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Sample records for human macrophage colony-stimulating

  1. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

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    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  2. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

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    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  3. Native low-density lipoprotein uptake by macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated human macrophages is mediated by macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzinger, Joshua J; Chang, Janet; Xu, Qing; Buono, Chiara; Li, Yifu; Leyva, Francisco J; Park, Bum-Chan; Greene, Lois E; Kruth, Howard S

    2010-10-01

    To examine the pinocytotic pathways mediating native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by human macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated macrophages (the predominant macrophage phenotype in human atherosclerotic plaques). We identified the kinase inhibitor SU6656 and the Rho GTPase inhibitor toxin B as inhibitors of macrophage fluid-phase pinocytosis of LDL. Assessment of macropinocytosis by time-lapse microscopy revealed that both drugs almost completely inhibited macropinocytosis, although LDL uptake and cholesterol accumulation by macrophages were only partially inhibited (approximately 40%) by these agents. Therefore, we investigated the role of micropinocytosis in mediating LDL uptake in macrophages and identified bafilomycin A1 as an additional partial inhibitor (approximately 40%) of macrophage LDL uptake that targeted micropinocytosis. When macrophages were incubated with both bafilomycin A1 and SU6656, inhibition of LDL uptake was additive (reaching 80%), showing that these inhibitors target different pathways. Microscopic analysis of fluid-phase uptake pathways in these macrophages confirmed that LDL uptake occurs through both macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis. Our findings show that human macrophage colony-stimulating factor-differentiated macrophages take up native LDL by macropinocytosis and micropinocytosis, underscoring the importance of both pathways in mediating LDL uptake by these cells.

  4. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit [CFU-Mk]) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production

  5. A STUDY OF INTERMEDIATES INVOLVED IN THE FOLDING PATHWAY FOR RECOMBINANT HUMAN MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (M-CSF) - EVIDENCE FOR 2 DISTINCT FOLDING PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILKINS, JA; CONE, J; RANDHAWA, ZI; WOOD, D; WARREN, MK; WITKOWSKA, HE

    The folding pathway for a 150-amino acid recombinant form of the dimeric cytokine human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been studied. All 14 cysteine residues in the biologically active homodimer are involved in disulfide linkages. The structural characteristics of folding

  6. Increased biological activity of deglycosylated recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor produced by yeast or animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, P.; Mermod, J.J.; Ernst, J.F.; Hirschi, M.; DeLamarter, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) produced by several recombinant sources including Escherichia coli, yeast, and animal cells was studied. Recombinant animal cells produced hGM-CSF in low quantities and in multiple forms of varying size. Mammalian hGM-CSF was purified 200,000-fold using immunoaffinity and lectin chromatography. Partially purified proteins produced in yeast and mammalian cells were assayed for the effects of deglycosylation. Following enzymatic deglycosylation, immunoreactivity was measured by radioimmunoassay and biological activity was measured in vitro on responsive human primary cells. Removal of N-linked oligosaccharides from both proteins increased their immunoreactivities by 4- to 8-fold. Removal of these oligosaccharides also increased their specific biological activities about 20-fold, to reach approximately the specific activity of recombinant hGM-CSF from E. coli. The E. coli produced-protein-lacking any carbohydrate- had by far the highest specific activity observed for the recombinant hGM-CSFs

  7. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of 125 I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB- 125 I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein

  8. CD1 molecule expression on human monocytes induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinrerk, W; Baumruker, T; Majdic, O; Knapp, W; Stockinger, H

    1993-01-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) specifically induces the expression of CD1 molecules, CD1a, CD1b and CD1c, upon human monocytes. CD1 molecules appeared upon monocytes on day 1 of stimulation with rGM-CSF, and expression was up-regulated until day 3. Monocytes cultured in the presence of LPS, FMLP, PMA, recombinant granulocyte-CSF, rIFN-gamma, rTNF-alpha, rIL-1 alpha, rIL-1 beta, and rIL-6 remained negative. The induction of CD1 molecules by rGM-CSF was restricted to monocytes, since no such effect was observed upon peripheral blood granulocytes, PBL, and the myeloid cell lines Monomac1, Monomac6, MV4/11, HL60, U937, THP1, KG1, and KG1A. CD1a mRNA was detectable in rGM-CSF-induced monocytes but not in those freshly isolated. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analyses of CD1a mAb VIT6 immunoprecipitate from lysate of rGM-CSF-activated monocytes revealed an appropriate CD1a polypeptide band of 49 kDa associated with beta 2-microglobulin. Expression of CD1 molecules on monocytes complements the distribution of these structures on accessory cells, and their specific induction by GM-CSF strengthens the suggestion that CD1 is a family of crucial structures required for interaction between accessory cells and T cells.

  9. Combined application of alginate dressing and human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor promotes healing in refractory chronic skin ulcers.

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    Huang, Guobao; Sun, Tangqing; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qiuhe; Zhang, Keyan; Tian, Qingfen; Huo, Ran

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical therapeutic effect of the combined application of alginate and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the healing of refractory chronic skin ulcers. A single center, three arm, randomized study was performed at Jinan Central Hospital (Jinan, Shandong, China). A total of 60 patients with refractory chronic skin ulcers, which persisted for >1 month, were enrolled and randomly assigned into one of the following three groups: alginate dressing/rhGM-CSF group (group A), rhGM-CSF only group (group B) and conventional (vaseline dressing) group (group C). The wound area rate was measured, granulation and color were observed and pain was evaluated. The data were summarized and statistical analysis was performed. The results demonstrated that group A exhibited a significantly faster wound healing rate and lower pain score compared with the other groups (PCSF for the treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers demonstrated significant advantages. It promoted the growth of granulation tissue, accelerated re-epithelialization and also effectively reduced wound pain, and thus improved the quality of life for the patient. This suggests that the combined application of alginate and rhGM-CSF may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers.

  10. Nuclear proteins interacting with the promoter region of the human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.F.; Gamble, J.R.; Vadas, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The gene for human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is expressed in a tissue-specific as well as an activation-dependent manner. The interaction of nuclear proteins with the promoter region of the GM-CSF gene that is likely to be responsible for this pattern of GM-CSF expression was investigated. The authors show that nuclear proteins interact with DNA fragments from the GM-CSF promoter in a cell-specific manner. A region spanning two cytokine-specific sequences, cytokine 1 (CK-1, 5', GAGATTCCAC 3') and cytokine 2 (CK-2, 5' TCAGGTA 3') bound two nuclear proteins from GM-CSF-expressing cells in gel retardation assays. NF-GMb was inducible with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and accompanied induction of GM-CSF message. NF-GMb was absent in cell lines not producing GM-CSF, some of which had other distinct binding proteins. NF-GMa and NF-GMb eluted from a heparin-Sepharose column at 0.3 and 0.6 M KCl, respectively. They hypothesize that the sequences CK-1 and CK-2 bind specific proteins and regulate GM-CSF transcription

  11. Notch signaling mediates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor priming-induced transendothelial migration of human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L Y; Wang, H; Xenakis, J J; Spencer, L A

    2015-07-01

    Priming with cytokines such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances eosinophil migration and exacerbates the excessive accumulation of eosinophils within the bronchial mucosa of asthmatics. However, mechanisms that drive GM-CSF priming are incompletely understood. Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that regulates cellular processes, including migration, by integrating exogenous and cell-intrinsic cues. This study investigates the hypothesis that the priming-induced enhanced migration of human eosinophils requires the Notch signaling pathway. Using pan Notch inhibitors and newly developed human antibodies that specifically neutralize Notch receptor 1 activation, we investigated a role for Notch signaling in GM-CSF-primed transmigration of human blood eosinophils in vitro and in the airway accumulation of mouse eosinophils in vivo. Notch receptor 1 was constitutively active in freshly isolated human blood eosinophils, and inhibition of Notch signaling or specific blockade of Notch receptor 1 activation during GM-CSF priming impaired priming-enhanced eosinophil transendothelial migration in vitro. Inclusion of Notch signaling inhibitors during priming was associated with diminished ERK phosphorylation, and ERK-MAPK activation was required for GM-CSF priming-induced transmigration. In vivo in mice, eosinophil accumulation within allergic airways was impaired following systemic treatment with Notch inhibitor, or adoptive transfer of eosinophils treated ex vivo with Notch inhibitor. These data identify Notch signaling as an intrinsic pathway central to GM-CSF priming-induced eosinophil tissue migration. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Characterization and molecular features of the cell surface receptor for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Miyazono, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    The receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the surfaces of normal and leukemic myeloid cells were characterized using 125I-labeled bacterially synthesized GM-CSF. The binding was rapid, specific, time dependent, and saturable. Scatchard analysis of the 125I-GM-CSF binding to peripheral blood neutrophils indicated the presence of a single class of binding site (Kd = 99 +/- 21 pM; 2,304 +/- 953 sites/cell). However, for peripheral blood monocytes and two GM-CSF-responsive myeloid cell lines (U-937 and TF-1), the Scatchard plots were biphasic curvilinear, which were best fit by curves derived from two binding site model: one with high affinity (Kd1 = 10-40 pM) and the other with low affinity (Kd2 = 0.9-2.0 nM). For U-937 cells, the number of high-affinity receptors was 1,058 +/- 402 sites/cell and that of low-affinity receptors was estimated to be 10,834 +/- 2,396 sites/cell. Cross-linking studies yielded three major bands with molecular masses of 150 kDa, 115 kDa, and 95 kDa, which were displaced by an excess amount of unlabeled GM-CSF, suggesting 135-kDa, 100-kDa, and 80-kDa species for the individual components of the human GM-CSF receptor. These bands comigrated for different cell types including peripheral blood neutrophils, U-937 cells and TF-1 cells. In experiments using U-937 cells, only the latter two bands appeared to be labeled in a dose-dependent manner in a low-affinity state. These results suggest that the human GM-CSF receptor possibly forms a multichain complex

  13. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised...... placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified...... with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01023256....

  14. Effect of human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on differentiation and apoptosis of the human osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Postiglione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of human granulocyte macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on the relation between differentiation and apoptosis in SaOS-2 cells, an osteoblast-like cell line. To determine the relationship between these cellular processes, SaOS-2 cells were treated in vitro for 1, 7 and 14 days with 200 ng/mL GM-CSF and compared with untreated cells. Five nM insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I and 30 nM okadaic acid were used as negative and positive controls of apoptosis, respectively. Effects on cell differentiation were determined by ECM (extracellular matrix mineralization, morphology of some typical mature osteoblast differentiation markers, such as osteopontin and sialoprotein II (BSP-II, and production of bone ECM components such as collagen I. The results showed that treatment with GM-CSF caused cell differentiation accompanied by increased production of osteopontin and BSP-II, together with increased ECM deposition and mineralization. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V and propidium iodide incorporation showed that GM-CSF up-regulated apoptotic cell death of SaOS-2 cells after 14 days of culture in contrast to okadaic acid, which stimulated SaOS-2 apoptosis only during the early period of culture. Endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA, detected by “laddering analysis”, confirmed these data. The results suggest that GM-CSF induces osteoblastic differentiation and long-term apoptotic cell death of the SaOS-2 human osteosarcoma cell line, which in turn suggests a possible in vivo physiological role for GM-CSF on human osteoblast cells.

  15. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Chon, J J; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1998-06-01

    This study focused on the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and lipopolysaccharide of the putative periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum on IL-6 production by THP-1 cells (a human monocytic cell line). Resting THP-1 cells were alternatively treated with GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) and lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum, in varying concentrations for varying time periods. IL-6 production in supernatant fluids of treated cells was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate gene expression. Untreated THP-1 cells did not produce IL-6 as determined by ELISA. RT-PCR also failed to detect IL-6 mRNA in untreated THP-1 cells, indicating that IL-6 was not constitutively produced. After stimulation of THP-1 cells with lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis, IL-6 was produced, peaking at 4 h (200-300 pg/ml) and thereafter sharply declining by 8 h. When GM-CSF was added together with lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum, there was a synergistic quantitative increase in production of IL-6 as measured by ELISA as compared with lipopolysaccharide alone. IL-6 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR, 15 min after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide of either P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum. GM-CSF supplementation with lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis shortened the transcription of IL-6 mRNA to 5 min, a shift which was not observed with lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum, possibly indicating a different mechanism of initiation of transcription. Production of IL-6 by GM-CSF-treated THP-1 cells in the presence of lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms may provide a model for studying the role of macrophages in acute and chronic periodontal diseases, including the clinical periodontal exacerbation as observed in chemotherapy patients receiving GM-CSF for bone marrow recovery.

  16. Culture of human oocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor has no effect on embryonic chromosomal constitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Inge; Loft, Anne; Hald, Finn

    2010-01-01

    -vitro culture of human embryos in the presence of 2 ng/ml GM-CSF resulted in 34.8% (8/23) uniformly normal embryos. Culture without 2 ng/ml GM-CSF resulted in 33.3% (9/27) uniformly normal embryos. A trend towards a higher number of TQE in the test group was observed; however, due to lack of TQE in the control...... women donating 86 oocytes. The primary endpoint was to investigate the chromosomal constitution of human embryos (fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22, X and Y) cultured with or without GM-CSF. The secondary endpoints were number of top-quality embryos (TQE......) and number of normally developed embryos evaluated morphologically on day 3. The cytogenetic analyses demonstrated non-inferiority and therefore the chromosomal constitution of human embryos cultured in vitro in the presence of 2 ng/ml GM-CSF was no worse than the control group cultured without GM-CSF. In...

  17. Culture of human oocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor has no effect on embryonic chromosomal constitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Inge; Loft, Anne; Hald, Finn

    2010-01-01

    women donating 86 oocytes. The primary endpoint was to investigate the chromosomal constitution of human embryos (fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22, X and Y) cultured with or without GM-CSF. The secondary endpoints were number of top-quality embryos (TQE......) and number of normally developed embryos evaluated morphologically on day 3. The cytogenetic analyses demonstrated non-inferiority and therefore the chromosomal constitution of human embryos cultured in vitro in the presence of 2 ng/ml GM-CSF was no worse than the control group cultured without GM-CSF. In......-vitro culture of human embryos in the presence of 2 ng/ml GM-CSF resulted in 34.8% (8/23) uniformly normal embryos. Culture without 2 ng/ml GM-CSF resulted in 33.3% (9/27) uniformly normal embryos. A trend towards a higher number of TQE in the test group was observed; however, due to lack of TQE in the control...

  18. Pichia pastoris versus Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a case study on the recombinant production of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh-Minh; Nguyen, Thanh-Thao; Nguyen, Cong-Thuan; Huynh-Thi, Xuan-Mai; Nguyen, Cao-Tri; Trinh, Minh-Thuong; Tran, Linh-Thuoc; Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Tran-Van, Hieu

    2017-04-04

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) is a glycoprotein that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of neutropenia and leukemia in combination with chemotherapies. Recombinant hGM-CSF is produced industrially using the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by large-scale fermentation. The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has emerged as an alternative host cell system due to its shorter and less immunogenic glycosylation pattern together with higher cell density growth and higher secreted protein yield than S. cerevisiae. In this study, we compared the pipeline from gene to recombinant protein in these two yeasts. Codon optimization in silico for both yeast species showed no difference in frequent codon usage. However, rhGM-CSF expressed from S. cerevisiae BY4742 showed a significant discrepancy in molecular weight from those of P. pastoris X33. Analysis showed purified rhGM-CSF species with molecular weights ranging from 30 to more than 60 kDa. Fed-batch fermentation over 72 h showed that rhGM-CSF was more highly secreted from P. pastoris than S. cerevisiae (285 and 64 mg total secreted protein/L, respectively). Ion exchange chromatography gave higher purity and recovery than hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Purified rhGM-CSF from P. pastoris was 327 times more potent than rhGM-CSF from S. cerevisiae in terms of proliferative stimulating capacity on the hGM-CSF-dependent cell line, TF-1. Our data support a view that the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is an effective recombinant host for heterologous rhGM-CSF production.

  19. Enhanced interleukin-8 production in THP-1 human monocytic cells by lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Falkler, W A

    1999-10-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in macrophage mediated inflammatory processes including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in GM-CSF receiving cancer patients. The effect of GM-CSF supplementation on IL-8 production was investigated in a human monocyte cell line THP-1, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide extracted from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) for varying time periods. The production of IL-8 in THP-1 cells was measured by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A very low level of the cytokine IL-8 was produced constitutive in THP-1 cells. Starting from 8 h of treatment and afterwards GM-CSF alone significantly increased IL-8 production in THP-1 cells. Lipopolysaccharide (1 microgram/ml) extracts from either F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis amplified IL-8 production 500-800 times in comparison to resting THP-1 cells. When lipopolysaccharide of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis was supplemented with 50 IU/ml of GM-CSF, there was a statistically significant enhanced production of IL-8 by THP-1 cells after 1 day to 7 days of treatment as compared with lipopolysaccharide treatment alone. GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) also significantly increased IL-8 production from 2-7 days of treatment of THP-1 cells when supplemented with a positive control, phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate (PMA), as compared to PMA treatment alone. These investigations using the in vitro THP-1 human monocyte cell model indicate that there may be an increase in the response on a cellular level to oral endotoxin following GM-CSF therapy as evidenced by enhanced production of the tissue-reactive inflammatory cytokine, IL-8.

  20. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Amplification of Interleukin-1β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in THP-1 Human Monocytic Cells Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide of Oral Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Meiller, Timothy F.; Chon, Jennifer J.; Turng, Been-Foo; Falkler, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1β and TNF-α production following GM-CSF suppl...

  1. Activation of human gingival epithelial cells by cell-surface components of black-pigmented bacteria: augmentation of production of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, A; Uehara, A; Iki, K; Matsushita, K; Nakamura, R; Ogawa, T; Sugawara, S; Takada, H

    2002-01-01

    Black-pigmented anaerobic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, are amongst the predominant bacteria in periodontal pockets and have been implicated in periodontal diseases. To elucidate the roles of gingival keratinocytes, which are the first cells encountered by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases, human gingival keratinocytes in primary culture were stimulated with cell-surface components of P gingivalis and Pr. intermedia. A glycoprotein fraction from Pr. intermedia (PGP) clearly augmented the release of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This PGP also induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), as determined by flow cytometry. The augmentation of mRNA expression for these molecules was also confirmed by reverse transcription PCR. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pr. intermedia and Escherichia coli was completely inactive in these assays. LPS fraction and purified fimbriae from P gingivalis exhibited weak activities. Cytokine production and ICAM-1 expression by gingival keratinocytes might cause accumulation and activation of neutrophils in the epithelium and, therefore, may be involved in the initiation and development of inflammation in periodontal tissues.

  2. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in gastrointestinal immunity to salmonellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, C; Beagley, K W; Bao, S

    2009-08-01

    Human Salmonella infection, in particular, typhoid fever is a highly infectious disease that remains a major public health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections depends on the host's immune response, particularly the actions of granulocytes and macrophages. Using a mouse model of human typhoid fever, with Salmonella typhimurium infection of wild type and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) knock out mice we show a delay in the onset of immune-mediated tissue damage in the spleens and livers of GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Furthermore, GM-CSF(-/-) mice have a prolonged sequestration of S. typhimurium in affected tissues despite an increased production of F4/80+ effector cells. Moreover in the absence of GM-CSF, a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 was found, which may alter the host's immune response to infection. GM-CSF appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Salmonellosis, and may contribute significantly to the development of protective gastrointestinal mucosal immune responses against oral pathogens.

  4. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) radioimmunoassay: detection of a CSF subclass stimulating macrophage production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) stimulate the differentiation of immature precursor cells to mature granulocytes and macrophages. Purified 125 I-labeled murine L cell CSF has been used to develop a radioimmunoassay (RIA) that detects a subclass of CSFs that stimulates macrophage production. Murine CSF preparations that contain this subclass of CSF compete for all of the CSF binding sites on anti-L cell CSF antibody. With the exception of mouse serum, which can contain inhibitors of the bioassay, there is complete correspondence between activities determined by RIA and those determined by bioassay. The RIA is slightly more sensitive than the bioassay, detecting approximately 0.3 fmol of purified L cell CSF. It can also detect this subclass of CSF in chickens, rats, and humans. In the mouse, the subclass is distinguished from other CSFs by a murine cell bioassay dose-response curve in which 90% of the response occurs over a 10-fold (rather than a 100-fold) increase in concentration, by stimulating the formations of colonies contaning a high proportion of mononuclear (rather than granulocytic) cells, and by certain physical characteristics

  5. Development and characterization of antiserum to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, D.Y.; Eisenman, J.R.; Conlon, P.J.; Park, L.S.; Urdal, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has made possible the purification of large quantities of this recombinant protein. Rabbits immunized with pure recombinant GM-CSF generated antibodies that were shown to be specific for both recombinant GM-CSF and GM-CSF isolated from natural sources. Other lymphokines, including IL 1β, IL 2, IL 3, and recombinant human GM-CSF did not react with the antiserum. The antiserum together with recombinant GM-CSF that had been radiolabeled with 125 I to high specific activity, formed the foundation for a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative radioimmunoassay specific for murine GM-CSF. Furthermore, the antiserum was found to inhibit the biologic activities of GM-CSF as measured in both a bone marrow proliferation assay and a colony assay, and thus should prove to be a useful reagent for dissecting the complex growth factor activities involved in murine hematopoiesis

  6. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin [NWU

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  7. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  8. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi; Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of 125 I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the α and β subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively

  9. Recurrent spleen enlargement during cyclic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmer, A.; Karmochkine, M.; Cadiou, M.; Gerhartz, H.; Zittoun, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with refractory anemia with excess of blasts received sequential courses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy (GM-CSF) and low-dose cytosine arabinoside. Each course of GM-CSF induced a rapid and tremendous increase in leukocyte count as well as in spleen size, 111-indium chloride scanning suggested a myeloid metaplasia of the spleen. This observation suggests that in some patients the granulopoietic response to the myeloid growth factor stimulation may be predominant in the spleen

  10. A Randomized Case-Controlled Study of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor for the Treatment of Sepsis in Preterm Neutropenic Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Methods: Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were ...

  11. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  12. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor amplification of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha production in THP-1 human monocytic cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide of oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Chon, J J; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1998-05-01

    Cytokines, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), are used to assist in bone marrow recovery during cancer chemotherapy. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) play important roles in inflammatory processes, including exacerbation of periodontal diseases, one of the most common complications in patients who undergo this therapy. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was utilized to investigate IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production following GM-CSF supplementation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from two oral microorganisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum was prepared by a phenol-water extraction method and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and determination of total protein and endotoxin contents. Resting THP-1 cells were treated with LPS of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum and/or GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) by using different concentrations for various time periods. Production of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in THP-1 cells was measured by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to evaluate the gene expression of resting and treated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta was not detected in untreated THP-1 cells. IL-1beta production was, however, stimulated sharply at 4 h. GM-CSF amplified IL-1beta production in THP-1 cells treated with LPS from both oral anaerobes. No IL-1beta-specific mRNA transcript was detected in untreated THP-1 cells. However, IL-1beta mRNA was detected by RT-PCR 2 h after stimulation of THP-1 cells with LPS from both organisms. GM-CSF did not shorten the IL-1beta transcriptional activation time. GM-CSF plus F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis LPS activated THP-1 cells to produce a 1.6-fold increase in TNF-alpha production at 4 h over LPS stimulation alone. These investigations with the in vitro THP-1 model indicate that there may be an increase in the cellular immune response to oral

  13. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, and its proto-oncogene-encoded receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, C.J.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Roussel, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    The macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, or M-CSF, is one of a family of hematopoietic growth factors that stimulates the proliferation of monocytes, macrophages, and their committed bone marrow progenitors. Unlike pluripotent hemopoietins such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3 or multi-CSF), which affect the growth of myeloid cells of several different hematopoietic lineages, CSF-1 acts only on cells of the mononuclear phagocyte series to stimulate their growth and enhance their survival. Retroviral transduction of the feline c-fms gene in the Susan McDonough and Hardy Zuckerman-5 (HZ-5) strains of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) led to genetic alterations that endowed the recombined viral oncogene (v-fms) with the ability to transform cells in culture morphologically and to induce firbrosarcomas and hematopoietic neoplasms in susceptible animals. The v-fms oncogene product differs from the normal CSF-1 receptor in certain of its cardinal biochemical properties, most notably in exhibiting constitutively high basal levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of its ligand. Comparative studies of the c-fms and v-fms genes coupled with analyses of engineered mutants and receptor chimeras have begun to pinpoint pertinent genetic alterations in the normal receptor gene that unmask its latent oncogenic potential. In addition, the availability of biologically active c-fms, v-fms, and CSF-1 cDNAs has allowed these genes to be mobilized and expressed in naive cells, thereby facilitating assays for receptor coupling with downstream components of the mitogenic pathway in diverse cell types

  14. Increased macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Eriko; Sekiya, Akiko; Hayashi, Tomoe; Kadohira, Yasuko; Maekawa, Mio; Yamazaki, Masahide; Asakura, Hidesaku; Nakao, Shinji; Ohtake, Shigeki

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have found markedly elevated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with Graves' disease (GD). We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in GD. We assayed concentrations of M-CSF in sera from 32 patients with GD (25 untreated; 7 receiving thiamazole therapy). We also studied 32 age-matched healthy subjects as controls. Relationships between serum M-CSF and both thyroid state and serum lipids were examined. Moreover, to examine the effect of thyroid hormone alone on serum M-CSF, T3 was administered orally to normal subjects. Serum concentrations of M-CSF in GD patients who were hyperthyroid were significantly increased compared with GD patients who were euthyroid (P oral T3 administered to 15 volunteers for 7 days produced significant increases in serum levels of M-CSF (P production of M-CSF in patients with GD.

  15. Regulation of wound healing by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor after vocal fold injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yol Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vocal fold (VF scarring remains a therapeutic challenge. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF facilitates epithelial wound healing, and recently, growth factor therapy has been applied to promote tissue repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of GM-CSF on VF wound healing in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: VF scarring was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by direct injury. Immediately thereafter, either GM-CSF or PBS was injected into the VFs of rabbits. Endoscopic, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical evaluations of VFs were performed at 3 months post-injury. Human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFFs were cultured with GM-CSF. Production of type I and III collagen was examined immunocytochemically, and the synthesis of elastin and hyaluronic acids was evaluated by ELISA. The mRNA levels of genes related to ECM components and ECM production-related growth factors, such as HGF and TGF-ß1, were examined by real time RT-PCR. RESULTS: The GM-CSF-treated VFs showed reduced collagen deposition in comparison to the PBS-injected controls (P<0.05. Immunohistochemical staining revealed lower amounts of type I collagen and fibronectin in the GM-CSF-treated VFs (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively. Viscous and elastic shear moduli of VF samples were significantly lower in the GM-CSF group than in the PBS-injected group (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively. Mucosal waves in the GM-CSF group showed significant improvement when compared to the PBS group (P = 0.0446. GM-CSF inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by hVFFs (P<0.05 and the production of hyaluronic acids increased at 72 hours post-treatment (P<0.05. The expressions of HAS-2, tropoelastin, MMP-1, HGF, and c-Met mRNA were significantly increased by GM-CSF, although at different time points (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that GM-CSF offers therapeutic potential for the remodeling of VF wounds and the promotion of VF

  16. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  17. Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mouthwashes heal oral ulcers during head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovirosa, Angeles; Ferre, Jorge; Biete, Albert

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor GM-CSF mouthwashes in the epithelization of radiation-induced oral mucosal ulceration, control of pain, and weight loss. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients received curative radiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. All had oropharyngeal and/or oral mucosa irradiation, with a median dose of 72 Gy (range 50-74), with conventional fractionation. A total of 300 μg of GM-CSF in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouthwashing was prescribed. The procedure started once oral ulceration in the irradiation field was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral ulceration, pain, and weight loss. Blood tests were taken weekly during GM-CSF administration. A comparison was carried out with 12 retrospective case-matched controls. Results: In the GM-CSF group, mucosa ulcerations healed in 9 of 12 (75%) of the patients during the course of the radiotherapy. Fifty percent of the patients said they felt less pain during the GM-CSF treatment; 30% needed morphine. The mean and median weight loss as a percentage of baseline weight in addition to the actual weight were 4.2% and 3%, respectively (variation ranged between a gain of 1% and a loss of 13%). No GM-CSF-related side effects were found. In the case control group, in the 12 cases, oral ulcerations increased during radiotherapy and two patients needed intubation intake and hospital admission, as opposed to the GM-CSF group. The mean and median percentage of weight loss were 5.8% and 5%, respectively. Sixty percent of patients needed morphine, as opposed to 30% in the GM-CSF group. Conclusions: Granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor was effective in curing mucosal ulcerations during the course of radiotherapy. This is the first time we have seen a drug with this capacity. Although the GM-CSF seems to be effective in the control of pain, oral intake, and weight loss, we need further studies with a greater number

  18. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels during cardiopulmonary bypass with extracorporeal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Denizot

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia occur during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. Elevated circulating concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF are reported during thrombocytopenia and leukopenia of different origins. We have assessed M-CSF concentrations in 40 patients undergoing CPB with ECC. Plasma M-CSF concentrations were stable during ECC and increased at the 6th (7.3 ± 0.7 IU/μg protein and 24th (8.6 ± 0.8 IU/μg protein postoperative hour compared with pre-ECC values (4.9 ± 0.5 IU/μg protein. A deep thrombocytopenia was found during ECC and until the 24th postoperative hour. A drop of leukocyte counts was found during ECC followed by an increase after ECC weaning. While no correlation was found between M-CSF concentrations and the leukocyte counts, M-CSF values were positively correlated with platelet counts only before and during ECC. Thus, M-CSF is not implicated in the thrombocytopenia and the leukopenia generated during CPB with ECC. However the elevated levels of M-CSFa few hours after the end of ECC might play a role in the inflammatory process often observed after CPB.

  20. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C.; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S.; Crocker, Paul R.; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Summary The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26200014

  1. [Macrophage colony stimulating factor enhances non-small cell lung cancer invasion and metastasis by promoting macrophage M2 polarization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Yang, L; Wang, L P; Zhang, Y

    2017-06-23

    Objective: To investigate the key cytokine which polarizes M2 macrophages and promotes invasion and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: After co-culture with A549 cells in vitro, the proportion of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages in monocytes and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) levels in culture supernatant were detected by flow cytometry, ELISA assay and real-time qPCR, respectively. The effects of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages on invasion of A549 cells and angiogenesis of HUVEC cells were measured by transwell assay and tubule formation assay, respectively. The clinical and prognostic significance of M-CSF expression in NSCLC was further analyzed. Results: The percentage of CD14(+) CD163(+) M2 macrophages in monocytes and the concentration of M-CSF in the supernatant followed by co-culture was (12.03±0.46)% and (299.80±73.76)pg/ml, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in control group [(2.80±1.04)% and (43.07±11.22)pg/ml, respectively, P macrophages in vitro . M2 macrophages enhanced the invasion of A549 cells (66 cells/field vs. 26 cells/field) and the angiogenesis of HUVEC cells (22 tubes/field vs. 8 tubes/field). The mRNA expression of M-CSF in stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients (16.23±4.83) was significantly lower than that in stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ (53.84±16.08; P macrophages, which can further promote the metastasis and angiogenesis of NSCLC. M-CSF could be used as a potential therapeutic target of NSCLC.

  2. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  3. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in gastric ulcer healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Y; Nakase, Y; Isomoto, Y; Matsuda, N; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in the healing of gastric ulcers in mice. Male M-CSF-deficient (op/op) and M-CSF-expressing heterozygote (+/?) mice were used. Gastric ulcers were induced by thermal cauterization under ether anesthesia, and healing was observed for 14 days after ulceration. The numbers of macrophages and microvessels in the gastric mucosa were determined immunohistochemically with anti-CD68 and anti-CD31 antibodies, respectively. Expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined via real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the mucosal content of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) was determined via enzyme immunoassay on day 10 after ulceration. The healing of gastric ulcers was significantly delayed in op/op mice compared with +/? mice. Further, significantly fewer macrophages were observed in the normal gastric mucosa of op/op mice than in +/? mice. Ulcer induction caused a marked accumulation of macrophages around the ulcer base in +/? mice, but this response was attenuated in op/op mice. The mucosal PGE(2) content as well as the expression of COX-2, VEGF, and TNF-α mRNA were all upregulated in the ulcerated area of +/? mice but significantly suppressed in op/op mice. The degree of vascularization in the ulcerated area was significantly lower in op/op mice than in +/? mice. Taken together, these results suggest that M-CSF-dependent macrophages play an important role in the healing of gastric ulcers, and that this action may be associated with angiogenesis promoted by upregulation of COX-2/PGE(2) production.

  4. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Supplementation in Culture Media for Subfertile Women Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Technologies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Salamalekis, George; Creatsa, Maria; Vrachnis, Nikos; Glujovsky, Demián; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine/growth factor produced by epithelial cells that exerts embryotrophic effects during the early stages of embryo development. We performed a systematic review, and six studies that were performed in humans undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) were located. We wanted to evaluate if embryo culture media supplementation with GM-CSF could improve success rates. As the type of studies and the outcome parameters investigated were heterogeneous, we decided not to perform a meta-analysis. Most of them had a trend favoring the supplementation with GM-CSF, when outcomes were measured in terms of increased percentage of good-quality embryos reaching the blastocyst stage, improved hatching initiation and number of cells in the blastocyst, and reduction of cell death. However, no statistically significant differences were found in implantation and pregnancy rates in all apart from one large multicenter trial, which reported favorable outcomes, in terms of implantation and live birth rates. We propose properly conducted and adequately powered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to further validate and extrapolate the current findings with the live birth rate to be the primary outcome measure. PMID:23509457

  5. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) induces Fc receptor expression on macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, D.M.; Wing, E.J.; Waheed, A.; Shadduck, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    M-CSF is a glycoprotein that stimulates bone marrow progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into macrophages (M theta). In addition, M-CSF can modulate the function of mature M theta. In this study, the authors determined the effect of M-CSF on expression of receptors for IgG (Fc receptors). Murine resident peritoneal M theta monolayers were incubated with either M-CSF, recombinant gamma interferon (IFN), or left untreated for 48 hrs. Expression of Fc receptors was assessed by microscopy using an antibody coated sheet erythrocytes (EA) rosette assay. The results indicated that M-CSF treated M theta had significantly higher numbers of bound EA (7.1 erythrocytes/M theta), than IFN M theta (4.4), or untreated M theta (2.5) (p 51 Cr labelled EA assay, CSF M theta (16,411 cpm), IFN M theta (10,887), untreated M theta (6897) (p < 0.001). Additionally, the maximal response was noted between 10 and 500 units M-CSF. Purified anti-M-CSF IgG, when included in the cultures, ablated the enhancement of EA binding, whereas normal rabbit IgG did not. These findings indicate that M-CSF is a potent inducer of Fc receptor expression on M theta and supports other data concerning the role of M-CSF as a biological response modifier

  6. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  7. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  8. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  9. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA ter...

  10. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Ganesan, Pugalenthi; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    Mice deficient for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF -/- ) are highly susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and clinical data have shown that anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies can lead to increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in otherwise healthy people. GM-CSF activates human and murine macrophages to inhibit intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. We have previously shown that GM-CSF produced by iNKT cells inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis However, the more general role of T cell-derived GM-CSF during infection has not been defined and how GM-CSF activates macrophages to inhibit bacterial growth is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to nonconventional T cells, conventional T cells also produce GM-CSF during M. tuberculosis infection. Early during infection, nonconventional iNKT cells and γδ T cells are the main source of GM-CSF, a role subsequently assumed by conventional CD4 + T cells as the infection progresses. M. tuberculosis -specific T cells producing GM-CSF are also detected in the peripheral blood of infected people. Under conditions where nonhematopoietic production of GM-CSF is deficient, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and required for control of M. tuberculosis infection. However, GM-CSF is not required for T cell-mediated protection in settings where GM-CSF is produced by other cell types. Finally, using an in vitro macrophage infection model, we demonstrate that GM-CSF inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth requires the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Thus, we identified GM-CSF production as a novel T cell effector function. These findings suggest that a strategy augmenting T cell production of GM-CSF could enhance host resistance against M. tuberculosis IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the leading cause of death by any infection worldwide. T cells are critical components of the immune

  13. Biological properties in vitro of a combination of recombinant murine interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklis, I; Kletter, Y; Bleiberg, I; Fabian, I

    1989-04-01

    The effect of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rIL-3) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) on in vitro murine myeloid progenitor cell (CFU-C) growth and on the function of murine resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Both rIL-3 and rGM-CSF are known to support the growth of CFU-C and, when combined, were found to act synergistically to induce the development of an increased number of CFU-C. The distribution pattern of myeloid colonies in the presence of these two growth factors was in general similar to that in the presence of rGM-CSF alone. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 enhanced the phagocytosis of Candida albicans (CA) by mature macrophages producing an increase in the percentage of phagocytosing cells as well as an increase in the number of yeast particles ingested per cell. No additive effect on the phagocytosis was observed when the two growth factors were added concurrently. rGM-CSF, but not rIL-3, enhanced the killing of CA by macrophages. This killing was inhibited by scavengers of oxygen radicals.

  14. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  15. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  16. Heterogeneity Within Macrophage Populations: A Possible Role for Colony Stimulating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-04

    highest concentration ofriFN-yused (5.0 U/ml), a depression of T cell proliferation induced by the antigen-pulsed rGM-CSF-derived macrophages was...stimulation by rGM-CSF and nCSF-1 in bone marrow cells derived from normal mice and mice 3 and 7 days post-treatment with 5FU . Bone marrow cells

  17. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Results Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. Conclusions MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Trial registration number NCT01023256 PMID:24534756

  18. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  19. Co-expression of HIV-1 virus-like particles and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor by GEO-D03 DNA vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellerstein, Michael; Xu, Yongxian; Marino, Tracie; Lu, Shan; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report on GEO-D03, a DNA vaccine that co-expresses non-infectious HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the human cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The virus-like particles display the native gp160 form of the HIV-1 Envelope glycoprotein (Env) and are designed to elicit antibody against the natural form of Env on virus and virus-infected cells. The DNA-expressed HIV Gag, Pol and Env proteins also have the potential to elicit virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. The purpose of the co-expressed GM-CSF is to target a cytokine that recruits, expands and differentiates macrophages and dendritic cells to the site of VLP expression. The GEO-D03 DNA vaccine is currently entered into human trials as a prime for a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost. In preclinical studies in macaques using an SIV prototype vaccine, this vaccination regimen elicited both anti-viral T cells and antibody, and provided 70% protection against acquisition during 12 weekly rectal exposures with a heterologous SIV. Higher avidity of the Env-specific Ab for the native form of the Env in the challenge virus correlated with lower likelihood of SIV infection. PMID:23111169

  20. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor signaling augment glycated albumin-induced retinal microglial inflammation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chun H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation and the proinflammatory response are controlled by a complex regulatory network. Among the various candidates, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is considered an important cytokine. The up-regulation of M-CSF and its receptor CSF-1R has been reported in brain disease, as well as in diabetic complications; however, the mechanism is unclear. An elevated level of glycated albumin (GA is a characteristic of diabetes; thus, it may be involved in monocyte/macrophage-associated diabetic complications. Results The basal level of expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R was examined in retinal microglial cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analyses revealed the up-regulation of CSF-1R in GA-treated microglial cells. We also detected increased expression and release of M-CSF, suggesting that the cytokine is produced by activated microglia via autocrine signaling. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that GA affects microglial activation by stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Furthermore, the neutralization of M-CSF or CSF-1R with antibodies suppressed the proinflammatory response. Conversely, this proinflammatory response was augmented by the administration of M-CSF. Conclusions We conclude that GA induces microglial activation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, which may contribute to the inflammatory pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. The increased microglial expression of M-CSF/CSF-1R not only is a response to microglial activation in diabetic retinopathy but also augments the microglial inflammation responsible for the diabetic microenvironment.

  1. Benefits of gene transduction of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cancer vaccine using genetically modified dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Iwahashi, Makoto; Nakamura, Masaki; Matsuda, Kenji; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ueda, Kentaro; Naka, Teiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2007-10-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key cytokine for the generation and stimulation of dendritic cells (DCs), and it may also play a pivotal role in promoting the survival of DCs. In this study, the feasibility of creating a cancer vaccine using DCs adenovirally transduced with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene and the GM-CSF gene was examined. In addition, the effect of the co-transduction of GM-CSF gene on the lifespan of these genetically modified DCs was determined. A cytotoxic assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was performed in a 4-h 51Cr release assay. The apoptosis of DCs was examined by TdT-mediated dUTP-FITC nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. CEA-specific CTLs were generated from PBMCs stimulated with genetically modified DCs expressing CEA. The cytotoxicity of these CTLs was augmented by co-transduction of DCs with the GM-CSF gene. Co-transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs inhibited apoptosis of these DCs themselves via up-regulation of Bcl-x(L) expression, leading to the extension of the lifespan of these DCs. Furthermore, the transduction of the GM-CSF gene into DCs also suppressed the incidence of apoptosis of DCs induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta-1). Immunotherapy using these genetically modified DCs may therefore be useful with several advantages as follows: i) adenoviral toxicity to DCs can be reduced; ii) the lifespan of vaccinated DCs can be prolonged; and iii) GM-CSF may protect DCs from apoptosis induced by tumor-derived TGFbeta-1 in the regional lymph nodes.

  2. The combined effect of erythropoietin and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on liver regeneration after major hepatectomy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frangou Matrona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The liver presents a remarkable capacity for regeneration after hepatectomy but the exact mechanisms and mediators involved are not yet fully clarified. Erythropoietin (EPO and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF have been shown to promote liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Aim of this experimental study is to compare the impact of exogenous administration of EPO, GM-CSF, as well as their combination on the promotion of liver regeneration after major hepatectomy. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to 70% major hepatectomy. The animals were assigned to 4 experimental groups: a control group (n = 21 that received normal saline, an EPO group (n = 21, that received EPO 500 IU/kg, a GM-CSF group (n = 21 that received 20 mcg/kg of GM-CSF and a EPO+GMCSF group (n = 21 which received a combination of the above. Seven animals of each group were killed on the 1st, 3rd and 7th postoperative day and their remnant liver was removed to evaluate liver regeneration by immunochemistry for PCNA and Ki 67. Results Our data suggest that EPO and GM-CSF increases liver regeneration following major hepatectomy when administered perioperatively. EPO has a more significant effect than GM-CSF (p Conclusion EPO, GM-CSF and their combination enhance liver regeneration after hepatectomy in rats when administered perioperatively. However their combination has a weaker effect on liver regeneration compared to EPO alone. Further investigation is needed to assess the exact mechanisms that mediate this finding.

  3. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-06-01

    To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. NCT01023256. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) expression in plastids of Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment.

  6. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  7. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 on the growth of leukemic blasts in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C J; Cheng, T Y; Chang, S L; Su, W J; Tseng, J Y

    1992-05-01

    We examined the stimulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 6 (IL)-6 on the in vitro proliferation of leukemic blast cells from patients with acute leukemia. Bone marrow or peripheral blood leukemic blast cells were obtained from 21 patients, including 14 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), four cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia, and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. The proliferation of leukemic blast cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into cells incubated with various concentrations of cytokines for 3 days. GM-CSF stimulated the DNA synthesis (with greater than 2.0 stimulation index) of blast cells in 9 of 14 (64%) AML cases, two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Only two cases of AML blasts responded to IL-6 to grow in the short-term suspension cultures. GM-CSF and IL-6 did not display a synergistic effect on the growth of leukemic cells. Moreover, GM-CSF and IL-6 did not stimulate the proliferation of ALL blast cells. Binding study also revealed the specific binding of GM-CSF on the blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Our results indicated that leukemic blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia possessed functional GM-CSF receptors.

  8. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (MΦ1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the MΦ2 phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Murakami, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that MΦs can be divided into proinflammatory MΦs (MΦ1) and anti-inflammatory MΦs (MΦ2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of MΦ1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven MΦ1 with nicotine (Ni-MΦ1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of MΦ2. Like MΦ2, Ni-MΦ1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-MΦ1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with MΦ1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated MΦ1, whereas Ni-MΦ1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-γ production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of MΦ and skew the MΦ1 phenotype to MΦ2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  9. Effects of human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on fracture healing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozlar, M.; Aslan, B.; Kalaci, A.; Yanat, Ahmet N.; Baktiroglu, L.; Tasci, A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) is generally used to prevent and cure the neutropenia associated with chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. In addition to its effects on neutrophil function, G-CSF was found to have the characteristic of modulating the cytokines in the inflammatory response. Then, the question to answer is whether it has any effect on fracture healing and to what extent? In this study, we test the effects of G-CSF on the healing of tibia fracture in a rat model. This study was performed at Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey between July 2003 and August 2004. Twenty female, healthy Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing between 250 and 300 gm were divided into 2 groups, and their tibiae broken. The rats in the G-CSF group were injected subcutaneous with 25ug/kg/day of recombinant human G-CSF for 7 days, and the ones in the control group with 0.9% sodium chloride. Rats were sacrificed 3 weeks after surgery and then radiological, histological and biomechanical evaluations were performed. Biomechanical tests were performed at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.The median radiographic scores for the control group were calculated as 4.1, and 6.1 for the G-CSF group (p = 0.016). Cortex remodeling, callus formation, bone union and marrow changes values did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). Mechanical parameter (mean max-Load) values for the control group were found to be 24.0 +/- 3.0 N, and 241.5 +/-75.7 N for the G-CSF group (p 0.001). We found that G-CSF has an important effect on fracture healing. However, this effect requires further study. (author)

  10. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A randomized case-controlled study of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor for the treatment of sepsis in preterm neutropenic infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were randomized either to receive rhG-CSF plus empirical antibiotics (Group I) or empirical antibiotics alone (Group II). Clinical features were recorded. Daily complete blood count was performed until neutropenia subsided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Thirty-three infants received rhG-CSF plus antibiotic treatment and 23 infants received antibiotic treatment. No drug-related adverse event was recorded. Absolute neutrophil count values were significantly higher on the 2(nd) study day and 3(rd) study day in Group I. Short-term mortality did not differ between the groups. Treatment with rhG-CSF resulted in a more rapid recovery of ANC in neutropenic preterm infants. However, no reduction in short-term mortality was documented. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. [Effect of lipopolysaccharides from Porphyromonas endodontalis on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor in mouse osteoblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaqiong; Qiu, Lihong; Guo, Jiajie; Qu, Liu; Xu, Liya; Zhong, Ming

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe) on the expression of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) mRNA and protein in MC3T3-E1 cells and the role of nucler factor-κB (NF-κB) in the process. MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L) and 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for different hours (0-24 h). The expression of M-CSF mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay (ELISA). The cells untreated by Pe-LPS served as control. The expression of M- CSF mRNA and protein was also detected in 10 mg/L Pe- LPS treated MC3T3-E1 cells after pretreated with BAY 11-7082 for 1 h, a special NF-κB inhibitor. The groups were divided as follows, control group, BAY group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 treated alone MC3T3-E1 cells), Pe-LPS group (10 mg/L Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h), BAY combine with Pe-LPS group (10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 pretreated cells for 1 h and 10 mg/L of Pe-LPS stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells for 6 h). The level of M- CSF mRNA and protein increased significantly after treatment with different concentrations of Pe-LPS (0-50 mg/L), which indicated that Pe-LPS induced osteoblasts to express M-CSF mRNA and protein in dose dependent manners. The expression of M-CSF protein increased from (35 ± 2) ng/L (control group) to (170 ± 8) ng/L (50 mg/L group). Maximal induction of M-CSF mRNA expression was found in the MC3T3- E1 cells treated with 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 6 h. After 6 h, the expression of M-CSF mRNA decreased gradually. The expression of M-CSF protein also increased with the treatment of 10 mg/L Pe-LPS for 10 h [(122 ± 4) ng/L]. After 10 h, the expression of M-CSF protein decreased gradually. The mRNA and proteins of M-CSF decreased significantly after pretreatment with 10 µmol/L BAY 11-7082 for 1 h. There was no significant difference between BAY group and the control. Pe-LPS may induce

  13. Adjuvant therapy for melanoma in dogs: results of randomized clinical trials using surgery, liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwen, E G; Kurzman, I D; Vail, D M; Dubielzig, R R; Everlith, K; Madewell, B R; Rodriguez, C O; Phillips, B; Zwahlen, C H; Obradovich, J; Rosenthal, R C; Fox, L E; Rosenberg, M; Henry, C; Fidel, J

    1999-12-01

    Spontaneous canine oral melanoma (COM) is a highly metastatic cancer, resistant to chemotherapy, and can serve as a model for cancer immunotherapy. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE) can activate the tumoricidal activity of the monocyte-macrophage system following i.v. injection. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of L-MTP-PE administered alone and combined with recombinant canine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rcGM-CSF) in dogs undergoing surgery for oral melanoma. Ninety-eight dogs with histologically confirmed, clinically staged, oral melanoma were entered into two randomized, double-blind, surgical adjuvant trials. In trial 1, 50 dogs were stratified based on clinical stage and randomized to once a week L-MTP-PE or lipid equivalent (control). When all of the clinical stages were combined, no difference in disease-free survival or in survival time (ST) were detected. However, within stage I, dogs receiving L-MTP-PE had a significant increase in ST compared with control, with 80% of the dogs treated with L-MTP-PE still alive at >2 years. Within each stage II and stage III, there was no difference detected between the treatment groups. In trial 2, 48 dogs were stratified on the basis of clinical stage and extent of surgery (simple resection or radical excision), treated with L-MTP-PE two times a week, and randomized to rcGM-CSF or saline (placebo) given s.c. daily for 9 weeks. Within each stage and when all of the stages were combined, there was no difference between the treatment groups. In both studies, stage I COM is associated with a better prognosis. No effect on survival was observed with regard to tumor location in the oral cavity, sex, type/extent of surgery, or age. In a subset of dogs tested, pulmonary alveolar macrophage cytotoxicity was enhanced with combined rcGM-CSF and L-MTP-PE but not in dogs treated with L-MTP-PE alone. The present study

  14. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  15. Interleukin-6 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in apical periodontitis: correlation with clinical and histologic findings of the involved teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radics, T; Kiss, C; Tar, I; Márton, I J

    2003-02-01

    Apical periodontitis is characterized by the presence of immunocompetent cells producing a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Releasing cytokines with long-range action, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), apical periodontitis may induce changes in remote organs of the host. This study quantified the levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF in symptomatic and asymptomatic human periradicular lesions. Lesions were also characterized by size and histologic findings. Tissue samples were homogenized and supernatants were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between cytokine levels and characteristic features (as single variables) of the lesions were analysed. There was a trend for higher levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF in symptomatic than in asymptomatic lesions, but the difference was not significant. Levels also tended to be higher in large than in small lesions, in polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell-rich than in PMN cell-poor samples, and in epithelialized than in non-epithelialized lesions. Significantly higher levels of IL-6 (778.1 +/- 220.5 pg/microg) and GM-CSF (363.3 +/- 98.4 pg/microg) were found in samples coincidentally possessing symptomatic and epithelialized features than in asymptomatic, small, PMN cell-poor, non-epithelialized lesions (IL-6: 45.2 +/- 13.1 pg/microg and GM-CSF: 135.1 +/- 26.4 pg/microg). These results suggest that symptomatic lesions containing epithelial cells represent an immunologically active stage of apical periodontitis, whereas asymptomatic, small, PMN cell-poor, non-epithelialized lesions represent healing apical lesions.

  16. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor is a central component of the foreign body response to biomaterial implants in rodents and non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Veiseh, Omid; Vegas, Arturo J.; Tam, Hok Hei; Farah, Shady; Ma, Minglin; Li, Jie; Bader, Andrew; Chiu, Alan; Sadraei, Atieh; Aresta-Dasilva, Stephanie; Griffin, Marissa; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Webber, Matthew; Siebert, Sean; Tang, Katherine; Chen, Michael; Langan, Erin; Dholokia, Nimit; Thakrar, Raj; Qi, Meirigeng; Oberholzer, Jose; Greiner, Dale L.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2017-06-01

    Host recognition and immune-mediated foreign body response to biomaterials can compromise the performance of implanted medical devices. To identify key cell and cytokine targets, here we perform in-depth systems analysis of innate and adaptive immune system responses to implanted biomaterials in rodents and non-human primates. While macrophages are indispensable to the fibrotic cascade, surprisingly neutrophils and complement are not. Macrophages, via CXCL13, lead to downstream B cell recruitment, which further potentiated fibrosis, as confirmed by B cell knockout and CXCL13 neutralization. Interestingly, colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) is significantly increased following implantation of multiple biomaterial classes: ceramic, polymer and hydrogel. Its inhibition, like macrophage depletion, leads to complete loss of fibrosis, but spares other macrophage functions such as wound healing, reactive oxygen species production and phagocytosis. Our results indicate that targeting CSF1R may allow for a more selective method of fibrosis inhibition, and improve biomaterial biocompatibility without the need for broad immunosuppression.

  17. Highly Expressed Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR) in Human Gastric Cancer Leads to Poor Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhisong; Li, Yong; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Liqiao; Tan, Bibo; Zuo, Jing; Hua, Kelei; Ji, Qiang

    2018-03-23

    BACKGROUND Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients has been the mainstay of therapy for many years. Although adding anti-angiogenic drugs to chemotherapy improves patient survival slightly, identifying anti-angiogenic therapy-sensitive patients remains challenging for oncologists. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis, which can be minimized with the anti-G-CSF antibody. Thus, G-CSF might be a potential tumor marker. However, the effects of G-CSF and G-CSFR expression on GC patient survival remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy GC tissue samples were collected for G-CSF and G-CSFR detection by immunohistochemistry. A total of 40 paired GC tissues and matched adjacent mucosa were used to measure the G-CSF and G-CSFR levels by ELISA. Correlations between G-CSF/G-CSFR and clinical characteristics, VEGF-A levels and overall survival were analyzed. Biological function and underlying mechanistic investigations were carried out using SGC7901 cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF on tumor proliferation, migration, and tube formation were examined. RESULTS The levels of G-CSFR were upregulated in GC tissues compared to normal mucosa tissues. Higher G-CSF expression was associated with later tumor stages and higher tumor VEGF-A and serum CA724 levels, whereas higher G-CSFR expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher G-CSF expression had shorter overall survival times. In vitro, G-CSF stimulated SGC7901 proliferation and migration through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and accelerated HUVEC tube formation. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that increased G-CSF and G-CSFR in tumors leads to unfavorable outcomes for GC patients by stimulating tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, indicating that these factors are potential tumor targets for cancer treatment.

  18. X-ray-induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by mouse spleen cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, M.; Shinoda, M.; Tsuneoka, K.; Shikita, M.

    1980-01-01

    Spleen cells were collected from normal mice and cultured in a medium containing 20% calf serum. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the culture significantly increased the production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and a maximum induction was attained in 5 days. Irradiation of the spleen cells with 300 to 3000 R x rays also enhanced the production of GM-CSF, but there was a latent period of about 5 days before the factor appeared in the culture medium. The observed difference between LPS and x rays in the timing of inducing GM-CSF production in the spleen cell culture was consistent with the difference observed in animals. These results suggest that different mechanisms of GM-CSF production operate in the spleen in response to either LPS or x rays

  19. Short-term exposure of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor early in culture improves ex vivo expansion of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturana, Flavia; Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2011-03-01

    Despite the availability of modern antibiotics/antimycotics and cytokine support, neutropenic infection accounts for the majority of chemotherapy-associated deaths. While transfusion support with donor neutrophils is possible, cost and complicated logistics make such an option unrealistic on a routine basis. A manufactured neutrophil product could enable routine prophylactic administration of neutrophils, preventing the onset of neutropenia and substantially reducing the risk of infection. We examined the use of pre-culture strategies and various cytokine/modulator combinations to improve neutrophil expansion from umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC). Enriched UCB HPC were cultured using either two-phase pre-culture strategies or a single phase using various cytokine/modulator combinations. Outcome was assessed with respect to numerical expansion, cell morphology, granulation and respiratory burst activity. Pre-culture in the absence of strong differentiation signals (e.g. granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF) failed to provide any improvement to final neutrophil yields. Similarly, removal of differentiating cells during pre-culture failed to improve neutrophil yields to an appreciable extent. Of the cytokine/modulator combinations, the addition of granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-colony-stimulating factor (CSF) alone gave the greatest increase. In order to avoid production of monocytes, it was necessary to remove GM-CSF on day 5. Using this strategy, neutrophil expansion improved 2.7-fold. Although all cytokines and culture strategies employed have been reported previously to enhance HPC expansion, we found that the addition of GM-CSF alone was sufficient to improve total cell yields maximally. The need to remove GM-CSF on day 5 to avoid monocyte differentiation highlights the context and time-dependent complexity of exogenous signaling in hematopoietic cell differentiation and growth.

  20. Substance P enhances tissue factor release from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces procoagulant activity of macrophages. Tissue factor (TF) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein and substance P (SP) is a pro-inflammatory neuropeptide involved in the formation of membrane blebs. This study investigated the role of SP in TF release by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. SP significantly decreased TF levels in whole-cell lysates of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. TF was detected in the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation of macrophages by SP. Aprepitant (an SP/neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) reduced TF release from macrophages stimulated with SP. Pretreatment of macrophages with a radical scavenger(pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) also limited the decrease of TF in whole-cell lysates after stimulation with SP. A protein kinase C inhibitor (rottlerin) partially blocked this macrophage response to SP, while it was significantly inhibited by a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) or a dynamin inhibitor (dinasore). An Akt inhibitor (perifosine) also partially blocked this response. Furthermore, siRNA targeting p22phox, β-arrestin 2, or Rho A, blunted the release of TF from macrophages stimulated with SP. In other experiments, visceral adipocytes derived from cryopreserved preadipocytes were found to produce SP. In conclusion, SP enhances the release of TF from macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The immunomodulatory effect of inhaled granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cystic fibrosis. A new treatment paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heslet, Lars; Bay, Christiane; Nepper-Christensen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience recurrent infections and develop chronically infected lungs, which initiates an altered immunological alveolar environment. End-stage pulmonary dysfunction is a result of a long sequence of complex events in CF, progressing to alveolar macrophage dysf...

  2. Increased production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in Crohn's disease--a possible target for infliximab treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agnholt, Jørgen; Kelsen, Jens; Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The presence of neutrophils among epithelial cells is one of the major features of the inflammation in Crohn's disease, and has been used to indicate disease activity. The survival of neutrophils outside the blood vessels is limited and their longevity is influenced by granulocyte-macrophage colo...

  3. Relationship of colony-stimulating activity to apparent kill of human colony-forming cells by irradiation and hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxmeyer, H.E.; Galbraith, P.R.; Baker, F.L.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were subjected to 137 Cs irradiation in vitro and then cultured in semisolid agar medium. Cultures of irradiated cells were stimulated with colony-stimulating activity (CSA) of different potencies, and it was found that the amount of stimulation applied to cultures influenced the apparent kill of colony-forming cells (CFC). It was also found that the effects of irradiation on colony formation were not confined to CFC kill since medium conditioned by cells during irradiation exhibited stimulatory and inhibitory properties after treatment by 600 and 1000 rads, respectively. Studies in which irradiated cells were pretreated with hydroxyurea indicated that CFC in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were particularly sensitive to low doses of irradiation. The proliferative capacity of CFC surviving 1000 rads was undiminished as judged by their ability to form large colonies. Estimates of CFC kill by hydroxyurea were also affected by the level of CSA

  4. The Potential Role of Recombinant Hematopoietic Colony-Stimulating Factors in Preventing Infections in the Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rusthoven

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors coordinate the proliferation and maturation of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells during normal hematopoiesis. Most of these factors are now available as recombinant human colony-stimulating factors, and preclinical and clinical testing is proceeding rapidly. Granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors have been the most extensively studied to date. In human clinical trials, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves neutrophil counts and function, reduces episodes of febrile neutropenia, improves neutrophil recovery after disease- or treatment-induced myelosuppression, and reduces the number of serious infections in several neutropenic disease states. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor has similar biological properties but may also improve eosinophil proliferation and function, and platelet cell recovery after myelotoxic bone marrow injury, Interleukin-1 boosts the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but also may promote the resolution of established infections in conjunction with antibiotics. The therapeutic realities and future therapeutic implications of these agents for the therapy of infections, cancer and hemopoietic disorders are discussed.

  5. Paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or recombinant human interleukin 3 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in ovarian cancer : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Beijnen, JH; Piersma, H; vanderGraaf, WTA; deVries, EGE; Boonstra, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tolerability and efficacy of four courses of paclitaxel and ifosfamide plus cisplatin every 3 weeks was evaluated in patients with residual or refractory ovarian cancer. Additionally, supportive haematological effects of recombinant human interleukin 3 (rhIL-3) and recombinant human granulocyte

  6. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Receptor, Tissue Factor, and VEGF-R Bound VEGF in Human Breast Cancer In Loco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Sierko, Ewa; Skalij, Piotr; Kamińska, Magda; Zimnoch, Lech; Brekken, Ralf A; Thorpe, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin and docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimens used in breast cancer patients are associated with high risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are recommended for both treating and preventing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Increased thrombosis incidence in G-CSF treated patients was reported; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The principal activator of blood coagulation in cancer is tissue factor (TF). It additionally contributes to cancer progression and stimulates angiogenesis. The main proangiogenic factor is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of the study was to evaluate granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR), tissue factor (TF) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R) bound VEGF in human breast cancer in loco. G-CSFR, TF and VEGFR bound VEGF (VEGF: VEGFR) were assessed in 28 breast cancer tissue samples. Immunohistochemical (IHC) methodologies according to ABC technique and double staining IHC procedure were employed utilizing antibodies against G-CSFR, TF and VEGF associated with VEGFR (VEGF: VEGFR). Expression of G-CSFR was demonstrated in 20 breast cancer tissue specimens (71%). In 6 cases (21%) the expression was strong (IRS 9-12). Strong expression of TF was observed in all investigated cases (100%). Moreover, expression of VEGF: VEGFR was visualized in cancer cells (IRS 5-8). No presence of G-CSFR, TF or VEGF: VEGFR was detected on healthy breast cells. Double staining IHC studies revealed co-localization of G-CSFR and TF, G-CSFR and VEGF: VEGFR, as well as TF and VEGF: VEGFR on breast cancer cells and ECs. The results of the study indicate that GCSFR, TF and VEGF: VEGFR expression as well as their co-expression might influence breast cancer biology, and may increase thromboembolic adverse events incidence.

  7. Enhancement of the grafting efficiency of transplanted marrow cells by preincubation with interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, M.; Konno, M.; Shiota, Y.; Omoto, E.; Minguell, J.J.; Zanjani, E.D.

    1991-04-01

    To improve the grafting efficiency of transplanted murine hematopoietic progenitors, we briefly preincubated mouse bone marrow cells with interleukin-3 (IL-3) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) ex vivo before their transplantation into irradiated recipients. This treatment was translated into an increase in the seeding efficiency of colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) and CFU-GM after transplantation. Not only was the concentration of CFU-S in the tibia increased 2 and 24 hours after transplantation, but the total cell number and CFU-S and CFU-GM concentrations were persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups 1 to 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, the survival of animals as a function of transplanted cell number was persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups compared with controls. The data indicate that the pretreatment of marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF before transplantation increases the seeding efficiency of hematopoietic stem cells and probably other progenitor cells after transplantation. This increased efficiency may be mediated by upward modulation of homing receptors. Therefore, ex vivo preincubation of donor marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF may be a useful tactic in bone marrow transplantation.

  8. Diagnostic Power of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in Breast Cancer Patients Based on ROC Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Zajkowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy in women. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been described as an important regulator of angiogenesis which plays a vital role in the progression of tumor. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF is a cytokine whose functions include regulation of hematopoietic lineages cells growth, proliferation, and differentiation. We investigated the diagnostic significance of these parameters in comparison to CA15-3 in BC patients and in relation to the control group (benign breast tumor and healthy women. Plasma levels of the tested parameters were determined by ELISA and CA15-3 was determined by CMIA. VEGF was shown to be comparable to CA15-3 values of sensitivity in BC group and, what is more important, higher values in early stages of BC. VEGF was also the only parameter which has statistically significant AUC in all stages of cancer. M-CSF has been shown to be comparable to CA15-3 and VEGF, specificity, and AUC values only in stages III and IV of BC. These results indicate the usefulness and high diagnostic power of VEGF in the detection of BC. Also, it occurred to be the best candidate for cancer diagnostics in stages I and II of BC and in the differentiation between BC and benign cases.

  9. The effect of interleukin-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor on the response of neutrophils to formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, M; Llewellyn-Jones, C G; Stockley, R A

    1998-08-14

    Neutrophils isolated from patients with chronic bronchitis and emphysema have been shown to have enhanced responses to formyl peptides when assessed in vitro compared to age, sex matched controls. It is currently unclear whether the observed differences are due to a 'priming' effect by a second agent in vivo, or whether this is a primary difference in the neutrophils. We have studied the effects of interleukin-8, which is thought to be one of the major pro-inflammatory cytokines in chronic lung disease and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), in order to assess their effects on neutrophil chemotaxis and connective tissue degradation. In addition, we have assessed the effect of preincubation of these agents with neutrophils for 30 min followed by stimulation with F-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) to investigate any possible 'priming' effect that may be relevant to our clinical data. We report suppression of neutrophil chemotaxis to FMLP following incubation of the neutrophils with both IL-8 and GMCSF. However, we have observed an additive effect of IL-8 and FMLP for neutrophil degranulation leading to fibronectin degradation. The results suggest that IL-8 does not 'prime' neutrophils for subsequent FMLP stimulation as observed in vivo. Although the results for GMCSF were similar for the chemotactic response, the agent also had a synergistic effect on connective tissue degradation. However, it is concluded that neither agent could explain the enhanced neutrophil responses seen in our patients.

  10. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  11. The safety and clinical efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection for colon cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF injection and whether this regimen could reduce the incidence of adverse events caused by chemotherapy. Method: A total of 100 patients with colon cancer who were treated with chemotherapy in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2014 were randomly divided into two groups, with 50 patients in each group. The patients in the treatment group received G-CSF 24 hours after chemotherapy for consecutive three days; the patients in the control group received the same dose of normal saline. Routine blood tests were performed 7 days and 14 days after chemotherapy. Results: Compared with the control group, the incidences of febrile neutropenia and leukocytopenia in the treatment group were significantly lower (p<0.05. In addition, the incidence of liver dysfunction in the treatment group was lower than that of the control group, without statistical significance. The incidence of myalgia in the treatment was higher than that of the control group without statistical significance. Conclusion: The present study indicated that G-CSF injection after chemotherapy is safe and effective for preventing adverse events in colon cancer patients with chemotherapy.

  12. Simplified in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor using protein folding cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sandeep; Dedaniya, Akshay; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Mallu, Maheswara Reddy; Parupudi, Pavani; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-01-30

    Protein folding-strong cation exchange chromatography (PF-SCX) has been employed for efficient refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). To acquire a soluble form of renatured and purified rhG-CSF, various chromatographic conditions, including the mobile phase composition and pH was evaluated. Additionally, the effects of additives such as urea, amino acids, polyols, sugars, oxidizing agents and their amalgamations were also investigated. Under the optimal conditions, rhG-CSF was efficaciously solubilized, refolded and simultaneously purified by SCX in a single step. The experimental results using ribose (2.0M) and arginine (0.6M) combination were found to be satisfactory with mass yield, purity and specific activity of 71%, ≥99% and 2.6×10(8)IU/mg respectively. Through this investigation, we concluded that the SCX refolding method was more efficient than conventional methods which has immense potential for the large-scale production of purified rhG-CSF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytokines, chemokines, and colony-stimulating factors in human milk: the 1997 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, R P; Goldman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted over the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breast-feeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult due to its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. Nevertheless, a host of bioactive substances including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of the immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk over the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system.

  14. Identification of a new adapter protein that may link the common beta subunit of the receptor for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-3, and IL-5 to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1995-11-17

    Binding of human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to its receptor induces the rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). As hGM-CSF receptor (hGMR) does not contain a consensus sequence for binding of PI 3-kinase, hGMR must use a distinct mechanism for its association with and activation of PI 3-kinase. Here, we describe the identification of a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein of 76-85 kDa (p80) that associates with the common beta subunit of hGMR and with the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase in hGM-CSF-stimulated cells. Src/Yes and Lyn were tightly associated with the p80.PI 3-kinase complex, suggesting that p80 and other phosphotyrosyl proteins present in the complex were phosphorylated by Src family kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p80 was only detected in hGM-CSF or human interleukin-3-stimulated cells, suggesting that activation of p80 might be specific for signaling via the common beta subunit. We postulate that p80 functions as an adapter protein that may participate in linking the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

  15. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; filgrastim) treatment of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H

    1993-01-01

    After 10 weeks of treatment with clozapine, severe agranulocytosis was diagnosed in a 33-year-old female. The patient was treated with filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]) 5 micrograms kg-1 day-1. The neutrophil count was 0.234 x 10(9) l-1 on admission, with a further decrease...

  16. The frequency of clinical pregnancy and implantation rate after cultivation of embryos in a medium with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with preceding failed attempts of ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevkin, S; Lokshin, V; Shishimorova, M; Polumiskov, V

    2014-10-01

    The application in IVF practice of modern techniques can improve positive outcome of each cycle in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs and the effectiveness of treatment as a whole. There are embryos in the female reproductive tract in physiological medium which contain various cytokines and growth factors. It plays an important role in the regulation of normal embryonic development, improve implantation and subsequently optimizing the development of the fetus and the placenta. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is one of the cytokines playing an important role in reproductive function. Addition of recombinant GM-CSF to the culture medium can makes closer human embryos culture to in vivo conditions and improve the efficacy ART cycles. The analysis of culture embryos in EmbryoGen medium has shown that fertilization rate embryo culture and transfer to patients with previous unsuccessful attempts increases clinical pregnancy rate compared to the control group 39.1 versus 27.8%, respectively. It is noted that the implantation rate (on 7 weeks' gestation) and progressive clinical pregnancy rate (on 12 weeks' gestation) were significantly higher in group embryos culture in EmbryoGen medium compared to standard combination of medium (ISM1+VA), and were 20.4 and 17.4% versus 11.6 and 9.1%, respectively.

  17. Purity assessment of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in finished drug product by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benković, Goran; Skrlin, Ana; Madić, Tomislav; Debeljak, Zeljko; Medić-Šarić, Marica

    2014-09-01

    Current methods for determination of impurities with different charge-to-volume ratio are limited especially in terms of sensitivity and precision. The main goal of this research was to establish a quantitative method for determination of impurities with charges differing from that of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, filgrastim) with superior precision and sensitivity compared to existing methods. A CZE method has been developed, optimized, and validated for a purity assessment of filgrastim in liquid pharmaceutical formulations. Optimal separation of filgrastim from the related impurities with different charges was achieved on a 50 μm id fused-silica capillary of a total length of 80.5 cm. A BGE that contains 100 mM phosphoric acid adjusted to pH 7.0 with triethanolamine was used. The applied voltage was 20 kV while the temperature was maintained at 25°C. UV detection was set to 200 nm. Method was validated in terms of selectivity/specificity, linearity, precision, LOD, LOQ, stability, and robustness. Linearity was observed in the concentration range of 6-600 μg/mL and the LOQ was determined to be 0.3% relative to the concentration of filgrastim of 0.6 mg/mL. Other validation parameters were also found to be acceptable; thus the method was successfully applied for a quantitative purity assessment of filgrastim in a finished drug product. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells by chemotherapy and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for hematologic support after high-dose intensification for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Ayash, L; Anderson, K C; Hunt, M; Wheeler, C; Schwartz, G; Tepler, I; Mazanet, R; Lynch, C; Pap, S

    1992-06-01

    High-dose therapy with autologous marrow support results in durable complete remissions in selected patients with relapsed lymphoma and leukemia who cannot be cured with conventional dose therapy. However, substantial morbidity and mortality result from the 3- to 6-week period of marrow aplasia until the reinfused marrow recovers adequate hematopoietic function. Hematopoietic growth factors, particularly used after chemotherapy, can increase the number of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) present in systemic circulation. The reinfusion of PBPCs with marrow has recently been reported to reduce the time to recovery of adequate marrow function. This study was designed to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mobilized PBPCs alone (without marrow) would result in rapid and reliable hematopoietic reconstitution. Sixteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with four cycles of doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate (AFM induction). Patients responding after the first two cycles were administered GM-CSF after the third and fourth cycles to recruit PBPCs for collection by two leukapheresis per cycle. These PBPCs were reinfused as the sole source of hematopoietic support after high doses of cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin. No marrow or hematopoietic cytokines were used after progenitor cell reinfusion. Granulocytes greater than or equal to 500/microL was observed on a median of day 14 (range, 8 to 57). Transfusion independence of platelets greater than or equal to 20,000/microL occurred on a median day of 12 (range, 8 to 134). However, three patients required the use of a reserve marrow for slow platelet engraftment. In retrospect, these patients were characterized by poor baseline bone marrow cellularity and poor platelet recovery after AFM induction therapy. When compared with 29 historical control patients who had received the same high-dose intensification chemotherapy using autologous

  19. Neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), as administered in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered Rose Bengal in the optic nerve head of 60 adult male Wistar rats, an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) was inducted. Rats either immediately received G-CSF (subcutaneous injections) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized at 4 weeks post infarct. Density of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was counted using retrograde labeling of Fluoro-gold. Visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials (FVEP) at 4 weeks. TUNEL assay in the retinal sections and immunohistochemical staining of ED1 (marker of macrophage/microglia) were investigated in the optic nerve (ON) specimens. The RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in the G-CSF treated rats were significantly higher than those of the PBS-treated rats (survival rate was 71.4% vs. 33.2% in the central retina; 61.8% vs. 22.7% in the mid-peripheral retina, respectively; both p optic nerve sections of G-CSF-treated rats (16 ± 6/HPF vs. 35 ± 10/HPF; p = 0.016). In conclusion, administration of G-CSF is neuroprotective in the rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, as demonstrated both structurally by RGC density and functionally by FVEP. G-CSF may work via the dual actions of anti-apoptosis for RGC surviving as well as anti-inflammation in the optic nerves as evidenced by less infiltration of ED1-povitive cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nicotine can skew the characterization of the macrophage type-1 (M{Phi}1) phenotype differentiated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the M{Phi}2 phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagita, Manabu; Kobayashi, Ryohei [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Division of Oral Biology and Disease Control, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-10-09

    Macrophages (M{Phi}s) exhibit functional heterogeneity and plasticity in the local microenvironment. Recently, it was reported that M{Phi}s can be divided into proinflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}1) and anti-inflammatory M{Phi}s (M{Phi}2) based on their polarized functional properties. Here, we report that nicotine, the major ingredient of cigarette smoke, can modulate the characteristics of M{Phi}1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-driven M{Phi}1 with nicotine (Ni-M{Phi}1) showed the phenotypic characteristics of M{Phi}2. Like M{Phi}2, Ni-M{Phi}1 exhibited antigen-uptake activities. Ni-M{Phi}1 suppressed IL-12, but maintained IL-10 and produced high amounts of MCP-1 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation compared with M{Phi}1. Moreover, we observed strong proliferative responses of T cells to lipopolysaccharide-stimulated M{Phi}1, whereas Ni-M{Phi}1 reduced T cell proliferation and inhibited IFN-{gamma} production by T cells. These results suggest that nicotine can change the functional characteristics of M{Phi} and skew the M{Phi}1 phenotype to M{Phi}2. We propose that nicotine is a potent regulator that modulates immune responses in microenvironments.

  1. Recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (rGM-CSF) : A Review of its Pharmacological Properties and Prospective Role in the Management of Myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan M; Heel, Rennie C

    1992-04-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) is a polypeptide hormone produced through recombinant DNA technologies in glycosylated (yeast or mammalian expression systems) or nonglycosylated (Escherichia coli expression system) form. It is a multilineage haematopoietin which stimulates proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and increases peripheral white blood cell counts when administered systemically. Treatment is generally well tolerated, although mild to moderate flu-like symptoms are common and rGM-CSF-induced fever and fluid retention may be problematic in occasional patients. rGM-CSF accelerates recovery of peripheral neutrophil counts after bone marrow transplantation, and results of a placebo-controlled randomised trial correlate this with reduced infectious episodes and shortened length of hospitalisation in patients with lymphoid malignancies. A substantial number of patients with graft failure after bone marrow transplantation also respond to rGM-CSF. The duration of myelosuppression secondary to cancer chemotherapy can be significantly reduced by rGM-CSF which has permitted investigation of antineoplastic dose-intensity escalation. In some haematopoietic disorders (e.g. aplastic anaemia, myelodysplasia and neutropenia secondary to HIV infection and antiviral therapy), rGM-CSF produces clinically useful increases in peripheral blood granulocyte counts, although the effect is generally not sustained after drug withdrawal. The potential for rGM-CSF to stimulate proliferation of the abnormal clone in myelodysplasia and in acute myelogenous leukaemia following induction therapy is of concern. Available data suggest, however, that with appropriate monitoring and exclusion of high-risk patients this serious potential risk can be avoided, and that myelopoiesis is enhanced in such patients by rGM-CSF treatment. Recombinant colony-stimulating factors are a new therapeutic modality; hence many aspects of

  2. Effect of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor With or Without Supervised Exercise on Walking Performance in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: The PROPEL Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Guralnik, Jack M; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Kibbe, Melina R; Polonsky, Tamar S; Domanchuk, Kathryn; Stein, James H; Zhao, Lihui; Taylor, Doris; Skelly, Christopher; Pearce, William; Perlman, Harris; McCarthy, Walter; Li, Lingyu; Gao, Ying; Sufit, Robert; Bloomfield, Christina L; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-12-05

    Benefits of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for improving walking ability in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) are unclear. Walking exercise may augment the effects of GM-CSF in PAD, since exercise-induced ischemia enhances progenitor cell release and may promote progenitor cell homing to ischemic calf muscle. To determine whether GM-CSF combined with supervised treadmill exercise improves 6-minute walk distance, compared with exercise alone and compared with GM-CSF alone; to determine whether GM-CSF alone improves 6-minute walk more than placebo and whether exercise improves 6-minute walk more than an attention control intervention. Randomized clinical trial with 2 × 2 factorial design. Participants were identified from the Chicago metropolitan area and randomized between January 6, 2012, and December 22, 2016, to 1 of 4 groups: supervised exercise + GM-CSF (exercise + GM-CSF) (n = 53), supervised exercise + placebo (exercise alone) (n = 53), attention control  + GM-CSF (GM-CSF alone) (n = 53), attention control + placebo (n = 51). The final follow-up visit was on August 15, 2017. Supervised exercise consisted of treadmill exercise 3 times weekly for 6 months. The attention control consisted of weekly educational lectures by clinicians for 6 months. GM-CSF (250 μg/m2/d) or placebo were administered subcutaneously (double-blinded) 3 times/wk for the first 2 weeks of the intervention. The primary outcome was change in 6-minute walk distance at 12-week follow-up (minimum clinically important difference, 20 m). P values were adjusted based on the Hochberg step-up method. Of 827 persons evaluated, 210 participants with PAD were randomized (mean age, 67.0 [SD, 8.6] years; 141 [67%] black, 82 [39%] women). One hundred ninety-five (93%) completed 12-week follow-up. At 12-week follow-up, exercise + GM-CSF did not significantly improve 6-minute walk distance more than

  3. Colony stimulating factors and their clinical implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    1989-01-01

    Granulocytes and macrophage are dependent for their production and/or functional activation in vitro on the presence of a family of glycoproteins. They are generally called colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) because of their capacity to stimulate colony formation in semi-solid cultures, and are currently classified into four distinct subtypes, that is, Multi-CSF, GM-CSF, G-CSF and M-CSF, according to the cell type of colonies formed under their stimulation or their target cell specificity. All of the murine and human CSF subtypes and the genes for them have become available in a purified form and in a large scale, and now allow us to investigate their interactions, the mechanisms for their actions, the cell-cell interactions leading to their production and secretion, and their actions in vivo. Furthermore, the preclinical and/or clinical studies which were carried out using the purified CSFs strongly indicate that human CSFs will be effective strategies for preventing and treating opportunistic bacterial and fungal infection as a major cause of death in granulocytopenic patients. (author)

  4. Application of microchip CGE for the analysis of PEG-modified recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Ji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Na, Dong Hee

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microchip CGE (MCGE) for the analysis of PEG-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) prepared with PEG-aldehydes. The unmodified and PEG-modified G-CSFs were analyzed by Protein 80 and 230 Labchips on the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. The MCGE allowed size-based separation and quantitation of PEG-G-CSF. The Protein 80 Labchip was useful for PEG-5K-G-CSF, while the Protein 230 Labchip was more suitable for PEG-20K-G-CSF. The MCGE was also used to monitor a search for optimal PEG-modification (PEGylation) conditions to produce mono-PEG-G-CSF. This study demonstrates the usefulness of MCGE for monitoring and optimizing the PEGylation of G-CSF with the advantages of speed, minimal sample consumption, and automatic quantitation.

  5. Purification and molecular cloning of SH2- and SH3-containing inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase, which is involved in the signaling pathway of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and Bcr-Abl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odai, H; Sasaki, K; Iwamatsu, A; Nakamoto, T; Ueno, H; Yamagata, T; Mitani, K; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1997-04-15

    Grb2/Ash and Shc are the adapter proteins that link tyrosine-kinase receptors to Ras and make tyrosine-kinase functionally associated with receptors and Ras in fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells. Grb2/Ash and Shc have the SH3, SH2, or phosphotyrosine binding domains. These domains bind to proteins containing proline-rich regions or tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and contribute to the association of Grb2/Ash and Shc with other signaling molecules. However, there could remain unidentified signaling molecules that physically and functionally interact with these adapter proteins and have biologically important roles in the signaling pathways. By using the GST fusion protein including the full length of Grb2/Ash, we have found that c-Cbl and an unidentified 135-kD protein (pp135) are associated with Grb2/Ash. We have also found that they become tyrosine-phosphorylated by treatment of a human leukemia cell line, UT-7, with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We have purified the pp135 by using GST-Grb2/Ash affinity column and have isolated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the pp135 using a cDNA probe, which was obtained by the degenerate polymerase chain reaction based on a peptide sequence of the purified pp135. The cloned cDNA has 3,958 nucleotides that contain a single long open reading frame of 3,567 nucleotides, encoding a 1,189 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 133 kD. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals that pp135 is a protein that has one SH2, one SH3, and one proline-rich domain. The pp135, which contains two motifs conserved among the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase proteins, was shown to have the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase activity. The pp135 was revealed to associate constitutively with Grb2/Ash and inducibly with Shc using UT-7 cells stimulated with GM-CSF. In the cell lines derived from human chronic myelogenous leukemia, pp135 was constitutively tyrosine

  6. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN GRANULOCYTIC COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN TREATMENT OF GRANULOCYTOPENIA DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with severe clinical course of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is difficult problem. During the last years genetically engineered biological drugs are used equally with traditional immunosuppressive agents in treatment of severe forms of juvenile arthritis. High effectiveness of these drugs can be accompanied with development of unfavorable effects, for example, febrile neutropenia. The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of recombinant human granulocytic colony-stimulating factor — filgrastim (Leucostim — in treatment of granulocytopenia developed during immunosuppressive therapy in 16 patients with JRA. It was shown that administration of filgrastim arrests leucopenia in 100% of patients and granulocytopenia — in 93% of patients in 24 hours after first injection. High effectiveness of drug was combined with good tolerability and safety.Key words: children, treatment, granulocytopenia, filgrastim, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:94-100

  7. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments Tie2-expressing monocyte differentiation, angiogenic function, and recruitment in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Mary A; Voorhees, Jeffrey L; Cole, Sara L; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Patterson, Ivory L; Gross, Amy C; Moldovan, Leni; Mo, Xiaokui; Evans, Randall; Marsh, Clay B; Eubank, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Reports demonstrate the role of M-CSF (CSF1) in tumor progression in mouse models as well as the prognostic value of macrophage numbers in breast cancer patients. Recently, a subset of CD14+ monocytes expressing the Tie2 receptor, once thought to be predominantly expressed on endothelial cells, has been characterized. We hypothesized that increased levels of CSF1 in breast tumors can regulate differentiation of Tie2- monocytes to a Tie2+ phenotype. We treated CD14+ human monocytes with CSF1 and found a significant increase in CD14+/Tie2+ positivity. To understand if CSF1-induced Tie2 expression on these cells improved their migratory ability, we pre-treated CD14+ monocytes with CSF1 and used Boyden chemotaxis chambers to observe enhanced response to angiopoietin-2 (ANG2), the chemotactic ligand for the Tie2 receptor. We found that CSF1 pre-treatment significantly augmented chemotaxis and that Tie2 receptor upregulation was responsible as siRNA targeting Tie2 receptor abrogated this effect. To understand any augmented angiogenic effect produced by treating these cells with CSF1, we cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with conditioned supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated CD14+ monocytes for a tube formation assay. While supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated TEMs increased HUVEC branching, a neutralizing antibody against the CSF1R abrogated this activity, as did siRNA against the Tie2 receptor. To test our hypothesis in vivo, we treated PyMT tumor-bearing mice with CSF1 and observed an expansion in the TEM population relative to total F4/80+ cells, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. Investigation into the mechanism of Tie2 receptor upregulation on CD14+ monocytes by CSF1 revealed a synergistic contribution from the PI3 kinase and HIF pathways as the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002, as well as HIF-1α-deficient macrophages differentiated from the bone marrow of HIF-1αfl/fl/LysMcre mice, diminished CSF1-stimulated Tie2 receptor expression.

  8. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor augments Tie2-expressing monocyte differentiation, angiogenic function, and recruitment in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A Forget

    Full Text Available Reports demonstrate the role of M-CSF (CSF1 in tumor progression in mouse models as well as the prognostic value of macrophage numbers in breast cancer patients. Recently, a subset of CD14+ monocytes expressing the Tie2 receptor, once thought to be predominantly expressed on endothelial cells, has been characterized. We hypothesized that increased levels of CSF1 in breast tumors can regulate differentiation of Tie2- monocytes to a Tie2+ phenotype. We treated CD14+ human monocytes with CSF1 and found a significant increase in CD14+/Tie2+ positivity. To understand if CSF1-induced Tie2 expression on these cells improved their migratory ability, we pre-treated CD14+ monocytes with CSF1 and used Boyden chemotaxis chambers to observe enhanced response to angiopoietin-2 (ANG2, the chemotactic ligand for the Tie2 receptor. We found that CSF1 pre-treatment significantly augmented chemotaxis and that Tie2 receptor upregulation was responsible as siRNA targeting Tie2 receptor abrogated this effect. To understand any augmented angiogenic effect produced by treating these cells with CSF1, we cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with conditioned supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated CD14+ monocytes for a tube formation assay. While supernatants from CSF1-pre-treated TEMs increased HUVEC branching, a neutralizing antibody against the CSF1R abrogated this activity, as did siRNA against the Tie2 receptor. To test our hypothesis in vivo, we treated PyMT tumor-bearing mice with CSF1 and observed an expansion in the TEM population relative to total F4/80+ cells, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. Investigation into the mechanism of Tie2 receptor upregulation on CD14+ monocytes by CSF1 revealed a synergistic contribution from the PI3 kinase and HIF pathways as the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002, as well as HIF-1α-deficient macrophages differentiated from the bone marrow of HIF-1αfl/fl/LysMcre mice, diminished CSF1-stimulated Tie2 receptor

  9. Effect of filgrastim (recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor) on IgE responses in human asthma: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Joks, Rauno; Norowitz, Kevin B; Chice, Seto; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    The role of peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization on Immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses has not been studied. Distributions of blood lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD60+, CD19+, CD23+, CD16/56+, CD25, CD45RA+, CD45RO+, CD34+), and levels of serum immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE) were studied in an allergic asthmatic serum IgE+ (181IU/mL) adult (m/45 y/o) donor undergoing routine stem cell mobilization protocol (American Society of Hematology) before (day-30), during (day 4), and after (1 wk post last dose) filgrastim (subcutaneous, 480 mcg, 2qd) treatment (flow cytometry, nephelometry, UniCAP Total IgE Fluoro enzyme immunoassay). On day 4 of filgrastim treatment, numbers of CD8+CD60+T cells and CD23+ blood cells dramatically increased (98% and 240% respectively) compared with pre treatment. In contrast on day 4 of treatment, serum IgE levels decreased (>50%) compared with pre treatment. CD8+CD60+T cells and CD23+ blood cells and serum IgE levels approached pre-treatment levels at 1 week post treatment. Filgrastim treatment transiently increases numbers of CD8+CD60+T and CD23+ expressing cells, which are known to regulate human IgE responses, while also transiently suppressing ongoing IgE responses. These results suggest that filgrastim affects IgE related responses, and may be useful in modulating allergic responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  11. Inductive potential of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mature neutrophils from X-irradiated human peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumori, Takeo; Yoshino, Hironori; Hayashi, Masako; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) has been used for treatment of neutropenia. Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim are clinically available in Japan. However, the differences in potential benefit for radiation-induced disorder between these types of rhG-CSFs remain unknown. Therefore, the effects of three different types of rhG-CSFs on granulocyte progenitor cells and expansion of neutrophils from nonirradiated or 2 Gy X-irradiated human CD34 + hematopoietic progenitor cells were examined. For analysis of granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) and a surviving fraction of CFU-G, nonirradiated or X-irradiated CD34 + cells were cultured in methylcellulose containing rhG-CSF. These cells were cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with rhG-CSF, and the expansion and characteristics of neutrophils were analyzed. All three types of rhG-CSFs increased the number of CFU-G in a dose-dependent manner; however, Lenograstim is superior to others because of CFU-G-derived colony formation at relatively low doses. The surviving fraction of CFU-G was independent of the types of rhG-CSFs. Expansion of neutrophils by rhG-CSF was largely attenuated by X-irradiation, though no significant difference in neutrophil number was observed between the three types of rhG-CSFs under both nonirradiation and X-irradiation conditions. In terms of functional characteristics of neutrophils, Lenograstim-induced neutrophils produced high levels of reactive oxygen species compared to Filgrastim, when rhG-CSF was applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells. In conclusion, different types of rhG-CSFs lead to different effects when rhG-CSF is applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells, though Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim show equal effects on X-irradiated CD34 + cells. (author)

  12. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  13. Enhanced heterologous expression of biologically active human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells by localization to endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nisha R; Chidambareswaren, M; Manjula, S

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, one of the best characterized cell lines is an attractive expression system for heterologous protein expression. However, the expression of foreign proteins is currently hampered by their low yield, which is partially the result of proteolytic degradation. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine. Recombinant hG-CSF is successfully being used for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in cancer patients. Here, we describe a simple strategy for producing biologically active hG-CSF in tobacco BY-2 cells, localized in the apoplast of BY-2 cells, as well as targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER targeting significantly enhanced recombinant production which scaled to 17.89 mg/l from 4.19 mg/l when expressed in the apoplasts. Southern blotting confirmed the stable integration of hG-CSF in the BY-2 nuclear genome, and the expression of hG-CSF was analysed by Western blotting. Total soluble protein containing hG-CSF isolated from positive calli showed proliferative potential when tested on HL-60 cell lines by MTT assay. We also report the potential of a Fluorescence-activated cell sorting approach for an efficient sorting of the hG-CSF-expressing cell lines, which will enable the generation of homogenous high-producing cell lines.

  14. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi (Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd., Gunma (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory); Fushiki, Masato

    1994-08-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 [mu]g/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author).

  15. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi; Fushiki, Masato.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 μg/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author)

  16. Direct anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on activation and functional properties of human T cell subpopulations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashchenko, Vladimir Vladimirovich; Meniailo, Maxsim Evgenievich; Shmarov, Viacheslav Anatolievich; Gazatova, Natalia Dinislamovna; Melashchenko, Olga Borisovna; Goncharov, Andrei Gennadievich; Seledtsova, Galina Victorovna; Seledtsov, Victor Ivanovich

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on functionality of human T-cell subsets. CD3 + T-lymphocytes were isolated from blood of healthy donors by positive magnetic separation. T cell activation with particles conjugated with antibodies (Abs) to human CD3, CD28 and CD2 molecules increased the proportion of cells expressing G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR, CD114) in all T cell subpopulations studied (CD45RA + /CD197 + naive T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 + central memory T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 - effector memory T cells and CD45RA + /CD197 - terminally differentiated effector T cells). Upon T-cell activation in vitro, G-CSF (10.0 ng/ml) significantly and specifically enhanced the proportion of CD114 + T cells in central memory CD4 + T cell compartment. A dilution series of G-CSF (range, 0.1-10.0 ng/ml) was tested, with no effect on the expression of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α-chain) on activated T cells. Meanwhile, G-CSF treatment enhanced the proportion of CD38 + T cells in CD4 + naïve T cell, effector memory T cell and terminally differentiated effector T cell subsets, as well as in CD4 - central memory T cells and terminally differentiated effector T cells. G-CSF did not affect IL-2 production by T cells; relatively low concentrations of G-CSF down-regulated INF-γ production, while high concentrations of this cytokine up-regulated IL-4 production in activated T cells. The data obtained suggests that G-CSF could play a significant role both in preventing the development of excessive and potentially damaging inflammatory reactivity, and in constraining the expansion of potentially cytodestructive T cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mobilization of primitive and committed hematopoietic progenitors in nonhuman primates treated with defibrotide and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Longoni, Paolo; Milani, Raffaella; Milanesi, Marco; Guidetti, Anna; Haanstra, Krista; Jonker, Margaret; Cleris, Loredana; Magni, Michele; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alesssandro M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of defibrotide in enhancing cytokine-induced hematopoietic mobilization in rhesus monkeys. Animals received recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, 100 microg/kg/day SC for 5 days) and, after a 4- to 6-week washout period, were remobilized with defibrotide (15 mg/kg/hour continuous intravenous for 5 days) plus rhG-CSF. Hematopoietic mobilization was evaluated by complete blood counts, differential counts, as well as frequency and absolute numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs), high-proliferative potential CFCs (HPP-CFCs), and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs). Compared to baseline values, rhG-CSF increased circulating CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 158-, 125-, and 67-fold, respectively; the same figures for defibrotide/rhG-CSF were 299-, 1452-, and 295-fold, respectively. Defibrotide/rhG-CSF treatment compared to rhG-CSF alone increased CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 1.4- (35,089 vs 25,825, pdefibrotide treatment associated with a 5-day rhG-CSF treatment. Compared to rhG-CSF, defibrotide/rhG-CSF increased the mobilization of CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 2- (31,128 vs 15,527, pdefibrotide enhances rhG-CSF-elicited mobilization of primitive and committed progenitors; and 2) a 2-day defibrotide injection is as effective as a 5-day injection.

  18. Adaptive T cell responses induced by oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor therapy expanded by dendritic cell and cytokine-induced killer cell adoptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Gwin, William R; Zhou, Xinna; Wang, Xiaoli; Huang, Hongyan; Jiang, Ni; Zhou, Lei; Agarwal, Pankaj; Hobeika, Amy; Crosby, Erika; Hartman, Zachary C; Morse, Michael A; H Eng, Kevin; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : Although local oncolytic viral therapy (OVT) may enhance tumor lysis, antigen release, and adaptive immune responses, systemic antitumor responses post-therapy are limited. Adoptive immunotherapy with autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) synergizes with systemic therapies. We hypothesized that OVT with Herpes Simplex Virus-granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (HSV-GM-CSF) would induce adaptive T cell responses that could be expanded systemically with sequential DC-CIK therapy. Patients and Methods : We performed a pilot study of intratumoral HSV-GM-CSF OVT followed by autologous DC-CIK cell therapy. In addition to safety and clinical endpoints, we monitored adaptive T cell responses by quantifying T cell receptor (TCR) populations in pre-oncolytic therapy, post-oncolytic therapy, and after DC-CIK therapy. Results : Nine patients with advanced malignancy were treated with OVT (OrienX010), of whom seven experienced stable disease (SD). Five of the OVT treated patients underwent leukapheresis, generation, and delivery of DC-CIKs, and two had SD, whereas three progressed. T cell receptor sequencing of TCR β sequences one month after OVT therapy demonstrates a dynamic TCR repertoire in response to OVT therapy in the majority of patients with the systematic expansion of multiple T cell clone populations following DC-CIK therapy. This treatment was well tolerated and long-term event free and overall survival was observed in six of the nine patients. Conclusions : Strategies inducing the local activation of tumor-specific immune responses can be combined with adoptive cellular therapies to expand the adaptive T cell responses systemically and further studies are warranted.

  19. A pilot study of the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients during x-radiation therapy: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolatou, Ourania; Sotiropoulou-Lontou, Anastasia; Skarlatos, John; Kyprianou, Konstantinos; Kolitsi, Georgia; Dardoufas, Konstantinos

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in reduction of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients who were going to be irradiated with a total dose of 50-70 Gy for head and neck malignancies were included in the study. After the second week of radiotherapy, with the experience of oral pain, GM-CSF 400 μg was administered locally, once a day, until completion of radiotherapy. Patients were evaluated weekly for mucosal reaction and functional impairment. Results: Three patients with gross and functional mucositis grade I after the second week, completed the planned radiotherapy showing mucositis grade I. Eleven patients who experienced, after 2 weeks of radiotherapy, mucositis grade II and III, presented after the third week with gross mucositis grade I and II and functional impairment grade I. One of these 11 patients was then lost to follow-up and the remaining 10 completed their planned radiotherapy having an almost asymptomatic mucositis grade I. The 15th patient with gross mucositis grade III after the 2 weeks of radiotherapy, had a 2-day interruption because of painful mucositis and then continued and completed radiotherapy with gross and functional mucositis grade I. The 16th patient with mucositis grade III after the second week, did not show any improvement, and completed her planned radiotherapy with mucositis grade III which finally healed after the administration of acyclovir. The last, 17th patient discontinued radiotherapy at the third week because of mucositis grade IV and severe ulceration in apposition to an extensive gold prosthesis. Conclusion: The local administration of GM-CSF significantly reduced and almost healed radiation-induced oral mucositis in 14 of 17 patients during the radiotherapy, which was completed within the preplanned time and without any significant patient weight loss or functional impairment

  20. Propofol pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in cultured hepatocytes by suppressing MAPK/ERK activity and NF-κB translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawan, Bruno; Kao, Y.-H.; Goto, Shigeru; Pan, M.-C.; Lin, Y.-C.; Hsu, L.-W.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, C.-Y.; Sun, C.-K.; Cheng, Y.-F.; Tai, M.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Propofol (PPF), a widely used intravenous anesthetic for induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgeries, was found to possess suppressive effect on host immunity. This study aimed at investigating whether PPF plays a modulatory role in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in a cell line of rat hepatocytes. Morphological observation and viability assay showed that PPF exhibits no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 300 μM after 48 h incubation. Pretreatment with 100 μM PPF for 24 h prior to LPS stimulation was performed to investigate the modulatory effect on LPS-induced inflammatory gene production. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PPF pretreatment significantly suppressed the LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expression. Western blotting analysis showed that PPF pretreatment potentiated the LPS-induced TLR-4 downregulation. Flow cytometrical analysis revealed that PPF pretreatment showed no modulatory effect on the LPS-upregulated CD14 expression on hepatocytes. In addition, PPF pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and IκBα, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB primed by LPS. Moreover, addition of PD98059, a MAPK kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the LPS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and GM-CSF production, suggesting that the PPF-attenuated GM-CSF production in hepatocytes may be attributed to its suppressive effect on MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, PPF as an anesthetic may clinically benefit those patients who are vulnerable to sepsis by alleviating sepsis-related inflammatory response in livers

  1. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Janice K.; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Scarantino, Charles W.; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 μg/m 2 or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer

  2. Use of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor during and after remission induction chemotherapy in patients aged 61 years and older with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : Final report of AML-11, a phase III randomized study of the Leukemia Cooperative Group of European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-LCG) and the Dutch Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, B; Suciu, S; Archimbaud, E; Ossenkoppele, G; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E; Wijermans, P; Berneman, Z; Dekker, AW; Stryckmans, P; Jehn, U; Muus, P; Sonneveld, P; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1997-01-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized multicenter clinical trial comparing the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an adjunct to intensive chemotherapy in patients of 61 years and older with untreated newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were

  3. Comparison of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a double-blind prospective randomized phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarilahti, Kauko; Kajanti, Mikael; Joensuu, Timo; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) mouthwashes with sucralfate mouthwashes in the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with radically operated head-and-neck cancer were randomly allocated to use either GM-CSF (n=21) or sucralfate (n=19) mouthwashes during postoperative radiotherapy (RT). All patients received conventionally fractionated RT to a total dose of 50-60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions during 5-6 weeks to the primary site and regional lymphatics. A minimum of 50% of the oral cavity and oropharyngeal mucosa was included in the clinical target volume. GM-CSF mouthwashes consisted of 37.5 μg GM-CSF and sucralfate mouthwashes of 1.0 g of sucralfate distilled in water. Both washes were used 4 times daily, beginning after the first week of RT and continued to the end of the RT course. Symptoms related to radiation mucositis and body weight, serum prealbumin level, and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Results: Oral mucositis tended to be less severe in the GM-CSF group (p=0.072). Complete (n=1) or partial (n=4) healing of mucositis occurred during the RT course in 5 patients (24%) in the GM-CSF group and in none of the patients in the sucralfate group (p=0.049). Patients who received GM-CSF had less mucosal pain (p=0.058) and were less often prescribed opioids for pain (p=0.042). Three patients in the sucralfate group needed hospitalization for mucositis during RT compared with none in the GM-CSF group. Four patients (21%) in the sucralfate group and none in the GM-CSF group required an interruption in the RT course (p=0.042). No significant differences in weight, prealbumin level, or blood cell count were found between the groups, and both mouthwashes were well tolerated. Conclusion: GM-CSF mouthwashes may be moderately more effective than sucralfate mouthwashes in preventing radiation-induced mucositis and mucositis-related pain, and their use may lead to less frequent

  4. Efficacy and safety of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with stage IIIB/C and IVM1a melanoma: subanalysis of the Phase III OPTiM trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrington KJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Harrington,1 Robert HI Andtbacka,2 Frances Collichio,3 Gerald Downey,4 Lisa Chen,5 Zsolt Szabo,6 Howard L Kaufman7 1The Institute of Cancer Research/The Royal Marsden Hospital NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK; 2Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Amgen Ltd, Cambridge, UK; 5Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 6Amgen GmbH, Zug, Switzerland; 7Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA Objectives: Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic immunotherapy to receive approval in Europe, the USA and Australia. In the randomized, open-label Phase III OPTiM trial (NCT00769704, talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate (DRR versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in 436 patients with unresectable stage IIIB–IVM1c melanoma. The median overall survival (OS was longer versus GM-CSF in patients with earlier-stage melanoma (IIIB–IVM1a. Here, we report a detailed subgroup analysis of the OPTiM study in patients with IIIB–IVM1a disease. Patients and methods: The patients were randomized (2:1 ratio to intralesional talimogene laherparepvec or subcutaneous GM-CSF and were evaluated for DRR, overall response rate (ORR, OS, safety, benefit–risk and numbers needed to treat. Descriptive statistics were used for subgroup comparisons. Results: Among 249 evaluated patients with stage IIIB–IVM1a melanoma, DRR was higher with talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF (25.2% versus 1.2%; P<0.0001. ORR was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm (40.5% versus 2.3%; P<0.0001, and 27 patients in the talimogene laherparepvec arm had a complete response, compared with none in GM-CSF-treated patients. The incidence rates of exposure-adjusted adverse events (AE and serious AEs were similar with both treatments. Conclusion

  5. [Macrophages in human semen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Beatriz Reina; Brufman, Adriana Silvia; Paparella, Cecilia Vicenta; Feldman, Rodolfo Nestor; Gatti, Vanda Nora; Solis, Edita Amalia

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the presence of macrophages in human semen samples and the function they carry out in the seminal fluid. Their presence was studied in relation to spermatic morphology, percentage of spermatozoids with native DNA, and presence of antispermatic antibodies. The work was performed with semen samples from 31 unfertile males from 63 couples in which the "female factor" was ruled out as the cause of infertility. Sperm study according to WHO (1992) was carried out in all samples, in addition to: DNA study with acridine orange as fluorocrom, macrophage concentration by neutral red in a Neubauer camera, and detection of antispermatic antibodies with a mixed agglutination test (TAC II) (validated with Mar Screen-Fertility technologies). Sperm morphology was evaluated by Papanicolaou test. 19/31 selected sperm samples (61.3%) showed increased concentration of macrophages, 13 of them (41.9%) with denaturalized DNA, and 8 (25.8%) abnormal morphology. Six samples showed increased macrophage concentration and predominance of native DNA, whereas 11 samples showed increased macrophages and abnormal morphology. Among 18 (58.1%) samples showing antispermatic antibodies 14 (77.7%) had an increased concentration of macrophages. Statistical analysis resulted in a high correlation between macrophage concentration and increased percentage of spermatozoids with denaturalized DNA (p < 0.05). An increased concentration of macrophages is associated with the presence of antispermatic antibodies (p < 0.05). There was not evidence of significant association between concentration of macrophages and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoids (p < 0.05). We can conclude that macrophages are present in human semen and participate in immunovigilance contributing to improve the seminal quality.

  6. Adsorption of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and glass: effect of solvent additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, T P

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of recombinant-derived proteins to glass and polymeric materials used in their packaging and delivery remains a problem. Loss of these very expensive proteins to surface adsorption not only results in reduced yields during purification and scale-up, but also to decreased therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of the present investigation was to inhibit/minimize adsorption of a model protein, namely, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to glass, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polypropylene by inclusion of select solvent additives. Solvent additives used to inhibit/minimize surface adsorption included glycerin, U.S.P. (0.5%, 1%, 5%, and 25% v/v), Pluronic F-127 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Pluronic F-68 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Tween 80 (0.005% and 0.05% w/w) and Tween 20 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w). Over the rhG-CSF concentration range of 0.0 ng/ml to 300 ng/ml, the amount of rhG-CSF bound per cm2 of PVC increased with an increase in the rhG-CSF concentration tested. At rhG-CSF equilibrium concentrations of 262 +/- 3.7 ng/ml and 136 +/- 1.9 ng/ml, the rhG-CSF bound/cm2 of PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C reached a maximum of 37.6 +/- 9.8 ng/cm2 and 165.2 +/- 11.7 ng/cm2, respectively. The adsorption isotherms determined at each temperature were described by the classic Freundlich equation. Moreover, the rate of adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was extremely rapid. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC after only 10 minutes of equilibration at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C were 92.8 +/- 9.2 percent and 97.3 +/- 17.9 percent, respectively. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C after 24 hours were 52.4 +/- 10.9% and 70.0 +/- 9.7%, respectively, indicating that some desorption of rhG-CSF does occur during 24 hr. However, surface adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was shown to be irreversible over a 1 hr time period. Using viscometry, an estimate of the thickness

  7. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence...... and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced...

  8. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  10. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng; Sun Wanjun; Hu Hailan; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4- CD8-, CD4+ CD8+, CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4+ CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. (author)

  11. Recent Advances of Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) Kinase and Its Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Al-Ameen, Shahad K; Al-Koumi, Dania M; Hamad, Mawadda G; Jalal, Nouran A; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2018-01-17

    Colony stimulation factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which is also known as FMS kinase, plays an important role in initiating inflammatory, cancer, and bone disorders when it is overstimulated by its ligand, CSF-1. Innate immunity, as well as macrophage differentiation and survival, are regulated by the stimulation of the CSF-1R. Another ligand, interlukin-34 (IL-34), was recently reported to activate the CSF-1R receptor in a different manner. The relationship between CSF-1R and microglia has been reviewed. Both CSF-1 antibodies and small molecule CSF-1R kinase inhibitors have now been tested in animal models and in humans. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of CSF-1 and IL-34 in producing cancer, bone disorders, and inflammation. We also review the newly discovered and improved small molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that have shown potent activity toward CSF-1R, reported from 2012 until 2017.

  12. Studies on mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human interleukin-11 and recombinant human interleukin-2 on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Ou Hongling; Xing Shuang; Huang Haixiao; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Zhao Yanfang; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Luo Qingliang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Xueguang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidence for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: Sixteen beagle dogs were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI), then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group or cytokines + supportive care (abbreviated as cytokines) group. In addition to supportive care, rhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 were administered subcutaneously to treat dogs in cytokines group. The percentage of CD34 + cells, cell cycle and apoptosis of nucleated cells in peripheral blood were examined by Flow cytometry. Results: After 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, the CD34 + cells in peripheral blood declined obviously (61.3% and 52.1% of baseline for irradiation control and supportive care group separately). The cell proportion of nucleated cells in G 0 /G 1 phase was increased notably notably (99.27% and 99.49% respectively). The rate of apoptosis (26.93% and 21.29% separately) and necrosis (3.27% and 4.14%, respectively) of nucleated cells were elevated significantly when compared with values before irradiation (P 0 /G 1 phase blockage of nucleated cells became more serious (99.71%). The rate of apoptosis (5.66%) and necrosis (1.60%) of nucleated cells were significantly lower than that of irradiation control and supportive care groups 1 d after exposure. Conclusions: Cytokines maybe mobilize CD34 + cells in bone marrow to peripheral blood, indce cell block at G 0 /G 1 phase and reduce apoptosis, and eventually cure hematopoietic injuries induced by irradiation. (authors)

  13. Comparison of autologous cell therapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection vs. G-CSF injection alone for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome in a non-human primate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Frick, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Demarquay, Christelle; Dudoignon, Nicolas; Trompier, Francois; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Thierry, Dominique; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of autologous cell therapy after irradiation combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections with G-CSF treatment alone in a heterogeneous model of irradiation representative of an accidental situation. Material and Methods: Non-human primates were irradiated at 8.7 Gy whole-body dose with the right arm shielded to receive 4.8 Gy. The first group of animals received G-CSF (lenograstim) injections starting 6 h after irradiation, and a second group received a combination of G-CSF (lenograstim) injections and autologous expanded hematopoietic cells. Animals were followed up for blood cell counts, circulating progenitors, and bone marrow cellularity. Results: No significant differences were seen between the two treatment groups, whatever the parameter observed: time to leukocyte or platelet recovery and duration and severity of aplasia. Conclusion: Our results indicated that identical recovery kinetic was observed when irradiated animals are treated with G-CSF independently of the reinjection of ex vivo expanded autologous hematopoietic cells. Thus G-CSF injections might be chosen as a first-line therapeutic strategy in the treatment of accidental acute radiation victims

  14. Combination Therapy for Radiation-Induced Bone Marrow Aplasia in Nonhuman Primates Using Synthokine SC-55494 and Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacVittle, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Herodin, Francis; Grab, Lisa B; Baum, Charles M; McKearn, John P

    1996-01-01

    .... After irradiation on day (d) 0, cohorts of animals subcutaneously received single-agent protocols of either human serum albumin (HSA; every day [OD], 15 microng/kg/d. n = 10). Synthokine (twice daily [BID...

  15. CCR8 signaling influences Toll-like receptor 4 responses in human macrophages in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Martina Kvist; Brange, Charlotte; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    CCR8 immunity is generally associated with Th2 responses in allergic diseases. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time a pronounced attenuated influx of macrophages in ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged CCR8 knockout mice. To explore whether macrophages in human inflamed lung tissue also were CCR8 positive, human lung tissue from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was evaluated. Indeed, CCR8 expression was pronounced in invading monocytes/macrophages from lungs of patients with Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage IV COPD. Given this expression pattern, the functional role of CCR8 on human macrophages was evaluated in vitro. Human peripheral blood monocytes expressed low levels of CCR8, while macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-derived human macrophages expressed significantly elevated surface levels of CCR8. Importantly, CCL1 directly regulated the expression of CD18 and CD49b and hence influenced the adhesion capacity of human macrophages. CCL1 drives chemotaxis in M-CSF-derived macrophages, and this could be completely inhibited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas both CCL1 and LPS monotreatment inhibited spontaneous superoxide release in macrophages, CCL1 significantly induced superoxide release in the presence of LPS in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, CCL1 induced production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of CCR8 on inflammatory macrophages in human COPD lung tissue. Importantly, the functional data from human macrophages suggest a potential cross talk between the CCR8 and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways, both of which are present in COPD patients.

  16. Combination Immunotherapy of B16 Melanoma Using Anti–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 (Ctla-4) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (Gm-Csf)-Producing Vaccines Induces Rejection of Subcutaneous and Metastatic Tumors Accompanied by Autoimmune Depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsas, Andrea; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Allison, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade, alone or in combination with a granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–expressing tumor cell vaccine, on rejection of the highly tumorigenic, poorly immunogenic murine melanoma B16-BL6. Recently established tumors could be eradicated in 80% (68/85) of the cases using combination treatment, whereas each treatment by itself showed little or no effect. Tumor rejection was dependent on CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells but occurred irrespective of the presence of CD4+ T cells. Mice surviving a primary challenge rejected a secondary challenge with B16-BL6 or the parental B16-F0 line. The same treatment regimen was found to be therapeutically effective against outgrowth of preestablished B16-F10 lung metastases, inducing long-term survival. Of all mice surviving B16-BL6 or B16-F10 tumors after combination treatment, 56% (38/68) developed depigmentation, starting at the site of vaccination or challenge and in most cases progressing to distant locations. Depigmentation was found to occur in CD4-depleted mice, strongly suggesting that the effect was mediated by CTLs. This study shows that CTLA-4 blockade provides a powerful tool to enhance T cell activation and memory against a poorly immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor and that this may involve recruitment of autoreactive T cells. PMID:10430624

  17. Purification of human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramya

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Proteins expressed as inclusion bodies are currently solubilized by the use of high ... by dialyzing with buffer containing reducing and oxidizing agents. Renaturation of ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. Expression system and ...

  18. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4.......01/microL (P CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  20. A phase I study of different doses and frequencies of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) in patients with standard-dose chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Lin; Du, Ping; Yao, Jiarui; Wu, Di; Song, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Tang, Le; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-10-01

    The recommended dose of prophylactic pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) is 100 μg/kg once per cycle for patients receiving intense-dose chemotherapy. However, few data are available on the proper dose for patients receiving less-intense chemotherapy. The aim of this phase I study is to explore the proper dose and administration schedule of PEG rhG-CSF for patients receiving standard-dose chemotherapy. Eligible patients received 3-cycle chemotherapy every 3 weeks. No PEG rhG-CSF was given in the first cycle. Patients experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia would then enter the cycle 2 and 3. In cycle 2, patients received a single subcutaneous injection of prophylactic PEG rhG-CSF on d 3, and received half-dose subcutaneous injection in cycle 3 on d 3 and d 5, respectively. Escalating doses (30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg) of PEG rhG-CSF were investigated. A total of 26 patients were enrolled and received chemotherapy, in which 24 and 18 patients entered cycle 2 and cycle 3 treatment, respectively. In cycle 2, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia for patients receiving single-dose PEG rhG-CSF of 30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg was 66.67%, 33.33%, 22.22% and 0, respectively, with a median duration less than 1 (0-2) d. No grade 3 or higher neutropenia was noted in cycle 3 in all dose cohorts. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of PEG rhG-CSF used in cancer patients were similar to those reported, as well as the safety. Double half dose administration model showed better efficacy result than a single dose model in terms of grade 3 neutropenia and above. The single dose of 60 μg/kg, 100 μg/kg and double half dose of 30 μg/kg were recommended to the phase II study, hoping to find a preferable method for neutropenia treatment.

  1. Protective, restorative, and therapeutic properties of recombinant colony-stimulating factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmadge, J.E.; Tribble, H.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Schneider, M.A.; Castelli, P.; Black, P.L.; Abe, F.

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with recombinant murine (rM) colony-stimulating factor-granulocyte-macrophage (CSF-gm) or recombinant human (rH) CSF-g provides partial protection from the lethal effects of ionizing radiation or the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide (CTX). In addition, these agents can significantly prolong survival if administered following lethal doses of irradiation or CTX. To induce protective activity, cytokines were injected 20 hours before lethal irradiation or CTX administration. To accelerate recovery from lethal irradiation, the cytokines must be administered shortly following irradiation, and the induction of maximal levels of activity is dependent on chronic administration. In contrast, because of their longer half-lives, accelerated recovery from alkylating agents requires a delay of at least 24 to 48 hours to allow complete clearance of CTX before administration of a CSF. Studies quantitating peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity as well as colony-forming units per culture (CFU-C) frequency and CFU-C per femur revealed a significant correlation between these parameters and the ability to survive lethal irradiation

  2. Soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 polarizes differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Guo, YiFan; So, Kam-Hei; Vijayan, Madhavi; Guo, Yue; Wong, Vera H H; Yao, YuanQing; Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C N; Yeung, William S B

    2015-10-01

    What are the actions of soluble human leukocyte antigen G5 (sHLAG5) on macrophage differentiation? sHLAG5 polarizes the differentiation of macrophages toward a decidual macrophage-like phenotype, which could regulate fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. sHLAG5 is a full-length soluble isoform of human leukocyte antigen implicated in immune tolerance during pregnancy. Low or undetectable circulating level of sHLAG5 in first trimester of pregnancy is associated with pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia and spontaneous abortion. Decidual macrophages are located in close proximity to invasive trophoblasts, and are involved in regulating fetomaternal tolerance and placental development. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into macrophages by treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence or absence of recombinant sHLAG5 during the differentiation process. The phenotypes and the biological activities of the resulting macrophages were compared. Recombinant sHLAG5 was produced in Escherichia coli BL21 and the protein identity was verified by tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of macrophage markers were analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative PCR. Phagocytosis was determined by flow cytometry. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 expression and activity were measured by western blot analysis and kynurenine assay, respectively. Cell proliferation and cell cycling were determined by fluorometric cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Cytokine secretion was determined by cytokine array and ELISA kits. Intracellular cytokine expression was measured by flow cytometry. Cell invasion and migration were determined by trans-well invasion and migration assay, respectively. sHLAG5 drove the differentiation of macrophages with 'immuno-modulatory' characteristics, including reduced expression of M1 macrophage marker CD86 and increased expression of M2 macrophage marker CD163. sHLAG5-polarized

  3. Isolation of human monocytes by double gradient centrifugation and their differentiation to macrophages in teflon-coated cell culture bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, Kerstin; Behme, Daniel; Pantke, Mathias; Reiling, Norbert; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias; Klemm, Florian

    2014-09-09

    Human macrophages are involved in a plethora of pathologic processes ranging from infectious diseases to cancer. Thus they pose a valuable tool to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases. We therefore present a straightforward protocol for the isolation of human monocytes from buffy coats, followed by a differentiation procedure which results in high macrophage yields. The technique relies mostly on commonly available lab equipment and thus provides a cost and time effective way to obtain large quantities of human macrophages. Briefly, buffy coats from healthy blood donors are subjected to a double density gradient centrifugation to harvest monocytes from the peripheral blood. These monocytes are then cultured in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon-coated cell culture bags in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The differentiated macrophages can be easily harvested and used for subsequent studies and functional assays. Important methods for quality control and validation of the isolation and differentiation steps will be highlighted within the protocol. In summary, the protocol described here enables scientists to routinely and reproducibly isolate human macrophages without the need for cost intensive tools. Furthermore, disease models can be studied in a syngeneic human system circumventing the use of murine macrophages.

  4. CCR8 Signaling Influences Toll-Like Receptor 4 Responses in Human Macrophages in Inflammatory Diseases ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist Reimer, Martina; Brange, Charlotte; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    CCR8 immunity is generally associated with Th2 responses in allergic diseases. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time a pronounced attenuated influx of macrophages in ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged CCR8 knockout mice. To explore whether macrophages in human inflamed lung tissue also were CCR8 positive, human lung tissue from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was evaluated. Indeed, CCR8 expression was pronounced in invading monocytes/macrophages from lungs of patients with Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage IV COPD. Given this expression pattern, the functional role of CCR8 on human macrophages was evaluated in vitro. Human peripheral blood monocytes expressed low levels of CCR8, while macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-derived human macrophages expressed significantly elevated surface levels of CCR8. Importantly, CCL1 directly regulated the expression of CD18 and CD49b and hence influenced the adhesion capacity of human macrophages. CCL1 drives chemotaxis in M-CSF-derived macrophages, and this could be completely inhibited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas both CCL1 and LPS monotreatment inhibited spontaneous superoxide release in macrophages, CCL1 significantly induced superoxide release in the presence of LPS in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, CCL1 induced production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of CCR8 on inflammatory macrophages in human COPD lung tissue. Importantly, the functional data from human macrophages suggest a potential cross talk between the CCR8 and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways, both of which are present in COPD patients. PMID:21976223

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor

  6. Rapid transient expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in two industrial cultivars of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. by agroinfiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Vojta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the production of hGM-CSF cytokine in leaves of industrial tobacco cultivars DH-17 and DH-27 by using Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression. We prove the concept that very high biomass industrial tobacco plants are suitable platforms for rapid, low cost production of foreign proteins. Successful transient expression of the GM-CSF was achieved in less than three months, opening the possibility for future applications of this approach in rapid response production of various proteins of non-plant origin in industrial tobacco.

  7. The Combination of Fosfomycin, Metronidazole, and Recombinant Human Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor is Stable in vitro and Has Maintained Antibacterial Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, Siv; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Gasbjerg, Lærke Smidt

    2017-01-01

    to the antibacterial effects of fosfomycin and metronidazole alone. CONCLUSION: The drug combination had neutral and stable pH, was iso-osmotic, and had stable concentrations during 24 h of storage. The antibacterial effect of fosfomycin and metronidazole were not altered when the drugs were mixed....

  8. Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition delays recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation by altering myeloid cell recruitment and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Jason H.; Hirai, Takahisa; Deng, Lei; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Urata, Kimiko; West, Brian L.; Brown, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) may initially respond to treatment with ionizing radiation (IR), but the prognosis remains extremely poor because the tumors invariably recur. Using animal models, we previously showed that inhibiting stromal cell–derived factor 1 signaling can prevent or delay GBM recurrence by blocking IR-induced recruitment of myeloid cells, specifically monocytes that give rise to tumor-associated macrophages. The present study was aimed at determining if inhibiting colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling could be used as an alternative strategy to target pro-tumorigenic myeloid cells recruited to irradiated GBM. Methods To inhibit CSF-1 signaling in myeloid cells, we used PLX3397, a small molecule that potently inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R). Combined IR and PLX3397 therapy was compared with IR alone using 2 different human GBM intracranial xenograft models. Results GBM xenografts treated with IR upregulated CSF-1R ligand expression and increased the number of CD11b+ myeloid-derived cells in the tumors. Treatment with PLX3397 both depleted CD11b+ cells and potentiated the response of the intracranial tumors to IR. Median survival was significantly longer for mice receiving combined therapy versus IR alone. Analysis of myeloid cell differentiation markers indicated that CSF-1R inhibition prevented IR-recruited monocyte cells from differentiating into immunosuppressive, pro-angiogenic tumor-associated macrophages. Conclusion CSF-1R inhibition may be a promising strategy to improve GBM response to radiotherapy. PMID:26538619

  9. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  10. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo was ...

  11. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, S P; Onions, D E

    2001-06-21

    A cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony stimulating factor (fG-CSF) was cloned from alveolar macrophages using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA is 949 bp in length and encodes a predicted mature protein of 174 amino acids. Recombinant fG-CSF was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion and purified by affinity chromatography. Biological activity of the recombinant protein was demonstrated using the murine myeloblastic cell line GNFS-60, which showed an ED50 for fG-CSF of approximately 2 ng/ml. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Inhibition of colony-stimulating-factor-1 signaling in vivo with the orally bioavailable cFMS kinase inhibitor GW2580.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, James G; McDonald, Brad; Parham, Janet; Keith, Barry; Rusnak, David W; Shaw, Eva; Jansen, Marilyn; Lin, Peiyuan; Payne, Alan; Crosby, Renae M; Johnson, Jennifer H; Frick, Lloyd; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Depee, Scott; Tadepalli, Sarva; Votta, Bart; James, Ian; Fuller, Karen; Chambers, Timothy J; Kull, Frederick C; Chamberlain, Stanley D; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2005-11-01

    Colony-stimulating-factor-1 (CSF-1) signaling through cFMS receptor kinase is increased in several diseases. To help investigate the role of cFMS kinase in disease, we identified GW2580, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of cFMS kinase. GW2580 completely inhibited human cFMS kinase in vitro at 0.06 microM and was inactive against 26 other kinases. GW2580 at 1 microM completely inhibited CSF-1-induced growth of mouse M-NFS-60 myeloid cells and human monocytes and completely inhibited bone degradation in cultures of human osteoclasts, rat calvaria, and rat fetal long bone. In contrast, GW2580 did not affect the growth of mouse NS0 lymphoblastoid cells, human endothelial cells, human fibroblasts, or five human tumor cell lines. GW2580 also did not affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 production in freshly isolated human monocytes and mouse macrophages. After oral administration, GW2580 blocked the ability of exogenous CSF-1 to increase LPS-induced IL-6 production in mice, inhibited the growth of CSF-1-dependent M-NFS-60 tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, and diminished the accumulation of macrophages in the peritoneal cavity after thioglycolate injection. Unexpectedly, GW2580 inhibited LPS-induced TNF production in mice, in contrast to effects on monocytes and macrophages in vitro. In conclusion, GW2580's selective inhibition of monocyte growth and bone degradation is consistent with cFMS kinase inhibition. The ability of GW2580 to chronically inhibit CSF-1 signaling through cFMS kinase in normal and tumor cells in vivo makes GW2580 a useful tool in assessing the role of cFMS kinase in normal and disease processes.

  13. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administered enterally to neonates is not absorbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Maheshwari, Akhil; Christensen, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is present in liquids swallowed by the fetus and neonate; specifically, amniotic fluid, colostrum, and human milk. The swallowed G-CSF has local effects on enteric cells, which express the G-CSF receptor. However, some portion of the G-CSF ingested by the fetus and neonate might be absorbed into the circulation and have systemic actions, such as stimulating neutrophil production. To assess this possibility we sought to determine if circulating G-CSF concentrations of neonates increase after enteral administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). This was a single-center, prospective, blinded, randomized, 2 x 2 crossover study, with each infant receiving 1 dose of rhG-CSF (100 microg/kg) and 1 dose of placebo. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were measured at 2 and 4 hours after administration of the test solution. No significant change in plasma G-CSF concentration was observed after the enteral administration of rhG-CSF. On this basis, we conclude that orally administered rhG-CSF is not absorbed in significant quantities, and we speculate that the G-CSF swallowed by the fetus and neonate has local but not systemic effects.

  14. Colony-stimulating factors for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara; Lyman, Gary; Engel Ayer Botrel, Tobias; Morganti Paladini, Luciano; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2014-10-30

    Febrile neutropenia is a frequent adverse event experienced by people with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, and is a potentially life-threatening situation. The current treatment is supportive care plus antibiotics. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), such as granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), are cytokines that stimulate and accelerate the production of one or more cell lines in the bone marrow. Clinical trials have addressed the question of whether the addition of a CSF to antibiotics could improve outcomes in individuals diagnosed with febrile neutropenia. However, the results of these trials are conflicting. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding G-CSF or GM-CSF to standard treatment (antibiotics) when treating chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in individuals diagnosed with cancer. We conducted the search in March 2014 and covered the major electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and SCI. We contacted experts in hematology and oncology and also scanned the citations from the relevant articles. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adults and children. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We performed meta-analysis of the selected studies using Review Manager 5 software. Fourteen RCTs (15 comparisons) including a total of 1553 participants addressing the role of CSF plus antibiotics in febrile neutropenia were included. Overall mortality was not improved by the use of CSF plus antibiotics versus antibiotics alone (hazard ratio (HR) 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.16) P = 0.19; 13 RCTs; 1335 participants; low quality evidence). A similar finding was seen for infection-related mortality (HR 0.75 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.20) P = 0.23; 10 RCTs; 897

  15. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor does not increase the potency or efficacy of a foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine Fator estimulante de colônias de granu-lócitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF não aumenta a eficácia ou potência da vacina de subunidades da febre aftosa em suínos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luizinho Caron

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is one of the most feared diseases of livestock worldwide. Vaccination has been a very effective weapon in controlling the disease, however a number of concerns with the current vaccine including the inability of approved diagnostic tests to reliably distinguish vaccinated from infected animals and the need for high containment facilities for vaccine production, have limited its use during outbreaks in countries previously free of the disease. A number of FMD vaccine candidates have been tested and a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector containing the FMDV capsid (P1-2A and 3C protease coding regions has been shown to completely protect pigs against challenge with the homologous virus (FMDV A12 and A24. An Ad5-P1-2A+3C vaccine for FMDV O1 Campos (Ad5-O1C, however, only induced a low FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response in swine potency tests. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has been successfully used to stimulate the immune response in vaccine formulations against a number of diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and B. To attempt to improve the FMDV-specific immune response induced by Ad5-O1C, we inoculated swine with Ad5-O1C and an Ad5 vector containing the gene for porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF. However, in the conditions used in this trial, pGM-CSF did not improve the immune response to Ad5-O1C and adversely affected the level of protection of swine challenged with homologous FMDV.A febre aftosa é uma das doenças mais temidas nos rebanhos em todo o mundo. A vacinação tem sido uma arma eficiente no controle da doença, no entanto há preocupações com as vacinas atualmente utilizadas incluindo a necessidade de instalações de alta segurança para a produção dessas vacinas e a falta de um teste de diagnóstico aprovado que faça distinção precisa entre animais vacinados dos infectados. Várias vacinas têm sido testadas contra a febre aftosa e uma dessas

  16. Human progenitor cells rapidly mobilized by AMD3100 repopulate NOD/SCID mice with increased frequency in comparison to cells from the same donor mobilized by granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, David A; Bonde, Jesper; Craft, Timothy P

    2007-01-01

    ) or purified CD34(+) cells was compared at limiting dilution into NOD/SCID mice. Human AMD3100-mobilized MNC possessed enhanced repopulating frequency in comparison to G-CSF-mobilized MNC from paired donors, and purified CD34(+) progenitors were at least as efficient as the G-CSF mobilized cells....... The frequencies of NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRC) were 1 SRC in 8.7 x 10(6) AMD3100-mobilized MNC compared to 1 SRC in 29.0 x 10(6) G-CSF-mobilized MNC, and 1 SRC in 1.2 x 10(5) AMD3100-mobilized CD34(+) cells compared to 1 SRC in 1.8 x 10(5) G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) cells. Hematopoietic differentiation...

  17. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  18. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  19. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages for Unraveling Human Macrophage Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    Despite a substantial appreciation for the critical role of macrophages in cardiometabolic diseases, understanding of human macrophage biology has been hampered by the lack of reliable and scalable models for cellular and genetic studies. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages (IPSDM), as an unlimited source of subject genotype-specific cells, will undoubtedly play an important role in advancing our understanding of the role of macrophages in human diseases. In this review, we summarize current literature in the differentiation and characterization of IPSDM at phenotypic, functional, and transcriptomic levels. We emphasize the progress in differentiating iPSC to tissue resident macrophages, and in understanding the ontogeny of in vitro differentiated IPSDM that resembles primitive hematopoiesis, rather than adult definitive hematopoiesis. We review the application of IPSDM in modeling both Mendelian genetic disorders and host-pathogen interactions. Finally, we highlighted the potential areas of research using IPSDM in functional validation of coronary artery disease loci in genome-wide association studies, functional genomic analyses, drug testing, and cell therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Leucine supplementation attenuates macrophage foam-cell formation: Studies in humans, mice, and cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Rom, Oren; Hamoud, Shadi; Volkova, Nina; Hayek, Tony; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Aviram, Michael

    2018-02-05

    Whereas atherogenicity of dietary lipids has been largely studied, relatively little is known about the possible contribution of dietary amino acids to macrophage foam-cell formation, a hallmark of early atherogenesis. Recently, we showed that leucine has antiatherogenic properties in the macrophage model system. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the role of leucine in macrophage lipid metabolism was conducted by supplementing humans, mice, or cultured macrophages with leucine. Macrophage incubation with serum obtained from healthy adults supplemented with leucine (5 g/d, 3 weeks) significantly decreased cellular cholesterol mass by inhibiting the rate of cholesterol biosynthesis and increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Similarly, leucine supplementation to C57BL/6 mice (8 weeks) resulted in decreased cholesterol content in their harvested peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in relation with reduced cholesterol biosynthesis rate. Studies in J774A.1 murine macrophages revealed that leucine dose-dependently decreased cellular cholesterol and triglyceride mass. Macrophages treated with leucine (0.2 mM) showed attenuated uptake of very low-density lipoproteins and triglyceride biosynthesis rate, with a concurrent down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, a key enzyme catalyzing triglyceride biosynthesis in macrophages. Similar effects were observed when macrophages were treated with α-ketoisocaproate, a key leucine metabolite. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro leucine supplementation significantly improved macrophage mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. The above studies, conducted in human, mice, and cultured macrophages, highlight a protective role for leucine attenuating macrophage foam-cell formation by mechanisms related to the metabolism of cholesterol, triglycerides, and energy production. © 2018 BioFactors, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Combined measurement of growth and differentiation in suspension cultures of purified human CD34-positive cells enables a detailed analysis of myelopoiesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerst, J. M.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I. C.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.; van Oers, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have made a detailed analysis of growth factor (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF], and macrophage colony-stimulating factor [M-CSF])-induced proliferation and differentiation of highly purified CD34+ committed

  2. Nicotinamide: a vitamin able to shift macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with restricted inflammatory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ronald; Schilling, Erik; Grahnert, Anja; Kölling, Valeen; Dorow, Juliane; Ceglarek, Uta; Sack, Ulrich; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages is influenced by environmental signals. Here we asked in how far nicotinamide (NAM), a vitamin B3 derivative known to play a major role in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated signaling events, is able to modulate monocyte differentiation into macrophages developed in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MØ) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-MØ). We found that GM-MØ undergo biochemical, morphological and functional modifications in response to NAM, whereas M-MØ were hardly affected. GM-MØ exposed to NAM acquired an M-MØ-like structure while the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and COX-derived eicosanoids were down-regulated. In contrast, NAM had no effect on the production of IL-10 or the cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids. Administration of NAM enhanced intracellular NAD concentrations; however, it did not prevent the LPS-mediated drain on NAD pools. In search of intracellular molecular targets of NAM known to be involved in LPS-induced cytokine and eicosanoid synthesis, we found NF-κB activity to be diminished. In conclusion, our data show that vitamin B3, when present during the differentiation of monocytes into GM-MØ, interferes with biochemical pathways resulting in strongly reduced pro-inflammatory features. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Supernatants from oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts modulate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 promoter activation induced by periodontopathogens in monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O A; Ebersole, J L; Huang, C B

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial and host cell products during coinfections of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1-positive (HIV-1(+)) patients regulate HIV-1 recrudescence in latently infected cells (e.g. T cells, monocytes/macrophages), impacting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure and progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A high frequency of oral opportunistic infections (e.g. periodontitis) in HIV-1(+) patients has been demonstrated; however, their potential to impact HIV-1 exacerbation is unclear. We sought to determine the ability of supernatants derived from oral epithelial cells (OKF4) and human gingival fibroblasts (Gin-4) challenged with periodontal pathogens, to modulate the HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes/macrophages. BF24 monocytes/macrophages transfected with the HIV-1 promoter driving the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, or Treponema denticola in the presence of supernatants from OKF4 or Gin4 cells either unstimulated or previously pulsed with bacteria. CAT levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cytokine production was evaluated by Luminex beadlyte assays. OKF4 and Gin4 supernatants enhanced HIV-1 promoter activation particularly related to F. nucleatum challenge. An additive effect was observed in HIV-1 promoter activation when monocytes/macrophages were simultaneously stimulated with gingival cell supernatants and bacterial extracts. OKF4 cells produced higher levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukins -6 and -8 in response to F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis. Preincubation of OKF4 supernatants with anti-GM-CSF reduced the additive effect in periodontopathogen-induced HIV-1 promoter activation. These results suggest that soluble mediators produced by gingival resident cells in response to periodontopathogens could contribute to HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes/macrophages

  4. Structural analysis of the receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanazono, Y.; Hosoi, T.; Kuwaki, T.; Matsuki, S.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors on neutrophils from three patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase, in comparison with four normal volunteers. Because we experienced some difficulties in radioiodinating intact recombinant human G-CSF, we developed a new derivative of human G-CSF termed YPY-G-CSF. It was easy to iodinate this protein using the lactoperoxidase method because of two additional tyrosine residues, and its radioactivity was higher than that previously reported. The biological activity of YPY-G-CSF as G-CSF was fully retained. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that CML neutrophils had a single class of binding sites (1400 +/- 685/cell) with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 245 +/- 66 pM. The number of sites and Kd value of CML neutrophils were not significantly different from those of normal neutrophils (p greater than 0.9). Cross-linking studies revealed two specifically labeled bands of [125I]YPY-G-CSF-receptor complexes with apparent molecular masses of 160 and 110 kd on both normal and CML neutrophils. This is the first report describing two receptor proteins on neutrophils. According to the analyses of the proteolytic process of these cross-linked complexes and proteolytic mapping, we assume that alternative splicing or processing from a single gene may generate two distinct receptor proteins that bind specifically to G-CSF but have different fates in intracellular metabolism

  5. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  6. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  7. Defibrotide in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor significantly enhances the mobilization of primitive and committed peripheral blood progenitor cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Stucchi, Claudio; Cleris, Loredana; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Massimo A

    2002-11-01

    Defibrotide is a polydeoxyribonucleotide, which significantly reduces the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. We investigated the activity of Defibrotide alone or in combination with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) in BALB/c mice. A 5-day treatment with Defibrotide alone (1-15 mg/mouse/day) had no effect on WBC counts, frequencies and absolute numbers of total circulating colony-forming cells (CFCs), i.e., granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, erythroid burst-forming units, and multilineage colony-forming units. As compared with mock-injected mice, administration of rhG-CSF alone (5 micro g/mouse/day) for 5 days significantly (P Defibrotide (15 mg/mouse/day) and rhG-CSF significantly (P Defibrotide plus rhG-CSF resulted in a significant increase (P Defibrotide/rhG-CSF-mobilized mononuclear cells rescued 43% and 71% of recipient mice, respectively. Experiments of CFC homing performed in lethally irradiated or nonirradiated recipients showed that marrow homing of transplanted PBPCs was reduced by 3-fold in Defibrotide-treated animals as compared with mock-injected mice (P Defibrotide might be because of an effect on PBPC trafficking. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Defibrotide synergizes with rhG-CSF and significantly increases the mobilization of a broad spectrum of PBPCs, including primitive and committed progenitor cells. These data might have relevant implications for autologous and allogeneic anticancer therapy in humans.

  8. SIZE FRACTIONS OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER INDUCE GRANULOCYTE MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE PATHWAYS. (R827351C004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Alternatively Activated (M2) Macrophage Phenotype Is Inducible by Endothelin-1 in Cultured Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Stefano; Pizzorni, Carmen; Paolino, Sabrina; Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Montagna, Paola; Brizzolara, Renata; Ruaro, Barbara; Sulli, Alberto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are phenotypically characterized by the expression of specific markers, mainly macrophage scavenger receptors (CD204 and CD163) and mannose receptor-1 (CD206), and participate in the fibrotic process by over-producing pro-fibrotic molecules, such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFbeta1) and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is implicated in the fibrotic process, exerting its pro-fibrotic effects through the interaction with its receptors (ETA and ETB). The study investigated the possible role of ET-1 in inducing the transition from cultured human macrophages into M2 cells. Cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) were activated into macrophages (M0 macrophages) with phorbol myristate acetate and subsequently maintained in growth medium (M0-controls) or treated with either ET-1 (100nM) or interleukin-4 (IL-4, 10ng/mL, M2 inducer) for 72 hours. Similarly, primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocyte (PBM)-derived macrophages obtained from healthy subjects, were maintained in growth medium (untreated cells) or treated with ET-1 or IL-4 for 6 days. Both M0 and PBM-derived macrophages were pre-treated with ET receptor antagonist (ETA/BRA, bosentan 10-5M) for 1 hour before ET-1 stimulation. Protein and gene expression of CD204, CD206, CD163, TGFbeta1 were analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Gene expression of interleukin(IL)-10 and macrophage derived chemokine (CCL-22) was evaluated by qRT-PCR. MMP-9 production was investigated by gel zymography. ET-1 significantly increased the expression of M2 phenotype markers CD204, CD206, CD163, IL-10 and CCL-22, and the production of MMP-9 in both cultures of M0 and PBM-derived macrophages compared to M0-controls and untreated cells. In cultured PBM-derived macrophages, ET-1 increased TGFbeta1 protein and gene expression compared to untreated cells. The ET-1-mediated effects were

  10. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2014), s. 4770-4778 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : granulocyte colony-stimulating factor * radiation accident s * acute radiation syndrome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014

  11. CD14-dependent monocyte isolation enhances phagocytosis of listeria monocytogenes by proinflammatory, GM-CSF-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Neu

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an important line of defence against invading pathogens. Human macrophages derived by different methods were tested for their suitability as models to investigate Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infection and compared to macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Human primary monocytes were isolated by either positive or negative immunomagnetic selection and differentiated in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Regardless of the isolation method, GM-CSF-derived macrophages (GM-Mφ stained positive for CD206 and M-CSF-derived macrophages (M-Mφ for CD163. THP-1 cells did not express CD206 or CD163 following incubation with PMA, M- or GM-CSF alone or in combination. Upon infection with Lm, all primary macrophages showed good survival at high multiplicities of infection whereas viability of THP-1 was severely reduced even at lower bacterial numbers. M-Mφ generally showed high phagocytosis of Lm. Strikingly, phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ was markedly influenced by the method used for isolation of monocytes. GM-Mφ derived from negatively isolated monocytes showed low phagocytosis of Lm whereas GM-Mφ generated from positively selected monocytes displayed high phagocytosis of Lm. Moreover, incubation with CD14 antibody was sufficient to enhance phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ generated from negatively isolated monocytes. By contrast, non-specific phagocytosis of latex beads by GM-Mφ was not influenced by treatment with CD14 antibody. Furthermore, phagocytosis of Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, human cytomegalovirus and the protozoan parasite Leishmania major by GM-Mφ was not enhanced upon treatment with CD14 antibody indicating that this effect is specific for Lm. Based on these observations, we propose macrophages derived by ex vivo differentiation of negatively selected human primary monocytes as the most

  12. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Gene-Modified Vaccines for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (1999), s. 115-119 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC45011; GA MZd NC5526; GA ČR GA312/98/0826; GA ČR GA312/99/0542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.493, year: 1999

  13. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  14. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rhinovirus infection induces distinct transcriptome profiles in polarized human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Charu; Walsh, Megan P; Eder, Breanna N; Metitiri, Ediri E; Popova, Antonia P; Hershenson, Marc B

    2018-05-01

    Infections with rhinovirus (RV) cause asthma exacerbations. Recent studies suggest that macrophages play a role in asthmatic airway inflammation and the innate immune response to RV infection. Macrophages exhibit phenotypes based on surface markers and gene expression. We hypothesized that macrophage polarization state alters gene expression in response to RV infection. Cells were derived from human peripheral blood derived monocytes. M1 and M2 polarization was carried out by using IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively, and RNA was extracted for Affymetrix Human Gene ST2.1 exon arrays. Selected genes were validated by quantitative (q)PCR. Treatment of nonactivated (M0) macrophages with IFN-γ and IL-4 induced the expression of 252 and 153 distinct genes, respectively, including previously-identified M1 and M2 markers. RV infection of M0 macrophages induced upregulation of 232 genes; pathway analysis showed significant overrepresentation of genes involved in IFN-α/β signaling and cytokine signaling in the immune system. RV infection induced differential expression of 195 distinct genes in M1-like macrophages but only seven distinct genes in M2-like-polarized cells. In a secondary analysis, comparison between M0-, RV-infected, and M1-like-polarized, RV-infected macrophages revealed differential expression of 227 genes including those associated with asthma and its exacerbation. qPCR demonstrated increased expression of CCL8, CXCL10, TNFSF10, TNFSF18, IL6, NOD2, and GSDMD and reduced expression of VNN1, AGO1, and AGO2. Together, these data show that, in contrast to M2-like-polarized macrophages, gene expression of M1-like macrophages is highly regulated by RV.

  16. Modulation of human macrophage activity by Ascaris antigens is dependent on macrophage polarization state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Sara; Nejsum, Peter; Williams, Andrew R.

    2018-01-01

    Parasitic worms (helminths) are known to actively modulate host immune responses and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate if adult body fluid (ABF) from the helminth Ascaris suum has immunomodulatory effects on different subtypes of human monocyte-derived macrophages (Mɸ) in vitro...

  17. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

  18. Selective binding and oligomerization of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor by a low molecular weight, nonpeptidyl ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michael L; Tian, Shin-Shay; Miller, Stephen G; Kessler, Linda; Baker, Audrey E; Brigham-Burke, Michael R; Dillon, Susan B; Duffy, Kevin J; Keenan, Richard M; Lehr, Ruth; Rosen, Jon; Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Trill, John; Young, Peter R; Luengo, Juan I; Lamb, Peter

    2003-03-14

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates neutrophil production by binding to a specific receptor, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, expressed on cells of the granulocytic lineage. Recombinant forms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are used clinically to treat neutropenias. As part of an effort to develop granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mimics with the potential for oral bioavailability, we previously identified a nonpeptidyl small molecule (SB-247464) that selectively activates murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signal transduction pathways and promotes neutrophil formation in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism of action of SB-247464, a series of cell-based and biochemical assays were performed. The activity of SB-247464 is strictly dependent on the presence of zinc ions. Titration microcalorimetry experiments using a soluble murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor construct show that SB-247464 binds to the extracellular domain of the receptor in a zinc ion-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that SB-247464 induces self-association of the N-terminal three-domain fragment in a manner that is consistent with dimerization. SB-247464 induces internalization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor on intact cells, consistent with a mechanism involving receptor oligomerization. These data show that small nonpeptidyl compounds are capable of selectively binding and inducing productive oligomerization of cytokine receptors.

  19. Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Bai, An; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Kinney, William H; Weaver, Michael; Zhang, Gong; Honda, Jennifer R; Chan, Edward D

    2016-07-01

    With the worldwide emergence of highly drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), novel agents that have direct antimycobacterial effects or that enhance host immunity are urgently needed. Curcumin is a polyphenol responsible for the bright yellow-orange colour of turmeric, a spice derived from the root of the perennial herb Curcuma longa. Curcumin is a potent inducer of apoptosis-an effector mechanism used by macrophages to kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). An in vitro human macrophage infection model was used to determine the effects of curcumin on MTB survival. We found that curcumin enhanced the clearance of MTB in differentiated THP-1 human monocytes and in primary human alveolar macrophages. We also found that curcumin was an inducer of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Curcumin mediated these anti-MTB cellular functions, in part, via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) activation. Curcumin protects against MTB infection in human macrophages. The host-protective role of curcumin against MTB in macrophages needs confirmation in an animal model; if validated, the immunomodulatory anti-TB effects of curcumin would be less prone to drug resistance development. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  2. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  3. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of 59 Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of 59 Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in 59 Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models

  4. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin lα or 1β. The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes

  5. Moderate restriction of macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, Kahoru; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are able to grow to high titers in human monocyte-derived macrophages. However, it was recently reported that cellular protein SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in human cells of the myeloid lineage, including monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we show that degradation of SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages was associated with moderately enhanced growth of the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. SAMHD1 degradation was induced by treating target macrophages with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) particles containing viral protein X. For undifferentiated monocytes, HIV-2 particle treatment allowed undifferentiated monocytes to be fully permissive for productive infection by the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. In contrast, untreated monocytes were totally resistant to HIV-1 replication. These results indicated that SAMHD1 moderately restricts even a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain in monocyte-derived macrophages, whereas the protein potently restricts HIV-1 replication in undifferentiated monocytes.

  6. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  7. Ionic channels and membrane hyperpolarization in human macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ince, C.; van Duijn, B.; Ypey, D. L.; van Bavel, E.; Weidema, F.; Leijh, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    Microelectrode impalement of human macrophages evokes a transient hyperpolarizing response (HR) of the membrane potential. This HR was found to be dependent on the extracellular concentration of K+ but not on that of Na+ or Cl-. It was not influenced by low temperature (12 degrees C) or by 0.2 mM

  8. Effects of Acrolein on Leukotriene Biosynthesis in Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Zemski Berry, Karin A.; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Acrolein is a toxic, highly reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in high concentrations in cigarette smoke. In the current study, the effect of acrolein on eicosanoid synthesis in stimulated human neutrophils was examined. Eicosanoid synthesis in neutrophils was initiated by priming with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent stimulation with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and 5-LO products in addition to small amounts of COX produc...

  9. Angiogenic potential of human macrophages on electrospun bioresorbable vascular grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, K; Sell, S A; Madurantakam, P; Bowlin, G L, E-mail: glbowlin@vcu.ed [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate macrophage interactions with electrospun scaffolds and quantify the expression of key angiogenic growth factors in vitro. This study will further help in evaluating the potential of these electrospun constructs as vascular grafts for tissue repair and regeneration in situ. Human peripheral blood macrophages were seeded in serum free media on electrospun (10 mm) discs of polydioxanone (PDO), elastin and PDO:elastin blends (50:50, 70:30 and 90:10). The growth factor secretion was analyzed by ELISA. Macrophages produced high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and acidic fibroblast growth factor. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1) secretion was relatively low and there was negligible production of basic fibroblast growth factor. Therefore, it can be anticipated that these scaffolds will support tissue regeneration and angiogenesis. (communication)

  10. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  11. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  12. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eWallner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor.

  13. Effect of colony-stimulating factor and conventional- or high-dose chemotherapy on FDG uptake in bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Toshiki; Swanston, Nancy; Podoloff, Donald A.; Macapinlac, Homer A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF), usually used in conjunction with chemotherapy, may interfere with the 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) reading. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of CSF, conventional-or high-dose chemotherapy on bone marrow FDG uptake. Two hundred and forty-one FDG PET scans obtained in 163 patients with lymphoma and no pathologically and radiologically proven bone marrow involvement were analyzed. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of each patient's spine was measured. Among patients with no recent history of CSF use, the average SUV in 36 patients with no history of chemotherapy was 1.60±0.34, that in 49 patients with a history of conventional-dose chemotherapy was 1.37±0.32, and that in 12 patients with a history of high-dose chemotherapy was 1.26±0.25 (P=0.008 and 0.002, respectively by Mann-Whitney U test). In 80 patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy and CSF, the average SUV after discontinuation of CSF was as follows: 0-7 days, 2.37±1.19; 8-14 days: 2.04±0.67; 15-21 days: 1.87±0.52; 22-30 days: 1.59±0.18; 31-90 days: 1.54±0.36. In 45 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and CSF, no significant increase in bone marrow uptake was seen in most of them. Bone marrow FDG uptake may be increased by CSF treatment and may be decreased by chemotherapy. In patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy and CSF, increased marrow uptake will return to the pretreatment value approximately 1 month after discontinuation of CSF. (orig.)

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1998-01-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of 60 Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au)

  16. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fen Liu

    Full Text Available The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation.Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT and visceral(VAT adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified.Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001. With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance.The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots.

  17. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Macrophages Share Ontogeny with MYB-Independent Tissue-Resident Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Buchrieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-resident macrophages, such as microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells, derive from Myb-independent yolk sac (YS progenitors generated before the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Myb-independent YS-derived resident macrophages self-renew locally, independently of circulating monocytes and HSCs. In contrast, adult blood monocytes, as well as infiltrating, gut, and dermal macrophages, derive from Myb-dependent HSCs. These findings are derived from the mouse, using gene knockouts and lineage tracing, but their applicability to human development has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we use human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as a tool to model human hematopoietic development. By using a CRISPR-Cas9 knockout strategy, we show that human iPSC-derived monocytes/macrophages develop in an MYB-independent, RUNX1-, and SPI1 (PU.1-dependent fashion. This result makes human iPSC-derived macrophages developmentally related to and a good model for MYB-independent tissue-resident macrophages, such as alveolar and kidney macrophages, microglia, Kupffer cells, and Langerhans cells.

  18. In an in-vitro model using human fetal membranes, 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate is not an optimal progestogen for inhibition of fetal membrane weakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Moore, Robert M; Mercer, Brian M; Mansour, Joseph M; Mesiano, Sam; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J; Moore, John J

    2017-12-01

    The progestogen 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) is 1 of only 2 agents recommended for clinical use in the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery, and studies of its efficacy have been conflicting. We have developed an in-vitro model to study the fetal membrane weakening process that leads to rupture in preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes (pPROM). Inflammation/infection associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induction and decidual bleeding/abruption associated thrombin release are leading causes of preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes. Both agents (TNF-α and thrombin) cause fetal membrane weakening in the model system. Furthermore, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a critical intermediate for both TNF-α and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening. In a previous report, we demonstrated that 3 progestogens, progesterone, 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), each inhibit both TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening at 2 distinct points of the fetal membrane weakening pathway. Each block both the production of and the downstream action of the critical intermediate granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The objective of the study was to characterize the inhibitory effects of 17-OHPC on TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening in vitro. Full-thickness human fetal membrane fragments from uncomplicated term repeat cesarean deliveries were mounted in 2.5 cm Transwell inserts and cultured with/without 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (10 -9 to 10 -7 M). After 24 hours, medium (supernatant) was removed and replaced with/without the addition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (20 ng/mL) or thrombin (10 U/mL) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (200 ng/mL). After 48 hours of culture, medium from the maternal side compartment of the model was assayed for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating

  19. Estradiol is a critical mediator of macrophage-nerve cross talk in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Erin; Temp, Julia; Esnal-Zufiurre, Arantza; Mechsner, Sylvia; Horne, Andrew W; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis occurs in approximately 10% of women and is associated with persistent pelvic pain. It is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue (lesions) outside the uterus, most commonly on the peritoneum. Peripheral neuroinflammation, a process characterized by the infiltration of nerve fibers and macrophages into lesions, plays a pivotal role in endometriosis-associated pain. Our objective was to determine the role of estradiol (E2) in regulating the interaction between macrophages and nerves in peritoneal endometriosis. By using human tissues and a mouse model of endometriosis, we demonstrate that macrophages in lesions recovered from women and mice are immunopositive for estrogen receptor β, with up to 20% being estrogen receptor α positive. In mice, treatment with E2 increased the number of macrophages in lesions as well as concentrations of mRNAs encoded by Csf1, Nt3, and the tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptor, TrkB. By using in vitro models, we determined that the treatment of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons with E2 increased mRNA concentrations of the chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 that stimulated migration of colony-stimulating factor 1-differentiated macrophages. Conversely, incubation of colony-stimulating factor 1 macrophages with E2 increased concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3, which stimulated neurite outgrowth from ganglia explants. In summary, we demonstrate a key role for E2 in stimulating macrophage-nerve interactions, providing novel evidence that endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent neuroinflammatory disorder. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Estradiol Is a Critical Mediator of Macrophage-Nerve Cross Talk in Peritoneal Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Erin; Temp, Julia; Esnal-Zufiurre, Arantza; Mechsner, Sylvia; Horne, Andrew W.; Saunders, Philippa T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis occurs in approximately 10% of women and is associated with persistent pelvic pain. It is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue (lesions) outside the uterus, most commonly on the peritoneum. Peripheral neuroinflammation, a process characterized by the infiltration of nerve fibers and macrophages into lesions, plays a pivotal role in endometriosis-associated pain. Our objective was to determine the role of estradiol (E2) in regulating the interaction between macrophages and nerves in peritoneal endometriosis. By using human tissues and a mouse model of endometriosis, we demonstrate that macrophages in lesions recovered from women and mice are immunopositive for estrogen receptor β, with up to 20% being estrogen receptor α positive. In mice, treatment with E2 increased the number of macrophages in lesions as well as concentrations of mRNAs encoded by Csf1, Nt3, and the tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptor, TrkB. By using in vitro models, we determined that the treatment of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons with E2 increased mRNA concentrations of the chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 that stimulated migration of colony-stimulating factor 1–differentiated macrophages. Conversely, incubation of colony-stimulating factor 1 macrophages with E2 increased concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3, which stimulated neurite outgrowth from ganglia explants. In summary, we demonstrate a key role for E2 in stimulating macrophage-nerve interactions, providing novel evidence that endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent neuroinflammatory disorder. PMID:26073038

  1. Mobilization of stem cell with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to investigate the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF administration in rats for 6 weeks after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n = 30 were injured with controlled cortical impact device and divided into four groups. The treatment groups (n = 10 each were injected subcutaneously with recombinant human G-CSF. Vehicle group (n=10 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and only Brdu intraperitoneally. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was used for mitotic labeling. Experimental rats were injected intraperitoneally with BrdU. Rats were killed at 6th week after traumatic brain injury. Neurological functional evaluation of animals was performed before and after injury using neurological severity scores (NSS. Animals were sacrificed 42 days after TBI and brain sections were stained using Brdu immunohistochemistry. Results: Statistically significant improvement in functional outcome was observed in treatment groups when compared with control (p<0.01. This benefit was visible 7 days after TBI and persisted until 42 days (end of trial. Histological analysis showed that Brdu cell positive was more in the lesion boundary zone at treatment animal group than all injected animals. Discussion: We believe that G-CSF therapeutic protocol reported here represents an attractive strategy for the development of a clinically significant noninvasive traumatic brain injury therapy.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  3. Structural insights into the backbone-circularized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor containing a short connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Shibuya, Risa; Honda, Shinya

    2018-06-02

    Backbone circularization is a powerful approach for enhancing the structural stability of polypeptides. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the circularized variant of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in which the terminal helical region was circularized using a short, two-amino acid connector. The structure revealed that the N- and C-termini were indeed connected by a peptide bond. The local structure of the C-terminal region transited from an α helix to 3 10 helix with a bend close to the N-terminal region, indicating that the structural change offset the insufficient length of the connector. This is the first-ever report of a crystal structure of the backbone of a circularized protein. It will facilitate the development of backbone circularization methodology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor protects mice during respiratory virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Hermesh

    Full Text Available A burst in the production of pro-inflammatory molecules characterizes the beginning of the host response to infection. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors work in concert to control pathogen replication and activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilizes and activates hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow, and it has been shown to mediate the generation of effective immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. G-CSF is produced at high levels in the lungs during infection with influenza and parainfluenza viruses, but its role during these infections is unknown. Here we show that during infection of mice with a non-lethal dose of influenza or Sendai virus, G-CSF promotes the accumulation of activated Ly6G+ granulocytes that control the extent of the lung pro-inflammatory response. Remarkably, these G-CSF-mediated effects facilitate viral clearance and sustain mouse survival.

  6. Tissue localization and fate in mice of injected multipotential colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, D.; Nicola, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The hemopoietic regulator multipotential colony-stimulating factor [Multi-CSF (interleukin 3)] has proliferative effects on a wide range of hemopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo. Native or recombination Multi-CSF injected intravenoulsy into adult mice had an initial half-life of 3-5 min and a second phase of 50 min. Clear labeling of hemopoietic cells was observed in the bone marrow and spleen of mice injected intravenously with recombinant 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF showing that injected Multi-CSF can obtain access to such cells in situ. A high proportion of injected 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF of both types became localized in the liver and in the kidney (in cells of the Bowman's capsule and proximal renal tubules). The kidney appeared to be an active site of degradation of Multi-CSF with the early appearance of low molecular weight labeled material in the urine

  7. Macrophage Activation Mechanisms in Human Monocytic Cell Line-derived Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, Yu; Ishikawa, Mami; Inoue, Takahiro; Inui, Toshio; Kuchiike, Daisuke; Kubo, Kentaro; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nishikata, Takahito

    2015-08-01

    Although the mechanisms of macrophage activation are important for cancer immunotherapy, they are poorly understood. Recently, easy and robust assay systems for assessing the macrophage-activating factor (MAF) using monocytic cell line-derived macrophages were established. Gene-expression profiles of U937- and THP-1-derived macrophages were compared using gene expression microarray analysis and their responses against several MAFs were examined by in vitro experiments. Activated states of these macrophages could not be assigned to a specific sub-type but showed, however, different unique characteristics. The unique of monocytic cell line-derived macrophages could provide clues to understand the activation mechanism of macrophages and, therefore, help to develop effective cancer immunotherapy with MAFs. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Legionella pneumophila transcriptome during intracellular multiplication in human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute pulmonary infection. L. pneumophila is able to infect and multiply in both phagocytic protozoa, such as Acanthamoeba castellanii, and mammalian professional phagocytes. The best-known L. pneumophila virulence determinant is the Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system (TFBSS, which is used to translocate more than 150 effector proteins to host cells. While the transcriptional response of Legionella to the intracellular environment of A. castellanii has been investigated, much less is known about the Legionella transcriptional response inside human macrophages. In this study, the transcriptome of L. pneumophila was monitored during exponential and post-exponential phase in rich AYE broth as well as during infection of human cultured macrophages. This was accomplished with microarrays and an RNA amplification procedure called SCOTS to detect small amounts of mRNA from low numbers of intracellular bacteria. Among the genes induced intracellularly are those involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathways leading to L-arginine, L-histidine and L-proline as well as many transport systems involved in amino acid and iron uptake. Gene involved in catabolism of glycerol is also induced during intracellular growth and could be used as a carbon source. The genes encoding the Icm/Dot system are not differentially expressed inside cells compared to control bacteria grown in rich broth, but the genes encoding several translocated effectors are strongly induced. Moreover, we used the transcriptome data to predict previously unrecognized Icm/Dot effector genes based on their expression pattern and confirmed translocation for three candidates. This study provides a comprehensive view of how L. pneumophila responds to the human macrophage intracellular environment.

  9. Aggressive cutaneous vasculitis in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia following granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Husseiny Noha M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vasculitis has been reported in a few cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia and with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy. Those with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor occurred after prolonged therapy and there was a rise in total leukocyte count unlike that in our patient who received just a single injection for the first time. Case presentation We report the case of a 64-year-old Egyptian man with chronic lymphatic leukemia who developed progressive cutaneous vasculitic lesions following injection of a single dose of a granulocytic colony stimulating factor before a third cycle of chemotherapy to improve neutropenia. This is an unusual case and the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Our patient was not on any medical treatment except for bisoprolol for ischemic heart disease. Although aggressive management with steroids, anticoagulation and plasmapheresis had been carried out, the condition was aggressive and the patient's consciousness deteriorated. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his brain revealed multiple ischemic foci that could be attributed to vasculitis of the brain. Conclusion The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of monitoring patients on granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy, especially in the context of other conditions (such as a hematological malignancy that may lead to an adverse outcome.

  10. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, JK; van der Holt, B; van Imhoff, GW; van der Hem, KG; Kramer, MHH; van Oers, MHJ; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verdonck, LF; Verhoef, GEG; Steijaert, MMC; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, CA; van Agthoven, M; Mulder, AH; Sonneveld, P; Schaafsma, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate whether the relative close-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  11. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, J. K.; van der Holt, B.; van Imhoff, G. W.; van der Hem, K. G.; Kramer, M. H. H.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Schaafsma, M. R.; Verdonck, L. F.; Verhoef, G. E. G.; Steijaert, M. M. C.; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.; van Agthoven, M.; Mulder, A. H.; Sonneveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the relative dose-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  12. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes functional endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Tiffany M; Paul, Jonathan D; Hill, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael; Benjamin, Moshe; Rodrigo, Maria; McCoy, J Philip; Read, Elizabeth J; Khuu, Hanh M; Leitman, Susan F; Finkel, Toren; Cannon, Richard O

    2005-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) that may repair vascular injury are reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We reasoned that EPC number and function may be increased by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) used to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells in healthy donors. Sixteen CAD patients had reduced CD34(+)/CD133(+) (0.0224+/-0.0063% versus 0.121+/-0.038% mononuclear cells [MNCs], P<0.01) and CD133(+)/VEGFR-2(+) cells, consistent with EPC phenotype (0.00033+/-0.00015% versus 0.0017+/-0.0006% MNCs, P<0.01), compared with 7 healthy controls. Patients also had fewer clusters of cells in culture, with out-growth consistent with mature endothelial phenotype (2+/-1/well) compared with 16 healthy subjects at high risk (13+/-4/well, P<0.05) or 14 at low risk (22+/-3/well, P<0.001) for CAD. G-CSF 10 microg/kg per day for 5 days increased CD34(+)/CD133(+) cells from 0.5+/-0.2/microL to 59.5+/-10.6/microL and CD133(+)/ VEGFR-2(+) cells from 0.007+/-0.004/microL to 1.9+/-0.6/microL (both P<0.001). Also increased were CD133(+) cells that coexpressed the homing receptor CXCR4 (30.4+/-8.3/microL, P<0.05). Endothelial cell-forming clusters in 10 patients increased to 27+/-9/well after treatment (P<0.05), with a decline to 9+/-4/well at 2 weeks (P=0.06). Despite reduced EPCs compared with healthy controls, patients with CAD respond to G-CSF with increases in EPC number and homing receptor expression in the circulation and endothelial out-growth in culture. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are reduced in coronary artery disease. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) administered to patients increased: (1) CD133+/VEGFR-2+ cells consistent with EPC phenotype; (2) CD133+ cells coexpressing the chemokine receptor CXCR4, important for homing of EPCs to ischemic tissue; and (3) endothelial cell-forming clusters in culture. Whether EPCs mobilized into the circulation will be useful for the purpose of initiating vascular growth and myocyte repair

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and umbilical cord blood cell transplantation: Synergistic therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Liska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is now characterized as a progressive, degenerative disease and continues to stand as a prevalent cause of death and disability. The pathophysiology of TBI is complex, with a variety of secondary cell death pathways occurring which may persist chronically following the initial cerebral insult. Current therapeutic options for TBI are minimal, with surgical intervention or rehabilitation therapy existing as the only viable treatments. Considering the success of stem-cell therapies in various other neurological diseases, their use has been proposed as a potential potent therapy for patients suffering TBI. Moreover, stem cells are highly amenable to adjunctive use with other therapies, providing an opportunity to overcome the inherent limitations of using a single therapeutic agent. Our research has verified this additive potential by demonstrating the efficacy of co-delivering human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in a murine model of TBI, providing encouraging results which support the potential of this approach to treat patients suffering from TBI. These findings justify ongoing research toward uncovering the mechanisms which underlie the functional improvements exhibited by hUCB + G-CSF combination therapy, thereby facilitating its safe and effect transition into the clinic. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the reference section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing in Human iPSC-Derived Macrophage Reveals Lysosomal Acid Lipase Function in Human Macrophages-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanrui; Shi, Jianting; Hachet, Melanie A; Xue, Chenyi; Bauer, Robert C; Jiang, Hongfeng; Li, Wenjun; Tohyama, Junichiro; Millar, John; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Phillips, Michael C; Razani, Babak; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P

    2017-11-01

    To gain mechanistic insights into the role of LIPA (lipase A), the gene encoding LAL (lysosomal acid lipase) protein, in human macrophages. We used CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology to knock out LIPA in human induced pluripotent stem cells and then differentiate to macrophage (human-induced pluripotent stem cells-derived macrophage [IPSDM]) to explore the human macrophage LIPA loss-of-function phenotypes. LIPA was abundantly expressed in monocyte-derived macrophages and was markedly induced on IPSDM differentiation to comparable levels as in human monocyte-derived macrophage. IPSDM with knockout of LIPA ( LIPA -/- ) had barely detectable LAL enzymatic activity. Control and LIPA -/- IPSDM were loaded with [ 3 H]-cholesteryl oleate-labeled AcLDL (acetylated low-density lipoprotein) followed by efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. Efflux of liberated [ 3 H]-cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I was abolished in LIPA -/- IPSDM, indicating deficiency in LAL-mediated lysosomal cholesteryl ester hydrolysis. In cells loaded with [ 3 H]-cholesterol-labeled AcLDL, [ 3 H]-cholesterol efflux was, however, not different between control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1) expression was upregulated by AcLDL loading but to a similar extent between control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. In nonlipid loaded state, LIPA -/- IPSDM had high levels of cholesteryl ester mass compared with minute amounts in control IPSDM. Yet, with AcLDL loading, overall cholesteryl ester mass was increased to similar levels in both control and LIPA -/- IPSDM. LIPA -/- did not impact lysosomal apolipoprotein-B degradation or expression of IL1B , IL6 , and CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: LIPA -/- IPSDM reveals macrophage-specific hallmarks of LIPA deficiency. CRISPR/Cas9 and IPSDM provide important tools to study human macrophage biology and more broadly for future studies of disease-associated LIPA genetic variation in human

  16. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab') 2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  17. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  18. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor controls neural and behavioral plasticity in response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S; Godino, Arthur; Peck, Emily G; Salery, Marine; Mervosh, Nicholas L; Landry, Joseph A; Russo, Scott J; Hurd, Yasmin L; Nestler, Eric J; Kiraly, Drew D

    2018-01-16

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by dysfunction in reward-related brain circuits, leading to maladaptive motivation to seek and take the drug. There are currently no clinically available pharmacotherapies to treat cocaine addiction. Through a broad screen of innate immune mediators, we identify granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a potent mediator of cocaine-induced adaptations. Here we report that G-CSF potentiates cocaine-induced increases in neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex. In addition, G-CSF injections potentiate cocaine place preference and enhance motivation to self-administer cocaine, while not affecting responses to natural rewards. Infusion of G-CSF neutralizing antibody into NAc blocks the ability of G-CSF to modulate cocaine's behavioral effects, providing a direct link between central G-CSF action in NAc and cocaine reward. These results demonstrate that manipulating G-CSF is sufficient to alter the motivation for cocaine, but not natural rewards, providing a pharmacotherapeutic avenue to manipulate addictive behaviors without abuse potential.

  19. Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor correlates with prognosis in oral and mesopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, H; Fujieda, S; Sunaga, H; Noda, I; Saito, H

    1998-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSFRs) have been observed on the surface of not only hematopoietic cells but also several cancer cells. The stimulation of G-CSF has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and activation of G-CSFR-positive cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of G-CSFR on the surface of tumor cells and G-CSF production in oral and mesopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by an immunohistochemical approach. Of 58 oral and mesopharyngeal SCCs, 31 cases (53.4%) and 36 cases (62.1%) were positive for G-CSFR and G-CSF, respectively. There was no association between G-CSFR expression and G-CSF staining. In the group positive for G-CSFR expression, relapse was significantly more likely after primary treatment (P = 0.0069), whereas there was no association between G-CSFR expression and age, sex, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage. Also, the G-CSFR-positive groups had a significantly lower disease-free and overall survival rate than the G-CSFR-negative groups (P = 0.0172 and 0.0188, respectively). However, none of the clinical markers correlated significantly with G-CSF staining, nor did the status of G-CSF production influence the overall survival. The results imply that assessment of G-CSFR may prove valuable in selecting patients with oral and mesopharyngeal SCC for aggressive therapy.

  20. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose splenic uptake from extramedullary hematopoiesis after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, H M; Rosen, G; El-Zeftawy, H; Naddaf, S; Kumar, M; Atay, S; Cacavio, A

    1999-05-01

    Two patients with sarcoma, one with recurrent osteosarcoma of the spine and the other with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma, were treated with high-dose chemotherapy that produced severe leukopenia. The patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to stimulate the bone marrow (480 mg given subcutaneously twice daily for 5 to 7 days); their responses were seen as a marked increase in peripheral leukocyte count with no change in the erythrocyte or platelet counts. The patients had fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) imaging 24 hours after the end of G-CSF treatment. Diffusely increased uptake of F-18 FDG was seen in the bone marrow in both patients. In addition, markedly increased uptake in the spleen was noted in both, indicating that the spleen was the site of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The patients had no evidence of splenic metastases. The first patient had a history of irradiation to the dorsal spine, which was less responsive to G-CSF administration than was the nonirradiated lumbar spine.

  1. Radioprotective effect of colony-stimulating factor on mice irradiated with 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junning; Wang Tao; Xu Changshao; Wang Hongyun

    1995-01-01

    Adult male mice were irradiated with γ-rays 6 Gy once or 3 Gy three times in 7 days and intraperitoneally injected with colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in high doses or low doses. Mice of the control group were injected with normal saline only. Within 30 days after irradiation, the survival rate of mice irradiated with 6 Gy γ-rays once and treated with high dose CSF was 9/25, while that in the control group was 2/25. The survival rate of mice irradiated with 3 Gy three times and treated with high dose CSF was 10/13, while that in the control group was 4/13. Moreover, the survival times of both irradiated groups treated with high dose CSF were much longer than the control groups (p<0.01). This experiment also showed that CSF could reduce the lowering of peripheral blood white blood cell counts and promote their recovery. The number of CFU-S in mice treated with CSF was much higher (23.8 +- 4.82) than in the control group (9.4 +- 4.39) (p<0.01). Therefore, CSF could recover and reconstruct the hematopoietic function of bone marrow, and prolong the survival of irradiated mice

  2. Prevention of myelosuppression by combined treatment with enterosorbent and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, O O; Posokhova, К А; Todor, I N; Lukianova, N Yu; Nikolaev, V G; Chekhun, V F

    2015-06-01

    Hematotoxicity and its complication are the prominent limiting factors for rational treatment of malignancies. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to increase granulocyte production. It has been shown previously that enterosorption causes prominent myeloprotective activity also. Still, no trial was performed to combine both of them. To study the influence of combination of enterosorption and pharmaceutical analogue of naturally occurring G-CSF (filgrastim) on bone marrow protection and the growth of grafted tumor in a case of injection of melphalan (Mel). Mel injections were used for promotion of bone marrow suppression in rats. Carbon granulated enterosorbent C2 (IEPOR) was used for providing of enteral sorption detoxifying therapy. Filgrastim was used to increase white blood cells (WBC) count. The simultaneous usage of enterosorption and filgrastim had maximum effectiveness for restoring of all types of blood cells. WBC count was higher by 138.3% compared with the Mel group. The increase of platelets count by 98.5% was also observed. In the group (Mel + C2 + filgrastim) the absolute neutrophils count was twofold higher, in comparison with rats of Mel group. Simultaneous administration of G-CSF-analogue and carbonic enterosorbent C2 is a perspective approach for bone marrow protection, when the cytostatic drug melphalan is used. Such combination demonstrates prominent positive impact on restoring of all types of blood cells and had no influence on the antitumor efficacy.

  3. Regulation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor-mediated granulocytic differentiation by C-mannosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Kei; Niwa, Yuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sato, Natsumi; Sasazawa, Yukiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Simizu, Siro

    2018-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor (G-CSFR) is a type I cytokine receptor which is involved in hematopoietic cell maturation. G-CSFR has three putative C-mannosylation sites at W253, W318, and W446; however, it is not elucidated whether G-CSFR is C-mannosylated or not. In this study, we first demonstrated that G-CSFR was C-mannosylated at only W318. We also revealed that C-mannosylation of G-CSFR affects G-CSF-dependent downstream signaling through changing ligand binding capability but not cell surface localization. Moreover, C-mannosylation of G-CSFR was functional and regulated granulocytic differentiation in myeloid 32D cells. In conclusion, we found that G-CSFR is C-mannosylated at W318 and that this C-mannosylation has role(s) for myeloid cell differentiation through regulating downstream signaling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fibronectin induces macrophage migration through a SFK-FAK/CSF-1R pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiacomo, Graziana; Tusa, Ignazia; Bacci, Marina; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Rovida, Elisabetta

    2017-07-04

    Integrins, following binding to proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including collagen, laminin and fibronectin (FN), are able to transduce molecular signals inside the cells and to regulate several biological functions such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. Besides activation of adaptor molecules and kinases, integrins transactivate Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). In particular, adhesion to the ECM may promote RTK activation in the absence of growth factors. The Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) is a RTK that supports the survival, proliferation, and motility of monocytes/macrophages, which are essential components of innate immunity and cancer development. Macrophage interaction with FN is recognized as an important aspect of host defense and wound repair. The aim of the present study was to investigate on a possible cross-talk between FN-elicited signals and CSF-1R in macrophages. FN induced migration in BAC1.2F5 and J774 murine macrophage cell lines and in human primary macrophages. Adhesion to FN determined phosphorylation of the Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Src Family Kinases (SFK) and activation of the SFK/FAK complex, as witnessed by paxillin phosphorylation. SFK activity was necessary for FAK activation and macrophage migration. Moreover, FN-induced migration was dependent on FAK in either murine macrophage cell lines or human primary macrophages. FN also induced FAK-dependent/ligand-independent CSF-1R phosphorylation, as well as the interaction between CSF-1R and β1. CSF-1R activity was necessary for FN-induced macrophage migration. Indeed, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of CSF-1R prevented FN-induced macrophage migration. Our results identified a new SFK-FAK/CSF-1R signaling pathway that mediates FN-induced migration of macrophages.

  5. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine administered in vivo induce serum colony-stimulating activity and interleukin-6 in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Znojil, V.; Štreitová, Denisa

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2007), s. 463-473 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP305/03/D050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : extracellular adenosine * serum colony-stimulating activity * interleukin-6 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  6. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) for stroke: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    England, Timothy J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Alasheev, Andrey M.; Belkin, Andrey A.; Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may enhance recovery from stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms if administered early, or neurorepair if given later. Several small trials suggest administration is safe but effects on efficacy are unclear. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing G-CSF in patients with hyperacute, acute, subacute or chronic stroke, and asked Investigators to share individual patient data on baseline characteristics, stroke severity and typ...

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes dormant hematopoietic stem cells without proliferation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, Jeffrey M; Daniel, Michael G; Fstkchyan, Yesai S; Moore, Kateri

    2017-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically to treat leukopenia and to enforce hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization to the peripheral blood (PB). However, G-CSF is also produced in response to infection, and excessive exposure reduces HSC repopulation capacity. Previous work has shown that dormant HSCs contain all the long-term repopulation potential in the bone marrow (BM), and that as HSCs accumulate a divisional history, they progressively lose regenerative potential. As G-CSF treatment also induces HSC proliferation, we sought to examine whether G-CSF-mediated repopulation defects are a result of increased proliferative history. To do so, we used an established H2BGFP label retaining system to track HSC divisions in response to G-CSF. Our results show that dormant HSCs are preferentially mobilized to the PB on G-CSF treatment. We find that this mobilization does not result in H2BGFP label dilution of dormant HSCs, suggesting that G-CSF does not stimulate dormant HSC proliferation. Instead, we find that proliferation within the HSC compartment is restricted to CD41-expressing cells that function with short-term, and primarily myeloid, regenerative potential. Finally, we show CD41 expression is up-regulated within the BM HSC compartment in response to G-CSF treatment. This emergent CD41 Hi HSC fraction demonstrates no observable engraftment potential, but directly matures into megakaryocytes when placed in culture. Together, our results demonstrate that dormant HSCs mobilize in response to G-CSF treatment without dividing, and that G-CSF-mediated proliferation is restricted to cells with limited regenerative potential found within the HSC compartment. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Chemoimmunotherapy of cancer: potentiated effectiveness of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and ifosfamide derivative CBM-4A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Šmahel, M.; Vonka, V.; Glazman-Kusnierczyk, H.; Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.; Radzikowski, C.; Mikyšková, Romana

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2001), s. 1371-1374 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526; GA MZd NC5900; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA AV ČR IAA7052002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : chemoimmunotherapy * murine * neoplasms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2001

  10. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  11. The role of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in radiation-induced tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Brune, Jourdan; Rafat, Marjan; Soto, Luis; Graves, Edward E

    2018-03-13

    Recently it has been observed in preclinical models that that radiation enhances the recruitment of circulating tumor cells to primary tumors, and results in tumor regrowth after treatment. This process may have implications for clinical radiotherapy, which improves control of a number of tumor types but which, despite continued dose escalation and aggressive fractionation, is unable to fully prevent local recurrences. By irradiating a single tumor within an animal bearing multiple lesions, we observed an increase in tumor cell migration to irradiated and unirradiated sites, suggesting a systemic component to this process. Previous work has identified the cytokine GM-CSF, produced by tumor cells following irradiation, as a key effector of this process. We evaluated the ability of systemic injections of a PEGylated form of GM-CSF to stimulate tumor cell migration. While increases in invasion and migration were observed for tumor cells in a transwell assay, we found that daily injections of PEG-GM-CSF to tumor-bearing animals did not increase migration of cells to tumors, despite the anticipated changes in circulating levels of granulocytes and monocytes produced by this treatment. Combination of PEG-GM-CSF treatment with radiation also did not increase tumor cell migration. These findings suggest that clinical use of GM-CSF to treat neutropenia in cancer patients will not have negative effects on the aggressiveness of residual cancer cells. However, further work is needed to characterize the mechanism by which GM-CSF facilitates systemic recruitment of trafficking tumor cells to tumors.

  12. Human Adipose Tissue Macrophages Are Enhanced but Changed to an Anti-Inflammatory Profile in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Fjeldborg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Adipose tissue (AT macrophages are increased in obesity and associated with low grade inflammation. We aimed to characterize the phenotype of AT macrophages in humans in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. Design. Gene-expression levels of general macrophage markers (CD68 and CD14, proinflammatory markers/M1 (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-6, and anti-inflammatory markers/M2 (CD163, CD206, and IL-10 were determined by RT-PCR in subcutaneous AT samples from lean and obese subjects. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR. Results. All the macrophage markers were elevated in the AT from obese compared to lean subjects (P<0.001. To determine the phenotype of the macrophages the level of CD14 was used to adjust the total number of macrophages. The relative expression of CD163 and IL-10 was elevated, and TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced in AT from obese subjects (all P<0.05. In a multivariate regression analysis CD163 was the only macrophage marker significantly associated with HOMA-IR (β: 0.57; P<0.05. Conclusion. Obesity is associated with elevated numbers of macrophages in the AT. Unexpectedly, the macrophages change phenotype by obesity, with a preponderance of M2 and a decrement of M1 markers in AT from obese subjects. Moreover, CD163 was the only macrophage marker associated with HOMA-IR after multiple adjustments.

  13. CSF1R inhibition prevents radiation pulmonary fibrosis by depletion of interstitial macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Lydia; Mondini, Michele; Petit, Benoît; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Thomas de Montpreville, Vincent; Mercier, Olaf; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Deutsch, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RIF) is a delayed side-effect of chest radiotherapy, frequently associated with macrophage infiltration.We aimed to characterise the role of pulmonary macrophages in RIF using human lung biopsies from patients receiving radiotherapy for thorax malignancies and a RIF model developed in C57BL/6 mice after 16-Gy thorax irradiation.High numbers of macrophages (both interstitial and alveolar) were detected in clinical and preclinical RIF. In the preclinical model, upregulation of T-helper (Th)2 cytokines was measured, whereas Th1 cytokines were downregulated in RIF tissue lysate. Bronchoalveolar lavage demonstrated upregulation of both types of cytokines. At steady state, tissue-infiltrating macrophages (IMs) expressed 10-fold more arginase (Arg)-1 than alveolar macrophages (AMs), and a 40-fold upregulation of Arg-1 was found in IMs isolated from RIF. IMs, but not AMs, were able to induce myofibroblast activation in vitro In addition, whereas depletion of AMs using Clodrosome didn't affect RIF score, depletion of IMs using a clinically available colony-stimulating factor receptor-1 (CSF1R) neutralising antibody was antifibrotic.These findings suggest differential contributions of alveolar versus interstitial macrophages in RIF, highlighting the fibrogenic role of IMs. The CSF1/CSF1R pathway was identified as a new therapeutic target to inhibit RIF. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  14. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Catherine A; Webb, David J; Rossi, Adriano G; Megson, Ian L

    2009-05-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-). In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMvarphi), and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z)-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO) and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-, chloride (GEA-3162) was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMvarphi. Resultant MDMvarphi were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 - 1000 muM) or GEA-3162 (10 - 300 muM) in the presence or absence of BAY 41-2272 (1 muM), isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 muM), 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 muM) or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM). Apoptosis in MDMvarphi was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO) had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162) caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMvarphi. Preconditioning of MDMvarphi with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41-2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner. These results

  15. Cyclic GMP protects human macrophages against peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis

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    Rossi Adriano G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO can be both pro- and anti-apoptotic in various cell types, including macrophages. This apparent paradox may result from the actions of NO-related species generated in the microenvironment of the cell, for example the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO-. In this study we have examined the ability of NO and ONOO- to evoke apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMϕ, and investigated whether preconditioning by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is able to limit apoptosis in this cell type. Methods Characterisation of the NO-related species generated by (Z-1- [2-(2-aminoethyl-N-(2-ammonioethylamino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NO and 1,2,3,4-oxatriazolium, 5-amino-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-, chloride (GEA-3162 was performed by electrochemistry using an isolated NO electrode and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometry. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and cultured to allow differentiation into MDMϕ. Resultant MDMϕ were treated for 24 h with DETA/NO (100 – 1000 μM or GEA-3162 (10 – 300 μM in the presence or absence of BAY 41–2272 (1 μM, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 1 μM, 1H- [1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 20 μM or 8-bromo-cGMP (1 mM. Apoptosis in MDMϕ was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V binding in combination with propidium iodide staining. Results Electrochemistry and EPR revealed that DETA/NO liberated free NO radical, whilst GEA-3162 concomitantly released NO and O2-, and is therefore a ONOO- generator. NO (DETA/NO had no effect on cell viability, but ONOO- (GEA-3162 caused a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis in MDMϕ. Preconditioning of MDMϕ with NO in combination with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, or the NO-independent stimulator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY 41–2272, significantly attenuated ONOO--induced apoptosis in a cGMP-dependent manner

  16. Comparison of two strategies for the treatment of radiogenic leukopenia using granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, I.A.; Rosskopf, B.; Dapper, F.D.; Lieven, H. von; Boettcher, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced leukopenia can cause a delay or discontinuation of radiotherapy. This complication can be overcome with the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, an uncertainty exists regarding the mode of application of G-CSF in patients treated with radiotherapy. For this reason, the efficacy of two strategies for the administration of G-CSF in irradiated patients was compared in a prospective randomized clinical study. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients who developed leukopenia ( 9 per liter) while undergoing radiotherapy were treated with G-CSF at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg. The first group received single injections of G-CSF as required (n = 21). The second group received G-CSF on at least 3 consecutive days (n = 20). An analysis was made of the changes in leucocyte counts, the number of days on which radiotherapy had to be interrupted, and the side effects of growth-factor treatment. Results: An increase in leucocyte values in the peripheral blood was observed in all patients treated with G-CSF. In the group which received G-CSF when required, two injections (range: 1-8) were administered in most cases. In the second group, most of the patients received three injections (range: 3-9). The average duration of therapy interruptions due to leukopenia was 4.8 days (0-28) in the first therapy arm and 2.5 (0-20) in the second arm. The variance in the duration of therapy interruptions between the two groups was not significant (p = 0.2). Radiotherapy had to be terminated in two patients due to thrombocytopenia but the application of G-CSF did not seem to be a reason of decreasing platelet counts. Conclusions: Our results reveal that G-CSF is safe and effective in the treatment of radiation-induced leukopenia regardless of the mode of application. Because the calculated difference related to radiation treatment interruptions has no clinical relevance, both approaches examined in our study appear reasonable.

  17. Timing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment after acute myocardial infarction and recovery of left ventricular function: results from the STEMMI trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Mikkel; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Wang, Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial.......Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial....

  18. Myeloprotective Action of Combined Application of Ukrainian Recombinant Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (r-GCSF and Enterosorbent С2 in Rats with Malignant Guerin Carcinoma

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    Todor, I.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to analyze myeloprotective effect of novel enterosorbents alone and in combination with two recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factors: Neupogen (Switzerland and r- GCSF (Ukraine. It is proven that Ukrainian version of recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor r-GCSF does not concede officinal drug Neupogen (Switzerland by its experimental therapeutic action and combined use with enterosorbent C2 significantly increases myeloprotective effect of both GCSF versions.

  19. Cysteamine-mediated clearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

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    Chandra L Shrestha

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens that survive and replicate intracellularly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. We have discovered that B. cenocepacia cannot be cleared from CF macrophages due to defective autophagy, causing continued systemic inflammation and infection. Defective autophagy in CF is mediated through constitutive reactive oxygen species (ROS activation of transglutaminase-2 (TG2, which causes the sequestration (accumulation of essential autophagy initiating proteins. Cysteamine is a TG2 inhibitor and proteostasis regulator with the potential to restore autophagy. Therefore, we sought to examine the impact of cysteamine on CF macrophage autophagy and bacterial killing. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and alveolar macrophages were isolated from CF and non-CF donors. Macrophages were infected with clinical isolates of relevant CF pathogens. Cysteamine caused direct bacterial growth killing of live B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, P. aeruginosa and MRSA in the absence of cells. Additionally, B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, and P. aeruginosa invasion were significantly decreased in CF MDMs treated with cysteamine. Finally, cysteamine decreased TG2, p62, and beclin-1 accumulation in CF, leading to increased Burkholderia uptake into autophagosomes, increased macrophage CFTR expression, and decreased ROS and IL-1β production. Cysteamine has direct anti-bacterial growth killing and improves human CF macrophage autophagy resulting in increased macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance, decreased inflammation, and reduced constitutive ROS production. Thus, cysteamine may be an effective adjunct to antibiotic regimens in CF.

  20. Hyperglycemia induces mixed M1/M2 cytokine profile in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moganti, Kondaiah; Li, Feng; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Riemann, Sarah; Klüter, Harald; Gratchev, Alexei; Harmsen, Martin C; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Hyperglycaemia is a key factor in diabetic pathology. Macrophages are essential regulators of inflammation which can be classified into two major vectors of polarisation: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). Both types of macrophages play a role in diabetes, where M1 and M2-produced cytokines can have detrimental effects in development of diabetes-associated inflammation and diabetic vascular complications. However, the effect of hyperglycaemia on differentiation and programming of primary human macrophages was not systematically studied. We established a unique model to assess the influence of hyperglycaemia on M1 and M2 differentiation based on primary human monocyte-derived macrophages. The effects of hyperglycaemia on the gene expression and secretion of prototype M1 cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and prototype M2 cytokines IL-1Ra and CCL18 were quantified by RT-PCR and ELISA. Hyperglycaemia stimulated production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-1Ra during macrophage differentiation. The effect of hyperglycaemia on TNF-alpha was acute, while the stimulating effect on IL-1beta and IL-1Ra was constitutive. Expression of CCL18 was supressed in M2 macrophages by hyperglycaemia. However the secreted levels remained to be biologically significant. Our data indicate that hyperglycaemia itself, without additional metabolic factors induces mixed M1/M2 cytokine profile that can support of diabetes-associated inflammation and development of vascular complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

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    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  2. Clinical outcome after stem cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been investigated in trials aiming to promote recovery of myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Long-term safety-data have never been reported. A few studies indicated an increased risk of in-stent re-stenosis. We aimed to i.......8; 0.3). Conclusions. We found no indication of increased risk of adverse events up to 5 years after G-CSF treatment. These results support the continued investigation of G-CSF for cardiac therapy....

  3. The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on rotator cuff healing after injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael; Hein, Joel; Doshi, Shashin; Bedi, Asheesh; Anderson, Kyle; Baker, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    The failure rate of tendon-bone healing after repair of rotator cuff tears remains high. A variety of biologic- and cell-based therapies aimed at improving rotator cuff healing have been investigated, and stem cell-based techniques have become increasingly more common. However, most studies have focused on the implantation of exogenous cells, which introduces higher risk and cost. We aimed to improve rotator cuff healing by inducing endogenous stem cell mobilization with systemic administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We asked: (1) Does G-CSF administration increase local cellularity after acute rotator cuff repair? (2) Is there histologic evidence that G-CSF improved organization at the healing enthesis? (3) Does G-CSF administration improve biomechanical properties of the healing supraspinatus tendon-bone complex? (4) Are there micro-MRI-based observations indicating G-CSF-augmented tendon-bone healing? After creation of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon defects with immediate repair, 52 rats were randomized to control or G-CSF-treated groups. G-CSF was administered for 5 days after repair and rats were euthanized at 12 or 19 postoperative days. Shoulders were subjected to micro-MR imaging, stress relaxation, and load-to-failure as well as blinded histologic and histomorphometric analyses. G-CSF-treated animals had significantly higher cellularity composite scores at 12 and 19 days compared with both control (12 days: 7.40 ± 1.14 [confidence interval {CI}, 5.98-8.81] versus 4.50 ± 0.57 [CI, 3.58-5.41], p = 0.038; 19 days: 8.00 ± 1.00 [CI, 6.75-9.24] versus 5.40 ± 0.89 [CI, 4.28-6.51], p = 0.023) and normal animals (12 days: p = 0.029; 19 days: p = 0.019). There was no significant difference between G-CSF-treated animals or control animals in ultimate stress (MPa) and strain, modulus (MPa), or yield stress (MPa) and strain at either 12 days (p = 1.000, p = 0.104, p = 1.000, p = 0.909, and p = 0.483, respectively) or 19 days (p = 0

  4. Augmented macrophage differentiation and polarization of tumor-associated macrophages towards M1 subtype in listeria-administered tumor-bearing host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rakesh K; Vishvakarma, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Tribhuban M; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of Listeria administration on differentiation of macrophages from precursor bone marrow cells and functional status of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Listeria administration not only resulted in an augmented infiltration of tumor by F4/80 macrophages but also repolarized the functional status of TAM displaying features of some M1 macrophage subtype with upregulated phagocytosis and tumoricidal activity accompanied by altered expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1, toll-like receptor-2, surface markers: CD11c, interleukin-2 receptor, CD62L, and secreted molecules: nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Declined tumor cell survival and modulated repertoire of cytokines: interferon-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β in tumor microenvironment indicated their role in polarization of TAM towards proinflammatory state. Bone marrow cell of Listeria-administered tumor-bearing mice showed augmented survival, declined expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis with an upregulated differentiation into activation responsive bone marrow-derived macrophages along with altered expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor. These findings indicate that Listeria infection is associated with an augmented differentiation of macrophages accompanied by tumoricidal activation of TAM.

  5. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, improves experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats via nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kana; Okabe, Taka-aki; Mikami, Yu; Hattori, Miki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2010-09-01

    We systematically investigated serial efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy upon experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats treated with and without the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) with the analyses of tissue regeneration. G-CSF could mobilize multipotent progenitor cells of bone marrow into the peripheral blood and may improve ventricular function. A rat model of porcine myosin-induced EAM was used. After the immunization of myosin, G-CSF (10 microg/kg/day) or saline was injected intraperitoneally on days 0-21 in experiment 1 and on days 21-42 in experiment 2. Additional myosin-immunized rats were orally given 25 mg/kg/day of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in each experiment (each group; n=8-21). Serum cytokines and peripheral blood cell counts were measured in each group. In experiment 1, G-CSF treatment aggravated cardiac pathology associated with increased macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and enhanced superoxide production. In experiment 2, G-CSF treatment reduced the severity of myocarditis with increased capillary density and improved left ventricular ejection fraction. In the rats with EAM treated with G-CSF associated with oral L-NAME treatment in experiment 2, the severity of myocarditis was not reduced. Myocardial c-kit(+) cells were demonstrated only in G-CSF-treated group in experiment 2 but not in other groups. G-CSF has differential effects on EAM in rats associated with the modulation of cytokine network. The overwhelming superoxide production by G-CSF administration in the acute stage may worsen the disease. G-CSF therapy improved cardiac function via NO system in a rat model of myocarditis in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, possibly through the myocardial regeneration and acceleration of healing process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

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    Karl J Staples

    Full Text Available Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  7. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Methods: Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with a 6.0 Gy of γ-ray total-body irradiation and then randomly divided into GCSF group and control group. For mice in the GCSF group, recombinant human G-CSF 100 μg · kg -1 · d -1 was injected subcutaneously once daily for 14 continuous days and mice in the control group were given the same volume of phosphate buffered solution (PBS). At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days later, mice were killed and thymus mononuclear cell suspension were analyzed by flow cytometry for the percentage of the four stages of thymic CD4 - CD8 - double negative cells (DN1-4) and the CD4 + CD8 + double positive ( CD4 + CD8 + DP), CD4 + CD8 - single positive (CD4 + SP), CD4 - CD8 + single positive cells (CD8 + SP).Real-time PCR was used for detection and quantitation of murine T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs) of the thymic cells of 30 and 60 d after irradiation. Results: The percentage of thymic DN1 cells in GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 7 d after irradiation (t=9.59, P<0.05). 21 d later, the proportion of thymic DN3 and DN4 cells were higher than those of the control group (t=16.37, 7.6, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells decreased 7 d after irradiation,increased at 14 d, decreased again at 21 days,and then got a permanent recover. The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells in the GCSF group recovered to normal and was significantly higher than that of the control group 28 days after irradiation (t=12.22, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD8 + SP cells of the GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 21 d after irradiation (t=3.77, P<0.05), while G-CSF had no obvious influence on the percentage of the thymic CD4 + SP cells. The sjTRECs copies in the

  8. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

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    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  9. Tie2 signaling cooperates with TNF to promote the pro-inflammatory activation of human macrophages independently of macrophage functional phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Samuel; Krausz, Sarah; Ambarus, Carmen A; Fernández, Beatriz Malvar; Hartkamp, Linda M; van Es, Inge E; Hamann, Jörg; Baeten, Dominique L; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2014-01-01

    Angiopoietin (Ang) -1 and -2 and their receptor Tie2 play critical roles in regulating angiogenic processes during development, homeostasis, tumorigenesis, inflammation and tissue repair. Tie2 signaling is best characterized in endothelial cells, but a subset of human and murine circulating monocytes/macrophages essential to solid tumor formation express Tie2 and display immunosuppressive properties consistent with M2 macrophage polarization. However, we have recently shown that Tie2 is strongly activated in pro-inflammatory macrophages present in rheumatoid arthritis patient synovial tissue. Here we examined the relationship between Tie2 expression and function during human macrophage polarization. Tie2 expression was observed under all polarization conditions, but was highest in IFN-γ and IL-10 -differentiated macrophages. While TNF enhanced expression of a common restricted set of genes involved in angiogenesis and inflammation in GM-CSF, IFN-γ and IL-10 -differentiated macrophages, expression of multiple chemokines and cytokines, including CXCL3, CXCL5, CXCL8, IL6, and IL12B was further augmented in the presence of Ang-1 and Ang-2, via Tie2 activation of JAK/STAT signaling. Conditioned medium from macrophages stimulated with Ang-1 or Ang-2 in combination with TNF, sustained monocyte recruitment. Our findings suggest a general role for Tie2 in cooperatively promoting the inflammatory activation of macrophages, independently of polarization conditions.

  10. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

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    Xiyuan Bai

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB. However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  11. Cigarette smoking decreases global microRNA expression in human alveolar macrophages.

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    Joel W Graff

    Full Text Available Human alveolar macrophages are critical components of the innate immune system. Cigarette smoking-induced changes in alveolar macrophage gene expression are linked to reduced resistance to pulmonary infections and to the development of emphysema/COPD. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs could control, in part, the unique messenger RNA (mRNA expression profiles found in alveolar macrophages of cigarette smokers. Activation of macrophages with different stimuli in vitro leads to a diverse range of M1 (inflammatory and M2 (anti-inflammatory polarized phenotypes that are thought to mimic activated macrophages in distinct tissue environments. Microarray mRNA data indicated that smoking promoted an "inverse" M1 mRNA expression program, defined by decreased expression of M1-induced transcripts and increased expression of M1-repressed transcripts with few changes in M2-regulated transcripts. RT-PCR arrays identified altered expression of many miRNAs in alveolar macrophages of smokers and a decrease in global miRNA abundance. Stratification of human subjects suggested that the magnitude of the global decrease in miRNA abundance was associated with smoking history. We found that many of the miRNAs with reduced expression in alveolar macrophages of smokers were predicted to target mRNAs upregulated in alveolar macrophages of smokers. For example, miR-452 is predicted to target the transcript encoding MMP12, an important effector of smoking-related diseases. Experimental antagonism of miR-452 in differentiated monocytic cells resulted in increased expression of MMP12. The comprehensive mRNA and miRNA expression profiles described here provide insight into gene expression regulation that may underlie the adverse effects cigarette smoking has on alveolar macrophages.

  12. CCR5 Signal Transduction in Macrophages by Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelopes

    OpenAIRE

    Arthos, James; Rubbert, Andrea; Rabin, Ronald L.; Cicala, Claudia; Machado, Elizabeth; Wildt, Kathryne; Hanbach, Meredith; Steenbeke, Tavis D.; Swofford, Ruth; Farber, Joshua M.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2000-01-01

    The capacity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelopes to transduce signals through chemokine coreceptors on macrophages was examined by measuring the ability of recombinant envelope proteins to mobilize intracellular calcium stores. Both HIV and SIV envelopes mobilized calcium via interactions with CCR5. The kinetics of these responses were similar to those observed when macrophages were treated with MIP-1β. Distinct differences in the capacity o...

  13. Proliferation-stimulating effect of colony stimulating factor 2 on porcine trophectoderm cells is mediated by activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

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    Wooyoung Jeong

    Full Text Available Colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2, also known as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, facilitates mammalian embryonic development and implantation. However, biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of action of porcine endometrial CSF2 in peri-implantation events have not been elucidated. The aim of present study was to determine changes in cellular activities induced by CSFs and to access CSF2-induced intracellular signaling in porcine primary trophectoderm (pTr cells. Differences in expression of CSF2 mRNA in endometrium from cyclic and pregnant gilts were evaluated. Endometrial CSF2 mRNA expression increases during the peri-implantation period, Days 10 to 14 of pregnancy, as compared to the estrous cycle. pTr cells obtained in Day 12 of pregnancy were cultured in the presence or absence of CSF2 (20 ng/ml and LY294002 (20 µM, U0126 (20 µM, rapamycin (20 nM, and SB203580 (20 µM. CSF2 in pTr cell culture medium at 20 ng/ml significantly induced phosphorylation of AKT1, ERK1/2, MTOR, p70RSK and RPS6 protein, but not STAT3 protein. Also, the PI3K specific inhibitor (LY294002 abolished CSF2-induced increases in p-ERK1/2 and p-MTOR proteins, as well as CSF2-induced phosphorylation of AKT1. Changes in proliferation and migration of pTr cells in response to CSF2 were examined in dose- and time-response experiments. CSF2 significantly stimulated pTr cell proliferation and, U0126, rapamycin and LY294002 blocked this CSF2-induced proliferation of pTr cells. Collectively, during the peri-implantation phase of pregnancy in pigs, endometrial CSF2 stimulates proliferation of trophectoderm cells by activation of the PI3K-and ERK1/2 MAPK-dependent MTOR signal transduction cascades.

  14. Increased expression of interleukin-1β in triglyceride-induced macrophage cell death is mediated by p38 MAP kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ho Joong; Son, Sin Jee; Yang, Seung-ju; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-07-01

    Triglycerides (TG) are implicated in the development of atherosclerosis through formation of foam cells and induction of macrophage cell death. In this study, we report that addition of exogenous TG induced cell death in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated THP-1 human macrophages. TG treatment induced a dramatic decrease in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule remained unchanged. To identify signaling pathways involved in TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, we added p38 MAPK, protein kinase C (PKC) or c-Raf1 specific inhibitors. We found that inhibition of p38 MAPK alleviated the TG-induced downregulation of IL-1β, whereas inhibition of PKC and c-Raf1 had no effect. This is the first report showing decreased IL-1β expression during TG-induced cell death in a human macrophage line. Our results suggest that downregulation of IL-1β expression by TG-treated macrophages may play a role during atherogenesis.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of human polarized macrophages: more than one role of alternative activation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Derlindati

    Full Text Available Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population which in response to the cytokine milieu polarize in either classically activated macrophages (M1 or alternatively activated macrophages (M2. This plasticity makes macrophages essential in regulating inflammation, immune response and tissue remodeling and a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to describe the transcriptomic profiles of differently polarized human macrophages to generate new hypotheses on the biological function of the different macrophage subtypes.Polarization of circulating monocytes/macrophages of blood donors was induced in vitro by IFN-γ and LPS (M1, by IL-4 (M2a, and by IL-10 (M2c. Unstimulated cells (RM served as time controls. Gene expression profile of M1, M2a, M2c and RM was assessed at 6, 12 and 24h after polarization with Whole Human Genome Agilent Microarray technique. When compared to RM, M1 significantly upregulated pathways involved in immunity and inflammation, whereas M2a did the opposite. Conversely, decreased and increased expression of mitochondrial metabolism, consistent with insulin resistant and insulin sensitive patterns, was seen in M1 and M2a, respectively. The time sequence in the expression of some pathways appeared to have some specific bearing on M1 function. Finally, canonical and non-canonical Wnt genes and gene groups, promoting inflammation and tissue remodeling, were upregulated in M2a compared to RM.Our data in in vitro polarized human macrophages: 1. confirm and extend known inflammatory and anti-inflammatory gene expression patterns; 2. demonstrate changes in mitochondrial metabolism associated to insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in M1 and M2a, respectively; 3. highlight the potential relevance of gene expression timing in M1 function; 4. unveil enhanced expression of Wnt pathways in M2a suggesting a potential dual (pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory role of M2a in

  16. The impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerosis and vascular macrophage distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Stone, James R

    Splenectomy can potentially impact atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms including altered lipid homeostasis, increased coagulation, and altered macrophage recruitment to the plaque. In patients, splenectomy has been associated with increased rates of coronary artery events, while in experimental mice, splenectomy causes increased atherosclerosis but reduces systemic monocyte supply. In this study, the direct impact of splenectomy on human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and macrophage content was investigated. Coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity was determined at autopsy in 18 long-term (≥10 years) splenectomy patients and 90 matched control patients. Coronary artery macrophage content was evaluated in mild atherosclerotic plaques of 11 mid- to long-term (≥1 year) splenectomy patients and 11 matched control patients. Splenectomy was associated with reduced coronary artery atherosclerosis (P=.03). The association was most pronounced for the subgroup of patients who had undergone splenectomy 20 years or more prior to death (P=.02). There was no difference in the density of macrophages in the plaque, media, or adventitia upon comparing splenectomy and control patients. In the control group, there was no correlation between the macrophage densities in the three arterial layers. However, in the splenectomy patients, there was a strong correlation in the macrophage densities across the plaque, media, and adventitia (P≤.0002), with resulting slopes that were significantly greater than seen in the control patients (P=.0007-.011). These findings indicate that, in humans, splenectomy is associated with lower coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque severity and altered coronary artery macrophage distribution. These results suggest that the spleen can modulate the recruitment of macrophages into human coronary arteries and the progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  18. Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. Identification of a subgroup of responders. The Spanish Erythropathology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, A F; Arrizabalaga, B; Villegas, A; Manteiga, R; Calvo, T; Julià, A; Fernández Fuertes, I; González, F A; Font, L; Juncà, J; del Arco, A; Malcorra, J J; Equiza, E P; de Mendiguren, B P; Romero, M

    1999-12-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion is probably the most important problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have been used to treat patients with anemia of MDS, but fewer than 50% respond. The aim of this work was to evaluate the benefit of rHuEpo +/- G-CSF treatment and to isolate the response predictive variables in a group of selected patients with MDS. A non-randomized multicenter trial was carried out in 32 patients with MDS. The inclusion criteria were age >= 18 years, refractory anemia (RA) or refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, Hb +1 (77% of cases responded). In contrast, when this score was <= 1 only 15 % of the cases responded. Use of the Scandinavian-American response score is to be recommended in a patient-oriented approach to treating MDS cases with the Epo and G-CSF. Treatment with rHuEpo and G-CSF is safe, its main drawback being its cost. However, a long-term study evaluating the regimen's cost-benefit ratio is warranted.

  19. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A L; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M; El-Sayed, Najib M

    2016-05-10

    Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. Little is known about the transcriptional changes that occur within mammalian cells harboring intracellular pathogens. This study characterizes the gene expression signatures of Leishmania spp. parasites and the coordinated response of infected human macrophages as the pathogen enters and persists within them. After accounting for the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis, we observed a parasite-specific response of the human macrophages early in

  20. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...

  1. The effects of exogenous fatty acids and niacin on human monocyte-macrophage plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Rodriguez, Dolores; Cardelo, Magdalena P; Naranjo, Maria C; Bermudez, Beatriz; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G; Lopez, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Macrophage plasticity allows adapting to different environments, having a dual activity in inflammatory-related diseases. Our hypothesis is that the type of dietary fatty acids into human postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), alone or in combination with niacin (vitamin B3), could modulate the plasticity of monocytes-macrophages. We isolated TRLs at the postprandial peak from blood samples of healthy volunteers after the ingestion of a meal rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or MUFAs plus omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs). Autologous monocytes isolated at fasting were first induced to differentiate into naïve macrophages. We observed that postprandial TRL-MUFAs, particularly in combination with niacin, enhance competence to monocytes to differentiate and polarise into M2 macrophages. Postprandial TRL-SFAs made polarised macrophages prone to an M1 phenotype. In contrast to dietary SFAs, dietary MUFAs in the meals plus immediate-release niacin primed circulating monocytes for a reduced postprandial pro-inflammatory profile. Our study underlines a role of postprandial TRLs as a metabolic entity in regulating the plasticity of the monocyte-macrophage lineage and also brings an understanding of the mechanisms by which dietary fatty acids are environmental factors fostering the innate immune responsiveness in humans. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Progastrin represses the alternative activation of human macrophages and modulates their influence on colon cancer epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hernández

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a negative prognostic factor for most cancers but gastrointestinal tumors seem to be an exception. The effect of macrophages on cancer progression depends on their phenotype, which may vary between M1 (pro-inflammatory, defensive to M2 (tolerogenic, pro-tumoral. Gastrointestinal cancers often become an ectopic source of gastrins and macrophages present receptors for these peptides. The aim of the present study is to analyze whether gastrins can affect the pattern of macrophage infiltration in colorectal tumors. We have evaluated the relationship between gastrin expression and the pattern of macrophage infiltration in samples from colorectal cancer and the influence of these peptides on the phenotype of macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in vitro. The total number of macrophages (CD68+ cells was similar in tumoral and normal surrounding tissue, but the number of M2 macrophages (CD206+ cells was significantly higher in the tumor. However, the number of these tumor-associated M2 macrophages correlated negatively with the immunoreactivity for gastrin peptides in tumor epithelial cells. Macrophages differentiated from human peripheral monocytes in the presence of progastrin showed lower levels of M2-markers (CD206, IL10 with normal amounts of M1-markers (CD86, IL12. Progastrin induced similar effects in mature macrophages treated with IL4 to obtain a M2-phenotype or with LPS plus IFNγ to generate M1-macrophages. Macrophages differentiated in the presence of progastrin presented a reduced expression of Wnt ligands and decreased the number and increased cell death of co-cultured colorectal cancer epithelial cells. Our results suggest that progastrin inhibits the acquisition of a M2-phenotype in human macrophages. This effect exerted on tumor associated macrophages may modulate cancer progression and should be taken into account when analyzing the therapeutic value of gastrin immunoneutralization.

  3. Human macrophages support persistent transcription from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Jeremy; Beddall, Margaret H.; Yu Dongyang; Iyer, Subashini R.; Marsh, Jon W.; Wu Yuntao

    2008-01-01

    Retroviruses require integration of their RNA genomes for both stability and productive viral replication. In HIV infection of non-dividing, resting CD4 T cells, where integration is greatly impeded, the reverse transcribed HIV DNA has limited biological activity and a short half-life. In metabolically active and proliferating T cells, unintegrated DNA rapidly diminishes with cell division. HIV also infects the non-dividing but metabolically active macrophage population. In an in vitro examination of HIV infection of macrophages, we find that unintegrated viral DNA not only has an unusual stability, but also maintains biological activity. The unintegrated linear DNA, 1-LTR, and 2-LTR circles are stable for at least 30 days. Additionally, there is persistent viral gene transcription, which is selective and skewed towards viral early genes such as nef and tat with highly diminished rev and vif. One viral early gene product Nef was measurably synthesized. We also find that independent of integration, the HIV infection process in macrophages leads to generation of numerous chemokines

  4. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health

  5. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Liu, Hao [Affiliated Cancer Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510095 (China); Wang, Hongsheng [Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Xu, Meiying, E-mail: xumy@gdim.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  6. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  7. Comparative effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors in febrile neutropenia prophylaxis: how results are affected by research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henk, Henry J; Li, Xiaoyan; Becker, Laura K; Xu, Hairong; Gong, Qi; Deeter, Robert G; Barron, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of research design on results in two published comparative effectiveness studies. Guidelines for comparative effectiveness research have recommended incorporating disease process in study design. Based on the recommendations, we develop a checklist of considerations and apply the checklist in review of two published studies on comparative effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors. Both studies used similar administrative claims data, but different methods, which resulted in directionally different estimates. Major design differences between the two studies include: whether the timing of intervention in disease process was identified and whether study cohort and outcome assessment period were defined based on this temporal relationship. Disease process and timing of intervention should be incorporated into the design of comparative effectiveness studies.

  8. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-17

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of octadecylamine-functionalized nanodiamond on primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, A E; Witherel, C E; Gogotsi, Y; Spiller, K L

    2017-09-26

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis are characterized by excessive pro-inflammatory or "M1" activation of macrophages, the primary cells of the innate immune system. Current treatments include delivery of glucocorticoids (e.g. dexamethasone - Dex), which reduce pro-inflammatory M1 behaviour in macrophages. However, these treatments have many off-target effects on cells other than macrophages, resulting in broad immunosuppression. To limit such side effects, drug-incorporated nano- and microparticles may be used to selectively target macrophages via phagocytosis, because of their roles as highly effective phagocytes in the body. In this study, surface-modified nanodiamond (ND) was explored as a platform for the delivery of dexamethasone to macrophages because of ND's rich surface chemistry, which contributes to ND's high potential as a versatile drug delivery platform. After finding that octadecylamine-functionalized nanodiamond (ND-ODA) enhanced adsorption of Dex compared to carboxylated ND, the effects of Dex, ND-ODA, and Dex-adsorbed ND-ODA on primary human macrophage gene expression were characterized. Surprisingly, even in the absence of Dex, ND-ODA had strong anti-inflammatory effects, as determined by multiplex gene expression via NanoString and by protein secretion analysis via ELISA. ND-ODA also inhibited expression of M2a markers yet increased the expression of M2c markers and phagocytic receptors. Interestingly, the adsorption of Dex to ND-ODA further increased some anti-inflammatory effects, but abrogated the effect on phagocytic receptors, compared to its individual components. Overall, the ability of ND-ODA to promote anti-inflammatory and pro-phagocytic behaviour in macrophages, even in the absence of loaded drugs, suggests its potential for use as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic to directly target macrophages through phagocytosis.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded BARF1 protein is a decoy receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor and interferes with macrophage differentiation and activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, Eveline K.; Le Large, Tessa Y. S.; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Oosterhoff, Dinja; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Greijer, Astrid E.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), like many other persistent herpes viruses, has acquired numerous mechanisms for subverting or evading immune surveillance. This study investigates the role of secreted EBV-encoded BARF1 protein (sBARF1) in creating an immune evasive microenvironment. Wild-type consensus

  11. Interleukin-3/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor promotes stem cell expansion, monocytosis, and atheroma macrophage burden in mice with hematopoietic ApoE deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Mi; Subramanian, Manikandan; Abramowicz, Sandra; Murphy, Andrew J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Witztum, Joseph; Welch, Carrie; Tabas, Ira; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is associated with monocytosis. Studies using animal models of monocytosis and atherosclerosis such as ApoE(-/-) mice have shown bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion, associated with increased cell surface expression of the

  12. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  13. Human CD68 promoter GFP transgenic mice allow analysis of monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif J; McNeill, Eileen; Kapellos, Theodore S; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Norman, Sophie; Burd, Sarah; Smart, Nicola; Machemer, Daniel E W; Stylianou, Elena; McShane, Helen; Channon, Keith M; Chawla, Ajay; Greaves, David R

    2014-10-09

    The recruitment of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages at sites of inflammation are key events in determining the outcome of the inflammatory response and initiating the return to tissue homeostasis. To study monocyte trafficking and macrophage differentiation in vivo, we have generated a novel transgenic reporter mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the human CD68 promoter. CD68-GFP mice express high levels of GFP in both monocyte and embryo-derived tissue resident macrophages in adult animals. The human CD68 promoter drives GFP expression in all CD115(+) monocytes of adult blood, spleen, and bone marrow; we took advantage of this to directly compare the trafficking of bone marrow-derived CD68-GFP monocytes to that of CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes in vivo using a sterile zymosan peritonitis model. Unlike CX3CR1(GFP) monocytes, which downregulate GFP expression on differentiation into macrophages in this model, CD68-GFP monocytes retain high-level GFP expression for 72 hours after differentiation into macrophages, allowing continued cell tracking during resolution of inflammation. In summary, this novel CD68-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource for analyzing monocyte mobilization and monocyte trafficking as well as studying the fate of recruited monocytes in models of acute and chronic inflammation. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. NOD2 enhances the innate response of alveolar macrophages to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Esmeralda; Carranza, Claudia; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; León-Contreras, Juan C; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Escobedo, Dante; Torres, Martha; Sada, Eduardo

    2012-04-01

    A role for the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) receptor in pulmonary innate immune responses has recently been explored. In the present study, we investigated the role that NOD2 plays in human alveolar macrophage innate responses and determined its involvement in the response to infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our results showed that NOD2 was expressed in human alveolar macrophages, and significant amounts of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were produced upon ligand recognition with muramyldipeptide (MDP). NOD2 ligation induced the transcription and protein expression of the antimicrobial peptide LL37 and the autophagy enzyme IRGM in alveolar macrophages, demonstrating a novel function for this receptor in these cells. MDP treatment of alveolar macrophages improved the intracellular growth control of virulent M. tuberculosis; this was associated with a significant release of TNF-α and IL-6 and overexpression of bactericidal LL37. In addition, the autophagy proteins IRGM, LC3 and ATG16L1 were recruited to the bacteria-containing autophagosome after treatment with MDP. In conclusion, our results suggest that NOD2 can modulate the innate immune response of alveolar macrophages and play a role in the initial control of respiratory M. tuberculosis infections. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.J.; Peters, F.P.; Mandigers, C.M.P.W.; Dercksen, M.W.; Stouthard, J.M.; Nortier, H.J.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Warmerdam, L.J. van; Wouw, A.J. van de; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Mattijssen, V.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Smilde, T.J.; Velden, A.W. van der; Temizkan, M.; Batman, E.; Muller, E.W.; Gastel, S.M. van; Borm, G.F.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  16. Primary Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prophylaxis During the First Two Cycles Only or Throughout All Chemotherapy Cycles in Patients With Breast Cancer at Risk for Febrile Neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Maureen J.; Peters, Frank P.; Mandigers, Caroline M.; Dercksen, M. Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M.; Nortier, Hans J.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W.; van Warmerdam, Laurence J.; van de Wouw, Agnes J.; Jacobs, Esther M.; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van der Velden, Annette W.; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W.; van Gastel, Saskia M.; Borm, George F.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  17. Dose intensity of standard adjuvant CMF with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Willemse, PHB; Bong, SB; Piersma, H; Tjabbes, T; vanVeelen, H; Coenen, JLLM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on total dose and dose intensity of standard oral adjuvant CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy were studied in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer. Treatment consisted of standard CMF

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  19. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  20. Degalactosylated/desialylated human serum containing GcMAF induces macrophage phagocytic activity and in vivo antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiike, Daisuke; Uto, Yoshihiro; Mukai, Hirotaka; Ishiyama, Noriko; Abe, Chiaki; Tanaka, Daichi; Kawai, Tomohito; Kubo, Kentaro; Mette, Martin; Inui, Toshio; Endo, Yoshio; Hori, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The group-specific component protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) has various biological activities, such as macrophage activation and antitumor activity. Clinical trials of GcMAF have been carried out for metastatic breast cancer, prostate cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. In this study, despite the complicated purification process of GcMAF, we used enzymatically-treated human serum containing GcMAF with a considerable macrophage-stimulating activity and antitumor activity. We detected GcMAF in degalactosylated/desialylated human serum by western blotting using an anti-human Gc globulin antibody, and Helix pomatia agglutinin lectin. We also found that GcMAF-containing human serum significantly enhanced the phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages and extended the survival time of mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumors. We demonstrated that GcMAF-containing human serum can be used as a potential macrophage activator for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Foamy macrophages and the progression of the human TB granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David G.; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Allain, Sophie; Altare, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    The progression of tuberculosis from a latent, sub-clinical infection to active disease that culminates in transmission of infectious bacilli is determined locally at the level of the granuloma. This progression takes place even in the face of a robust immune response that, while it contains infection, is unable to eliminate the bacterium. The factors or environmental conditions that influence this progression remain to be determined. Recent advances have indicated that pathogen-induced dysregulation of host lipid synthesis and sequestration plays a critical role in this transition. The foamy macrophage appears to be a key player in both sustaining persistent bacteria and contributing to the tissue pathology that leads to cavitation and release of infectious bacilli. PMID:19692995

  2. Cloning of a cDNA encoding chitotriosidase, a human chitinase produced by macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, R. G.; Renkema, G. H.; Strijland, A.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; Aerts, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have recently observed that chitotriosidase, a chitinolytic enzyme, is secreted by activated human macrophages and is markedly elevated in plasma of Gaucher disease patients (Hollak, C. E. M., van Weely, S., van Oers, M. H. J., and Aerts, J. M. F. G. (1994) J. Clin. Invest. 93, 1288-1292). Here,

  3. Tacaribe virus but not junin virus infection induces cytokine release from primary human monocytes and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Groseth

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV, in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation.

  4. Macrophage-specific nanotechnology-driven CD163 overexpression in human macrophages results in an M2 phenotype under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla Abigail; Bernal, Laura; Paige, Candler A; Grosick, Rachel L; Moracho Vilrriales, Carolina; Ferreira, David Wilson; Ulecia-Morón, Cristina; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    M1 macrophages release proinflammatory factors during inflammation. They transit to an M2 phenotype and release anti-inflammatory factors to resolve inflammation. An imbalance in the transition from M1 to M2 phenotype in macrophages contributes to the development of persistent inflammation. CD163, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family, is an M2 macrophage marker. The functional role of CD163 during the resolution of inflammation is not completely known. We postulate that CD163 contributes to the transition from M1 to M2 phenotype in macrophages. We induced CD163 gene in THP-1 and primary human macrophages using polyethylenimine nanoparticles grafted with a mannose ligand (Man-PEI). This nanoparticle specifically targets cells of monocytic origin via mannose receptors. Cells were challenged with a single or a double stimulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A CD163 or empty plasmid was complexed with Man-PEI nanoparticles for cell transfections. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and ELISAs were used for molecular assessments. CD163-overexpressing macrophages displayed reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α and monocytes chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 after a single stimulation with LPS. Following a double stimulation paradigm, CD163-overexpressing macrophages showed an increase of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1ra and a reduction of MCP-1. This anti-inflammatory phenotype was partially blocked by an anti-CD163 antibody (effects on IL-10 and IL-1ra). A decrease in the release of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 was observed in CD163-overexpressing human primary macrophages. The release of IL-6 was blocked by an anti-CD163 antibody in the CD163-overexpressing group. Our data show that the induction of the CD163 gene in human macrophages under inflammatory conditions produces changes in cytokine secretion in favor of an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Targeting macrophages to induce CD163 using cell-directed nanotechnology is an attractive

  5. Uptake and economic impact of first-cycle colony-stimulating factor use during adjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Dawn L; Wilde, Elizabeth T; Wright, Jason D; Buono, Donna L; Kalinsky, Kevin; Malin, Jennifer L; Neugut, Alfred I

    2012-03-10

    In 2002, pegfilgrastim was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the benefits of dose-dense breast cancer chemotherapy, especially for hormone receptor (HR) -negative tumors, were reported. We examined first-cycle colony-stimulating factor use (FC-CSF) before and after 2002 and estimated US expenditures for dose-dense chemotherapy. We identified patients in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare greater than 65 years old with stages I to III breast cancer who had greater than one chemotherapy claim within 6 months of diagnosis(1998 to 2005) and classified patients with an average cycle length less than 21 days as having received dose-dense chemotherapy. The associations of patient, tumor, and physician-related factors with the receipt of any colony-stimulating factor (CSF) and FC-CSF use were analyzed by using generalized estimating equations. CSF costs were estimated for patients who were undergoing dose-dense chemotherapy. Among the 10,773 patients identified, 5,266 patients (48.9%) had a CSF claim. CSF use was stable between 1998 and 2002 and increased from 36.8% to 73.7% between 2002 and 2005, FC-CSF use increased from 13.2% to 67.9%, and pegfilgrastim use increased from 4.1% to 83.6%. In a multivariable analysis, CSF use was associated with age and chemotherapy type and negatively associated with black/Hispanic race, rural residence, and shorter chemotherapy duration. FC-CSF use was associated with high socioeconomic status but not with age or race/ethnicity. The US annual CSF expenditure for women with HR-positive tumors treated with dose-dense chemotherapy is estimated to be $38.8 million. A rapid increase in FC-CSF use occurred over a short period of time, which was likely a result of the reported benefits of dose-dense chemotherapy and the ease of pegfilgrastim administration. Because of the increasing evidence that elderly HR-positive patients do not benefit from dose-dense chemotherapy, limiting pegfilgrastim use would combat

  6. The Reactive Oxygen Species in Macrophage Polarization: Reflecting Its Dual Role in Progression and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hor-Yue; Li, Sha; Hong, Ming; Wang, Xuanbin

    2016-01-01

    High heterogeneity of macrophage is associated with its functions in polarization to different functional phenotypes depending on environmental cues. Macrophages remain in balanced state in healthy subject and thus macrophage polarization may be crucial in determining the tissue fate. The two distinct populations, classically M1 and alternatively M2 activated, representing the opposing ends of the full activation spectrum, have been extensively studied for their associations with several disease progressions. Accumulating evidences have postulated that the redox signalling has implication in macrophage polarization and the key roles of M1 and M2 macrophages in tissue environment have provided the clue for the reasons of ROS abundance in certain phenotype. M1 macrophages majorly clearing the pathogens and ROS may be crucial for the regulation of M1 phenotype, whereas M2 macrophages resolve inflammation which favours oxidative metabolism. Therefore how ROS play its role in maintaining the homeostatic functions of macrophage and in particular macrophage polarization will be reviewed here. We also review the biology of macrophage polarization and the disturbance of M1/M2 balance in human diseases. The potential therapeutic opportunities targeting ROS will also be discussed, hoping to provide insights for development of target-specific delivery system or immunomodulatory antioxidant for the treatment of ROS-related diseases. PMID:27143992

  7. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV. C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA

  8. Benzo(a)pyrene activation and detoxification by human pulmonary alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.V.; McLemore, T.L.; Martin, R.R.; Marshall, M.H.; Wray, N.P.; Busbee, D.L.; Cantrell, E.T.; Arnott, M.S.; Griffin, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of pulmonary alveolar macrophages and circulating lymphocytes from five smokers and five nonsmokers for their ability to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography were carried out. Utilizing this approach, further investigation of activation and detoxification by several human cell types could provide the basis for more precise and comprehensive studies of carcinogen and drug metabolism in the human lung, and for a better assessment of cancer risk in selected populations

  9. Synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules expression by the irradiated human monocyte/macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pons, I.

    1997-09-01

    As lesions induced by ionizing radiations are essentially noticed in organs the functional and structural organisation of which depend on the highly proliferative stem cell pool, the author reports an in-vivo investigation of the effect of a gamma irradiation on the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines par human monocytes/macrophages. In order to study the role of the cell environment in the radiation-induced inflammation, the author studied whether a co-stimulation of monocytes/macrophages by gamma irradiation, or the exposure of co-cultures of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, could modulate the regulation of inflammatory cytokines. The author also studied the modulation of the expression of adhesion molecules mainly expressed by the monocyte/macrophage, and the membrane density of the CD14 receptor after irradiation of monocytes/macrophages during 24 hours, and of totally differentiated macrophages after seven days of culture

  10. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  11. Engineering a pharmacologically superior form of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by fusion with gelatin-like-protein polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Shan; Wen, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Yi-Liang; Wang, Ye-Fei; Fan, Min; Yang, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2010-03-01

    The plasma half-life of therapeutic proteins is a critical factor in many clinical applications. Therefore, new strategies to prolong plasma half-life of long-acting peptides and protein drugs are in high demand. Here, we designed an artificial gelatin-like protein (GLK) and fused this hydrophilic GLK polymer to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to generate a chimeric GLK/G-CSF fusion protein. The genetically engineered recombinant GLK/G-CSF (rGLK/G-CSF) fusion protein was purified from Pichia pastoris. In vitro studies demonstrated that rGLK/G-CSF possessed an enlarged hydrodynamic radius, improved thermal stability and retained full bioactivity compared to unfused G-CSF. Following a single subcutaneous administration to rats, the rGLK/G-CSF fusion protein displayed a slower plasma clearance rate and stimulated greater and longer lasting increases in circulating white blood cells than G-CSF. Our findings indicate that fusion with this artificial, hydrophilic, GLK polymer provides many advantages in the construction of a potent hematopoietic factor with extended plasma half-life. This approach could be easily applied to other therapeutic proteins and have important clinical applications. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Chelsea & Westminster TEN management protocol [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sica-Chapman, A; Williams, G; Soni, N; Bunker, C B

    2010-04-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life-threatening, allergic drug reaction. Skin blistering with epidermal and mucosal necrolysis with subsequent detachment from an inflamed underlying dermis is a hallmark of the condition. The pathogenesis of TEN is not well understood, accounting for controversies about its management and significant delay in initiating potentially beneficial therapy. There are no management protocols based on a robust evidence base. Prompt recognition of the diagnosis and consensus on early management initiatives are necessary in order to improve outcomes and survival in TEN. To date, TEN management has been directed at arresting the allergic reaction and treating the complications. We have identified a need for specific medical interventions to accelerate wound regeneration. This approach has not previously been adopted in the management of TEN. We observed that in two cases of severe TEN, dramatic re-epithelialization and recovery coincided with the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia. We explain how addition of the G-CSF promotes recovery from TEN by enhanced bioregeneration of the damaged tissues through accelerated re-epithelialization. G-CSF has been used for severe neutropenia in TEN, but we recommend and explain why, as in our Chelsea and Westminster protocol, G-CSF should be considered in treating severe TEN irrespective of the severity of neutropenia.

  14. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; He, Mei-Qing; Han, Xiang-Yu; Sun, Jing-Yi; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-Dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-Lei; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Zong-Yong; Zheng, Cheng-Bi; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  15. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lithium-stimulated recovery of granulopoiesis after sublethal irradiation is not mediated via increased levels of colony stimulating factor (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium accelerates the recovery of granulopoiesis following sublethal (2 Gy) whole body x-irradiation. Studies are described that further define this Li-mediated recovery by measuring the levels of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) present in serum from mice administered 105 μg/mouse (total dose) of ultra-pure Li 2 CO 3 for 3 days following irradiation. On days 1-28 following the last lithium dose, the serum was tested for its CSF activity against both normal non-adherent derived bone marrow target cells and non-adherent marrow cells from mice administered cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg body weight). Serum was assayed at 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10% final concentration. No significant difference in the total number of CFU-GM was observed from normal marrow using either serum from irradiated mice or lithium-treated and irradiated mice, although the irradiation did produce a 300% rise in CFU-GM colonies compared to normal serum (days 4 and 10-15). From regenerating marrow, a significant difference (P <= 0.01) was observed in CFU-GM cultured with serum at 0.1% concentration from irradiated and lithium-treated mice compared to irradiated mice without lithium. The presence of CSF was confirmed by its reduced activity in the presence of anti-(CSF). (U.K.)

  17. Enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in human helicobacter pylori-associated atrophic gastritis and in vaccinated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Quiding-Järbrink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori triggers a chronic gastric inflammation that can progress to atrophy and gastric adenocarcinoma. Polarization of macrophages is a characteristic of both cancer and infection, and may promote progression or resolution of disease. However, the role of macrophages and their polarization during H. pylori infection has not been well defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a mouse model of infection and gastric biopsies from 29 individuals, we have analyzed macrophage recruitment and polarization during H. pylori infection by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. We found a sequential recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages to the gastric mucosa of infected mice. Gene expression analysis of stomach tissue and sorted macrophages revealed that gastric macrophages were polarized to M1 after H. pylori infection, and this process was substantially accelerated by prior vaccination. Human H. pylori infection was characterized by a mixed M1/M2 polarization of macrophages. However, in H. pylori-associated atrophic gastritis, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was markedly increased compared to uncomplicated gastritis, indicative of an enhanced M1 macrophage polarization in this pre-malignant lesion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that vaccination of mice against H. pylori amplifies M1 polarization of gastric macrophages, and that a similar enhanced M1 polarization is present in human H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis.

  18. Hematopoietic growth factors and human acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, B; Touw, I

    1988-10-22

    The study of myelopoietic maturation arrest in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) has been eased by availability of the human recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte-(G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-(GM-CSF) and multilineage stimulating factor (IL-3). Nonphysiological expansion of the leukemic population is not due to escape from control by these factors. Proliferation in vitro of AML cells is dependent on the presence of one or several factors in most cases. The pattern of factor-dependency does not correlate with morphological criteria in individual cases, and may thus offer a new tool for classification of AML. Overproduction of undifferentiated cells is not due to abnormal expression of receptors for the stimulating factors acting at an immature level. Rather, autocrine secretion of early acting lymphokines maintains proliferation of the leukemic clone. When looking at causes of leukemic dysregulation, yet undefined inhibitors of differentiation probably are of equal importance as dysequilibrated stimulation by lymphokines.

  19. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages : similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; Ten Hacken, Nick H.; Jimenez, Viviana Cobos; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jorg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues.

  20. Genetic programs expressed in resting and IL-4 alternatively activated mouse and human macrophages: similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Fernando O.; Helming, Laura; Milde, Ronny; Varin, Audrey; Melgert, Barbro N.; Draijer, Christina; Thomas, Benjamin; Fabbri, Marco; Crawshaw, Anjali; Ho, Ling Pei; ten Hacken, Nick H.; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Hamann, Jörg; Greaves, David R.; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Gordon, Siamon

    2013-01-01

    The molecular repertoire of macrophages in health and disease can provide novel biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Th2-IL-4-activated macrophages (M2) have been associated with important diseases in mice, yet no specific markers are available for their detection in human tissues.

  1. Vitamin D Is Required for IFN-γ–Mediated Antimicrobial Activity of Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Mario; Stenger, Steffen; Shin, Dong-Min; Yuk, Jae-Min; Liu, Philip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Lee, Hye-Mi; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Schenk, Mirjam; Sieling, Peter A.; Teles, Rosane; Montoya, Dennis; Iyer, Shankar S.; Bruns, Heiko; Lewinsohn, David M.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Cheng, Genhong; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Control of tuberculosis worldwide depends on our understanding of human immune mechanisms, which combat the infection. Acquired T cell responses are critical for host defense against microbial pathogens, yet the mechanisms by which they act in humans remain unclear. We report that T cells, by the release of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), induce autophagy, phagosomal maturation, the production of antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin, and antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages via a vitamin D–dependent pathway. IFN-γ induced the antimicrobial pathway in human macrophages cultured in vitamin D–sufficient sera, but not in sera from African-Americans that have lower amounts of vitamin D and who are more susceptible to tuberculosis. In vitro supplementation of vitamin D–deficient serum with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 restored IFN-γ–induced antimicrobial peptide expression, autophagy, phagosome-lysosome fusion, and antimicrobial activity. These results suggest a mechanism in which vitamin D is required for acquired immunity to overcome the ability of intracellular pathogens to evade macrophage-mediated antimicrobial responses. The present findings underscore the importance of adequate amounts of vitamin D in all human populations for sustaining both innate and acquired immunity against infection. PMID:21998409

  2. The proliferative human monocyte subpopulation contains osteoclast precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Roya; Kitchener, Peter D; Hamilton, John A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Immediate precursors of bone-resorbing osteoclasts are cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Particularly during clinical conditions showing bone loss, it would appear that osteoclast precursors are mobilized from bone marrow into the circulation prior to entering tissues undergoing such loss. The observed heterogeneity of peripheral blood monocytes has led to the notion that different monocyte subpopulations may have special or restricted functions, including as osteoclast precursors. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted based upon their degree of proliferation and cultured in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Results The monocyte subpopulation that is capable of proliferation gave rise to significantly more multinucleated, bone-resorbing osteoclasts than the bulk of the monocytes. Conclusions Human peripheral blood osteoclast precursors reside in the proliferative monocyte subpopulation. PMID:19222861

  3. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood-optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment compared to

  4. Efficient internalization of mesoporous silica particles of different sizes by primary human macrophages without impairment of macrophage clearance of apoptotic or antibody-opsonized target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witasp, Erika; Kupferschmidt, Natalia; Bengtsson, Linnea; Hultenby, Kjell; Smedman, Christian; Paulie, Staffan; Garcia-Bennett, Alfonso E.; Fadeel, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage recognition and ingestion of apoptotic cell corpses, a process referred to as programmed cell clearance, is of considerable importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and in the resolution of inflammation. Moreover, macrophages are the first line of defense against microorganisms and other foreign materials including particles. However, there is sparse information on the mode of uptake of engineered nanomaterials by primary macrophages. In this study, mesoporous silica particles with cubic pore geometries and covalently fluorescein-grafted particles were synthesized through a novel route, and their interactions with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages were assessed. Efficient and active internalization of mesoporous silica particles of different sizes was observed by transmission electron microscopic and flow cytometric analysis and studies using pharmacological inhibitors suggested that uptake occurred through a process of endocytosis. Moreover, uptake of silica particles was independent of serum factors. The silica particles with very high surface areas due to their porous structure did not impair cell viability or function of macrophages, including the ingestion of different classes of apoptotic or opsonized target cells. The current findings are relevant to the development of mesoporous materials for drug delivery and other biomedical applications.

  5. Ocimum basilicum ethanolic extract decreases cholesterol synthesis and lipid accumulation in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Elena; Amrani, Souliman; Aziz, Mohammed; Harnafi, Hicham; Napolitano, Mariarosaria

    2008-12-01

    Macrophage lipid accumulation induced by low density lipoproteins (LDL) plays a pivotal role in atherosclerotic plaque development. Previous work showed that Ocimum basilicum extract, used as hypocholesterolemic agent by traditional medicine in Morocco, has hypolipidemic activity in rat acute hyperlipimidemia. This study investigated the effects of ethanolic extract of O. basilicum on lipid accumulation in human macrophages. As modification of LDL increase atherogenicity of the particles we evaluated the effects of the extract on LDL oxidation. The extract caused a dose-related increase of LDL-resistance to Cu(2+)-induced oxidation. Furthermore, at the dose of 60 microg/ml, significantly decreases the accumulation of macrophage lipid droplets induced by modified LDL evaluated as by red-oil staining. Cholesterol esterification and triacylglycerol synthesis in the cells were not affected. Macrophage treatment with 60 microg/ml, but not 20 microg/ml, of the extract reduced newly synthesized unesterified cholesterol by about 60% and decreased scavenger receptors activity by about 20-30%, evaluated by the internalization of cholesterol carried by [(3)H]CE-aggregated-LDL. The results suggest that O. basilicum ethanolic extract has the capability to reduce foam cell formation through the reduction of cholesterol synthesis and the modulation of the activity of surface scavenger receptors.

  6. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus dysregulates the expression of cytokines in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, F; Machado, J; Bertoni, G; Seow, H F; Dobbelaere, D A; Peterhans, E

    1997-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is a lentivirus of goats that leads to chronic mononuclear infiltration of various tissues, in particular, the radiocarpal joints. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the major host cells of CAEV in vivo. We have shown that infection of cultured goat macrophages with CAEV results in an alteration of cytokine expression in vitro. Constitutive expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) was increased in infected macrophages, whereas transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA was down-regulated. When macrophages were infected with a CAEV clone lacking the trans-acting nuclear regulatory gene tat, IL-8 and MCP-1 were also increased. No significant differences from cells infected with the wild-type clone were observed, suggesting that Tat is not required for the increased expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 in infected macrophages. Furthermore, infection with CAEV led to an altered pattern of cytokine expression in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes plus gamma interferon, or fixed cells of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. In infected macrophages, tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 mRNA expression was reduced in response to all stimuli tested whereas changes in expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor depended on the stimulating agent. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that, in contrast to effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection of macrophages, CAEV infection had no effect on the level of constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity or on the level of LPS-stimulated NF-kappaB activity, suggesting that NF-kappaB is not involved in altered regulation of cytokine expression in CAEV-infected cells. In contrast, activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding activity was decreased in infected macrophages. These data show that CAEV infection may result in a dysregulation of

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for febrile neutropenia prophylaxis following chemotherapy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Matt D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Febrile neutropenia (FN occurs following myelosuppressive chemotherapy and is associated with morbidity, mortality, costs, and chemotherapy reductions and delays. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs stimulate neutrophil production and may reduce FN incidence when given prophylactically following chemotherapy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim or lenograstim in reducing FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. G-CSFs were compared with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis and with one another. Nine databases were searched in December 2009. Meta-analysis used a random effects model due to heterogeneity. Results Twenty studies compared primary G-CSF prophylaxis with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis: five studies of pegfilgrastim; ten of filgrastim; and five of lenograstim. All three G-CSFs significantly reduced FN incidence, with relative risks of 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.65 for pegfilgrastim, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.69 for filgrastim, and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.88 for lenograstim. Overall, the relative risk of FN for any primary G-CSF prophylaxis versus no primary G-CSF prophylaxis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.62. In terms of comparisons between different G-CSFs, five studies compared pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. FN incidence was significantly lower for pegfilgrastim than filgrastim, with a relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.98. Conclusions Primary prophylaxis with G-CSFs significantly reduces FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. Pegfilgrastim reduces FN incidence to a significantly greater extent than filgrastim.

  9. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  10. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  11. Inhibition of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor early in disease ameliorates motor deficits in SCA1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenhui; Johnson, Andrea; Kim, Joo Hyun; Lukowicz, Abigail; Svedberg, Daniel; Cvetanovic, Marija

    2017-05-25

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the protein Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a fatal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor deficits, cerebellar neurodegeneration, and gliosis. Currently, there are no treatments available to delay or ameliorate SCA1. We have examined the effect of depleting microglia during the early stage of disease by using PLX, an inhibitor of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSFR1), on disease severity in a mouse model of SCA1. Transgenic mouse model of SCA1, ATXN1[82Q] mice, and wild-type littermate controls were treated with PLX from 3 weeks of age. The effects of PLX on microglial density, astrogliosis, motor behavior, atrophy, and gene expression of Purkinje neurons were examined at 3 months of age. PLX treatment resulted in the elimination of 70-80% of microglia from the cerebellum of both wild-type and ATXN1[82Q] mice. Importantly, PLX ameliorated motor deficits in SCA1 mice. While we have not observed significant improvement in the atrophy or disease-associated gene expression changes in Purkinje neurons upon PLX treatment, we have detected reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and increase in the protein levels of wild-type ataxin-1 and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) that may help improve PN function. A decrease in the number of microglia during an early stage of disease resulted in the amelioration of motor deficits in SCA1 mice.

  12. Is febrile neutropenia prophylaxis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors economically justified for adjuvant TC chemotherapy in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedgel, Chris; Rayson, Daniel; Younis, Tallal

    2016-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) during adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with morbidity, mortality risk, and substantial cost, and subsequent chemotherapy dose reductions may result in poorer outcomes. Patients at high risk of, or who develop FN, often receive prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF). We investigated whether different prophylaxis strategies with G-CSF offered favorable value-for-money. We developed a decision model to estimate the short- and long-term costs and outcomes of a hypothetical cohort of women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxotere + cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy. The short-term phase estimated upfront costs and FN risks with adjuvant TC chemotherapy without G-CSF prophylaxis (i.e., chemotherapy dose reductions) as well as with secondary and primary G-CSF prophylaxis strategies. The long-term phase estimated the expected costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for patients who completed adjuvant TC chemotherapy with or without one or more episodes of FN. Secondary G-CSF was associated with lower costs and greater QALY gains than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF appears likely to be cost-effective relative to secondary G-CSF at FN rates greater than 28%, assuming some loss of chemotherapy efficacy at lower dose intensities. The cost-effectiveness of primary vs. secondary G-CSF was sensitive to FN risk and mortality, and loss of chemotherapy efficacy following FN. Secondary G-CSF is more effective and less costly than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF may be justified at higher willingness-to-pay thresholds and/or higher FN risks, but this threshold FN risk appears to be higher than the 20% rate recommended by current clinical guidelines.

  13. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Combined with Methylprednisolone Improves Functional Outcomes in Rats with Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gemio Jacobsen Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and methylprednisolone in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats received a moderate spinal cord injury and were divided into four groups: control (no treatment; G-CSF (G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days; methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h; and G-CSF/Methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h and G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days. Functional evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score on days 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 following injury. Motor-evoked potentials were evaluated. Histological examination of the spinal cord lesion was performed immediately after euthanasia on day 42. RESULTS: Eight animals were excluded (2 from each group due to infection, a normal Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score at their first evaluation, or autophagy, and 32 were evaluated. The combination of methylprednisolone and G-CSF promoted greater functional improvement than methylprednisolone or G-CSF alone (p<0.001. This combination also exhibited a synergistic effect, with improvements in hyperemia and cellular infiltration at the injury site (p<0.001. The groups displayed no neurophysiological differences (latency p=0.85; amplitude p=0.75. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone plus G-CSF promotes functional and histological improvements superior to those achieved by either of these drugs alone when treating spinal cord contusion injuries in rats. Combining the two drugs did have a synergistic effect.

  14. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  15. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  16. Extension of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment Window by Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Thromboembolic Rat Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike C. dela Peña

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available When given beyond 4.5 h of stroke onset, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA induces deleterious side effects in the ischemic brain, notably, hemorrhagic transformation (HT. We examined the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in reducing delayed tPA-induced HT, cerebral infarction, and neurological deficits in a thromboembolic (TE stroke model, and whether the effects of G-CSF were sustained for longer periods of recovery. After stroke induction, rats were given intravenous saline (control, tPA (10 mg/kg, or G-CSF (300 μg/kg + tPA 6 h after stroke. We found that G-CSF reduced delayed tPA-associated HT by 47%, decreased infarct volumes by 33%, and improved motor and neurological deficits by 15% and 25%, respectively. It also prevented delayed tPA treatment-induced mortality by 46%. Immunohistochemistry showed 1.5- and 1.8-fold enrichment of the endothelial progenitor cell (EPC markers CD34+ and VEGFR2 in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, and 1.7- and 2.8-fold increases in the expression of the vasculogenesis marker von Willebrand factor (vWF in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, in G-CSF-treated rats compared with tPA-treated animals. Flow cytometry revealed increased mobilization of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of rats given G-CSF. These results corroborate the efficacy of G-CSF in enhancing the therapeutic time window of tPA for stroke treatment via EPC mobilization and enhancement of vasculogenesis.

  17. Influence of ER leak on resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ and receptor-mediated Ca2+ signalling in human macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layhadi, Janice A; Fountain, Samuel J

    2017-06-03

    Mechanisms controlling endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca 2+ homeostasis are important regulators of resting cytoplasmic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] cyto ) and receptor-mediated Ca 2+ signalling. Here we investigate channels responsible for ER Ca 2+ leak in THP-1 macrophage and human primary macrophage. In the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ we employ ionomycin action at the plasma membrane to stimulate ER Ca 2+ leak. Under these conditions ionomycin elevates [Ca 2+ ] cyto revealing a Ca 2+ leak response which is abolished by thapsigargin. IP 3 receptors (Xestospongin C, 2-APB), ryanodine receptors (dantrolene), and translocon (anisomycin) inhibition facilitated ER Ca 2+ leak in model macrophage, with translocon inhibition also reducing resting [Ca 2+ ] cyto . In primary macrophage, translocon inhibition blocks Ca 2+ leak but does not influence resting [Ca 2+ ] cyto . We identify a role for translocon-mediated ER Ca 2+ leak in receptor-mediated Ca 2+ signalling in both model and primary human macrophage, whereby the Ca 2+ response to ADP (P2Y receptor agonist) is augmented following anisomycin treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrate a role of ER Ca 2+ leak via the translocon in controlling resting cytoplasmic Ca 2+ in model macrophage and receptor-mediated Ca 2+ signalling in model macrophage and primary macrophage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unlike PPARγ, PPARα or PPARβ/δ activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPARγ promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPARβ/δ in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPARα. Here, we show that in contrast to PPARγ, expression of PPARα and PPARβ/δ overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPARγ, PPARα or PPARβ/δ activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPARα and PPARβ/δ do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Adcock, Ian M; Ricciardolo, Fabio L M; Varahram, Mohammad; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar; Folkerts, Gert; Garssen, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS) as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve) attenuate the development of 'allergic asthma' in animals but their effects in COPD are unknown. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on CS and Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. We stimulated the human macrophage cell line THP-1 with CS extract in the presence and absence of L. rhamnosus and B. breve and measured the expression and release of inflammatory mediators by RT-qPCR and ELISA respectively. An activity assay and Western blotting were used to examine NF-κB activation. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve were efficiently phagocytized by human macrophages. L. rhamnosus and B. breve significantly suppressed the ability of CS to induce the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-23, TNFα, CXCL-8 and HMGB1 release (all p<0.05) in human THP-1 macrophages. Similar suppression of TLR4- and TLR9-induced CXCL8 expression was also observed (p<0.05). The effect of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on inflammatory mediator release was associated with the suppression of CS-induced NF-κB activation (p<0.05). This data indicate that these probiotics may be useful anti-inflammatory agents in CS-associated disease such as COPD.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lactobacillus Rahmnosus and Bifidobacterium Breve on Cigarette Smoke Activated Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem with cigarette smoke (CS as the main risk factor for its development. Airway inflammation in COPD involves the increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as CXCL-8 and IL-1β which are important mediators for neutrophil recruitment. Macrophages are an important source of these mediators in COPD. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Befidobacterium breve (B. breve attenuate the development of 'allergic asthma' in animals but their effects in COPD are unknown.To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on CS and Toll-like receptor (TLR activation.We stimulated the human macrophage cell line THP-1 with CS extract in the presence and absence of L. rhamnosus and B. breve and measured the expression and release of inflammatory mediators by RT-qPCR and ELISA respectively. An activity assay and Western blotting were used to examine NF-κB activation.Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve were efficiently phagocytized by human macrophages. L. rhamnosus and B. breve significantly suppressed the ability of CS to induce the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-23, TNFα, CXCL-8 and HMGB1 release (all p<0.05 in human THP-1 macrophages. Similar suppression of TLR4- and TLR9-induced CXCL8 expression was also observed (p<0.05. The effect of L. rhamnosus and B. breve on inflammatory mediator release was associated with the suppression of CS-induced NF-κB activation (p<0.05.This data indicate that these probiotics may be useful anti-inflammatory agents in CS-associated disease such as COPD.

  1. Human macrophage scavenger receptors: Primary structure, expression, and localization in atherosclerotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akiyo; Itakura, Hiroshige; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Naito, Makoto; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Ikemoto, Shinji; Asaoka, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Ikuho; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kobari, Yukage; Miyai, Tatsuya; Cohen, E.H.; Wydro, R.; Housman, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of cDNAs for human macrophage scavenger receptors were cloned from a cDNA library derived from the phorbol ester-treated human monocytic cell line THP-1. The type I and type II human scavenger receptors encoded by these cDNAs are homologous (73% and 71% amino acid identity) to their previously characterized bovine counterparts and consist of six domains: cytoplasmic (I), membrane-spanning (II), spacer (III), α-helical coiled-coil (IV), collagen-like (V), and a type-specific C-terminal (VI). The receptor gene is located on human chromosome 8. The human receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells mediated endocytosis of modified low density lipoproteins. Two mRNAs, 4.0 and 3.2 kilobases, have been detected in human liver, placenta, and brain. Immunohistochemical studies using an anti-peptide antibody which recognizes human scavenger receptors indicated the presence of the scavenger receptors in the macrophages of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting the involvement of scavenger receptors in atherogenesis

  2. In vitro cytotoxicity of Manville Code 100 glass fibers: Effect of fiber length on human alveolar macrophages

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    Jones William

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs are inorganic noncrystalline materials widely used in residential and industrial settings for insulation, filtration, and reinforcement purposes. SVFs conventionally include three major categories: fibrous glass, rock/slag/stone (mineral wool, and ceramic fibers. Previous in vitro studies from our laboratory demonstrated length-dependent cytotoxic effects of glass fibers on rat alveolar macrophages which were possibly associated with incomplete phagocytosis of fibers ≥ 17 μm in length. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fiber length on primary human alveolar macrophages, which are larger in diameter than rat macrophages, using length-classified Manville Code 100 glass fibers (8, 10, 16, and 20 μm. It was hypothesized that complete engulfment of fibers by human alveolar macrophages could decrease fiber cytotoxicity; i.e. shorter fibers that can be completely engulfed might not be as cytotoxic as longer fibers. Human alveolar macrophages, obtained by segmental bronchoalveolar lavage of healthy, non-smoking volunteers, were treated with three different concentrations (determined by fiber number of the sized fibers in vitro. Cytotoxicity was assessed by monitoring cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase release and loss of function as indicated by a decrease in zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence. Results Microscopic analysis indicated that human alveolar macrophages completely engulfed glass fibers of the 20 μm length. All fiber length fractions tested exhibited equal cytotoxicity on a per fiber basis, i.e. increasing lactate dehydrogenase and decreasing chemiluminescence in the same concentration-dependent fashion. Conclusion The data suggest that due to the larger diameter of human alveolar macrophages, compared to rat alveolar macrophages, complete phagocytosis of longer fibers can occur with the human cells. Neither incomplete phagocytosis nor length-dependent toxicity was

  3. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

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    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages.Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp.HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Slimane, Mohamed-Naceur; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-01-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1β, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPARα and PPARγ, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPARα and γ isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1β-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPARα agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1β-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPARα -/- mice and treated with the PPARα agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by ∼ 50% in IL-1β-stimulated PPARα-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1β effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPARα and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies suggest that PPARα agonists may be used therapeutically, not only for lipid

  5. The transcriptome of Legionella pneumophila-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Christopher T D Price

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within alveolar macrophages through injection of ∼ 300 effector proteins by its Dot/Icm type IV translocation apparatus. The bona fide F-box protein, AnkB, is a nutritional virulence effector that triggers macrophages to generate a surplus of amino acids, which is essential for intravacuolar proliferation. Therefore, the ankB mutant represents a novel genetic tool to determine the transcriptional response of human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs to actively replicating L. pneumophila.Here, we utilized total human gene microarrays to determine the global transcriptional response of hMDMs to infection by wild type or the ankB mutant of L. pneumophila. The transcriptomes of hMDMs infected with either actively proliferating wild type or non-replicative ankB mutant bacteria were remarkably similar. The transcriptome of infected hMDMs was predominated by up-regulation of inflammatory pathways (IL-10 anti-inflammatory, interferon signaling and amphoterin signaling, anti-apoptosis, and down-regulation of protein synthesis pathways. In addition, L. pneumophila modulated diverse metabolic pathways, particularly those associated with bio-active lipid metabolism, and SLC amino acid transporters expression.Taken together, the hMDM transcriptional response to L. pneumophila is independent of intra-vacuolar replication of the bacteria and primarily involves modulation of the immune response and metabolic as well as nutritional pathways.

  6. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

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    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  7. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

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    Svantje Tauber

    Full Text Available The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes the functions of immune cells. The CELLBOX-PRIME (= CellBox-Primary Human Macrophages in Microgravity Environment experiment investigated for the first time microgravity-associated long-term alterations in primary human macrophages, one of the most important effector cells of the immune system. The experiment was conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on board of the International Space Station ISS using the NanoRacks laboratory and Biorack type I standard CELLBOX EUE type IV containers. Upload and download were performed with the SpaceX CRS-3 and the Dragon spaceship on April 18th, 2014 / May 18th, 2014. Surprisingly, primary human macrophages exhibited neither quantitative nor structural changes of the actin and vimentin cytoskeleton after 11 days in microgravity when compared to 1g controls. Neither CD18 or CD14 surface expression were altered in microgravity, however ICAM-1 expression was reduced. The analysis of 74 metabolites in the cell culture supernatant by GC-TOF-MS, revealed eight metabolites with significantly different quantities when compared to 1g controls. In particular, the significant increase of free fucose in the cell culture supernatant was associated with a significant decrease of cell surface-bound fucose. The reduced ICAM-1 expression and the loss of cell surface-bound fucose may contribute to functional impairments, e.g. the activation of T cells, migration and activation of the innate immune response. We assume that the surprisingly small

  8. Macrophages Contribute to the Spermatogonial Niche in the Adult Testis

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    Tony DeFalco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The testis produces sperm throughout the male reproductive lifespan by balancing self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs. Part of the SSC niche is thought to lie outside the seminiferous tubules of the testis; however, specific interstitial components of the niche that regulate spermatogonial divisions and differentiation remain undefined. We identified distinct populations of testicular macrophages, one of which lies on the surface of seminiferous tubules, in close apposition to areas of tubules enriched for undifferentiated spermatogonia. These macrophages express spermatogonial proliferation- and differentiation-inducing factors, such as colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 and enzymes involved in retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis. We show that transient depletion of macrophages leads to a disruption in spermatogonial differentiation. These findings reveal an unexpected role for macrophages in the spermatogonial niche in the testis and raise the possibility that macrophages play previously unappreciated roles in stem/progenitor cell regulation in other tissues.

  9. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use after Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Two Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrita D; Parmar, Sapna; Patel, Khilna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Phillips, Adrienne; Hsu, Jing-Mei; Niesvizky, Ruben; Mark, Tomer M; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; van Besien, Koen

    2018-02-01

    Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is generally recommended to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia; however, data regarding the optimal timing of G-CSFs post-transplantation are limited and conflicting. This retrospective study was performed at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center between November 5, 2013, and August 9, 2016, of adult inpatient autologous PBSCT recipients who received G-CSF empirically starting on day +5 (early) versus on those who received G-CSF on day +12 only if absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ANC-driven). G-CSF was dosed at 300 µg in patients weighing ANC-driven (n = 50) G-CSF regimen. Patient and transplantation characteristics were comparable in the 2 groups. In the ANC-driven group, 24% (n = 12) received G-CSF on day +12 and 60% (n = 30) started G-CSF earlier due to febrile neutropenia or at the physician's discretion, 6% (n = 3) started after day +12 at the physician's discretion, and 10% (n = 5) did not receive any G-CSF. The median start day of G-CSF therapy was day +10 in the ANC-driven group versus day +5 in the early group (P ANC-driven group (P = .07). There were no significant between-group differences in time to platelet engraftment, 1-year relapse rate, or 1-year overall survival. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 74% in the early group versus 90% in the ANC-driven group (P = .04); however, there was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of positive bacterial cultures or transfer to the intensive care unit. The duration of G-CSF administration until neutrophil engraftment was 6 days in the early group versus 3 days in the ANC-driven group (P ANC-driven group (P = .28). Our data show that early initiation of G-CSF (on day +5) and ANC-driven initiation of G-CSF following autologous PBSCT were associated with a similar time to neutrophil engraftment

  10. Evaluation of a nanotechnology-based approach to induce gene-expression in human THP-1 macrophages under inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Laura; Alvarado-Vázquez, Abigail; Ferreira, David Wilson; Paige, Candler A; Ulecia-Morón, Cristina; Hill, Bailey; Caesar, Marina; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-02-01

    Macrophages orchestrate the initiation and resolution of inflammation by producing pro- and anti-inflammatory products. An imbalance in these mediators may originate from a deficient or excessive immune response. Therefore, macrophages are valid therapeutic targets to restore homeostasis under inflammatory conditions. We hypothesize that a specific mannosylated nanoparticle effectively induces gene expression in human macrophages under inflammatory conditions without undesirable immunogenic responses. THP-1 macrophages were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5μg/mL). Polyethylenimine (PEI) nanoparticles grafted with a mannose receptor ligand (Man-PEI) were used as a gene delivery method. Nanoparticle toxicity, Man-PEI cellular uptake rate and gene induction efficiency (GFP, CD14 or CD68) were studied. Potential immunogenic responses were evaluated by measuring the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Man-PEI did not produce cytotoxicity, and it was effectively up-taken by THP-1 macrophages (69%). This approach produced a significant expression of GFP (mRNA and protein), CD14 and CD68 (mRNA), and transiently and mildly reduced IL-6 and IL-10 levels in LPS-challenged macrophages. Our results indicate that Man-PEI is suitable for inducing an efficient gene overexpression in human macrophages under inflammatory conditions with limited immunogenic responses. Our promising results set the foundation to test this technology to induce functional anti-inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced uptake of multiple sclerosis-derived myelin by THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia.

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    Hendrickx, Debbie A E; Schuurman, Karianne G; van Draanen, Michael; Hamann, Jörg; Huitinga, Inge

    2014-03-31

    The pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin phagocytosis. It remains unclear why microglia and macrophages demyelinate axons in MS, but previously found or yet-unknown changes in the myelin of MS patients could contribute to this process. We therefore studied whether myelin from normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of MS donors is phagocytosed more efficiently than myelin from control donors. Myelin was isolated from 11 MS and 12 control brain donors and labeled with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye pHrodo to quantify uptake in lysosomes. Phagocytosis by differentiated THP-1 macrophages and by primary human microglia was quantified with flow cytometry. Whereas myelin uptake by THP-1 macrophages reached a plateau after approximately 24 hours, uptake by primary human microglia showed an almost linear increase over a 72-hour period. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test. MS-derived myelin was phagocytosed more efficiently by THP-1 macrophages after 6-hour incubation (P = 0.001 for the percentage of myelin-phagocytosing cells and P = 0.0005 for total myelin uptake) and after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0001, respectively), and by microglia after 24-hour incubation (P = 0.0106 for total myelin uptake). This enhanced uptake was not due to differences in the oxidation status of the myelin. Interestingly, myelin phagocytosis correlated negatively with the age of myelin donors, whereas the age of microglia donors showed a positive trend with myelin phagocytosis. Myelin isolated from normal-appearing white matter of MS donors was phagocytosed more efficiently than was myelin isolated from control brain donors by both THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia. These data indicate that changes in MS myelin might precede phagocyte activation and subsequent demyelination in MS. Identifying these myelin changes responsible for enhancing phagocytic ability could be an interesting therapeutic target to

  12. Apoptotic death of Listeria monocytogenes-infected human macrophages induced by lactoferricin B, a bovine lactoferrin-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, C; Conte, M P; Ranaldi, S; Penta, M; Valenti, P; Tinari, A; Superti, F; Seganti, L

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular facultative food-borne pathogen, was reported to induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in a variety of cell types with the exception of murine macrophages. These cells represent the predominant compartment of bacterial multiplication and die as a result of necrosis. In this study we showed that human non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated macrophagic-like (THP-1) cells infected with L. monocytogenes, mainly die by necrosis rather than by an apoptotic process. Two natural products derived from bovine milk, lactoferrin and its derivative peptide lactoferricin B, are capable of regulating the fate of infected human macrophages. Bovine lactoferrin treatment of macrophages protects them from L. monocytogenes-induced death whereas lactoferricin B, its derivative peptide, determines a shifting of the equilibrium from necrosis to apoptosis.

  13. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted lactate induces M2-macrophage differentiation by metabolic reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civini, Sara; Pacelli, Consiglia; Dieng, Mame Massar; Lemieux, William; Jin, Ping; Bazin, Renée; Patey, Natacha; Marincola, Francesco M.; Moldovan, Florina; Zaouter, Charlotte; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Benabdhalla, Basma; Louis, Isabelle; Beauséjour, Christian; Stroncek, David; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to dampen immune response and promote tissue repair, but the underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. Herein, we demonstrate that umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) alter the phenotype and function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) through lactate-mediated metabolic reprogramming. UC-MSC can secrete large quantities of lactate and, when present during monocyte-to-DC differentiation, induce instead the acquisition of M2-macrophage features in terms of morphology, surface markers, migratory properties and antigen presentation capacity. Microarray expression profiling indicates that UC-MSC modify the expression of metabolic-related genes and induce a M2-macrophage expression signature. Importantly, monocyte-derived DC obtained in presence of UC-MSC, polarize naïve allogeneic CD4+ T-cells into Th2 cells. Treatment of UC-MSC with an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase strongly decreases lactate concentration in culture supernatant and abrogates the effect on monocyte-to-DC differentiation. Metabolic analysis further revealed that UC-MSC decrease oxidative phosphorylation in differentiating monocytes while strongly increasing the spare respiratory capacity proportional to the amount of secreted lactate. Because both MSC and monocytes are recruited in vivo at the site of tissue damage and inflammation, we propose the local increase of lactate concentration induced by UC-MSC and the consequent enrichment in M2-macrophage generation as a mechanism to achieve immunomodulation. PMID:27070086

  14. Interaction of differentiated human adipocytes with macrophages leads to trogocytosis and selective IL-6 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárvári, A K; Doan-Xuan, Q-M; Bacsó, Z; Csomós, I; Balajthy, Z; Fésüs, L

    2015-01-22

    Obesity leads to adipose tissue inflammation that is characterized by increased release of proinflammatory molecules and the recruitment of activated immune cells. Although macrophages are present in the highest number among the immune cells in obese adipose tissue, not much is known about their direct interaction with adipocytes. We have introduced an ex vivo experimental system to characterize the cellular interactions and the profile of secreted cytokines in cocultures of macrophages and human adipocytes differentiated from either mesenchymal stem cells or a preadipocyte cell line. As observed by time-lapse microscopy, flow, and laser-scanning cytometry, macrophages phagocytosed bites of adipocytes (trogocytosis), which led to their de novo, phagocytosis and NF-κB-dependent synthesis, then release of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. IL-6 secretion was not accompanied by secretion of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-8, except MCP-1. LPS-induced release of TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1 was decreased in the presence of the differentiated adipocytes but the IL-6 level did not subside suggesting that phagocytosis-dependent IL-6 secretion may have significant regulatory function in the inflamed adipose tissue.

  15. Quantification of sterol-specific response in human macrophages using automated imaged-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gater, Deborah L; Widatalla, Namareq; Islam, Kinza; AlRaeesi, Maryam; Teo, Jeremy C M; Pearson, Yanthe E

    2017-12-13

    The transformation of normal macrophage cells into lipid-laden foam cells is an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis. One major contributor to foam cell formation in vivo is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol. Here, we report the effects of various combinations of low-density lipoprotein, sterols, lipids and other factors on human macrophages, using an automated image analysis program to quantitatively compare single cell properties, such as cell size and lipid content, in different conditions. We observed that the addition of cholesterol caused an increase in average cell lipid content across a range of conditions. All of the sterol-lipid mixtures examined were capable of inducing increases in average cell lipid content, with variations in the distribution of the response, in cytotoxicity and in how the sterol-lipid combination interacted with other activating factors. For example, cholesterol and lipopolysaccharide acted synergistically to increase cell lipid content while also increasing cell survival compared with the addition of lipopolysaccharide alone. Additionally, ergosterol and cholesteryl hemisuccinate caused similar increases in lipid content but also exhibited considerably greater cytotoxicity than cholesterol. The use of automated image analysis enables us to assess not only changes in average cell size and content, but also to rapidly and automatically compare population distributions based on simple fluorescence images. Our observations add to increasing understanding of the complex and multifactorial nature of foam-cell formation and provide a novel approach to assessing the heterogeneity of macrophage response to a variety of factors.

  16. Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Gemelli, Claudia; Pirondi, Sara; Testa, Anna; Montanari, Monica; Parenti, Sandra; Tenedini, Elena; Grande, Alexis; Ferrari, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage

  17. Imatinib and Nilotinib Off-Target Effects on Human NK Cells, Monocytes, and M2 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellora, Francesca; Dondero, Alessandra; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Casu, Beatrice; Regis, Stefano; Caliendo, Fabio; Moretta, Alessandro; Cazzola, Mario; Elena, Chiara; Vinti, Luciana; Locatelli, Franco; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta

    2017-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used in the clinical management of hematological neoplasms. Moreover, in solid tumors such as stage 4 neuroblastomas (NB), imatinib showed benefits that might depend on both on-target and immunological off-target effects. We investigated the effects of imatinib and nilotinib on human NK cells, monocytes, and macrophages. High numbers of monocytes died upon exposure to TKI concentrations similar to those achieved in patients. Conversely, NK cells were highly resistant to the TKI cytotoxic effect, were properly activated by immunostimulatory cytokines, and degranulated in the presence of NB cells. In NB, neither drug reduced the expression of ligands for activating NK receptors or upregulated that of HLA class I, B7-H3, PD-L1, and PD-L2, molecules that might limit NK cell function. Interestingly, TKIs modulated the chemokine receptor repertoire of immune cells. Acting at the transcriptional level, they increased the surface expression of CXCR4, an effect observed also in NK cells and monocytes of patients receiving imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia. Moreover, TKIs reduced the expression of CXCR3 (in NK cells) and CCR1 (in monocytes). Monocytes also decreased the expression of M-CSFR, and low numbers of cells underwent differentiation toward macrophages. M0 and M2 macrophages were highly resistant to TKIs and maintained their phenotypic and functional characteristics. Importantly, also in the presence of TKIs, the M2 immunosuppressive polarization was reverted by TLR engagement, and M1-oriented macrophages fully activated autologous NK cells. Our results contribute to better interpreting the off-target efficacy of TKIs in tumors and to envisaging strategies aimed at facilitating antitumor immune responses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Viral Inhibition of Bacterial Phagocytosis by Human Macrophages: Redundant Role of CD36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E Cooper

    Full Text Available Macrophages are essential to maintaining lung homoeostasis and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-infected lung macrophages downregulate their expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. This receptor has also been shown to be involved in phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a primary agent associated with pneumonia secondary to viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD36 in the effects of viral infection on macrophage phagocytic function. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were exposed to H3N2 X31 influenza virus, M37 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV or UV-irradiated virus. No infection of MDM was seen upon exposure to UV-irradiated virus but incubation with live X31 or M37 resulted in significant levels of viral detection by flow cytometry or RT-PCR respectively. Infection resulted in significantly diminished uptake of S. pneumoniae by MDM and significantly decreased expression of CD36 at both the cell surface and mRNA level. Concurrently, there was a significant increase in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection and we observed a significant decrease in bacterial phagocytosis (p = 0.031 and CD36 gene expression (p = 0.031 by MDM cultured for 24 h in 50IU/ml IFNβ. Knockdown of CD36 by siRNA resulted in decreased phagocytosis, but this was mimicked by transfection reagent alone. When MDM were incubated with CD36 blocking antibodies no effect on phagocytic ability was observed. These data indicate that autologous IFNβ production by virally-infected cells can inhibit bacterial phagocytosis, but that decreased CD36 expression by these cells does not play a major role in this functional deficiency.

  19. The influence of macrophage growth factors on Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV) infection and activation of macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Karin M; Watson, Neva B; Minchenberg, Scott B; Massa, Paul T

    2018-02-01

    Macrophages are common targets for infection and innate immune activation by many pathogenic viruses including the neurotropic Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV). As both infection and innate activation of macrophages are key determinants of viral pathogenesis especially in the central nervous system (CNS), an analysis of macrophage growth factors on these events was performed. C3H mouse bone-marrow cells were differentiated in culture using either recombinant macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), inoculated with TMEV (BeAn) and analyzed at various times thereafter. Cytokine RNA and protein analysis, virus titers, and flow cytometry were performed to characterize virological parameters under these culture conditions. GM-CSF-differentiated macrophages showed higher levels of TMEV viral RNA and proinflammatory molecules compared to infected M-CSF-differentiated cells. Thus, GM-CSF increases both TMEV infection and TMEV-induced activation of macrophages compared to that seen with M-CSF. Moreover, while infectious viral particles decreased from a peak at 12h to undetectable levels at 48h post infection, TMEV viral RNA remained higher in GM-CSF- compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages in concert with increased proinflammatory gene expression. Analysis of a possible basis for these differences determined that glycolytic rates contributed to heightened virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in GM-CSF compared to M-CSF-differentiated macrophages. In conclusion, we provide evidence implicating a role for GM-CSF in promoting virus replication and proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages, indicating that GM-CSF may be a key factor for TMEV infection and the induction of chronic TMEV-induced immunopathogenesis in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis decreases human macrophage IFN-γ responsiveness through miR-132 and miR-26a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Lafuse, William P; Landes, Michelle B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2014-11-01

    IFN-γ-activated macrophages play an essential role in controlling intracellular pathogens; however, macrophages also serve as the cellular home for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on previous evidence that M. tuberculosis can modulate host microRNA (miRNA) expression, we examined the miRNA expression profile of M. tuberculosis-infected primary human macrophages. We identified 31 differentially expressed miRNAs in primary human macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection by NanoString and confirmed our findings by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In addition, we determined a role for two miRNAs upregulated upon M. tuberculosis infection, miR-132 and miR-26a, as negative regulators of transcriptional coactivator p300, a component of the IFN-γ signaling cascade. Knockdown expression of miR-132 and miR-26a increased p300 protein levels and improved transcriptional, translational, and functional responses to IFN-γ in human macrophages. Collectively, these data validate p300 as a target of miR-132 and miR-26a, and demonstrate a mechanism by which M. tuberculosis can limit macrophage responses to IFN-γ by altering host miRNA expression. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Characterization of the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of a triterpene saponin, securioside B against BAC1.2F5 macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yui

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the growth state of macrophages in local pathological sites is considered a factor that regulates the processes of many disease, such as tumors, inflammation, and atherosclerosis, the substances that regulate macrophage growth or survival may be useful for disease control. We previously reported that securiosides A and B, novel triterpene saponins, exerted macrophage-oriented cytotoxicity in the presence of a L-cell-conditioned medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, while the compounds did not exhibit an effect on macrophages in the absence of the growth-stimulating factors.

  2. Comparison of different methods of osmotic shocks for extraction of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor produced in periplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Peymanfar

    2018-06-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Regarding the results, it is concluded that the MgSO4 with Tris buffer create a good osmotic pressure and accordingly is a more effective way for G-CSF protein extraction. As a result, this method could be used for production and simple separation of recombinant drug proteins.

  3. Hematologic effects of subcutaneous administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) in healthy alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Erica C; Tornquist, Susan J; Gorman, M Elena; Cebra, Christopher K; Payton, Mark E

    2008-06-01

    To determine the effects of SC administration of filgrastim on cell counts in venous blood and bone marrow of healthy adult alpacas. 10 healthy alpacas. Alpacas were randomly assigned to receive treatment with filgrastim (5 microg/kg, SC; n=5) or an equivalent volume of physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (5) once a day for 3 days. Blood samples were obtained via jugular venipuncture 1 day prior to treatment and once a day for 5 days commencing 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Complete blood counts were performed for each blood sample. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the sternum of each alpaca 48 hours before the first treatment was administered and 72 hours after the third treatment was administered. Myeloid-to-erythroid cell (M:E) ratio was determined via cytologic evaluation of bone marrow aspirates. In filgrastim-treated alpacas, substantial increases in counts of WBCs and neutrophils were detected within 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Band cell count and percentage significantly increased 24 hours after the second dose. Counts of WBCs, neutrophils, and band cells remained high 48 hours after the third dose. Red blood cell counts and PCV were unaffected. The M:E ratio also increased significantly after treatment with filgrastim. Filgrastim induced rapid and substantial increases in numbers of circulating neutrophils and M:E ratios of bone marrow in healthy alpacas. Therefore, filgrastim may be useful in the treatment of camelids with impaired bone marrow function.

  4. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases circulating CD34-postive cells in patients with AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Dam-Larsen, S; Nielsen, C

    1997-01-01

    G-CSF for 3-5 consecutive days. Within 5 days of initiation of G-CSF therapy, an increase in the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was seen in all patients. There was a median increase in ANC from 0.4 to 3.4 x 10(9)/l. In addition, G-CSF treatment significantly increased the absolute number of CD34...

  5. Osteogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells by CO2 laser-treatment stimulating macrophages via BMP2 signalling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-01-01

    Immune reactions play an important role in determining the biostimulation of bone formation, either in new bone formation or inflammatory fibrous tissue encapsulation. Macrophage cell, the important effector cells in the immune reaction, which are indispensable for osteogenesis and their heterogeneity and plasticity, render macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. However, there are very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteogenesis. In this study, we used CO 2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of macrophage cells on the CO 2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was also significantly up regulated by the CO 2 laser stimulation, indicating that macrophage may participate in the CO 2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when laser treatment macrophage-conditioned medium were applied to human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs), the osteogenesis differentiation of hPDLs was significantly enhanced, indicating the important role of macrophages in CO 2 laser-induced osteogenesis. These findings provided valuable insights into the mechanism of CO 2 laser-stimulated osteogenic differentiation, and a strategy to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of laser treatment. (paper)

  6. Soluble immune complexes shift the TLR-induced cytokine production of distinct polarized human macrophage subsets towards IL-10.

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    Carmen A Ambarus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Costimulation of murine macrophages with immune complexes (ICs and TLR ligands leads to alternative activation. Studies on human myeloid cells, however, indicate that ICs induce an increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. This study aimed to clarify the effect of ICs on the pro- versus anti-inflammatory profile of human polarized macrophages. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors were polarized for four days with IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, or LPS, in the presence or absence of heat aggregated gamma-globulins (HAGGs. Phenotypic polarization markers were measured by flow cytometry. Polarized macrophages were stimulated with HAGGs or immobilized IgG alone or in combination with TLR ligands. TNF, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-23 were measured by Luminex and/or RT-qPCR. RESULTS: HAGGs did not modulate the phenotypic polarization and the cytokine production of macrophages. However, HAGGs significantly altered the TLR-induced cytokine production of all polarized macrophage subsets, with the exception of MΦ(IL-4. In particular, HAGGs consistently enhanced the TLR-induced IL-10 production in both classically and alternatively polarized macrophages (M1 and M2. The effect of HAGGs on TNF and IL-6 production was less pronounced and depended on the polarization status, while IL-23p19 and IL-12p35 expression was not affected. In contrast with HAGGs, immobilized IgG induced a strong upregulation of not only IL-10, but also TNF and IL-6. CONCLUSION: HAGGs alone do not alter the phenotype and cytokine production of in vitro polarized human macrophages. In combination with TLR-ligands, however, HAGGs but not immobilized IgG shift the cytokine production of distinct macrophage subsets toward IL-10.

  7. Extracellular Purine Metabolism Is the Switchboard of Immunosuppressive Macrophages and a Novel Target to Treat Diseases With Macrophage Imbalances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ohradanova-Repic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available If misregulated, macrophage (Mϕ–T cell interactions can drive chronic inflammation thereby causing diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We report that in a proinflammatory environment, granulocyte-Mϕ (GM-CSF- and Mϕ colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF-dependent Mϕs have dichotomous effects on T cell activity. While GM-CSF-dependent Mϕs show a highly stimulatory activity typical for M1 Mϕs, M-CSF-dependent Mϕs, marked by folate receptor β (FRβ, adopt an immunosuppressive M2 phenotype. We find the latter to be caused by the purinergic pathway that directs release of extracellular ATP and its conversion to immunosuppressive adenosine by co-expressed CD39 and CD73. Since we observed a misbalance between immunosuppressive and immunostimulatory Mϕs in human and murine arthritic joints, we devised a new strategy for RA treatment based on targeted delivery of a novel methotrexate (MTX formulation to the immunosuppressive FRβ+CD39+CD73+ Mϕs, which boosts adenosine production and curtails the dominance of proinflammatory Mϕs. In contrast to untargeted MTX, this approach leads to potent alleviation of inflammation in the murine arthritis model. In conclusion, we define the Mϕ extracellular purine metabolism as a novel checkpoint in Mϕ cell fate decision-making and an attractive target to control pathological Mϕs in immune-mediated diseases.

  8. Efficacy, safety and proper dose analysis of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as support for dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy in node positive Chinese breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; LingHu, RuiXia; Zhan, XingYang; Li, Ruisheng; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Junlan

    2017-01-01

    For high-risk breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes, dose-dense every-two-week epirubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (ddEC-P) regimen is the optimal postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, this regimen is limited by the grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). There is an urgent need to explore the efficacy, safety and proper dosage of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) as support for ddEC-P in Chinese breast cancer patients with posit...

  9. Increased Frequency of Peripheral B and T Cells Expressing Granulocyte Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Makris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesGranulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is currently considered a crucial inflammatory mediator and a novel therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, despite the fact that its precise cellular sources remain uncertain. We studied the expression of GM-CSF in peripheral lymphocytes from RA patients and its change with antirheumatic therapies.MethodsIntracellular GM-CSF expression was assessed by flow cytometry in stimulated peripheral B (CD19+ and T (CD3+ cells from RA patients (n = 40, disease (n = 31 including osteoarthritis n = 15, psoriatic arthritis n = 10, and systemic rheumatic diseases n = 6 and healthy (n = 16 controls. The phenotype of GM-CSF+ B cells was assessed as well as longitudinal changes in GM-CSF+ lymphocytes during methotrexate (MTX, n = 10 or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF, n = 10 therapy.ResultsAmong untreated RA patients with active disease (Disease Activity Score 28-C-reactive protein = 5.6 ± 0.89 an expanded population of peripheral GM-CSF+ B (4.1 ± 2.2% and T (3.4 ± 1.6% cells was detected compared with both disease (1.7 ± 0.9%, p < 0.0001 and 1.7 ± 1.3%, p < 0.0001, respectively and healthy (0.3 ± 0.2%, p < 0.0001 and 0.6 ± 0.6%, p < 0.0001 controls. RA GM-CSF+ B cells displayed more commonly a plasmablast or transitional phenotype (37.12 ± 18.34% vs. 14.26 ± 9.46%, p = 0.001 and 30.49 ± 15.04% vs. 2.45 ± 1.84%, p < 0.0001, respectively and less a memory phenotype (21.46 ± 20.71% vs. 66.99 ± 16.63%, p < 0.0001 compared to GM-CSF− cells. GM-CSF expression in RA patients did not correlate to disease duration, activity or serological status. Anti-TNF treatment led to a statistically significant decrease in GM-CSF+ B and T cells while MTX had no significant effect.DiscussionThis is the first study showing an expanded population of GM-CSF+ B and T lymphocytes

  10. Cord blood-derived macrophage-lineage cells rapidly stimulate osteoblastic maturation in mesenchymal stem cells in a glycoprotein-130 dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania J Fernandes

    Full Text Available In bone, depletion of osteoclasts reduces bone formation in vivo, as does osteal macrophage depletion. How osteoclasts and macrophages promote the action of bone forming osteoblasts is, however, unclear. Since recruitment and differentiation of multi-potential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSC generates new active osteoblasts, we investigated whether human osteoclasts and macrophages (generated from cord blood-derived hematopoietic progenitors induce osteoblastic maturation in adipose tissue-derived MSC. When treated with an osteogenic stimulus (ascorbate, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate these MSC form matrix-mineralising, alkaline phosphatase-expressing osteoblastic cells. Cord blood-derived progenitors were treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF to form immature proliferating macrophages, or with M-CSF plus receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL to form osteoclasts; culture medium was conditioned for 3 days by these cells to study their production of osteoblastic factors. Both osteoclast- and macrophage-conditioned medium (CM greatly enhanced MSC osteoblastic differentiation in both the presence and absence of osteogenic medium, evident by increased alkaline phosphatase levels within 4 days and increased mineralisation within 14 days. These CM effects were completely ablated by antibodies blocking gp130 or oncostatin M (OSM, and OSM was detectable in both CM. Recombinant OSM very potently stimulated osteoblastic maturation of these MSC and enhanced bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 actions on MSC. To determine the influence of macrophage activation on this OSM-dependent activity, CM was collected from macrophage populations treated with M-CSF plus IL-4 (to induce alternative activation or with GM-CSF, IFNγ and LPS to cause classical activation. CM from IL-4 treated macrophages stimulated osteoblastic maturation in MSC, while CM from classically-activated macrophages did not. Thus, macrophage-lineage cells

  11. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  12. Triglyceride-rich lipoprotein regulates APOB48 receptor gene expression in human THP-1 monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Beatriz; Lopez, Sergio; Varela, Lourdes M; Ortega, Almudena; Pacheco, Yolanda M; Moreda, Wenceslao; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2012-02-01

    The postprandial metabolism of dietary fats implies that the production of TG-rich lipoproteins (TRL) contributes to the progression of plaque development. TRL and their remnants cause rapid receptor-mediated monocyte/macrophage lipid engorgement via the cell surface apoB48 receptor (apoB48R). However, the mechanistic basis for apoB48 receptor (APOB48R) regulation by postprandial TRL in monocytes and macrophages is not well established. In this study, we investigated the effects of postprandial TRL from healthy volunteers on the expression of APOB48R mRNA and lipid uptake in human THP-1 monocytes and THP-1-derived macrophages. The expression of APOB48R mRNA was upregulated in THP-1 monocytes, but downregulated in THP-1-derived macrophages when treated with postprandial TRL (P < 0.05), in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TG and free cholesterol were dramatically increased in THP-1-derived macrophages (140 and 50%, respectively; P < 0.05) and in THP-1 monocytes (160 and 95%, respectively; P < 0.05). This lipid accumulation was severely decreased (~50%; P < 0.05) in THP-1-derived macrophages by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting of APOB48R. Using PPAR and retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists, antagonists, and siRNA, our data indicate that PPARα, PPARγ, and RXRα are involved in postprandial TRL-induced APOB48R transcriptional regulation. Co-incubation with acyl-CoA synthetase or acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitors potentiated the effects of postprandial TRL on the expression of APOB48R mRNA in THP-1 monocytes and THP-1-derived macrophages. Our findings collectively suggest that APOB48R represents a molecular target of postprandial TRL via PPAR-dependent pathways in human THP-1 monocytes and macrophages and advance a potentially important link between postprandial metabolism of dietary fats and atherogenesis.

  13. A role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8{sup +} T cell responses to rabies virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8{sup +} T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8{sup +} T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8{sup +} T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8{sup +} T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  14. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and sucralfate in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, Tuula A.; Minn, Heikki; Jekunen, Antti; Vilja, Pekka; Tuominen, Juhani; Joensuu, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subcutaneously given molgramostim (GM-CSF) and sucralfate mouth washings to sucralfate mouth washings in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty head and neck cancer patients were randomly assigned to use either GM-CSF and sucralfate (n = 20) or sucralfate alone (n = 20) during radiotherapy. Sucralfate was used as 1.0 g mouth washing 6 times daily after the first 10 Gy of radiotherapy, and 150-300 μg GM-CSF was given subcutaneously. The grade of radiation mucositis and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Salivary lactoferrin was measured as a surrogate marker for oral mucositis. Results: We found no significant difference between the molgramostim and the control groups in the oral mucositis grade, oral pain, use of analgesic drugs, weight loss, or survival. The median maximum neutrophil counts (median, 9.2 x 10 9 /L vs. 5.9 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0005), eosinophil counts (median, 1.3 x 10 9 /L vs. 0.2 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0004), and salivary lactoferrin concentrations were higher in patients who received GM-CSF. The most common toxicities in the GM-CSF plus sucralfate group were skin reactions at the GM-CSF injection site (65%), fever (30%), bone pain (25%), and nausea (15%), whereas the toxicity of sucralfate given alone was minimal. Conclusion: We found no evidence indicating that subcutaneously given GM-CSF reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis

  15. Efficacy and safety of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the frequency and severity of radiation mucositis in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, V.; Bapsy, Poonamallee P.; Anantha, Naranappa; Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Vaithianathan, Hema; Banumathy, G.; Reddy, Krishnamurthy B.; Kumaraswamy, Saklaspur Veerappaiah; Shenoy, Ashok Mohan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the clinical evidence of mucosal protection by GM-CSF during cytotoxic chemotherapy, a pilot study was undertaken to determine the safety and mucosal reaction of patients receiving GM-CSF while undergoing definitive conventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients were considered eligible if buccal mucosa and oropharynx were included in the teleradiation field. Ten adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (buccal mucosa--8 and posterior (1(3)) tongue--2) were entered into the trial. Radiation therapy was delivered with telecobalt machine at conventional 2 Gy fraction and 5 fractions/week. The radiation portals consisted of two parallel opposing lateral fields. GM-CSF was given subcutaneously at a dose of 1 μg/kg body weight, daily, after 20 Gy until the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated daily for mucosal reaction, pain, and functional impairment. Results: The median radiation dose was 66 Gy. Eight patients received ≥60 Gy. The tolerance to GM-CSF was good. All 10 patients completed the planned daily dose of GM-CSF without interruption. Mucosal toxicity was Grade I in four patients till the completion of radiotherapy (dose range 50-66 Gy). Six patients developed Grade II reaction, fibrinous mucosal lesions of maximum size 1.0-1.5 cm, during radiotherapy. None developed Grade III mucositis. The maximum mucosal pain was Grade I during GM-CSF therapy. In two patients after starting GM-CSF the pain reduced in intensity. Functional impairment was mild to moderate. All patients were able to maintain adequate oral intake during the treatment period. Total regression of mucosal reaction occurred within 8 days following completion of radiotherapy. Conclusions: GM-CSF administration concurrently with conventional fractionated radiotherapy was feasible without significant toxicity. The acute side effects of radiotherapy namely mucositis, pain, and functional impairment were nil to minimal. The results are suggestive of mucosal protection by GM-CSF during radiotherapy and warrants further study in randomized double blind trial

  16. A role for granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to rabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8 + T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8 + T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8 + T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8 + T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  17. Value of different modalities of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor applied during or after induction therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, B; Boogaerts, MA; Daenen, SMGJ; Verhoef, GEG; Hagenbeek, A; Vellenga, E; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Huijgens, PC; Verdonck, LF; vanderLelie, J; Wielenga, JJ; Gmur, J; Gratwohl, A; Hess, U; Fey, MF; vanPutten, WLJ

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) introduced into induction chemotherapy (CT) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) might be of benefit to treatment outcome by at least two mechanisms. HGFs given on days simultaneously with CT might sensitize the leukemic cells and enhance their

  18. OVX1, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and CA-125-II as tumor markers for epithelial ovarian carcinoma - A critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaften-Day, C; Shen, Y; Xu, FJ; Yu, YH; Berchuck, A; Havrilesky, LJ; de Bruijn, HWA; van der Zee, AGJ; Bast, RC; Hacker, NF

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Ovarian carcinoma remains the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in Australia, the Netherlands, and the United States. CA-125-II, the most widely used serum marker, has limited sensitivity and specificity for detecting small-volume, early-stage disease. Therefore, a panel

  19. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Singh

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human

  20. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulatory factor enhances the pro-inflammatory response of interferon-γ-treated macrophages to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonali; Barr, Helen; Liu, Yi-Chia; Robins, Adrian; Heeb, Stephan; Williams, Paul; Fogarty, Andrew; Cámara, Miguel; Martínez-Pomares, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections at compromised epithelial surfaces, such those found in burns, wounds, and in lungs damaged by mechanical ventilation or recurrent infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. CF patients have been proposed to have a Th2 and Th17-biased immune response suggesting that the lack of Th1 and/or over exuberant Th17 responses could contribute to the establishment of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and deterioration of lung function. Accordingly, we have observed that interferon (IFN)-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CF patients positively correlated with lung function, particularly in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. In contrast, IL-17A levels tended to correlate negatively with lung function with this trend becoming significant in patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. These results are in agreement with IFN-γ and IL-17A playing protective and detrimental roles, respectively, in CF. In order to explore the protective effect of IFN-γ in CF, the effect of IFN-γ alone or in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), on the ability of human macrophages to control P. aeruginosa growth, resist the cytotoxicity induced by this bacterium or promote inflammation was investigated. Treatment of macrophages with IFN-γ, in the presence and absence of GM-CSF, failed to alter bacterial growth or macrophage survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, but changed the inflammatory potential of macrophages. IFN-γ caused up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and TNF-α and down-regulation of IL-10 expression by infected macrophages. GM-CSF in combination with IFN-γ promoted IL-6 production and further reduction of IL-10 synthesis. Comparison of TNF-α vs. IL-10 and IL-6 vs. IL-10 ratios revealed the following hierarchy in regard to the pro-inflammatory potential of human macrophages

  1. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A.; Tentschert, J.; Jungnickel, H.; Graf, P.; Mantion, A.; Draude, F.; Plendl, J.; Goetz, M. E.; Galla, S.; Mašić, A.; Thuenemann, A. F.; Taubert, A.; Arlinghaus, H. F.; Luch, A.

    2011-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  2. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A; Graf, P; Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F; Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F; Plendl, J; Masic, A; Taubert, A

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  3. Inhibition of transglutaminase 2 reduces efferocytosis in human macrophages: Role of CD14 and SR-AI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eligini, S; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Colli, S

    2016-10-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), a member of the transglutaminase family of enzymes, is a multifunctional protein involved in numerous events spanning from cell differentiation, to signal transduction, apoptosis, and wound healing. It is expressed in a variety of cells, macrophages included. Macrophage TGM2 promotes the clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and emerging evidence suggests that defective efferocytosis contributes to the consequences of inflammation-associated diseases, including atherosclerotic lesion progression and its sequelae. Of interest, active TGM2 identified in human atherosclerotic lesions plays critical roles in plaque stability through effects on matrix cross-linking and TGFβ activity. This study explores the mechanisms by which TGM2 controls efferocytosis in human macrophages. Herein we show that TGM2 increases progressively during monocyte differentiation towards macrophages and controls their efferocytic potential as well as morphology and viability. Two experimental approaches that took advantage of the inhibition of TGM2 activity and protein silencing give proof that TGM2 reduction significantly impairs macrophage efferocytosis. Among the mechanisms involved we highlighted a role of the receptors CD14 and SR-AI whose levels were markedly reduced by TGM2 inhibition. Conversely, CD36 receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were not influenced. Of note, lipid accumulation and IL-10 secretion were reduced in macrophages displaying defective efferocytosis. Overall, our data define a crucial role of TGM2 activity during macrophage differentiation via mechanisms involving CD14 and SR-AI receptors and show that TGM2 inhibition triggers a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Subcutaneous Tissue Response to Glucose Sensors: Macrophages Accumulation Impact on Sensor Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigla, Mercedes; Pons, Belén; Rebasa, Pere; Luna, Alexis; Pozo, Francisco Javier; Caixàs, Assumpta; Villaplana, Maria; Subías, David; Bella, Maria Rosa; Combalia, Neus

    2018-04-01

    Subcutaneous (s.c.) glucose sensors have become a key component in type 1 diabetes management. However, their usability is limited by the impact of foreign body response (FBR) on their duration, reliability, and accuracy. Our study gives the first description of human acute and subacute s.c. response to glucose sensors, showing the changes observed in the sensor surface, the inflammatory cells involved in the FBR and their relationship with sensor performance. Twelve obese patients (seven type 2 diabetes) underwent two abdominal biopsies comprising the surrounding area where they had worn two glucose sensors: the first one inserted 7 days before and the second one 24 h before biopsy procedure. Samples were processed and studied to describe tissue changes by two independent pathologists (blind regarding sensor duration). Macrophages quantification was studied by immunohistochemistry methods in the area surrounding the sensor (CD68, CD163). Sensor surface changes were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Seven-day continuous glucose monitoring records were considered inaccurate when mean absolute relative difference was higher than 10%. Pathologists were able to correctly classify all the biopsies regarding sensor duration. Acute response (24 h) was characterized by the presence of neutrophils while macrophages were the main cell involved in subacute inflammation. The number of macrophages around the insertion hole was higher for less accurate sensors compared with those performing more accurately (32.6 ± 14 vs. 10.6 ± 1 cells/0.01 mm 2 ; P sensor-tissue interface is related with decrease in accuracy of the glucose measure.

  5. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin II reduces constitutive protein secretion from primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Kockx

    Full Text Available Dynamins are fission proteins that mediate endocytic and exocytic membrane events and are pharmacological therapeutic targets. These studies investigate whether dynamin II regulates constitutive protein secretion and show for the first time that pharmacological inhibition of dynamin decreases secretion of apolipoprotein E (apoE and several other proteins constitutively secreted from primary human macrophages. Inhibitors that target recruitment of dynamin to membranes (MiTMABs or directly target the GTPase domain (Dyngo or Dynole series, dose- and time- dependently reduced the secretion of apoE. SiRNA oligo's targeting all isoforms of dynamin II confirmed the involvement of dynamin II in apoE secretion. Inhibition of secretion was not mediated via effects on mRNA or protein synthesis. 2D-gel electrophoresis showed that inhibition occurred after apoE was processed and glycosylated in the Golgi and live cell imaging showed that inhibited secretion was associated with reduced post-Golgi movement of apoE-GFP-containing vesicles. The effect was not restricted to macrophages, and was not mediated by the effects of the inhibitors on microtubules. Inhibition of dynamin also altered the constitutive secretion of other proteins, decreasing the secretion of fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase 9, Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and lysozyme but unexpectedly increasing the secretion of the inflammatory mediator cyclophilin A. We conclude that pharmacological inhibitors of dynamin II modulate the constitutive secretion of macrophage apoE as a class effect, and that their capacity to modulate protein secretion may affect a range of biological processes.

  6. Macrophage activation and differentiation signals regulate schlafen-4 gene expression: evidence for Schlafen-4 as a modulator of myelopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J van Zuylen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ten mouse and six human members of the Schlafen (Slfn gene family all contain an AAA domain. Little is known of their function, but previous studies suggest roles in immune cell development. In this report, we assessed Slfn regulation and function in macrophages, which are key cellular regulators of innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple members of the Slfn family were up-regulated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM by the Toll-like Receptor (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the TLR3 agonist Poly(I∶C, and in disease-affected joints in the collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis. Of these, the most inducible was Slfn4. TLR agonists that signal exclusively through the MyD88 adaptor protein had more modest effects on Slfn4 mRNA levels, thus implicating MyD88-independent signalling and autocrine interferon (IFN-β in inducible expression. This was supported by the substantial reduction in basal and LPS-induced Slfn4 mRNA expression in IFNAR-1⁻/⁻ BMM. LPS causes growth arrest in macrophages, and other Slfn family genes have been implicated in growth control. Slfn4 mRNA levels were repressed during macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow progenitors into BMM. To determine the role of Slfn4 in vivo, we over-expressed the gene specifically in macrophages in mice using a csf1r promoter-driven binary expression system. Transgenic over-expression of Slfn4 in myeloid cells did not alter macrophage colony formation or proliferation in vitro. Monocyte numbers, as well as inflammatory macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity, were reduced in transgenic mice that specifically over-expressed Slfn4, while macrophage numbers and hematopoietic activity were increased in the livers and spleens. CONCLUSIONS: Slfn4 mRNA levels were up-regulated during macrophage activation but down-regulated during differentiation. Constitutive Slfn4 expression in the

  7. Genome-wide analysis reveals loci encoding anti-macrophage factors in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Dowling

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important human pathogen whose infection biology is still poorly understood. The bacterium is endemic to tropical regions, including South East Asia and Northern Australia, where it causes melioidosis, a serious disease associated with both high mortality and antibiotic resistance. B. pseudomallei is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to replicate in macrophages. However despite the critical nature of its interaction with macrophages, few anti-macrophage factors have been characterized to date. Here we perform a genome-wide gain of function screen of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 to identify loci encoding factors with anti-macrophage activity. We identify a total of 113 such loci scattered across both chromosomes, with positive gene clusters encoding transporters and secretion systems, enzymes/toxins, secondary metabolite, biofilm, adhesion and signal response related factors. Further phenotypic analysis of four of these regions shows that the encoded factors cause striking cellular phenotypes relevant to infection biology, including apoptosis, formation of actin 'tails' and multi-nucleation within treated macrophages. The detailed analysis of the remaining host of loci will facilitate genetic dissection of the interaction of this important pathogen with host macrophages and thus further elucidate this critical part of its infection cycle.

  8. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... anti-inflammatory markers. These data demonstrate for the first time in human that MPs sequentially orchestrate adult myogenesis during regeneration of damaged skeletal muscle. These results support the emerging concept that inflammation, through MP activation, controls stem cell fate and coordinates......Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here...

  9. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1......-mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats...

  10. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50...... or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data...

  11. Extracts of human atherosclerotic lesions modify LDL inducing enhanced macrophage uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, H.F.; O'Neill, J.

    1986-01-01

    Both an LDL-like fraction isolated from human aortic plaques and LDL incubated with cultured aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells have been shown to be internalized by macrophages in vitro in an unregulated fashion leading to foam cell formation. Lipid peroxidation induced by free radicals released from cells was shown to be responsible for cell-modified LDL. The authors incubated LDL with a supernatant fraction of leached, i.e. non-homogenized, extracts of aortic plaques for one hour at 37 0 C, to determine whether extracellular components present in arteries were also capable of modifying LDL. Extract-treated LDL showed the following changes relative to untreated LDL: 1) increased electrophretic mobility, 2) altered pattern of B-100 on SDS-PAGE, i.e. presence of a doublet with higher M/sub r/ than B-100, and 3) enhanced uptake by cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages as measured by increased degradation of 125 I-LDL, and increased stimulation of cholesterol esterification using 14 C-oleate. Extracts from homogenized plaques and grossly normal intima induced similar changes. The modification was tissue specific in that extracts of arteries but not of liver, muscle or skin modified LDL. Protease degradation of LDL during incubation was probably not responsible since inhibitors did not prevent modification. It is possible that products of lipid peroxidation present in extracellular lipid of arteries may propagate free radicals or be incorporated into LDL, leading to modifications similar to those found in cell-modified LDL

  12. Cigarette smoke regulates the expression of TLR4 and IL-8 production by human macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Irfan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs are present on monocytes and alveolar macrophages that form the first line of defense against inhaled particles. The importance of those cells in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD has well been documented. Cigarette smoke contains high concentration of oxidants which can stimulate immune cells to produce reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines. Methods In this study, we evaluated the effects of cigarette smoke medium (CSM on TLR4 expression and interleukin (IL-8 production by human macrophages investigating the involvement of ROS. Results and Discussion TLR4 surface expression was downregulated on short term exposure (1 h of CSM. The downregulation could be explained by internalization of the TLR4 and the upregulation by an increase in TLR4 mRNA. IL-8 mRNA and protein were also increased by CSM. CSM stimulation increased intracellular ROS-production and decreased glutathione (GSH levels. The modulation of TLR4 mRNA and surface receptors expression, IRAK activation, IκB-α degradation, IL-8 mRNA and protein, GSH depletion and ROS production were all prevented by antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC. Conclusion TLR4 may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema and oxidative stress and seems to be a crucial contributor in lung inflammation.

  13. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Th1-like human T-cell clones recognizing Leishmania gp63 inhibit Leishmania major in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Hey, A S; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    The major surface protease of Leishmania major, gp63, has been suggested as a vaccine candidate for cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study gp63 was purified from L. major promastigotes. A panel of human T-cell clones recognizing this protein were generated from individuals who had previously had...... resembling Th1 cells. Autologous mononuclear cells and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cell lines were equally efficient in presenting the antigen to the T cells. The gp63 reactive T cells induced resistance to infection in cultured human macrophages by L. major. The data confirm that human CD4+ T cells...... recognizing gp63 can take part in the host defence against L. major infections....

  15. Decreased expression of liver X receptor-α in macrophages infected with Chlamydia pneumoniae in human atherosclerotic arteries in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Killingsworth, Murray C; Lu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, Chlamydia pneumoniae has been shown to infect macrophages and to accelerate foam cell formation. It has been hypothesized that the C. pneumoniae infection affects foam cell formation by suppressing the expression of liver X receptors (LXR), but whether such an event occurs in human atherosclerosis is not known. In this study we examined carotid artery segments, obtained by endarterectomy, in which the presence of C. pneumoniae was confirmed by both polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The expression of LXR-α in macrophages infected with C. pneumoniae and macrophages that were not infected was compared using a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis. The analysis revealed a 2.2-fold reduction in the expression of LXR-α in C. pneumoniae-infected cells around the lipid cores in atherosclerotic plaques. In the cytoplasm of laser-capture microdissected cells that were immunopositive for C. pneumoniae, electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of structures with the appearance of elementary, reticulate and aberrant bodies of C. pneumoniae. We conclude that LXR-α expression is reduced in C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages in human atherosclerotic lesions which supports the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae infection might suppress LXR expression in macrophages transforming into foam cells. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Morphometric Characterization of Rat and Human Alveolar Macrophage Cell Models and their Response to Amiodarone using High Content Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ewelina; Patel, Aateka; Ball, Doug; Klapwijk, Jan; Millar, Val; Kumar, Abhinav; Martin, Abigail; Mahendran, Rhamiya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Forbes, Ben; Hutter, Victoria

    2017-12-01

    Progress to the clinic may be delayed or prevented when vacuolated or "foamy" alveolar macrophages are observed during non-clinical inhalation toxicology assessment. The first step in developing methods to study this response in vitro is to characterize macrophage cell lines and their response to drug exposures. Human (U937) and rat (NR8383) cell lines and primary rat alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage were characterized using high content fluorescence imaging analysis quantification of cell viability, morphometry, and phospholipid and neutral lipid accumulation. Cell health, morphology and lipid content were comparable (p content. Responses to amiodarone, a known inducer of phospholipidosis, required analysis of shifts in cell population profiles (the proportion of cells with elevated vacuolation or lipid content) rather than average population data which was insensitive to the changes observed. A high content image analysis assay was developed and used to provide detailed morphological characterization of rat and human alveolar-like macrophages and their response to a phospholipidosis-inducing agent. This provides a basis for development of assays to predict or understand macrophage vacuolation following inhaled drug exposure.

  17. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2005-01-01

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application

  18. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Codoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules. Six modules were found preserved (P < 10−4 in macrophages from 86 mice of the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. One of these modules was significantly [false discovery rate (FDR = 8.9 × 10−11] enriched for genes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS pathway. This pathway was also found significantly (FDR < 10−4 enriched in susceptibility genes for Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8 the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans.

  19. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Aparecida de Brito Eid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G- CSF for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 µg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 - patients who received a single daily dose of 10 µg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 - patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results: Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3% for Group 10 and 36 (24.7% for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1-7 leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59 were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1-3 and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001. Conclusions: To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed.

  20. Volcanic ash activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in murine and human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damby, David; Horwell, Claire J.; Baxter, Peter J.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Schnurr, Max; Dingwell, Donald B.; Duewell, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Volcanic ash is a heterogeneous mineral dust that is typically composed of a mixture of amorphous (glass) and crystalline (mineral) fragments. It commonly contains an abundance of the crystalline silica (SiO2) polymorph cristobalite. Inhalation of crystalline silica can induce inflammation by stimulating the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic receptor complex that plays a critical role in driving inflammatory immune responses. Ingested material results in the assembly of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 with subsequent secretion of the interleukin-1 family cytokine IL-1β. Previous toxicology work suggests that cristobalite-bearing volcanic ash is minimally reactive, calling into question the reactivity of volcanically derived crystalline silica, in general. In this study, we target the NLRP3 inflammasome as a crystalline silica responsive element to clarify volcanic cristobalite reactivity. We expose immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages of genetically engineered mice and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano as well as representative, pure-phase samples of its primary componentry (volcanic glass, feldspar, cristobalite) and measure NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that respirable Soufrière Hills volcanic ash induces the activation of caspase-1 with subsequent release of mature IL-1β in a NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent manner. Macrophages deficient in NLRP3 inflammasome components are incapable of secreting IL-1β in response to volcanic ash ingestion. Cellular uptake induces lysosomal destabilization involving cysteine proteases. Furthermore, the response involves activation of mitochondrial stress pathways leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Considering ash componentry, cristobalite is the most reactive pure-phase with other components inducing only low-level IL-1β secretion. Inflammasome activation mediated by inhaled ash and its potential relevance in chronic pulmonary

  1. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells alter macrophage phenotype and promote regeneration via homing to the kidney following ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wise, Andrea F; Williams, Timothy M; Kiewiet, Mensiena B G; Payne, Natalie L; Siatskas, Christopher; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ameliorate injury and accelerate repair in many organs, including the kidney, although the reparative mechanisms and interaction with macrophages have not been elucidated. This study investigated the reparative potential of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and traced

  3. Organic UV filters exposure induces the production of inflammatory cytokines in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Junjie; Yuan, Tao; Gao, Li; Yu, Xiaodan; Zhao, Xiaodong; Tian, Ying; Ding, Wenjin; Ma, Yuning; Shen, Zhemin

    2018-09-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters, found in many personal care products, are considered emerging contaminants due to growing concerns about potential long-term deleterious effects. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of four commonly used organic UV filters (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, BP-3; 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, 4-MBC; 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate, EHMC; and butyl-methoxydibenzoylmethane, BDM) on human macrophages. Our results indicated that exposure to these four UV filters significantly increased the production of various inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, particular tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). After exposure to the UV filters, a significant 1.1-1.5 fold increase were found in TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression. In addition, both the p38 MAPK and the NF-κB signaling pathways were enhanced 2 to 10 times in terms of phosphorylation after exposure to the UV filters, suggesting that these pathways are involved in the release of TNF-α and IL-6. Molecular docking analysis predicted that all four UV filter molecules would efficiently bind transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is responsible for the activation of the p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Our results therefore demonstrate that exposure to the four organic UV filters investigated may alter human immune system function. It provides new clue for the development of asthma or allergic diseases in terms of the environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and its receptor (CD74) in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Vincent; Kindt, Nadège; Decaestecker, Christine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Laurent, Guy; Noël, Jean-Christophe; Saussez, Sven

    2014-08-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its receptor CD74 appear to be involved in tumorigenesis. We evaluated, by immunohistochemical staining, the tissue expression and distribution of MIF and CD74 in serial sections of human invasive breast cancer tumor specimens. The serum MIF level was also determined in breast cancer patients. We showed a significant increase in serum MIF average levels in breast cancer patients compared to healthy individuals. MIF tissue expression, quantified by a modified Allred score, was strongly increased in carcinoma compared to tumor-free specimens, in the cancer cells and in the peritumoral stroma, with fibroblasts the most intensely stained. We did not find any significant correlation with histoprognostic factors, except for a significant inverse correlation between tumor size and MIF stromal positivity. CD74 staining was heterogeneous and significantly decreased in cancer cells but increased in the surrounding stroma, namely in lymphocytes, macrophages and vessel endothelium. There was no significant variation according to classical histoprognostic factors, except that CD74 stromal expression was significantly correlated with triple-negative receptor (TRN) status and the absence of estrogen receptors. In conclusion, our data support the concept of a functional role of MIF in human breast cancer. In addition to auto- and paracrine effects on cancer cells, MIF could contribute to shape the tumor microenvironment leading to immunomodulation and angiogenesis. Interfering with MIF effects in breast tumors in a therapeutic perspective remains an attractive but complex challenge. Level of co-expression of MIF and CD74 could be a surrogate marker for efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs, particularly in TRN breast cancer tumor.

  5. Responses of murine and human macrophages to leptospiral infection: a study using comparative array analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a re-emerging tropical infectious disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. The different host innate immune responses are partially related to the different severities of leptospirosis. In this study, we employed transcriptomics and cytokine arrays to comparatively calculate the responses of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs and human peripheral blood monocytes (HBMs to leptospiral infection. We uncovered a series of different expression profiles of these two immune cells. The percentages of regulated genes in several biological processes of MPMs, such as antigen processing and presentation, membrane potential regulation, and the innate immune response, etc., were much greater than those of HBMs (>2-fold. In MPMs and HBMs, the caspase-8 and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD-like apoptosis regulator genes were significantly up-regulated, which supported previous results that the caspase-8 and caspase-3 pathways play an important role in macrophage apoptosis during leptospiral infection. In addition, the key component of the complement pathway, C3, was only up-regulated in MPMs. Furthermore, several cytokines, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, were differentially expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in MPMs and HBMs. Some of the differential expressions were proved to be pathogenic Leptospira-specific regulations at mRNA level or protein level. Though it is still unclear why some animals are resistant and others are susceptible to leptospiral infection, this comparative study based on transcriptomics and cytokine arrays partially uncovered the differences of murine resistance and human susceptibility to leptospirosis. Taken together, these findings will facilitate further molecular studies on the innate immune response to leptospiral infection.

  6. Responses of Murine and Human Macrophages to Leptospiral Infection: A Study Using Comparative Array Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingchao; Zhao, Jinping; Yang, Yutao; Cao, Yongguo; Hong, Cailing; Liu, Yuan; Sun, Lan; Huang, Minjun; Gu, Junchao

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a re-emerging tropical infectious disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. The different host innate immune responses are partially related to the different severities of leptospirosis. In this study, we employed transcriptomics and cytokine arrays to comparatively calculate the responses of murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) and human peripheral blood monocytes (HBMs) to leptospiral infection. We uncovered a series of different expression profiles of these two immune cells. The percentages of regulated genes in several biological processes of MPMs, such as antigen processing and presentation, membrane potential regulation, and the innate immune response, etc., were much greater than those of HBMs (>2-fold). In MPMs and HBMs, the caspase-8 and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-like apoptosis regulator genes were significantly up-regulated, which supported previous results that the caspase-8 and caspase-3 pathways play an important role in macrophage apoptosis during leptospiral infection. In addition, the key component of the complement pathway, C3, was only up-regulated in MPMs. Furthermore, several cytokines, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), were differentially expressed at both mRNA and protein levels in MPMs and HBMs. Some of the differential expressions were proved to be pathogenic Leptospira-specific regulations at mRNA level or protein level. Though it is still unclear why some animals are resistant and others are susceptible to leptospiral infection, this comparative study based on transcriptomics and cytokine arrays partially uncovered the differences of murine resistance and human susceptibility to leptospirosis. Taken together, these findings will facilitate further molecular studies on the innate immune response to leptospiral infection. PMID:24130911

  7. Flagella from five Cronobacter species induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes.

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    Ariadnna Cruz-Córdova

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng induced the release of IL-8 (3314-6025 pg/ml, TNF-α (39-359 pg/ml, and IL-10 (2-96 pg/ml, in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200 suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95-100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria.

  8. Experimental Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages Results in Low-Frequency Mutations Not Associated with Selective Advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Guerrini

    Full Text Available Isolates of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical samples exhibit genetic heterogeneity. Such variation may result from the stressful environment encountered by the pathogen inside the macrophage, which is the host cell tubercle bacilli parasitize. To study the evolution of the M. tuberculosis genome during growth inside macrophages, we developed a model of intracellular culture in which bacteria were serially passaged in macrophage-like THP-1 cells for about 80 bacterial generations. Genome sequencing of single bacterial colonies isolated before and after the infection cycles revealed that M. tuberculosis developed mutations at a rate of about 5.7 × 10-9 / bp/ generation, consistent with mutation rates calculated during in vivo infection. Analysis of mutant growth in macrophages and in mice showed that the mutations identified after the cyclic infection conferred no advantage to the mutants relative to wild-type. Furthermore, activity testing of the recombinant protein harboring one of these mutations showed that the presence of the mutation did not affect the enzymatic activity. The serial infection protocol developed in this work to study M. tuberculosis genome microevolution can be applied to exposure to stressors to determine their effect on genome remodeling during intra-macrophage growth.

  9. Febrile Neutropenia Risk Assessment and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Support in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Receiving R-CHOP Regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salar, Antonio; Haioun, Corinne; Rossi, Francesca Gaia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ASCO and EORTC guidelines recommend granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis for cancer patients with a ≥20% overall risk of febrile neutropenia (FN), and to support delivery of dose-dense regimens. CHOP-like regimens (with rituximab [R]) are the current...... standard of care for the management of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but they are often associated with significant myelosuppression. Neutropenic events, particularly febrile neutropenia (FN), can be life-threatening and may lead to dose delays or reductions that compromise the efficacy......-CSF primary prophylaxis. Across all cycles, 29% of R-CHOP-21 patients had an unplanned hospitalization, with neutropenia/FN being the main reason. Subsequently, 67% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity (RDI) of ≥90% of their planned treatment (with respect to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin...

  10. Percutaneous implantation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in osteoarthritis of the knee. First case reported in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baganet Cobas, Aymara Maria; Hernandez Ramirez, Porfirio; Fernandez Delgado, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The degenerative joint disease, also known as osteoarthrosis affects to 10% of elderlies aged 60. It is mainly characterized by pain in the involved joint, crepitation, morning stiff and a progressive limitation of movement of that joint leading to a partial or total wear of articular cartilage. The treatment of the knee osteoarthrosis is a great challenge. The recent advances in use of regenerative medicine suggest that adult stem cells could represent a promisor alternative in the treatment of this entity. In a female patient aged 61 presenting with knee osteoarthrosis authors placed a percutaneous implant of autologous mononuclear cells mobilized to peripheral blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor achieving a fast clinical and radiological improvement. This result suggests that the procedure used is a feasible, simple, safe and less expensive method for treatment of articular degenerative lesions

  11. Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide and X-irradiation on the production of colony-stimulating factor and the maintenance of granulopoiesis in bone marrow culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, H.; Miyanomae, T.; Tsurusawa, M.; Fujita, J.; Mori, K.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and X-irradiation on CSF production and granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures were studied. Levels of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) increased soon after the refeeding of the culture, but the activity was undetectable at day 7. Addition of LPS induced a significant increase in CSF levels in the culture, followed by an elevated granulopoiesis. The increase in CSF levels was suppressed when culture medium that had been harvested at refeeding on day 7 was added. Although irradiation did not increase CSF production, granulopoiesis was markedly stimulated shortly after irradiation. Thus granulopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture may also be regulated by humoral factors such as CSF, and the culture system may represent the in vivo response to haemopoietic stimuli. (author)

  12. Virulence of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. hominissuis Human Isolates in an in vitro Macrophage Infection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rindi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH is an environmental opportunistic pathogen for humans and swine worldwide; in humans, the vast majority of MAH infections is due to strains belonging to specific genotypes, such as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS-sequevars Mav-A and Mav-B that mostly cause pulmonary infections in elderly patients and severe disseminated infections in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients, respectively. To test whether the different types of infections in distinct patients' populations might reflect a different virulence of the infecting genotypes, MAH human isolates, genotyped by ITS sequencing and MIRU-VNTR minisatellite analysis, were studied for the capacity to infect and replicate in human macrophages in vitro. Methods: Cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and phagocytic human leukemic cell line THP-1 cells were infected with each MAH isolate and intracellular colony-forming units (CFU were determined. Results: At 2 h after infection, i.e., immediately after cell entry, the numbers of intracellular bacteria did not differ between Mav-A and Mav-B organisms in both phagocytic cell types. At 5 days, Mav-A organisms, sharing highly related VNTR-MIRU genotypes, yielded numbers of intracellular CFUs significantly higher than Mav-B organisms in both phagocytic cell types. MIRU-VNTR-based minimum spanning tree analysis of the MAH isolates showed a divergent phylogenetic pathway of Mav-A and Mav-B organisms. Conclusion: Mav-A and Mav-B sequevars might have evolved different pathogenetic properties that might account for their association with different human infections.

  13. The differential role of human macrophage in triggering secondary bystander effects after either gamma-ray or carbon beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Tu, Wenzhi; Konishi, Teruaki; Liu, Weili; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-07-10

    The abscopal effect could be an underlying factor in evaluating prognosis of radiotherapy. This study established an in vitro system to examine whether tumor-generated bystander signals could be transmitted by macrophages to further trigger secondary cellular responses after different irradiations, where human lung cancer NCI-H446 cells were irradiated with either γ-rays or carbon ions and co-cultured with human macrophage U937 cells, then these U937 cells were used as a bystander signal transmitter and co-cultured with human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Results showed that U937 cells were only activated by γ-irradiated NCI-H446 cells so that the secondary injuries in BEAS-2B cells under carbon ion irradiation were weaker than γ-rays. Both TNF-α and IL-1α were involved in the γ-irradiation induced secondary bystander effect but only TNF-α contributed to the carbon ion induced response. Further assay disclosed that IL-1α but not TNF-α was largely responsible for the activation of macrophages and the formation of micronucleus in BEAS-2B cells. These data suggest that macrophages could transfer secondary bystander signals and play a key role in the secondary bystander effect of photon irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation has conspicuous advantage due to its reduced secondary injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Specific Kv1.3 blockade modulates key cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human macrophages exposed to ox-LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Fu; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Zhao-Hui; Lian, Yi-Tian; Yang, Ying; Li, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jian; Shu, Yan-Wen; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liao, Yu-Hua; Liu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules, including scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, ACAT1, ABCA1, ABCG1, and scavenger receptor class B type I, can modulate cholesterol metabolism in the transformation from macrophages to foam cells. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 has increasingly been demonstrated to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage function. Here, we investigate the role of Kv1.3 in modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human acute monocytic leukemia cell-derived macrophages (THP-1 macrophages) and human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Human Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels (hKv1.3 and hKv1.5) are expressed in macrophages and form a heteromultimeric channel. The hKv1.3-E314 antibody that we had generated as a specific hKv1.3 blocker inhibited outward delayed rectifier potassium currents, whereas the hKv1.5-E313 antibody that we had generated as a specific hKv1.5 blocker failed. Accordingly, the hKv1.3-E314 antibody reduced percentage of cholesterol ester and enhanced apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to ox-LDL. The hKv1.3-E314 antibody downregulated SR-A, LOX-1, and ACAT1 expression and upregulated ABCA1 expression in THP-1 macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Our results reveal that specific Kv1.3 blockade represents a novel strategy modulating cholesterol metabolism in macrophages, which benefits the treatment of atherosclerotic lesions.

  15. Specific Kv1.3 blockade modulates key cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human macrophages exposed to ox-LDL[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Fu; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Zhao-Hui; Lian, Yi-Tian; Yang, Ying; Li, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jian; Shu, Yan-Wen; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liao, Yu-Hua; Liu, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules, including scavenger receptor class A (SR-A), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, ACAT1, ABCA1, ABCG1, and scavenger receptor class B type I, can modulate cholesterol metabolism in the transformation from macrophages to foam cells. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 has increasingly been demonstrated to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage function. Here, we investigate the role of Kv1.3 in modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human acute monocytic leukemia cell-derived macrophages (THP-1 macrophages) and human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Human Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels (hKv1.3 and hKv1.5) are expressed in macrophages and form a heteromultimeric channel. The hKv1.3-E314 antibody that we had generated as a specific hKv1.3 blocker inhibited outward delayed rectifier potassium currents, whereas the hKv1.5-E313 antibody that we had generated as a specific hKv1.5 blocker failed. Accordingly, the hKv1.3-E314 antibody reduced percentage of cholesterol ester and enhanced apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to ox-LDL. The hKv1.3-E314 antibody downregulated SR-A, LOX-1, and ACAT1 expression and upregulated ABCA1 expression in THP-1 macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Our results reveal that specific Kv1.3 blockade represents a novel strategy modulating cholesterol metabolism in macrophages, which benefits the treatment of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:23099443

  16. Sunlight Triggers Cutaneous Lupus through a Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) Dependent Mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T.; Lucas, Julie A.; Rabacal, Whitney A.; Croker, Byron P.; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E. Richard; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2008-01-01

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø) -mediated mechanism in MRL-Faslpr mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Faslpr strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex-vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intra-dermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible, MRL-Faslpr mice, but not in lupus-resistant, BALB/c mice. Notably, UVB incites an increase in Mø, apoptosis in the skin and CLE in MRL-Faslpr, but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Faslpr mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Mø that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Faslpr, but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, we envision CSF-1 as the “match” and lupus-susceptibility as the “tinder” leading to CLE. PMID:18981160

  17. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Anubha; Klemm, Carolin; Hartjes, Lara; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  18. The β-Hemolysin and Intracellular Survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Anubha; Klemm, Carolin; Hartjes, Lara; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches. PMID:23593170

  19. The β-hemolysin and intracellular survival of Streptococcus agalactiae in human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sagar

    Full Text Available S. agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS is a major microbial pathogen in human neonates and causes invasive infections in pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. The S. agalactiae β-hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor for the development of invasive disease. To examine the role of β-hemolysin in the interaction with professional phagocytes, the THP-1 monocytic cell line and human granulocytes were infected with a serotype Ia S. agalactiae wild type strain and its isogenic nonhemolytic mutant. We could show that the nonhemolytic mutants were able to survive in significantly higher numbers than the hemolytic wild type strain, in THP-1 macrophage-like cells and in assays with human granulocytes. Intracellular bacterial multiplication, however, could not be observed. The hemolytic wild type strain stimulated a significantly higher release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α than the nonhemolytic mutant in THP-1 cells, while similar levels of the chemokine Interleukin-8 were induced. In order to investigate bacterial mediators of IL-8 release in this setting, purified cell wall preparations from both strains were tested and found to exert a potent proinflammatory stimulus on THP-1 cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the β-hemolysin has a strong influence on the intracellular survival of S. agalactiae and that a tightly controlled regulation of β-hemolysin expression is required for the successful establishment of S. agalactiae in different host niches.

  20. C–C Chemokines Released by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Human Macrophages Suppress HIV-1 Infection in Both Macrophages and T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Alessia; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Comar, Manola; Tresoldi, Eleonora; Polo, Simona; Giacca, Mauro; Lusso, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Vercelli, Donata

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) expression in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected in vitro is known to be inhibited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We show here that HIV-1 suppression is mediated by soluble factors released by MDM stimulated with physiologically significant concentrations of LPS. LPS-conditioned supernatants from MDM inhibited HIV-1 replication in both MDM and T cells. Depletion of C–C chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β) neutralized the ability of LPS-conditioned supernatants to inhibit HIV-1 replication in MDM. A combination of recombinant C–C chemokines blocked HIV-1 infection as effectively as LPS. Here, we report an inhibitory effect of C–C chemokines on HIV replication in primary macrophages. Our results raise the possibility that monocytes may play a dual role in HIV infection: while representing a reservoir for the virus, they may contribute to the containment of the infection by releasing factors that suppress HIV replication not only in monocytes but also in T lymphocytes. PMID:9120386

  1. Changes in the topology of gene expression networks by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Girón, María Juliana; García-Vallejo, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    One key step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the integration of its viral cDNA. This process is mediated through complex networks of host-virus interactions that alter several normal cell functions of the host. To study the complexity of disturbances in cell gene expression networks by HIV-1 integration, we constructed a network of human macrophage genes located close to chromatin regions rich in proviruses. To perform the network analysis, we selected 28 genes previously identified as the target of cDNA integration and their transcriptional profiles were obtained from GEO Profiles (NCBI). A total of 2770 interactions among the 28 genes located around the HIV-1 proviruses in human macrophages formed a highly dense main network connected to five sub-networks. The overall network was significantly enriched by genes associated with signal transduction, cellular communication and regulatory processes. To simulate the effects of HIV-1 integration in infected macrophages, five genes with the most number of interaction in the normal network were turned off by putting in zero the correspondent expression values. The HIV-1 infected network showed changes in its topology and alteration in the macrophage functions reflected in a re-programming of biosynthetic and general metabolic process. Understanding the complex virus-host interactions that occur during HIV-1 integration, may provided valuable genomic information to develop new antiviral treatments focusing on the management of some specific gene expression networks associated with viral integration. This is the first gene network which describes the human macrophages genes interactions related with HIV-1 integration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. alpha-MSH and its receptors in regulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by human monocyte/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, S; Sharma, S; Chhajlani, V; Gantz, I; Rajora, N; Demitri, M T; Kelly, L; Zhao, H; Ichiyama, T; Catania, A; Lipton, J M

    1999-05-01

    The hypothesis that macrophages contain an autocrine circuit based on melanocortin [ACTH and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)] peptides has major implications for neuroimmunomodulation research and inflammation therapy. To test this hypothesis, cells of the THP-1 human monocyte/macrophage line were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of alpha-MSH. The inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was inhibited in relation to alpha-MSH concentration. Similar inhibitory effects on TNF-alpha were observed with ACTH peptides that contain the alpha-MSH amino acid sequence and act on melanocortin receptors. Nuclease protection assays indicated that expression of the human melanocortin-1 receptor subtype (hMC-1R) occurs in THP-1 cells; Southern blots of RT-PCR product revealed that additional subtypes, hMC-3R and hMC-5R, also occur. Incubation of resting macrophages with antibody to hMC-1R increased TNF-alpha concentration; the antibody also markedly reduced the inhibitory influence of alpha-MSH on TNF-alpha in macrophages treated with LPS. These results in cells known to produce alpha-MSH at rest and to increase secretion of the peptide when challenged are consistent with an endogenous regulatory circuit based on melanocortin peptides and their receptors. Targeting of this neuroimmunomodulatory circuit in inflammatory diseases in which myelomonocytic cells are prominent should be beneficial.

  3. Increased platelet reactivity is associated with circulating platelet-monocyte complexes and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Rutten

    Full Text Available Platelet reactivity, platelet binding to monocytes and monocyte infiltration play a detrimental role in atherosclerotic plaque progression. We investigated whether platelet reactivity was associated with levels of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes (PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.Platelet reactivity was determined by measuring platelet P-selectin expression after platelet stimulation with increasing concentrations of adenosine diphosphate (ADP, in two independent cohorts: the Circulating Cells cohort (n = 244 and the Athero-Express cohort (n = 91. Levels of PMCs were assessed by flow cytometry in blood samples of patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (Circulating Cells cohort. Monocyte infiltration was semi-quantitatively determined by histological examination of atherosclerotic carotid plaques collected during carotid endarterectomy (Athero-Express cohort.We found increased platelet reactivity in patients with high PMCs as compared to patients with low PMCs (median (interquartile range: 4153 (1585-11267 area under the curve (AUC vs. 9633 (3580-21565 AUC, P<0.001. Also, we observed increased platelet reactivity in patients with high macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques as compared to patients with low macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques (mean ± SD; 8969 ± 3485 AUC vs. 7020 ± 3442 AUC, P = 0.02. All associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and use of drugs against platelet activation.Platelet reactivity towards ADP is associated with levels of PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Induces the Expression of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1 in Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chinetti-Gbaguidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is the initiator of the blood coagulation cascade after interaction with the activated factor VII (FVIIa. Moreover, the TF/FVIIa complex also activates intracellular signalling pathways leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines. The TF/FVIIa complex is inhibited by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI-1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a transcription factor that, together with PPARα and PPARβ/δ, controls macrophage functions. However, whether PPARγ activation modulates the expression of TFP1-1 in human macrophages is not known. Here we report that PPARγ activation increases the expression of TFPI-1 in human macrophages in vitro as well as in vivo in circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The induction of TFPI-1 expression by PPARγ ligands, an effect shared by the activation of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, occurs also in proinflammatory M1 and in anti-inflammatory M2 polarized macrophages. As a functional consequence, treatment with PPARγ ligands significantly reduces the inflammatory response induced by FVIIa, as measured by variations in the IL-8, MMP-2, and MCP-1 expression. These data identify a novel role for PPARγ in the control of TF the pathway.

  5. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

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    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  6. The MAPK ERK5, but not ERK1/2, inhibits the progression of monocytic phenotype to the functioning macrophage

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    Wang, Xuening [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers, NJ Medical School, 185 South Orange Ave, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States); Pesakhov, Stella [Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Harrison, Jonathan S [Department of Medicine, Rutgers, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Kafka, Michael; Danilenko, Michael [Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, PO Box 653, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Studzinski, George P, E-mail: studzins@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers, NJ Medical School, 185 South Orange Ave, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways present targets for pharmacological agents with potential for treatment of neoplastic diseases, with some disease remissions already recorded. However, cellular compensatory mechanisms usually negate the initial success. For instance, attempts to interrupt aberrant signaling downstream of the frequently mutated ras by inhibiting ERK1/2 has shown only limited usefulness for cancer therapy. Here, we examined how ERK5, that overlaps the functions of ERK1/2 in cell proliferation and survival, functions in a manner distinct from ERK1/2 in human AML cells induced to differentiate by 1,25D-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D). Using inhibitors of ERK1/2 and of MEK5/ERK5 at concentrations specific for each kinase in HL60 and U937 cells, we observed that selective inhibition of the kinase activity of ERK5, but not of ERK1/2, in the presence of 1,25D resulted in macrophage-like cell morphology and enhancement of phagocytic activity. Importantly, this was associated with increased expression of the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR), but was not seen when M-CSFR expression was knocked down. Interestingly, inhibition of ERK1/2 led to activation of ERK5 in these cells. Our results support the hypothesis that ERK5 negatively regulates the expression of M-CSFR, and thus has a restraining function on macrophage differentiation. The addition of pharmacological inhibitors of ERK5 may influence trials of differentiation therapy of AML. - Highlights: • ERK5 has at least some functions in AML cells which are distinct from those of ERK1/2. • ERK5 activity negatively controls the expression of M-CSFR. • ERK5 retards the progression of differentiation from monocyte to functional macrophage.

  7. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

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    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  8. Response of Human Skin Equivalents to Sarcoptes scabiei

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    MORGAN, MARJORIE S.; ARLIAN, LARRY G.

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that molecules in an extract made from bodies of the ectoparasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei De Geer, modulate cytokine secretion from cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In vivo, in the parasitized skin, these cells interact with each other by contact and cytokine mediators and with the matrix in which they reside. Therefore, these cell types may function differently together than they do separately. In this study, we used a human skin equivalent (HSE) model to investigate the influence of cellular interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts when the cells were exposed to active/burrowing scabies mites, mite products, and mite extracts. The HSE consisted of an epidermis of stratified stratum corneum, living keratinocytes, and basal cells above a dermis of fibroblasts in a collagen matrix. HSEs were inoculated on the surface or in the culture medium, and their cytokine secretions on the skin surface and into the culture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Active mites on the surface of the HSE induced secretion of cutaneous T cell-attracting chemokine, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The main difference between HSEs and monocultured cells was that the HSEs produced the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β and their competitive inhibitor IL-1ra, whereas very little of these mediators was previously found for cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts. It is not clear how the balance between these cytokines influences the overall host response. However, IL-1ra may contribute to the depression of an early cutaneous inflammatory response to scabies in humans. These contrasting results illustrate that cell interactions are important in the host’s response to burrowing scabies mites. PMID:20939384

  9. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markhoff, Jana; Krogull, Martin; Schulze, Christian; Rotsch, Christian; Hunger, Sandra; Bader, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi) have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC)-coated NiTi) to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery. PMID:28772412

  10. Biocompatibility and Inflammatory Potential of Titanium Alloys Cultivated with Human Osteoblasts, Fibroblasts and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Markhoff

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomaterials used to maintain or replace functions in the human body consist mainly of metals, ceramics or polymers. In orthopedic surgery, metallic materials, especially titanium and its alloys, are the most common, due to their excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Aside from the established Ti6Al4V alloy, shape memory materials such as nickel-titanium (NiTi have risen in importance, but are also discussed because of the adverse effects of nickel ions. These might be reduced by specific surface modifications. In the present in vitro study, the osteoblastic cell line MG-63 as well as primary human osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages were cultured on titanium alloys (forged Ti6Al4V, additive manufactured Ti6Al4V, NiTi, and Diamond-Like-Carbon (DLC-coated NiTi to verify their specific biocompatibility and inflammatory potential. Additive manufactured Ti6Al4V and NiTi revealed the highest levels of metabolic cell activity. DLC-coated NiTi appeared as a suitable surface for cell growth, showing the highest collagen production. None of the implant materials caused a strong inflammatory response. In general, no distinct cell-specific response could be observed for the materials and surface coating used. In summary, all tested titanium alloys seem to be biologically appropriate for application in orthopedic surgery.

  11. Transforming growth factor beta-1 expression in macrophages of human chronic periapical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z-Z; Li, J; Huang, S-G

    2017-03-30

    The objective of this study was to observe the distribution of macrophages (MPs) expressing transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) in tissue samples from patients with different human chronic periapical diseases. In this study, samples were collected from 75 volunteers, who were divided into three groups according to classified standards, namely, healthy control (N = 25), periapical granuloma (N = 25), and periapical cyst (N = 25). The samples were fixed in 10% buffered formalin for more than 48 h, dehydrated, embedded, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Double immunofluorescence was conducted to analyze the expression of TGF-β-CD14 double-positive MPs in periapical tissues. The number of double-positive cells (cells/mm 2 ) were significantly higher in the chronic periapical disease tissues (P periapical cyst group than in the periapical granuloma group (P periapical diseases. The TGF-β1-CD14 double-positive cells might play an important role in the pathology of human chronic periapical diseases.

  12. Macrophages inhibit human osteosarcoma cell growth after activation with the bacterial cell wall derivative liposomal muramyl tripeptide in combination with interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Jens H W; Kwappenberg, Kitty M C; Varypataki, Eleni M; Santos, Susy J; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Mohamed, Susan; Wijnen, Juul T; van Tol, Maarten J D; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Egeler, R Maarten; Jiskoot, Wim; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2014-03-10

    In osteosarcoma, the presence of tumor-infiltrating macrophages positively correlates with patient survival in contrast to the negative effect of tumor-associated macrophages in patients with other tumors. Liposome-encapsulated muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) has been introduced in the treatment of osteosarcoma patients, which may enhance the potential anti-tumor activity of macrophages. Direct anti-tumor activity of human macrophages against human osteosarcoma cells has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed osteosarcoma cell growth after co-culture with human macrophages. Monocyte-derived M1-like and M2-like macrophages were polarized with LPS + IFN-γ, L-MTP-PE +/- IFN-γ or IL-10 and incubated with osteosarcoma cells. Two days later, viable tumor cell numbers were analyzed. Antibody-dependent effects were investigated using the therapeutic anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab. M1-like macrophages inhibited osteosarcoma cell growth when activated with LPS + IFN-γ. Likewise, stimulation of M1-like macrophages with liposomal muramyl tripeptide (L-MTP-PE) inhibited tumor growth, but only when combined with IFN-γ. Addition of the tumor-reactive anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab did not further improve the anti-tumor activity of activated M1-like macrophages. The inhibition was mediated by supernatants of activated M1-like macrophages, containing TNF-α and IL-1β. However, specific blockage of these cytokines, nitric oxide or reactive oxygen species did not inhibit the anti-tumor effect, suggesting the involvement of other soluble factors released upon macrophage activation. While LPS + IFN-γ-activated M2-like macrophages had low anti-tumor activity, IL-10-polarized M2-like macrophages were able to reduce osteosarcoma cell growth in the presence of the anti-EGFR cetuximab involving antibody-dependent tumor cell phagocytosis. This study demonstrates that human macrophages can be induced to exert direct anti-tumor activity against osteosarcoma cells. Our

  13. Efficient, long term production of monocyte-derived macrophages from human pluripotent stem cells under partly-defined and fully-defined conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie van Wilgenburg

    Full Text Available Human macrophages are specialised hosts for HIV-1, dengue virus, Leishmania and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet macrophage research is hampered by lack of appropriate cell models for modelling infection by these human pathogens, because available myeloid cell lines are, by definition, not terminally differentiated like tissue macrophages. We describe here a method for deriving monocytes and macrophages from human Pluripotent Stem Cells which improves on previously published protocols in that it uses entirely defined, feeder- and serum-free culture conditions and produces very consistent, pure, high yields across both human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC and multiple human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC lines over time periods of up to one year. Cumulatively, up to ∼3×10(7 monocytes can be harvested per 6-well plate. The monocytes produced are most closely similar to the major blood monocyte (CD14(+, CD16(low, CD163(+. Differentiation with M-CSF produces macrophages that are highly phagocytic, HIV-1-infectable, and upon activation produce a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile similar to blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Macrophages are notoriously hard to genetically manipulate, as they recognise foreign nucleic acids; the lentivector system described here overcomes this, as pluripotent stem cells can be relatively simply genetically manipulated for efficient transgene expression in the differentiated cells, surmounting issues of transgene silencing. Overall, the method we describe here is an efficient, effective, scalable system for the reproducible production and genetic modification of human macrophages, facilitating the interrogation of human macrophage biology.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causes different levels of apoptosis and necrosis in human macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelishvili, Lia; McGarvey, Jeffery; Li, Yong-Jun; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2003-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with macrophages and epithelial cells in the alveolar space of the lung, where it is able to invade and replicate in both cell types. M. tuberculosis-associated cytotoxicity to these cells has been well documented, but the mechanisms of host cell death are not well understood. We examined the induction of apoptosis and necrosis of human macrophages (U937) and type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549) by virulent (H37Rv) and attenuated (H37Ra) M. tuberculosis strains. Apoptosis was determined by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay, whereas necrosis was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both virulent and attenuated M. tuberculosis induced apoptosis in macrophages; however, the attenuated strain resulted in significantly more apoptosis than the virulent strain after 5 days of infection. In contrast, cytotoxicity of alveolar cells was the result of necrosis, but not apoptosis. Although infection with M. tuberculosis strains resulted in apoptosis of 14% of the cells on the monolayer, cell death associated with necrosis was observed in 59% of alveolar epithelial cells after 5 days of infection. Infection with M. tuberculosis suppressed apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells induced by the kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. Because our findings suggest that M. tuberculosis can modulate the apoptotic response of macrophages and epithelial cells, we carried out an apoptosis pathway-specific cDNA microarray analysis of human macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells. Whereas the inhibitors of apoptosis, bcl-2 and Rb, were upregulated over 2.5-fold in infected (48 h) alveolar epithelial cells, the proapoptotic genes, bad and bax, were downregulated. The opposite was observed when U937 macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis. Upon infection of alveolar epithelial cells with M. tuberculosis, the generation of apoptosis, as determined by the

  15. Tumor-cytolytic human macrophages cultured as nonadherent cells: potential for the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helinski, E H; Hurley, E L; Streck, R J; Bielat, K L; Pauly, J L

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-cytolytic lymphokine (e.g., interleukin-2; IL-2)-activated killer cells are currently being evaluated in IL-2/LAK cell adoptive immunotherapy regimens for the treatment of cancer. Monocyte-derived macrophages (M phi) are also known to be efficient tumor killer cells; accordingly, M phi that have been activated in vitro may also be of therapeutic merit. However, attempts to cultivate M phi for morphological and functional studies have often been compromised because M phi adhere rapidly and tenaciously to cultureware. Studies that we have conducted to address this problem have proven successful in developing procedures for the long-term cultivation of non-adherent immunocompetent M phi in serum-free medium using petri dishes containing a thin Teflon liner. The utility of this technology is documented by the results of studies presented herein in which light and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze tumor-cytolytic human M phi. In these experiments, we demonstrated that nonadherent immunocompetent human M phi can be prepared for detailed examinations of their pleomorphic membrane architecture. Moreover, nonadherent human M phi could readily be collected for preparing conjugates of M phi and tumor cells. It is anticipated that this technology should prove useful for future structure-function studies defining the topographical location and spatial distribution of antigens and receptors on M phi membrane ultrastructures, particularly the microvilli-like projections that bridge together an immunocompetent effector M phi and target cell (e.g., tumor cells and microbial pathogens) and which provide the physical interaction required for the initial phases of a cellular immune response that includes antigen recognition and cell-to-cell adhesion.

  16. Classification of M1/M2-polarized human macrophages by label-free hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscopy and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Francesca R; Mozetic, Pamela; Fioramonti, Marco; Iuliani, Michele; Ribelli, Giulia; Pantano, Francesco; Santini, Daniele; Tonini, Giuseppe; Trombetta, Marcella; Businaro, Luca; Selci, Stefano; Rainer, Alberto

    2017-08-21

    The possibility of detecting and classifying living cells in a label-free and non-invasive manner holds significant theranostic potential. In this work, Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) has been successfully applied to the analysis of macrophagic polarization, given its central role in several pathological settings, including the regulation of tumour microenvironment. Human monocyte derived macrophages have been investigated using hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscopy, and hyperspectral datasets have been analysed in terms of M1 vs. M2 polarization by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Following PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis has been implemented for semi-automatic classification of macrophagic polarization from HSI data. Our results confirm the possibility to perform single-cell-level in vitro classification of M1 vs. M2 macrophages in a non-invasive and label-free manner with a high accuracy (above 98% for cells deriving from the same donor), supporting the idea of applying the technique to the study of complex interacting cellular systems, such in the case of tumour-immunity in vitro models.

  17. Human β-defensin 3 inhibits periodontitis development by suppressing inflammatory responses in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Lyu, Jinglu; Li, Houxuan; Lei, Lang; Bian, Tianying; Li, Lili; Yan, Fuhua

    2017-11-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) is a cationic peptide with immunomodulatory effects on both innate and acquired immune responses. Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease that extends deep into periodontal tissues, causes the loss of supporting structures around the tooth. The present study assessed the effects of hBD3 as a monotherapy for periodontitis in mice and explored its potential mechanism. In vivo, hBD3 inhibited the levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloprotease-9 in periodontium exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) in a mouse periodontitis model; reduced osteoclast formation and lower alveolar bone loss were also observed. In addition, hBD3 was related to the expression of polarization signature molecules in circulating monocytes. In vitro, hBD3 notably suppressed the production of TNF-α and interleukin-6 in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated by the lipopolysaccharide of P.g. Moreover, hBD3 attenuated polarization of RAW 264.7 cells into the M1 phenotype, with reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB signal transduction. In conclusion, hBD3 exhibits potent anti-periodontitis properties both in vitro and in vivo, and this effect may be correlated to inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB pathway and macrophage polarization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Human umbilical cord blood-derived f-macrophages retain pluripotentiality after thrombopoietin expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yong; Mazzone, Theodore

    2005-01-01

    We have previously characterized a new type of stem cell from human peripheral blood, termed fibroblast-like macrophage (f-MΦ). Here, using umbilical cord blood as a source, we identified cells with similar characteristics including expression of surface markers (CD14, CD34, CD45, CD117, and CD163), phagocytosis, and proliferative capacity. Further, thrombopoietin (TPO) significantly stimulated the proliferation of cord blood-derived f-MΦ (CB f-MΦ) at low dosage without inducing a megakaryocytic phenotype. Additional experiments demonstrated that TPO-expanded cord blood-derived f-MΦ (TCB f-MΦ) retained their surface markers and differentiation ability. Treatment with vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) gave rise to endothelial-like cells, expressing Flt-1, Flk-1, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), CD31, acetylated low density lipoprotein internalization, and the ability to form endothelial-like cell chains. In the presence of lipopolyssacharide (LPS) and 25 mM glucose, the TCB f-MΦ differentiated to express insulin mRNA, C-peptide, and insulin. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that these insulin-positive cells could release insulin in response to glucose and other secretagogues. These findings demonstrate a potential use of CB f-MΦ and may lead to develop new therapeutic strategy for treating dominant disease

  19. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

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    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  20. Alteration of human macrophages microRNA expression profile upon infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Lucinda Furci

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This study signifies the miRNA host response upon intracellular mycobacterial infection in macrophages, providing new aspects of regulation in host-pathogen interactions, at post-transcriptional levels.

  1. PLASMA AND LUNG MACROPHAGE CAROTENOID RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLEMENTATION AND OZONE EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE:: To examine the effect of ozone exposure and vegetable juice supplementation on plasma and lung macrophage concentrations of carotenoids. DESIGN:: A randomized trial. SETTING:: Subjects were exposed to ambient air prior to antioxidant supplementation and to ozone after...

  2. Cardiotoxicity of combined administration of adriamycin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in rats. With special reference to 125I-MIBG cardioautoradiography and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Nozomi; Yamazaki, Junichi; Serizawa, Isao; Misaizu, Tadashi; Sato, Masanori.

    1995-01-01

    We studied whether adriamycin (ADM)-induced myocardial damage in rats is advanced when recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is administered. Rats were divided into three groups: ADM group, ADM+G-CSF group and vehicle-treated control group. ADM (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for the first 2 days in each cycle and 10 days administration of G-CSF (50lμg/kg, s.c.) was started two days after the second administration of ADM in each cycle. The administration cycle was repeated 3 times. One day after the last administration, following parameters were analyzed: hematological examination including peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, electrocardiogram (ECG) and histopathological findings. At 4 hr after an intravenous administration of 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 125 I-MIBG), accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in some organs and findings of autoradiography (ARG) of the heart was examined. ECG revealed an extended ventricular activation (VAT) time in the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. In the histopathological analysis, vacuolar degeneration of the myocardium was observed in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. The severity of the change was equivalent in those groups. The accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in the heart was lower in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups than in the control group. The same tendency was observed in ARG, but the difference between the ADM group and the ADM+G-CSF group was not significant. These results suggest that administration of G-CSF in the standard clinical dosage does not aggravate ADM-induced myocardial damage. However, because this disorder may be more clearly manifested by treatment with higher doses of ADM, it is necessary to conduct further studies on the methods of administration. (author)

  3. Extracellular traps are associated with human and mouse neutrophil and macrophage mediated killing of larval Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne-Année, Sandra; Kerepesi, Laura A; Hess, Jessica A; Wesolowski, Jordan; Paumet, Fabienne; Lok, James B; Nolan, Thomas J; Abraham, David

    2014-06-01

    Neutrophils are multifaceted cells that are often the immune system's first line of defense. Human and murine cells release extracellular DNA traps (ETs) in response to several pathogens and diseases. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is crucial to trapping and killing extracellular pathogens. Aside from neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils also release ETs. We hypothesized that ETs serve as a mechanism of ensnaring the large and highly motile helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis thereby providing a static target for the immune response. We demonstrated that S. stercoralis larvae trigger the release of ETs by human neutrophils and macrophages. Analysis of NETs revealed that NETs trapped but did not kill larvae. Induction of NETs was essential for larval killing by human but not murine neutrophils and macrophages in vitro. In mice, extracellular traps were induced following infection with S. stercoralis larvae and were present in the microenvironment of worms being killed in vivo. These findings demonstrate that NETs ensnare the parasite facilitating larval killing by cells of the immune system. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. MIR144* inhibits antimicrobial responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human monocytes and macrophages by targeting the autophagy protein DRAM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Lee, Hye-Mi; Park, Ki-Sun; Shin, Dong-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Yi Sak; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Soo Yeon; Kim, In Soo; Kim, Jin-Man; Son, Ji-Woong; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Jung, Sung Soo; Chung, Chaeuk; Han, Sang-Bae; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an important antimicrobial effector process that defends against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the human pathogen causing tuberculosis (TB). MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous noncoding RNAs, are involved in various biological functions and act as post-transcriptional regulators to target mRNAs. The process by which miRNAs affect antibacterial autophagy and host defense mechanisms against Mtb infections in human monocytes and macrophages is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we show that Mtb significantly induces the expression of MIR144*/hsa-miR-144-5p, which targets the 3'-untranslated region of DRAM2 (DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2) in human monocytes and macrophages. Mtb infection downregulated, whereas the autophagy activators upregulated, DRAM2 expression in human monocytes and macrophages by activating AMP-activated protein kinase. In addition, overexpression of MIR144* decreased DRAM2 expression and formation of autophagosomes in human monocytes, whereas inhibition of MIR144* had the opposite effect. Moreover, the levels of MIR144* were elevated, whereas DRAM2 levels were reduced, in human peripheral blood cells and tissues in TB patients, indicating the clinical significance of MIR144* and DRAM2 in human TB. Notably, DRAM2 interacted with BECN1 and UVRAG, essential components of the autophagic machinery, leading to displacement of RUBCN from the BECN1 complex and enhancement of Ptdlns3K activity. Furthermore, MIR144* and DRAM2 were critically involved in phagosomal maturation and enhanced antimicrobial effects against Mtb. Our findings identify a previously unrecognized role of human MIR144* in the inhibition of antibacterial autophagy and the innate host immune response to Mtb. Additionally, these data reveal that DRAM2 is a key coordinator of autophagy activation that enhances antimicrobial activity against Mtb.

  5. Interaction of differentiated human adipocytes with macrophages leads to trogocytosis and selective IL-6 secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Sárvári, Anitta Kinga; Doan-Xuan, Quang-Minh; Bacsó, Zsolt; Csomós, István; Balajthy, Zoltán; Fésüs, László

    2015-01-01

    Obesity leads to adipose tissue inflammation that is characterized by increased release of proinflammatory molecules and the recruitment of activated immune cells. Although macrophages are present in the highest number among the immune cells in obese adipose tissue, not much is known about their direct interaction with adipocytes. We have introduced an ex vivo experimental system to characterize the cellular interactions and the profile of secreted cytokines in cocultures of macrophages and h...

  6. The humanized anti-human AMHRII mAb 3C23K exerts an anti-tumor activity against human ovarian cancer through tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Houcine; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Massonnet, Gérald; Pugnière, Martine; Ngô, Charlotte; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Leary, Alexandra; Alexandre, Jérôme; Meseure, Didier; Barret, Jean-Marc; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Prost, Jean-François; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Decaudin, Didier

    2017-11-21

    Müllerian inhibiting substance, also called anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of AMH type II receptor-positive tumor cells, such as human ovarian cancers (OCs). On this basis, a humanized glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody (3C23K) has been developed. The aim of this study was therefore to experimentally confirm the therapeutic potential of 3C23K in human OCs. We first determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and cytofluorometry analyses the expression of AMHRII in patient's tumors and found that a majority (60 to 80% depending on the detection technique) of OCs were positive for this marker. We then provided evidence that the tumor stroma of OC is enriched in tumor-associated macrophages and that these cells are responsible for 3C23K-induced killing of tumor cells through ADCP and ADCC mechanisms. In addition, we showed that 3C23K reduced macrophages induced-T cells immunosuppression. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 3C23K alone and in combination with a carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy in a panel of OC Patient-Derived Xenografts. In those experiments, we showed that 3C23K significantly increased the proportion and the quality of chemotherapy-based in vivo responses. Altogether, our data support the potential interest of AMHRII targeting in human ovarian cancers and the evaluation of 3C23K in further clinical trials.

  7. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Modulates Immunity by Polarizing Human Macrophages to a M2 Profile.

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    María Carolina Ortiz

    Full Text Available Current data suggest that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. The present report is focused on gonococcus evasion mechanism on macrophages (MФ and its impact in the subsequent immune response. In response to various signals MФ may undergo classical-M1 (M1-MФ or alternative-M2 (M2-MФ activation. Until now there are no reports of the gonococcus effects on human MФ polarization. We assessed the phagocytic ability of monocyte-derived MФ (MDM upon gonococcal infection by immunofluorescence and gentamicin protection experiments. Then, we evaluated cytokine profile and M1/M2 specific-surface markers on MФ challenged with N. gonorrhoeae and their proliferative effect on T cells. Our findings lead us to suggest N. gonorrhoeae stimulates a M2-MФ phenotype in which some of the M2b and none of the M1-MФ-associated markers are induced. Interestingly, N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1, widely known as an immunosuppressive molecule. Moreover, functional results showed that N. gonorrhoeae-treated MФ are unable to induce proliferation of human T-cells, suggesting a more likely regulatory phenotype. Taken together, our data show that N. gonorroheae interferes with MФ polarization. This study has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of clearance versus long-term persistence of N. gonorroheae infection and might be applicable for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Uptake of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose in human monocyte-macrophages in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deichen, Jan Thiess; Prante, Olaf; Gack, Michaela; Schmiedehausen, Kristin; Kuwert, Torsten

    2003-01-01

    The fact that fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) accumulates in inflammatory lesions as well as in tumours reduces the diagnostic specificity of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. The aim of this study was to characterise the uptake of [ 18 F]FDG in isolated human monocyte-macrophages (HMMs) in vitro in comparison with that in human glioblastoma (GLI) and pancreatic carcinoma cells (PAN). The purity of HMM preparations was determined by immunohistochemical staining and their functional integrity was assessed by long-term incubation with iodine-131 acetylated bovine serum albumin. [ 18 F]FDG uptake in HMMs was quantified as percent of whole [ 18 F]FDG activity per well (% ID) or as % ID in relation to total protein mass. [ 18 F]FDG uptake in HMMs significantly increased with culture duration, yielding 7.5%±0.9% (% ID/100 μg) at day 14. Stimulation by lipopolysaccharide further enhanced [ 18 F]FDG uptake in HMMs by a factor of 2. [ 18 F]FDG uptake significantly decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium. Radio-thin layer chromatography of intracellular metabolites revealed that [ 18 F]FDG was trapped by HMMs mainly as [ 18 F]FDG-6-phosphate and [ 18 F]FDG-1,6-diphosphate. [ 18 F]FDG uptake was in the range of uptake values measured in GLI and PAN. By accumulating [ 18 F]FDG in a manner analogous to uptake by tumour cells, activated HMMs may contribute to the [ 18 F]FDG uptake values measured by PET in neoplasms. (orig.)

  9. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Alters the Morphology and Secretion Profile of Both Polarized and Unpolarized Human Macrophages in a Polarization-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, Raymond A.; Bonilla, Fernando J.; Pagan, Hendrick; Cruz, Myrella L.; Lopez, Pablo; Godoy, Lenin; Hernandez, Siomara; Loucil-Alicea, Raisa Y.; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Isidro, Angel A.; Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), most commonly Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), suffer from chronic intestinal inflammation of unknown etiology. Increased proinflammatory macrophages (M1) have been documented in tissue from patients with CD. Anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2) may play a role in UC given the preponderance of Th2 cytokines in this variant of IBD. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the probiotic VSL#3 can ameliorate signs and symptoms of IBD. Although animal data suggests a modulatory effect on macrophage phenotype, the effect of VSL#3 on human macrophages remains unknown. Objective To determine the effect of the probiotic VSL#3 on the phenotype of polarized (M1/M2) and unpolarized (MΦ) human macrophages. Methods Human monocyte-derived macrophages, generated by culturing monocytes with M-CSF, were left unpolarized or were polarized towards an M1 or an M2 phenotype by culture with LPS and IFN-γ or IL-4, respectively, and were then cultured in the presence or absence of VSL#3 for 3 days. Changes in macrophage morphology were assessed. Cytokine and chemokine levels in supernatants were determined by multiplex assay. Results VSL#3 decreased the granuloma-like aggregates of M1 macrophages, increased fibroblast-like M2 macrophages, and decreased fibroblast-like MΦ macrophages. VSL#3 increased the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and G-CSF by M1, M2, and MΦ macrophages. VSL#3 exposure maintained the proinflammatory phenotype of M1 macrophages, sustaining IL-12 secretion, increasing IL-23 secretion, and decreasing MDC secretion. Both VSL#3-treated M2 and MΦ macrophages secreted higher levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-healing factors such as IL-1Ra, IL-13, EGF, FGF-2, TGF-α, and VEGF, as well as proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-12 and TNF-α. Conclusion Under our experimental conditions VSL#3 induced a mixed proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenotype in polarized and unpolarized

  10. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, January 1-July 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1986-08-01

    Two genes for colony stimulating factors (CSF) has been mapped on chromosome five of humans. These CSFs are a family of glycoproteins that are required for the growth and maturation of myeloid progenetor cells in vitro. They are classified according to their cell specificity; thus, M-CSF (CSF-1) and G-CSF primarily stimulate cells committed to the macrophage and granulocyte lineages, respectively. Recently, the genes for both of these factors have been cloned and probes for the clonal genes were used to map their location on normal human chromosomes. Localization of CSF-1 was performed by in situ hybridization of the probe pST-CSF-17 to normal human metaphase chromosomes. This resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 5. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Human papillomavirus infection is associated with decreased levels of GM-CSF in cervico-vaginal fluid of infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comar, Manola; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Ricci, Giuseppe; Zauli, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, there are very scant data about the influence of this virus on the in vitro fertilization outcome. To assess the presence of HPV in the cervico-vaginal fluid in relationship to the in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome and to the concentration of selected cytokines, known to affect embryo implantation and gestation: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Cervico-vaginal samples were collected on the day of oocyte pick-up from 82 women. Vaginas were flushed with 50 mL of sterile water and 3 mL of fluid was collected. Twelve women (15%) were positive for HPV. Interestingly, among HPV(+) women live birth rate was about half of the rate in HPV(-) women, although the differences were not statistically significant due to the low number of cases. Cervico-vaginal samples of a sub-group of 29 (8 HPV(+) and 21 HPV(-)) women were analyzed for GM-CSF and G-CSF by ELISA. GM-CSF but not G-CSF was significantly lower in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) than in HPV(-) women. Since GM-CSF plays an important role during pregnancy, the reduced levels of GM-CSF in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) women might contribute to explain the reduced live birth rate observed in HPV(+) women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Oral and Periodontal Manifestations in a Patient with Cyclic Neutropenia: A Case Report

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    Sergio Matarasso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Neutropenia (CN is characterized by recurrent infections, fever, oral ulcerations, and severe periodontitis as result of the reduced host defences. The previous studies have established the effectiveness of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF to increase the number and the function of neutrophils in the peripheral blood in this disease. In a 20-year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, oral clinical examination revealed multiple painful ulcerations of the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene conditions, marginal gingivitis, and moderate periodontitis. The patient received a treatment with G-CSF (Pegfilgrastim, 6 mg/month in order to improve her immunological status. Once a month nonsurgical periodontal treatment was carefully performed when absolute neutrophil count (ANC was ≥500/L. The treatment with G-CSF resulted in a rapid increase of circulating neutrophils that, despite its short duration, leaded to a reduction in infection related events and the resolution of the multiple oral ulcerations. The disappearance of oral pain allowed an efficacy nonsurgical treatment and a normal tooth brushing that determined a reduction of probing depth (PD≤4 mm and an improvement of the oral hygiene conditions recorded at 6-month follow-up.

  13. Hematological remission and long term hematological control of acute myeloblastic leukemia induced and maintained by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Luciana; Cunha, Manuel; Gonçalves, Cristina; Teixeira, Maria dos Anjos; Coutinho, Jorge; Ribeiro, António Carlos Pinto; Lima, Margarida

    2003-12-01

    We describe a case of a patient with CD34+, TdT+, CD13-, CD33-, MPO- undifferentiated acute leukemia who refused chemotherapy and who achieved complete hematological remission 14 months after the diagnosis, during a short course of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia and life threatening infection. Relapse occurred approximately one year later and G-CSF was reintroduced, being maintained for 4 months, at a dose and frequency adapted to maintain normal blood counts, a complete hematological remission being achieved again. Five months after withdrawing the G-CSF therapy a second relapse was observed; G-CSF was tried again with success, resulting in a very good hematological response that was sustained by G-CSF maintenance therapy. One year latter there was the need of increasing the doses of G-CSF in order to obtain the same hematological effect, at same time blast cells acquired a more mature CD34+, TdT-, CD13+, CD33-, MPO+ myeloid phenotype. Finally, the patient developed progressive neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute leukemia in spite of G-CSF therapy, dying 64 months after initial diagnosis (50 months after starting G-CSF therapy) with overt G-CSF resistant acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), after failure of conventional induction chemotherapy.

  14. A pilot cohort study of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of unresponsive thin endometrium resistant to standard therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, N; Kim, A; Michaeli, T; Lee, H-J; Shohat-Tal, A; Lazzaroni, E; Barad, D H

    2013-01-01

    Is thin endometrium unresponsive to standard treatments expandable by intrauterine perfusion with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)? This cohort study is supportive of the effectiveness of G-CSF in expanding chronically unresponsive endometria. In a previous small case series, we reported the successful off-label use of G-CSF in four consecutive patients, who had previously failed to expand their endometria beyond 6.9 mm with the use of standard treatments. In a prospective observational cohort pilot study over 18 months, we described 21 consecutive infertile women with endometria women had, based on age-specific FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone, an objective diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve and had failed 2.0 ± 2.1 prior IVF cycles elsewhere. With 5.2 ± 1.9 days between G-CSF perfusions and embryo transfers, endometrial thickness increased from 6.4 ± 1.4 to 9.3 ± 2.1 mm (P inventors on a number of awarded and still pending U.S. patents, none related to the materials presented here. N.G. is on the board of a medically related company, not in any way associated with the data presented here.

  15. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating EPC on cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zilin; Luo, Jianchun; Ma, Lixian; Luo, Xia; Huang, Liangyan

    2015-01-01

    To study the changes of cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure following treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction. Thirty-eight patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction were randomized into G-CSF treatment group and control group. All the patients received conventional treatment (medication and interventional therapy), and the patients in treatment group were given additional G-CSF (600 μg/day) for 7 consecutive days. The plasma level of brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in the peripheral blood were detected before and at 7 days and 4 months after the treatment. The cardiac functions (LVEF, FS, LVIDs, PWTs, EDV, SV, ET) was evaluated by ultrasonic imaging before and at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment. The MEE and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) were calculated by correlation formula. The number of EPC was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group after the treatment especially at 7 days (Pexpenditure were improved in all the patients at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment, and the improvement was more obvious in the treatment group (Pexpenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

  16. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment at a low dose but for a long duration in patients with coronary heart disease. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Koji; Nagashima, Kenshi; Arai, Masazumi

    2006-01-01

    In animal models, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves post-infarct cardiac function. However, in pilot studies involving patients with angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), G-CSF at a high dose frequently induced coronary occlusion or restenosis, but those at a low dose showed no significant beneficial effect. We hypothesized that a low dose but long duration of G-CSF will have a beneficial effect without serious complications to patients with coronary heart disease. Forty-six patients with angina or AMI were randomly assigned into G-CSF and non-G-CSF control groups, respectively. Recombinant G-CSF was subcutaneously injected once a day for 10 days. The leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood were controlled at approximately 30,000/μl. One month later, a Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography revealed the increased percentage uptake and the reduced extent and severity scores in the G-CSF angina group. In the G-CSF AMI group, the curve between the ejection fraction and peak creatine kinase shifted significantly upward, compared with that of the non-G-CSF AMI group. Serious complications were not observed during the 6 months of observation. A low dose but long duration of G-CSF treatment may have a beneficial effect without any serious complications in patients with coronary heart disease. (author)

  17. Systemic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances wound healing in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB): Results of a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jo-David; Manes, Becky; Frangoul, Haydar

    2015-07-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds are the norm in patients with inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB), especially those with dystrophic EB (DEB). A possible benefit in wound healing after subcutaneous treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was suggested from an anecdotal report of a patient given this during stem cell mobilization before bone-marrow transplantation. We sought to determine whether benefit in wound healing in DEB skin might result after 6 daily doses of G-CSF and to confirm its safety. Patients were assessed for changes in total body blister and erosion counts, surface areas of selected wounds, and specific symptomatology after treatment. Seven patients with DEB (recessive, 6; dominant, 1) were treated daily with subcutaneous G-CSF (10 μg/kg/dose) and reevaluated on day 7. For all patients combined, median reductions of 75.5% in lesional size and 36.6% in blister/erosion counts were observed. When only the 6 responders were considered, there were median reductions of 77.4% and 38.8% of each of these measured parameters, respectively. No adverse side effects were noted. Limitations include small patient number, more than 1 DEB subtype included, and lack of untreated age-matched control subjects. Subcutaneous G-CSF may be beneficial in promoting wound healing in some patients with DEB when conventional therapies fail. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The receptor for Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is expressed in radial glia during development of the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Carola

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating (G-CSF factor is a well-known hematopoietic growth factor stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Recently, we uncovered that G-CSF acts also as a neuronal growth factor in the brain, which promotes adult neural precursor differentiation and enhances regeneration of the brain after insults. In adults, the receptor for G-CSF is predominantly expressed in neurons in many brain areas. We also described expression in neurogenic regions of the adult brain, such as the subventricular zone and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus. In addition, we found close co-localization of the G-CSF receptor and its ligand G-CSF. Here we have conducted a systematic expression analysis of G-CSF receptor and its ligand in the developing embryo. Results Outside the central nervous system (CNS we found G-CSF receptor expression in blood vessels, muscles and their respective precursors and neurons. The expression of the G-CSF receptor in the developing CNS was most prominent in radial glia cells. Conclusion Our data imply that in addition to the function of G-CSF and its receptor in adult neurogenesis, this system also has a role in embryonic neurogenesis and nervous system development.

  19. The impact of donor characteristics on the immune cell composition of mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    The association of donor characteristics with immune cell composition in allografts remains poorly understood. In this retrospective study, the effects of donor characteristics on immune cell composition in allografts were investigated. The correlations of donor characteristics with the immune cell composition in mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests of 390 healthy donors (male, 240; female, 150; median age, 40 years old) were analyzed. The median doses of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells, and monocytes in mixture allografts were 160.57 × 10(6), 89.29 × 10(6), 56.16 × 10(6), 10.87 × 10(6), and 137.94 × 10(6)/kg, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that younger donor age was associated with a higher dose of CD3+ T cells (p = 0.006), CD3+CD8+ T cells (p donor weight with CD3+ T cells (p blood lymphocyte pre-peripheral blood apheresis was correlated with the yield of CD3+ T cells (p blood monocyte count before marrow harvest predicted the monocyte dose (p = 0.002). The results suggested that older and overweight donors should not be chosen. The monocyte and lymphocyte counts before harvest could predict the yield of immune cells in allografts. © 2015 AABB.

  20. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirzagar, Nasibeh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Tafakhori, Abbas; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Siroos, Bahaddin; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Forty subjects with ALS were randomly assigned to two groups, which received either subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/q12h) or placebo for 5 days. The subjects were then followed up for 3 months using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), manual muscle testing, ALS Assessment Questionnaire-40, and nerve conduction studies. CD34+/CD133+ cell count and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated at baseline. The rate of disease progression did not differ significantly between the two groups. The reduction in ALSFRS-R scores was greater in female subjects in the G-CSF group than in their counterparts in the placebo group. There was a trend toward a positive correlation between baseline CSF MCP-1 levels and the change in ALSFRS-R scores in both groups (Spearman's ρ=0.370, p=0.070). With the protocol implemented in this study, G-CSF is not a promising option for the treatment of ALS. Furthermore, it may accelerate disease progression in females.

  2. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright ©