of the elastase promoter as well.

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Fibrin in Otitis Media: Analysis of Human and Chinchilla Temporal Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachern, Patricia A; Kwon, Geeyoun; Briles, David E; Ferrieri, Patricia; Juhn, Steven; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Paparella, Michael M; Tsuprun, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial resistance in acute otitis can result in bacterial persistence and biofilm formation, triggering chronic and recurrent infections. To investigate the middle ear inflammatory response to bacterial infection in human and chinchilla temporal bones. Six chinchillas underwent intrabullar inoculations with 0.5 mL of 106 colony-forming units (CFUs) of Streptococcus pneumoniae, serotype 2. Two days later, we counted bacteria in middle ear effusions postmortem. One ear from each chinchilla was processed in paraffin and sectioned at 5 µm. The opposite ear was embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned at a thickness of 1 µm, and stained with toluidine blue. In addition, we examined human temporal bones from 2 deceased donors with clinical histories of otitis media (1 with acute onset otitis media, 1 with recurrent infection). Temporal bones had been previously removed at autopsy, processed, embedded in celloidin, and cut at a thickness of 20 µm. Sections of temporal bones from both chinchillas and humans were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunolabeled with antifibrin and antihistone H4 antibodies. Histopatological and imminohistochemical changes owing to otitis media. Bacterial counts in chinchilla middle ear effusions 2 days after inoculation were approximately 2 logs above initial inoculum counts. Both human and chinchilla middle ear effusions contained bacteria embedded in a fibrous matrix. Some fibers in the matrix showed positive staining with antifibrin antibody, others with antihistone H4 antibody. In acute and recurrent otitis media, fibrin and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are part of the host inflammatory response to bacterial infection. In the early stages of otitis media the host defense system uses fibrin to entrap bacteria, and NETs function to eliminate bacteria. In chronic otitis media, fibrin and NETs appear to persist.

  20. The Bacillus anthracis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, Anthrolysin O, kills human neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rest Richard F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is an animal and human pathogen whose virulence is characterized by lethal and edema toxin, as well as a poly-glutamic acid capsule. In addition to these well characterized toxins, B. anthracis secretes several proteases and phospholipases, and a newly described toxin of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family, Anthrolysin O (ALO. Results In the present studies we show that recombinant ALO (rALO or native ALO, secreted by viable B. anthracis, is lethal to human primary polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, lymphocytes, THP-1 monocytic human cell line and ME-180, Detroit 562, and A549 epithelial cells by trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release viability assays. ALO cytotoxicity is dose and time dependent and susceptibility to ALO-mediated lysis differs between cell types. In addition, the viability of monocytes and hMDMs was assayed in the presence of vegetative Sterne strains 7702 (ALO+, UT231 (ALO-, and a complemented strain expressing ALO, UT231 (pUTE544, and was dependent upon the expression of ALO. Cytotoxicity of rALO is seen as low as 0.070 nM in the absence of serum. All direct cytotoxic activity is inhibited by the addition of cholesterol or serum concentration as low as 10%. Conclusion The lethality of rALO and native ALO on human monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes supports the idea that ALO may represent a previously unidentified virulence factor of B. anthracis. The study of other factors produced by B. anthracis, along with the major anthrax toxins, will lead to a better understanding of this bacterium's pathogenesis, as well as provide information for the development of antitoxin vaccines for treating and preventing anthrax.

  1. Human Neutrophil Elastase Mediates Fibrinolysis Shutdown Through Competitive Degradation of Plasminogen and Generation of Angiostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christopher D; Moore, Hunter B; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; Moore, Ernest E; Yaffe, Michael B

    2017-08-23

    A subset of trauma patients undergo fibrinolysis shutdown rather than pathologic hyperfibrinolysis, contributing to organ failure. The molecular basis for fibrinolysis shutdown in trauma is incompletely understood. Elastase released from primed/activated human neutrophils (HNE) has historically been described as fibrin(ogen)olytic. However, HNE can also degrade plasminogen (PLG) to angiostatin (ANG), retaining the Kringle domains but not the proteolytic function, and could thereby compete for generation of active plasmin by tPA. We hypothesized that HNE can drive fibrinolysis shutdown rather than fibrinolysis. Turbidometry was performed using light scatter (λ=620nm) in a purified fibrinogen + PLG system and in healthy citrate plasma clotted with Ca/thrombin -/+tPA, -/+HNE, and -/+ANG to evaluate HNE effects on fibrinolysis, quantified by time to transition midpoint (Tm). ΔTm from control is reported as percent of control ±95%CI. Purified HNE coincubated with PLG or tPA was analysed by western blot to identify cleavage products. Exogenous HNE was mixed ex-vivo with healthy volunteer blood (n=7) and used in TEG -/+tPA to evaluate effects on fibrinolysis. HNE did not cause measurable fibrinolysis on fibrin clots, clotted plasma, or whole blood as assessed by turbidometry or TEG in the absence of tPA. Upon tPA treatment, all 3 methods of evaluating fibrinolysis showed delays and decreases in fibrinolysis due to HNE relative to control: fibrin clot turbidometry ΔTm =110.7% (CI 105.0%-116.5%), clotted citrate plasma (n=6 healthy volunteers) ΔTm =126.1% (CI 110.4%-141.8%), and whole blood native TEG (n=7 healthy volunteers) with ΔLY30=28% (p=0.043). Western blot analysis of HNE-PLG co-incubation confirmed that HNE generates angiostatin K1-3, and plasma turbidity assays treated with angiostatin K1-3 delayed fibrinolysis. HNE degrades PLG and generates angiostatin K1-3, which predominates over HNE cleavage of fibrin(ogen). These findings suggest that neutrophil

  2. IL-4 increases human endothelial cell adhesiveness for T cells but not for neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, M H; Kyan-Aung, U; Haskard, D O

    1990-04-15

    The adhesion of leukocytes to vascular endothelium is the first step in their passage from the blood into inflammatory tissues. By modulating endothelial cell (EC) adhesiveness for leukocytes, cytokines may regulate leukocyte accumulation and hence the nature and progression of inflammatory responses. We have found that the T cell cytokine IL-4 increases the adhesion of T cells, but not neutrophils, to human umbilical vein EC monolayers. The increase in T cell adhesion induced by IL-4 was dose dependent (ED50 = 5 U/ml) and peaked around 33 U/ml. No increase in adhesion of neutrophils was observed at concentrations of IL-4 up to 1000 U/ml. The kinetic of the increase in T cell adhesion exhibited a steady rise peaking between 18 and 24 h before returning to basal levels by 72 h. The IL-4 specificity of the effect was confirmed by the ability of neutralizing anti-IL-4, but not anti-TNF, antibodies to abolish the effect. The increase in T cell-EC adhesion was due to an effect of IL-4 on EC inasmuch as preincubation of the T cells with IL-4 did not increase T cell binding. Furthermore, preincubation of A549 epithelial cell line monolayers with IL-4 caused no increase in T cell binding whereas A549 cells and EC showed a similarly enhanced adhesiveness for T cells after preincubation with IL-1, TNF, or IFN-gamma. EC treated with IL-4 retained their increased adhesiveness for T cells after light fixation, suggesting that IL-4 up-regulates binding by increasing the expression or accessibility of EC surface receptors for lymphocytes. Although antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and the beta-chain (CD18) of lymphocyte function-associated Ag-1 (CD11a/CD18) partially inhibited T cell adhesion to unstimulated EC, they did not affect the increase in adhesion due to IL-4 stimulation, indicating that the increased binding resulted from the generation of an alternative binding receptor(s) on the EC membrane. These findings suggest that IL-4 may play a role in the

  3. Expression of genes involved in initiation, regulation, and execution of apoptosis in human neutrophils and during neutrophil differentiation of HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Beneit, A M; Mollinedo, F

    2000-05-01

    Neutrophils possess a very short lifespan, dying by apoptosis. HL-60 cells undergo apoptosis after neutrophil differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We have found that the onset of apoptosis in neutrophil-differentiating HL-60 cells correlates with the achievement of an apoptosis-related gene expression pattern similar to that of peripheral blood mature neutrophils. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and sequencing techniques, we have found that HL-60 cells express bak, bik, bax, bad, bcl-2, bcl-xL, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1-4 and 7-10. After DMSO treatment, bak, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1 and 9 were up-regulated, whereas bik, bcl-2, and caspases 2, 3, and 10 were down-regulated at different degrees, achieving mRNA expression levels that correlated with those detected in peripheral blood neutrophils. Caspase-2 mRNA and protein expression was drastically reduced after HL-60 cell differentiation, being absent in both HL-60-differentiated neutrophils and mature neutrophils, whereas caspase-3 and -10 mRNA and protein expression were diminished upon HL-60 cell differentiation until achieving the respective levels found in mature neutrophils. Bak and bfl-1 mRNA levels were largely increased during DMSO-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, and these genes were the bcl-2 family members that were expressed most abundantly in mature neutrophils. Bcl-2 overexpression or caspase inhibition prevented differentiation-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells, but not their differentiation capability. Neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis was also blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-Asp-2,6-dichlorobenzoyloxymethylketone. Peripheral blood neutrophils expressed bak, bad, bcl-w, bfl-1, fas, and caspases 1, 3, 4, and 7-10, but hardly expressed bcl-2, bcl-xL, bik, bax, and caspase-2. These results suggest that the above gene expression changes in neutrophil-differentiating HL-60 cells may play a role in the acquisition of the neutrophil

  4. Interaction Between Humans and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    On structures two types of humans may be present. (1) Active humans and (2) passive humans (sitting or standing on the structure). The active humans can excite the structure and cause structural vibrations. The mass of the passive humans will interact with the structure and basically it changes...... the structural system (modal characteristics and structural vibration levels). The paper addresses this subject and explores the implications of having passive humans present on the structure....

  5. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-21

    and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses . J. Immunol. 170:2797–2801. 30. Martini, G. A., and R. Siegert. 1971. Marburg virus disease...Immunol. 6:1191–1197. 41. Slenczka, W. G. 1999. The Marburg virus outbreak of 1967 and subsequent episodes. Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 235:49–75...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

  6. Activation of TAK1 by Chemotactic and Growth Factors, and Its Impact on Human Neutrophil Signaling and Functional Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain-Prévost, Stéphanie; Ear, Thornin; Simard, François A; Fortin, Carl F; Dubois, Claire M; Flamand, Nicolas; McDonald, Patrick P

    2015-12-01

    The MAP3 kinase, TAK1, is known to act upstream of IKK and MAPK cascades in several cell types, and is typically activated in response to cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1) and TLR ligands. In this article, we report that in human neutrophils, TAK1 can also be activated by different classes of inflammatory stimuli, namely, chemoattractants and growth factors. After stimulation with such agents, TAK1 becomes rapidly and transiently activated. Blocking TAK1 kinase activity with a highly selective inhibitor (5z-7-oxozeaenol) attenuated the inducible phosphorylation of ERK occurring in response to these stimuli but had little or no effect on that of p38 MAPK or PI3K. Inhibition of TAK1 also impaired MEKK3 (but not MEKK1) activation by fMLF. Moreover, both TAK1 and the MEK/ERK module were found to influence inflammatory cytokine expression and release in fMLF- and GM-CSF-activated neutrophils, whereas the PI3K pathway influenced this response independently of TAK1. Besides cytokine production, other responses were found to be under TAK1 control in neutrophils stimulated with chemoattractants and/or GM-CSF, namely, delayed apoptosis and leukotriene biosynthesis. Our data further emphasize the central role of TAK1 in controlling signaling cascades and functional responses in primary neutrophils, making it a promising target for therapeutic intervention in view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Immunomodulatory activity of methanolic extracts of fruits and bark of Ficus glomerata Roxb. in mice and on human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroor, Sanjeev; Beknal, Arun Kumar; Mahurkar, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of methanolic extracts of fruit and bark of Ficus glomerata Roxb. on cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression in mice and the phagocytic effect on human neutrophils. Methanolic extracts of fruits and bark of Ficus glomerata Roxb. at two dose levels of 250 and 500 mg/kg p.o. were administered for 13 days to albino mice and cyclophosphamide (30 mg/kg i.p.) was administered on 11th, 12th, and 13th days, 1 hour after the administration of the respective treatment. On 14th day blood was collected and the hematological parameters were evaluated. The two extracts in the concentration range 100, 50, 25, 12 and 6.25 μg were also tested for phagocytic effect on human neutrophils using the in vitro models-nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) dye test, phagocytosis of Candida albicans, and chemotaxis assay. Methanolic extracts of fruit and bark of Ficus glomerata Roxb. showed significant counteracting effect (P plant in the concentration range 100, 50, 25, 12, and 6.25 μg also showed significant (P effect on human neutrophils in the parameters studied. Methanolic extracts of fruits and bark of Ficus glomerata Roxb. exhibited immunomodulatory property in both in vivo and in vitro models.

  8. Applying label-free dynamic mass redistribution assay for studying endogenous FPR1 receptor signalling in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanna B; Gloriam, David E; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The label-free dynamic mass redistribution-based assay (DMR) is a powerful method for studying signalling pathways of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Herein we present the label-free DMR assay as a robust readout for pharmacological characterization of formyl peptide receptors...... (FPRs) in human neutrophils. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from fresh human blood and their responses to FPR1 and FPR2 agonists, i.e. compound 43, fMLF and WKYMVm were measured in a label-free DMR assay using Epic Benchtop System from Corning®. Obtained DMR traces were used to calculate agonist...... potencies. RESULTS: The potencies (pEC50) of fMLF, WKYMVm and compound 43, determined on human neutrophils using the label-free DMR assay were 8.63, 7.76 and 5.92, respectively. The DMR response to fMLF, but not WKYMVm and compound 43 could be blocked by the FPR1-specific antagonist cyclosporin H...

  9. Design of an Activity-Based Probe for Human Neutrophil Elastase: Implementation of the Lossen Rearrangement To Induce Förster Resonance Energy Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Fincke, Anna-Christina; Tikhomirov, Alexander S; Braune, Annett; Girbl, Tamara; Gilberg, Erik; Bajorath, Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Nourshargh, Sussan; Gütschow, Michael

    2018-01-16

    Human neutrophil elastase is an important regulator of the immune response and plays a role in host defense mechanisms and further physiological processes. The uncontrolled activity of this serine protease may cause severe tissue alterations and impair inflammatory states. The design of an activity-based probe for human neutrophil elastase reported herein relies on a sulfonyloxyphthalimide moiety as a new type of warhead that is linker-connected to a coumarin fluorophore. The inhibitory potency of the activity-based probe was assessed against several serine and cysteine proteases, and the selectivity for human neutrophil elastase (Ki = 6.85 nM) was determined. The adequate fluorescent tag of the probe allowed for the in-gel fluorescence detection of human neutrophil elastase in the low nanomolar range. The coumarin moiety and the anthranilic acid function of the probe, produced in the course of a Lossen rearrangement, were part of two different Förster resonance energy transfers.

  10. Proinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is the most abundant protein in gram-negative bacterial cell walls, heavily outweighing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein we present findings demonstrating the potent in vitro effects of BLP on neutrophil (PMN) activation status, function, and capacity to transmigrate an endothelial monolayer. PMNs are the principal effectors of the initial host response to injury or infection and constitute a significant threat to invading bacterial pathogens. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterised by significant host tissue injury mediated, in part, by uncontrolled regulation of PMN cytotoxic activity. We found that BLP-activated human PMN as evidenced by increased CD11b\\/CD18 (Mac-1) expression. Up-regulation of PMN Mac-1 in response to BLP occurred independently of membrane-bound CD14 (mCD14). A similar up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells was observed whilst E-Selectin expression was unaffected. PMN transmigration across a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was markedly increased after treating either PMN\\'s or HUVEC independently with BLP. This increased transmigration did not occur as a result of any direct effect of BLP on HUVEC monolayer permeability, assessed objectively using the passage of FITC-labeled Dextran-70. BLP primed PMN for enhanced respiratory burst and superoxide anion production in response to PMA, but did not influence phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. BLP far exceeds LPS as a gram-negative bacterial wall component, these findings therefore implicate BLP as an additional putative mediator of SIRS arising from gram-negative infection.

  11. Bacterial Siderophores Hijack Neutrophil Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Piu; Yeoh, Beng San; Olvera, Rodrigo A; Xiao, Xia; Singh, Vishal; Awasthi, Deepika; Subramanian, Bhagawat C; Chen, Qiuyan; Dikshit, Madhu; Wang, Yanming; Parent, Carole A; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2017-06-01

    Neutrophils are the primary immune cells that respond to inflammation and combat microbial transgression. To thrive, the bacteria residing in their mammalian host have to withstand the antibactericidal responses of neutrophils. We report that enterobactin (Ent), a catecholate siderophore expressed by Escherichia coli, inhibited PMA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mouse and human neutrophils. Ent also impaired the degranulation of primary granules and inhibited phagocytosis and bactericidal activity of neutrophils, without affecting their migration and chemotaxis. Molecular analysis revealed that Ent can chelate intracellular labile iron that is required for neutrophil oxidative responses. Other siderophores (pyoverdine, ferrichrome, deferoxamine) likewise inhibited ROS and NETs in neutrophils, thus indicating that the chelation of iron may largely explain their inhibitory effects. To counter iron theft by Ent, neutrophils rely on the siderophore-binding protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) in a "tug-of-war" for iron. The inhibition of neutrophil ROS and NETs by Ent was augmented in Lcn2-deficient neutrophils compared with wild-type neutrophils but was rescued by the exogenous addition of recombinant Lcn2. Taken together, our findings illustrate the novel concept that microbial siderophore's iron-scavenging property may serve as an antiradical defense system that neutralizes the immune functions of neutrophils. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Human neutrophil elastase induces endothelial cell apoptosis by activating the PERK-CHOP branch of the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechowa, Irina; Horke, Sven; Wallrath, Anja; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Dorweiler, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    Human neutrophil elastase impacts on atherosclerotic plaque stability by inducing apoptosis in endothelial cells. Our aim was to investigate the proapoptotic mechanism of elastase on endothelial cells and to evaluate the presence of elastase in human plaque material. Human endothelial cells were treated with purified human neutrophil elastase. Apoptosis was assayed by capsase-3/7 activation, TUNEL, and sub-G 1 assay. Activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) effector molecules binding Ig protein, soluble X-binding protein-1, protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) was analyzed by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot. Genetic silencing of CHOP was achieved by small interfering RNA. Elastase induces autophagic-apoptotic forms of endothelial cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner, in conjunction with a significant increase in phosphorylation/expression of the canonical UPR-activation markers PERK and CHOP. By using CHOP knockdown, we identified CHOP as a key mediator of elastase-induced endothelial cell death. Immunohistochemical analysis of human rupture-prone plaque specimens confirmed the presence of elastase and colocalization with apoptosis. We have demonstrated for the first time that the PERK-CHOP branch of the UPR is causally involved in elastase-induced apoptosis of endothelial cells. Ex vivo analysis of human rupture-prone plaques confirmed the presence of elastase and its colocalization with markers of apoptosis. This novel role of elastase underlines the potential of combined targeting of elastase and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the prevention of plaque progression and cardiovascular events.-Grechowa, I., Horke, S., Wallrath, A., Vahl, C.-F., Dorweiler, B. Human neutrophil elastase induces endothelial cell apoptosis by activating the PERK-CHOP branch of the unfolded protein response. © FASEB.

  13. Regulation of Discrete Functional Responses by Syk and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornin Ear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a critical role in innate immunity and also influence adaptive immune responses. This occurs in good part through their production of inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines, in conjunction with their prolonged survival at inflamed foci. While a picture of the signaling machinery underlying these neutrophil responses is now emerging, much remains to be uncovered. In this study, we report that neutrophils constitutively express various Src family isoforms (STKs, as well as Syk, and that inhibition of these protein tyrosine kinases selectively hinders inflammatory cytokine generation by acting posttranscriptionally. Accordingly, STK or Syk inhibition decreases the phosphorylation of signaling intermediates (e.g., eIF-4E, S6K, and MNK1 involved in translational control. By contrast, delayed apoptosis appears to be independent of either STKs or Syk. Our data therefore significantly extend our understanding of which neutrophil responses are governed by STKs and Syk and pinpoint some signaling intermediates that are likely involved. In view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions, our findings identify potential molecular targets that could be exploited for future therapeutic intervention.

  14. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure Enhances Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils through the NADPH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Scheer, Marleen H; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society, and the potential biological consequences of exposure to these fields are under intense debate. Immune cells are suggested as possible target cells, though a clear mechanism is lacking. Considering their crucial role in innate immune activation, we selected an ex vivo exposure set-up with human neutrophils to investigate a possible correlation between neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation and LF EMF exposure. Our study shows that formation of NETs is enhanced by LF EMF exposure. Enhanced NET formation leads to increased antimicrobial properties as well as damage to surrounding cells. We found that LF-EMF-induced NET formation is dependent on the NADPH oxidase pathway and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LF EMF exposure does not influence autophagy and PAD4 activity. Our study provides a mechanism by which exposure to LF EMFs could influence the innate immune system. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Data on human neutrophil activation induced by pepducins with amino acid sequences derived from β2AR and CXCR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Holdfeldt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data described here is related to the research article titled (Gabl et al., 2016 [1]. Pepducins with peptide sequence derived from one of the intracellular domains of a given G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR can either activate or inhibit cell functions. Here we include data on human neutrophil function induced by pepducins derived from β2AR (ICL3-8 and CXCR4 (ATI-2341, respectively. ICL3-8 exerts neither direct activating effect on the NADPH-oxidase as measured by superoxide release nor inhibitory effect on FPR signaling. ATI-2341 dose-dependently triggers neutrophil activation and these cells were subsequently desensitized in their response to FPR2 specific agonists F2Pal10 and WKYMVM. Moreover, the ATI-2341 response is inhibited by PBP10 and the peptidomimetic Pam-(Lys-betaNSpe6-NH2 (both are FPR2 specific inhibitors, but not to the FPR1 specific inhibitor cyclosporine H.

  16. Amantadine inhibits platelet-activating factor induced clathrin-mediated endocytosis in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckels, Phillip C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; McLaughlin, Nathan J. D.; Gries, Lynn M.; Kelher, Marguerite R.; England, Kelly M.; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia; Khan, Samina Y.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor signaling is integral for adhesion, emigration, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species production in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Priming is an important part of PMN emigration, but it can also lead to PMN-mediated organ injury in the host. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) primes PMNs through activation of a specific G protein-coupled receptor. We hypothesize that PAF priming of PMNs requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) of the PAF receptor (PAFr), and, therefore, amantadine, known to inhibit CME, significantly antagonizes PAF signaling. PMNs were isolated by standard techniques to >98% purity and tested for viability. Amantadine (1 mM) significantly inhibited the PAF-mediated changes in the cellular distribution of clathrin and the physical colocalization [fluorescence resonance energy transfer positive (FRET+)] of early endosome antigen-1 and Rab5a, known components of CME and similar to hypertonic saline, a known inhibitor of CME. Furthermore, amantadine had no effect on the PAF-induced cytosolic calcium flux; however, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was significantly decreased. Amantadine inhibited PAF-mediated changes in PMN physiology, including priming of the NADPH oxidase and shape change with lesser inhibition of increases in CD11b surface expression and elastase release. Furthermore, rimantadine, an amantadine analog, was a more potent inhibitor of PAF priming of the N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-activated oxidase. PAF priming of PMNs requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis that is inhibited when PMNs are pretreated with either amantadine or rimantadine. Thus, amantadine and rimantadine have the potential to ameliorate PMN-mediated tissue damage in humans. PMID:19295175

  17. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Siti M; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Edinur, Hisham A

    2015-10-01

    Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641-0.765), -3a (0.676-0.867), -4a (0.943-1.000) and -5a (0.529-0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study.

  18. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K D; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M

    1991-02-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell-dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence.

  19. Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kamoshida

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. A. baumannii is usually harmless, but it may cause infectious diseases in an immunocompromised host. Although neutrophils are the key players of the initial immune response against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. A new biological defense mechanism, termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, has been attracting attention. NETs play a critical role in bacterial killing by bacterial trapping and inactivation. Many pathogenic bacteria have been reported to induce NET formation, while an inhibitory effect on NET formation is rarely reported. In the present study, to assess the inhibition of NET formation by A. baumannii, bacteria and human neutrophils were cocultured in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and NET formation was evaluated. NETs were rarely observed during the coculture despite neutrophil PMA stimulation. Furthermore, A. baumannii prolonged the lifespan of neutrophils by inhibiting NET formation. The inhibition of NET formation by other bacteria was also investigated. The inhibitory effect was only apparent with live A. baumannii cells. Finally, to elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, neutrophil adhesion was examined. A. baumannii suppressed the adhesion ability of neutrophils, thereby inhibiting PMA-induced NET formation. This suppression of cell adhesion was partly due to suppression of the surface expression of CD11a in neutrophils. The current study constitutes the first report on the inhibition of NET formation by a pathogenic bacterium, A. baumannii, and prolonging the neutrophil lifespan. This novel pathogenicity to inhibit NET formation, thereby escaping host immune responses might contribute to a development of new treatment strategies for A. baumannii infections.

  20. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  1. Ezrin/Exocyst complex regulates mucin 5AC secretion induced by neutrophil elastase in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Li, Na; Liu, Chun-Yi; Xu, Rui; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M; Zhou, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Increased mucin secretion is a characteristic feature of many chronic airway diseases, particularly during periods of exacerbation; however, the exact mechanism of mucin secretion remains unclear. Ezrin, which is a specific marker of apical membranes, is predominantly concentrated in exocyst-rich cell surface structures, crosslinking the actin cytoskeleton with the plasma membrane. In the present study, we examined whether Ezrin is involved in mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) secretion after neutrophil elastase (NE) attack, and we investigated the role of the exocyst complex docking protein Sec3 in this process. NE was used as a stimulator in a 16HBE14o- cell culture model. The expression and location of Ezrin and Sec3 were investigated, and the interaction between Ezrin and Sec3 in 16HBE14o-cells was assayed after treatment with NE, Ezrin siRNA, Sec3 siRNA, neomycin or PIP2-Ab. We found that Ezrin was highly expressed in the bronchi of humans with chronic airway diseases. NE induced robust MUC5AC protein secretion. The Ezrin siRNA, Sec3 siRNA, and neomycin treatments led to impaired MUC5AC secretion in cells. Both Ezrin and Sec3 were recruited primarily to the cytoplasmic membrane after NE stimulation, and the neomycin and PIP2-Ab treatments abrogated this effect. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Ezrin and Sec3 combined to form complexes; however, these complexes could not be detected in Ezrin∆1-333 mutant-transfected cells, even when PIP2 was added. These results demonstrate that Ezrin/Sec3 complexes are essential for MUC5AC secretion in NE-stimulated airway epithelial cells and that PIP2 is of critical importance in the formation of these complexes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Ezrin/Exocyst Complex Regulates Mucin 5AC Secretion Induced by Neutrophil Elastase in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Increased mucin secretion is a characteristic feature of many chronic airway diseases, particularly during periods of exacerbation; however, the exact mechanism of mucin secretion remains unclear. Ezrin, which is a specific marker of apical membranes, is predominantly concentrated in exocyst-rich cell surface structures, crosslinking the actin cytoskeleton with the plasma membrane. In the present study, we examined whether Ezrin is involved in mucin 5AC (MUC5AC secretion after neutrophil elastase (NE attack, and we investigated the role of the exocyst complex docking protein Sec3 in this process. Methods: NE was used as a stimulator in a 16HBE14o- cell culture model. The expression and location of Ezrin and Sec3 were investigated, and the interaction between Ezrin and Sec3 in 16HBE14o-cells was assayed after treatment with NE, Ezrin siRNA, Sec3 siRNA, neomycin or PIP2-Ab. Results: We found that Ezrin was highly expressed in the bronchi of humans with chronic airway diseases. NE induced robust MUC5AC protein secretion. The Ezrin siRNA, Sec3 siRNA, and neomycin treatments led to impaired MUC5AC secretion in cells. Both Ezrin and Sec3 were recruited primarily to the cytoplasmic membrane after NE stimulation, and the neomycin and PIP2-Ab treatments abrogated this effect. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Ezrin and Sec3 combined to form complexes; however, these complexes could not be detected in Ezrin∆1-333 mutant-transfected cells, even when PIP2 was added. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that Ezrin/Sec3 complexes are essential for MUC5AC secretion in NE-stimulated airway epithelial cells and that PIP2 is of critical importance in the formation of these complexes.

  3. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  4. [Neuro-neutrophilic disease suspected by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing and brain biopsy: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Etsuro; Sawamura, Masanori; Maruhama, Shinichiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kim, Gan; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 72-year-old female, subacute right hemiplegia and aphasia appeared in late May 2011. The results of hematology, a cerebrospinal fluid test, (13)F-FDG-PET, and cephalic MRI suggested intravascular/malignant lymphoma. Brain biopsy was performed. Pathological findings did not suggest a malignant tumor. In the perivascular space, the infiltration of neutrophils or histiocytes was observed. The patient was referred to the Department of Neurology. Based on the results of various examinations, infection was ruled out, and steroid therapy was conducted. Marked improvement was achieved. Subsequently, the results of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing showed B54/Cw1. As dermal findings were absent, it was impossible to make a definitive diagnosis of neuro-Sweet disease, but the disorder was regarded as a neuro-neutrophilic disease, which is a more comprehensive entity. Few studies have reported brain tissue findings of active neuro-neutrophilic disease. We report the present case, which will contribute to future research.

  5. Impact of Anti-Inflammatory Agents on the Gene Expression Profile of Stimulated Human Neutrophils: Unraveling Endogenous Resolution Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Mireille; Dumas, Aline; Michaud, Annick; Laflamme, Cynthia; Dussault, Andrée-Anne; Pouliot, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine, prostaglandin E2, or increased intracellular cyclic AMP concentration each elicit potent anti-inflammatory events in human neutrophils by inhibiting functions such as phagocytosis, superoxide production, adhesion and cytokine release. However, the endogenous molecular pathways mediating these actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined their impact on the gene expression profile of stimulated neutrophils. Purified blood neutrophils from healthy donors were stimulated with a cocktail of inflammatory agonists in the presence of at least one of the following anti-inflammatory agents: adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680, prostaglandin E2, cyclic-AMP-elevating compounds forskolin and RO 20-1724. Total RNA was analyzed using gene chips and real-time PCR. Genes encoding transcription factors, enzymes and regulatory proteins, as well as secreted cytokines/chemokines showed differential expression. We identified 15 genes for which the anti-inflammatory agents altered mRNA levels. The agents affected the expression profile in remarkably similar fashion, suggesting a central mechanism limiting cell activation. We have identified a set of genes that may be part of important resolution pathways that interfere with cell activation. Identification of these pathways will improve understanding of the capacity of tissues to terminate inflammatory responses and contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies based on endogenous resolution. PMID:19295914

  6. Impact of anti-inflammatory agents on the gene expression profile of stimulated human neutrophils: unraveling endogenous resolution pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille St-Onge

    Full Text Available Adenosine, prostaglandin E(2, or increased intracellular cyclic AMP concentration each elicit potent anti-inflammatory events in human neutrophils by inhibiting functions such as phagocytosis, superoxide production, adhesion and cytokine release. However, the endogenous molecular pathways mediating these actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we examined their impact on the gene expression profile of stimulated neutrophils. Purified blood neutrophils from healthy donors were stimulated with a cocktail of inflammatory agonists in the presence of at least one of the following anti-inflammatory agents: adenosine A(2A receptor agonist CGS 21680, prostaglandin E(2, cyclic-AMP-elevating compounds forskolin and RO 20-1724. Total RNA was analyzed using gene chips and real-time PCR. Genes encoding transcription factors, enzymes and regulatory proteins, as well as secreted cytokines/chemokines showed differential expression. We identified 15 genes for which the anti-inflammatory agents altered mRNA levels. The agents affected the expression profile in remarkably similar fashion, suggesting a central mechanism limiting cell activation. We have identified a set of genes that may be part of important resolution pathways that interfere with cell activation. Identification of these pathways will improve understanding of the capacity of tissues to terminate inflammatory responses and contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies based on endogenous resolution.

  7. Frontline Science: Tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation and priming of human neutrophil granule exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, Kenneth R; Merchant, Michael L; Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Barati, Michelle T; Uriarte, Silvia M; Ward, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis plays an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. The present study examined TNF-α stimulation or priming of exocytosis of the 4 neutrophil granule subsets. TNF-α stimulated exocytosis of secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules and primed specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis to fMLF stimulation. Both stimulation and priming of exocytosis by TNF-α were dependent on p38 MAPK activity. Bioinformatic analysis of 1115 neutrophil proteins identified by mass spectrometry as being phosphorylated by TNF-α exposure found that actin cytoskeleton regulation was a major biologic function. A role for p38 MAPK regulation of the actin cytoskeleton was confirmed experimentally. Thirteen phosphoproteins regulated secretory vesicle quantity, formation, or release, 4 of which-Raf1, myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C (PKC) substrate (MARCKS), Abelson murine leukemia interactor 1 (ABI1), and myosin VI-were targets of the p38 MAPK pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of Raf1 reduced stimulated exocytosis of gelatinase granules and priming of specific granule exocytosis. We conclude that differential regulation of exocytosis by TNF-α involves the actin cytoskeleton and is a necessary component for priming of the 2 major neutrophil antimicrobial defense mechanisms: oxygen radical generation and release of toxic granule contents. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Effect of salivary agglutination on oral streptococcal clearance by human polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzek, A; Chen, Z; Merritt, J; Kreth, J

    2017-06-01

    Salivary agglutination is an important host defense mechanism to aggregate oral commensal bacteria as well as invading pathogens. Saliva flow and subsequent swallowing more easily clear aggregated bacteria compared with single cells. Phagocytic clearance of bacteria through polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes also seems to increase to a certain extent with the size of bacterial aggregates. To determine a connection between salivary agglutination and the host innate immune response by phagocytosis, an in vitro agglutination assay was developed reproducing the average size of salivary bacterial aggregates. Using the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii as a model organism, the effect of salivary agglutination on phagocytic clearance through polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes was investigated. Here we describe how salivary aggregates of S. gordonii are readily cleared through phagocytosis, whereas single bacterial cells showed a significant delay in being phagocytosed and killed. Furthermore, before phagocytosis the polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes were able to induce a specific de-aggregation, which was dependent on serine protease activity. The data presented suggest that salivary agglutination of bacterial cells leads to an ideal size for recognition by polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes. As a first line of defense, these phagocytic cells are able to recognize the aggregates and de-aggregate them via serine proteases to a more manageable size for efficient phagocytosis and subsequent killing in the phagolysosome. This observed mechanism not only prevents the rapid spreading of oral bacterial cells while entering the bloodstream but would also avoid degranulation of involved polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes, so preventing collateral damage to nearby tissue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. fMLP-Induced IL-8 Release Is Dependent on NADPH Oxidase in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Hidalgo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP and platelet-activating factor (PAF induce similar intracellular signalling profiles; but only fMLP induces interleukin-8 (IL-8 release and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils. Because the role of ROS on IL-8 release in neutrophils is until now controversial, we assessed if NADPH oxidase is involved in the IL-8 secretions and PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways activity induced by fMLP. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy volunteers. IL-8 was measured by ELISA, IL-8 mRNA by qPCR, and ROS production by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, reduction of ferricytochrome c, and FACS. Intracellular pH changes were detected by spectrofluorescence. ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt phosphorylation were analysed by immunoblotting and NF-κB was analysed by immunocytochemistry. Hydroxy-3-methoxyaceto-phenone (HMAP, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, and siRNA Nox2 reduced the ROS and IL-8 release in neutrophils treated with fMLP. HMAP, DPI, and amiloride (a Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor inhibited the Akt phosphorylation and did not affect the p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activity. DPI and HMAP reduced NF-κB translocation induced by fMLP. We showed that IL-8 release induced by fMLP is dependent on NADPH oxidase, and ROS could play a redundant role in cell signalling, ultimately activating the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways in neutrophils.

  10. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Woodman

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50 via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  11. The transcriptional activation program of human neutrophils in skin lesions supports their important role in wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard-Monch, K.; Knudsen, Steen; Follin, P.

    2004-01-01

    receptors involved in inflammatory responses. These findings indicate a change of responsiveness to chemotactic and immunoregulatory mediators once PMNs have migrated to skin lesions and have been activated. Other effects of the up-regulated cytokines/chemokines/enzymes were critical for wound healing......To investigate the cellular fate and function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNs) attracted to skin wounds, we used a human skin-wounding model and microarray technology to define differentially expressed genes in PMNs from peripheral blood, and PMNs that had transmigrated to skin...... and function, and promotes wound healing....

  12. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... YKL-40 at the myelocyte-metamyelocyte stage, the stage of maturation at which other specific granule proteins are formed. Assuming that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in RA by inducing T cell-mediated autoimmune response, YKL-40 released from neutrophils in the inflamed joint could be essential...

  13. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    tested monocyte chemotactic responsiveness in 19 patients with acute primary attack malaria. In addition, the neutrophil chemotaxis was measured in 12 patients. Before the initiation of antimalarial treatment a significant depression of monocyte chemotaxis was observed in approximately half...... suppressed. The monocyte chemotaxis was followed in 14 of the patients, during treatment and after complete recovery. After 3 days of treatment the response had improved in most of the patients, and after 7 days all patients had a normal monocyte chemotaxis, which remained normal after one month....... No significant differences between P. falciparum and P. vivax/ovale malaria was observed with respect to blood monocyte chemotactic responsiveness. Neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with P. falciparum infections was similarly suppressed before treatment (54% of controls), was still defective after 3 days...

  14. In vitro inhibition of human neutrophil histotoxicity by ambroxol: evidence for a multistep mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ottonello, Luciano; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Dapino, Patrizia; Mancini, Marina; Dallegri, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are major culprits for the protease/antiprotease imbalance during various lung diseases, that is, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Thus, these cells are presently considered an ideal target for the pharmacologic control of tissue injury during these diseases.This study was planned in order to investigate if ambroxol and its precursor bromhexine are actually capable of preventing alpha-1-a...

  15. Chemiluminescence response of human neutrophils to He-Ne laser irradiation (in vivo and in vitro)

    OpenAIRE

    Schepetkin, I.; Udut, V.; Karpov, A.

    1994-01-01

    He-Ne laser irradiation (0.01-6 J/cm3) of the blood and neutrophile suspension in vitrowas shown to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in healthy donors. Intravascular laser irradiation of the blood (5 mW, 30 minutes, daily) of the patients with chronic gastric ulcer during first 5 days resulted in increasing stimul-induced ROS production in patients with the low initial chemiluminescence response and its decreasing in patients with the high initial chemiluminescence response.

  16. Overhauser-enhanced MRI of elastase activity from in vitro human neutrophil degranulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Parzy

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging can reveal exquisite anatomical details. However several diseases would benefit from an imaging technique able to specifically detect biochemical alterations. In this context protease activity imaging is one of the most promising areas of research.We designed an elastase substrate by grafting stable nitroxide free radicals on soluble elastin. This substrate generates a high Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI contrast upon digestion by the target proteases through the modulation of its rotational correlation time. The sensitivity is sufficient to generate contrasted images of the degranulation of neutrophils induced by a calcium ionophore from 2×10(4 cells per milliliter, well under the physiological neutrophils concentrations.These ex-vivo experiments give evidence that OMRI is suitable for imaging elastase activity from neutrophil degranulation. Provided that a fast protease-substrate is used these results open the door to better diagnoses of a number of important pathologies (cystic fibrosis, inflammation, pancreatitis by OMRI or Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging in vivo. It also provides a long-expected method to monitor anti-protease treatments efficiency and help pharmaceutical research.

  17. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence.

  18. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa extract on virulence factors of Candida albicans and human neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2017-12-10

    Candida albicans has become a major problem of oral candidiasis due to increase in antibiotic resistance. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, a medicinal plant possessing several phytochemical constituents, has been considered as a potential source of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory agents. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-virulence and immunostimulatory activity of R. tomentosa ethanolic leaf extract against C. albicans. The effects of the extract on C. albicans were assessed on germ tube production, adherence of the organisms to surfaces, and biofilm. In addition, the effects of the extract on phagocytosis and killing activity of neutrophils against the pathogen were investigated. Suppression of germ tube production following 30 min exposure to the extract at 256 μg/mL was significantly increased in comparison with that of the unexposed cells (p extract at 512-1024 μg/mL significantly reduced biofilm forming ability of the organisms up to 42.31-64.58% (p extract at 256 μg/mL was observed (p extract at 50 μg/mL significantly enhanced phagocytosis and killing activity of neutrophils against the organism, compared with the control (p extract displayed a dual mode of action, inhibiting virulence factors of C. albicans and enhancing neutrophil functions. Further pharmaceutical development of the extract might be useful as an alternative therapeutic agent against oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Cell Intrinsic Galectin-3 Attenuates Neutrophil ROS-Dependent Killing of Candida by Modulating CR3 Downstream Syk Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Juin-Hua; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chan, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Liu, Fu-Tong; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Neutrophils are the important effector cells in host resistance to candidiasis. To investigate the modulation of neutrophil fungicidal function will advance our knowledge on the control of candidiasis. While recombinant galectin-3 enhances neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida, we found that intracellular galectin-3 downregulates neutrophil fungicidal functions. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining reveal that cytosolic gal3 physically interacts with Syk in neutrophils after Candida stimulation. Gal3−/− neutrophils have higher level of Syk activation as well as greater abilities to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill Candida than gal3+/+ cells. While galectin-3 deficiency modulates neutrophil and macrophage activation and the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cells, the deficiency does not affect the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils or macrophages. Galectin-3 deficiency ameliorates systemic candidiasis by reducing fungal burden, renal pathology, and mortality. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate that cell intrinsic galectin-3 negatively regulates neutrophil effector functions against candidiasis. Reducing galectin-3 expression or activity by siRNA or gal3 inhibitor TD139 enhances human neutrophil ROS production. Mice treated with TD139 have enhanced ability to clear the fungus. Our work unravels the mechanism by which galectin-3 regulates Syk-dependent neutrophil fungicidal functions and raises the possibility that blocking gal3 in neutrophils may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating systemic candidiasis. PMID:28217127

  20. Effects of red grape juice polyphenols in NADPH oxidase subunit expression in human neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Alberto; de la Peña, Gema; Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Teresa Guerra, M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2009-10-01

    The NADPH oxidase enzyme system is the main source of superoxide anions in phagocytic and vascular cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide generation has been found to be abnormally enhanced in several chronic diseases. Evidence is accumulating that polyphenols may have the potential to improve cardiovascular health, although the mechanism is not fully established. Consumption of concentrated red grape juice, rich in polyphenols, has been recently shown to reduce NADPH oxidase activity in circulating neutrophils from human subjects. In the present work we studied whether red grape juice polyphenols affected NADPH oxidase subunit expression at the transcription level. For this, we used human neutrophils and mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, HL-60-derived neutrophils and the endothelial cell line EA.hy926.Superoxide production was measured with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate or lucigenin, mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Each experiment was performed at least three times. In all cell types tested, red grape juice, dealcoholised red wine and pure polyphenols decreased superoxide anion production. Red grape juice and dealcoholised red wine selectively reduced p47phox, p22phox and gp91phox expression at both mRNA and protein levels, without affecting the expression of p67phox. Pure polyphenols, particularly quercetin, also reduced NADPH oxidase subunit expression, especially p47phox, in all cell types tested. The present results showing that red grape juice polyphenols reduce superoxide anion production provide an alternative mechanism by which consumption of grape derivatives may account for a reduction of oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular and/or inflammatory diseases related to NADPH oxidase superoxide overproduction.

  1. The influence of procyanidins isolated from small-leaved lime flowers (Tilia cordata Mill.) on human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwińska, Monika E; Dudek, Marta K; Pawłowska, Karolina A; Pruś, Anna; Ziaja, Maria; Granica, Sebastian

    2018-02-12

    Linden flower is a wildly used plant material among patients in the treatment of common cold symptoms and mucosa inflammations. However, the structure and bioactivity of flavan-3-ol derivatives present in infusions from flowers of Tilia cordata have not been studied so far. The aim of current study was to isolate and identify main procyanidins present in the flowers of small-leaved lime and to evaluate their influence on the inflammatory response of human neutrophils ex vivo. The chemical structure of isolated compounds was established by 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The bioactivity of obtained compounds was tested in human neutrophils model. Cytotoxicity and influence of compounds on apoptosis was established by flow cytometry. The levels of produced cytokines were established by ELISA after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species was checked by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence method after N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP) induction. The phytochemical work resulted in the isolation of 10 compounds. Compounds were identified as oligomeric procyanidins and their precursor epicatechin. The potential anti-inflammatory activity of compounds was evaluated in the concentration range 5-20 μM. All compounds were able to decrease the production of ROS from f-MLP-stimulated neutrophils. Most of compounds were able to inhibit the LPS-induced release of IL-8. Some trimeric and tetrameric derivatives were also able to decrease the production of MIP-1β. Obtained results partially support the traditional usage of infusion from lime flowers in the treatment of symptoms of inflammation and irritation of mucosa in common cold, pharyngitis and tonsillitis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts of Psidium guajava leaves by DPPH and chemiluminescence inhibition in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M R V; Azzolini, A E C S; Martinez, M L L; Souza, C R F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M; Oliveira, W P

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of spray dried extracts (SDE) from Psidium guajava L. leaves. Different drying carriers, namely, maltodextrin, colloidal silicon dioxide, Arabic gum, and β -cyclodextrin at concentrations of 40 and 80% relative to solids content, were added to drying composition. SDE were characterized through determination of the total phenolic, tannins, and flavonoid content. Antioxidant potential of the SDE was assessed by two assays: cellular test that measures the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (LumCL) produced by neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and the DPPH radical scavenging (DPPH∗ method). In both assays the antioxidant activity of the SDE occurred in a concentration-dependent manner and showed no toxicity to the cells. Using the CLlum method, the IC50 ranged from 5.42 to 6.50 µg/mL. The IC50 of the SDE ranged from 7.96 to 8.11 µg/mL using the DPPH(•) method. Psidium guajava SDE presented significant antioxidant activity; thus they show high potential as an active phytopharmaceutical ingredient. Our findings in human neutrophils are pharmacologically relevant since they indicate that P. guajava SDE is a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in human cells.

  3. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Mireille; Lagarde, Stéphanie; Laflamme, Cynthia; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Marois, Louis; Naccache, Paul H.; Pouliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    We shed new light on the expression and function of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family, associated with inflammation and hyperalgesia, in human granulocytes. Resting cells expressed constitutive levels of PAR-2 and PAR-3 mRNA but not PAR-1 or PAR-4. Based on flow cytometry, stimulation with opsonized bacteria (Bop) specifically up-regulated cell surface expression of PAR-2 in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, independent of transcription or de novo protein synthesis. Primary granules were identified as a source of preformed PAR-2 that can readily be mobilized at the surface on fusion with the plasma membrane. Cellular response to PAR-2 activation, measured as changes in intracellular calcium concentration, was enhanced in PAR-2 up-regulated cells. Increase of cell-surface PAR-2 and of cell responsiveness were dependent specifically on the engagement of immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding receptors. Together, our results reveal that mobilization of intracellular granules, in response to Ig-receptor activation, up-regulates PAR-2 surface expression and makes neutrophils more responsive to proteinase activity. This enhanced response to PAR-2 activation indicates that molecular communication between pain and inflammation may be more important than previously believed.—St-Onge, M., Lagarde, S., Laflamme, C., Rollet-Labelle, E., Marois, L., Naccache, P. H., Pouliot, M. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils. PMID:20154268

  4. Bromelain decreases neutrophil interactions with P-selectin, but not E-selectin, in vitro by proteolytic cleavage of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Banks

    Full Text Available Stem bromelain, a cysteine protease isolated from pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory treatment, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Curious as to whether bromelain might affect selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling, we studied the ability of bromelain-treated human neutrophils to tether to substrates presenting immobilized P-selectin or E-selectin under shear stress. Bromelain treatment attenuated P-selectin-mediated tethering but had no effect on neutrophil recruitment on E-selectin substrates. Flow cytometric analysis of human neutrophils, using two antibodies against distinct epitopes within the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 active site, revealed that bromelain cleaves PSGL-1 to remove one of two sites required for P-selectin binding, while leaving the region required for E-selectin binding intact. These findings suggest one molecular mechanism by which bromelain may exert its anti-inflammatory effects is via selective cleavage of PSGL-1 to reduce P-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment.

  5. Bromelain decreases neutrophil interactions with P-selectin, but not E-selectin, in vitro by proteolytic cleavage of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jessica M; Herman, Christine T; Bailey, Ryan C

    2013-01-01

    Stem bromelain, a cysteine protease isolated from pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory treatment, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Curious as to whether bromelain might affect selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling, we studied the ability of bromelain-treated human neutrophils to tether to substrates presenting immobilized P-selectin or E-selectin under shear stress. Bromelain treatment attenuated P-selectin-mediated tethering but had no effect on neutrophil recruitment on E-selectin substrates. Flow cytometric analysis of human neutrophils, using two antibodies against distinct epitopes within the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) active site, revealed that bromelain cleaves PSGL-1 to remove one of two sites required for P-selectin binding, while leaving the region required for E-selectin binding intact. These findings suggest one molecular mechanism by which bromelain may exert its anti-inflammatory effects is via selective cleavage of PSGL-1 to reduce P-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment.

  6. Minimal mobile human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Ali, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the widespread adoption of personal, mobile computing devices in everyday life, has allowed entry into a new technological era in Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The constant change of the physical and social context in a user's situation made possible by the portability of

  7. Targeting neutrophils in ischemic stroke: translational insights from experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jickling, Glen C; Liu, DaZhi; Ander, Bradley P; Stamova, Boryana; Zhan, Xinhua; Sharp, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils have key roles in ischemic brain injury, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. As such, neutrophils are of great interest as targets to treat and prevent ischemic stroke. After stroke, neutrophils respond rapidly promoting blood–brain barrier disruption, cerebral edema, and brain injury. A surge of neutrophil-derived reactive oxygen species, proteases, and cytokines are released as neutrophils interact with cerebral endothelium. Neutrophils also are linked to the major processes that c...

  8. Interactions between Humans and Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Combining multiple scientific disciplines, robotic technology has made significant progress the last decade, and so did the interactions between humans and robots. This article updates the agenda for robotic research by highlighting the factors that affect Human – Robot Interaction (HRI......), and explains the relationships and dependencies that exist between them. The four main factors that define the properties of a robot, and therefore the interaction, are distributed in two dimensions: (1) Intelligence (Control - Autonomy), and (2) Perspective (Tool - Medium). Based on these factors, we...... introduce a generic model for comparing and contrasting robots (CCM), aiming to provide a common platform for robot designers, developers and users. The framework for HRI we propose stems mainly from the vagueness and the lack of clarity that has been observed in the definitions of both Direct and Indirect...

  9. A bovine whey protein extract stimulates human neutrophils to generate bioactive IL-1Ra through a NF-kappaB- and MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Daniel; Drouin, Réjean; Pouliot, Yves; Gauthier, Sylvie; Poubelle, Patrice E

    2010-02-01

    Innate immunity depends on the efficiency of neutrophils to be activated rapidly to restore homeostasis. It can benefit from priming agents that enhance neutrophil capacity to respond more efficiently to a subsequent stimulation. Among natural products, a bovine whey protein extract (WPE) has been shown to prime normal human blood neutrophils by enhancing their chemotaxis, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and degranulation. These leukocytes are also an important source of cytokines, some of which have antiinflammatory functions. We investigated the role of WPE, as well as its mechanisms of action, on the production of interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) by neutrophils in vitro. WPE dose-dependently stimulated de novo synthesis and release of IL-1Ra by normal human blood neutrophils. Among the major proteins present in WPE, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) were the only active components. They had additive effects that exactly reproduced those of WPE. Similarly to WPE, they also stimulated the accumulation of IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, neutrophils incubated with WPE, beta-LG, and alpha-LA produced IL-1Ra in excess of IL-1beta and the ratio IL-1Ra:IL-1beta increased linearly. The amounts of IL-1Ra stimulated by WPE or beta-LG + alpha-LA significantly reduced the IL-1 activity in EL4 cells. Inhibitors of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB cascades reduced neutrophil production of IL-1Ra. Our data suggest that WPE, through beta-LG + alpha-LA, has immunomodulatory properties and the potential to increase host defenses.

  10. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  11. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase and metalloprotease-9 of human adenocarcinoma gastric cells by chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgari, Michela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Colombo, Elisa; Maschi, Omar; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether the antiinflammatory effect of chamomile infusion at gastric level could be ascribed to the inhibition of metalloproteinase-9 and elastase. The infusions from capitula and sifted flowers (250-1500 µg/mL) and individual flavonoids (10 µM) were tested on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated AGS cells and human neutrophil elastase. The results indicate that the antiinflammatory activity associated with chamomile infusions from both the capitula and sifted flowers is most likely due to the inhibition of neutrophil elastase and gastric metalloproteinase-9 activity and secretion; the inhibition occurring in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activity was inhibited as well and the decrease of metalloproteinase-9 expression was found to be associated with the inhibition of NF-kB driven transcription. The results further indicate that the flavonoid-7-glycosides, major constituents of chamomile flowers, may be responsible for the antiinflammatory action of the chamomile infusion observed here. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2017-12-05

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  13. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Little, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3) antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener\\'s granulomatosis). Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻\\/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17%) more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  14. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Little

    Full Text Available Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3 antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's granulomatosis. Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17% more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  15. Lack of activity of 15-epi-lipoxin A₄ on FPR2/ALX and CysLT1 receptors in interleukin-8-driven human neutrophil function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planagumà, A; Domenech, T; Jover, I; Ramos, I; Sentellas, S; Malhotra, R; Miralpeix, M

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and survival are important control points in the development and resolution of inflammatory processes. 15-epi-lipoxin (LX)A interaction with formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2)/ALX receptor is suggested to enhance anti-inflammatory neutrophil functions and mediate resolution of airway inflammation. However, it has been reported that 15-epi-LXA₄ analogues can also bind to cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1) and that the CysLT1 antagonist MK-571 binds to FPR2/ALX, so cross-reactivity between FPR2/ALX and CysLT1 ligands cannot be discarded. It is not well established whether the resolution properties reported for 15-epi-LXA4 are mediated through FPR2/ALX, or if other receptors such as CysLT1 may also be involved. Evaluation of specific FPR2/ALX ligands and CysLT1 antagonists in functional biochemical and cellular assays were performed to establish a role for both receptors in 15-epi-LXA₄-mediated signalling and function. In our study, a FPR2/ALX synthetic peptide (WKYMVm) and a small molecule FPR2/ALX agonist (compound 43) induced FPR2/ALX-mediated signalling, enhancing guanosine triphosphate-gamma (GTPγ) binding and decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels, whereas 15-epi-LXA₄ was inactive. Furthermore, 15-epi-LXA4 showed neither binding affinity nor signalling towards CysLT1. In neutrophils, 15-epi-LXA₄ showed a moderate reduction of interleukin (IL)-8-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis but no effect on neutrophil survival was observed. In addition, CysLT1 antagonists were inactive in FPR2/ALX signalling or neutrophil assays. In conclusion, 15-epi-LXA₄ is not a functional agonist or an antagonist of FPR2/ALX or CysLT1, shows no effect on IL-8-induced neutrophil survival and produces only moderate inhibition in IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration. Our data do not support an anti-inflammatory role of 15-epi-LXA₄- FPR2/ALX interaction in IL-8-induced neutrophil inflammation. © 2013 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Scavenging of superoxide anion by phosphorylethanolamine: studies in human neutrophils and in a cell free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L I; Weiss, D; Prachand, S; Weitzman, S A

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of previous observations, we attempted to characterize the effects of various products of phospholipid hydrolysis on neutrophil (PMN) respiratory burst activity. We studied the effects of phosphorylcholine (PC) and phosphorylethanoline (PE) on superoxide anion production in PMN and in cell free system. We found that PE but not PC inhibited measured superoxide anion, but that this was not due to inhibition of cellular superoxide generation but to scavenging of generated superoxide anion. Further, utilizing a system based upon the photo-oxidation of O-dianisidine sensitized by riboflavin, we were able to determine that the scavenging effect of PE was not superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like but rather a general scavenging or glutathione (GSH)-like effect. These data underscore the importance of identifying the mechanism of inhibition of superoxide generation by putative inhibitors as being due to a direct cellular effect or to a scavenging property.

  17. Knowing About Human and Computer Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rahayu, Dewi Agushinta; Pratiwi, Dyah

    2008-01-01

    Human computer interaction is a study learning about human computer interaction and its task. Its principle is how about human and computer interactively done the task effectively. HCI is a mix study form technique and art and its involving principles, clues and methods for making evaluation from interactive system.

  18. Silver nanoparticles of 70 nm and 20 nm affect differently the biology of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Michelle; Simard, Jean-Christophe; Girard, Denis

    2016-05-01

    The influence of size of nanoparticles (NP), especially in regard to pulmonary toxicity, has been widely investigated. In general, NP with smaller diameters are more pro-inflammatory in vivo, at least in terms of neutrophil influx. Nevertheless, the influence of size of NP on polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) cell biology is poorly documented. In the study here, it was decided to determine if AgNP with a diameter of 70 nm (AgNP70) will alter the biology of human PMN similarly to AgNP20 previously reported to induce apoptosis and inhibit de novo protein synthesis. The results here indicated that, in contrast to AgNP20, AgNP70 delayed PMN apoptosis. However, both AgNP20 and AgNP70 inhibited de novo protein synthesis. Both forms of AgNP did not significantly increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but AgNP20 significantly increased the cell production of the CXCL8 chemokine (IL-8). In addition, AgNP20, but not AgNP70, induced the release of albumin and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9/gelatinase B) into culture supernatants. Consistent with this latter observation, gelatinase activity was increased by AgNP20, as assessed by zymography. From these outcomes, it is concluded that two NP with different initial diameters can possess similar - as well as distinct - biological properties in modulating human PMN functions. These outcomes are testimony to the complexity of the modes of action of NP at the cellular level.

  19. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S

    1998-01-01

    of patients with RA, and the cells are assumed to play a role in joint destruction in that disorder. Therefore, we examined whether neutrophils are a source of YKL-40. YKL-40 was found to colocalize and comobilize with lactoferrin (the most abundant protein of specific granules) but not with gelatinase...... in subcellular fractionation studies on stimulated and unstimulated neutrophils. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of YKL-40 and lactoferrin in specific granules of neutrophils. Immunohistochemistry on bone marrow cells showed that neutrophil precursors begin to synthesize...

  20. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol activates human neutrophils: critical role of its hydrolysis and de novo leukotriene B4 biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, François; Lefebvre, Julie S; Navarro, Pauline; Bouchard, Line; Ferland, Claudine; Lalancette-Hébert, Mélanie; Marsolais, David; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Although endocannabinoids are important players in nociception and obesity, their roles as immunomodulators remain elusive. The main endocannabinoids described to date, namely 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) and arachidonyl-ethanolamide (AEA), induce an intriguing profile of pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. This could relate to cell-specific cannabinoid receptor expression and/or the action of endocannabinoid-derived metabolites. Importantly, 2-AG and AEA comprise a molecule of arachidonic acid (AA) in their structure and are hydrolyzed rapidly. We postulated the following: 1) the released AA from endocannabinoid hydrolysis would be metabolized into eicosanoids; and 2) these eicosanoids would mediate some of the effects of endocannabinoids. To confirm these hypotheses, experiments were performed in which freshly isolated human neutrophils were treated with endocannabinoids. Unlike AEA, 2-AG stimulated myeloperoxidase release, kinase activation, and calcium mobilization by neutrophils. Although 2-AG did not induce the migration of neutrophils, it induced the release of a migrating activity for neutrophils. 2-AG also rapidly (1 min) induced a robust biosynthesis of leukotrienes, similar to that observed with AA. The effects of 2-AG were not mimicked nor prevented by cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists, respectively. Finally, the blockade of either 2-AG hydrolysis, leukotriene (LT) B(4) biosynthesis, or LTB(4) receptor 1 activation prevented all the effects of 2-AG on neutrophil functions. In conclusion, we demonstrated that 2-AG potently activates human neutrophils. This is the consequence of 2-AG hydrolysis, de novo LTB(4) biosynthesis, and an autocrine activation loop involving LTB(4) receptor 1.

  1. Prognostic Significance of Immunoreactive Neutrophil Elastase in Human Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up Results in 313 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Akizuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We have measured the concentration of immunoreactive neutrophil elastase (ir-NE in the tumor extracts of 313 primary human breast cancers. Sufficient time has elapsed, and we are now ready to analyze its prognostic value in human breast cancer. METHODS: ir-NE concentration in tumor extracts was determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that enables a rapid measurement of both free-form ir-NE and the α1-protease inhibitor-complexed form of ir-NE. We analyzed the prognostic value of this enzyme in human breast cancer in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Patients with breast cancer tissue containing a high concentration of ir-NE had poor survival compared to those with a low concentration of ir-NE at the cutoff point of 9.0 µg/100 mg protein (P = .0012, which had been previously determined in another group of 49 patients. Multivariate stepwise analysis selected lymph node status (P= .0004; relative risk = 1.46 and ir-NE concentration (P= .0013; relative risk = 1.43 as independent prognostic factors for recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor ir-NE concentration is an independent prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer who undergo curative surgery. This enzyme may play an active role in tumor progression that leads to metastasis in human breast cancer.

  2. Possible in vivo tolerance of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil to low-grade exercise-induced endotoxaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Camus

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the question of whether translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the blood could be involved in the process of exercise-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN activation, 12 healthy male subjects who took part in a sprint triathlon (1.5 km river swim, 40 km bicycle race, 10 km road race were studied. While there was no detectable amount of endotoxin in the blood samples drawn at rest, exercise was followed by the appearance of circulating endotoxin molecules at the end of competition in four subjects, and after one and 24 h recovery in three and seven athletes, respectively. The concentrations of plasma granulocyte myeloperoxidase ([MPO], were significantly higher immediately after exercise and one hour later than baseline values (P<0.001. This variable returned to pre-race levels the day after exercise, despite the presence of detectable amounts of LPS, at that time, in seven athletes. The absence of significant correlation (r=0.26;P=0.383 and temporal association between [MPO]and plasma endotoxin levels led us to conclude that endotoxaemia was not involved in the process of exercise-induced PMN degranulation observed in our subjects.

  3. Increased proliferation and decreased membrane permeability as defense mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum against human neutrophilic peptide-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Isik, Gülden; Firatli, Erhan; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-12-01

    Human neutrophilic peptides (HNPs) constitute a class of host defense molecules, which contribute to the non-oxidative killing of bacteria and other microorganisms. Since the adaptability is crucial to bacterial survival in changing environments, it is of interest to know how Fusobacterium nucleatum, the major bridge organism connecting early and late colonizers in dental biofilms, defends itself against HNPs. This study aimed to examine the planktonic growth, membrane permeability, and biofilm formation characteristics as defense mechanisms of F. nucleatum against HNP-1. In all experiments, the type strain of F. nucleatum (ssp. nucleatum ATCC 25586) and two clinical strains (ssp. nucleatum AHN 9508 and ssp. polymorphum AHN 9910) were used. Planktonic growth (measured in colony forming units), capsular polysaccharide production (visualized by Ziehl-Neelsen stain), membrane permeability (demonstrated as N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake), biofilm formation, and established biofilm development (measured as total mass and polysaccharide levels) were analyzed in the presence of 0 μg/ml (control), 1 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, and 10 μg/ml of HNP-1. Planktonic growth of the strains AHN 9508 and ATCC 25586 were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the presence of HNP-1, while their membrane permeability decreased (p<0.005) in the planktonic form. HNP-1 decreased the biofilm formation of the strains ATCC 25586 and AHN 9910, whereas it increased the growth of the strain AHN 9508 in established biofilms. Capsule formation and polysaccharide production were not observed in any strain. We conclude that the inhibition of the membrane permeability and the increase in planktonic and established biofilm growth could act as bacterial defense mechanisms against neutrophilic defensins. In addition, this strain-dependent survival ability against HNP-1 may explain the variation in the virulence of different F. nucleatum strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction between integrin alpha9beta1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) inhibits neutrophil apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ewan A; Douglas, Mike R; Wong, See Heng; Ross, Emma J; Curnow, S John; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, Ed; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Lord, Janet M; Salmon, Mike; Buckley, Christopher D

    2006-02-01

    According to the prevailing paradigm, neutrophils are short-lived cells that undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 24 hours of their release from the bone marrow. However, neutrophil survival can be significantly prolonged within inflamed tissue by cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and hypoxia. During screening experiments aimed at identifying the effect of the adhesive microenvironment on neutrophil survival, we found that VCAM-1 (CD106) was able to delay both spontaneous and Fas-induced apoptosis. VCAM-1-mediated survival was as efficient as that induced by the cytokine IFN-beta and provided an additive, increased delay in apoptosis when given in combination with IFN-beta. VCAM-1 delivered its antiapoptotic effect through binding the integrin alpha9beta1. The alpha9beta1 signaling pathway shares significant features with the IFN-beta survival signaling pathway, requiring PI3 kinase, NF-kappaB activation, as well as de novo protein synthesis, but the kinetics of NF-kappaB activation by VCAM-1 were slower and more sustained compared with IFN-beta. This study demonstrates a novel functional role for alpha9beta1 in neutrophil biology and suggests that adhesive signaling pathways provide an important extrinsic checkpoint for the resolution of inflammatory responses in tissues.

  5. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Jancinova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues.

  6. Mitochondrial membrane potential in human neutrophils is maintained by complex III activity in the absence of supercomplex organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. van Raam (Bram); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); F.R.C. de Wit (Frank); D. Roos (Dirk); A.J. Verhoeven (Arthur); T.W. Kuijpers (Taco W.)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Neutrophils depend mainly on glycolysis for their enegry provision. Their mitochondria maintain a membrace potential (ΔΨm), which is usually generated by the repiratory chain complexes. We investigated the source of ΔΨm in neutrophils, as compared to peripheral blood

  7. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation: DRUGGABILITY OF THE SMALL GTPase Rab27a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-12-09

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  8. Aspirin-triggered lipoxins override the apoptosis-delaying action of serum amyloid A in human neutrophils: a novel mechanism for resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kebir, Driss; József, Levente; Khreiss, Tarek; Pan, Wanling; Petasis, Nicos A; Serhan, Charles N; Filep, János G

    2007-07-01

    Elevated plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as a marker and predictor of inflammatory diseases. SAA regulates leukocyte activation; however, it is not known whether it also modulates neutrophil apoptosis, which is critical to the optimal expression and resolution of inflammation. Culture of human neutrophils with SAA (0.1-20 microg/ml) markedly prolonged neutrophil longevity by delaying constitutive apoptosis. SAA evoked concurrent activation of the ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, leading to phosphorylation of BAD at Ser(112) and Ser(136), respectively, and to prevention of collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These actions were abrogated by pharmacological inhibition of the formyl peptide receptor, ERK or PI3K. Furthermore, aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) (15-epi-LXA(4)) and its stable analog 15-epi-16-p-fluorophenoxy-LXA(4), which binds to the same receptor as SAA, effectively overrode the antiapoptosis signal from SAA even when neutrophils were treated with 15-epi-LXA(4) at either 1 or 4 h postculture with SAA. 15-Epi-LXA(4) itself did not affect neutrophil survival and apoptosis. Our results indicate that SAA at clinically relevant concentrations promotes neutrophil survival by suppressing the apoptotic machinery, an effect that can be opposed by 15-epi-LXA(4). The opposing actions of SAA and aspirin-triggered 15-epi-LXA(4) may contribute to the local regulation of exacerbation and resolution of inflammation, respectively.

  9. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S

    1991-01-01

    of LPS. After preincubation, the chemotaxis and chemiluminescence of neutrophils to various stimuli were determined. It was shown that LPS from different strains did not exert the same degree of regulatory effect on neutrophil functions. LPS from strain 174-O:9 exerted the most pronounced effect...... on neutrophil function seen as inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis toward the chemotactic peptide f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and priming of the cells for less than or equal to 8-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence response to f-Met-Leu-Phe. Conversely, LPS from strain 1118-O:3 had...... no effect on neutrophil chemotaxis and a slight effect on chemiluminescence. The major differences in chemical composition of the LPS from these two strains are in the rhamnose and heptose content of the O side chain and in the alanine content of the core region. These data indicate that chemical...

  10. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  11. Characterization of human septin interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Kirstin; Bartsch, Ingrid; Bläser, Susanne; Busse, Anja; Busse, Eileen; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    Septins constitute a group of GTP binding proteins that assemble into homo- and hetero-oligomeric complexes and filaments. These higher order septin structures are thought to function like scaffolds and/or diffusion barriers serving as spatial localizers for many proteins with key roles in cell polarity and cell cycle progression. In this study, we extensively characterized septin interaction partners using yeast two-hybrid and three-hybrid systems in addition to precipitation analyses in platelets. As a result, we identified human hetero-trimeric septin complexes on a large scale, which had been only postulated in the past. In addition, we illustrated roles of SEPT9 that might contribute to hetero-trimeric septin complex formation. SEPT9 can substitute for septins of the SEPT2 group and partially for SEPT7. Mutagenic analyses revealed that mutation of a potential phosphorylation site in SEPT7 (Y318) regulates the interaction with other septins. We identified several septin-septin interactions in platelets suggesting a regulatory role of diverse septin complexes in platelet function.

  12. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Syed Musthafa, Khadar; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-05-27

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125-250 µg/mL was 58.48%-50.28% and 69.13%-35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  13. Kinin B1 receptor regulates interactions between neutrophils and endothelial cells by modulating the levels of Mac-1, LFA-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Carlos D; Matus, Carola E; Pavicic, Francisca; Sarmiento, Jose; Hidalgo, Maria A; Burgos, Rafael A; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    Kinins are pro-inflammatory peptides that mimic the cardinal features of inflammation. We examined the concept that expression levels of endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and neutrophil integrins Mac-1 and LFA-1 are modulated by the kinin B1 receptor (B1R) agonist, Lys-des[Arg(9)]bradykinin (LDBK). Stimulation of endothelial cells with LDBK increased the levels of ICAM-1 mRNA transcripts/protein, and also of E-selectin and platelet endothelial adhesion molecule-1. ICAM-1 levels increased in a magnitude comparable with that produced by TNF-α. This stimulatory effect was reduced when endothelial cells, which had been previously transfected with a B1R small interfering RNA, were stimulated with LDBK, under comparable conditions. Similarly, LDBK produced a significant increase in protein levels of LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins in human neutrophils, an effect that was reversed by pretreatment of cells with 10 µg/ml cycloheximide or a B1R antagonist. Functional experiments performed with post-confluent monolayers of endothelial cells stimulated with LDBK and neutrophils primed with TNF-α, and vice versa, resulted in enhanced adhesiveness between both cells. Neutralizing Abs to ICAM-1 and Mac-1 reduced the adhesion between them. Our results indicate that kinin B1R is a novel modulator that promotes adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, critically enhancing the movement of neutrophils from the circulation to sites of inflammation. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. From Human-Computer Interaction to Human-Robot Social Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Toumi, Tarek; Abdelmadjid ZIDANI

    2014-01-01

    Human-Robot Social Interaction became one of active research fields in which researchers from different areas propose solutions and directives leading robots to improve their interactions with humans. In this paper we propose to introduce works in both human robot interaction and human computer interaction and to make a bridge between them, i.e. to integrate emotions and capabilities concepts of the robot in human computer model to become adequate for human robot interaction and discuss chall...

  15. Interpersonal Couplings in Human Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Kevin; Riley, Michael A.

    As inherently social beings people routinely interact with others. Interpersonal activities such as dancing, conversation, or team sports require people to coordinate at several different levels, ranging from the coordination of physical movements and physiological states of the body to the coordination of mental states and cognitive or linguistic activity. One of the challenges confronted by researchers in this interdisciplinary field has been to find ways to objectively quantify interpersonal coupling on the basis of brief, noisy, nonstationary, and complex time series of human behavioral sequences. Given their robustness to these challenges, recurrence-based strategies have played a very important role in the development of this field of research. This chapter provides a review of current behavioral, cognitive, and physiological research that has used recurrence methods to quantify interpersonal coupling.

  16. PARTICIPATION OF TLR4 IN ENGULFMENT OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BY HUMAN BLOOD NEUTROPHILS IN PRESENCE OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zubova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. TLR4 is a key player in signaling system of host cells. Possible role of TLR4 is actively discussed, e.g. its significance for phagocytosis. A capacity of neutrophils to engulf FITC-labeled E. coli bacteria upon activation with LPS of different origin was studied in presence of anti-TLR4 Mab’s (HTA125 clone. It was shown that, in whole blood, TLR4 does not play any essential role in engulfment of bacteria by the neutrophils. Phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood increases increased after their priming with E. coli endotoxins. LPS from Rb. сapsulatus did not affect phagocytosis. In presence of endotoxins, the degree of TLR4 involvement in neutrophil phagocytosis depends on LPS structure.

  17. Acetylcholine stimulation of human neutrophil chemotactic activity is directly inhibited by tiotropium involving Gq and ERK-1/2 regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurai M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiotropium, a long-acting anticholinergic, may improve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by mechanisms beyond bronchodilatation. We tested the hypothesis that tiotropium may act as an anti-inflammatory mediator by directly acting on and inhibiting human neutrophil chemotactic activity (NCA that is promoted by acetylcholine (ACh exposure. ACh treatment increased NCA in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.001 and tiotropium pretreatment reduced ACh stimulation (dose effect; 0 to 1000 nM; p < 0.001. Selective muscarinic receptor inhibitors demonstrated that subtype-3 (M3 receptor plays a role in NCA regulation. In addition, NCA that was stimulated by cevimeline (M3 agonist and pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT, M3 coupled Gq agonist. However, the increased NCA to cevimeline and PMT was reduced by tiotropium pretreatment (p < 0.001. ACh treatment stimulated ERK-1/2 activation by promoting protein phosphorylation and tiotropium reduced this effect (p < 0.01. In addition, pretreatment of the cells with a specific MEK-1/2 kinase inhibitor reduced ACh stimulated NCA (p < 0.01. Together these results demonstrated that cholinergic stimulation of NCA is effectively inhibited by tiotropium and is governed by a mechanism involving M3 coupled Gq signaling and downstream ERK signaling. This study further demonstrates that tiotropium may act as an anti-inflammatory agent in lung disease.

  18. Rapid neutrophil adhesion to activated endothelium mediated by GMP-140.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J G; Bevilacqua, M P; Moore, K L; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M; Kim, J M; Bliss, G A; Zimmerman, G A; McEver, R P

    1990-02-22

    Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140), a membrane glycoprotein of platelet and endothelial cell secretory granules, is rapidly redistributed to the plasma membrane during cellular activation and degranulation. Also known as PADGEM protein, GMP-140 is structurally related to two molecules involved in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium: ELAM-1, a cytokine-inducible endothelial cell receptor for neutrophils, and the MEL-14 lymphocyte homing receptor. These three proteins define a new gene family, termed selectins, each of which contains an N-terminal lectin domain, followed by an epidermal growth factor-like module, a variable number of repeating units related to those in complement-binding proteins, a transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. Here we demonstrate that GMP-140 can mediate leukocyte adhesion, thus establishing a functional similarity with the other selectins. Human neutrophils and promyelocytic HL-60 cells bind specifically to COS cells transfected with GMP-140 complementary DNA and to microtitre wells coated with purified GMP-140. Cell binding does not require active neutrophil metabolism but is dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Within minutes after stimulation with phorbol esters or histamine, human endothelial cells become adhesive for neutrophils; this interaction is inhibited by antibodies to GMP-140. Thus, GMP-140 expressed by activated endothelium might promote rapid neutrophil targeting to sites of acute inflammation.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defensins and evasion of neutrophil killing via the novel virulence factor MprF is based on modification of membrane lipids with L-lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peschel, A.; Jack, R.W.; Otto, M.; Collins, L.V.; Staubitz, P.; Nicholson, G.; Kalbacher, H.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Jung, G.; Tarkowski, A.; Kessel, K.P.M. van; Strijp, J.A.G. van

    2001-01-01

    Defensins, antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system, protect human mucosal epithelia and skin against microbial infections and are produced in large amounts by neutrophils. The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is insensitive to defensins by virtue of an unknown resistance

  20. Peptide conjugated cellulose nanocrystals with sensitive human neutrophil elastase sensor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    In chronic wounds, elevated human neutorphil elastase (HNE) is a destructive protease that has been proposed as a biomarker. Numerous wound dressing designs have been introduced in an effort to lower HNE levels. The clinical detection of HNE as a point of care biomarker or an in situ colorimetric ...

  1. Effects of pyrrophenone, an inhibitor of group IVA phospholipase A2, on eicosanoid and PAF biosynthesis in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, N; Picard, S; Lemieux, L; Pouliot, M; Bourgoin, S G; Borgeat, P

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The biosynthesis of leukotrienes (LT) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) involves the release of their respective precursors, arachidonic acid (AA) and lyso-PAF by the group IVA PLA2 (cPLA2α). This paper aims at characterizing the inhibitory properties of the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone on eicosanoids and PAF in human neutrophils (PMN). Experimental Approach: Freshly isolated human PMN were activated with physiological and pharmacological agents (fMLP, PAF, exogenous AA, A23187 and thapsigargin) in presence and absence of the cPLA2α inhibitor pyrrophenone and biosynthesis of LT, PAF, and PGE2 was measured. Key Results: Pyrrophenone potently inhibited LT, PGE2 and PAF biosynthesis in PMN with IC50s in the range of 1–20 nM. These inhibitory effects of pyrrophenone were specific (the consequence of substrate deprivation), as shown by the reversal of inhibition by exogenous AA and lyso-PAF. Comparative assessment of pyrrophenone, methyl-arachidonoyl-fluoro-phosphonate (MAFP) and arachidonoyl-trifluoromethylketone (AACOCF3) demonstrated that pyrrophenone was more specific and 100-fold more potent than MAFP and AACOCF3 for the inhibition of LT biosynthesis in A23187-activated PMN. The inhibitory effect of pyrrophenone on LT biosynthesis was reversible as LT biosynthesis was recovered when pyrrophenone-treated PMN were washed with autologous plasma. No alteration of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in fMLP-activated PMN was observed with up to 10 μM pyrrophenone, suggesting that the cPLA2α inhibitor does not directly inhibit PLD. Conclusions and Implications: Pyrrophenone is a more potent and specific cPLA2α inhibitor than MAFP and AACOCF3 and represents an excellent pharmacological tool to investigate the biosynthesis and the biological roles of eicosanoids and PAF. PMID:16967052

  2. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  3. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported...... that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor......A controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus....

  4. Unsaturated long-chain fatty acids induce the respiratory burst of human neutrophils and monocytes in whole blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osthaus Wilhelm A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly recognized that infectious complications in patients treated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN may be caused by altered immune responses. Neutrophils and monocytes are the first line of defence against bacterial and fungal infection through superoxide anion production during the respiratory burst. To characterize the impact of three different types of lipid solutions that are applied as part of TPN formulations, we investigated the unstimulated respiratory burst activation of neutrophils and monocytes in whole blood. Methods Whole blood samples were incubated with LCT (Intralipid®, LCT/MCT (Lipofundin® and LCT-MUFA (ClinOleic® in three concentrations (0.06, 0.3 and 0.6 mg ml-1 for time periods up to one hour. Hydrogen peroxide production during the respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes was measured by flow cytometry. Results LCT and LCT-MUFA induced a hydrogen peroxide production in neutrophils and monocytes without presence of a physiological stimulus in contrast to LCT/MCT. Conclusion We concluded that parenteral nutrition containing unsaturated oleic (C18:1 and linoleic (C18:2 acid can induce respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes, resulting in an elevated risk of tissue damage by the uncontrolled production of reactive oxygen species. Contradictory observations reported in previous studies may in part be the result of different methods used to determine hydrogen peroxide production.

  5. Equine sperm-neutrophil binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdorrahman S; Madill, Scott; Foster, Douglas N; Troedsson, Mats H T

    2015-04-01

    When mares are inseminated repeatedly, protein molecules from the seminal plasma (SP) prevent sperm-neutrophil binding and reduced fertility. The molecule(s) responsible for sperm-neutrophil binding is not known and the identification of beneficial SP proteins is complicated by their large numbers and abundant variation. We examined several important aspects of sperm-neutrophil binding to ultimately facilitate the identification and isolation of the molecule(s) responsible. First, we raised anti-equine P-selectin antibodies to determine the involvement of this adhesion molecule in sperm-neutrophil binding. While these antibodies identified equine P-selectin, they did not inhibit sperm-neutrophil binding. However, acrosome-reacted equine sperm expressed a molecule similar to the ligand recognition unit of P-selectin. Second, we attempted to characterize SP protein binding to equine sperm and gauge their affinity. Biotinylated SP proteins were incubated with fresh sperm, washed over a viscous medium, electrophoresed, and probed with avidin. Several SP proteins bound to sperm with a strong affinity to withstand these treatments. This finding may prove valuable for future attempts to identify and characterize specific SP molecules. Lastly, we compared the secretions from male sex organs/glands on sperm motility, sperm-neutrophil binding, and their protein profile. We expected fewer proteins from individual organs/glands, which would facilitate isolation and identification of target molecules. While each secretion had a varying effect on motility and sperm-neutrophil binding, the protein profile was as complex as that seen in whole SP, indicating that collection of proteins from individual sources will not facilitate this work. Together, these experiments answer several important questions related to sperm-neutrophil binding, sperm-SP proteins interaction, and the complexity of the SP proteome. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  6. Human mucosal leishmaniasis: neutrophils infiltrate areas of tissue damage that express high levels of Th17-related cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Santos, Claire S; Cardoso, Cristina R; de Andrade, José; Dos Santos, Washington L C; Clarêncio, Jorge; Silva, João S; Borges, Valeria M; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Claudia I; Barral, Aldina

    2010-10-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is characterised by severe tissue destruction. Herein, we evaluated the involvement of the IL-17-type response in the inflammatory infiltrate of biopsy specimens from 17 ML patients. IL-17 and IL-17-inducing cytokines (IL-1β, IL-23, IL-6 and TGF-β) were detected by immunohistochemistry in ML patients. IL-17(+) cells exhibited CD4(+), CD8(+) or CD14(+) phenotypes, and numerous IL-17(+) cells co-expressed the CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Neutrophils, a hallmark of Th17-mediated inflammation, were regularly detected in necrotic and perinecrotic areas and stained positive for neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and MMP-9. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of Th17 cells in ML lesions associated with neutrophils in areas of tissue injury and suggest that IL-17 is involved in ML pathogenesis.

  7. Enhancing Learning through Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Elspeth, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing Learning Through Human Computer Interaction is an excellent reference source for human computer interaction (HCI) applications and designs. This "Premier Reference Source" provides a complete analysis of online business training programs and e-learning in the higher education sector. It describes a range of positive outcomes for linking…

  8. The Self-Organization of Human Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Rick; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Duran, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    , processes, and contexts can be integrated into a broader account of human interaction. By introducing and utilizing basic concepts of self-organization and synergy, we review empirical work that shows how human interaction is flexible and adaptive and structures itself incrementally during unfolding...

  9. Themes in human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Mark Pejtersen, Annelise; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. This paper raises themes that are seen as some of the challenges facing the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design. The paper has its offset in the discussions and writings that have been dominant within the IFIP Working Group on Human Work Interaction...... Design (name HWID) through the last two and half years since the commencement of this Working Group. The paper thus provides an introduction to the theory and empirical evidence that lie behind the combination of empirical work studies and interaction design. It also recommends key topics for future...... research in Human Work Interaction Design....

  10. Improving healthcare through human city interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Woolliscroft, Tim; Polovina, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The study of information technology has given insufficient focus to a) the structural factors and b) the community perspective. As information systems become increasingly integrated with human systems these wider influences are more important than ever. Human city interaction concepts including their interplay with cyber-physical systems and social computing are appropriated to healthcare. Through Structuration Theory, insights are given into how healthcare through the human city interaction ...

  11. Elevated glucose concentrations promote receptor-independent activation of adherent human neutrophils: an experimental and computational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kummer, Ursula; Zobeley, Jürgen; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    of NO and superoxide formation were observed. However, these changes were not observed for sorbitol, a nonmetabolizable carbohydrate. Glucose transport appears to be important in this process as phloretin interferes with the glucose-specific receptor-independent activation of neutrophils. However, LY83583...

  12. Selection of reliable reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in human T cells and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledderose, Carola; Heyn, Jens; Limbeck, Elisabeth; Kreth, Simone

    2011-10-20

    The choice of reliable reference genes is a prerequisite for valid results when analyzing gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). This method is frequently applied to study gene expression patterns in immune cells, yet a thorough validation of potential reference genes is still lacking for most leukocyte subtypes and most models of their in vitro stimulation. In the current study, we evaluated the expression stability of common reference genes in two widely used cell culture models-anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells and lipopolysaccharide stimulated neutrophils-as well as in unselected untreated leukocytes. The mRNA expression of 17 (T cells), 7 (neutrophils) or 8 (unselected leukocytes) potential reference genes was quantified by reverse transcription qPCR, and a ranking of the preselected candidate genes according to their expression stability was calculated using the programs NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper. IPO8, RPL13A, TBP and SDHA were identified as suitable reference genes in T cells. TBP, ACTB and SDHA were stably expressed in neutrophils. TBP and SDHA were also the most stable genes in untreated total blood leukocytes. The critical impact of reference gene selection on the estimated target gene expression is demonstrated for IL-2 and FIH expression in T cells. The study provides a shortlist of suitable reference genes for normalization of gene expression data in unstimulated and stimulated T cells, unstimulated and stimulated neutrophils and in unselected leukocytes.

  13. Selection of reliable reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in human T cells and neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledderose Carola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of reliable reference genes is a prerequisite for valid results when analyzing gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. This method is frequently applied to study gene expression patterns in immune cells, yet a thorough validation of potential reference genes is still lacking for most leukocyte subtypes and most models of their in vitro stimulation. In the current study, we evaluated the expression stability of common reference genes in two widely used cell culture models-anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells and lipopolysaccharide stimulated neutrophils-as well as in unselected untreated leukocytes. Results The mRNA expression of 17 (T cells, 7 (neutrophils or 8 (unselected leukocytes potential reference genes was quantified by reverse transcription qPCR, and a ranking of the preselected candidate genes according to their expression stability was calculated using the programs NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper. IPO8, RPL13A, TBP and SDHA were identified as suitable reference genes in T cells. TBP, ACTB and SDHA were stably expressed in neutrophils. TBP and SDHA were also the most stable genes in untreated total blood leukocytes. The critical impact of reference gene selection on the estimated target gene expression is demonstrated for IL-2 and FIH expression in T cells. Conclusions The study provides a shortlist of suitable reference genes for normalization of gene expression data in unstimulated and stimulated T cells, unstimulated and stimulated neutrophils and in unselected leukocytes.

  14. Azurophil granule proteins constitute the major mycobactericidal proteins in human neutrophils and enhance the killing of mycobacteria in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna Jena

    Full Text Available Pathogenic mycobacteria reside in, and are in turn controlled by, macrophages. However, emerging data suggest that neutrophils also play a critical role in innate immunity to tuberculosis, presumably by their different antibacterial granule proteins. In this study, we purified neutrophil azurophil and specific granules and systematically analyzed the antimycobacterial activity of some purified azurophil and specific granule proteins against M. smegmatis, M. bovis-BCG and M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Using gel overlay and colony forming unit assays we showed that the defensin-depleted azurophil granule proteins (AZP were more active against mycobacteria compared to other granule proteins and cytosolic proteins. The proteins showing antimycobacterial activity were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate that the AZP disintegrate bacterial cell membrane resulting in killing of mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of AZP to murine macrophage RAW 264.7, THP-1 and peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages significantly reduced the intracellular survival of mycobacteria without exhibiting cytotoxic activity on macrophages. Immunofluorescence studies showed that macrophages actively endocytose neutrophil granular proteins. Treatment with AZP resulted in increase in co-localization of BCG containing phagosomes with lysosomes but not in increase of autophagy. These data demonstrate that neutrophil azurophil proteins may play an important role in controlling intracellular survival of mycobacteria in macrophages.

  15. Human-computer interaction in multitask situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Human-computer interaction in multitask decisionmaking situations is considered, and it is proposed that humans and computers have overlapping responsibilities. Queueing theory is employed to model this dynamic approach to the allocation of responsibility between human and computer. Results of simulation experiments are used to illustrate the effects of several system variables including number of tasks, mean time between arrivals of action-evoking events, human-computer speed mismatch, probability of computer error, probability of human error, and the level of feedback between human and computer. Current experimental efforts are discussed and the practical issues involved in designing human-computer systems for multitask situations are considered.

  16. Original paper The effect of leptin on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils cultured in synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Gajewski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Leptin is a hormone responsible for nutritional status and immune competence coordination. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA increased leptin levels were observed in both serum and synovial fluid. Its influence on development of the disease still remains unclear. So far, research on leptin’s influence on the emission of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI measured with chemiluminescence (CL has provided unclear and contradictory results. In this study, we evaluated the influence of leptin on oxidative activity of neutrophils isolated from blood of healthy volunteers and cultured in different amounts of synovial fluid (SF from patients with RA. Material and methods: Neutrophils’ oxidative metabolism was measured by two types of CL. The first one, luminol-dependent CL (CL-lum, allows one to determine phagocytic activity and the level of ROI generated in a myeloperoxidase-dependent manner. The second method used was lucigenin-dependent CL (CL-luc, which monitors ROI production dependent on the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex located in the cell membranes of neutrophils and enables one to determine the scope of extracellular ROI emission. Results: Neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan show a decrease in the level of CL-lum, proportional to the increasing concentration of both SF and serum collected from healthy donors. The observed effect of decreased CL-lum may, therefore, be dependent on the physical conditions (viscosity of fluids used. None of these experiments showed any effect of leptin on the level of CL-lum. Conclusions : The present study showed that leptin does not affect the level of any of the CL types in inactive neutrophils incubated in normal serum, and it does not affect the level of oxidative activity in resting neutrophils incubated with SF. However, leptin influences extracellular ROI emission (measured by CL-luc. Leptin reduces extracellular emission of ROI, and this effect is dependent on concentration and duration

  17. Neutrophil Segmentation Index Anomaly in Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neutrophil lobe count was conducted on the blood films of 262 patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Virus (AIDS) and 204 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody-negative apparently healthy controls. The count for each group was evaluated for neutrophil segmentation index by standard method.

  18. Mixed reality and human-robot interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2011-01-01

    MR technologies play an increasing role in different aspects of human-robot interactions. The visual combination of digital contents with real working spaces creates a simulated environment that is set out to enhance these aspects. This book presents and discusses fundamental scientific issues, technical implementations, lab testing, and industrial applications and case studies of Mixed Reality in Human-Robot Interaction. It is a reference book that not only acts as meta-book in the field that defines and frames Mixed Reality use in Human-Robot Interaction, but also addresses up-coming trends

  19. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutrophil serine proteases mediate inflammatory cell recruitment by glomerular endothelium and progression towards dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuravi, Sahithi J; Bevins, Anne; Satchell, Simon C; Harper, Lorraine; Williams, Julie M; Rainger, G Ed; Savage, Caroline O S; Tull, Samantha P

    2012-12-01

    Neutrophil recruitment into glomerular tissues and reduced capillary wall integrity has been implicated in the development of vasculitic glomerulonephritis (VGN). This study investigated the stages and mechanisms through which neutrophil serine proteases (SPs), proteinase 3 (PR3) or elastase contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Protease-induced damage to endothelium and adhesion molecule upregulation was measured by viability assays and ELISA. Neutrophil/platelet adhesion to human glomerular and umbilical vein endothelium was assessed using in vitro adhesion assays. PR3 and elastase (1 µg/mL, 2 h) significantly induced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells (EnC) whilst PR3 also enhanced platelet-EnC interactions. This neutrophil adhesion was associated with enhanced P-selectin expression and required CXCL8 receptor involvement, and could be inhibited by blocking the P-selectin ligand PSGL-1. SPs induced damage in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, decreasing cell monolayer integrity followed by cell membrane integrity, inducing caspase-3 activation and p21 cleavage. However, SPs caused significant EnC damage with increasing concentrations and prolonged exposures. Neutrophil SPs induce a pro-adhesive phenotype in glomerular endothelium primarily by inducing neutrophil and platelet adhesion that transits to dysfunction after high/prolonged exposures. Dysregulated release of these enzymes within glomeruli may contribute to injury during diseases such as VGN.

  1. Chemokine- and adhesion-dependent survival of neutrophils after transmigration through cytokine-stimulated endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, Helen M; Lord, Janet M; Wang, Ke-Qing; Rainger, G Ed; Buckley, Christopher D; Nash, Gerard B

    2006-04-01

    We examined the fate of neutrophils following transmigration through an endothelial monolayer cultured on "Transwell" membrane filters. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with increasing doses of tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased the efficiency of transmigration and markedly reduced apoptosis among the transmigrated neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. Apoptosis was also inhibited after transmigration of neutrophils through HUVEC stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1beta but not so effectively after chemotaxis through unstimulated HUVEC driven by IL-8 added below the filter. Inhibition of beta2-integrin binding after transmigration or coating the lower chamber with a nonadhesive polymer (polyhydroxyl-ethyl-methacrylate) abrogated neutrophil survival. Although integrin engagement during migration itself was not essential to inhibit apoptosis, activation of neutrophils through CXC chemokine receptors was necessary. Quite brief exposure to the HUVEC (30-120 min) was effective in reducing subsequent apoptosis, although if coincubation with the HUVEC were prolonged, neutrophil apoptosis was reduced further. Neutralization of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor inhibited this additional effect. Thus, a complex interplay between migration- and activation-dependent signals and adhesive interaction in tissue may combine to effectively prolong the survival of neutrophils recruited during inflammation.

  2. Effects of interferon-γ and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on antifungal activity of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils against Candida albicans grown as biofilms or planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, Alphaspasia; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Georgiadou, Elpiniki; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-09-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of biofilm-related infections. As Candida biofilms are recalcitrant to host defenses, we sought to determine the effects of interferon-γ and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, on the antifungal activities of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) against C. albicans biofilms, using an in vitro biofilm model. Priming of PMNs by these cytokines augmented fungal damage of planktonic cells; however, priming of PMNs did not have the same effect against Candida biofilms. Biofilm phenotype appears to play an important role in protecting C. albicans from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments are presented along with a list of attendees. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the state-of-technology and level of maturity of several areas in human-computer interaction and to provide guidelines for focused future research leading to effective use of these facilities in the design/fabrication and operation of future high-performance engineering systems.

  4. Hypertonic saline resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock does not decrease in vivo neutrophil interactions with endothelium in the blood-brain microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wanfeng; Marks, Joshua A; Sanati, Paymon; Sims, Carrie; Sarani, Babak; Smith, Douglas H; Pascual, Jose L

    2011-08-01

    Resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock with isotonic crystalloids has been shown to activate polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Although hypertonic saline (HTS) can reduce PMN activation and interactions with endothelial cells (EC) in systemic microvascular beds, no data exist demonstrating that the same occurs in the unique blood-brain barrier microcirculation. We hypothesized that resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock with HTS would blunt brain in vivo PMN-EC interactions. Wistar rats (250-350 g) underwent craniotomy and placement of a window for live intravital viewing of pial vessels. Twenty animals were bled to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mm Hg to 35 mm Hg for 1 hour and resuscitated with shed blood and either 5% HTS (6 mL/kg) or Ringer's lactate (RL) (2× shed blood volume). Circulating rhodamine-6G-labeled PMN in pial venules were captured by videomicroscopy at baseline (preshock), end of the shock period, after resuscitation, and every 15 minutes to 30 minutes for 2 hours. Hemodynamics and arterial gases were monitored. Off-line footage analysis allowed comparisons of PMN-EC interactions between groups. Animals in both groups developed significant metabolic acidosis (p nature of the blood-brain interface.

  5. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 1. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces ... The aim of the present study is to compare the behaviours of neutrophils in direct contact with different Ti surfaces. Isolated human neutrophils were placed into contact with Ti discs, ...

  6. LPS-induced galectin-3 oligomerization results in enhancement of neutrophil activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise Lopes Fermino

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal 3 is a glycan-binding protein that can be secreted by activated macrophages and mast cells at inflammation sites and plays an important role in inflammatory diseases caused by Bacteria and their products, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS. Although it is well established that Gal 3 can interact with LPS, the pathophysiological importance of LPS/Gal 3 interactions is not fully understood. Data presented herein demonstrate for the first time that the interaction of Gal 3, either via its carbohydrate binding C-terminal domain or via its N-terminal part, with LPS from different bacterial strains, enhances the LPS-mediated neutrophil activation in vitro. Gal 3 allowed low LPS concentrations (1 µg/mL without serum, 1 ng/mL with serum to upregulate CD11b expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation on human neutrophils in vitro and drastically enhanced the binding efficiency of LPS to the neutrophil surface. These effects required LPS preincubation with Gal 3, before neutrophil stimulation and involved specific Gal 3/LPS interaction. A C-terminal Gal-3 fragment, which retains the lectin domain but lacks the N-terminal part, was still able to bind both to Escherichia coli LPS and to neutrophils, but had lost the ability to enhance neutrophil response to LPS. This result emphasizes the importance of an N-terminus-mediated Gal 3 oligomerization induced by its interaction with LPS. Finally we demonstrated that Balb/C mice were more susceptible to LPS-mediated shock when LPS was pretreated with Gal 3. Altogether, these results suggest that multimeric interactions between Gal 3 oligomers and LPS potentiate its pro-inflammatory effects on neutrophils.

  7. CFP-10 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Selectively Activates Human Neutrophils through a Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive Chemotactic Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Welin, Amanda; Björnsdottir, Halla; Winther, Malene; Christenson, Karin; Oprea, Tudor; Karlsson, Anna; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Bylund, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, neutrophils are massively recruited to the lungs, but the role of these cells in combating the infection is poorly understood. Through a type VII secretion system, M. tuberculosis releases a heterodimeric protein complex, containing a 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6) and a 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP-10), that is essential for virulence. Whereas the ESAT-6 component possesses multiple virulence-related activities, no direc...

  8. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravati, Gianluca; Gatteschi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  9. Neutrophil mediated IFN activation in the bone marrow alters B cell development in human and murine SLE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Arumugam; Bauer, Jason W; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Meednu, Nida; Barnard, Jennifer; Owen, Teresa; Cistrone, Christopher; Bird, Anna; Rabinovich, Alfred; Nevarez, Sarah; Knight, Jason S.; Dedrick, Russell; Rosenberg, Alexander; Wei, Chungwen; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Liesveld, Jane; Sanz, Inaki; Baechler, Emily; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Anolik, Jennifer H

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of type I interferon (IFN) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report the presence of IFN activation in SLE bone marrow (BM), as measured by an IFN gene signature, increased IFN regulated chemokines, and direct production of IFN by BM resident cells, associated with profound changes in B cell development. The majority of SLE patients had an IFN signature in the BM that was more pronounced than the paired peripheral blood (PB) and correlated with both higher autoantibodies and disease activity. Pronounced alterations in B cell development were noted in SLE in the presence of an IFN signature with a reduction in the fraction of pro/pre B cells suggesting an inhibition in early B cell development and an expansion of B cells at the transitional (T2) stage. These B cell changes strongly correlated with an increase in BAFF and APRIL expression in the IFN high BM. Furthermore, we found that BM neutrophils in SLE were prime producers of IFN-α and B cell factors. In NZM lupus-prone mice similar changes in B cell development were observed and mediated by IFN, given abrogation in NZM mice lacking type I IFN receptor. BM neutrophils were abundant, responsive to and producers of IFN, in close proximity to B cells. These results indicate that the BM is an important but previously unrecognized target organ in SLE with neutrophil mediated IFN activation and alterations in B cell ontogeny and selection. PMID:24379124

  10. Congenital Defects in Neutrophil Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton Keszei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil granulocytes are key effector cells of the vertebrate immune system. They represent 50–70% of the leukocytes in the human blood and their loss by disease or drug side effect causes devastating bacterial infections. Their high turnover rate, their fine-tuned killing machinery, and their arsenal of toxic vesicles leave them particularly vulnerable to various genetic deficiencies. The aim of this review is to highlight those congenital immunodeficiencies which impede the dynamics of neutrophils, such as migration, cytoskeletal rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, and secretion.

  11. Problem spotting in human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc; Theune, Mariet; Weegels, Mieke

    In human-human communication, dialogue participants are con-tinuously sending and receiving signals on the status of the inform-ation being exchanged. We claim that if spoken dialogue systems were able to detect such cues and change their strategy accordingly, the interaction between user and

  12. Deep architectures for Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noulas, A.K.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the application of Conditional Restricted Boltzmann Machines in Human Computer Interaction. These provide a well suited framework to model the complex temporal patterns produced from humans in the audio and video modalities. They can be trained in a semisupervised fashion and

  13. Human eosinophil-lymphocyte interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weller Peter F

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available While the eosinophil's effector functions clearly can contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases, the evolutionary benefit to having eosinophils as a distinct class of leukocytes is not clear, especially if one must reconsider the nominally beneficial role of eosinophils in parasite host defense. Eosinophils are equipped to respond to lymphocytes and their cytokines (and not solely the eosinophil growth factor cytokines, but the functional consequences of such eosinophil responses need to be defined. Conversely, eosinophils, as antigen-presenting cells (APCs or sources of lymphocyte-active cytokines, may stimulate and effect lymphocyte functioning. Eosinophils share with CD4+ lymphocytes expression of a number of receptors, including CD4 and IL-2R, and specific alpha4 integrins that may help in their common recruitment and activation. Further, elucidation of the interactions between lymphocytes and eosinophils will contribute to a broader understanding of the functioning of eosinophils in "normal" ongoing immune responses and in allergic disorders.

  14. Prosodic alignment in human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, N.; Katagiri, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Androids that replicate humans in form also need to replicate them in behaviour to achieve a high level of believability or lifelikeness. We explore the minimal social cues that can induce in people the human tendency for social acceptance, or ethopoeia, toward artifacts, including androids. It has been observed that people exhibit a strong tendency to adjust to each other, through a number of speech and language features in human-human conversational interactions, to obtain communication efficiency and emotional engagement. We investigate in this paper the phenomena related to prosodic alignment in human-computer interactions, with particular focus on human-computer alignment of speech characteristics. We found that people exhibit unidirectional and spontaneous short-term alignment of loudness and response latency in their speech in response to computer-generated speech. We believe this phenomenon of prosodic alignment provides one of the key components for building social acceptance of androids.

  15. Structural characterization of the interaction of human lactoferrin with calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Gifford

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (Lf is an 80 kDa, iron (Fe(3+-binding immunoregulatory glycoprotein secreted into most exocrine fluids, found in high concentrations in colostrum and milk, and released from neutrophil secondary granules at sites of infection and inflammation. In a number of cell types, Lf is internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis and targeted to the nucleus where it has been demonstrated to act as a transcriptional trans-activator. Here we characterize human Lf's interaction with calmodulin (CaM, a ubiquitous, 17 kDa regulatory calcium (Ca(2+-binding protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of activated cells. Due to the size of this intermolecular complex (∼100 kDa, TROSY-based NMR techniques were employed to structurally characterize Ca(2+-CaM when bound to intact apo-Lf. Both CaM's backbone amides and the ε-methyl group of key methionine residues were used as probes in chemical shift perturbation and cross-saturation experiments to define the binding interface of apo-Lf on Ca(2+-CaM. Unlike the collapsed conformation through which Ca(2+-CaM binds the CaM-binding domains of its classical targets, Ca(2+-CaM assumes an extended structure when bound to apo-Lf. Apo-Lf appears to interact predominantly with the C-terminal lobe of Ca(2+-CaM, enabling the N-terminal lobe to potentially bind another target. Our use of intact apo-Lf has made possible the identification of a secondary interaction interface, removed from CaM's primary binding domain. Secondary interfaces play a key role in the target's response to CaM binding, highlighting the importance of studying intact complexes. This solution-based approach can be applied to study other regulatory calcium-binding EF-hand proteins in intact intermolecular complexes.

  16. Identifying the structural discontinuities of human interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Hövel, Philipp; Simini, Filippo; Vanhoof, Maarten; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The idea of a hierarchical spatial organization of society lies at the core of seminal theories in human geography that have strongly influenced our understanding of social organization. In the same line, the recent availability of large-scale human mobility and communication data has offered novel quantitative insights hinting at a strong geographical confinement of human interactions within neighboring regions, extending to local levels within countries. However, models of human interaction largely ignore this effect. Here, we analyze several country-wide networks of telephone calls and uncover a systematic decrease of communication induced by borders which we identify as the missing variable in state-of-the-art models. Using this empirical evidence, we propose an alternative modeling framework that naturally stylize the damping effect of borders. We show that this new notion substantially improves the predictive power of widely used interaction models, thus increasing our ability to predict social activiti...

  17. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makino Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. Results We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD, and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. Conclusions Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  18. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  19. Human-Robot Interaction: Status and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    The current status of human-robot interaction (HRI) is reviewed, and key current research challenges for the human factors community are described. Robots have evolved from continuous human-controlled master-slave servomechanisms for handling nuclear waste to a broad range of robots incorporating artificial intelligence for many applications and under human supervisory control. This mini-review describes HRI developments in four application areas and what are the challenges for human factors research. In addition to a plethora of research papers, evidence of success is manifest in live demonstrations of robot capability under various forms of human control. HRI is a rapidly evolving field. Specialized robots under human teleoperation have proven successful in hazardous environments and medical application, as have specialized telerobots under human supervisory control for space and repetitive industrial tasks. Research in areas of self-driving cars, intimate collaboration with humans in manipulation tasks, human control of humanoid robots for hazardous environments, and social interaction with robots is at initial stages. The efficacy of humanoid general-purpose robots has yet to be proven. HRI is now applied in almost all robot tasks, including manufacturing, space, aviation, undersea, surgery, rehabilitation, agriculture, education, package fetch and delivery, policing, and military operations. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  20. Language evolution and human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudin, Jonathan; Norman, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the issues that confront designers of interactive computer systems also appear in natural language evolution. Natural languages and human-computer interfaces share as their primary mission the support of extended 'dialogues' between responsive entities. Because in each case one participant is a human being, some of the pressures operating on natural languages, causing them to evolve in order to better support such dialogue, also operate on human-computer 'languages' or interfaces. This does not necessarily push interfaces in the direction of natural language - since one entity in this dialogue is not a human, this is not to be expected. Nonetheless, by discerning where the pressures that guide natural language evolution also appear in human-computer interaction, we can contribute to the design of computer systems and obtain a new perspective on natural languages.

  1. Angiopoietin-1 upregulates de novo expression of IL-1β and Il1-Ra, and the exclusive release of Il1-Ra from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lydia E; Sirois, Martin G

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the angiopoietin (Ang) receptor, Tie2, on both endothelial and inflammatory cells supports the idea that Ang signaling may play a fundamental role in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. We have previously shown that Ang1 and/or Ang2 alter the innate immune response by enhancing human neutrophil survival, chemotaxis and production of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that Ang1 and Ang2 could modulate other inflammatory signals in neutrophils, a possibility we explored through a gene-based assay looking at changes in the mRNA expression of 84 inflammatory cytokines and their receptors. We observed that Ang1 (10(-8) M), but not Ang2, increased mRNA expression of prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and its natural antagonist IL-1RA, by up to 32.6- and 10.0-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. The effects of Ang1 extended to the proteins, as Ang1 increased intracellular levels of precursor and mature IL-1β, and extracellular levels of IL-1RA proteins, by up to 4.2-, 5.0- and 4.4-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. Interestingly, Ang1 failed at inducing IL-1β protein release or at increasing intracellular IL-1RA, but the ratio of IL-1RA to mature IL-1β remained above 100-fold molar excess inside and outside the cells. The above-noted effects of Ang1 were mediated by MAP kinases, whereby inhibiting MEK1/2 lead to up to 70% effect reduction, whereas the blockade of p38MAPK activity doubled Ang1's effect. These findings suggest that Ang1 selectively alters the balance of neutrophil-derived inflammatory cytokines, favoring the blockade of IL-1 activity, a consideration for future therapies of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Angiopoietin-1 upregulates de novo expression of IL-1β and Il1-Ra, and the exclusive release of Il1-Ra from human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia E Haddad

    Full Text Available The expression of the angiopoietin (Ang receptor, Tie2, on both endothelial and inflammatory cells supports the idea that Ang signaling may play a fundamental role in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory response. We have previously shown that Ang1 and/or Ang2 alter the innate immune response by enhancing human neutrophil survival, chemotaxis and production of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8 in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that Ang1 and Ang2 could modulate other inflammatory signals in neutrophils, a possibility we explored through a gene-based assay looking at changes in the mRNA expression of 84 inflammatory cytokines and their receptors. We observed that Ang1 (10(-8 M, but not Ang2, increased mRNA expression of prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and its natural antagonist IL-1RA, by up to 32.6- and 10.0-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. The effects of Ang1 extended to the proteins, as Ang1 increased intracellular levels of precursor and mature IL-1β, and extracellular levels of IL-1RA proteins, by up to 4.2-, 5.0- and 4.4-fold respectively, compared to PBS-control. Interestingly, Ang1 failed at inducing IL-1β protein release or at increasing intracellular IL-1RA, but the ratio of IL-1RA to mature IL-1β remained above 100-fold molar excess inside and outside the cells. The above-noted effects of Ang1 were mediated by MAP kinases, whereby inhibiting MEK1/2 lead to up to 70% effect reduction, whereas the blockade of p38MAPK activity doubled Ang1's effect. These findings suggest that Ang1 selectively alters the balance of neutrophil-derived inflammatory cytokines, favoring the blockade of IL-1 activity, a consideration for future therapies of inflammatory diseases.

  3. Immunosenescence of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Wessels

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All immune cells are affected by aging, contributing to the high susceptibility to infections and increased mortality observed in the elderly. The effect of aging on cells of the adaptive immune system is well documented. In contrast, knowledge concerning age-related defects of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is limited. During the past decade, it has become evident that in addition to their traditional role as phagocytes, neutrophils are able to secrete a wide array of immunomodulating molecules. Their importance is underlined by the finding that genetic defects that lead to neutropenia increase susceptibility to infections. Whereas there is consistence about the constant circulating number of PMN throughout aging, the abilities of tissue infiltration, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst of PMN from aged donors are discussed controversially. Furthermore, there are numerous discrepancies between in vivo and in vitro results, as well as between results for murine and human PMN. Most of the reported functional changes can be explained by defective signaling pathways, but further research is required to get a detailed insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. This could form the basis for drug development in order to prevent or treat age-related diseases, and thus to unburden the public health systems.

  4. Interferon lambda1/IL-29 and inorganic polyphosphate are novel regulators of neutrophil-driven thromboinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysanthopoulou, Akrivi; Kambas, Konstantinos; Stakos, Dimitrios; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Mitsios, Alexandros; Vidali, Veroniki; Angelidou, Iliana; Bochenek, Magdalena; Arelaki, Stella; Arampatzioglou, Athanasios; Galani, Ioanna-Evdokia; Skendros, Panagiotis; Couladouros, Elias A; Konstantinides, Stavros; Andreakos, Evangelos; Schäfer, Katrin; Ritis, Konstantinos

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils and neutrophil-released meshwork structures termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are major mediators of thromboinflammation and emerging targets for therapy, yet the mechanisms and pathways that control the role of neutrophils in thromboinflammation remain poorly understood. Here, we explored the role of IFN-λ1/IL-29, a major antiviral cytokine recently shown to suppress the neutrophil migratory capacity, in prothrombotic and proNETotic functions of neutrophils. In an ex vivo human experimental setting of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), we show that IFN-λ1/IL-29 hinders NET release and diminishes the amount of cytoplasmic TF in neutrophils. Since platelet-neutrophil interaction plays a major role in NET-induced thromboinflammation, we further studied how IFN-λ1/IL-29 may interrupt this interaction. In this context, we identified inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) as a platelet-derived NET inducer in STEMI. In arterial STEMI thrombi, polyP was present in platelets and in close proximity to NET remnants. PolyP release from activated platelets was dependent on thrombin present in infarcted artery plasma, resulting in NET formation by promoting mTOR inhibition and autophagy induction. The effect of polyP on mTOR inhibition was counteracted by IFN-λ1/IL-29 treatment, leading to inhibition of NET formation. Consistently, we show in an in vivo model of FeCl3 -induced arterial thrombosis that IFN-λ2/IL-28A exerts strong antithrombotic potential. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function of IFN-λ1/IL-29 in the suppression of thromboinflammation. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Formal verification of human-automation interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a formal and rigorous approach to the analysis of operator interaction with machines. It addresses the acute problem of detecting design errors in human-machine interaction and focuses on verifying the correctness of the interaction in complex and automated control systems. The paper describes a systematic methodology for evaluating whether the interface provides the necessary information about the machine to enable the operator to perform a specified task successfully and unambiguously. It also addresses the adequacy of information provided to the user via training material (e.g., user manual) about the machine's behavior. The essentials of the methodology, which can be automated and applied to the verification of large systems, are illustrated by several examples and through a case study of pilot interaction with an autopilot aboard a modern commercial aircraft. The expected application of this methodology is an augmentation and enhancement, by formal verification, of human-automation interfaces.

  6. Analysis of human emotion in human-robot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blar, Noraidah; Jafar, Fairul Azni; Abdullah, Nurhidayu; Muhammad, Mohd Nazrin; Kassim, Anuar Muhamed

    2015-05-01

    There is vast application of robots in human's works such as in industry, hospital, etc. Therefore, it is believed that human and robot can have a good collaboration to achieve an optimum result of work. The objectives of this project is to analyze human-robot collaboration and to understand humans feeling (kansei factors) when dealing with robot that robot should adapt to understand the humans' feeling. Researches currently are exploring in the area of human-robot interaction with the intention to reduce problems that subsist in today's civilization. Study had found that to make a good interaction between human and robot, first it is need to understand the abilities of each. Kansei Engineering in robotic was used to undergo the project. The project experiments were held by distributing questionnaire to students and technician. After that, the questionnaire results were analyzed by using SPSS analysis. Results from the analysis shown that there are five feelings which significant to the human in the human-robot interaction; anxious, fatigue, relaxed, peaceful, and impressed.

  7. Interleukin-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M.; Amezquita, Robert A.; Pierce, Richard W.; Jane-wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S.; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C.; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multi-step process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with interleukin (IL)-1- or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, while neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA-seq analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media (CM) from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and also stimulate neutrophil production of pro-inflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs but not ECs can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization and caspase 9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by CM from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  8. α-Linoleic acid enhances the capacity of α-1 antitrypsin to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1β in human blood neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Nupur; Korenbaum, Elena; Mahadeva, Ravi; Immenschuh, Stephan; Grau, Veronika; Dinarello, Charles A; Welte, Tobias; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2016-07-13

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT, SERPINA1), a major circulating inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3 (PRN3), has been proposed to reduce the processing and release of IL-1β. Since the anti-inflammatory properties of A1AT are influenced by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, we compared effects of fatty acid-free (A1AT-0) and α-linoleic acid-bound (A1AT-LA) forms of A1AT on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synthesis of IL-1β precursor and the release of IL-1β from human blood neutrophils. The presence of A1AT-LA or A1AT-0 significantly reduced LPS-induced release of mature IL-1β. However, only A1A-LA reduced both steady state mRNA levels of IL-1β and the secretion of mature IL-1β. In LPS stimulated neutrophils, mRNA levels of TLR2/4, NFKBIA, P2RX7, NLRP3, and CASP1 decreased significantly in the presence of A1AT-LA but not A1AT-0. A1AT-0 and A1AT-LA did not inhibit the direct enzymatic activity of caspase-1, but we observed complexes of either form of A1AT with NE and PR3. Consistent with the effect on TLR and IL-1β gene expression, only A1AT-LA inhibited LPS-induced gene expression of NE and PR3. Increased gene expression of PPAR-γ was observed in A1AT-LA-treated neutrophils without of LPS stimulation, and the selective PPAR-γ antagonist (GW9662) prevented the reduction in IL-1β by A1AT-LA. We conclude from our data, that the ability of A1AT to reduce TLR and IL-1β gene expression depends on its association with LA. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory properties of A1AT-LA are likely to be mediated by the activation of PPAR-γ.

  9. Movement coordination in applied human-human and human-robot interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubö, Anna; Vesper, Cordula; Wiesbeck, Mathey

    2007-01-01

    and describing human-human interaction in terms of goal-oriented movement coordination is considered an important and necessary step for designing and describing human-robot interaction. In the present scenario, trajectories of hand and finger movements were recorded while two human participants performed......The present paper describes a scenario for examining mechanisms of movement coordination in humans and robots. It is assumed that coordination can best be achieved when behavioral rules that shape movement execution in humans are also considered for human-robot interaction. Investigating...... coordination were affected. Implications for human-robot interaction are discussed....

  10. Learning to Detect Human-Object Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chao, Yu-Wei

    2017-02-17

    In this paper we study the problem of detecting human-object interactions (HOI) in static images, defined as predicting a human and an object bounding box with an interaction class label that connects them. HOI detection is a fundamental problem in computer vision as it provides semantic information about the interactions among the detected objects. We introduce HICO-DET, a new large benchmark for HOI detection, by augmenting the current HICO classification benchmark with instance annotations. We propose Human-Object Region-based Convolutional Neural Networks (HO-RCNN), a novel DNN-based framework for HOI detection. At the core of our HO-RCNN is the Interaction Pattern, a novel DNN input that characterizes the spatial relations between two bounding boxes. We validate the effectiveness of our HO-RCNN using HICO-DET. Experiments demonstrate that our HO-RCNN, by exploiting human-object spatial relations through Interaction Patterns, significantly improves the performance of HOI detection over baseline approaches.

  11. Fundamentals of human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Monk, Andrew F

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction aims to sensitize the systems designer to the problems faced by the user of an interactive system. The book grew out of a course entitled """"The User Interface: Human Factors for Computer-based Systems"""" which has been run annually at the University of York since 1981. This course has been attended primarily by systems managers from the computer industry. The book is organized into three parts. Part One focuses on the user as processor of information with studies on visual perception; extracting information from printed and electronically presented

  12. Human Work Interaction Design Meets International Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil; Barricelli, Barbara Rita

    2017-01-01

    opportunity to observe technology-mediated innovative work practices in informal settings that may be related to the notion of International Development. In this unique context, this workshop proposes to analyze findings related to opportunities for design research in this type of work domains: a) human......Over the last decade, empirical relationships between work domain analysis and HCI design have been identified by much research in the field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) across five continents. Since this workshop takes place at the Interact Conference in Mumbai, there is a unique...

  13. Human Work Interaction Design Meets International Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil; Barricelli, Barbara Rita

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, empirical relationships between work domain analysis and HCI design have been identified by much research in the field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) across five continents. Since this workshop takes place at the Interact Conference in Mumbai, there is a unique...... opportunity to observe technology-mediated innovative work practices in informal settings that may be related to the notion of International Development. In this unique context, this workshop proposes to analyze findings related to opportunities for design research in this type of work domains: a) human...

  14. Lundep, a sand fly salivary endonuclease increases Leishmania parasite survival in neutrophils and inhibits XIIa contact activation in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza C Chagas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the host's first line of defense against infections, and their extracellular traps (NET were recently shown to kill Leishmania parasites. Here we report a NET-destroying molecule (Lundep from the salivary glands of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Previous analysis of the sialotranscriptome of Lu. longipalpis showed the potential presence of an endonuclease. Indeed, not only was the cloned cDNA (Lundep shown to encode a highly active ss- and dsDNAse, but also the same activity was demonstrated to be secreted by salivary glands of female Lu. longipalpis. Lundep hydrolyzes both ss- and dsDNA with little sequence specificity with a calculated DNase activity of 300000 Kunitz units per mg of protein. Disruption of PMA (phorbol 12 myristate 13 acetate- or parasite-induced NETs by treatment with recombinant Lundep or salivary gland homogenates increases parasite survival in neutrophils. Furthermore, co-injection of recombinant Lundep with metacyclic promastigotes significantly exacerbates Leishmania infection in mice when compared with PBS alone or inactive (mutagenized Lundep. We hypothesize that Lundep helps the parasite to establish an infection by allowing it to escape from the leishmanicidal activity of NETs early after inoculation. Lundep may also assist blood meal intake by lowering the local viscosity caused by the release of host DNA and as an anticoagulant by inhibiting the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  15. Measuring Multimodal Synchrony for Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Antinus; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Ramseyer, Fabian; Sourin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Nonverbal synchrony is an important and natural element in human-human interaction. It can also play various roles in human-computer interaction. In particular this is the case in the interaction between humans and the virtual humans that inhabit our cyberworlds. Virtual humans need to adapt their

  16. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Paravati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  17. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  18. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis triggers neutrophil activation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A C Falcão

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection.

  19. Neutrophil influx into an inflammatory site inhibited by a soluble homing receptor-IgG chimaera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S R; Fennie, C; Lasky, L A

    1991-01-10

    Neutrophil-mediated inflammation is involved in a number of human clinical manifestations, including the adult respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure and reperfusion injury. One way of inhibiting this type of inflammatory response would be to block competitively the adhesive interactions between neutrophils and the endothelium adjacent to the inflamed region. The lectin-containing murine adhesion molecule gp90MEL, the homing receptor, is found on all leukocytic cells, including neutrophils. MEL 14, a monoclonal antibody directed against this adhesion molecule, blocks lymphocyte traffic to lymph nodes and extravasation of neutrophils from blood to inflammatory sites. Here we show that administration to mice of a soluble immunoglobulin chimaera containing the murine homing receptor extracellular domain significantly decreases the number of neutrophils that migrate to the peritoneum in response to the inflammatory irritant thioglycollate. These results indicate that soluble forms of a single type of adhesion molecule, the homing receptor, could be clinically effective compounds for the inhibition of neutrophil-mediated inflammation.

  20. HCI (human computer interaction): concepto y desarrollo

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos, Mari-Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The concept of human-computer interaction (HCI) is analysed from a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, including a review of the evolution of HCI from the 1950s up to the present. The author stresses the importance of incorporating HCI studies within the curricula of information science programmes.

  1. Bacterial lipoprotein delays apoptosis in human neutrophils through inhibition of caspase-3 activity: regulatory roles for CD14 and TLR-2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Colm P

    2012-02-03

    The human sepsis syndrome resulting from bacterial infection continues to account for a significant proportion of hospital mortality. Neutralizing strategies aimed at individual bacterial wall products (such as LPS) have enjoyed limited success in this arena. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is a major constituent of the wall of diverse bacterial forms and profoundly influences cellular function in vivo and in vitro, and has been implicated in the etiology of human sepsis. Delayed polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis is a characteristic feature of human sepsis arising from Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial infection. Bacterial wall product ligation and subsequent receptor-mediated events upstream of caspase inhibition in neutrophils remain incompletely understood. BLP has been shown to exert its cellular effects primarily through TLR-2, and it is now widely accepted that lateral associations with the TLRs represent the means by which CD14 communicates intracellular messages. In this study, we demonstrate that BLP inhibits neutrophil mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a subsequent reduction in caspase-3 processing, ultimately leading to a significant delay in PMN apoptosis. Pretreatment of PMNs with an anti-TLR-2 mAb or anti-CD14 mAb prevented BLP from delaying PMN apoptosis to such a marked degree. Combination blockade using both mAbs completely prevented the effects of BLP (in 1 and 10 ng\\/ml concentrations) on PMN apoptosis. At higher concentrations of BLP, the antiapoptotic effects were observed, but were not as pronounced. Our findings therefore provide the first evidence of a crucial role for both CD14 and TLR-2 in delayed PMN apoptosis arising from bacterial infection.

  2. Human interactions with sirenians (manatees and dugongs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Robert K.; Flint, Mark

    2017-01-01

    There are three extant sirenian species of the Trichechidae family and one living Dugongidae family member. Given their close ties to coastal and often urbanized habitats, sirenians are exposed to many types of anthropogenic activities that result in challenges to their well-being, poor health, and even death. In the wild, they are exposed to direct and indirect local pressures as well as subject to large-scale stressors such as global climate change acting on regions or entire genetic stocks. In captivity, they are subject to husbandry and management practices based on our collective knowledge, or in some cases lack thereof, of their needs and welfare. It is therefore reasonable to consider that their current imperiled status is very closely linked to our actions. In this chapter, we identify and define human interactions that may impact dugongs and manatees, including hunting, fisheries, boat interactions, negative interactions with man-made structures, disease and contaminants, and global climate change. We examine techniques used to investigate these impacts and the influence of sirenian biology and of changing human behaviors on potential outcomes. We examine how this differs for dugongs and manatees in the wild and for those held in captivity. Finally, we provide possible mitigation strategies and ways to assess the efforts we are making to improve the welfare of individuals and to conserve these species. This chapter identifies how the welfare of these species is intrinsically linked to the human interactions these animals experience, and how the nature of these interactions has changed with societal shifts. We proffer suggested ways to minimize negative impacts. Current knowledge should be used to minimize negative human interactions and impacts, to promote positive impacts, and to protect these animals for the future.

  3. Interaction and Humans in Internet of Things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turunen, Markku; Sonntag, Daniel; Engelbrecht, Klaus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Internet of Things is mainly about connected devices embedded in our everyday environment. Typically, ‘interaction’ in the context of IoT means interfaces which allow people to either monitor or configure IoT devices. Some examples include mobile applications and embedded touchscreens for control...... of various functions (e.g., heating, lights, and energy efficiency) in environments such as homes and offices. In some cases, humans are an explicit part of the scenario, such as in those cases where people are monitored (e.g., children and elderly) by IoT devices. Interaction in such applications is still...... quite straightforward, mainly consisting of traditional graphical interfaces, which often leads to clumsy co-existence of human and IoT devices. Thus, there is a need to investigate what kinds of interaction techniques could provide IoT to be more human oriented, what is the role of automation...

  4. Characterization of Total Phenolic Constituents from the Stems of Spatholobus suberectus Using LC-DAD-MSn and Their Inhibitory Effect on Human Neutrophil Elastase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatholobus suberectus Dunn, belonging to the legume family (Fabaceae, has been used as a Traditional Chinese Medicine for the treatment of anemia, menoxenia and rheumatism. A limited number of studies report that various types of flavonoids are the main characteristic constituents of this herb. We have now found that S. suberectus contains about 2% phenolic components and characterized the major phenolic components as homogeneous B-type procyanidin conjugates using a liquid chromatography with diode-array detection-ESI mass spectrometry (LC-DAD/ESI-MS method. This is the first report on occurrence of most B-type procyanidins in this herb. Moreover, the total phenolics extract was assayed for inhibitory activity on human neutrophil elastase and its IC50 was found to be 1.33 μg/mL.

  5. Interactive Exploration Robots: Human-Robotic Collaboration and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terry

    2017-01-01

    For decades, NASA has employed different operational approaches for human and robotic missions. Human spaceflight missions to the Moon and in low Earth orbit have relied upon near-continuous communication with minimal time delays. During these missions, astronauts and mission control communicate interactively to perform tasks and resolve problems in real-time. In contrast, deep-space robotic missions are designed for operations in the presence of significant communication delay - from tens of minutes to hours. Consequently, robotic missions typically employ meticulously scripted and validated command sequences that are intermittently uplinked to the robot for independent execution over long periods. Over the next few years, however, we will see increasing use of robots that blend these two operational approaches. These interactive exploration robots will be remotely operated by humans on Earth or from a spacecraft. These robots will be used to support astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS), to conduct new missions to the Moon, and potentially to enable remote exploration of planetary surfaces in real-time. In this talk, I will discuss the technical challenges associated with building and operating robots in this manner, along with lessons learned from research conducted with the ISS and in the field.

  6. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrinin (CIT is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3 and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I. In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of the potential deleterious effects of ZnO nanomaterials (nanoneedles and nanoflowers) on blood components, including albumin, erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastrello, Bruna [São Paulo State University (UNESP), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences (Brazil); Paracatu, Luana Chiquetto [São Paulo State University (UNESP), Department of Clinical Analysis, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Brazil); Carvalho Bertozo, Luiza de [São Paulo State University (UNESP), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences (Brazil); Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez [University of São Paulo (USP), Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicology Group, Physics Institute of São Carlos (IFSC) (Brazil); Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha [São Paulo State University (UNESP), Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences (Brazil); Ximenes, Valdecir Farias, E-mail: vfximenes@fc.unesp.br [São Paulo State University (UNESP), Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences (Brazil)

    2016-07-15

    The application of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in biomaterials has increased significantly in the recent years. Here, we aimed to study the potential deleterious effects of ZnO on blood components, including human serum albumin (HSA), erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils. To test the influence of the morphology of the nanomaterials, ZnO nanoneedles (ZnO-nn) and nanoflowers (ZnO-nf) were synthesized. The zeta potential and mean size of ZnO-nf and ZnO-nn suspensions in phosphate-buffered saline were −10.73 mV and 3.81 nm and −5.27 mV and 18.26 nm, respectively. The incubation of ZnO with HSA did not cause its denaturation as verified by the absence of significant alterations in the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence and in the circular dichroism spectrum of the protein. The capacity of HSA as a drug carrier was not affected as verified by employing site I and II fluorescent markers. Neither type of ZnO was able to provoke the activation of neutrophils, as verified by lucigenin- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence and by the extracellular release of hydrogen peroxide. ZnO-nf, but not ZnO-nn, induced the haemolysis of erythrocytes. In conclusion, our results reinforce the concept that ZnO nanomaterials are relatively safe for usage in biomaterials. A potential exception is the capacity of ZnO-nf to promote the lysis of erythrocytes, a discovery that shows the importance of the morphology in the toxicity of nanoparticles.

  8. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis of human neutrophil elastase inhibitors using shuffling classification and regression trees and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi-Baboli, M

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship models for N-benzoylindazole derivatives as inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. These models were developed with the aid of classification and regression trees (CART) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) combined with a shuffling cross-validation technique using interpretable descriptors. More than one hundred meaningful descriptors, representing various structural characteristics for all 51 N-benzoylindazole derivatives in the data set, were calculated and used as the original variables for shuffling CART modelling. Five descriptors of average Wiener index, Kier benzene-likeliness index, subpolarity parameter, average shape profile index of order 2 and folding degree index selected by the shuffling CART technique have been used as inputs of the ANFIS for prediction of inhibition behaviour of N-benzoylindazole derivatives. The results of the developed shuffling CART-ANFIS model compared to other techniques, such as genetic algorithm (GA)-partial least square (PLS)-ANFIS and stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR)-ANFIS, are promising and descriptive. The satisfactory results r2p = 0.845, Q2(LOO) = 0.861, r2(L25%O) = 0.829, RMSE(LOO)  = 0.305 and RMSE(L25%O)  = 0.336) demonstrate that shuffling CART-ANFIS models present the relationship between human neutrophil elastase inhibitor activity and molecular descriptors, and they yield predictions in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of the potential deleterious effects of ZnO nanomaterials (nanoneedles and nanoflowers) on blood components, including albumin, erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrello, Bruna; Paracatu, Luana Chiquetto; de Carvalho Bertozo, Luiza; Paino, Iêda Maria Martinez; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias

    2016-07-01

    The application of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in biomaterials has increased significantly in the recent years. Here, we aimed to study the potential deleterious effects of ZnO on blood components, including human serum albumin (HSA), erythrocytes and human isolated primary neutrophils. To test the influence of the morphology of the nanomaterials, ZnO nanoneedles (ZnO-nn) and nanoflowers (ZnO-nf) were synthesized. The zeta potential and mean size of ZnO-nf and ZnO-nn suspensions in phosphate-buffered saline were -10.73 mV and 3.81 nm and -5.27 mV and 18.26 nm, respectively. The incubation of ZnO with HSA did not cause its denaturation as verified by the absence of significant alterations in the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence and in the circular dichroism spectrum of the protein. The capacity of HSA as a drug carrier was not affected as verified by employing site I and II fluorescent markers. Neither type of ZnO was able to provoke the activation of neutrophils, as verified by lucigenin- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence and by the extracellular release of hydrogen peroxide. ZnO-nf, but not ZnO-nn, induced the haemolysis of erythrocytes. In conclusion, our results reinforce the concept that ZnO nanomaterials are relatively safe for usage in biomaterials. A potential exception is the capacity of ZnO-nf to promote the lysis of erythrocytes, a discovery that shows the importance of the morphology in the toxicity of nanoparticles.

  10. The lipidated peptidomimetic Lau-[(S)-Aoc]-(Lys-βNphe)6-NH2 is a novel formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist that activates both human and mouse neutrophil NADPH-oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdfeldt, Andre; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Winther, Malene

    2016-01-01

    2 (F2M2), showing comparable potency in activating human and mouse neutrophils by inducing a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and assembly of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase. This FPR2/Fpr2 agonist contains a headgroup consisting of a 2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) residue acylated...

  11. Effect of interleukin 10 on the release of the CXC chemokines growth related oncogene GRO-alpha and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide (ENA)-78 during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olszyna, D. P.; Pajkrt, D.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    Pretreatment with interleukin (IL)-10 inhibited the release of growth-related oncogene GRO-alpha but not of epithelial-cell derived neutrophil activating protein (ENA)-78, after injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into healthy humans. In vitro, IL-10 dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced release

  12. The receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator and urokinase is translocated from two distinct intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane on stimulation of human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, T; Ploug, M; Ellis, V

    1994-01-01

    including cell migration and resolution of thrombi. We have previously shown that uPAR is expressed on the plasma membrane of circulating neutrophils, and we now report that stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), FMLP, or tumor necrosis factor-alpha results in a rapid increase in the expression...... for plasminogen activation. These processes may be important for neutrophil extravasation and migration through extracellular matrix and for the contribution of neutrophils to resolution of thrombi....

  13. Humans, computers and wizards human (simulated) computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Norman; McGlashan, Scott; Wooffitt, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Using data taken from a major European Union funded project on speech understanding, the SunDial project, this book considers current perspectives on human computer interaction and argues for the value of an approach taken from sociology which is based on conversation analysis.

  14. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... estimation system uses a single camera to estimate the motion of a human. The results show that inverse kinematics can significantly speed up the estimation process, while retaining a quality comparable to a full pose motion estimation system. Our novelty lies primarily in use of inverse kinematics...

  15. Ensemble models of neutrophil trafficking in severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ok Song

    Full Text Available A hallmark of severe sepsis is systemic inflammation which activates leukocytes and can result in their misdirection. This leads to both impaired migration to the locus of infection and increased infiltration into healthy tissues. In order to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved, we developed a coarse-grained phenomenological model of the acute inflammatory response in CLP (cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats. This model incorporates distinct neutrophil kinetic responses to the inflammatory stimulus and the dynamic interactions between components of a compartmentalized inflammatory response. Ensembles of model parameter sets consistent with experimental observations were statistically generated using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampling. Prediction uncertainty in the model states was quantified over the resulting ensemble parameter sets. Forward simulation of the parameter ensembles successfully captured experimental features and predicted that systemically activated circulating neutrophils display impaired migration to the tissue and neutrophil sequestration in the lung, consequently contributing to tissue damage and mortality. Principal component and multiple regression analyses of the parameter ensembles estimated from survivor and non-survivor cohorts provide insight into pathologic mechanisms dictating outcome in sepsis. Furthermore, the model was extended to incorporate hypothetical mechanisms by which immune modulation using extracorporeal blood purification results in improved outcome in septic rats. Simulations identified a sub-population (about 18% of the treated population that benefited from blood purification. Survivors displayed enhanced neutrophil migration to tissue and reduced sequestration of lung neutrophils, contributing to improved outcome. The model ensemble presented herein provides a platform for generating and testing hypotheses in silico, as well as motivating further experimental

  16. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. INTERACTION MANAGMENT BETWEEN SOCIAL AGENTS AND HUMAN

    OpenAIRE

    Pruski, Alain; Moussaoui, Abdelhak

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we address the problem of managing social interactions between a human user and a set of social agents in structured environments. These agents have to regulate a measurable characteristic of the user. Our study focuses mainly therapeutic, caring for elderly people and assessment applications. The agent concept considered in this study is suitable for multi-robot systems (physical, service, mobile or not), but also to virtual agents (avatars) in a virtual...

  18. Affect in Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    second is for the benefit of the human when interacting with a robot by providing a means and mechanism for increasing the bandwidth in communication ...expected; whereas an introverted robot was rated as more appropriate for a problem solving task requiring concentration (Moshkina 2011). II.1.2...effective communication for a humanoid robot. The Emotion space is defined along three dimensions: activation, pleasantness, and certainty. Emotions

  19. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design and und...... and understanding of audio-based mobile systems are evolving to offer new perspectives on interaction and design and support such systems to be applied in areas, such as the humanities.......Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design...

  20. Neutrophils at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauseef, William M; Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    blood to tissues in models of blood-borne infections versus bacterial invasion through epithelial linings. We examine data on novel aspects of the activation of NADPH oxidase and the heterogeneity of phagosomes and, finally, consider the importance of two neutrophil-derived biological agents: neutrophil...

  1. Apoptosis of neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, N. A.; Maianski, A. N.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Roos, D.

    2004-01-01

    Regulation of the neutrophil life span by apoptosis provides a fine balance between their function as effector cells of host defense and a safe turnover of these potentially harmful cells. Alterations of neutrophil apoptosis are associated with a number of diseases. As do other cell types,

  2. Human neutrophils mediate trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of CLL B cells opsonized with anti-CD20 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Cattaneo, Irene; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino; Figliuzzi, Marina; Golay, Josée

    2017-05-11

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have previously been reported to mediate phagocytosis of anti-CD20-opsonized B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, recent data have suggested that PMNs, like macrophages, can also mediate trogocytosis. We have performed experiments to more precisely investigate this point and to discriminate between trogocytosis and phagocytosis. In live-cell time-lapse microscopy experiments, we could not detect any significant phagocytosis by purified PMNs of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B cells, but could detect only the repeated close contact between effectors and targets, which suggested trogocytosis. Similarly, in flow cytometry assays using CLL B-cell targets labeled with the membrane dye PKH67 and opsonized with rituximab or obinutuzumab, we observed that a mean of 50% and 75% of PMNs had taken a fraction of the dye from CLL B cells at 3 and 20 hours, respectively, with no significant decrease in absolute live or total CLL B-cell numbers, confirming that trogocytosis occurs, rather than phagocytosis. Trogocytosis was accompanied by loss of membrane CD20 from CLL B cells, which was evident with rituximab but not obinutuzumab. We conclude that PMNs mediate mostly trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B cells, and we discuss the implications of this finding in patients with CLL treated with rituximab or obinutuzumab in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Yersinia pestis subverts the dermal neutrophil response in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Jeffrey G; Hasenkrug, Aaron M; Dorward, David W; Nair, Vinod; Carmody, Aaron B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2013-08-27

    The majority of human Yersinia pestis infections result from introduction of bacteria into the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Once in the dermis, Y. pestis can evade the host's innate immune response and subsequently disseminate to the draining lymph node (dLN). There, the pathogen replicates to large numbers, causing the pathognomonic bubo of bubonic plague. In this study, several cytometric and microscopic techniques were used to characterize the early host response to intradermal (i.d.) Y. pestis infection. Mice were infected i.d. with fully virulent or attenuated strains of dsRed-expressing Y. pestis, and tissues were analyzed by flow cytometry. By 4 h postinfection, there were large numbers of neutrophils in the infected dermis and the majority of cell-associated bacteria were associated with neutrophils. We observed a significant effect of the virulence plasmid (pCD1) on bacterial survival and neutrophil activation in the dermis. Intravital microscopy of i.d. Y. pestis infection revealed dynamic interactions between recruited neutrophils and bacteria. In contrast, very few bacteria interacted with dendritic cells (DCs), indicating that this cell type may not play a major role early in Y. pestis infection. Experiments using neutrophil depletion and a CCR7 knockout mouse suggest that dissemination of Y. pestis from the dermis to the dLN is not dependent on neutrophils or DCs. Taken together, the results of this study show a very rapid, robust neutrophil response to Y. pestis in the dermis and that the virulence plasmid pCD1 is important for the evasion of this response. Yersinia pestis remains a public health concern today because of sporadic plague outbreaks that occur throughout the world and the potential for its illegitimate use as a bioterrorism weapon. Since bubonic plague pathogenesis is initiated by the introduction of Y. pestis into the skin, we sought to characterize the response of the host's innate immune cells to bacteria early after

  4. A role for the endothelial glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan in neutrophil recruitment by endothelial cells cultured for prolonged periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lynn M; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2009-11-15

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) presented on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) are believed to influence leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, but their roles remain uncertain. Here we report an in vitro model of prolonged culture of human EC in which the contributions of heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronan (HA) to the process of neutrophil recruitment could be studied. Previously, we reported that increasing EC culture duration (up to 20 days) enhanced neutrophil recruitment in response to low dose (1 U/ml) but not high dose (100 U/ml) of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Here we found that HS and HA were present at much higher levels on the surface of day 20 cultures than day 3 cultures. Neutrophil recruitment on both day 3 and day 20 ECs was mediated through CXCR chemokine receptors and interleukin-8 (IL-8). In addition, mRNA levels for TNF receptors, signalling pathway constituents, adhesion receptors, and chemokines involved in neutrophil recruitment were similar for day 3 and day 20 ECs. To test whether the enhanced neutrophil recruitment on day 20 EC was mediated by GAGs, they were removed enzymatically. Removal of HA (but not HS) inhibited neutrophil recruitment, as did antibody blockade of CD44, a counter-receptor for HA on neutrophils. Supernatants from hyaluronidase-treated day 20 ECs were more potent in activating neutrophils than supernatants from untreated EC. Thus, HA has a role in neutrophil recruitment that is revealed in long-term cultures where it increases potency of response to sub-optimal levels of TNF. This effect appears to occur through a dual mechanism involving chemokine presentation and interaction with CD44.

  5. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  6. The Anti-Apoptotic Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Human Peripheral Blood Neutrophils is Mediated by a Monocyte Derived Soluble Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Christopher M; Plant, Karen; Newton, Susan; Hobson, Lynsey; Whyte, Moira K B; Everard, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) causes annual epidemics of respiratory disease particularly affecting infants. The associated airway inflammation is characterized by an intense neutrophilia. This neutrophilic inflammation appears to be responsible for much of the pathology and symptoms. Previous work from our group had shown that there are factors within the airways of infants with RSV bronchiolitis that inhibit neutrophil apoptosis. This study was undertaken to determine if RSV can directly affect neutrophil survival.NEUTROPHILS WERE ISOLATED FROM CITRATED VENOUS BLOOD (COLLECTED FROM HEALTHY ADULT VOLUNTEERS) BY DISCONTINUOUS PLASMA: Percoll gradient centrifugation and, in some experiments, further purified by negative immunomagnetic bead selection. The effect of RSV on neutrophil survival was measured by Annexin V-PE /To-Pro-3 staining and by morphological changes, using Dif-Quick staining of cytospins.Inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis was observed in neutrophils isolated by standard plasma:Percoll gradient when exposed to RSV but not in ultra pure neutrophil preparations. Adding monocytes back to ultra purified preparations restored the effect. The inhibition of apoptosis was observed with both active and UV inactivated virus. The effect is dependent on a soluble factor and appears to be dependent on CD14 receptors on the monocytes.

  7. Human-Computer Interaction The Agency Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, José

    2012-01-01

    Agent-centric theories, approaches and technologies are contributing to enrich interactions between users and computers. This book aims at highlighting the influence of the agency perspective in Human-Computer Interaction through a careful selection of research contributions. Split into five sections; Users as Agents, Agents and Accessibility, Agents and Interactions, Agent-centric Paradigms and Approaches, and Collective Agents, the book covers a wealth of novel, original and fully updated material, offering:   ü  To provide a coherent, in depth, and timely material on the agency perspective in HCI ü  To offer an authoritative treatment of the subject matter presented by carefully selected authors ü  To offer a balanced and broad coverage of the subject area, including, human, organizational, social, as well as technological concerns. ü  To offer a hands-on-experience by covering representative case studies and offering essential design guidelines   The book will appeal to a broad audience of resea...

  8. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe's success as a human pathogen.

  9. Dissociations in the effects of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists on cAMP formation and superoxide production in human neutrophils: support for the concept of functional selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Brunskole Hummel

    Full Text Available In neutrophils, activation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR, a Gs-coupled receptor, inhibits inflammatory responses, which could be therapeutically exploited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various β2AR ligands on adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP accumulation and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2(•- production in human neutrophils and to probe the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations (also referred to as functional selectivity or biased signaling in a native cell system. This is an important question because so far, evidence for functional selectivity has been predominantly obtained with recombinant systems, due to the inherent difficulties to genetically manipulate human native cells. cAMP concentration was determined by HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry, and O2(•- formation was assessed by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c. β2AR agonists were generally more potent in inhibiting fMLP-induced O2(•- production than in stimulating cAMP accumulation. (--Ephedrine and dichloroisoproterenol were devoid of any agonistic activity in the cAMP assay, but partially inhibited fMLP-induced O2(•- production. Moreover, (--adrenaline was equi-efficacious in both assays whereas the efficacy of salbutamol was more than two-fold higher in the O2(•- assay. Functional selectivity was visualized by deviations of ligand potencies and efficacies from linear correlations for various parameters. We obtained no evidence for involvement of protein kinase A in the inhibition of fMLP-induced O2(•- production after β2AR-stimulation although cAMP-increasing substances inhibited O2(•- production. Taken together, our data corroborate the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations with unique signaling capabilities in native human cells and suggest that the β2AR inhibits O2(•- production in a cAMP-independent manner.

  10. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  11. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

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    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  12. Neutrophils and inflammatory resolution in the mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory diseases in mucosal organs as diverse as the lung, liver and intestine inevitably require the intimate interactions between neutrophils and epithelia. The physiologic consequences of such interactions often determine endpoint organ function, and for this reason, much recent interest has developed in identifying mechanisms and novel targets to promote the resolution of mucosal inflammation. Physiologically-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems have aided in discovery of novel pathways to define basic inflammatory mechanisms and approaches to defining the concepts of inflammatory resolution. Here, we will review the recent literature regarding the contribution of neutrophils to inflammatory resolution, with an emphasis on the role of the tissue microenvironment, endogenous pathways for promoting resolution and the molecular determinants of neutrophil-epithelial cell interactions during ongoing inflammation. These recent studies highlight the dynamic nature of pro-resolving pathways and lend insight into the complexity of treating mucosal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Design of hybrid multimodal poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymer nanoparticles for neutrophil labeling, imaging and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuan; Palankar, Raghavendra; Echeverría, María; Medvedev, Nikolay; Moya, Sergio E.; Delcea, Mihaela

    2013-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating quantum dots (QDs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and gold (Au) NPs for neutrophil labeling were fabricated via the w/o/w double emulsion method. QDs and SPIONs were entrapped in the PLGA core during emulsification while Au NPs were assembled on top of the PLGA NPs via electrostatic interactions. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM) were applied to characterize the hybrid PLGA NPs. The uptake of the hybrid PLGA NPs by human neutrophils was studied by Flow Cytometry and confocal microscopy. In addition, the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils after incubation with the hybrid PLGA NPs was assessed. Magnetophoresis experiments showed that neutrophils with internalized hybrid PLGA NPs can be effectively laterally displaced towards the magnetic field. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the hybrid PLGA NPs resulted in images with a contrast enhancement linearly dependent on the concentration of the hybrid PLGA NPs. Research reported in this work is relevant for imaging, tracking and manipulating neutrophils and has potential for in vivo applications, e.g., tumor visualization and localized photothermal treatment.Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating quantum dots (QDs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and gold (Au) NPs for neutrophil labeling were fabricated via the w/o/w double emulsion method. QDs and SPIONs were entrapped in the PLGA core during emulsification while Au NPs were assembled on top of the PLGA NPs via electrostatic interactions. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CLSM) were applied to characterize the hybrid PLGA NPs. The uptake of the hybrid PLGA NPs by human neutrophils was studied by Flow Cytometry and confocal microscopy. In addition, the induction of

  14. Introduction to human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Originally published in 1989 this title provided a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the burgeoning discipline of human-computer interaction for students, academics, and those from industry who wished to know more about the subject. Assuming very little knowledge, the book provides an overview of the diverse research areas that were at the time only gradually building into a coherent and well-structured field. It aims to explain the underlying causes of the cognitive, social and organizational problems typically encountered when computer systems are introduced. It is clear and co

  15. Human Information Processing and Interactive Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-10

    Design--A Challenge to Human Factors," Conference on .a4n-Computer interaction, pp. 95-101. Asch , Solomon E. (1969), "A Reformulation of the Problem...included I,,i 47 association as a deacriptive term and as a statement of pro- existent verbal hierarchies. Finally, Asch (1969) emphasized the importance...of conceiving of an association in terms of the relation cf :•o events A and B. Asch suggests that the problem of associations is part of the general

  16. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  17. Detection of human neutrophil elastase by aptamer affinity capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence using specified site fluorescently labeled aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunlong; Wang, Hailin; Zhao, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    As a multifunctional serine protease, human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays critical roles in a variety of physiopathological processes, such as acute lung injury, emphysema, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. The quantification of HNE is important in many applications. In this paper, we report an aptamer affinity capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) assay for detection of HNE using a tetramethylrhodamine (TMR)-labeled DNA aptamer probe. The affinity complex of HNE and DNA aptamer probe was well separated from the unbound aptamer probe in CE separation based on the difference of electrophoretic mobility. Broad complex peaks appeared due to possible multiple binding. The 45-mer aptamer having TMR labeling on the 40th T base was used as affinity probe, as larger complex peaks were obtained. We investigated the effects of various metal cations (Na + , K + , and Mg 2+ ) in sample buffer on the binding of HNE and the aptamer in CE-LIF analysis. The presence of Na + , K + , or Mg 2+ in sample buffer caused a decrease of complex peaks, and Mg 2+ showed a larger effect. Under optimized conditions, this aptamer CE-LIF assay enabled the detection of HNE at 0.5 nM. This assay showed good specificity and allowed for detection of HNE spiked in diluted human serum sample. Graphical abstract The complex of HNE and DNA aptamer probe was isolated from the unbound aptamer probe in CE separation due to difference of electrophoretic mobility, allowing a CE-LIF assay for HNE.

  18. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ricci-Azevedo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1 immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be

  19. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C A V; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  20. Measuring Multimodal Synchrony for Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    England, D.; Reidsma, Dennis; Sheridan, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Crane, B.; Tschacher, Wolfgang; Ramseyer, Fabian

    Nonverbal synchrony is an important element in human-human interaction. It can also play various roles in human-computer interaction. This paper surveys some of these uses, and presents a quantitative method for measuring the level of nonverbal synchrony in an interaction.

  1. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace,

  2. Human computer interaction using hand gesture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Silas; Nguyen, Hung T

    2008-01-01

    Hand gesture is a very natural form of human interaction and can be used effectively in human computer interaction (HCI). This project involves the design and implementation of a HCI using a small hand-worn wireless module with a 3-axis accelerometer as the motion sensor. The small stand-alone unit contains an accelerometer and a wireless Zigbee transceiver with microcontroller. To minimize intrusiveness to the user, the module is designed to be small (3cm by 4 cm). A time-delay neural network algorithm is developed to analyze the time series data from the 3-axis accelerometer. Power consumption is reduced by the non-continuous transmission of data and the use of low-power components, efficient algorithm and sleep mode between sampling for the wireless module. A home control interface is designed so that the user can control home appliances by moving through menus. The results demonstrate the feasibility of controlling home appliances using hand gestures and would present an opportunity for a section of the aging population and disabled people to lead a more independent life.

  3. Temporal stability in human interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Renato; Fabbri, Ricardo; Antunes, Deborah Christina; Pisani, Marilia Mello; de Oliveira, Osvaldo Novais

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on stable (or invariant) properties of human interaction networks, with benchmarks derived from public email lists. Activity, recognized through messages sent, along time and topology were observed in snapshots in a timeline, and at different scales. Our analysis shows that activity is practically the same for all networks across timescales ranging from seconds to months. The principal components of the participants in the topological metrics space remain practically unchanged as different sets of messages are considered. The activity of participants follows the expected scale-free trace, thus yielding the hub, intermediary and peripheral classes of vertices by comparison against the Erdös-Rényi model. The relative sizes of these three sectors are essentially the same for all email lists and the same along time. Typically, 45% are peripheral vertices. Similar results for the distribution of participants in the three sectors and for the relative importance of the topological metrics were obtained for 12 additional networks from Facebook, Twitter and ParticipaBR. These properties are consistent with the literature and may be general for human interaction networks, which has important implications for establishing a typology of participants based on quantitative criteria.

  4. Functional characterization of mitochondria in neutrophils: a role restricted to apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, N. A.; Geissler, J.; Srinivasula, S. M.; Alnemri, E. S.; Roos, D.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondria are known to combine life-supporting functions with participation in apoptosis by controlling caspase activity. Here, we report that in human blood neutrophils the mitochondria are different, because they preserve mainly death-mediating abilities. Neutrophil mitochondria hardly

  5. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  6. Interaction between bioactive glasses and human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efflandt, S E; Magne, P; Douglas, W H; Francis, L F

    2002-06-01

    This study explores the interaction between bioactive glasses and dentin from extracted human teeth in simulated oral conditions. Bioactive glasses in the Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) and MgO-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) systems were prepared as polished disks. Teeth were prepared by grinding to expose dentin and etching with phosphoric acid. A layer of saliva was placed between the two, and the pair was secured with an elastic band and immersed in saliva at 37 degrees C for 5, 21 or 42 days. The bioactive glasses adhered to dentin, while controls showed no such interaction. A continuous interface between the bioactive glass and dentin was imaged using cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, after alcohol dehydration and critical point drying, fracture occurred due to stresses from dentin shrinkage. SEM investigations showed a microstructurally different material at the fractured interface. Chemical analyses revealed that ions from the glass penetrated into the dentin and that the surface of the glass in contact with the dentin was modified. Microdiffractometry showed the presence of apatite at the interface. Bonding appears to be due to an affinity of collagen for the glass surface and chemical interaction between the dentin and glass, leading to apatite formation at the interface.

  7. Neutrophil perversion in demyelinating autoimmune diseases: Mechanisms to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Courtney S; Nantes, Julia C; Whittaker Hawkins, Ryder F; Vallières, Luc

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophils are essential to a healthy life, yet pose a threat if improperly controlled. Neutrophil perversion is well documented in a variety of inflammatory disorders (e.g. arthritis, lupus, psoriasis), but is only beginning to be demystified in autoimmune demyelination, the most common cause of neurological disability in young adults. Using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), several molecules that help neutrophils invade the central nervous system (CNS) have been identified. Mechanisms by which neutrophils may contribute to demyelination have also been proposed (e.g. secretion of endothelial/leukocytic modulators, antigen presentation to T cells, myelin degradation and phagocytosis). In human, neutrophils are seen in the CNS of people with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and other severe variants of autoimmune demyelinating diseases. At the time of autopsy for multiple sclerosis (MS) - often many years after its onset - neutrophils appear to have escaped the scene of the crime. However, new clues implicate neutrophils in MS relapses and progression. This warrants further investigating 1) the differential importance of neutrophils among demyelinating diseases, 2) the largely unknown effects of current MS therapies on neutrophils, and 3) the potential of neutrophil proteins as clinical biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of Extracellular Traps against Aspergillus fumigatus In Vitro and in Infected Lung Tissue Is Dependent on Invading Neutrophils and Influenced by Hydrophobin RodA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Nietzsche, Sandor; Thywißen, Andreas; Jeron, Andreas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Brakhage, Axel A.; Gunzer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages and neutrophils are known to kill conidia, whereas hyphae are killed mainly by neutrophils. Since hyphae are too large to be engulfed, neutrophils possess an array of extracellular killing mechanisms including the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of nuclear DNA decorated with fungicidal proteins. However, until now NET formation in response to A. fumigatus has only been demonstrated in vitro, the importance of neutrophils for their production in vivo is unclear and the molecular mechanisms of the fungus to defend against NET formation are unknown. Here, we show that human neutrophils produce NETs in vitro when encountering A. fumigatus. In time-lapse movies NET production was a highly dynamic process which, however, was only exhibited by a sub-population of cells. NETosis was maximal against hyphae, but reduced against resting and swollen conidia. In a newly developed mouse model we could then demonstrate the existence and measure the kinetics of NET formation in vivo by 2-photon microscopy of Aspergillus-infected lungs. We also observed the enormous dynamics of neutrophils within the lung and their ability to interact with and phagocytose fungal elements in situ. Furthermore, systemic neutrophil depletion in mice almost completely inhibited NET formation in lungs, thus directly linking the immigration of neutrophils with NET formation in vivo. By using fungal mutants and purified proteins we demonstrate that hydrophobin RodA, a surface protein making conidia immunologically inert, led to reduced NET formation of neutrophils encountering Aspergillus fungal elements. NET-dependent killing of Aspergillus-hyphae could be demonstrated at later time-points, but was only moderate. Thus, these data establish that NET formation occurs in vivo during host defence against A. fumigatus, but suggest

  9. Platelets: New Bricks in the Building of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carestia, Agostina; Kaufman, Tomas; Schattner, Mirta

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being key elements in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets have an important role in the inflammatory and innate immune response. This activity is associated with their capability to recognize pathogens through the expression of toll-like receptors, the secretion of various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors stored within their granules, and the expression of cell adhesion molecules that allows interaction with other immune cells, mainly neutrophils and monocytes. As part of the first line of defense, neutrophils control invading pathogens by phagocytosis, the release of antimicrobial proteins during degranulation, or through the formation of web-like structures named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are formed by chromatin, proteases, and antimicrobial proteins, and their main function is to trap and kill bacteria, virus, and fungi, avoiding their dissemination. Besides microorganisms, NET formation is also triggered by proinflammatory molecules and platelets. The uncontrolled formation of NETs might exert tissue damage and has been involved in a pathogenic mechanism of autoimmune and prothrombotic clinical conditions. In this review, we discuss the role of platelets in NET generation highlighting the mediators, stimuli, and molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, both in human and murine models.

  10. The paradox of the neutrophil's role in tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, George B; Halterman, Marc W; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2011-03-01

    The neutrophil is an essential component of the innate immune system, and its function is vital to human life. Its production increases in response to virtually all forms of inflammation, and subsequently, it can accumulate in blood and tissue to varying degrees. Although its participation in the inflammatory response is often salutary by nature of its normal interaction with vascular endothelium and its capability to enter tissues and respond to chemotactic gradients and to phagocytize and kill microrganisms, it can contribute to processes that impair vascular integrity and blood flow. The mechanisms that the neutrophil uses to kill microorganisms also have the potential to injure normal tissue under special circumstances. Its paradoxical role in the pathophysiology of disease is particularly, but not exclusively, notable in seven circumstances: 1) diabetic retinopathy, 2) sickle cell disease, 3) TRALI, 4) ARDS, 5) renal microvasculopathy, 6) stroke, and 7) acute coronary artery syndrome. The activated neutrophil's capability to become adhesive to endothelium, to generate highly ROS, and to secrete proteases gives it the potential to induce local vascular and tissue injury. In this review, we summarize the evidence for its role as a mediator of tissue injury in these seven conditions, making it or its products potential therapeutic targets.

  11. Autophagy Primes Neutrophils for Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation during Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Youn, Young-Jin; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Hee; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Yong Bum; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Ko, Yousang; Lee, Suh-Young; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Myung Jae; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are key effectors in the host's immune response to sepsis. Excessive stimulation or dysregulated neutrophil functions are believed to be responsible for sepsis pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating functional plasticity of neutrophils during sepsis have not been fully determined. We investigated the role of autophagy in neutrophil functions during sepsis in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Neutrophils were isolated from patients with sepsis and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The levels of reactive oxygen species generation, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and granule release, and the autophagic status were evaluated. The effect of neutrophil autophagy augmentation was further evaluated in a mouse model of sepsis. Neutrophils isolated from patients who survived sepsis showed an increase in autophagy induction, and were primed for NET formation in response to subsequent PMA stimulation. In contrast, neutrophils isolated from patients who did not survive sepsis showed dysregulated autophagy and a decreased response to PMA stimulation. The induction of autophagy primed healthy neutrophils for NET formation and vice versa. In a mouse model of sepsis, the augmentation of autophagy improved survival via a NET-dependent mechanism. These results indicate that neutrophil autophagy primes neutrophils for increased NET formation, which is important for proper neutrophil effector functions during sepsis. Our study provides important insights into the role of autophagy in neutrophils during sepsis.

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential biological processes in healthy neonatal cord neutrophils and adult neutrophils

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiang

    2014-06-11

    Neonatal neutrophils are characterized by the immaturity of bactericidal mechanisms that contributes largely to neonatal mortality. However, underlying molecular mechanism associated with the immaturity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analysis on neonatal neutrophils derived from human cord blood and adult peripheral neutrophils. A total of 1332 proteins were identified and quantified, and 127 proteins were characterized as differentially expressed between adult and cord neutrophils. The differentially expressed proteins are mapped in KEGG pathways into five clusters and indicated impaired functions of neonatal neutrophils in proteasome, lysosome, phagosome, and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In particular, many proteins associated with NETosis, a critical mechanism for antimicrobial process and auto-clearance, were also found to be downregulated in cord neutrophils. This study represents a first comparative proteome profiling of neonatal and adult neutrophils, and provides a global view of differentially expressed proteome for enhancing our understanding of their various functional difference. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Human Neutrophil Lipocalin in Activated Whole Blood Is a Specific and Rapid Diagnostic Biomarker of Bacterial Infections in the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venge, Per; Eriksson, Ann-Katrin; Douhan-Håkansson, Lena; Pauksen, Karlis

    2017-07-01

    The distinction between bacterial and viral causes of infections of the respiratory tract is a major but important clinical challenge. We investigated the diagnostic performance of human neutrophil lipocalin (HNL) in respiratory tract infections compared to those of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT). Patients were recruited from the emergency department and from a primary care unit (n = 162). The clinical diagnosis with regard to bacterial or viral cause of infection was complemented with objective microbiological/serological testing. HNL was measured in whole blood after preactivation with the neutrophil activator formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP) (B-HNL), and CRP and PCT were measured in plasma. Head-to-head comparisons of the three biomarkers showed that B-HNL was a superior diagnostic means to distinguish between causes of infections, with areas under the concentration-time curve (AUCs) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for HNL of 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 0.96) and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.82 to 0.97) for all respiratory infections and for upper respiratory infections, respectively, compared to 0.72 (95% CI, 0.63 to 0.80) and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.56 to 0.79) for CRP, respectively (P = 0.001). In relation to major clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infections (cough, sore throat, stuffy nose, and signs of sinusitis), AUCs varied between 0.88 and 0.93 in those patients with likely etiology (i.e., etiology is likely determined) of infection, compared to 0.63 and 0.71 for CRP, respectively, and nonsignificant AUCs for PCT. The diagnostic performance of B-HNL is superior to that of plasma CRP (P-CRP) and plasma PCT (P-PCT) in respiratory tract infections, and the activity specifically reflects bacterial challenge in the body. The rapid and accurate analysis of HNL by point-of-care technologies should be a major advancement in the diagnosis and management of respiratory infections with respect to antibiotic

  14. Upregulated expression of human neutrophil peptides 1, 2 and 3 (HNP 1-3 in colon cancer serum and tumours: a biomarker study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers for localized colon tumours and for prognosis following therapy are needed. Proteomics research is currently producing numerous biomarker studies with clinical potential. We investigate the protein composition of plasma and of tumour extracts with the aim of identifying biomarkers for colon cancer. Methods By Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionisation – Time Of Flight / Mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS we compare the protein profiles of colon cancer serum with serum from healthy individuals and the protein profiles of colon tumours with normal colon tissue. By size exclusion chromatography, we investigate the binding of HNP 1-3 to high mass plasma proteins. By microflow we investigate the effect of HNP 1-3 on mammalian cells. Results Human Neutrophil Peptides -1, -2 and -3 (HNP 1-3, also known as alfa-defensin-1, -2 and -3, are present in elevated concentrations in serum from colon cancer patients and in protein extracts from colon tumours. A fraction of HNP 1-3 in serum is bound to unidentified high mass plasma proteins. HNP 1-3 purified from colon tumours are lethal to mammalian cells. Conclusions HNP 1-3 may serve as blood markers for colon cancer in combination with other diagnostic tools. We propose that HNP 1-3 are carried into the bloodstream by attaching to high mass plasma proteins in the tumour microenvironment. We discuss the effect of HNP 1-3 on tumour progression.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

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    Yuandani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL. There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells. The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL. Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute.

  16. Reliability of Human Subject - Artificial System Interactions

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    M. Novák

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Main problems related to reliability of interaction between human subject and artificial system (namely of the transportation character are discussed. The paper consists of three mayor parts:The first one is devoted to the theoretical backgrounds of the problem from the both theory of system reliability and neurology/psychology views.Second part presents the discussion of relevant methodologies of the classification and prediction of the reliability decline. The methodology based on EEG pattern analysis is chosen as the appropriate one for the presented task. The key phenomenon of "micro-sleep" is discussed in detail.The last part presents some latest experimental results in context of presented knowledge. Proposals for the future studies are presented at the end of the presented article. The special interest should be devoted to the analysis and in-time prediction of fatal attention decreases and to the design and construction of the respective on-board applicable warning system.

  17. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  18. Interaction in Information Systems - Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and analyze the role of interaction in information systems. Interaction represents dynamic relations between actors and other elements in information systems. We introduce a semi-formal notation that we use to describe a set of interaction patterns and we i...

  19. Loving Machines: Theorizing Human and Sociable-Technology Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Garlock, Glenda

    Today, human and sociable-technology interaction is a contested site of inquiry. Some regard social robots as an innovative medium of communication that offer new avenues for expression, communication, and interaction. Other others question the moral veracity of human-robot relationships, suggesting that such associations risk psychological impoverishment. What seems clear is that the emergence of social robots in everyday life will alter the nature of social interaction, bringing with it a need for new theories to understand the shifting terrain between humans and machines. This work provides a historical context for human and sociable robot interaction. Current research related to human-sociable-technology interaction is considered in relation to arguments that confront a humanist view that confine 'technological things' to the nonhuman side of the human/nonhuman binary relation. Finally, it recommends a theoretical approach for the study of human and sociable-technology interaction that accommodates increasingly personal relations between human and nonhuman technologies.

  20. A review of the proposed role of neutrophils in rodent amebic liver abscess models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Meza, Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Drago-Serrano, María Elisa; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Cárdenas-Jaramillo, Luz María; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Host invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, the pathogenic agent of amebiasis, can lead to the development of amebic liver abscess (ALA). Due to the difficulty of exploring host and amebic factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALA in humans, most studies have been conducted with animal models (e.g., mice, gerbils, and hamsters). Histopathological findings reveal that the chronic phase of ALA in humans corresponds to lytic or liquefactive necrosis, whereas in rodent models there is granulomatous inflammation. However, the use of animal models has provided important information on molecules and mechanisms of the host/parasite interaction. Hence, the present review discusses the possible role of neutrophils in the effector immune response in ALA in rodents. Properly activated neutrophils are probably successful in eliminating amebas through oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, including neutrophil degranulation, the generation of free radicals (O2(-), H2O2, HOCl) and peroxynitrite, the activation of NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymes, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). On the other hand, if amebas are not eliminated in the early stages of infection, they trigger a prolonged and exaggerated inflammatory response that apparently causes ALAs. Genetic differences in animals and humans are likely to be key to a successful host immune response. © R. Campos-Rodríguez et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  1. A review of the proposed role of neutrophils in rodent amebic liver abscess models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos-Rodríguez Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, the pathogenic agent of amebiasis, can lead to the development of amebic liver abscess (ALA. Due to the difficulty of exploring host and amebic factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALA in humans, most studies have been conducted with animal models (e.g., mice, gerbils, and hamsters. Histopathological findings reveal that the chronic phase of ALA in humans corresponds to lytic or liquefactive necrosis, whereas in rodent models there is granulomatous inflammation. However, the use of animal models has provided important information on molecules and mechanisms of the host/parasite interaction. Hence, the present review discusses the possible role of neutrophils in the effector immune response in ALA in rodents. Properly activated neutrophils are probably successful in eliminating amebas through oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, including neutrophil degranulation, the generation of free radicals (O2−, H2O2, HOCl and peroxynitrite, the activation of NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO enzymes, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. On the other hand, if amebas are not eliminated in the early stages of infection, they trigger a prolonged and exaggerated inflammatory response that apparently causes ALAs. Genetic differences in animals and humans are likely to be key to a successful host immune response.

  2. A review of the proposed role of neutrophils in rodent amebic liver abscess models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Meza, Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Drago-Serrano, María Elisa; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Ventura-Juárez, Javier; Cárdenas-Jaramillo, Luz María; Pacheco-Yepez, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Host invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, the pathogenic agent of amebiasis, can lead to the development of amebic liver abscess (ALA). Due to the difficulty of exploring host and amebic factors involved in the pathogenesis of ALA in humans, most studies have been conducted with animal models (e.g., mice, gerbils, and hamsters). Histopathological findings reveal that the chronic phase of ALA in humans corresponds to lytic or liquefactive necrosis, whereas in rodent models there is granulomatous inflammation. However, the use of animal models has provided important information on molecules and mechanisms of the host/parasite interaction. Hence, the present review discusses the possible role of neutrophils in the effector immune response in ALA in rodents. Properly activated neutrophils are probably successful in eliminating amebas through oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms, including neutrophil degranulation, the generation of free radicals (O2−, H2O2, HOCl) and peroxynitrite, the activation of NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymes, and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). On the other hand, if amebas are not eliminated in the early stages of infection, they trigger a prolonged and exaggerated inflammatory response that apparently causes ALAs. Genetic differences in animals and humans are likely to be key to a successful host immune response. PMID:26880421

  3. Early diagnostic method for sepsis based on neutrophil MR imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanhua Han

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Mouse and human neutrophils could be more effectively labelled by Mannan-coated SPION in vitro than Feridex. Sepsis analog neutrophils labelled by Mannan-coated SPIONs could be efficiently detected on MR images, which may serve as an early diagnostic method for sepsis.

  4. Experimental and Human Evidence for Lipocalin-2 (Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin [NGAL]) in the Development of Cardiac Hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Prestes, Priscilla R; Byars, Sean G; Ritchie, Scott C; Würtz, Peter; Patel, Sheila K; Booth, Scott A; Rana, Indrajeetsinh; Minoda, Yosuke; Berzins, Stuart P; Curl, Claire L; Bell, James R; Wai, Bryan; Srivastava, Piyush M; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ruohonen, Saku; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitoharju, Emma; Havulinna, Aki; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; McGlynn, Maree; Kelly, Jason; Wlodek, Mary E; Lewandowski, Paul A; Delbridge, Lea M; Burrell, Louise M; Inouye, Michael; Harrap, Stephen B; Charchar, Fadi J

    2017-06-14

    Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of developing heart failure and cardiovascular death. The neutrophil inflammatory protein, lipocalin-2 (LCN2/NGAL), is elevated in certain forms of cardiac hypertrophy and acute heart failure. However, a specific role for LCN2 in predisposition and etiology of hypertrophy and the relevant genetic determinants are unclear. Here, we defined the role of LCN2 in concentric cardiac hypertrophy in terms of pathophysiology, inflammatory expression networks, and genomic determinants. We used 3 experimental models: a polygenic model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, a model of intrauterine growth restriction and Lcn2 -knockout mouse; cultured cardiomyocytes; and 2 human cohorts: 114 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 2064 healthy subjects of the YFS (Young Finns Study). In hypertrophic heart rats, cardiac and circulating Lcn2 was significantly overexpressed before, during, and after development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Lcn2 expression was increased in hypertrophic hearts in a model of intrauterine growth restriction, whereas Lcn2 -knockout mice had smaller hearts. In cultured cardiomyocytes, Lcn2 activated molecular hypertrophic pathways and increased cell size, but reduced proliferation and cell numbers. Increased LCN2 was associated with cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. In the YFS, LCN2 expression was associated with body mass index and cardiac mass and with levels of inflammatory markers. The single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs13297295, located near LCN2 defined a significant cis -eQTL for LCN2 expression. Direct effects of LCN2 on cardiomyocyte size and number and the consistent associations in experimental and human analyses reveal a central role for LCN2 in the ontogeny of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  5. Soil and Human Interactions in Maya Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Timothy; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2013-04-01

    Since the early 1990s, we have studied Maya interaction with soils in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and elsewhere. We studied upland and lowland soils, but here we focus on seasonal or 'Bajo' wetlands and perennial wetlands for different reasons. Around the bajos, the ancient Maya focused on intensive agriculture and habitation despite the difficulties their Vertisol soils posed. For the perennial wetlands, small populations spread diffusely through Mollisol and Histisol landscapes with large scale, intensive agro-ecosystems. These wetlands also represent important repositories for both environmental change and how humans responded in situ to environmental changes. Work analyzing bajo soils has recorded significant diversity but the soil and sediment record shows two main eras of soil instability: the Pleistocene-Holocene transition as rainfall fluctuated and increased and tropical forest pulsed through the region, and the Maya Preclassic to Classic 3000 to 1000 BP as deforestation, land use intensity, and drying waxed and waned. The ancient Maya adapted their bajo soil ecosystems successfully through agro-engineering but they also withdrew in many important places in the Late Preclassic about 2000 BP and Terminal Classic about 1200 BP. We continue to study and debate the importance of perennial wetland agro-ecosystems, but it is now clear that Maya interaction with these soil landscapes was significant and multifaceted. Based on soil excavation and coring with a broad toolkit of soil stratigraphy, chemistry, and paleoecology from 2001 to 2013, our results show the ancient Maya interacted with their wetland soils to maintain cropland for maize, tree crops, arrow root, and cassava against relative sea level rise, increased flooding, and aggradation by gypsum precipitation and sedimentation. We have studied these interactions across an area of 2000 km2 in Northern Belize to understand how Maya response varied and how these soil environments varied over time and distance

  6. Propagation of thrombosis by neutrophils and extracellular nucleosome networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophils, early mediators of the innate immune defense, are recruited to developing thrombi in different types of thrombosis. They amplify intravascular coagulation by stimulating the tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway via inactivation of endogenous anticoagulants, enhancing factor XII activation or decreasing plasmin generation. Neutrophil-dependent prothrombotic mechanisms are supported by the externalization of decondensed nucleosomes and granule proteins that together form neutrophil extracellular traps. These traps, either in intact or fragmented form, are causally involved in various forms of experimental thrombosis as first indicated by their role in the enhancement of both microvascular thrombosis during bacterial infection and carotid artery thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps can be induced by interactions of neutrophils with activated platelets; vice versa, these traps enhance adhesion of platelets via von Willebrand factor. Neutrophil-induced microvascular thrombus formation can restrict the dissemination and survival of blood-borne bacteria and thereby sustain intravascular immunity. Dysregulation of this innate immune pathway may support sepsis-associated coagulopathies. Notably, neutrophils and extracellular nucleosomes, together with platelets, critically promote fibrin formation during flow restriction-induced deep vein thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps/extracellular nucleosomes are increased in thrombi and in the blood of patients with different vaso-occlusive pathologies and could be therapeutically targeted for the prevention of thrombosis. Thus, during infections and in response to blood vessel damage, neutrophils and externalized nucleosomes are major promoters of intravascular blood coagulation and thrombosis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Breaking Fresh Ground in Human-Media Interaction Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    Human-Media Interaction research is devoted to methods and situations where humans individually or collectively interact with digital media, systems, devices and environments. Novel forms of interaction paradigms have been enabled by new sensor and actuator technology in the last decades, combining

  8. On the Rhetorical Contract in Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    An exploration of the rhetorical contract--i.e., the expectations for appropriate interaction--as it develops in human-computer interaction revealed that direct manipulation interfaces were more likely to establish social expectations. Study results suggest that the social nature of human-computer interactions can be examined with reference to the…

  9. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermin E. Guerra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions.

  11. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  12. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  13. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  14. Release of adenosine from human neutrophils stimulated by platelet activating factor, leukotriene B4 and opsonized zymosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sipka

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL stimulated by platelet activating factor (PAF, leukotriene B4 (LTB4 or opsonized zymosan (OZ released adenosine measured by thermospray high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in the cell-free supernatants. Stimulation by PAF or LTB4 resulted in a bellshaped concentration-effect curve; 5 × 10−7 M PAF, 10−8 M LTB4 and 500 μg ml−1 OZ induced peak adenosine release, thus cytotoxic concentrations did not elevate adenosine level in the supernatants. Therefore adenosine release was characteristic of viable cells. As calculated from concentration-effect curves, the rank order of potency for adenosine release was PAF > LTB > OZ. These resuits suggest that adenosine, when bound specifically to membrane receptor sites, may initiate signal transduction, and, in co-operation with other inflammatory mediators, may modulate phagocyte function, e.g. production of chemoluminescence (CL.

  15. Induction of oxidative burst response in human neutrophils by adherent staphylococci. Comparison between Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, U; Espersen, F; Skinhøj, P

    1993-01-01

    The ability of staphylococci adherent to silicone surfaces to induce superoxide anion (O2-) production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was investigated and compared with the same activity induced by planktonic bacteria. The responses to Staphylococcus aureus strain E 2371 and Staphylococcus...... epidermidis strain ATCC 14990 were compared. The staphylococci were allowed to adhere to silicone catheters for 2 h at 37 degrees C. After opsonization of adherent bacteria in 30% human AB-positive serum, the induction of superoxide anion production by PMNs was measured in a cytochrome C reduction assay. Both...... bacterial strains, when adhered to the surfaces, were able to induce superoxide anion production by PMNs to about the same extent. Comparing adherent and planktonic bacteria with these two bacterial strains, it was found that planktonic S. epidermidis induced one to three times higher superoxide anion...

  16. Mobile human-computer interaction perspective on mobile learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying a Mobile Human Computer Interaction (MHCI) view to the domain of education using Mobile Learning (Mlearning), the research outlines its understanding of the influences and effects of different interactions on the use of mobile technology...

  17. Affective processes in human-automation interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Stephanie M

    2011-08-01

    This study contributes to the literature on automation reliance by illuminating the influences of user moods and emotions on reliance on automated systems. Past work has focused predominantly on cognitive and attitudinal variables, such as perceived machine reliability and trust. However, recent work on human decision making suggests that affective variables (i.e., moods and emotions) are also important. Drawing from the affect infusion model, significant effects of affect are hypothesized. Furthermore, a new affectively laden attitude termed liking is introduced. Participants watched video clips selected to induce positive or negative moods, then interacted with a fictitious automated system on an X-ray screening task At five time points, important variables were assessed including trust, liking, perceived machine accuracy, user self-perceived accuracy, and reliance.These variables, along with propensity to trust machines and state affect, were integrated in a structural equation model. Happiness significantly increased trust and liking for the system throughout the task. Liking was the only variable that significantly predicted reliance early in the task. Trust predicted reliance later in the task, whereas perceived machine accuracy and user self-perceived accuracy had no significant direct effects on reliance at any time. Affective influences on automation reliance are demonstrated, suggesting that this decision-making process may be less rational and more emotional than previously acknowledged. Liking for a new system may be key to appropriate reliance, particularly early in the task. Positive affect can be easily induced and may be a lever for increasing liking.

  18. IL-4R(alpha), a new member that associates with Syk kinase: implication in IL-4-induced human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennaciri, Jamila; Girard, Denis

    2009-10-15

    Although Syk has been reported to be associated with IL-2R beta [corrected] and IL-15R alpha in some hematopoietic cells, its association has never been investigated in the IL-4/IL-4R system. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Syk is constitutively associated with IL-4R(alpha)in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and that IL-4 stimulation increases the amount of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha). Moreover, upon IL-4 treatment, a pool of Syk associated with IL-4R(alpha) is phosphorylated. We also report that such association is not unique to PMNs because Syk associates with IL-4R(alpha) in Raji and in PBMC cells. Stimulation of PMNs by IL-4 increased the amount of Syk associated with PLC-gamma2, pAkt, and alpha-tubulin. Pretreatment of cells with the Syk-selective inhibitor piceatannol or Syk inhibitor II, significantly inhibited the ability of IL-4 to enhance phagocytosis and cell adhesion and to delay apoptosis, and these results correlate with the ability of piceatannol to reduce Syk activation and its association with IL-4R(alpha). Down-regulation of Syk by antisense techniques demonstrates the importance of Syk in the antiapoptotic effect of IL-4. We conclude that association of Syk to IL-4R(alpha) is of biological significance and that IL-4R(alpha) is a new candidate to be added to the few cytokine receptor components which associate with Syk.

  19. Subcutaneous administration of interleukin-2 triggers Fcgamma receptor I expression on human peripheral blood neutrophils in solid and hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconocchia, G; Cococcetta, N Y; Campagnano, L; Amadori, S; Iorio, B; Boffo, V; Ferdinandi, V; Del Principe, I; Adorno, D; Casciani, C U

    2001-01-01

    Freshly isolated human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNCs) constitutively express Fcgamma receptor (Fc-gammaR) II and FcgammaRIII on the cell surface but not FcgammaRI. Cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF), and granulocyte-CSF trigger FcgammaRI expression on (PMNCs). Because PMNCs express interleukin (IL)-2 receptor, we investigated whether IL-2 can induce FcgammaRI expression on PMNCs isolated from IL-2-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC) and low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LGNHL) patients. Pretherapy flow cytometry analysis of Fcgamma receptors on PMNCs did not show FcgammaRI expression. Interestingly, 3 days after therapy, PMNCs displayed a detectable amount of FcgammaRI on the cell surface. Kinetic studies on the in vivo effects of IL-2 on MRCC patients showed that FcgammaRI was transiently expressed, starting within 3-6 days of therapy, remaining expressed for 10-15 days, and rapidly declining, whereas such expression remained stable for months in LGNHL patients. In contrast, Fc-gammaRII was not affected. In addition, FcgammaRI+ PMNCs coated in vitro with a bispecific antibody Fab anti-FcgammaRI x anti-HER-2/neu formed intercellular conjugates with a human HER-2/neu-transfected 3T3 cell line (HER-2/neu-3T3). Interleukin-2 treatment increased the number of FcgammaRIII low eosinophils, leading to a change in FcgammaRIII distribution among granulocyte cell subsets. In vitro IL-2 treatment of purified PMNCs failed to generate Fc-gammaRI expression, suggesting that IL-2 indirectly causes FcgammaRI expression. During the IL-2 administration, we did not observe significant changes in IFNgamma serum level. In conclusion, our observation may be used to potentiate the antitumor effects of IL-2 in novel immunotherapy regimens, perhaps by redirecting FcgammaRI+ PMNCs against cancer cells by heteroconjugate antibodies and monitoring the biologic activity of subcutaneous IL-2 in cancer patients.

  20. Neutrophils Induce Astroglial Differentiation and Migration of Human Neural Stem Cells via C1q and C3a Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Francisca; Flanagan, Lisa; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory processes play a key role in pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases/trauma, but the effect of immune cells and factors on neurotransplantation strategies remains unclear. We hypothesized that cellular and humoral components of innate immunity alter fate and migration of human neural stem cells (hNSC). In these experiments, conditioned media collected from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) selectively increased hNSC astrogliogenesis and promoted cell migration in vitro. PMN were shown to generate C1q and C3a; exposure of hNSC to PMN-synthesized concentrations of these complement proteins promoted astrogliogenesis and cell migration. Furthermore, in vitro, Abs directed against C1q and C3a reversed the fate and migration effects observed. In a proof-of-concept in vivo experiment, blockade of C1q and C3a transiently altered hNSC migration and reversed astroglial fate after spinal cord injury. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the innate/humoral inflammatory microenvironment may impact the potential of cell-based therapies for recovery and repair following CNS pathology. PMID:28687659

  1. Human Metabolism and Interactions of Deployment-Related Chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hodgson, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the human-metabolism and metabolic interactions of a subset of deployment-related chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, DEET, permethrin, pyridostigmine bromide, and sulfur mustard metabolites...

  2. Human-structure Interaction and Implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    On civil engineering structures human occupancy is often modeled as a static load. Modeling humans as a static load is a simplification of matters, as will be demonstrated in the paper. The paper addresses the complexity of having both passive humans (sitting or standing) as well as active humans...

  3. Human agency beliefs influence behaviour during virtual social interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brock, Jon; Caruana, Nathan; Spirou, Dean

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the emergence of relatively inexpensive and accessible virtual reality technologies, it is now possible to deliver compelling and realistic simulations of human-to-human interaction...

  4. Human Work Interaction Design for Pervasive and Smart Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Pedro F.; Lopes, Arminda; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2014-01-01

    ' experience and outputs? This workshop focuses on answering this question to support professionals, academia, national labs, and industry engaged in human work analysis and interaction design for the workplace. Conversely, tools, procedures, and professional competences for designing human-centered...

  5. Human-Computer Interaction and Information Management Research Needs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In a visionary future, Human-Computer Interaction HCI and Information Management IM have the potential to enable humans to better manage their lives through the use...

  6. Gene expression in blood changes rapidly in neutrophils and monocytes after ischemic stroke in humans: a microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Xu, Huichun; Du, XinLi; Lit, Lisa; Walker, Wynn; Lu, Aigang; Ran, Ruiqiong; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Reilly, Melinda; Pancioli, Art; Khoury, Jane C; Sauerbeck, Laura R; Carrozzella, Janice A; Spilker, Judith; Clark, Joseph; Wagner, Kenneth R; Jauch, Edward C; Chang, Dongwoo J; Verro, Piero; Broderick, Joseph P; Sharp, Frank R

    2006-08-01

    Ischemic brain and peripheral white blood cells release cytokines, chemokines and other molecules that activate the peripheral white blood cells after stroke. To assess gene expression in these peripheral white blood cells, whole blood was examined using oligonucleotide microarrays in 15 patients at 2.4+/-0.5, 5 and 24 h after onset of ischemic stroke and compared with control blood samples. The 2.4-h blood samples were drawn before patients were treated either with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) alone or with tPA plus Eptifibatide (the Combination approach to Lysis utilizing Eptifibatide And Recombinant tPA trial). Most genes induced in whole blood at 2 to 3 h were also induced at 5 and 24 h. Separate studies showed that the genes induced at 2 to 24 h after stroke were expressed mainly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and to a lesser degree by monocytes. These genes included: matrix metalloproteinase 9; S100 calcium-binding proteins P, A12 and A9; coagulation factor V; arginase I; carbonic anhydrase IV; lymphocyte antigen 96 (cluster of differentiation (CD)96); monocarboxylic acid transporter (6); ets-2 (erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2); homeobox gene Hox 1.11; cytoskeleton-associated protein 4; N-formylpeptide receptor; ribonuclease-2; N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase; BCL6; glycogen phosphorylase. The fold change of these genes varied from 1.6 to 6.8 and these 18 genes correctly classified 10/15 patients at 2.4 h, 13/15 patients at 5 h and 15/15 patients at 24 h after stroke. These data provide insights into the inflammatory responses after stroke in humans, and should be helpful in diagnosis, understanding etiology and pathogenesis, and guiding acute treatment and development of new treatments for stroke.

  7. Comparative antioxidant activity of cultivated and wild Vaccinium species investigated by EPR, human neutrophil burst and COMET assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, P C; Antonacci, R; Wang, Y Y; Lattuada, N; Dal Sasso, M; Marabini, L; Fibiani, M; Lo Scalzo, R

    2013-01-01

    The Vaccinium (V.) spp. berries are considered a source of antioxidants, mainly belonging to polyphenols, specifically flavonoids and anthocyanins. Wild genotypes generally contain more antioxidants than cultivated counterparts. So, seven different antioxidants assays on extracts from cultivated and wild Vaccinium berries were performed, to evaluate their difference in terms of bioactivity on oxidative protection and minimum dosage to have a significant action. Four cell-free antioxidant assays (ABTS radical scavenging and electronic paramagnetic resonance using Fremy's salt, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical), and three assays on human cells (two luminol amplified chemiluminescence, LACL, one on DNA damage, COMET) were used to measure the effects of cultivated blueberry (V. corymbosum) and wild bilberry (V. myrtillus) on the differently induced oxidative stress. Concentrations vs activity patterns were obtained by successive dilutions of extracts in order to identify both EC50 and minimum significant activity (MSA). All the assays (except for the hydroxyl radical scavenging) showed a good relationship mainly with anthocyanin and polyphenol content and the significant greater activity of wild Vaccinium extracts. In fact, LACL data gave an EC50 of 11.8 and an MSA of 5.2 g were calculated as fresh weight dosage in cultivated berries, compared with lower doses in wild berries, EC50 of 5.7 g and MSA of 3.4 g. Wild Vaccinium extracts averaged 3.04 and 2.40 fold more activity than cultivated extracts by EC50 and MSA, respectively. COMET assay confirmed the stronger action on DNA protection in wild samples.

  8. Antioxidant activity of Calendula officinalis extract: inhibitory effects on chemiluminescence of human neutrophil bursts and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra; Falchi, Mario; Bertelli, Aldo; Morelli, Roberto; Lo Scalzo, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in natural chemical compounds from aromatic, spicy, medicinal and other plants with antioxidant properties in order to find new sources of compounds inactivating free radicals generated by metabolic pathways within body tissue and cells, mainly polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) whose overregulated recruitment and activation generate a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), leading to an imbalance of redox homeostasis and oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine whether a propylene glycol extract of Calendula officinalis interferes with ROS and RNS during the PMN respiratory bursts, and to establish the lowest concentration at which it still exerts antioxidant activity by means of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was also used in order to confirm the activity of the C. officinalis extract. The C. officinalis extract exerted its anti-ROS and anti-RNS activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with significant effects being observed at even very low concentrations: 0.20 microg/ml without L-arginine, 0.10 microg/ml when L-arginine was added to the test with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 0.05 microg/ml when it was added to the test with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. The EPR study confirmed these findings, 0.20 microg/ml being the lowest concentration of C. officinalis extract that significantly reduced 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl. These findings are interesting for improving the antioxidant network and restoring the redox balance in human cells with plant-derived molecules as well as extending the possibility of antagonizing the oxidative stress generated in living organisms when the balance is in favor of free radicals as a result of the depletion of cell antioxidants. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Recapitulation of in vivo-like neutrophil transendothelial migration using a microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Newbold, Molly A; Haynes, Christy L

    2015-08-07

    Neutrophil transendothelial migration (TEM) is an essential physiological process that regulates the recruitment of neutrophils in response to inflammatory signals. Herein, a versatile hydrogel scaffold is embedded in a microfluidic platform that supports an endothelial cell layer cultured in the vertical direction and highly stable chemical gradients; this construct is employed to mimic the in vivo neutrophil TEM process. We found that the number of neutrophils migrating across the endothelial cell layer is dependent on the presented chemoattractant concentration and the spatial profile of the chemical gradient. Endothelial cells play a critical role in neutrophil TEM by promoting neutrophil morphological changes as well as expressing surface receptor molecules that are indispensable for inducing neutrophil attachment and migration. Furthermore, the microfluidic device also supports competing chemoattractant gradients to facilitate neutrophil TEM studies in complex microenvironments that more accurately model the in vivo system than simplified microenvironments without the complexity of chemical gradients. This work demonstrates that combinations of any two different chemoattractants induce more significant neutrophil migration than a single chemoattractant in the same total amount, indicating synergistic effects between distinct chemoattractants. The in vitro reconstitution of neutrophil TEM successfully translates planar neutrophil movement into in vivo-like neutrophil recruitment and accelerates understanding of cellular interactions between neutrophils and endothelial cells within the complicated physiological milieu.

  10. Visceral leishmaniasis patients display altered composition and maturity of neutrophils as well as impaired neutrophil effector functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalew Yizengaw

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunologically, active visceral leishmaniasis (VL is characterised by profound immunosuppression, severe systemic inflammatory responses and an impaired capacity to control parasite replication. Neutrophils are highly versatile cells, which play a crucial role in the induction as well as the resolution of inflammation, the control of pathogen replication and the regulation of immune responses. Neutrophil functions have been investigated in human cutaneous leishmaniasis, however, their role in human visceral leishmaniasis is poorly understood.In the present study we evaluated the activation status and effector functions of neutrophils in patients with active VL and after successful anti-leishmanial treatment. Our results show that neutrophils are highly activated and have degranulated; high levels of arginase, myeloperoxidase and elastase, all contained in neutrophils’ granules, were found in the plasma of VL patients. In addition, we show that a large proportion of these cells are immature. We also analysed effector functions of neutrophils that are essential for pathogen clearance and show that neutrophils have an impaired capacity to release neutrophil extracellular traps, produce reactive oxygen species and phagocytose bacterial particles, but not Leishmania parasites.Our results suggest that impaired effector functions, increased activation and immaturity of neutrophils play a key role in the pathogenesis of VL.

  11. Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human-Machine Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0006 Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions...AND SUBTITLE Impact of Human like Cues on Human Trust in Machines: Brain Imaging and Modeling Studies for Human -Machine Interactions 5a.  CONTRACT...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED: PB Public Release 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT When a human and an intelligent machine work together as a team, human

  12. Transcellular migration of neutrophils is a quantitatively significant pathway across dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Shana; Cammer, Michael; Raine, Cedric S; Lisanti, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil extravasation is central to inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In vivo, neutrophils have been shown to migrate through cell-to-cell junctions (paracellular pathway) or directly through the body of the endothelial cell (transcellular pathway). In vitro, however, neutrophil migration is a largely paracellular process where cells preferentially cross at tricellular corners devoid of tight junctions. To approximate the type of cells encountered by extravasating neutrophils in vivo, we developed a neutrophil-migration assay using primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. We show here that a large proportion of migrating neutrophils traverse a monolayer of microvascular endothelium using a purely transcellular pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that F-actin is rearranged similarly in neutrophils undergoing diapedesis along either route. This in vitro model closely simulates the physiological process of neutrophil extravasation in vivo and can be further utilized to evaluate the relative contribution of distinct migratory pathways to the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin disease.

  13. CIRCULATING CD11B EXPRESSION CORRELATES WITH THE NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE AND AIRWAY MCD-14 EXPRESSION IS ENHANCED FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently reported that baseline expression of circulating CD11b is associated with the magnitude of the neutrophil response following inhaled endotoxin. In this study, we examined whether circulating CD11b plays a similar role in the inflammatory response following inhaled ozo...

  14. Ficolin-1 is present in a highly mobilizable subset of human neutrophil granules and associates with the cell surface after stimulation with fMLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvig, Sara; Honoré, Christian Le Fèvre; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2009-01-01

    FCN1 gene expression largely in myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band cells with a profile quite similar to that of gelatinase. In accordance with this, biosynthesis studies of neutrophils precursor cells showed that ficolin-1 was primarily synthesized in myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band cells...

  15. Paracrine interactions between primary human macrophages and human fibroblasts enhance murine mammary gland humanization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jodie M; Miller, Tyler C; Kidacki, Michal; Ginsburg, Erika; Stuelten, Christina H; Stewart, Delisha A; Troester, Melissa A; Vonderhaar, Barbara K

    2012-06-25

    Macrophages comprise an essential component of the mammary microenvironment necessary for normal gland development. However, there is no viable in vivo model to study their role in normal human breast function. We hypothesized that adding primary human macrophages to the murine mammary gland would enhance and provide a novel approach to examine immune-stromal cell interactions during the humanization process. Primary human macrophages, in the presence or absence of ectopic estrogen stimulation, were used to humanize mouse mammary glands. Mechanisms of enhanced humanization were identified by cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography, western analysis, invasion and proliferation assays; results were confirmed with immunohistological analysis. The combined treatment of macrophages and estrogen stimulation significantly enhanced the percentage of the total gland humanized and the engraftment/outgrowth success rate. Timecourse analysis revealed the disappearance of the human macrophages by two weeks post-injection, suggesting that the improved overall growth and invasiveness of the fibroblasts provided a larger stromal bed for epithelial cell proliferation and structure formation. Confirming their promotion of fibroblasts humanization, estrogen-stimulated macrophages significantly enhanced fibroblast proliferation and invasion in vitro, as well as significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells in humanized glands. Cytokine/chemokine ELISAs, zymography and western analyses identified TNFα and MMP9 as potential mechanisms by which estrogen-stimulated macrophages enhanced humanization. Specific inhibitors to TNFα and MMP9 validated the effects of these molecules on fibroblast behavior in vitro, as well as by immunohistochemical analysis of humanized glands for human-specific MMP9 expression. Lastly, glands humanized with macrophages had enhanced engraftment and tumor growth compared to glands humanized with fibroblasts alone. Herein, we

  16. Assessment of human-snake interaction and its outcomes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human-snake interactions has always been associated with different outcomes. This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the human-snake interaction and its outcomes in Monduli District, northern Tanzania. Methods: Data collection was done through questionnaires, key informants interviews and ...

  17. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing....... Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight...

  18. Human-computer interaction and management information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    ""Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Applications"" offers state-of-the-art research by a distinguished set of authors who span the MIS and HCI fields. The original chapters provide authoritative commentaries and in-depth descriptions of research programs that will guide 21st century scholars, graduate students, and industry professionals. Human-Computer Interaction (or Human Factors) in MIS is concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. It is distinctiv

  19. Neutrophilic inflammation in asthma: mechanisms and therapeutic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hun Soo; Lee, Tae-Hyeong; Jun, Ji Ae; Baek, Ae Rin; Park, Jong-Sook; Koo, So-My; Kim, Yang-Ki; Lee, Ho Sung; Park, Choon-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophilic airway inflammation represents a pathologically distinct form of asthma and frequently appears in symptomatic adulthood asthmatics. However, clinical impacts and mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation have not been thoroughly evaluated up to date. Areas covered: Currently, distinct clinical manifestations, triggers, and molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation (namely Toll-like receptor, Th1, Th17, inflammasome) are under investigation in asthma. Furthermore, possible role of the neutrophilic inflammation is being investigated in respect to the airway remodeling. We searched the related literatures published during the past 10 years on the website of Pub Med under the title of asthma and neutrophilic inflammation in human. Expert commentary: Epidemiologic and experimental studies have revealed that the neutrophilic airway inflammation is induced by a wide variety of stimuli including ozone, particulate matters, cigarette smoke, occupational irritants, endotoxins, microbial infection and colonization, and aeroallergens. These triggers provoke diverse immune and inflammatory responses leading to progressive and sometimes irreversible airway obstruction. Clinically, neutrophilic airway inflammation is frequently associated with severe asthma and poor response to glucocorticoid therapy, indicating the need for other treatment strategies. Accordingly, therapeutics will be targeted against the main mediators behind the underlying molecular mechanisms of the neutrophilic inflammation.

  20. Real-time Animation of Interactive Virtual Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egges, A.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last years, there has been a lot of interest in the area of Interactive Virtual Humans (IVHs). Virtual characters who interact naturally with users in mixed realities have many different applications, such as interactive video games, virtual training and rehabilitation, or

  1. Implications of interaction between Humans and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    as structural damping and therefore also structural vibration levels). The paper addresses this subject and explores implications of having passive humans present on the structure. In experimental tests with a laboratory floor it is examined to which degree the posture of humans passively sitting on the floor...... influences the damping added to the floor. A numerical case study explores how passive humans may influence vibration levels of a floor....

  2. Human-Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human-Computer Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    editing. fraphical interaction (Report No. CW’-CS-R8718). Human Computer Interaction 1(3), 223-274. Washington, DC National Aeronautics and Space...Co - * r LLcOPY Research Product 90-31 j LL Human- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective Human- Computer Dialogue DTIC...5600 62785A 790 1304 C2 LE (include Security Classification) i- Computer Interaction in Tactical Operations: Designing for Effective i- Computer

  3. Sea Turtle Human/Gear Interactions Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories is responsible for new gear development and testing to reduce bycatch and incidental interactions of...

  4. Management Education: Reflective Learning on Human Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clydesdale, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe an attempt to develop a more effective technique to teach self-awareness and relationship skills. Design/methodology/approach: A journal is used in combination with a model of human nature. The model lists human characteristics that the management trainee must identify in themselves and others they interact…

  5. Neutrophil recruitment, chemokine receptors, and resistance to mucosal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godaly, G; Bergsten, G; Hang, L; Fischer, H; Frendéus, B; Lundstedt, A C; Samuelsson, M; Samuelsson, P; Svanborg, C

    2001-06-01

    Neutrophil migration to infected mucosal sites involves a series of complex interactions with molecules in the lamina propria and at the epithelial barrier. Much attention has focussed on the vascular compartment and endothelial cells, but less is known about the molecular determinants of neutrophil behavior in the periphery. We have studied urinary tract infections (UTIs) to determine the events that initiate neutrophil recruitment and interactions of the recruited neutrophils with the mucosal barrier. Bacteria activate a chemokine response in uroepithelial cells, and the chemokine repertoire depends on the bacterial virulence factors and on the specific signaling pathways that they activate. In addition, epithelial chemokine receptor expression is enhanced. Interleukin (IL)-8 and CXCR1 direct neutrophil migration across the epithelial barrier into the lumen. Indeed, mIL-8Rh knockout mice showed impaired transepithelial neutrophil migration, with tissue accumulation of neutrophils, and these mice developed renal scarring. They had a defective antibacterial defense and developed acute pyelonephritis with bacteremia. Low CXCR1 expression was also detected in children with acute pyelonephritis. These results demonstrate that chemokines and chemokine receptors are essential to orchestrate a functional antimicrobial defense of the urinary tract mucosa. Mutational inactivation of the IL-8R caused both acute disease and chronic tissue damage.

  6. A conceptual framework to evaluate human-wildlife interactions within coupled human and natural systems

    OpenAIRE

    Anita T. Morzillo; Kirsten M. de Beurs; Martin-Mikle, Chelsea J.

    2014-01-01

    Landscape characteristics affect human-wildlife interactions. However, there is a need to better understand mechanisms that drive those interactions, particularly feedbacks that exist between wildlife-related impacts, human reaction to and behavior as a result of those impacts, and how land use and landscape characteristics may influence those components within coupled human and natural systems. Current conceptual models of human-wildlife interactions often focus on species population size ...

  7. Eyeblink Synchrony in Multimodal Human-Android Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsukawa, Kyohei; Nakano, Tamami; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Yuichiro

    2016-12-23

    As the result of recent progress in technology of communication robot, robots are becoming an important social partner for humans. Behavioral synchrony is understood as an important factor in establishing good human-robot relationships. In this study, we hypothesized that biasing a human's attitude toward a robot changes the degree of synchrony between human and robot. We first examined whether eyeblinks were synchronized between a human and an android in face-to-face interaction and found that human listeners' eyeblinks were entrained to android speakers' eyeblinks. This eyeblink synchrony disappeared when the android speaker spoke while looking away from the human listeners but was enhanced when the human participants listened to the speaking android while touching the android's hand. These results suggest that eyeblink synchrony reflects a qualitative state in human-robot interactions.

  8. Development of a Simulated Environment for Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Berns

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human-robot interaction scenarios are extremely complicated and require precise definition of the environment variables for rigorously testing different aspects of robotic behavior. The environmental setup affects the behaviors of both the humans and the robots, as they respond differently under varying accoustic or lightning conditions. Moreover, conducting several experiments repeatedly with the humans as test subjects also causes behavioral changes in them and eventually the responses remain no longer similar to the already conducted experiments. Thus making it is impossible to perform interaction scenarios in a repeatable manner. Developing and using 3D simulations, where different parameters can be adjusted, is the most beneficial solution in such cases. This requires not only the development of different simulated robots but also the simulation of dynamic surroundings including the interaction partner. In this paper, we present a simulation framework that allows the simulation of human-robot interaction including the simulated interaction partner and its dynamics.

  9. Heterogeneity in Neutrophil Microparticles Reveals Distinct Proteome and Functional Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli, Jesmond; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Norling, Lucy V; Yin, Xiaoke; Hinds, Charles; Haskard, Dorian; Mayr, Manuel; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Altered plasma neutrophil microparticle levels have recently been implicated in a number of vascular and inflammatory diseases, yet our understanding of their actions is very limited. Herein, we investigate the proteome of neutrophil microparticles in order to shed light on their biological actions. Stimulation of human neutrophils, either in suspension or adherent to an endothelial monolayer, led to the production of microparticles containing >400 distinct proteins with only 223 being shared by the two subsets. For instance, postadherent microparticles were enriched in alpha-2 macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, whereas microparticles produced by neutrophils in suspension were abundant in heat shock 70 kDa protein 1. Annexin A1 and lactotransferrin were expressed in both microparticle subsets. We next determined relative abundance of these proteins in three types of human microparticle samples: healthy volunteer plasma, plasma of septic patients and skin blister exudates finding that these proteins were differentially expressed on neutrophil microparticles from these samples reflecting in part the expression profiles we found in vitro. Functional assessment of the neutrophil microparticles subsets demonstrated that in response to direct stimulation neutrophil microparticles produced reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 as well as locomoted toward a chemotactic gradient. Finally, we investigated the actions of the two neutrophil microparticles subsets described herein on target cell responses. Microarray analysis with human primary endothelial cells incubated with either microparticle subset revealed a discrete modulation of endothelial cell gene expression profile. These findings demonstrate that neutrophil microparticles are heterogenous and can deliver packaged information propagating the activation status of the parent cell, potentially exerting novel and fundamental roles both under homeostatic and disease conditions. PMID:23660474

  10. Experimental and Human Evidence for Lipocalin-2 (Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin [NGAL]) in the Development of Cardiac Hypertrophy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Marques FZ; Prestes PR; Byars SG; Ritchie SC; Würtz P; Patel SK; Booth SA; Rana I; Minoda Y; Berzins SP; Curl CL; Bell JR; Wai B; Srivastava PM; Kangas AJ

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of developing heart failure and cardiovascular death. The neutrophil inflammatory protein, lipocalin‐2 (LCN2/NGAL), is elevated in certain forms of cardiac hypertrophy and acute heart failure. However, a specific role for LCN2 in predisposition and etiology of hypertrophy and the relevant genetic determinants are unclear. Here, we defined the role of LCN2 in concentric cardiac hypertrophy in terms of pathophysiology, inflammatory expression ne...

  11. Inhibition of C5a-induced actin polymerization, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils incubated in a glucose-based dialysis solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, G J; Andre, M; Böhler, J; Norgauer, J; Lubrich-Birkner, I; Steinhauer, H B; Schollmeyer, P J

    1993-01-01

    Chemotaxis and phagocytosis are important functions of phagocytic cells, which are closely related to cytoskeletal reorganization. These functions may be abnormal in phagocytes of uremic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In order to examine whether these abnormalities result from treatment, we studied actin polymerization (AP), as an index of cytoskeletal alterations, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) of healthy subjects. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils were exposed to either a hepes buffer or a glucose-based dialysis solution (GBDS) of different pH's (5.2, 7.4) and different glucose concentrations (1.36%, 2.27%, 3.86%). After incubation for 0, 5, or 20 minutes, cells were activated with 10 nmol/L C5a-complement. AP was measured as filamentous (F) actin content by NBD phallacidin staining and FACS analysis. Chemotaxis of PMNs was measured in Boyden chambers. In addition, phagocytosis of zymosan particles was assessed. Prior exposure to GBDS pH 5.2 of each glucose concentration immediately and completely inhibited AP in response to 10 nmol/L C5a-complement, reduced chemotaxis (> 95%), and completely inhibited phagocytosis. The inhibition was pH-dependent, since GBDS pH 7.4 caused less inhibition of these functions. We conclude that glucose-based dialysis solutions are cytotoxic towards neutrophils and completely inhibit their ability to display responses requiring cytoskeletal reorganization.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  13. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9 Activity Regulates Neutrophil Spontaneous Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeldine, Jon; Krystof, Vladimir; Strnad, Miroslav; Pechan, Paul; M., Janet

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases. PMID:22276149

  14. The role of neutrophils in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila

    2012-03-30

    Though chronic autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus affect a significant percentage of the human population and strongly diminish the quality of life and life expectancy in Western societies, the molecular pathomechanisms of those diseases are still poorly understood, hindering the development of novel treatment strategies. Autoimmune diseases are thought to be caused by disturbed recognition of foreign and self antigens, leading to the emergence of autoreactive T-cells (so-called immunization phase). Those autoreactive T-cells then trigger the second (so-called effector) phase of the disease which is characterized by immune-mediated damage to host tissues. For a long time, neutrophils have mainly been neglected as potential players of the development of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant amount of new experimental data now indicates that neutrophils likely play an important role in both the immunization and the effector phase of autoimmune diseases. Here we review the current literature on the role of neutrophils in autoimmune diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune vasculitides and blistering skin diseases. We also discuss the role of neutrophil cell surface receptors (e.g. integrins, Fc-receptors or chemokine receptors) and intracellular signal transduction pathways (e.g. Syk and other tyrosine kinases) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammation. Though many of the results discussed in this review were obtained using animal models, additional data indicate that those mechanisms likely also contribute to human pathology. Taken together, neutrophils should be considered as one of the important cell types in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and they may also prove to be suitable targets of the pharmacological control of those diseases in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Eyeblink Synchrony in Multimodal Human-Android Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsukawa, Kyohei; Nakano, Tamami; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    As the result of recent progress in technology of communication robot, robots are becoming an important social partner for humans. Behavioral synchrony is understood as an important factor in establishing good human-robot relationships. In this study, we hypothesized that biasing a human’s attitude toward a robot changes the degree of synchrony between human and robot. We first examined whether eyeblinks were synchronized between a human and an android in face-to-face interaction and found that human listeners’ eyeblinks were entrained to android speakers’ eyeblinks. This eyeblink synchrony disappeared when the android speaker spoke while looking away from the human listeners but was enhanced when the human participants listened to the speaking android while touching the android’s hand. These results suggest that eyeblink synchrony reflects a qualitative state in human-robot interactions. PMID:28009014

  16. The benefits of human-companion animal interaction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Sandra B; Wolen, Aaron R

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a review of research published since 1980 on the benefits of human-companion animal interaction. Studies focusing on the benefits of pet ownership are presented first, followed by research on the benefits of interacting with companion animals that are not owned by the subject (animal-assisted activities). While most of the published studies are descriptive and have been conducted with convenience samples, a promising number of controlled studies support the health benefits of interacting with companion animals. Future research employing more rigorous designs and systematically building upon a clearly defined line of inquiry is needed to advance our knowledge of the benefits of human-companion animal interaction.

  17. Negative Affect in Human Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Krogsager, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The vision of social robotics sees robots moving more and more into unrestricted social environments, where robots interact closely with users in their everyday activities, maybe even establishing relationships with the user over time. In this paper we present a field trial with a robot in a semi...

  18. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design and und...

  19. Chamomile decoction extract inhibits human neutrophils ROS production and attenuates alcohol-induced haematological parameters changes and erythrocytes oxidative stress in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Sani, Mamane; Rtibi, Kais; Marzouki, Lamjed; El-Benna, Jamel; Sakly, Mohsen; Sebai, Hichem

    2016-03-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of subacute pre-treatment with chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract (CDE) against stimulated neutrophils ROS production as well as ethanol (EtOH)-induced haematological changes and erythrocytes oxidative stress in rat. Neutrophils were isolated and ROS generation was measured by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Superoxide anion generation was detected by the cytochrome c reduction assay. Adult male wistar rats were used and divided into six groups of ten each: control, EtOH, EtOH + various doses of CDE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, b.w.), and EtOH+ ascorbic acid (AA). Animals were pre-treated with CDE extract during 10 days. We found that CDE inhibited (P ≤ 0.0003) luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of resting neutrophils and N-formyl methionylleucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbolmyristate acetate (PMA) stimulated neutrophils, in a dose-dependent manner. CDE had no effect on superoxide anion, but it inhibited (P ≤ 0.0004) H2O2 production in cell free system. In vivo, CDE counteracted (P ≤ 0.0034) the effect of single EtOH administration which induced (P < 0.0001) an increase of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) counts. Our results also demonstrated that alcohol administration significantly (P < 0.0001) induced erythrocytes lipoperoxidation increase and depletion of sulfhydryl groups (-SH) content as well as antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). More importantly, we found that acute alcohol administration increased (P < 0.0001) erythrocytes and plasma hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), free iron, and calcium levels while the CDE pre-treatment reversed increased (P ≤ 0.0051) all these intracellular disturbances. These findings suggest that CDE inhibits neutrophil ROS production and protects against EtOH-induced haematologiacal parameters changes and erythrocytes oxidative stress. The haematoprotection offered

  20. Neutrophils are resistant to Yersinia YopJ/P-induced apoptosis and are protected from ROS-mediated cell death by the type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L Spinner

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The human innate immune system relies on the coordinated activity of macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils or PMNs for defense against bacterial pathogens. Yersinia spp. subvert the innate immune response to cause disease in humans. In particular, the Yersinia outer protein YopJ (Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis and YopP (Y. enterocolitica rapidly induce apoptosis in murine macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the effects of Yersinia Yop J/P on neutrophil fate are not clearly defined.In this study, we utilized wild-type and mutant strains of Yersinia to test the contribution of YopJ and YopP on induction of apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM and neutrophils. Whereas YopJ and YopP similarly induced apoptosis in HMDMs, interaction of human neutrophils with virulence plasmid-containing Yersinia did not result in PMN caspase activation, release of LDH, or loss of membrane integrity greater than PMN controls. In contrast, interaction of human PMNs with the virulence plasmid-deficient Y. pestis strain KIM6 resulted in increased surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and cell death. PMN reactive oxygen species (ROS production was inhibited in a virulence plasmid-dependent but YopJ/YopP-independent manner. Following phagocytic interaction with Y. pestis strain KIM6, inhibition of PMN ROS production with diphenyleneiodonium chloride resulted in a reduction of PMN cell death similar to that induced by the virulence plasmid-containing strain Y. pestis KIM5.Our findings showed that Yersinia YopJ and/or YopP did not induce pronounced apoptosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, robust PMN ROS production in response to virulence plasmid-deficient Yersinia was associated with increased PMN cell death, suggesting that Yersinia inhibition of PMN ROS production plays a role in evasion of the human innate immune response in part by limiting PMN apoptosis.

  1. Interactive displays natural human-interface technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Achintya K

    2014-01-01

    One of the first books to provide an in-depth discussion of the technologies, applications and trends in the rapidly emerging field of interactive displays (touch, gesture & voice) The book will cover the technologies, applications and trends in the field of interactive displays, namely interfaces based on touch, gesture and voice and those using a combination of these technologies. The book will be split into 4 main parts with each being dedicated to a specific user interface. Part 1 ''Touch Interfaces'' will provide a review of the currently deployed touch-screen technologies and applications. It will also cover the recent developments towards achieving thinner, lightweight and cost-reduced touch screen panels in the future via integration of touch functionalities. Part 2 ''Gesture Interfaces'' will examine techniques and applications in stereoscopic 3D computer vision, structured-light 3D computer vision and time-of-flight 3D computer vision in gesture interfaces. Part 3 ''Voice Interfaces'' will revie...

  2. [Biochemical profile of human-spacesuit interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, V E; Gurfinkel', V S

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses and analyzes the issues of optimizing energy, kinematic and dynamic structures of the process of human-spacesuit system movement. Recommendations concerning system stabilization during posture acquisition and motion are made; the biomechanic requirement for spacesuit R&D is that joints with preset frequencies must be designed.

  3. Personality and social skills in human-dog interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley

    Dogs have been part of human life for many thousands years, with the dog most likely being the first animal to be domesticated by humans. The dog as a species has had an enormous success in the human world, and research suggests that a co-evolution of humans and dogs has resulted in the dog......-questionnaire measures humans’ emotional empathy for animals, and is based on a human-oriented empathy scale. It was investigated how em-pathy for animals affects human interpretation of dog behaviour watched on video. The PONS test measures the ability to interpret human nonverbal communication and its reliability...... differed between breeds. Human social skills were shown to be associated with the interpretation of dog behaviour as well as the quality of human-dog interaction. Lower levels of empathy for animals were associated with interpreting the behaviour of dogs as more aggressive. In human-dog greeting...

  4. Two Invariants of Human-Swarm Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-16

    often have formal attractors such as nest selection (Nevai & Passino, 2010) and many of the collective animal behaviors described by Sumpter (Sumpter...can be used to design swarm systems with desired fan-outs and workloads in mind . The key reason this is possible is that we are managing attractors...E., Giardina, I., et al. (2008). Interaction ruling animal collective behavior depends on topological rather than metric distance: Evidence from a

  5. The dynamics of neutrophils in zebrafish (Danio rerio) during infection with the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2016-01-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis is a ciliated protozoan parasite infecting the skin and gills of freshwater fish. Neutrophils are attracted to the infection sites, as a part of the innate immune response. In this study a transgenic line of zebrafish (Tg(MPO:GFP)i114) with GFP-tagged neutrophils...... pi the neutrophil count was 2.7 times higher than prior to infection. A few dead parasites were observed, which were disintegrated and covered internally and externally with neutrophils. Live parasites, both surrounded by neutrophils and with no neutrophils in the near vicinity, were found during...... the infection. Neutrophils interacted directly with the parasites with pseudopod formation projecting towards the pathogen. These results indicate a strong innate immune response immediately following infection and/or a subsequent immune evasion by the parasite....

  6. Human-Android Interaction in the Near and Distant Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese, Neal J; Amir, Eyal

    2009-07-01

    In this article, a psychologist and an artificial-intelligence (AI) researcher speculate on the future of social interaction between humans and androids (robots designed to look and act exactly like people). We review the trajectory of currently developing robotics technologies and assess the level of android sophistication likely to be achieved in 50 years time. On the basis of psychological research, we consider obstacles to creating an android indistinguishable from humans. Finally, we discuss the implications of human-android social interaction from the standpoint of current psychological and AI research and speculate on the novel psychological issues likely to arise from such interaction. The science of psychology will face a remarkable new set of challenges in grappling with human-android interaction. © 2009 Association for Psychological Science.

  7. Evidence for simultaneous protein interactions between human Rad51 paralogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, D; Lio, Y C; Collins, D W; Tsomondo, T; Chen, D J

    2000-06-02

    In yeast, the Rad51-related proteins include Rad55 and Rad57, which form a heterodimer that interacts with Rad51. Five human Rad51 paralogs have been identified (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, and Rad51D/Rad51L3), and each interacts with one or more of the others. Previously we reported that HsRad51 interacts with XRCC3, and Rad51C interacts with XRCC3, Rad51B, and HsRad51. Here we report that in the yeast two-hybrid system, Rad51D interacts with XRCC2 and Rad51C. No other interactions, including self-interactions, were found, indicating that the observed interactions are specific. The yeast Rad51 interacts with human Rad51 and XRCC3, suggesting Rad51 conservation since the human yeast divergence. Data from yeast three-hybrid experiments indicate that a number of the pairs of interactions between human Rad51 paralogs can occur simultaneously. For example, Rad51B expression enhances the binding of Rad51C to XRCC3 and to HsRad51D, and Rad51C expression allows the indirect interaction of Rad51B with Rad51D. Experiments using 6xHis-tagged proteins in the baculovirus system confirm several of our yeast results, including Rad51B interaction with Rad51D only when Rad51C is simultaneously expressed and Rad51C interaction with XRCC2 only when Rad51D is present. These results suggest that these proteins may participate in one complex or multiple smaller ones.

  8. Quantifying Trust, Distrust, and Suspicion in Human-System Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0340 QUANTIFYING TRUST , DISTRUST, AND SUSPICION IN HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERACTIONS Stuart Hirshfield HAMILTON COLLEGE Final Report 10...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantifying Trust , Distrust, and Suspicion in Human-System Interactions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-11-1-0112 5c...variables that indicate the level of trust that is present while a person works with his or her computer system. Recent advances in Biomedical

  9. Human-Level AI's Killer Application: Interactive Computer Games

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, John; VanLent, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Although one of the fundamental goals of AI is to understand and develop intelligent systems that have all the capabilities of humans, there is little active research directly pursuing this goal. We propose that AI for interactive computer games is an emerging application area in which this goal of human-level AI can successfully be pursued. Interactive computer games have increasingly complex and realistic worlds and increasingly complex and intelligent computer-controlled characters. In thi...

  10. Impact of Cognitive Architectures on Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and, in so doing, evaluate user interfaces. In this report we will review the influence of several cognitive architectures—specifically, asking what...promises were made, what impacts were realized, and what potential impact can we reasonably expect in the future. human-computer interaction ( HCI ...human-computer interaction ( HCI ), it must harden. Their vision is for psychology to provide engineering style theory that influences the design of

  11. Technology-enhanced human interaction in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Zac E; Caperton, Derek D; Tanana, Michael; Atkins, David C

    2017-07-01

    Psychotherapy is on the verge of a technology-inspired revolution. The concurrent maturation of communication, signal processing, and machine learning technologies begs an earnest look at how these technologies may be used to improve the quality of psychotherapy. Here, we discuss 3 research domains where technology is likely to have a significant impact: (1) mechanism and process, (2) training and feedback, and (3) technology-mediated treatment modalities. For each domain, we describe current and forthcoming examples of how new technologies may change established applications. Moreover, for each domain we present research questions that touch on theoretical, systemic, and implementation issues. Ultimately, psychotherapy is a decidedly human endeavor, and thus the application of modern technology to therapy must capitalize on-and enhance-our human capacities as counselors, students, and supervisors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. The Law of Attraction in Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunil Park

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the law of attraction in human-human interaction, this paper examines the effects of a robot's personality and a human's personality in various human-robot interactions. This study was conducted using robots that were programmed to mimic both extroverted and introverted personality types, as well as humans who were classified as having introverted, extroverted or intermediate personality types. Using a 3 × 2 between-subjects experiment with 120 participants, the results indicated that participants who interacted with a similar personality robot were more comfortable than those who engaged with a different personality robot. Yet, the evaluation of social presence presented an opposing result. Both the implications and limitations of the present study, as well as guidelines for future research, are discussed.

  13. The human dynamic clamp as a paradigm for social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Guillaume; de Guzman, Gonzalo C; Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2014-09-02

    Social neuroscience has called for new experimental paradigms aimed toward real-time interactions. A distinctive feature of interactions is mutual information exchange: One member of a pair changes in response to the other while simultaneously producing actions that alter the other. Combining mathematical and neurophysiological methods, we introduce a paradigm called the human dynamic clamp (HDC), to directly manipulate the interaction or coupling between a human and a surrogate constructed to behave like a human. Inspired by the dynamic clamp used so productively in cellular neuroscience, the HDC allows a person to interact in real time with a virtual partner itself driven by well-established models of coordination dynamics. People coordinate hand movements with the visually observed movements of a virtual hand, the parameters of which depend on input from the subject's own movements. We demonstrate that HDC can be extended to cover a broad repertoire of human behavior, including rhythmic and discrete movements, adaptation to changes of pacing, and behavioral skill learning as specified by a virtual "teacher." We propose HDC as a general paradigm, best implemented when empirically verified theoretical or mathematical models have been developed in a particular scientific field. The HDC paradigm is powerful because it provides an opportunity to explore parameter ranges and perturbations that are not easily accessible in ordinary human interactions. The HDC not only enables to test the veracity of theoretical models, it also illuminates features that are not always apparent in real-time human social interactions and the brain correlates thereof.

  14. Neutrophils in Tuberculosis: will the code be unlocked?

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, K.; Kesavan, M.; P. Tamilmahan; Saravanan, M.; M Dashprakash

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease throughout the world both in humans and animals. Its history is vast, which dates back to era of Robert Koch. There is a huge amount of immunological studies in the aspect of tuberculosis but there remain many unanswered questions. Neutrophils, cells of First line defence are being neglected in tuberculosis. Macrophages are considered as the key player in case of tuberculosis. Researches reveal that neutrophils play some interesting roles; it can be calle...

  15. Plants, herbivores, and their interactions in human-modified landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Bähner, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Human forest modification is among the largest global drivers of terrestrial degradation of biodiversity, species interactions, and ecosystem functioning. One of the most pertinent components, forest fragmentation, has a long history in ecological research across the globe, particularly in lower latitudes. However, we still know little how fragmentation shapes temperate ecosystems, irrespective of the ancient status quo of European deforestation. Furthermore, its interaction wi...

  16. An Interactive Mixed Reality Framework for Virtual Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egges, A.; Papagiannakis, G.; Magnenat-Thalmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple and robust Mixed Reality (MR) framework that allows for real-time interaction with Virtual Humans in real and virtual environments under consistent illumination. We will look at three crucial parts of this system: interaction, animation and global

  17. New Theoretical Approaches for Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    Presents a critique of recent theoretical developments in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) together with an overview of HCI practice. This chapter discusses why theoretically based approaches have had little impact on the practice of interaction design and suggests mechanisms to enable designers and researchers to better articulate…

  18. Developing Human Capital for Agrifood Firms' Multi-Stakeholder Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; Blok, V.; Lans, T.; Wesselink, R.

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses 1) the current agri-food firms’ need of interacting with multiple stakeholders to undertake sustainable strategies effectively, 2) the relationship between human capital and firm capabilities to effectively interact with multiple stakeholders and 3) a list of competencies

  19. An Integrated Human System Interaction (HSI) Framework for Human-Agent Team Collaboration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA commitment to a human presence in space exploration results in the interaction of humans with challenging environments in space, on lunar, and on planetary...

  20. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications....

  1. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Mariano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS, Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS. qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  2. Applied human factors research at the NASA Johnson Space Center Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisill, Marianne; Mckay, Timothy D.

    1990-01-01

    The applied human factors research program performed at the NASA Johnson Space Center's Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory is discussed. Research is conducted to advance knowledge in human interaction with computer systems during space crew tasks. In addition, the Laboratory is directly involved in the specification of the human-computer interface (HCI) for space systems in development (e.g., Space Station Freedom) and is providing guidelines and support for HCI design to current and future space missions.

  3. Social interactions through the eyes of macaques and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McFarland

    Full Text Available Group-living primates frequently interact with each other to maintain social bonds as well as to compete for valuable resources. Observing such social interactions between group members provides individuals with essential information (e.g. on the fighting ability or altruistic attitude of group companions to guide their social tactics and choice of social partners. This process requires individuals to selectively attend to the most informative content within a social scene. It is unclear how non-human primates allocate attention to social interactions in different contexts, and whether they share similar patterns of social attention to humans. Here we compared the gaze behaviour of rhesus macaques and humans when free-viewing the same set of naturalistic images. The images contained positive or negative social interactions between two conspecifics of different phylogenetic distance from the observer; i.e. affiliation or aggression exchanged by two humans, rhesus macaques, Barbary macaques, baboons or lions. Monkeys directed a variable amount of gaze at the two conspecific individuals in the images according to their roles in the interaction (i.e. giver or receiver of affiliation/aggression. Their gaze distribution to non-conspecific individuals was systematically varied according to the viewed species and the nature of interactions, suggesting a contribution of both prior experience and innate bias in guiding social attention. Furthermore, the monkeys' gaze behavior was qualitatively similar to that of humans, especially when viewing negative interactions. Detailed analysis revealed that both species directed more gaze at the face than the body region when inspecting individuals, and attended more to the body region in negative than in positive social interactions. Our study suggests that monkeys and humans share a similar pattern of role-sensitive, species- and context-dependent social attention, implying a homologous cognitive mechanism of

  4. Priming of the oxidative burst in human neutrophils by physiological agonists or cytochalasin B results from the recruitment of previously non-responsive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, R H; Elmore, M A; Hill, M E; Shimizu, Y; Lackie, J M; Finnen, M J

    1994-01-01

    Using a sensitive flow cytometric assay, which measures the intracellular oxidation of 2'7' dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) by H2O2, we have assessed, at a single-cell level, the effects of a variety of physiological priming agonists and cytochalasin B (CB) on purified populations of neutrophils stimulated at different points along the signal response transduction pathway. Pretreatment of purified neutrophils with the physiological priming agonists monocyte interleukin-8 (IL-8), granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, and non-stimulatory doses of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), resulted in an increased percentage of cells generating an oxidative burst in response to subsequent receptor stimulation with FMLP. CB had a similar but much more pronounced effect on cellular recruitment to a receptor-mediated responsive state. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) using the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) resulted in a heterogeneous response, with all cells generating H2O2, but with two populations differing in their magnitude of response. Physiological priming agonists had no effect on the heterogeneity of the PMA response. However, pretreatment with CB dramatically altered the PMA response, producing a homogeneous population highly responsive to stimulation with PKC. In contrast, direct stimulation of G proteins with fluoride (A1F-4) was primed both by physiological priming agonists and by CB. These results demonstrate that priming of neutrophils by physiological agonists involves changes at the level of signal transduction which enable a previously non-responsive cell to respond to a secondary stimulus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7959884

  5. The Interaction between Human and Organizational Capital in Strategic Human Resource Management (P.49-62)

    OpenAIRE

    Audia Junita

    2017-01-01

    Studies in strategic human resource management emphasize the contribution of human and human resource management to organizational performance achievement. Human and organizational capitals are strategic capability and mechanism to create value in an organization.This paper seeks to identify an interactive relationship between human and organizational capital in strategic human resource management theoretically, which so far, have not got adequate attention, particularly in a systemic relatio...

  6. The Interaction between Human and Organizational Capital in Strategic Human Resource Management

    OpenAIRE

    Audia Junita

    2016-01-01

    Studies in strategic human resource management emphasize the contribution of human and human resource management to organizational performance achievement. Human and organizational capitals are strategic capability and mechanism to create value in an organization.This paper seeks to identify an interactive relationship between human and organizational capital in strategic human resource management theoretically, which so far, have not got adequate attention, particularly in a systemic relatio...

  7. The epistemology and ontology of human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brey, Philip A.E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic:

  8. Multimodal Information Presentation for High-Load Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation addresses multimodal information presentation in human computer interaction. Information presentation refers to the manner in which computer systems/interfaces present information to human users. More specifically, the focus of our work is not on which information to present, but

  9. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannat, Risat A; Hammer, Daniel A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Robbins, Gregory P; Ricart, Brendon G [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dembo, Micah, E-mail: hammer@seas.upenn.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the K{sub D} of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against {beta}{sub 2}-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  10. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases. These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing.

  11. The Proteolytically Stable Peptidomimetic Pam-(Lys-ßNSpe)6-NH2 Selectively Inhibits Human Neutrophil Activation via Formyl Peptide Receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Larsen, Camilla J.

    2015-01-01

    of reactive oxygen species. The potency of Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 was comparable to that of PBP10, the most potent FPR2-selective inhibitor known. The immunomodulatory effects of structural analogues of Pam-(Lys-βNSpe)6-NH2 emphasized the importance of both the lipid and peptidomimetic parts. By using imaging...... in the further dissection of the role of FPR2 in inflammation and homeostasis as well as for investigation of the importance of neutrophil stimulation in anti-infective therapy involving HDPs....

  12. Functional interactions as big data in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B

    2013-11-01

    Noninvasive studies of human brain function hold great potential to unlock mysteries of the human mind. The complexity of data generated by such studies, however, has prompted various simplifying assumptions during analysis. Although this has enabled considerable progress, our current understanding is partly contingent upon these assumptions. An emerging approach embraces the complexity, accounting for the fact that neural representations are widely distributed, neural processes involve interactions between regions, interactions vary by cognitive state, and the space of interactions is massive. Because what you see depends on how you look, such unbiased approaches provide the greatest flexibility for discovery.

  13. Polymicrobial Interactions: Impact on Pathogenesis and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brian M.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; O'May, Graeme A.; Costerton, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Microorganisms coexist in a complex milieu of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses on or within the human body, often as multifaceted polymicrobial biofilm communities at mucosal sites and on abiotic surfaces. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the complicated biofilm phenotype during infection; moreover, even less is known about the interactions that occur between microorganisms during polymicrobial growth and their implications in human disease. Therefore, this review focuses on polymicrobial biofilm-mediated infections and examines the contribution of bacterial-bacterial, bacterial-fungal, and bacterial-viral interactions during human infection and potential strategies for protection against such diseases. PMID:22232376

  14. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps, Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jessica Bravo-Barrera; Maria Kourilovitch; Claudio Galarza-Maldonado

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a network of extracellular fibers, compounds of chromatin, neutrophil DNA and histones, which are covered with antimicrobial enzymes with granular components...

  16. Mouse neutrophils lacking lamin B-receptor expression exhibit aberrant development and lack critical functional responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Peter; Tien, Chiung W; Olins, Ada L; Olins, Donald E; Shultz, Leonard D; Carney, Lisa; Berliner, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    The capacity of neutrophils to eradicate bacterial infections is dependent on normal development and activation of functional responses, which include chemotaxis and generation of oxygen radicals during the respiratory burst. A unique feature of the neutrophil is its highly lobulated nucleus, which is thought to facilitate chemotaxis, but may also play a role in other critical neutrophil functions. Nuclear lobulation is dependent on expression of the inner nuclear envelope protein, the lamin B receptor (LBR), mutations of which cause hypolobulated neutrophil nuclei in human Pelger-Huët anomaly and the "ichthyosis" (ic) phenotype in mice. In this study, we have investigated roles for LBR in mediating neutrophil development and activation of multiple neutrophil functions, including chemotaxis and the respiratory burst. A progenitor EML cell line was generated from an ic/ic mouse, and derived cells that lacked LBR expression were induced to mature neutrophils and then examined for abnormal morphology and functional responses. Neutrophils derived from EML-ic/ic cells exhibited nuclear hypolobulation identical to that observed in ichthyosis mice. The ic/ic neutrophils also displayed abnormal chemotaxis, supporting the notion that nuclear segmentation augments neutrophil extravasation. Furthermore, promyelocytic forms of ic/ic cells displayed decreased proliferative responses and produced a deficient respiratory burst upon terminal maturation. Our studies of promyelocytes that lack LBR expression have identified roles for LBR in regulating not only the morphologic maturation of the neutrophil nucleus, but also proliferative and functional responses that are critical to innate immunity.

  17. Neutrophil Integrins and Matrix Ligands and NET Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Reichner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are motile and responsive to tissue injury and infection. As neutrophils emigrate from the bloodstream and migrate towards a site of affliction, they encounter the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM and thereby engage integrins. Our laboratory studies the neutrophilic response to the fungal pathogen Candida albicans either in the filamentous state of the microbe or to the purified pathogen-associated molecular pattern, β-glucan. We have gained an appreciation for the role of integrins in regulating the neutrophil anti-Candida response and how the presence or absence of ECM can drive experimental outcome. The β2 integrin CR3 (Complement Receptor 3; αMβ2; Mac-1; CD11b/CD18 plays an important role in fungal recognition by its ability to bind β-glucan at a unique lectin-like domain. The presence of ECM differentially regulates essential neutrophil anti-fungal functions including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, homotypic aggregation, and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETosis. We have shown that NET release to C. albicans hyphae or immobilized β-glucan occurs rapidly and without the requirement for respiratory burst on ECM. This is in contrast to the more frequently reported mechanisms of NETosis to other pathogens without the context of ECM which occur after a prolonged lag period and require respiratory burst. As expected for an ECM-dependent phenotype, NETosis and other neutrophil functions are dependent on specific β1 integrins. The focus of this review is the role of ECM ligation by neutrophil integrins as it pertains to host defense functions with an emphasis on lessons we have learned studying the anti-Candida response of human neutrophils.

  18. Interaction of cannabidiol and alcohol in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consroe, P; Carlini, E A; Zwicker, A P; Lacerda, L A

    1979-01-01

    Six male and four female healthy volunteers were given oral placebo (glucose capsule and orange juice), cannabidiol (CBD 200 mg capsule and orange juice), alcohol (1 g/kg in orange juice and glucose capsule), and CBD (200 mg capsule) plus alcohol (1 g/kg in orange juice) in a double-blind, crossover, randomized design. Treatments were spaced one week apart. Parameters measured were a finger tap test (motor performance), cancellation and differential aptitude tests (psychomotor performance), a 1-min time production task, subjective effects (66 item adjective-pair semantic differential), and breathalyzer estimations of blood alcohol levels. Compared to placebo, alcohol and alcohol plus CBD, but not CBD alone, produced significant impairments of motor and psychomotor performances, overestimations of time production and subjective responses indicating an accurate self-perception of their intoxication and deficits. The combination of alcohol plus CBD resulted in significantly lower blood alcohol levels compared to alcohol given alone, however, there were few differences observed between the pharmacological effects of the two alcohol conditions. Thus, the inactivity of CBD, a major marijuana constituent, on motor and mental performance and effects also extends to its interaction with alcohol.

  19. Human Work Interaction Design. Work Analysis and HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume. ......, and mobile probing. They have been organized in the following topical sections: work analysis: dimensions and methods; interactions, models and approaches; and evaluations, interactions and applications.......This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume....... The papers reflect many different areas and address many complex and diverse work domains, ranging from medical user interfaces, work and speech interactions at elderly care facilities, greenhouse climate control, navigating through large oil industry engineering models, crisis management, library usability...

  20. Centrality of Social Interaction in Human Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta; Henriksson, Linda; Malinen, Sanna; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2015-10-07

    People are embedded in social interaction that shapes their brains throughout lifetime. Instead of emerging from lower-level cognitive functions, social interaction could be the default mode via which humans communicate with their environment. Should this hypothesis be true, it would have profound implications on how we think about brain functions and how we dissect and simulate them. We suggest that the research on the brain basis of social cognition and interaction should move from passive spectator science to studies including engaged participants and simultaneous recordings from the brains of the interacting persons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Leucine Rich α-2 Glycoprotein: A Novel Neutrophil Granule Protein and Modulator of Myelopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence J Druhan

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich α2 glycoprotein (LRG1, a serum protein produced by hepatocytes, has been implicated in angiogenesis and tumor promotion. Our laboratory previously reported the expression of LRG1 in murine myeloid cell lines undergoing neutrophilic granulocyte differentiation. However, the presence of LRG1 in primary human neutrophils and a role for LRG1 in regulation of hematopoiesis have not been previously described. Here we show that LRG1 is packaged into the granule compartment of human neutrophils and secreted upon neutrophil activation to modulate the microenvironment. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and direct biochemical measurements, we demonstrate that LRG1 is present in the peroxidase-negative granules of human neutrophils. Exocytosis assays indicate that LRG1 is differentially glycosylated in neutrophils, and co-released with the secondary granule protein lactoferrin. Like LRG1 purified from human serum, LRG1 secreted from activated neutrophils also binds cytochrome c. We also show that LRG1 antagonizes the inhibitory effects of TGFβ1 on colony growth of human CD34+ cells and myeloid progenitors. Collectively, these data invoke an additional role for neutrophils in innate immunity that has not previously been reported, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby neutrophils may modulate the microenvironment via extracellular release of LRG1.

  2. Human-Robot Interaction and Human Self-Realization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The ethical debate on robots has become a cutting edge issue in many countries. It is, however, most often approached through an us-versus-them perspective—as if we were watching a soccer game and taking one side. Informed by Eastern as well as Western thought, the meta-ethical aim of this paper ...... the limits of our conceptual framing and even facilitate the self-development of the human involved....

  3. Analysis of Human-Spacesuit Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts sustain injuries of various natures such as finger delamination, joint pain, and redness due to their interaction with the space suit. The role of the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility is to understand the biomechanics, environmental variables, and ergonomics of the suit. This knowledge is then used to make suggestions for improvement in future iterations of the space suit assembly to prevent injuries while allowing astronauts maneuverability, comfort, and tactility. The projects I was involved in were the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit stiffness study and the glove feasibility study. The EMU project looked at the forces exerted on the shoulder, arm, and wrist when subjects performed kinematic tasks with and without a pressurized suit. The glove study consisted of testing three conditions - the Series 4000 glove, the Phase VI glove, and the no glove condition. With more than forty channels of sensor data total, it was critical to develop programs that could analyze data with basic descriptive statistics and generate relevant graphs to help understand what happens within the space suit and glove. In my project I created a Graphical User Interface (GUI) in MATLAB that would help me visualize what each sensor was doing within a task. The GUI is capable of displaying overlain plots and can be synchronized with video. This was helpful during the stiffness testing to visualize how the forces on the arm acted while the subject performed tasks such as shoulder adduction/abduction and bicep curls. The main project of focus, however, was the glove comparison study. I wrote MATLAB programs which generated movies of the strain vectors during specific tasks. I also generated graphs that summarized the differences between each glove for the strain, shear and FSR sensors. Preliminary results indicate that the Phase VI glove places less strain and shear on the hand. Future work includes continued data analysis of surveys and sensor data. In the end

  4. Intuitive Cognition and Models of Human-Automation Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Robert Earl

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an analysis of the implications of the dominance of intuitive cognition in human reasoning and decision making for conceptualizing models and taxonomies of human-automation interaction, focusing on the Parasuraman et al. model and taxonomy. Knowledge about how humans reason and make decisions, which has been shown to be largely intuitive, has implications for the design of future human-machine systems. One hundred twenty articles and books cited in other works as well as those obtained from an Internet search were reviewed. Works were deemed eligible if they were published within the past 50 years and common to a given literature. Analysis shows that intuitive cognition dominates human reasoning and decision making in all situations examined. The implications of the dominance of intuitive cognition for the Parasuraman et al. model and taxonomy are discussed. A taxonomy of human-automation interaction that incorporates intuitive cognition is suggested. Understanding the ways in which human reasoning and decision making is intuitive can provide insight for future models and taxonomies of human-automation interaction.

  5. Cyberpsychology: a human-interaction perspective based on cognitive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Bruno; West, Robert L

    2003-10-01

    This paper argues for the relevance of cognitive modeling and cognitive architectures to cyberpsychology. From a human-computer interaction point of view, cognitive modeling can have benefits both for theory and model building, and for the design and evaluation of sociotechnical systems usability. Cognitive modeling research applied to human-computer interaction has two complimentary objectives: (1) to develop theories and computational models of human interactive behavior with information and collaborative technologies, and (2) to use the computational models as building blocks for the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive technologies. From the perspective of building theories and models, cognitive modeling offers the possibility to anchor cyberpsychology theories and models into cognitive architectures. From the perspective of the design and evaluation of socio-technical systems, cognitive models can provide the basis for simulated users, which can play an important role in usability testing. As an example of application of cognitive modeling to technology design, the paper presents a simulation of interactive behavior with five different adaptive menu algorithms: random, fixed, stacked, frequency based, and activation based. Results of the simulation indicate that fixed menu positions seem to offer the best support for classification like tasks such as filing e-mails. This research is part of the Human-Computer Interaction, and the Broadband Visual Communication research programs at the National Research Council of Canada, in collaboration with the Carleton Cognitive Modeling Lab at Carleton University.

  6. Penerapan Model Human Computer Interaction (HCI Dalam Analisis Sistem Informasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prihati Prihati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information system Analysis is very important to do to produce easy, effective, efficient, and proper use system for the user. This research is meant to design and apply information system analysis model with the concept of Human Computer Interaction (HCI, Jacob Nielsen’s usability criteria which are learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors and satisfaction. The model of information system analysis Human Computer Interaction (HCI with five usability criteria can be used as a standard to analyze how far Human Computer Interaction can be applied into the system so that every weakness will be known and system maintenance can be performed. The application Human Computer Interaction model in analysis of Sistem Administrasi Sekolah (SAS produce a conclusion that only half of Human Computer Interaction concept applied into SAS Dikmenti DKI Jakarta. SAS is easy to be learned and to remember but SAS is not efficient and not yet have the ability to cope the mistake well. Users are satisfied enough with the result achieved through SAS but the facility provided by SAS is considered not enough to accommodate the need of the users.

  7. Endogenous TNF? orchestrates the trafficking of neutrophils into and within lymphatic vessels during acute inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Arokiasamy, Samantha; Zakian, Christian; Dilliway, Jessica; Wang, Wen; Nourshargh, Sussan; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are recognised to play a pivotal role at the interface between innate and acquired immunities following their recruitment to inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs. While neutrophil trafficking through blood vessels has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms regulating their migration into the lymphatic system are still poorly understood. Here, we have analysed neutrophil-lymphatic vessel interactions in real time and in vivo using intravital confocal microscopy applied ...

  8. The Past, Present and Future of Human Computer Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Churchill, Elizabeth

    2018-01-16

    Human Computer Interaction (HCI) focuses on how people interact with, and are transformed by computation. Our current technology landscape is changing rapidly. Interactive applications, devices and services are increasingly becoming embedded into our environments. From our homes to the urban and rural spaces, we traverse everyday. We are increasingly able toヨoften required toヨmanage and configure multiple, interconnected devices and program their interactions. Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques are being used to create dynamic services that learn about us and others, that make conclusions about our intents and affiliations, and that mould our digital interactions based in predictions about our actions and needs, nudging us toward certain behaviors. Computation is also increasingly embedded into our bodies. Understanding human interactions in the everyday digital and physical context. During this lecture, Elizabeth Churchill -Director of User Experience at Google- will talk about how an emerging landscape invites us to revisit old methods and tactics for understanding how people interact with computers and computation, and how it challenges us to think about new methods and frameworks for understanding the future of human-centered computation.

  9. Role for protein-protein interaction databases in human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattin, Kristine A; Moore, Jason H

    2009-12-01

    Proteomics and the study of protein-protein interactions are becoming increasingly important in our effort to understand human diseases on a system-wide level. Thanks to the development and curation of protein-interaction databases, up-to-date information on these interaction networks is accessible and publicly available to the scientific community. As our knowledge of protein-protein interactions increases, it is important to give thought to the different ways that these resources can impact biomedical research. In this article, we highlight the importance of protein-protein interactions in human genetics and genetic epidemiology. Since protein-protein interactions demonstrate one of the strongest functional relationships between genes, combining genomic data with available proteomic data may provide us with a more in-depth understanding of common human diseases. In this review, we will discuss some of the fundamentals of protein interactions, the databases that are publicly available and how information from these databases can be used to facilitate genome-wide genetic studies.