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Sample records for human lung tissues

  1. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues.

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    Jérôme Lane

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408 and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282. Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05, respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05. Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival

  2. Human Lung Tissue Transcriptome : Influence of Sex and Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dugo, Matteo; Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Lavoie-Charland, Emilie; Incarbone, Matteo; Santambrogio, Luigi; Rosso, Lorenzo; van den Berge, Maarten; Nickle, David; Pare, Peter D.; Bosse, Yohan; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex and age strongly influence the pathophysiology of human lungs, but scarce information is available about their effects on pulmonary gene expression. Methods We followed a discovery-validation strategy to identify sex-and age-related transcriptional differences in lung. Results We

  3. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

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    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  4. Measurement of histamine release from human lung tissue ex vivo by microdialysis technique

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    Nissen, Dan; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Nolte, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Currently no method is available for measurement of mediator release from intact human lung. In this study, a microdialysis technique was used to measure histamine release from mast cells in human lung tissue ex vivo. MATERIAL: Microdialysis fibers of 216 microm were inserted...... responses were observed but data could be reproduced within individual donors. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a potent basophil secretagogue, did not induce histamine release in lung tissue which indicated mast cells to be the histamine source. Substance P did not release histamine in the lung tissue....... CONCLUSIONS: The microdialysis technique allowed measurements of histamine release from mast cells in intact lung ex vivo. The method may prove useful since a number of experiments can be performed in a few hours in intact lung tissue without any dispersion or enzymatic treatment....

  5. Characterizing human lung tissue microbiota and its relationship to epidemiological and clinical features.

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    Yu, Guoqin; Gail, Mitchell H; Consonni, Dario; Carugno, Michele; Humphrys, Michael; Pesatori, Angela C; Caporaso, Neil E; Goedert, James J; Ravel, Jacques; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-28

    The human lung tissue microbiota remains largely uncharacterized, although a number of studies based on airway samples suggest the existence of a viable human lung microbiota. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of lung microbiota in 165 non-malignant lung tissue samples from cancer patients. We show that the lung microbiota is distinct from the microbial communities in oral, nasal, stool, skin, and vagina, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum (60 %). Microbiota taxonomic alpha diversity increases with environmental exposures, such as air particulates, residence in low to high population density areas, and pack-years of tobacco smoking and decreases in subjects with history of chronic bronchitis. Genus Thermus is more abundant in tissue from advanced stage (IIIB, IV) patients, while Legionella is higher in patients who develop metastases. Moreover, the non-malignant lung tissues have higher microbiota alpha diversity than the paired tumors. Our results provide insights into the human lung microbiota composition and function and their link to human lifestyle and clinical outcomes. Studies among subjects without lung cancer are needed to confirm our findings.

  6. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in human fetal and infant lung.

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    Gould, S J; Isaacson, P G

    1993-02-01

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) has been defined as the organized lymphoid tissue of the lung. Although well described in a variety of animal species, documentation of its presence and development in human lung is limited. Because the tissue to volume ratio in adult lungs is so low, a systematic search for BALT would involve so many sections as to be impractical. In this study, therefore, we have studied post-mortem specimens of fetal (n = 102) and infant (n = 17) lungs, which have a much higher tissue to volume ratio. Fetal death was due to various causes but all but two infants died from sudden infant death syndrome. In the fetal lungs, the presence of BALT was almost invariably associated with chorioamnionitis or intrauterine pneumonia, being present in 24 of 51 of these cases (47 per cent). The earliest ill-defined lymphoid aggregate was seen at 16 weeks' gestation, while lymphoepithelium, a hallmark of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, could be identified at 20 weeks. In 51 fetuses without infection, BALT was found in only five cases (10 per cent). BALT was identified in 13/17 (77 per cent) of infant lungs and well-developed lymphoepithelium was evident in four cases. This study shows that BALT may be present in the human fetal and infant lung, but that its appearance is probably dependent on antigenic stimulation.

  7. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue.

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    Parasa, Venkata Ramanarao; Rahman, Muhammad Jubayer; Ngyuen Hoang, Anh Thu; Svensson, Mattias; Brighenti, Susanna; Lerm, Maria

    2014-02-01

    The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB) display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  8. Primary mesenchymal stem cells in human transplanted lungs are CD90/CD105 perivascularly located tissue-resident cells

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    Rolandsson, Sara; Andersson Sjöland, Annika; Brune, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have not only been implicated in the development of lung diseases, but they have also been proposed as a future cell-based therapy for lung diseases. However, the cellular identity of the primary MSC in human lung tissues has not yet been reported. This st......BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have not only been implicated in the development of lung diseases, but they have also been proposed as a future cell-based therapy for lung diseases. However, the cellular identity of the primary MSC in human lung tissues has not yet been reported...

  9. Bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in human lung: its distribution in smokers and non-smokers.

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    Richmond, I; Pritchard, G E; Ashcroft, T; Avery, A; Corris, P A; Walters, E H

    1993-11-01

    Bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is a normal component of the lung's immune system in many animals and may be analogous to gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This study aimed at assessing the nature and extent of BALT in human lung and determining whether its expression is induced within the human airway in response to smoking. Paraffin embedded, formalin fixed full thickness bronchial wall sections were examined from 31 whole lung specimens derived from both smokers and non-smokers. Samples were taken from throughout the bronchial tree to include main stem bronchi, lobar bronchi and segmental bronchi, as well as first to third generation carinae. Standard 4 microns step sections were stained by haematoxylin and eosin and immunocytochemical methods to show foci of BALT. Examination of 256 airway sites detected 46 foci of BALT. These differed from those described in other mammals in being distributed throughout the bronchial tree, in being found in relation to bronchial glandular epithelium as well as luminal bronchial epithelium, and in lacking any accompanying M cells. Analysis by smoking status showed that the expression of BALT was significantly more common in smokers than non-smokers (82% (14/17) v 14% (2/14) respectively). The findings support the view that BALT in humans is an integral feature in a comparatively small proportion of lungs from non-smokers while being significantly more prominent in lungs from smokers. The tissue shows several important differences from that described in other mammals.

  10. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

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    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  11. Serotype 1 and 8 Pneumococci Evade Sensing by Inflammasomes in Human Lung Tissue.

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    Diana Fatykhova

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin is a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, which can be sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among the over 90 serotypes, serotype 1 pneumococci (particularly MLST306 have emerged across the globe as a major cause of invasive disease. The cause for its particularity is, however, incompletely understood. We therefore examined pneumococcal infection in human cells and a human lung organ culture system mimicking infection of the lower respiratory tract. We demonstrate that different pneumococcal serotypes differentially activate inflammasome-dependent IL-1β production in human lung tissue and cells. Whereas serotype 2, 3, 6B, 9N pneumococci expressing fully haemolytic pneumolysins activate NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent responses, serotype 1 and 8 strains expressing non-haemolytic toxins are poor activators of IL-1β production. Accordingly, purified haemolytic pneumolysin but not serotype 1-associated non-haemolytic toxin activates strong IL-1β production in human lungs. Our data suggest that the evasion of inflammasome-dependent innate immune responses by serotype 1 pneumococci might contribute to their ability to cause invasive diseases in humans.

  12. Development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer for human lung tissue exploration.

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    Peyrot, Donald A; Lefort, Claire; Steffenhagen, Marie; Mansuryan, Tigran; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Abi-Haidar, Darine; Sandeau, Nicolas; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Kruglik, Sergei G; Thiberville, Luc; Louradour, Frédéric; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève

    2012-05-01

    Several major lung pathologies are characterized by early modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrillar collagen and elastin network. We report here the development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer, compatible with an endoscopic use, primarily intended for the recording of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) of both collagen and elastin. Fiber dispersion is accurately compensated by the use of a specific grism-pair stretcher, allowing laser pulse temporal width around 70 fs and excitation wavelength tunability from 790 to 900 nm. This spectrometer was used to investigate the excitation wavelength dependence (from 800 to 870 nm) of SHG and 2PEF spectra originating from ex vivo human lung tissue samples. The results were compared with spectral responses of collagen gel and elastin powder reference samples and also with data obtained using standard nonlinear microspectroscopy. The excitation-wavelength-tunable nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer presented in this study allows performing nonlinear spectroscopy of human lung tissue ECM through the elastin 2PEF and the collagen SHG signals. This work opens the way to tunable excitation nonlinear endomicroscopy based on both distal scanning of a single optical fiber and proximal scanning of a fiber-optic bundle.

  13. Expression of Fascin-1 on human lung cancer and paracarcinoma tissue and its relation to clinicopathological characteristics in patients with lung cancer

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    Zhao, Wei; Gao, Jing; Wu, Jing; Liu, Qiu-hong; Wang, Zhi-gang; Li, Hui-ling; Xing, Li-hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer poses a severe threat to human life. Biomarkers of cancers are helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with cancers. Biomarkers of lung cancers are rare, and thus deserve further research. Objective The objective of the present study was to explore the expression of Fascin-1 in human lung cancer and paracarcinoma tissue, its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics in patients with lung cancer, and study the possible relationship between Fascin-1 expression and clinical–biological behavior of lung cancer. Method This study used the MaxVision two-step immunohistochemical detection method to detect Fascin-1 expression in 84 of lung cancer and paracarcinoma tissues. This study set the expression of Fascin-1 in vascular endothelial cells as the positive control, and used phosphate buffered saline (replacing the primary antibodies) as negative control. Result Of all the 84 lung cancer tissues and paracarcinoma tissues, positive expression of the Fascin-1 protein were detected in 78 cases (92.9%) and 27 cases (32.1%), respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05). The survival times of the patients with different Fascin-1 protein-positive expressions in lung cancer tissues were statistically significant (P>0.05), while the survival times of the patients with different Fascin-1 protein-positive expressions in paracarcinoma tissues were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion In lung cancer, Fascin-1 expression was closely related to tumor invasion and metastasis, and the difference in expression of Fascin-1 had a significant effect on the survival time of the lung cancer patients. Therefore, Fascin-1 might be expected to serve as a possible potential biomarker of lung cancer. PMID:26451116

  14. Anti-human tissue factor antibody ameliorated intestinal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute lung injury in human tissue factor knock-in mice.

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    Xiaolin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interaction between the coagulation and inflammation systems plays an important role in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Anti-coagulation is an attractive option for ARDS treatment, and this has promoted development of new antibodies. However, preclinical trials for these antibodies are often limited by the high cost and availability of non-human primates. In the present study, we developed a novel alternative method to test the role of a humanized anti-tissue factor mAb in acute lung injury with transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human tissue factor knock-in (hTF-KI transgenic mice and a novel humanized anti-human tissue factor mAb (anti-hTF mAb, CNTO859 were developed. The hTF-KI mice showed a normal and functional expression of hTF. The anti-hTF mAb specifically blocked the pro-coagulation activity of brain extracts from the hTF-KI mice and human, but not from wild type mice. An extrapulmonary ARDS model was used by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Significant lung tissue damage in hTF-KI mice was observed after 2 h reperfusion. Administration of CNTO859 (5 mg/kg, i.v. attenuated the severity of lung tissue injury, decreased the total cell counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced Evans blue leakage. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced alveolar fibrin deposition, and decreased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity in the serum. This treatment also down-regulated cytokine expression and reduced cell death in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: This novel anti-hTF antibody showed beneficial effects on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury, which merits further investigation for clinical usage. In addition, the use of knock-in transgenic mice to test the efficacy of antibodies against human-specific proteins is a novel strategy for preclinical studies.

  15. Preclinical validation and imaging of Wnt-induced repair in human 3D lung tissue cultures.

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    Uhl, Franziska E; Vierkotten, Sarah; Wagner, Darcy E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Costa, Rita; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by a progressive loss of lung tissue. Inducing repair processes within the adult diseased lung is of major interest and Wnt/β-catenin signalling represents a promising target for lung repair. However, the translation of novel therapeutic targets from model systems into clinical use remains a major challenge.We generated murine and patient-derived three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo lung tissue cultures (LTCs), which closely mimic the 3D lung microenvironment in vivo. Using two well-known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and CHIR 99021 (CT), we determined Wnt/β-catenin-driven lung repair processes in high spatiotemporal resolution using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, (immuno)histological assessment, and four-dimensional confocal live tissue imaging.Viable 3D-LTCs exhibited preserved lung structure and function for up to 5 days. We demonstrate successful Wnt/β-catenin signal activation in murine and patient-derived 3D-LTCs from COPD patients. Wnt/β-catenin signalling led to increased alveolar epithelial cell marker expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression, as well as altered macrophage activity and elastin remodelling. Importantly, induction of surfactant protein C significantly correlated with disease stage (per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) in patient-derived 3D-LTCs.Patient-derived 3D-LTCs represent a valuable tool to analyse potential targets and drugs for lung repair. Enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling attenuated pathological features of patient-derived COPD 3D-LTCs. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  16. Mean Organ Doses Resulting From Non-Human Primate Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation Prescribed to Mid-Line Tissue.

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    Prado, Charlotte; Kazi, Abdul; Bennett, Alexander; MacVittie, Thomas; Prado, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Multi-organ dose evaluations and the effects of heterogeneous tissue dose calculations have been retrospectively evaluated following irradiation to the whole thorax and lung in non-human primates (NHP). A clinical-based approach was established to evaluate actual doses received in the heart and lungs during whole thorax lung irradiation. Anatomical structure and organ densities have been introduced in the calculations to show the effects of dose distribution through heterogeneous tissue. Mean organ doses received by non-human primates undergoing whole thorax lung irradiations were calculated using a treatment planning system that is routinely used in clinical radiation oncology. The doses received by non-human primates irradiated following conventional dose calculations have been retrospectively reconstructed using computerized tomography-based, heterogeneity-corrected dose calculations. The use of dose volume descriptors for irradiation to organs at risk and tissue exposed to radiation is introduced. Mean and partial-volume doses to lung and heart are presented and contrasted. The importance of exact dose definitions is highlighted, and the relevance of precise dosimetry to establish organ-specific dose response relationships in NHP models of acute and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure is emphasized.

  17. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology.

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    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R; Foster, Timothy J; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human setting. The

  18. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology

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    Srikanth Mairpady Shambat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a

  19. Rho inhibition by lovastatin affects apoptosis and DSB repair of primary human lung cells in vitro and lung tissue in vivo following fractionated irradiation

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    Ziegler, Verena; Henninger, Christian; Simiantonakis, Ioannis; Buchholzer, Marcel; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza; Budach, Wilfried; Fritz, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic radiotherapy causes damage of normal lung tissue, which limits the cumulative radiation dose and, hence, confines the anticancer efficacy of radiotherapy and impacts the quality of life of tumor patients. Ras-homologous (Rho) small GTPases regulate multiple stress responses and cell death. Therefore, we investigated whether pharmacological targeting of Rho signaling by the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin influences ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in primary human lung fibroblasts, lung epithelial and lung microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and subchronic mouse lung tissue damage following hypo-fractionated irradiation (4x4 Gy). The statin improved the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all cell types and, moreover, protected lung endothelial cells from IR-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, likely involving p53-regulated mechanisms. Under the in vivo situation, treatment with lovastatin or the Rac1-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 attenuated the IR-induced increase in breathing frequency and reduced the percentage of γH2AX and 53BP1-positive cells. This indicates that inhibition of Rac1 signaling lowers IR-induced residual DNA damage by promoting DNA repair. Moreover, lovastatin and EHT1864 protected lung tissue from IR-triggered apoptosis and mitigated the IR-stimulated increase in regenerative proliferation. Our data document beneficial anti-apoptotic and genoprotective effects of pharmacological targeting of Rho signaling following hypo-fractionated irradiation of lung cells in vitro and in vivo. Rac1-targeting drugs might be particular useful for supportive care in radiation oncology and, moreover, applicable to improve the anticancer efficacy of radiotherapy by widening the therapeutic window of thoracic radiation exposure. PMID:28796249

  20. Routes of conjugation in normal and cancerous tissue from human lung

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    Cohen, Gerald M.; Gibby, Elizabeth M.; Mehta, Rekha

    1981-06-01

    The selective toxicity of drugs leading to major advances in antibacterial chemotherapy has often resulted from the identification and exploitation of major biochemical differences between bacterial and mammalian species1. Similar progress has not been made in cancer chemotherapy, partly due to a lack of suitable biochemical differences between normal and cancerous tissue other than in DNA synthesis, but also because of many other problems such as those of metastases and resistance, and the presence in tumours of cells at different states of the cell cycle. Here we report a major biochemical difference in the routes of conjugation between normal lung and tumour tissue from patients with lung cancer. Conjugation with glucuronic acid and sulphate constitute two of the most important pathways of metabolism of drugs, other foreign compounds and hormonal steroids2,3. Using 1-naphthol as a model phenolic substrate, normal peripheral lung tissue formed almost exclusively the sulphate ester conjugate, 1-naphthyl sulphate, whereas tumour tissue from squamous carcinomas from the same patients formed predominantly the glucuronic acid conjugate, 1-naphthyl glucuronide. Such major biochemical differences may be exploitable in the design of selectively toxic cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Is the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) an integral structure of the lung in normal mammals, including humans?

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    Pabst, R; Gehrke, I

    1990-08-01

    In the respiratory tract, lymphoid aggregates with a specialized epithelium have been called bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) and compared to the organized lymphoid tissue of the gut (GALT), e.g., Peyer's patches. BALT might play a central role in antigen uptake, initiating immune responses and disseminating primed lymphoid cells in the respiratory tract. In the present study, lungs of mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, pigs, cats, and humans have been studied with respect to the presence and number of BALT and the dependence of BALT on age and microbial stimulation. BALT is not a constitutive structure in all these species. Its frequency varies widely, from 100% in rabbits and rats, 50% in guinea pigs, 33% in pigs, to its absence in cats and all normal human lungs. BALT seems to be a lymphoid structure which is not present in all the species studied but can develop in the lung after stimulation. This is in contrast to lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes or Peyer's patches, which can always be found. These species differences are of major importance in interpreting the clinical relevance of experiments in animal models on the lung immune system, e.g., antigen uptake, immunostimulation, or lung transplantation.

  2. Low incidence of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in chronically inflamed human lungs.

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    Delventhal, S; Brandis, A; Ostertag, H; Pabst, R

    1992-01-01

    The relevance of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in man is still under discussion. Animal experiments indicate that the development of BALT is dependent on microbial stimulation. Therefore, the incidence of BALT was investigated retrospectively in specimens removed during surgical procedures on patients with chronic pulmonary inflammation. All these patients had severe chronic bronchitis and bronchiectasis, but BALT was found in only 8%. In patients with BALT and a malignant tumor, occlusion of a bronchus with poststenotic pneumonia was always present and BALT was observed exclusively in areas peripheral to the occlusion. In man other compartments of the lung must be responsible for the immune function of BALT found in animals.

  3. Airways, vasculature, and interstitial tissue: anatomically informed computational modeling of human lungs for virtual clinical trials

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    Abadi, Ehsan; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Agasthya, Greeshma; Harrawood, Brian; Hoeschen, Christoph; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W. P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to model virtual human lung phantoms including both non-parenchymal and parenchymal structures. Initial branches of the non-parenchymal structures (airways, arteries, and veins) were segmented from anatomical data in each lobe separately. A volume-filling branching algorithm was utilized to grow the higher generations of the airways and vessels to the level of terminal branches. The diameters of the airways and vessels were estimated using established relationships between flow rates and diameters. The parenchyma was modeled based on secondary pulmonary lobule units. Polyhedral shapes with variable sizes were modeled, and the borders were assigned to interlobular septa. A heterogeneous background was added inside these units using a non-parametric texture synthesis algorithm which was informed by a high-resolution CT lung specimen dataset. A voxelized based CT simulator was developed to create synthetic helical CT images of the phantom with different pitch values. Results showed the progressive degradation in depiction of lung details with increased pitch. Overall, the enhanced lung models combined with the XCAT phantoms prove to provide a powerful toolset to perform virtual clinical trials in the context of thoracic imaging. Such trials, not practical using clinical datasets or simplistic phantoms, can quantitatively evaluate and optimize advanced imaging techniques towards patient-based care.

  4. Upregulation of IL-17A/F from human lung tissue explants with cigarette smoke exposure: implications for COPD.

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    Chang, Ying; Al-Alwan, Laila; Alshakfa, Sama; Audusseau, Severine; Mogas, Andrea Karen; Chouiali, Fazila; Nair, Parameswaran; Baglole, Carolyn J; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H

    2014-11-27

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory disorder marked by relative resistance to steroids. The IL-17 superfamily, which mediates cross-talk between the adaptive and innate immune systems, has been associated with diminished responses to steroids. Increasing evidence supports elevated IL-17 expression in the lung of COPD subjects. However, whether cells of the immune system (systemic) and/or local lung cells are contributing to the elevated IL-17 remains unclear. To address this issue, we utilized a human parenchymal lung tissue explant culture system with cigarette smoke exposure to investigate the expression of IL-17 and the mechanisms involved. Parenchymal lung tissue removed from 10 non-COPD and 8 COPD patients was sectioned and cultured with different concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 3 or 6 hours. Tissue viability was evaluated by LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) in culture supernatants. Western blot and real-time PCR were performed to evaluate IL-17A/F expression. To investigate the mechanisms, pharmacological inhibitors for MAPK p38, ERK1/2, NF-κB and PI3K pathways were added into the culture media. No tissue damage was observed after the cigarette smoke exposure for 3 h or 6 h compared with the control media. At the protein level, the expression of both IL-17A (2.4 ± 0.6 fold) and IL-17 F (3.7 ± 0.7 fold) in the tissue from non-COPD subjects was significantly increased by 5% of CSE at 3 h. For COPD subjects, IL-17A/F expression were significantly increased only at 6 h with 10% of CSE (IL-17A: 4.2 ± 0.8 fold; IL-17 F: 3.3 ± 0.8 fold). The increased expression of IL-17A/F is also regulated at the mRNA level. The inhibitors for NF-κB and PI3K pathways significantly inhibited CSE-induced IL-17A/F expression from lung tissue of non-COPD subjects. We found the evidence that the expression of both IL-17A and IL-17 F is increased by the cigarette smoke exposure in explants from both non-COPD and COPD subjects, supporting

  5. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-mediated cell differentiation to proteolysis mechanism networks from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Diao, Haizhen; Zhou, Huilei; Li, Xiaohe; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Wolfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To understand cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mechanism network from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma. COMP complete different activated (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma compared with lower human normal adjacent tissues from the corresponding COMP-stimulated (≥0.25) or inhibited (Pearson CC ≤ -0.25) overlapping molecules of Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) and GRNInfer, respectively. COMP complete different activated and inhibited (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues were constructed by integration of Pearson CC, GRNInfer and GO. As visualized by integration of GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and Disease, we deduced COMP complete different activated and inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues. As visualized by GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and disease database integration, we proposed mainly that the mechanism and function of COMP complete different activated network in higher lung adenocarcinoma was involved in COMP activation with matrix-localized insulin-like factor coupling carboxypeptidase to metallopeptidase-induced proteolysis, whereas the corresponding inhibited network in lower human normal adjacent tissues participated in COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized vasculogenesis, B and T cell differentiation and neural endocrine factors coupling pyrophosphatase-mediated proteolysis. However, COMP complete different inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma included COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized chromatin maintenance, licensing and assembly factors coupling phosphatase-inhibitor to cytokinesis regulators-mediated cell differentiation, whereas the corresponding activated network in lower human normal adjacent tissues contained COMP activation with cytolplasm-localized translation elongation factor coupling fucosyltransferase to ubiquitin-protein ligase-induced cell

  6. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT in adult human lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi Toru

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine which adhesion molecules are expressed on lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs in human BALT. Methods We immunostained frozen sections of BALT from lobectomy specimens from 17 patients with lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules. Results Sections of BALT showed B cell follicles surrounded by T cells. Most BALT CD4+ T cells had a CD45RO+ memory phenotype. Almost all BALT B cells expressed α4 integrin and L-selectin. In contrast, 43% of BALT T cells expressed α4 integrin and 20% of BALT T cells expressed L-selectin. Almost all BALT lymphocytes expressed LFA-1. HEVs, which support the migration of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into secondary lymphoid tissues, were prominent in BALT. All HEVs expressed peripheral node addressin, most HEVs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and no HEVs expressed mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1. Conclusion Human BALT expresses endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that may be important in recruiting naive and memory/effector lymphocytes to BALT during protective and pathologic bronchopulmonary immune responses.

  7. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in adult human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Nakaaki; Xu, Baohui; Nishijima, Hiroo; Aoyama, Kohji; Kusumoto, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Toru; Tei, Chuwa; Michie, Sara A; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-22

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine which adhesion molecules are expressed on lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs) in human BALT. We immunostained frozen sections of BALT from lobectomy specimens from 17 patients with lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules. Sections of BALT showed B cell follicles surrounded by T cells. Most BALT CD4+ T cells had a CD45RO+ memory phenotype. Almost all BALT B cells expressed alpha4 integrin and L-selectin. In contrast, 43% of BALT T cells expressed alpha4 integrin and 20% of BALT T cells expressed L-selectin. Almost all BALT lymphocytes expressed LFA-1. HEVs, which support the migration of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into secondary lymphoid tissues, were prominent in BALT. All HEVs expressed peripheral node addressin, most HEVs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and no HEVs expressed mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1. Human BALT expresses endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that may be important in recruiting naive and memory/effector lymphocytes to BALT during protective and pathologic bronchopulmonary immune responses.

  8. Human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells and their extracellular vesicles act differentially on lung mechanics and inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Ligia Lins; Xisto, Debora Gonçalves; Kitoko, Jamil Zola; Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Olsen, Priscilla Christina; Redondo, Patricia Albuquerque Garcia; Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Weiss, Daniel Jay; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-24

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that can be difficult to treat due to its complex pathophysiology. Most current drugs focus on controlling the inflammatory process, but are unable to revert the changes of tissue remodeling. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are effective at reducing inflammation and tissue remodeling; nevertheless, no study has evaluated the therapeutic effects of extracellular vesicles (EVs) obtained from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AD-MSC) on established airway remodeling in experimental allergic asthma. C57BL/6 female mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). Control (CTRL) animals received saline solution using the same protocol. One day after the last challenge, each group received saline, 10 5 human AD-MSCs, or EVs (released by 10 5  AD-MSCs). Seven days after treatment, animals were anesthetized for lung function assessment and subsequently euthanized. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lungs, thymus, and mediastinal lymph nodes were harvested for analysis of inflammation. Collagen fiber content of airways and lung parenchyma were also evaluated. In OVA animals, AD-MSCs and EVs acted differently on static lung elastance and on BALF regulatory T cells, CD3 + CD4 + T cells, and pro-inflammatory mediators (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin), but similarly reduced eosinophils in lung tissue, collagen fiber content in airways and lung parenchyma, levels of transforming growth factor-β in lung tissue, and CD3 + CD4 + T cell counts in the thymus. No significant changes were observed in total cell count or percentage of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes. In this immunocompetent mouse model of allergic asthma, human AD-MSCs and EVs effectively reduced eosinophil counts in lung tissue and BALF and modulated airway remodeling, but their effects on T cells differed in lung and thymus. EVs may hold promise for asthma; however, further studies are required to elucidate the different

  9. The novel human influenza A(H7N9) virus is naturally adapted to efficient growth in human lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Jessica; Schierhorn, Kristina L; Becher, Anne; Budt, Matthias; Tönnies, Mario; Bauer, Torsten T; Schneider, Paul; Neudecker, Jens; Rückert, Jens C; Gruber, Achim D; Suttorp, Norbert; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hocke, Andreas C; Wolff, Thorsten

    2013-10-08

    A novel influenza A virus (IAV) of the H7N9 subtype has been isolated from severely diseased patients with pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome and, apparently, from healthy poultry in March 2013 in Eastern China. We evaluated replication, tropism, and cytokine induction of the A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus isolated from a fatal human infection and two low-pathogenic avian H7 subtype viruses in a human lung organ culture system mimicking infection of the lower respiratory tract. The A(H7N9) patient isolate replicated similarly well as a seasonal IAV in explanted human lung tissue, whereas avian H7 subtype viruses propagated poorly. Interestingly, the avian H7 strains provoked a strong antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) response, whereas the A(H7N9) virus induced only low IFN levels. Nevertheless, all viruses analyzed were detected predominantly in type II pneumocytes, indicating that the A(H7N9) virus does not differ in its cellular tropism from other avian or human influenza viruses. Tissue culture-based studies suggested that the low induction of the IFN-β promoter correlated with an efficient suppression by the viral NS1 protein. These findings demonstrate that the zoonotic A(H7N9) virus is unusually well adapted to efficient propagation in human alveolar tissue, which most likely contributes to the severity of lower respiratory tract disease seen in many patients. Humans are usually not infected by avian influenza A viruses (IAV), but this large group of viruses contributes to the emergence of human pandemic strains. Transmission of virulent avian IAV to humans is therefore an alarming event that requires assessment of the biology as well as pathogenic and pandemic potentials of the viruses in clinically relevant models. Here, we demonstrate that an early virus isolate from the recent A(H7N9) outbreak in Eastern China replicated as efficiently as human-adapted IAV in explanted human lung tissue, whereas avian H7 subtype viruses were unable to

  10. Inhibition by human recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases of human amnion invasion and lung colonization by murine B16-F10 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, R M; Silberman, S; Persky, B; Bajkowski, A S; Carmichael, D F

    1988-10-01

    The human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 28,000. It appears to be ubiquitous in human mesoderm tissues and has previously been shown to be identical to the collagenase inhibitor isolated from human skin fibroblasts. TIMP inhibits type I- and IV-specific collagenases and other neutral metalloendoproteinases that may be responsible for the degradation of extracellular matrix in tumor cell metastasis. In this work we have utilized recombinant human TIMP (rTIMP) obtained by expression of its cDNA gene (Carmichael et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:2407, 1986). The rTIMP is shown to have similar inhibition properties as natural TIMP against human skin fibroblast collagenase. In an in vitro amnion invasion assay system, rTIMP inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 murine melanoma cells through the human amniotic membrane at an identical concentration to that reported previously for natural TIMP. The mechanism by which rTIMP inhibits amniotic membrane invasion was compared to the mechanism by which the fibronectin receptor binding peptide RGDS and the aminin receptor binding peptide YIGSR inhibit amnion invasion. RGDS and YIGSR inhibited strong binding of the tumor cells to the amniotic membrane. In contrast rTIMP did not inhibit the cell adhesion step in amnion invasion, but actually increased the number of tumor cells that were tightly bound to the amnion. Thus rTIMP appears to inhibit a later step in the amnion invasion process, following B16-F10 cell adhesion. C57BL/6 mice treated with i.p. injections of rTIMP every 12 h for 6.5 days showed a significant inhibition of metastatic lung colonization by B16-F10 murine melanoma cells. While the rTIMP inhibited the number of metastatic lung tumors formed, it had no significant effect on the size of the lung tumors. Furthermore, tumors grown s.c. in mice receiving 12-h i.p. injections of rTIMP for 6.5 days, as in the in vivo colonization assay, showed no difference

  11. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in adult human lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamata, N.; Xu, B.; Nishijima, H.; Aoyama, K.; Kusumoto, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Tei, C.; Michie, S. A.; Matsuyama, T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine w...

  12. Lung tissue classification using wavelet frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Sage, Daniel; Hidki, Asmâa; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Unser, Michael; Müller, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We describe a texture classification system that identifies lung tissue patterns from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD). This pattern recognition task is part of an image-based diagnostic aid system for ILDs. Five lung tissue patterns (healthy, emphysema, ground glass, fibrosis and microdules) selected from a multimedia database are classified using the overcomplete discrete wavelet frame decompostion combined with grey-level histogram features. The overall multiclass accuracy reaches 92.5% of correct matches while combining the two types of features, which are found to be complementary.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue for skin tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sweta K. [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Dinda, Amit K. [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Potdar, Pravin D. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mishra, Narayan C., E-mail: mishrawise@gmail.com [Department of Polymer and Process Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2013-10-15

    The present study aims to fabricate scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue and evaluate it for skin tissue engineering applications. Decellularized goat-lung scaffold was fabricated by removing cells from cadaver goat-lung tissue enzymatically, to have cell-free 3D-architecture of natural extracellular matrix. DNA quantification assay and Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the absence of cellular material in the decellularized lung-tissue. SEM analysis of decellularized scaffold shows the intrinsic porous structure of lung tissue with well-preserved pore-to-pore interconnectivity. FTIR analysis confirmed non-denaturation and well maintainance of collagenous protein structure of decellularized scaffold. MTT assay, SEM analysis and H and E staining of human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cell, seeded over the decellularized scaffold, confirms stem cell attachment, viability, biocompatibility and proliferation over the decellularized scaffold. Expression of Keratin18 gene, along with CD105, CD73 and CD44, by human skin-derived Mesenchymal Stem cells over decellularized scaffold signifies that the cells are viable, proliferating and migrating, and have maintained their critical cellular functions in the presence of scaffold. Thus, overall study proves the applicability of the goat-lung tissue derived decellularized scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • We successfully fabricated decellularized scaffold from cadaver goat-lung tissue. • Decellularized goat-lung scaffolds were found to be highly porous. • Skin derived MSC shows high cell viability and proliferation over the scaffold. • Phenotype of MSCs was well maintained over the scaffold. • The scaffold shows potential for applications in skin tissue engineering.

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of Lung Tissue from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Emphysema Murine Models and Human Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Show Shared and Distinct Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong H; Morrow, Jarrett; Owen, Caroline A; Qiu, Weiliang; Glass, Kimberly; Lao, Taotao; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Perrella, Mark A; Silverman, Edwin K; Zhou, Xiaobo; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-07-01

    Although cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the underlying molecular mechanisms for the significant variability in developing COPD in response to CS are incompletely understood. We performed lung gene expression profiling of two different wild-type murine strains (C57BL/6 and NZW/LacJ) and two genetic models with mutations in COPD genome-wide association study genes (HHIP and FAM13A) after 6 months of chronic CS exposure and compared the results to human COPD lung tissues. We identified gene expression patterns that correlate with severity of emphysema in murine and human lungs. Xenobiotic metabolism and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response were commonly regulated molecular response patterns in C57BL/6, Hhip +/- , and Fam13a -/- murine strains exposed chronically to CS. The CS-resistant Fam13a -/- mouse and NZW/LacJ strain revealed gene expression response pattern differences. The Fam13a -/- strain diverged in gene expression compared with C57BL/6 control only after CS exposure. However, the NZW/LacJ strain had a unique baseline expression pattern, enriched for nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated oxidative stress response and xenobiotic metabolism, and converged to a gene expression pattern similar to the more susceptible wild-type C57BL/6 after CS exposure. These results suggest that distinct molecular pathways may account for resistance to emphysema. Surprisingly, there were few genes commonly modulated in mice and humans. Our study suggests that gene expression responses to CS may be largely species and model dependent, yet shared pathways could provide biologically significant insights underlying individual susceptibility to CS.

  15. Defining the inflammatory signature of human lung explant tissue in the presence and absence of glucocorticoid [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Rimington

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airway inflammation is a feature of many respiratory diseases and there is a need for newer, more effective anti-inflammatory compounds. The aim of this study was to develop an ex vivo human lung explant model which can be used to help study the mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses and which can provide a tool to aid drug discovery for inflammatory respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD. Method: Parenchymal lung tissue from 6 individual donors was dissected and cultured with two pro-inflammatory stimuli, lipopolysaccharide (LPS (1 µg/ml and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β (10 ng/ml in the presence or absence of dexamethasone (1 µM.  Inflammatory responses were assessed using Luminex analysis of tissue culture supernatants to measure levels of 21 chemokines, growth factors and cytokines. Results: A robust and reproducible inflammatory signal was detected across all donors for 12 of the analytes measured following LPS stimulation with a modest fold increase (4-fold in CCL3, CCL4, GM-CSF, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-1β.  The inflammatory signal induced by IL-1β stimulation was less than that observed with LPS but resulted in elevated levels of 7 analytes (CXCL8, CCL3, CCL4, GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α.  The inflammatory responses induced by both stimulations was supressed by dexamethasone for the majority of analytes. Conclusions: These data provide proof of concept that this ex vivo human lung explant model is responsive to inflammatory signals and could be used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of existing and novel compounds.  In addition this model could be used to help define the mechanisms and pathways involved in development of inflammatory airway disease. Abbreviations: COPD: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; ICS: inhaled corticosteroids; LPS: lipopolysaccharide; IL-1β: interleukin-1 beta; PSF: penicillin, streptomycin and fungizone

  16. Lung involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases

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    Plavec Goran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Systemic connective tissue diseases (SCTD are chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders of unknown cause that can involve different organs and systems. Their course and prognosis are different. All of them can, more or less, involve the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of respiratory symptoms, lung function disorders, radiography and high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT abnormalities, and their correlation with the duration of the disease and the applied treatment. Methods. In 47 non-randomized consecutive patients standard chest radiography, HRCT, and lung function tests were done. Results. Hypoxemia was present in nine of the patients with respiratory symptoms (20%. In all of them chest radiography was normal. In five of these patients lung fibrosis was established using HRCT. Half of all the patients with SCTD had symptoms of lung involvement. Lung function tests disorders of various degrees were found in 40% of the patients. The outcome and the degree of lung function disorders were neither in correlation with the duration of SCTD nor with therapy used (p > 0.05 Spearmans Ro. Conclusion. Pulmonary fibrosis occurs in about 10% of the patients with SCTD, and possibly not due to the applied treatment regimens. Hypoxemia could be a sing of existing pulmonary fibrosis in the absence of disorders on standard chest radiography.

  17. Analysis of Lung Tissue Using Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J. L.; Barrera, R.; Miranda, J.

    2002-08-01

    In this work a comparative study is presented of the contents of metals in lung tissue from healthy patients and with lung cancer, by means of two analytical techniques: Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The samples of cancerous tissue were taken from 26 autopsies made to individuals died in the National Institute of Respiratory Disease (INER), 22 of cancer and 4 of other non-cancer biopsies. When analyzing the entirety of the samples, in the cancerous tissues, there were increments in the concentrations of S (4%), K (635%), Co (85%) and Cu (13%). Likewise, there were deficiencies in the concentrations of Cl (59%), Ca (6%), Fe (26%) and Zn (7%). Only in the cancerous tissues there were appearances of P, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Br and Sr. The tissue samples were classified according to cancer types (adenocarcinomas, epidermoides and of small cell carcinoma), personal habits (smokers and alcoholic), genetic predisposition and residence place. There was a remarkable decrease in the concentration of Ca and a marked increment in the Cu in the epidermoide tissue samples with regard to those of adenocarcinoma or of small cells cancer. Also, decrements were detected in K and increments of Fe, Co and Cu in the sample belonging to people that resided in Mexico City with regard to those that resided in the State of Mexico.

  18. Identification of inclusions in lung tissue with a Raman microprobe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiteveld, H.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Mud, J.; Greve, Jan

    1984-01-01

    Inhaled particles smaller than 4 μm can cause damage to lung tissue, a disease called silicosis. We present an investigation on the use of a Raman microspectrometer for the identification of inclusions in lung tissue. We measured Raman spectra of such inclusions in lung tissue of a patient whose

  19. A classification framework for lung tissue categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2008-03-01

    We compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) but also normal tissue. The evaluated classifiers are Naive Bayes, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), J48 decision trees, Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. Those are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 87.9% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  20. Expression of ADAMs ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") in the human lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Antoon; Postma, Dirkje S.; Noordhoek, Jacobien A.; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Kauffman, Henk F.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Timens, Wim

    In view of the associations of "a disintegrin and metalloprotease" (ADAM) with respiratory diseases, we assessed the expression of various ADAMs in human lung tissue. Lung tissue was obtained from nine individuals who underwent surgery for lung cancer or underwent lung transplantation for emphysema.

  1. Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Karin B; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Gupta, Shawon; Ahlm, Clas; Svensson, Mattias; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7-10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20-25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS.

  2. Synchrotron soft X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy reveal novel features of asbestos body morphology and composition in human lung tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polentarutti Maurizio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational or environmental exposure to asbestos fibres is associated with pleural and parenchymal lung diseases. A histopathologic hallmark of exposure to asbestos is the presence in lung parenchyma of the so-called asbestos bodies. They are the final product of biomineralization processes resulting in deposition of endogenous iron and organic matter (mainly proteins around the inhaled asbestos fibres. For shedding light on the formation mechanisms of asbestos bodies it is of fundamental importance to characterize at the same length scales not only their structural morphology and chemical composition but also to correlate them to the possible alterations in the local composition of the surrounding tissues. Here we report the first correlative morphological and chemical characterization of untreated paraffinated histological lung tissue samples with asbestos bodies by means of soft X-ray imaging and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF microscopy, which reveals new features in the elemental lateral distribution. Results The X-ray absorption and phase contrast images and the simultaneously monitored XRF maps of tissue samples have revealed the location, distribution and elemental composition of asbestos bodies and associated nanometric structures. The observed specific morphology and differences in the local Si, Fe, O and Mg content provide distinct fingerprints characteristic for the core asbestos fibre and the ferruginous body. The highest Si content is found in the asbestos fibre, while the shell and ferruginous bodies are characterized by strongly increased content of Mg, Fe and O compared to the adjacent tissue. The XRF and SEM-EDX analyses of the extracted asbestos bodies confirmed an enhanced Mg deposition in the organic asbestos coating. Conclusions The present report demonstrates the potential of the advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and microspectroscopy techniques for studying the response of the lung tissue to the

  3. Mtb-specific CD27low CD4 T cells as markers of lung tissue destruction during pulmonary tuberculosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, Irina Yu; Kondratuk, Natalya A; Kosmiadi, George A; Amansahedov, Rasul B; Vasilyeva, Irina A; Ganusov, Vitaly V; Lyadova, Irina V

    2012-01-01

    Effector CD4 T cells represent a key component of the host's anti-tuberculosis immune defense. Successful differentiation and functioning of effector lymphocytes protects the host against severe M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. On the other hand, effector T cell differentiation depends on disease severity/activity, as T cell responses are driven by antigenic and inflammatory stimuli released during infection. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) progression and the degree of effector CD4 T cell differentiation are interrelated, but the relationships are complex and not well understood. We have analyzed an association between the degree of Mtb-specific CD4 T cell differentiation and severity/activity of pulmonary TB infection. The degree of CD4 T cell differentiation was assessed by measuring the percentages of highly differentiated CD27(low) cells within a population of Mtb- specific CD4 T lymphocytes ("CD27(low)IFN-γ(+)" cells). The percentages of CD27(low)IFN-γ+ cells were low in healthy donors (median, 33.1%) and TB contacts (21.8%) but increased in TB patients (47.3%, p76%), but varied in blood (12-92%). The major correlate for the accumulation of CD27(low)IFN-γ(+) cells in blood was lung destruction (r = 0.65, p = 2.7 × 10(-7)). A cutoff of 47% of CD27(low)IFN-γ(+) cells discriminated patients with high and low degree of lung destruction (sensitivity 89%, specificity 74%); a decline in CD27(low)IFN-γ(+)cells following TB therapy correlated with repair and/or reduction of lung destruction (ppulmonary TB. Accumulation of CD27(low)IFN-γ(+) cells in the blood is associated with lung destruction. The findings indicate that there is no deficiency in CD4 T cell differentiation during TB; evaluation of CD27(low)IFN-γ(+) cells provides a valuable means to assess TB activity, lung destruction, and tissue repair following TB therapy.

  4. Characterizing the lung tissue mechanical properties using a micromechanical model of alveolar sac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Seify, Behzad; Moghadas, Hadi; Sabsalinejad, Masoomeh; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    According to statistics, lung disease is among the leading causes of death worldwide. As such, many research groups are developing powerful tools for understanding, diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. Recently, biomechanical modeling has emerged as an effective tool for better understanding of human physiology, disease diagnosis and computer assisted medical intervention. Mechanical properties of lung tissue are important requirements for methods developed for lung disease diagnosis and medical intervention. As such, the main objective of this study is to develop an effective tool for estimating the mechanical properties of normal and pathological lung parenchyma tissue based on its microstructure. For this purpose, a micromechanical model of the lung tissue was developed using finite element (FE) method, and the model was demonstrated to have application in estimating the mechanical properties of lung alveolar wall. The proposed model was developed by assembling truncated octahedron tissue units resembling the alveoli. A compression test was simulated using finite element method on the created geometry and the hyper-elastic parameters of the alveoli wall were calculated using reported alveolar wall stress-strain data and an inverse optimization framework. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed model can be potentially used to reconstruct microstructural images of lung tissue using macro-scale tissue response for normal and different pathological conditions. Such images can be used for effective diagnosis of lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

  5. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  6. [Expression of a new lung cancer drug resistance-related gene in lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling-Zhi; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Zhou, Xiang-Dong

    2003-02-01

    A new drug resistance-related gene fragment which was 494 bp long was found using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and its full-length cDNA fragment was cloned by the authors. This study was designed to determine the expression of this lung cancer drug resistance-related gene (LCDRG) in lung cancer tissues, juxtacancerous tissues, and five lung cancer cell strains. The expression of LCDRG was determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method in 38 lung cancer tissues,12 juxtacancerous tissues, and 5 lung cancer cell strains. The expression of LCDRG in cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in juxtacancerous tissue (Pcancer cell strains, the expression levels of LCDRG in adenocarcinoma cell strains SPC-A-1 and A549, big cell lung cancer cell strain H460, small cell lung cancer cell strains H446 and SH77 were decreased gradually. LCDRG is closely related to lung cancer and may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  7. Analysis of lung tissue particles among silicosis cases

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    B Case

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims:Lung tissue samples of several miners, millers, sandblaster, welders andconstruction workers with historical exposure to mineral particles were analyzed. These subjectshad significant respiratory exposure to silica particles and demanded compensation foroccupational lung diseases.Method: Lung tissue samples were observed under an Electron microscope with 10000Xmagnification. Mineral particles were sized and analyzed by EDS detector based on X-rayspectrophotometry.Results: The results have indicated that the lung particle burden of the subjects was closelyrelated to their occupational history. The highest level of mineral silica particles were found in thelungs of miners and sandblasters. The highest concentration of metallic particles was found in thelungs of welders and miners in ferric mining industry. Severity of lung fibrosis was directlyrelated to the lung free silica concentration. However, no association was found between particlediameter and severity of fibrosis. In addition, lung particle burden of silicotic cases with lungcancer contained a much higher concentration of metallic particles and asbestos fibres that thelung of those subject with silicosis only.Conclusion: Although workers in mining and construction may be predominantly exposed tosilica particles including quartz, the role of other mineral particles including asbestos fibres,metallic fibres and other minerals should be taken into account in the genesis of occupational lungdisease in particular lung cancer. Lung tissue sample analysis can provide valuable informationto assess the legal and compensation cases.

  8. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity.

  9. Transient Mechanical Response of Lung Airway Tissue during Mechanical Ventilation

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    Israr Bin Muhammad Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute lung injury, airway and other pulmonary diseases often require Mechanical Ventilation (MV. Knowledge of the stress/strain environment in lung airway tissues is very important in order to avoid lung injuries for patients undergoing MV. Airway tissue strains responsible for stressing the lung’s fiber network and rupturing the lung due to compliant airways are very difficult to measure experimentally. Multi-level modeling is adopted to investigate the transient mechanical response of the tissue under MV. First, airflow through a lung airway bifurcation (Generation 4–6 is modeled using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD to obtain air pressure during 2 seconds of MV breathing. Next, the transient air pressure was used in structural analysis to obtain mechanical strain experienced by the airway tissue wall. Structural analysis showed that airway tissue from Generation 5 in one bifurcation can stretch eight times that of airway tissue of the same generation number but with different bifurcation. The results suggest sensitivity of load to geometrical features. Furthermore, the results of strain levels obtained from the tissue analysis are very important because these strains at the cellular-level can create inflammatory responses, thus damaging the airway tissues.

  10. Comparison of two methods used to prepare smears of mouse lung tissue for detection of Pneumocystis carinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R B; Smith, T F; Wilson, W R

    1982-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in humans includes the identification of cysts in stained lung tissue impression smears. By using a mouse model, we compared the number of cysts in lung tissue impression smears with those contained in a concentrate of homogenized lung tissue. Eleven C3H/HEN mice developed P. carinii infection after corticosteroid injections, a low protein (8%) diet, and tetracycline administered in drinking water. Impression smears were prepared with freshly bisected lung tissue. Smears of concentrates were prepared with sediment from centrifuged lung tissue homogenates. All smears were made in duplicate, stained with toluidine blue O or methenamine silver, coded, randomized, and examined. The concentrate preparations contained more cysts per microscopic field than the impression preparations (P less than 0.01). Concentrates prepared by grinding with a mortar and pestle contained more cysts than concentrates prepared by blending with a Stomacher (P less than 0.05). Cysts were detected equally well with either the toluidine blue O or silver stain (not significant). Lung tissue concentrates were superior to lung tissue impressions for detecting P. carinii cysts in mice. Use of lung tissue concentrates should be considered for the diagnosis of human P. carinii infection. PMID:6181088

  11. EMBOli OF CEREBRAL TISSUES IN THE LUNGS*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lunas of newborn children with birth trauma. Tears of the ... Trauma to the foetal brain early in gestation may be an aetiological factor. This heterotopic brain fragment is found in the lung tis~u7 and not in the pulmonary artery as in the case of emboh; It has a limited ... tensive fractures in the right occipital area extending into.

  12. Regional lung tissue changes with mechanical ventilation and fluid load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcozzi, Cristiana; Moriondo, Andrea; Solari, Eleonora; Reguzzoni, Marcella; Severgnini, Paolo; Protasoni, Marina; Passi, Alberto; Pelosi, Paolo; Negrini, Daniela

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the regional gravity-dependent impact of mechanical ventilation and fluid overload on lung extracellular matrix (ECM) in healthy lungs. The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) composition of the ventral and dorsal lung parenchyma was determined in anesthetized supine healthy rats mechanically ventilated for 4 hours in air: (a) at low (∼7.5 mL/kg) or high (∼ 23 mL /kg) tidal volume (V(T)) and 0 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP); (b) at low or high V(T) at 5 cmH2O PEEP and (c) with or without 7 mL /(kg·h) intravenous saline infusion. Mechanical ventilation degraded lung ECM, with alveolar septa thinning and structural GAGs disorganization. Low V(T) ventilation was associated with significant tissue structure changes in both ventral and dorsal lung regions, while high VT mainly affected the dependent ones. PEEP decreased ECM injury mainly in the ventral lung regions, although it did not prevent matrix fragmentation and washout at high V(T). Intravascular fluid load increased lung damage prevalently in the ventral lung regions. Mechanical ventilation and fluid load may cause additive injuries in healthy lungs, mainly in ventral regions.

  13. Deregulated expression of hnRNP A/B proteins in human non-small cell lung cancer: parallel assessment of protein and mRNA levels in paired tumour/non-tumour tissues

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    Boukakis Georgios

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs of the A/B type (hnRNP A1, A2/B1, A3 are highly related multifunctional proteins participating in alternative splicing by antagonising other splicing factors, notably ASF/SF2. The altered expression pattern of hnRNP A2/B1 and/or splicing variant B1 alone in human lung cancer and their potential to serve as molecular markers for early diagnosis remain issues of intense investigation. The main objective of the present study was to use paired tumour/non-tumour biopsies from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC to investigate the expression profiles of hnRNP A1, A2/B1 and A3 in conjunction with ASF/SF2. Methods We combined western blotting of tissue homogenates with immunohistochemical examination of fixed tissue sections and quantification of mRNA expression levels in tumour versus adjacent normal-looking areas of the lung in the same patient. Results Our study, in addition to clear evidence of mostly uncoupled deregulation of hnRNPs A/B, has revealed hnRNP A1 to be the most deregulated protein with a high frequency of over-expression (76%, followed by A3 (52% and A2/B1 (43%. Moreover, direct comparison of protein/mRNA levels showed a lack of correlation in the case of hnRNP A1 (as well as of ASF/SF2, but not of A2/B1, suggesting that different mechanisms underlie their deregulation. Conclusion Our results provide strong evidence for the up-regulation of hnRNP A/B in NSCLC, and they support the existence of distinct mechanisms responsible for their deregulated expression.

  14. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    OpenAIRE

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2008-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potentia...

  15. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

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    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  16. Human Lung Mononuclear Phagocytes in Health and Disease

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    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The lungs are vulnerable to attack by respiratory insults such as toxins, allergens, and pathogens, given their continuous exposure to the air we breathe. Our immune system has evolved to provide protection against an array of potential threats without causing collateral damage to the lung tissue. In order to swiftly detect invading pathogens, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs—together termed mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs—line the respiratory tract with the key task of surveying the lung microenvironment in order to discriminate between harmless and harmful antigens and initiate immune responses when necessary. Each cell type excels at specific tasks: monocytes produce large amounts of cytokines, macrophages are highly phagocytic, whereas DCs excel at activating naïve T cells. Extensive studies in murine models have established a division of labor between the different populations of MNPs at steady state and during infection or inflammation. However, a translation of important findings in mice is only beginning to be explored in humans, given the challenge of working with rare cells in inaccessible human tissues. Important progress has been made in recent years on the phenotype and function of human lung MNPs. In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, three subsets of DCs have been identified in the human airways at steady state. More recently, monocyte-derived cells have also been described in healthy human lungs. Depending on the source of samples, such as lung tissue resections or bronchoalveolar lavage, the specific subsets of MNPs recovered may differ. This review provides an update on existing studies investigating human respiratory MNP populations during health and disease. Often, inflammatory MNPs are found to accumulate in the lungs of patients with pulmonary conditions. In respiratory infections or inflammatory diseases, this may contribute to disease severity, but in cancer patients this may

  17. Quantification of Age‐Related Lung Tissue Mechanics under Mechanical Ventilation

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    JongWon Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Elderly patients with obstructive lung diseases often receive mechanical ventilation to support their breathing and restore respiratory function. However, mechanical ventilation is known to increase the severity of ventilator‐induced lung injury (VILI in the elderly. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of aging to better understand the lung tissue mechanics to estimate the severity of ventilator‐induced lung injuries. Two age‐related geometric models involving human bronchioles from generation G10 to G23 and alveolar sacs were developed. The first is for a 50‐year‐old (normal and second is for an 80‐year old (aged model. Lung tissue mechanics of normal and aged models were investigated under mechanical ventilation through computational simulations. Results obtained indicated that lung tissue strains during inhalation (t = 0.2 s decreased by about 40% in the alveolar sac (G23 and 27% in the bronchiole (G20, respectively, for the 80‐year‐old as compared to the 50‐year‐old. The respiratory mechanics parameters (work of breathing per unit volume and maximum tissue strain over G20 and G23 for the 80‐year‐old decreased by about 64% (three‐fold and 80% (four‐fold, respectively, during the mechanical ventilation breathing cycle. However, there was a significant increase (by about threefold in lung compliance for the 80‐year‐old in comparison to the 50‐year‐old. These findings from the computational simulations demonstrated that lung mechanical characteristics are significantly compromised in aging tissues, and these effects were quantified in this study.

  18. Quantification of Age-Related Lung Tissue Mechanics under Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JongWon; Heise, Rebecca L; Reynolds, Angela M; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2017-09-29

    Elderly patients with obstructive lung diseases often receive mechanical ventilation to support their breathing and restore respiratory function. However, mechanical ventilation is known to increase the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in the elderly. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of aging to better understand the lung tissue mechanics to estimate the severity of ventilator-induced lung injuries. Two age-related geometric models involving human bronchioles from generation G10 to G23 and alveolar sacs were developed. The first is for a 50-year-old (normal) and second is for an 80-year old (aged) model. Lung tissue mechanics of normal and aged models were investigated under mechanical ventilation through computational simulations. Results obtained indicated that lung tissue strains during inhalation (t = 0.2 s) decreased by about 40% in the alveolar sac (G23) and 27% in the bronchiole (G20), respectively, for the 80-year-old as compared to the 50-year-old. The respiratory mechanics parameters (work of breathing per unit volume and maximum tissue strain) over G20 and G23 for the 80-year-old decreased by about 64% (three-fold) and 80% (four-fold), respectively, during the mechanical ventilation breathing cycle. However, there was a significant increase (by about threefold) in lung compliance for the 80-year-old in comparison to the 50-year-old. These findings from the computational simulations demonstrated that lung mechanical characteristics are significantly compromised in aging tissues, and these effects were quantified in this study.

  19. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

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    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  20. Lung Cancer and Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs: Examining the Molecular Evidence

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    Priya R. Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV, known to be an etiological agent for genital cancers, has been suggested also to be a possible contributory agent for lung cancer. Alternatively, lung cancer, formerly considered to be solely a smoker's disease, may now be more appropriately categorised into never smoker's and smoker's lung cancer. Through this paper we attempt to bring forth the current knowledge regarding mechanisms of HPV gaining access into the lung tissue, various strategies involved in HPV-associated tumorigenesis in lung tissue.

  1. Lung Cancer and Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs): Examining the Molecular Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Priya R.; Jayalekshmi, D.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV), known to be an etiological agent for genital cancers, has been suggested also to be a possible contributory agent for lung cancer. Alternatively, lung cancer, formerly considered to be solely a smoker's disease, may now be more appropriately categorised into never smoker's and smoker's lung cancer. Through this paper we attempt to bring forth the current knowledge regarding mechanisms of HPV gaining access into the lung tissue, various strategies involved in HPV-associated tumorigenesis in lung tissue. PMID:22363346

  2. Follistatin is a novel biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma in humans.

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    Fangfang Chen

    Full Text Available Follistatin (FST, a single chain glycoprotein, is originally isolated from follicular fluid of ovary. Previous studies have revealed that serum FST served as a biomarker for pregnancy and ovarian mucinous tumor. However, whether FST can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis in lung adenocarcinoma of humans remains unclear.The study population consisted of 80 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 40 patients with ovarian adenocarcinoma and 80 healthy subjects. Serum FST levels in patients and healthy subjects were measured using ELISA. The results showed that the positive ratio of serum FST levels was 51.3% (41/80, which was comparable to the sensitivity of FST in 40 patients with ovarian adenocarcinoma (60%, 24/40 using the 95th confidence interval for the healthy subject group as the cut-off value. FST expressions in lung adenocarcinoma were examined by immunohistochemical staining, we found that lung adenocarcinoma could produce FST and there was positive correlation between the level of FST expression and the differential degree of lung adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, the results showed that primary cultured lung adenocarcinoma cells could secrete FST, while cells derived from non-tumor lung tissues almost did not produce FST. In addition, the results of CCK8 assay and flow cytometry showed that using anti-FST monoclonal antibody to neutralize endogenous FST significantly augmented activin A-induced lung adenocarcinoma cells apoptosis.These data indicate that lung adenocarcinoma cells can secret FST into serum, which may be beneficial to the survival of adenocarcinoma cells by neutralizing activin A action. Thus, FST can serve as a promising biomarker for diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma and a useful biotherapy target for lung adenocarcinoma.

  3. Follistatin Is a Novel Biomarker for Lung Adenocarcinoma in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Liu, Haiyan; Sun, Yang; Liu, Zhonghui; Ge, Jingyan; Cui, Xueling

    2014-01-01

    Background Follistatin (FST), a single chain glycoprotein, is originally isolated from follicular fluid of ovary. Previous studies have revealed that serum FST served as a biomarker for pregnancy and ovarian mucinous tumor. However, whether FST can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis in lung adenocarcinoma of humans remains unclear. Methods and Results The study population consisted of 80 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 40 patients with ovarian adenocarcinoma and 80 healthy subjects. Serum FST levels in patients and healthy subjects were measured using ELISA. The results showed that the positive ratio of serum FST levels was 51.3% (41/80), which was comparable to the sensitivity of FST in 40 patients with ovarian adenocarcinoma (60%, 24/40) using the 95th confidence interval for the healthy subject group as the cut-off value. FST expressions in lung adenocarcinoma were examined by immunohistochemical staining, we found that lung adenocarcinoma could produce FST and there was positive correlation between the level of FST expression and the differential degree of lung adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, the results showed that primary cultured lung adenocarcinoma cells could secrete FST, while cells derived from non-tumor lung tissues almost did not produce FST. In addition, the results of CCK8 assay and flow cytometry showed that using anti-FST monoclonal antibody to neutralize endogenous FST significantly augmented activin A-induced lung adenocarcinoma cells apoptosis. Conclusions These data indicate that lung adenocarcinoma cells can secret FST into serum, which may be beneficial to the survival of adenocarcinoma cells by neutralizing activin A action. Thus, FST can serve as a promising biomarker for diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma and a useful biotherapy target for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25347573

  4. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Battaglini, Albane; Hammarström, Clara; Stankovic, Branislava; Aamodt, Henrik; Stjärne, Johan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Øynebråten, Inger; Corthay, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab.

  5. Neurotrophins expression is decreased in lungs of human infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon LD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lynn D O'Hanlon, Sherry M Mabry, Ikechukwu I EkekezieChildren's Mercy Hospitals/University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USAObjectives: To evaluate neurotrophin (NT (nerve growth factor [NGF], NT-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] expression in autopsy lung tissues of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH infants versus that of infants that expired with: 1 "normal" lungs (controls; 2 chronic lung disease (CLD; and 3 pulmonary hypertension (PPHN.Hypothesis: NT expression will be significantly altered in CDH lung tissue compared with normal lung tissue and other neonatal lung diseases.Study design: Immunohistochemical studies for NT proteins NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 were applied to human autopsy neonatal lung tissue samples.Subject selection: The samples included a control group of 18 samples ranging from 23-week gestational age to term, a CDH group of 15 samples, a PPHN group of six samples, and a CLD group of 12 samples.Methodology: The tissue samples were studied, and four representative slide fields of alveoli/saccules and four of bronchioles were recorded from each sample. These slide fields were then graded (from 0 to 3 by three blinded observers for intensity of staining.Results: BDNF, NGF, and NT-3 immunostaining intensity scores were significantly decreased in the CDH lung tissue (n=15 compared with normal neonatal lung tissue (n=18 (P<0.001. The other neonatal pulmonary diseases that were studied, CLD and PPHN, were much less likely to be affected and were much more variable in their neurotrophin expression.Conclusion: NT expression is decreased in CDH lungs. The decreased expression of NT in CDH lung tissue may suggest they contribute to the abnormality in this condition.Keywords: nerve growth factor, NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, neurotrophin-3, NT-3, chronic lung disease, persistent pulmonary hypertension, lung

  6. Extraction and quantification of carbon nanotubes in biological matrices with application to rat lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudrick, Kyle; Corson, Nancy; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison C; Herckes, Pierre; Halden, Rolf U; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-10-22

    Extraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from biological matrices such as rat lung tissue is integral to developing a quantification method for evaluating the environmental and human health exposure and toxicity of CNTs. The ability of various chemical treatment methods, including Solvable (2.5% sodium hydroxide/surfactant mixture), ammonium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and proteinase K, to extract CNTs from rat lung tissue was evaluated. CNTs were quantified using programmed thermal analysis (PTA). Two CNTs were used to represent the lower (500 °C) and upper (800 °C) PTA limit of CNT thermal stability. The recovery efficiency of each of the eight chemical reagents evaluated was found to depend on the ability to (1) minimize oxidation of CNTs, (2) remove interfering background carbon from the rat lung tissue, and (3) separate the solid-phase CNTs from the liquid-phase dissolved tissue via centrifugation. A two-step extraction method using Solvable and proteinase K emerged as the optimal approach, enabling a recovery of 98 ± 15% of a 2.9 ± 0.19 μg CNT loading that was spiked into whole rat lungs. Due to its high yield and applicability to low organ burdens of nanomaterials, this extraction method is particularly well suited for in vivo studies to quantify clearance rates and retained CNTs in lungs and other organs.

  7. Lipidomic characterization and localization of phospholipids in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C; Kosmider, Beata; Mason, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    Lipids play a central role in lung physiology and pathology; however, a comprehensive lipidomic characterization of human pulmonary cells relevant to disease has not been performed. The cells involved in lung host defense, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), and alveolar type II cells (ATIIs), were isolated from human subjects and lipidomic analysis by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS was performed. Additionally, pieces of lung tissue from the same donors were analyzed by MALDI imaging MS in order to determine lipid localization in the tissue. The unique distribution of phospholipids in ATIIs, BECs, and AMs from human subjects was accomplished by subjecting the large number of identified phospholipid molecular species to univariant statistical analysis. Specific MALDI images were generated based on the univariant statistical analysis data to reveal the location of specific cell types within the human lung slice. While the complex composition and function of the lipidome in various disease states is currently poorly understood, this method could be useful for the characterization of lipid alterations in pulmonary disease and may aid in a better understanding of disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Microwave ablation of lung tissue: impact of single-lung ventilation on ablation size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ricardo S; Gan, Jianmin; Ohara, Carl J; Daly, Benedict; Ebright, Michael I; Desimone, Michael; Fernando, Hiran C

    2010-10-01

    Thermal ablation is increasingly used to treat pulmonary tumors in medically inoperable patients. Most procedures are performed with sedation in the radiology suite. Ideally, the ablation should encompass the entire tumor volume with a surrounding margin of necrosis; however, ablation may not be as effective in the normal aerated lung surrounding a denser tumor. Inducing atelectasis of the lung may potentially increase ablation volumes and increase local cancer control. This study examines the effect of single-lung ventilation on ablation size using a microwave system. Twenty microwave ablation procedures were performed in the lungs of 10 swine. Bilateral thoracotomy using a clamshell approach was used. In one lung, ablation was performed with continuous ventilation. In the contralateral lung, single-lung ventilation was achieved by clamping the bronchus before ablation. The ablated lobes were resected and sent for pathologic analysis. Routine and supravital staining was performed. The ablation zone was clearly demarcated on gross examination, and in all cases 100% ablation occurred, without skip areas of viability. The ablation zones were elliptical with the long axis parallel to the axis of the ablation probes (active tip, 3.7 cm). Ablation diameters and volume were compared between the ventilated and nonventilated lungs. Ablation volume was superior in nonventilated lungs (10.74 cm(3) versus 7.35 cm(3); p = 0.039) primarily because of differences in the short axis of the ablation zone. Microwave energy can effectively ablate normal pulmonary parenchyma without skip areas of viable tissue within the gross ablation field. The volume of necrosis is increased in nonventilated lungs, suggesting that ablation results can be improved in patients by using general anesthesia with single-lung ventilation. Future studies will be required to confirm this hypothesis. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung tissue regeneration after induced injury in Runx3 KO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Bae, Suk-Chul; Jung, Han-Sung

    2010-09-01

    Runx3 is essential for normal murine lung development, and Runx3 knockout (KO) mice, which die soon after birth, exhibit alveolar hyperplasia. Wound healing, tissue repair, and regeneration mechanisms are necessary in humans for proper early lung development. Previous studies have reported that various signaling molecules, such as pErk, Tgf-beta1, CCSP, pJnk, Smad3, and HSP70 are closely related to wound healing. In order to confirm the relationship between lung defects caused by the loss of function of Runx3 and wound healing, we have localized various wound-healing markers after laser irradiation in wild-type and in Runx3 KO mouse lungs at post-natal day 1. Our results indicate that pERK, Tgf-beta1, CCSP, pJnk, and HSP70 are dramatically down-regulated by loss of Runx3 during lung wound healing. However, Smad3 is up-regulated in the Runx3 KO laser-irradiated lung region. Therefore, the lung wound-healing mechanism is inhibited in the Runx3 KO mouse, which shows abnormal lung architecture, by reduced pErk, Tgf-beta1, CCSP, pJnk, and HSP70 and by induced Smad3.

  10. Oxidative modification of albumin in the parenchymal lung tissue of current smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Tan Wan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is accumulating evidence that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. One current hypothesis is that the increased oxidant burden in these patients is not adequately counterbalanced by the lung antioxidant systems. Objective To determine the levels of oxidised human serum albumin (HSA in COPD lung explants and the effect of oxidation on HSA degradation using an ex vivo lung explant model. Methods Parenchymal lung tissue was obtained from 38 patients (15F/23M undergoing lung resection and stratified by smoking history and disease using the GOLD guidelines and the lower limit of normal for FEV1/FVC ratio. Lung tissue was homogenised and analysed by ELISA for total levels of HSA and carbonylated HSA. To determine oxidised HSA degradation lung tissue explants were incubated with either 200 μg/ml HSA or oxidised HSA and supernatants collected at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h and analysed for HSA using ELISA and immunoblot. Results When stratified by disease, lung tissue from GOLD II (median = 38.2 μg/ml and GOLD I (median = 48.4 μg/ml patients had lower levels of HSA compared to patients with normal lung function (median = 71.9 μg/ml, P Conclusion We report on a reliable methodology for measuring levels of oxidised HSA in human lung tissue and cell culture supernatant. We propose that differences in the levels of oxidised HSA within lung tissue from COPD patients and current smokers provides further evidence for an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance and has important biological implications for the disease.

  11. Measurement of lung tissue dynamics in artificially ventilated rats with optical coherence tomography

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    Schnabel Christian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of lung tissue and the airways become a major task for medical care and health care systems in modern industrial countries in the future. Suitable treatment methods and strategies for lung support and artificial ventilation are of dare need. Besides the obvious importance as life-saving intervention, the effects of usually used over-pressure ventilation onto the sensitive alveolar tissue are insufficiently understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to characterize lung tissue during artificial ventilation at the alveolar level. Those measurements can be used to link micromechanics of alveolar structures to mechanical properties of the whole lung like compliance and resistance measured at the ventilator device. This can be done only in animal experiments due to the fact that imaging techniques used in human diagnostics like CT or MRT fail to resolve alveolar tissue structures. The disadvantage of high-resolution techniques like optical coherence tomography (OCT or intravital microscopy (IVM is the need of a surgical access to the lung due to the limitation in penetration depth of these techniques. Furthermore, imaging dynamic processes with high-resolution imaging techniques during uninterrupted artificial ventilation is a challenging task. In this study, we present a measurement setup for combined imaging of conventional pressure-controlled ventilated rats and the visualization of volume changes of alveolar structures during one cycle of breath. A custom-made OCT system in combination with a triggered scanning algorithm was used to acquire time-resolved 3D OCT image data. Furthermore, this system was combined with a self-adapting autofocus function for intravital microscopy to track the lung surface keeping the tissue in focal plane. The combination of new dynamic measurement modes for OCT and IVM allows new insights into alveolar tissue and will promote the understanding of mechanical behavior during artificial ventilation.

  12. [NLRP3 inflammasome induces pyroptosis in lung tissues of radiation-induced lung injury in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rong; Wu, Dongming; Deng, Shihua; Liu, Teng; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Objective To establish a radiation-induced lung injury model and investigate the role of caspase-1-dependent programmed cell death (pyroptosis) in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. Methods BALB/c mice were sacrificed after receiving 5-day 15 Gy X-ray irradiation at chest cavity. The pathological changes of pulmonary tissues were observed by HE staining. The apoptosis of lung tissues cells after irradiation was detected by TUNEL assay. The expressions of γ-H2AX, ki67, NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), caspase-1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC/TMS-1) were detected by Western blot analysis. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to check mRNA levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), NLRP3, caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine the expressions of NLRP3, caspase-1 and TMS1 in lung tissues. The activity of caspase-1 was evaluated by caspase-1 assay kit, and the serum levels of IL-1β and IL-18 were detected by ELISA. Results After irradiation, the capillaries of the alveolar wall of the mice were dilated and congested, inflammatory cells infiltrated, the alveolar wall thickened. Positive rate of lung tissue cells was raised in TUNEL staining. The expressions of γ-H2AX and ki67 were elevated, indicating that DNA damage and cell proliferation activity decreased in lung tissues. The mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in lung cells increased; the serum levels of IL-1β and IL-18 increased; the expressions of IL-1β, IL-18, NLRP3, caspase-1 and ASC/TMS-1 in lung tissues were enhanced; and caspase-1 activity increased. Conclusion After irradiation, the pyroptosis caused by the activation of NLRP3 inflammatory body occurred in the lung tissue of mice.

  13. Metal concentrations in homing pigeon lung tissue as a biomonitor of atmospheric pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jia; Halbrook, Richard S; Zang, Shuying; Han, Shuang; Li, Xinyu

    2017-12-22

    Atmospheric pollution in urban areas is a major worldwide concern with potential adverse impacts on wildlife and humans. Biomonitoring can provide direct evidence of the bioavailability and bioaccumulation of toxic metals in the environment that is not available with mechanical air monitoring. The current study continues our evaluation of the usefulness of homing pigeon lung tissue as a biomonitor of atmospheric pollution. Homing pigeons (1-2, 5-6, and 9-10+ year old (yo)) collected from Guangzhou during 2015 were necropsied and concentrations of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg) were measured in lung tissue. Lung Cd and Pb concentrations were significantly greater in 9-10+-year-old pigeons compared with those in other age groups, indicating their bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Lung Pb and Cd concentrations measured in 5-yo pigeons collected from Guangzhou during 2015 were significantly lower than concentrations reported in 5-yo homing pigeons collected from Guangzhou during 2011 and correlated with concentrations measured using mechanical air monitoring. In addition to temporal differences, spatial differences in concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Hg reported in ambient air samples and in pigeon lung tissues collected from Beijing and Guangzhou are discussed.

  14. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  15. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve and the dynamic force moduli (storage and loss) are measured at low frequency (from 3 to 45 Hz). All the samples were preserved in the PBS solution at room temperature and the measurements were perfomed within 4 hours after surgery. Young's modulus of the human bronchial airway walls are fond ranged between 0.17 and 1.65 MPa, ranged between 0.25 to 1.96 MPa for cartilages, and between 0.02 to 0.28 MPa for mucosa. The storage modulus are found varying 0.10 MPa with frequency while the loss modulus are found increasing from ...

  16. [Determination of volatile organic compounds in lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan-jie; Qiu, Yuan-hua; Chen, En-guo; Ying, Ke-jing; Yu, Jin; Wang, Ping

    2010-05-01

    To identify the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. The lung cancer tissue samples from 18 patients were cultured and 4 lung cell lines (A549, NCI-H446, SK-MES-1, BEAS-2B) were also included in the study. Air samples in the headspace of culture flasks were analyzed for VOCs with solid-phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique (SPME-GC/MS). Two kinds of VOCs 2-pentadecanone and nonadecane were detected in lung cancer cell lines A549, NCI-H446 and SK-MES-1. The concentration of 2-pentadecanone were (1.382 + or -0.171) X 10(-5)mg/L, (1.681 + or - 0.190) X 10(-4)mg/L and (2.835 + or - 0.401) X 10(-6)mg/L, respectively; the concentrations of nonadecane were (8.382 + or - 0.606 ) X 10(-6)mg/L, (1.845 + or - 0.130) X 10(-5)mg/L and (6.220 + or - 0.362) X 10(-6)mg/L), respectively. The eicosane was detected in A549 and NCI-H446 with the concentration of (8.313 + or - 1.130) X 10(-6)mg/L and (1.020 + or - 0.141) X 10(-5)mg/L), respectively. All the 3 VOCs were not detected in cell line BEAS-2B. The concentrations of 12 VOCs including decane, 2- pentadecanone, nonadecane and eicosane were high in 18 lung cancer tissue samples; the concentrations of 2-pentadecanone were 5.421 X 10(-6)mg/L-3.621 X 10(-5)mg/L,those of nonadecane were 5.805 X 10(-6)mg/L-1.830 X 10(-5)mg/L, those of eicosane were 2.730 X 10(-6)mg/L-2.343 X 10(-5)mg/L. There were no differences of VOCs levels among patients with different cancer differentiation (P>0.05). The concentration of eicosane in the non-squamous carcinoma was higher than that in squamous carcinoma, the same results were confirmed in the lung cancer cell lines. This study has identified VOCs produced by lung cancer tissue, which may support to use breath test as a complementary noninvasive diagnostic method for lung cancer.

  17. FIBROBLASTS, EPITHELIAL-CELLS, ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS AND SMOOTH-MUSCLE CELLS ARE MAJOR TARGETS OF HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS-INFECTION IN LUNG AND GASTROINTESTINAL TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINZGER, C; GREFTE, A; PLACHTER, B; GOUW, ASH; THE, TH; JAHN, G

    High titre replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in cell culture is restricted to primary human fibroblasts. During acute infection in vivo, HCMV nucleic acids and antigens have been found in various organs. Using only morphological criteria, inconsistent data have been reported about the cell

  18. Gene Expression Analysis to Assess the Relevance of Rodent Models to Human Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Lofgren, Shane; Khatri, Purvesh; Rogers, Angela J

    2017-08-01

    The relevance of animal models to human diseases is an area of intense scientific debate. The degree to which mouse models of lung injury recapitulate human lung injury has never been assessed. Integrating data from both human and animal expression studies allows for increased statistical power and identification of conserved differential gene expression across organisms and conditions. We sought comprehensive integration of gene expression data in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rodents compared with humans. We performed two separate gene expression multicohort analyses to determine differential gene expression in experimental animal and human lung injury. We used correlational and pathway analyses combined with external in vitro gene expression data to identify both potential drivers of underlying inflammation and therapeutic drug candidates. We identified 21 animal lung tissue datasets and three human lung injury bronchoalveolar lavage datasets. We show that the metasignatures of animal and human experimental ALI are significantly correlated despite these widely varying experimental conditions. The gene expression changes among mice and rats across diverse injury models (ozone, ventilator-induced lung injury, LPS) are significantly correlated with human models of lung injury (Pearson r = 0.33-0.45, P human lung injury. Predicted therapeutic targets, peptide ligand signatures, and pathway analyses are also all highly overlapping. Gene expression changes are similar in animal and human experimental ALI, and provide several physiologic and therapeutic insights to the disease.

  19. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  20. Rapid diagnosis and intraoperative margin assessment of human lung cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyan; Tang, Feng; Pan, Xiaobo; Yao, Longfang; Wang, Xinyi; Jing, Yueyue; Ma, Jiong; Wang, Guifang; Mi, Lan

    2017-12-01

    A method of rapidly differentiating lung tumor from healthy tissue is extraordinarily needed for both the diagnosis and the intraoperative margin assessment. We assessed the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues with the autofluorescence, and also elucidated the mechanism in tissue studies and cell studies. A 15-patient testing group was used to compare FLIM results with traditional histopathology diagnosis. Based on the endogenous fluorescence lifetimes of the testing group, a criterion line was proposed to distinguish normal and cancerous tissues. Then by blinded examined 41 sections from the validation group of other 16 patients, the sensitivity and specificity of FLIM were determined. The cellular metabolism was studied with specific perturbations of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis in cell studies. The fluorescence lifetime of cancerous lung tissues is consistently lower than normal tissues, and this is due to the both decrease of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) lifetimes. A criterion line of lifetime at 1920 ps can be given for differentiating human lung cancer and normal tissues.The sensitivity and specificity of FLIM for lung cancer diagnosis were determined as 92.9% and 92.3%. These findings suggest that NADH and FAD can be used to rapidly diagnose lung cancer. FLIM is a rapid, accurate and highly sensitive technique in the judgment during lung cancer surgery and it can be potential in earlier cancer detection.

  1. Cancer-associated loss of TARSH gene expression in human primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kunihiko; Shimada, Junichi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Maruyama, Mitsuo; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    We have previously identified mouse Tarsh as one of the cellular senescence-related genes and showed the loss of expression of TARSH mRNA in four human lung cancer cell lines. TARSH is a presumptive signal transduction molecule interacting with NESH, which is implicated to have some roles in lung cancer metastasis. The amplification of complete ORF-encoding TARSH cDNA was done with reverse transcription-PCR. Northern blotting was carried out using TARSH cDNA probes. To clarify the relationship between TARSH and lung cancer, we quantified TARSH mRNA expression in 15 human lung cancer cell lines and 32 primary non-small cell lung cancers. We first determined the complete ORF-encoding cDNA sequence which is expressed in the human lung. On the Northern hybridization analysis, TARSH was strongly expressed in the human lung. The expression of TARSH mRNA is remarkably downregulated in all the lung cancer cell lines examined. Furthermore, TARSH expression was significantly low in all of the tumor specimens when compared to the expression in corresponding non-neoplastic lung tissue specimens. The cancer-associated transcriptional inactivation of TARSH suggests that TARSH could be used as a biomarker for lung cancer development as well as a molecular adjunct for lung carcinogenesis in human.

  2. MALDI profiling of human lung cancer subtypes.

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    Angelo Gámez-Pozo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteomics is expected to play a key role in cancer biomarker discovery. Although it has become feasible to rapidly analyze proteins from crude cell extracts using mass spectrometry, complex sample composition hampers this type of measurement. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis, it becomes critical to enrich samples for the analytes of interest. Despite that one-third of the proteins in eukaryotic cells are thought to be phosphorylated at some point in their life cycle, only a low percentage of intracellular proteins is phosphorylated at a given time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we have applied chromatographic phosphopeptide enrichment techniques to reduce the complexity of human clinical samples. A novel method for high-throughput peptide profiling of human tumor samples, using Parallel IMAC and MALDI-TOF MS, is described. We have applied this methodology to analyze human normal and cancer lung samples in the search for new biomarkers. Using a highly reproducible spectral processing algorithm to produce peptide mass profiles with minimal variability across the samples, lineal discriminant-based and decision tree-based classification models were generated. These models can distinguish normal from tumor samples, as well as differentiate the various non-small cell lung cancer histological subtypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel, optimized sample preparation method and a careful data acquisition strategy is described for high-throughput peptide profiling of small amounts of human normal lung and lung cancer samples. We show that the appropriate combination of peptide expression values is able to discriminate normal lung from non-small cell lung cancer samples and among different histological subtypes. Our study does emphasize the great potential of proteomics in the molecular characterization of cancer.

  3. Nonrigid Registration of Lung CT Images Based on Tissue Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonrigid image registration is a prerequisite for various medical image process and analysis applications. Much effort has been devoted to thoracic image registration due to breathing motion. Recently, scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT has been used in medical image registration and obtained promising results. However, SIFT is apt to detect blob features. Blobs key points are generally detected in smooth areas which may contain few diagnostic points. In general, diagnostic points used in medical image are often vessel crossing points, vascular endpoints, and tissue boundary points, which provide abundant information about vessels and can reflect the motion of lungs accurately. These points generally have high gradients as opposed to blob key points and can be detected by Harris. In this work, we proposed a hybrid feature detection method which can detect tissue features of lungs effectively based on Harris and SIFT. In addition, a novel method which can remove mismatched landmarks is also proposed. A series of thoracic CT images are tested by using the proposed algorithm, and the quantitative and qualitative evaluations show that our method is statistically significantly better than conventional SIFT method especially in the case of large deformation of lungs during respiration.

  4. 3D Bioprinting of Vascularized Human Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesky, David Barry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manufacture human tissues that replicate the spatial, mechano-chemical, and temporal aspects of biological tissues would enable myriad applications, including drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repair and regeneration. However, given the complexity of human tissues, this is a daunting challenge. Current biofabrication methods are unable to fully recapitulate the form and function of human tissues, which are composed of multiple cell types, extracellular matrices, and ...

  5. Microarray analysis of long non-coding RNAs in COPD lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hui; Zhou, Ji; Wu, Dandan; Gao, Wei; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Liu, Feng; Huang, Mao; Adcock, Ian M; Barnes, Peter J; Yao, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In this study, we provide the description of genome-wide lncRNA expression in the lung tissue of non-smokers without Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), of smokers without COPD and of smokers with COPD. RNA was extracted from human lung tissue and analysed using an Agilent Human lncRNA + mRNA Array v2.0 system. 39,253 distinct lncRNA transcripts were detected in the lung tissues of all subjects. In smokers without COPD 87 lncRNAs were significantly up-regulated and 244 down-regulated compared to non-smokers without COPD with RNA50010|UCSC-9199-1005 and RNA58351| CombinedLit_316_550, the most over- and under-regulated, respectively. In contrast, in COPD patients 120 lncRNAs were over-expressed and 43 under-expressed compared with smokers without COPD with RNA44121|UCSC-2000-3182 and RNA43510|UCSC-1260-3754 being the most over- and under-regulated, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis indicated that cigarette smoking was associated with activation of metabolic pathways, whereas COPD transcripts were associated with 'hematopoietic cell lineage', intermediary metabolism and immune system processes. We conclude that the altered expression of lncRNAs might play partial role in pathways implicated in COPD onset and progression such as intermediary metabolism and the immune response.

  6. A SCID mouse-human lung xenograft model of varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Dequan; Fu, Wenkun; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Liu, Che; Huang, Xiumin; Lin, Yanzhen; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-10-01

    Varicella pneumonia is one of the most serious, potentially life-threatening complications of primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection in adults and immunocompromised individuals. However, studies on the lung pathogenesis of VZV infection as well as development and testing of antivirals have long been hindered by limited access to clinical samples and a lack of suitable animal models. In this study, we report for the first time the use of human lung xenografts in SCID mice for investigating VZV infection. Human fetal lung tissues grafted under the kidney capsule of SCID mice rapidly grew and developed mature structures closely resembling normal human lung. Following infection, VZV replicated and spread efficiently in human lung xenografts, where the virus targeted both alveolar epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and resulted in formation of large viral lesions. VZV particles were readily detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of infected lung cells by electron microscopy. Additionally, VZV infection resulted in a robust pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human lung xenografts. In conclusion, infecting human lung xenografts in SCID mice provides a useful, biological relevant tool for future mechanistic studies on VZV lung pathogenesis, and may potentially facilitate the evaluation of new antiviral therapies for VZV lung infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical transition in tissue homeostasis accompanies murine lung senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla L Calvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory dysfunction is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in aged populations. The susceptibility to pulmonary insults is attributed to "low pulmonary reserve", ostensibly reflecting a combination of age-related musculoskeletal, immunologic and intrinsic pulmonary dysfunction. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a murine model of the aging lung, senescent DBA/2 mice, we correlated a longitudinal survey of airspace size and injury measures with a transcriptome from the aging lung at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months of age. Morphometric analysis demonstrated a nonlinear pattern of airspace caliber enlargement with a critical transition occurring between 8 and 12 months of age marked by an initial increase in oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation which is soon followed by inflammatory cell infiltration, immune complex deposition and the onset of airspace enlargement. The temporally correlative transcriptome showed exuberant induction of immunoglobulin genes coincident with airspace enlargement. Immunohistochemistry, ELISA analysis and flow cytometry demonstrated increased immunoglobulin deposition in the lung associated with a contemporaneous increase in activated B-cells expressing high levels of TLR4 (toll receptor 4 and CD86 and macrophages during midlife. These midlife changes culminate in progressive airspace enlargement during late life stages. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings establish that a tissue-specific aging program is evident during a presenescent interval which involves early oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation, followed by B lymphocyte and macrophage expansion/activation. This sequence heralds the progression to overt airspace enlargement in the aged lung. These signature events, during middle age, indicate that early stages of the aging immune system may have important correlates in the maintenance of tissue morphology. We further show that time-course analyses of aging

  8. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  10. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  11. Human tissue in systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Schuur, Klaas; Oniscu, Anca; Mullen, Peter; Reynolds, Paul A; Harrison, David J

    2013-12-01

    Histopathology, the examination of an architecturally artefactual, two-dimensional and static image remains a potent tool allowing diagnosis and empirical expectation of prognosis. Considerable optimism exists that the advent of molecular genetic testing and other biomarker strategies will improve or even replace this ancient technology. A number of biomarkers already add considerable value for prediction of whether a treatment will work. In this short review we argue that a systems medicine approach to pathology will not seek to replace traditional pathology, but rather augment it. Systems approaches need to incorporate quantitative morphological, protein, mRNA and DNA data. A significant challenge for clinical implementation of systems pathology is how to optimize information available from tissue, which is frequently sub-optimal in quality and amount, and yet generate useful predictive models that work. The transition of histopathology to systems pathophysiology and the use of multiscale data sets usher in a new era in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction based on the analysis of human tissue. © 2013 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  12. Nonparametric block-structured modeling of lung tissue strip mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksym, G N; Kearney, R E; Bates, J H

    1998-01-01

    Very large amplitude pseudorandom uniaxial perturbations containing frequencies between 0.125 and 12.5 Hz were applied to five dog lung tissue strips. Three different nonlinear block-structured models in nonparametric form were fit to the data. These models consisted of (1) a static nonlinear block followed by a dynamic linear block (Hammerstein model); (2) the same blocks in reverse order (Wiener model); and (3) the blocks in parallel (parallel model). Both the Hammerstein and Wiener models performed well for a given input perturbation, each accounting for greater than 99% of the measured stress signal variance. However, the Wiener and parallel model parameters showed some dependence on the strain amplitude and the mean stress. In contrast, a single Hammerstein model accounted for the data at all strain amplitudes and operating stresses. A Hammerstein model featuring a fifth-order polynomial static nonlinearity and a linear impulse response function of 1 s duration accounted for the most output variance (99.84%+/-0.13%, mean+/-standard deviations for perturbations of 50% strain at 1.5 kPa stress). The static nonlinear behavior of the Hammerstein model also matched the quasistatic stress-strain behavior obtained at the same strain amplitude and operating stress. These results show that the static nonlinear behavior of the dog lung tissue strip is separable from its linear dynamic behavior.

  13. Lung scintigraphy with nonspecific human immunoglobulin G ({sup 99m}Tc-HIG) in the evaluation of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue diseases: correlation with pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostopoulos, C.; Toubanakis, C.; Mamoulakis, C.; Gialafos, E.; Mavrikakis, M. [Alexandra University Hospital, Department of Clinical Therapeutics, Athens (Greece); Koutsikos, J.; Zerva, C.; Leondi, A. [Alexandra University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Athens (Greece); Moulopoulos, L.A. [Areteion University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Sfikakis, P.P. [Laikon University Hospital, Department of Propaedeutic Medicine, Athens (Greece)

    2008-02-15

    In patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD), the early detection and evaluation of the severity of the pulmonary involvement is mandatory. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are considered to be valuable noninvasive diagnostic modalities. Radiopharmaceuticals have also been used for this purpose. Our aim was the evaluation of technetium-labeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (HIG) lung scintigraphy in the early detection and assessment of the severity of the pulmonary involvement in CTD patients. Fifty-two nonsmoking CTD patients were studied by PFTs, HRCT, and HIG. According to PFTs, patients were divided in group A (impaired PFTs - abnormal pulmonary function) and group B (normal pulmonary function). Semiquantitative analysis was done on HIG and HRCT and corresponding scores were obtained. Significant difference was found between HIG scores in the two groups (0.6 {+-} 0.07 vs 0.51 {+-} 0.08, P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant negative correlation between HIG scores and PFTs results and a positive correlation between HIG and HRCT scores. HIG demonstrated similar clinical performance to HRCT. At the best cut-off levels of their score (0.56 and 7, respectively), HIG had a superior sensitivity (77.5 vs 57.5%) with lower specificity (75 vs 91.7%). The combination of the two methods increased the sensitivity of abnormal findings at the expense of specificity. HIG scintigraphy can be used in the early detection and evaluation of the severity of the pulmonary involvement in CTD, whereas, when used in combination with HRCT, the detection of affected patients can be further improved. (orig.)

  14. Fibrocytes and the tissue niche in lung repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjermer Leif

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human fibrocytes are bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells that express a variety of markers related to leukocytes, hematopoietic stem cells and a diverse set of fibroblast phenotypes. Fibrocytes can be recruited from the circulation to the tissue where they further can differentiate and proliferate into various mesenchymal cell types depending on the tissue niche. This local tissue niche is important because it modulates the fibrocytes and coordinates their role in tissue behaviour and repair. However, plasticity of a niche may be co-opted in chronic airway diseases such as asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and obliterative bronchiolitis. This review will therefore focus on a possible role of fibrocytes in pathological tissue repair processes in those diseases.

  15. Proteomic alteration in lung tissue of rats exposed to cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suping; Xu, Naiyu; Nie, Jihua; Dong, Liang; Li, Jianxiang; Tong, Jian

    2008-05-30

    Cigarette smoke has been widely investigated in terms of epidemiological and pathological studies in relation to human lung diseases. In this study, we conducted a proteomic analysis to characterize the differential protein expression in lung tissue of rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Wistar rats were exposed to cigarette smoke twice a day, 30 min each for 1, 2 and 4 months, respectively. The total protein of lung tissue was extracted for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and analyzed with ImageMaster 2D Platinum software. A total of 28 differentially expressed proteins between the control and the smoke-exposed groups were screened and of which 18 were identified by matrix assistant laser desorption ion-top of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) or MALDI- TOF-TOF analysis, revealing 10 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated proteins. The up-regulated expression of two proteins, receptor for advanced glycation endpoints (RAGE) and thioredoxin (Trx), were validated by immunoblotting and found to be consistent with the proteomic analysis. The results presented in this study demonstrate the identification of proteomic pattern as an early indicator of lung damages induced by cigarette smoke. The differentially expressed proteins may be applied as exposure biomarkers in future experimental as well as epidemiologic investigations upon confirmation by a greater sample size and more validate study design for the proteomic research.

  16. Microbiota of human breast tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M; Gloor, Gregory B; Baban, Chwanrow K; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M; Burton, Jeremy P; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    .... We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland...

  17. IMP3 Predicts Invasion and Prognosis in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinhai; Wei, Qingzhu; Jian, Wenjing; Qiu, Bo; Wen, Jing; Liu, Jianghuan; Fu, Bo; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2016-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein associated with several aggressive and advanced cancers. Whether IMP3 can predict invasion, and prognosis in patients with human lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) remains unclear. Ninety-five LAC and 75 non-tumor lung tissue samples were included in a tissue microarray. IMP3 expression was assessed by immunohistochemical examination. Correlation between IMP3 expression levels, clinicopathological characteristics, and overall prognosis was evaluated. In a separate in vitro study, RNA interference method was applied for knockdown of IMP3 gene in human LAC cell lines. Invasive potential of LAC cells was then evaluated by transwell migration assay. IMP3 immunoreactivity was observed in 39 out of 95 (41.1 %) LAC patients, but not in non-tumor lung tissues. IMP3 expression levels were closely associated with histological grade (P = 0.037), TNM stage (P = 0.034), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.011). Patients presenting with positive IMP3 expression (P = 0.000), an advanced TNM stage (P = 0.000), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001) had a worse overall survival, compared to those lacking these characteristics. Both IMP3 expression (hazard ratio [HR], 2.310; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.192-4.476; P = 0.013) and TNM stage (HR 2.338; 95 % CI 1.393-3.925; P = 0.001) were independent predictors of poor prognosis. The invasive potential of LAC cells was significantly inhibited by IMP3 knockdown. IMP3 appears to play an important role in tumor invasion in patients with LAC and may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker in these patients.

  18. Tissue-specific interferon alpha subtype response to SIV infection in brain, spleen, and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Luna Alammar; Dery, Alicia; Leong, Wan Yee; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E

    2013-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) is a type I interferon that plays a major role in host defense. There are 13 different IFNalpha genes in humans, but much of the work concerning their role in viral defense has been limited to studying either subtype 2 or pan IFNalpha due to the inability to distinguish between highly similar genetic and amino acid sequences. Because of recent advances in molecular and biochemical techniques, it is possible to study the regulation of individual subtypes. It has been reported that HIV/SIV infection results in impaired IFNalpha responses in certain tissues. Using a pigtailed macaque SIV model, we examined the subtype response during acute infection in 3 tissues that are known to be infected with HIV/SIV, but whose IFNalpha subtype response has not been extensively studied: the brain, spleen, and lung. We found that the expression and regulation of specific subtypes occur in a tissue-specific manner. There was more limited IFNalpha subtype expression in the lung and brain, where predominantly macrophages are infected compared to the spleen, which contains both infected CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages. Understanding the IFNalpha subtype response in tissues known to be infected with HIV/SIV can help tailor adjunctive treatment regimens to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Detection of N-acylhomoserine lactones in lung tissues of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H; Song, Z; Hentzer, Morten

    2000-01-01

    microscopy, GFP-expressing E. coli bacteria could be detected in the lung tissues, indicating production and excretion of AHL molecules in vivo by the infecting P. aeruginosa. AHL signals were detected mainly in lung tissues exhibiting severe pathological changes. These findings support the view...

  20. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  1. Preferential lymphatic growth in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue in sustained lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluk, Peter; Adams, Alicia; Phillips, Keeley; Feng, Jennifer; Hong, Young-Kwon; Brown, Mary B; McDonald, Donald M

    2014-05-01

    Lymphatics proliferate, become enlarged, or regress in multiple inflammatory lung diseases in humans. Lymphatic growth and remodeling is known to occur in the mouse trachea in sustained inflammation, but whether intrapulmonary lymphatics exhibit similar plasticity is unknown. We examined the time course, distribution, and dependence on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2/VEGFR-3 signaling of lung lymphatics in sustained inflammation. Lymphatics in mouse lungs were examined under baseline conditions and 3 to 28 days after Mycoplasma pulmonis infection, using prospero heomeobox 1-enhanced green fluorescence protein and VEGFR-3 as markers. Sprouting lymphangiogenesis was evident at 7 days. Lymphatic growth was restricted to regions of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT), where VEGF-C-producing cells were scattered in T-cell zones. Expansion of lung lymphatics after infection was reduced 68% by blocking VEGFR-2, 83% by blocking VEGFR-3, and 99% by blocking both receptors. Inhibition of VEGFR-2/VEGFR-3 did not prevent the formation of BALT. Treatment of established infection with oxytetracycline caused BALT, but not the lymphatics, to regress. We conclude that robust lymphangiogenesis occurs in mouse lungs after M. pulmonis infection through a mechanism involving signaling of both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. Expansion of the lymphatic network is restricted to regions of BALT, but lymphatics do not regress when BALT regresses after antibiotic treatment. The lung lymphatic network can thus expand in sustained inflammation, but the expansion is not as reversible as the accompanying inflammation. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  3. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  4. Human lung natural killer cells are predominantly comprised of highly differentiated hypofunctional CD69-CD56dim cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Nicole; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Chen, Puran; Kvedaraite, Egle; Wilson, Jennifer N; Ivarsson, Martin A; Mjösberg, Jenny; Berglin, Lena; Säfholm, Jesper; Manson, Martijn L; Adner, Mikael; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Bergman, Per; Orre, Ann-Charlotte; Svensson, Mattias; Dahlén, Barbro; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to the extensive knowledge about human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood, relatively little is known about NK cells in the human lung. Knowledge about the composition, differentiation, and function of human lung NK cells is critical to better understand their role in diseases affecting the lung, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections, and cancer. We sought to analyze and compare the phenotypic and functional characteristics of NK cells in the human lung and peripheral blood at the single-cell level. NK cells in human lung tissue and matched peripheral blood from 132 subjects were analyzed by using 16-color flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. CD56dimCD16+ NK cells made up the vast majority of NK cells in human lungs, had a more differentiated phenotype, and more frequently expressed educating killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors compared with NK cells in peripheral blood. Despite this, human lung NK cells were hyporesponsive toward target cell stimulation, even after priming with IFN-α. Furthermore, we detected a small subset of NK cells expressing CD69, a marker of tissue residency. These CD69+ NK cells in the lung consisted predominantly of immature CD56brightCD16- NK cells and less differentiated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells. Here, we characterize the major NK cell populations in the human lung. Our data suggest a model in which the majority of NK cells in the human lung dynamically move between blood and the lung rather than residing in the lung as bona fide tissue-resident CD69+ NK cells. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cadmium Concentration in Human Autopsy Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Teresa; Sadlik, Józefa K

    2017-10-01

    The concentration of cadmium in human tissues obtained on the basis of autopsies of non-poisoned Polish people (n = 150), aged from 1 to 80 years, examined between 1990 and 2010, is presented. The following values were found in wet digested samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) (mean ± SD, median, and range, μg/g of wet weight): brain 0.020 ± 0.031, 0.084, 0-0.120 (n = 41); stomach 0.148 ± 0.195, 0.084, 0-1.25 (n = 89); small intestine 0.227 ± 0.231, 0.130, 0-0.830 (n = 39); liver 1.54 ± 1.55, 1.01, 0.015-9.65 (n = 99); kidney 16.0 ± 13.2, 14.0, 0.62-61.3 (n = 91); lung 0.304 ± 0.414, 0.130, 0-1.90 (n = 25); and heart 0.137 ± 0.107, 0.140, 0.017-0.250 (n = 4). Additionally, results (n = 13 people, aged from 2 to 83 years, 63 samples) obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) between 2010 and 2015 are given. The obtained data on Cd concentration in the human body can be used to estimate the amounts occurring in "healthy" people and those occurring in cases of chronic or acute poisonings with Cd compounds, which are examined for forensic purposes or to assess environmental exposure levels.

  6. Hypothermia activates adipose tissue to promote malignant lung cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangjun Du

    Full Text Available Microenvironment has been increasingly recognized as a critical regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we identified early changes in the microenvironment that contribute to malignant progression. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B to methylnitrosourea (MNU caused a reduction in cell toxicity and an increase in clonogenic capacity when the temperature was lowered from 37°C to 28°C. Hypothermia-incubated adipocyte media promoted proliferation in A549 cells. Although a hypothermic environment could increase urethane-induced tumor counts and Lewis lung cancer (LLC metastasis in lungs of three breeds of mice, an increase in tumor size could be discerned only in obese mice housed in hypothermia. Similarly, coinjections using differentiated adipocytes and A549 cells promoted tumor development in athymic nude mice when adipocytes were cultured at 28°C. Conversely, fat removal suppressed tumor growth in obese C57BL/6 mice inoculated with LLC cells. Further studies show hypothermia promotes a MNU-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and protects the tumor cell against immune control by TGF-β1 upregulation. We also found that activated adipocytes trigger tumor cell proliferation by increasing either TNF-α or VEGF levels. These results suggest that hypothermia activates adipocytes to stimulate tumor boost and play critical determinant roles in malignant progression.

  7. Hypothermia activates adipose tissue to promote malignant lung cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Gangjun; Zhao, Bei; Zhang, Yaping; Sun, Ting; Liu, Weijie; Li, Jiahuan; Liu, Yinghui; Wang, Yingying; Li, Hong; Hou, Xidong

    2013-01-01

    Microenvironment has been increasingly recognized as a critical regulator of cancer progression. In this study, we identified early changes in the microenvironment that contribute to malignant progression. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to methylnitrosourea (MNU) caused a reduction in cell toxicity and an increase in clonogenic capacity when the temperature was lowered from 37°C to 28°C. Hypothermia-incubated adipocyte media promoted proliferation in A549 cells. Although a hypothermic environment could increase urethane-induced tumor counts and Lewis lung cancer (LLC) metastasis in lungs of three breeds of mice, an increase in tumor size could be discerned only in obese mice housed in hypothermia. Similarly, coinjections using differentiated adipocytes and A549 cells promoted tumor development in athymic nude mice when adipocytes were cultured at 28°C. Conversely, fat removal suppressed tumor growth in obese C57BL/6 mice inoculated with LLC cells. Further studies show hypothermia promotes a MNU-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and protects the tumor cell against immune control by TGF-β1 upregulation. We also found that activated adipocytes trigger tumor cell proliferation by increasing either TNF-α or VEGF levels. These results suggest that hypothermia activates adipocytes to stimulate tumor boost and play critical determinant roles in malignant progression.

  8. Synthetic Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605 Protects Human Lung in an Ex Vivo Model of Proton Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Velalopoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for the treatment of thoracic malignancies has improved significantly by directing of the proton beam in higher doses on the targeted tumor while normal tissues around the tumor receive much lower doses. Nevertheless, exposure of normal tissues to protons is known to pose a substantial risk in long-term survivors, as confirmed by our work in space-relevant exposures of murine lungs to proton radiation. Thus, radioprotective strategies are being sought. We established that LGM2605 is a potent protector from radiation-induced lung toxicity and aimed in the current study to extend the initial findings of space-relevant, proton radiation-associated late lung damage in mice by looking at acute changes in human lung. We used an ex vivo model of organ culture where tissue slices of donor living human lung were kept in culture and exposed to proton radiation. We exposed donor human lung precision-cut lung sections (huPCLS, pretreated with LGM2605, to 4 Gy proton radiation and evaluated them 30 min and 24 h later for gene expression changes relevant to inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest, and determined radiation-induced senescence, inflammation, and oxidative tissue damage. We identified an LGM2605-mediated reduction of proton radiation-induced cellular senescence and associated cell cycle changes, an associated proinflammatory phenotype, and associated oxidative tissue damage. This is a first report on the effects of proton radiation and of the radioprotective properties of LGM2605 on human lung.

  9. Asbestos fibers in human lung: forensic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenreich, T.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1981-03-01

    Asbestos is a fibrous mineral which, because of its unique properties, has innumerable applications in many industries and is used in a large variety of consumer products. It has become ubiquitous and is woven, literally and figuratively, into the fabric of our present-day civilization. However, its presence is sometimes unknown and unsuspected by those who are exposed to asbestos by virtue of occupation or environment and inhale its fibers. Exposed workers and even urban dwellers may have a variable lung burden of asbestos fibers. There is indisputable clinical, pathological, experimental and epidemiological proof that, after varying periods of latency, asbestos may cause benign and malignant disease often leading to disability or death. Forensic investigation of suspected asbestos-related deaths includes a life-time occupational history, a complete autopsy, and identification of the asbestos fiber tissue burden. The latter usually requires special procedures.

  10. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhizhou; Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Ren, Yi; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Jinfeng; Wolfram, Joy; Wang, Feng; Nie, Shinan

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson's trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury.

  11. Procoagulant, tissue factor-bearing microparticles in bronchoalveolar lavage of interstitial lung disease patients: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Novelli

    Full Text Available Coagulation factor Xa appears involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Through its interaction with protease activated receptor-1, this protease signals myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Although fibrogenic stimuli induce factor X synthesis by alveolar cells, the mechanisms of local posttranslational factor X activation are not fully understood. Cell-derived microparticles are submicron vesicles involved in different physiological processes, including blood coagulation; they potentially activate factor X due to the exposure on their outer membrane of both phosphatidylserine and tissue factor. We postulated a role for procoagulant microparticles in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases. Nineteen patients with interstitial lung diseases and 11 controls were studied. All subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage; interstitial lung disease patients also underwent pulmonary function tests and high resolution CT scan. Microparticles were enumerated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with a solid-phase assay based on thrombin generation. Microparticles were also tested for tissue factor activity. In vitro shedding of microparticles upon incubation with H₂O₂ was assessed in the human alveolar cell line, A549 and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. Tissue factor synthesis was quantitated by real-time PCR. Total microparticle number and microparticle-associated tissue factor activity were increased in interstitial lung disease patients compared to controls (84±8 vs. 39±3 nM phosphatidylserine; 293±37 vs. 105±21 arbitrary units of tissue factor activity; mean±SEM; p<.05 for both comparisons. Microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was inversely correlated with lung function as assessed by both diffusion capacity and forced vital capacity (r² = .27 and .31, respectively; p<.05 for both correlations. Exposure of lung epithelial cells to H₂O₂ caused an increase in microparticle-bound tissue factor

  12. Oxygen Transport to Human Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    venous PO2 differences in the fetal foal (Silver and Comline, 1972). There is evidence that normally there is a considerable amount of shunted blood in the...in the lung capillaries. J, 4ppl. Phvsiol. 11:290-302. Silver. M. and Comline, R.S. 1972. Some observations on the umbilical circulation of the foal ...Advances in Neurology . [ol. 20. Cerv6s-Navarro. J., Betz, E.. Ebhardt. GI.. Ferszt. R.. and Wijllenweber. R., eds. New York: Raven Press. pp. 333-339

  13. Thorium isotopes in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F.

    1991-12-31

    Concentrations of {sup 232}Th and activity ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th were determined in autopsy samples from five former employees of a thorium refinery. The ranges of {sup 232}Th activity concentrations (mBq g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.17--94 in lungs, 3.9--1210 in pulmonary lymph nodes, 0.14--1.19 in bones, 0.015--0.68 in liver, 0.97--5.8 in spleen, and 0.009--0.068 in kidneys. These concentrations are 10 to 1000 times greater than have been reported for persons not occupationally exposed to Th. In most of the samples, the ratios of {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th activity at death of the subject were 0.1--0.2 and 0.2--0.4, respectively. Thorium-228 to {sup 228}Ra activity ratios ({plus_minus} standard errors) of 0.86 {plus_minus} 0.11 in lungs and 1.18 {plus_minus} 0.13 in lymph nodes of one subject were obtained by calculation from ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th.

  14. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Epperly, Michael W. [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Basse, Per H. [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Immunology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wang, Hong [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Biostatistics, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wang, Xinhui [Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Proia, David A. [Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp., 45 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera, E-mail: levinav@upmc.edu [The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-05-22

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors.

  15. Cryobanking of human ovarian tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macklon, Kirsten Tryde; Ernst, Erik; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is one way of preserving fertility in young women with a malignant disease or other disorders that require gonadotoxic treatment. The purpose of the study was to explore how many women remained interested in continued cryostorage of their ovarian tissue beyond a...... women with ovarian tissue cryobanked requested continued cryostorage after an initial period of at least 5 years. The main reason for requesting disposal was successful completion of a family.......Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is one way of preserving fertility in young women with a malignant disease or other disorders that require gonadotoxic treatment. The purpose of the study was to explore how many women remained interested in continued cryostorage of their ovarian tissue beyond...... an initial 5-year period. Between 1999 and 2006, a total of 201 girls and young women had one ovary cryopreserved for fertility preservation in Denmark. One hundred of these met our inclusion criteria, which included a follow-up period of at least 5 years, and were mailed a questionnaire. The response rate...

  16. Numerical Simulation of Particle Deposition in the Human Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Gengenbach, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We model, simulate and calculate breathing and particle depositions in the human lungs. We review the theory and discretization of fluid mechanics, the anatomy, physiology and measuring methods of lungs. A new model is introduced and investigated with a sensitivity analysis using the singular value decomposition. Particle depositions are simulated in patient-specific and schematized human lungs and compared to the particle deposition in a multiplicative model of subsequent bifurcations.

  17. Recent advances in connective tissue disease related interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Fischer, Aryeh

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common manifestation of connective tissue disease (CTD). Although the majority of patients with CTD-ILD are stable or slowly progressive, a significant group exhibits a more severe and progressive decline. Interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features (IPAF) describes the subset of patients with interstitial pneumonia who have features suggesting underlying autoimmunity, but whose features fall short of a clear diagnosis of CTD. Areas covered: In this focused review, we discuss recent advances in early detection, prognostic evaluation, and management of autoimmune forms of ILD. Expert commentary: Early detection of ILD and a better understanding of factors that impact prognostication may be helpful when making decisions regarding therapeutic interventions. The treatment of CTD-ILD should be comprehensive, is often fraught with challenges and can be complicated by comorbid conditions and extra-thoracic disease activities. Several large randomized studies have examined the impact of immunosuppressive therapy for CTD-ILD, however, additional studies are needed to determine the optimal treatment strategies. Future studies may provide additional information about the best treatments in patients with IPAF.

  18. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon...

  19. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  20. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  1. Influence of acellular natural lung matrix on murine embryonic stem cell differentiation and tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortiella, Joaquin; Niles, Jean; Cantu, Andrea; Brettler, Andrea; Pham, Anthony; Vargas, Gracie; Winston, Sean; Wang, Jennifer; Walls, Shannon; Nichols, Joan E

    2010-08-01

    We report here the first attempt to produce and use whole acellular (AC) lung as a matrix to support development of engineered lung tissue from murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We compared the influence of AC lung, Gelfoam, Matrigel, and a collagen I hydrogel matrix on the mESC attachment, differentiation, and subsequent formation of complex tissue. We found that AC lung allowed for better retention of cells with more differentiation of mESCs into epithelial and endothelial lineages. In constructs produced on whole AC lung, we saw indications of organization of differentiating ESC into three-dimensional structures reminiscent of complex tissues. We also saw expression of thyroid transcription factor-1, an immature lung epithelial cell marker; pro-surfactant protein C, a type II pneumocyte marker; PECAM-1/CD31, an endothelial cell marker; cytokeratin 18; alpha-actin, a smooth muscle marker; CD140a or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha; and Clara cell protein 10. There was also evidence of site-specific differentiation in the trachea with the formation of sheets of cytokeratin-positive cells and Clara cell protein 10-expressing Clara cells. Our findings support the utility of AC lung as a matrix for engineering lung tissue and highlight the critical role played by matrix or scaffold-associated cues in guiding ESC differentiation toward lung-specific lineages.

  2. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albane Joly-Battaglini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab.

  3. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. FIB-SEM imaging of carbon nanotubes in mouse lung tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun

    2014-01-01

    volume imaging not easily obtained with TEM, but it is time-consuming to locate CNTs in the tissue. We demonstrate that protruding CNTs after ultramicrotomy can be used to locate the region of interest, and we present FIB-SEM images of CNTs in lung tissue. FIB-SEM imaging was applied to lung tissue from...... excluding them from TEM analysis. To provide an alternative to ultramicrotomy and subsequent TEMimaging, we studied focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) of CNTs in the lungs of mice, and we evaluated the applicability of the method compared to TEM. FIB-SEM can provide serial section...

  5. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  6. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  7. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  8. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is not present in the normal adult lung but in different diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernig, T; Pabst, R

    2000-01-01

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) was first described in the lungs of rabbits and differs greatly between species. It is part of the integrated mucosal immune system. This review clarifies its morphological definition and focuses on the situation in humans. The frequency of BALT at different ages, after chronic stimulation and in different diseases is described. In healthy humans, BALT can only be found in the lungs of children and adolescents. The role of BALT in lung transplantation and in the development of low-grade malignant lymphomas in the airways is also discussed. Furthermore, questions concerning the inducibility of BALT as an entry site for vaccines, and the regulation of its activity for future therapeutic interventions in pulmonary immune reactions are addressed. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, London (England))

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  10. Proteoglycan changes in the extracellular matrix of lung tissue from patients with pulmonary emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, JFM; Coers, W; Noordhoek, JA; Flipsen, JTM; Kauffman, HF; Timens, W; Postma, DS

    To characterize the changes in the extracellular matrix in smoking-related pulmonary emphysema, we undertook immunohistochemical studies in lung tissues from controls (n = 7), from patients with mild (n = 11) and severe (n = 8) emphysema, and from patients with lung fibrosis (n = 6). We studied

  11. Clonality evaluation in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant proliferations are usually clonal. While most times the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic and clinical examinations, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, in some situations there are dominant clones whose analysis is important, such as in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality, namely: evaluation of gene rearrangements of antigen receptor, and evaluation of human antigen receptor gene.

  12. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  13. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown in an Ex Vivo 3D Lung Model Produce Matrix Metalloproteinases Not Produced in 2D Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Sakamoto, Jason H.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the growth of human lung cancer cells in an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) lung model and 2D culture to determine which better mimics lung cancer growth in patients. A549 cells were grown in an ex vivo 3D lung model and in 2D culture for 15 days. We measured the size and formation of tumor nodules and counted the cells after 15 days. We also stained the tissue/cells for Ki-67, and Caspase-3. We measured matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in the conditioned media and in blood plasma from patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Organized tumor nodules with intact vascular space formed in the ex vivo 3D lung model but not in 2D culture. Proliferation and apoptosis were greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model compared to the 2D culture. After 15 days, there were significantly more cells in the 2D culture than the 3D model. MMP-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10 production were significantly greater in the ex vivo 3D lung model. There was no production of MMP-9 in the 2D culture. The patient samples contained MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The human lung cancer cells grown on ex vivo 3D model form perfusable nodules that grow over time. It also produced MMPs that were not produced in 2D culture but seen in human lung cancer patients. The ex vivo 3D lung model may more closely mimic the biology of human lung cancer development than the 2D culture. PMID:23028922

  14. Increased local expression of coagulation factor X contributes to the fibrotic response in human and murine lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Scotton, Chris J.; Krupiczojc, Malvina A.; Königshoff, Melanie; Mercer, Paul F; Lee, Y C Gary; Kaminski, Naftali; Morser, John; Post, Joseph M.; Maher, Toby M.; Nicholson, Andrew G; Moffatt, James D; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Derian, Claudia K.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the coagulation cascade contributes to the pathophysiology of several conditions, including acute and chronic lung diseases. Coagulation zymogens are considered to be largely derived from the circulation and locally activated in response to tissue injury and microvascular leak. Here we report that expression of coagulation factor X (FX) is locally increased in human and murine fibrotic lung tissue, with marked immunostaining associated with bronchial and alveolar ep...

  15. Electrolytic destruction of tissue in the normal lung of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, L; Jönsson, L

    1981-01-01

    Platinum electrodes were inserted by a percutaneous technique into the lungs of pigs. The direct current between the electrodes caused destruction of tissue by electrolysis. At the anode, chloride ions were oxidized to chlorine, which diffused into the surrounding lung tissues, creating lesions which were well demarcated and up to 30 mm in diameter. Various types of electrodes were tested, and the size of the lesion was observed to vary with electrode construction and with the dose given.

  16. Towards in vivo bacterial detection in human lung(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Tushar R.; Bradley, Mark; Duncan, Rory R.; Dhaliwal, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious global concern. One way to tackle this problem is to develop new and sensitive approaches to diagnose bacterial infections and prevent unnecessary antibiotic use. With recent developments in optical molecular imaging, we are one step closer to in situ rapid detection of bacterial infections. We present here bespoke fluorescent probes for bacterial detection in ex vivo human lung tissue using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Two in-house synthesised bespoke probes were used in this study to detect and differentiate between Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strain using their fluorescence lifetime in the ex vivo human lung tissue. The average fluorescence lifetime of Gram positive probe (n=12) was 2.40 ± 0.25 ns and Gram negative (n=12) was 6.73 ± 0.49 ns. The human lung tissue (n=12) average fluorescence lifetime value was found to be 3.43 ± 0.19 ns. Furthermore we were also able to distinguish between dead or alive bacteria in ex vivo lung tissue based on difference in their lifetime. We have developped Fibre-FLIM methods to enable clinical translation within the Proteus Project (www.proteus.ac.uk).

  17. [Study on expression of CTGF and WISP-1 genes in human lung cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Qi; Chen, Pingping; Xie, Dong

    2008-09-01

    To investigate CTGF and WISP-1 genes expression levels and theirs relations to clinical and pathological features in human lung carcinomas. The CTGF and WISP-1 mRNA expression levels in samples from sixty primary lung cancers and their matched normal lung tissues were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR assay and immunohistochemistry staining. Down-regulations of CTGF gene were quantified found in 65% (39/60) primary lung cancers in comparison the paired normal lung tissues (t = -1.59, P = 0.016). The up-regualtions of WISP-1 gene were observed in 83% (50/60) lung cancers in comparison their normal counterparts (t = 4.15, P = 0.000). These results were further conformed by immunohistochemistry staining. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that WISP-1 was negatively associated with CTGF (r = - 0.299, P = 0.020). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the position of the tumor and sex were key factors for CTGF expression, and tumor type, age, family history were valuable predictors for WISP-1 expression. These results suggested that CTGF and WISP-1 could play an important role in the progression of primary lung cancers by either individual gene itself or two-gene co-interactions of these genes and theirs relations to clinical and pathological features.

  18. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... (8-OHdG), and apoptosis based on 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay were evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, namely, H1155, ...

  19. Individualized analysis reveals CpG sites with methylation aberrations in almost all lung adenocarcinoma tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haidan; Guan, Qingzhou; He, Jun; Lin, Yunqing; Zhang, Juan; Li, Hongdong; Liu, Huaping; Gu, Yunyan; Guo, Zheng; He, Fei

    2017-02-08

    Due to the heterogeneity of cancer, identifying differentially methylated (DM) CpG sites between a set of cancer samples and a set of normal samples cannot tell us which patients have methylation aberrations in a particular DM CpG site. We firstly showed that the relative methylation-level orderings (RMOs) of CpG sites within individual normal lung tissues are highly stable but widely disrupted in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. This finding provides the basis of using the RankComp algorithm, previously developed for differential gene expression analysis at the individual level, to identify DM CpG sites in each cancer tissue compared with its own normal state. Briefly, through comparing with the highly stable normal RMOs predetermined in a large collection of samples for normal lung tissues, the algorithm finds those CpG sites whose hyper- or hypo-methylations may lead to the disrupted RMOs of CpG site pairs within a disease sample based on Fisher's exact test. Evaluated in 59 lung adenocarcinoma tissues with paired adjacent normal tissues, RankComp reached an average precision of 94.26% for individual-level DM CpG sites. Then, after identifying DM CpG sites in each of the 539 lung adenocarcinoma samples from TCGA, we found five and 44 CpG sites hypermethylated and hypomethylated in above 90% of the disease samples, respectively. These findings were validated in 140 publicly available and eight additionally measured paired cancer-normal samples. Gene expression analysis revealed that four of the five genes, HOXA9, TAL1, ATP8A2, ENG and SPARCL1, each harboring one of the five frequently hypermethylated CpG sites within its promoters, were also frequently down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. The common DNA methylation aberrations in lung adenocarcinoma tissues may be important for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Altered regulation of metabolic pathways in human lung cancer discerned by 13C stable isotope-resolved metabolomics (SIRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Richard M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic perturbations arising from malignant transformation have not been systematically characterized in human lung cancers in situ. Stable isotope resolved metabolomic analysis (SIRM enables functional analysis of gene dysregulations in lung cancer. To this purpose, metabolic changes were investigated by infusing uniformly labeled 13C-glucose into human lung cancer patients, followed by resection and processing of paired non-cancerous lung and non small cell carcinoma tissues. NMR and GC-MS were used for 13C-isotopomer-based metabolomic analysis of the extracts of tissues and blood plasma. Results Many primary metabolites were consistently found at higher levels in lung cancer tissues than their surrounding non-cancerous tissues. 13C-enrichment in lactate, Ala, succinate, Glu, Asp, and citrate was also higher in the tumors, suggesting more active glycolysis and Krebs cycle in the tumor tissues. Particularly notable were the enhanced production of the Asp isotopomer with three 13C-labeled carbons and the buildup of 13C-2,3-Glu isotopomer in lung tumor tissues. This is consistent with the transformations of glucose into Asp or Glu via glycolysis, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation (PC, and the Krebs cycle. PC activation in tumor tissues was also shown by an increased level of pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and protein. Conclusion PC activation – revealed here for the first time in human subjects – may be important for replenishing the Krebs cycle intermediates which can be diverted to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid biosynthesis to fulfill the high anabolic demands for growth in lung tumor tissues. We hypothesize that this is an important event in non-small cell lung cancer and possibly in other tumor development.

  1. Role of gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tissue remodeling following acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury is characterized by a severe disruption of alveolo-capillary structures and includes a variety of changes in lung cell populations. Evidence suggests the occurrence of rupture of the basement membranes and interstitial matrix remodeling during acute lung injury. The dynamic equilibrium of the extracellular matrix (ECM under physiological conditions is a consequence of the balance between the regulation of synthesis and degradation of ECM components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs represent a group of enzymes involved in the degradation of most of the components of the ECM and therefore participate in tissue remodeling associated with pathological situations such as acute lung injury. MMP activity is regulated by proteolytic activation of the latent secreted proenzyme and by interaction with specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This review details our knowledge of the involvement of MMPs, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9, in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  2. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  3. Towards a biomechanical model of the human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Marquez, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy of the lung is challenging due to the motion induced by respiration. Plans of radiotherapy treatments are developed based on static computed tomography (CT) images, while treatment is performed in moving organs. This leads to a lack of precise knowledge of the actual position of the tumor and internal organs during treatment makes the calculation of actual dose absorbed by the lungs and surrounding tissues unknown. In the Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies (CART), the ...

  4. Immunohistochemical characterization of human olfactory tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Eric H; Wu, Enming; Curry, William T; Lin, Derrick T; Schwob, James E

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiology underlying human olfactory disorders is poorly understood because biopsying the olfactory epithelium (OE) can be unrepresentative and extensive immunohistochemical analysis is lacking. Autopsy tissue enriches our grasp of normal and abnormal olfactory immunohistology and guides the sampling of the OE by biopsy. Furthermore, a comparison of the molecular phenotype of olfactory epithelial cells between rodents and humans will improve our ability to correlate human histopathology with olfactory dysfunction. An immunohistochemical analysis of human olfactory tissue using a comprehensive battery of proven antibodies. Human olfactory mucosa obtained from 21 autopsy specimens was analyzed with immunohistochemistry. The position and extent of olfactory mucosa was assayed by staining whole mounts (WMs) with neuronal markers. Sections of the OE were analyzed with an extensive group of antibodies directed against cytoskeletal proteins and transcription factors, as were surgical specimens from an esthesioneuroblastoma. Neuron-rich epithelium is always found inferior to the cribriform plate, even at advanced age, despite the interruptions in the neuroepithelial sheet caused by patchy respiratory metaplasia. The pattern of immunostaining with our antibody panel identifies two distinct types of basal cell progenitors in human OE similar to rodents. The panel also clarifies the complex composition of esthesioneuroblastoma. The extent of human olfactory mucosa at autopsy can easily be delineated as a function of age and neurologic disease. The similarities in human versus rodent OE will enable us to translate knowledge from experimental animals to humans and will extend our understanding of human olfactory pathophysiology. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Autopsy Tissue Program. [Plutonium determination in selected tissues of human cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, T.; Tietjen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The Autopsy Tissue Program was begun in 1960. To date, tissues on 900 or more persons in 7 geographic regions have been collected and analyzed for plutonium content. The tissues generally consist of lung, liver, kidney, lymph, bone, and gonadal tissue for each individual. The original objective of the program was to determine the level of plutonium in human tissues due solely to fall-out from weapons testing. The baseline thus established was to be used to evaluate future changes. From the first, this program was beset with chemical and statistical difficulties. Many factors whose effects were not recognized and not planned for were found later to be important. Privacy and ethical considerations hindered the gathering of adequate data. Since the chemists were looking for amounts of plutonium very close to background, possible contamination was a very real problem. Widely used chemical techniques introduced a host of statistical problems. The difficulties encountered touch on areas common to large data sets, unusual outlier detection methods, minimum detection limits, problems with Aliquot sizes, and time-trends in the data. The conclusions point out areas to which the biologists will have to devote much more careful attention than was believed.

  6. Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Esophagus Coexistent with Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Jin; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Kim, Ki Whang

    2005-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma very rarely involves the esophagus, occurring in less than 1% of patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. A few cases of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the esophagus have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, there has been no report of MALT lymphoma of the esophagus coexistent with bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (BALT) of the lung. This report details the radiological and clinical findings of this first concurrent case. PMID:16127783

  7. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  8. Reduced Dimensional Modeling of the Entire Human Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The entire human lung, including the pulmonary circulation, the lower respiratory tract and the oxygen exchange interface, was modeled using a novel multi-scale approach. This novel lung model very closely represents the actual human anatomy and moreover reproduces its physiological behavior. For the first time, the simulated results provide evidence for local phenomena such as volume competition between neighboring acini, volutrauma and hypoxia at a level never achieved before. Die gesamt...

  9. Identification and significance of magnetite in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatamed, F; Johnson, F B

    1986-07-01

    Magnetite or iron oxide has been identified in humans as well as certain animals and bacteria. With the current popularity of magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of these ferromagnetic particles in the tissues may impose biological significance. So far, identification of magnetite in tissue has been mainly based on magnetometry. Hence, a simple technique for direct identification of the magnetic particles in tissues is described. Lung tissues with abundant iron material and particles were digested in 1N sodium hydroxide solution. After rinsing, the sediments were suspended in 95% alcohol and placed on a glass slide located on a strong magnet. The iron-containing particles from the digestion procedure were aligned in a parallel manner along the north-south poles of the magnet and were confirmed to be magnetite by x-ray diffraction. No such effect was observed with hemosiderin-containing granules from the control liver tissues. The results of this experiment show that the "biological magnetite" is distinctly different from hemosiderin and has characteristic properties when subjected to a magnetic field.

  10. SUV-quantification of physiological lung tissue in an integrated PET/MR-system: Impact of lung density and bone tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Bezrukov, Ilja; Schraml, Christina; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of lung density changes as well as bone proximity on the attenuation correction of lung standardized uptake values (SUVs). Methods and materials 15 patients with mostly oncologic diseases were examined in 18F-FDG-PET/CT and subsequently in a fully integrated PET/MR scanner. From each PET dataset acquired in PET/MR, four different PET reconstructions were computed using different attenuation maps (μ-maps): i) CT-based μ-map (gold standard); ii) CT-based μ-map in which the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of the lung tissue was replaced by the lung LAC from the MR-based segmentation method; iii) based on reconstruction ii), the LAC of bone structures was additionally replaced with the LAC from the MR-based segmentation method; iv) the vendor-provided MR-based μ-map (segmentation-based method). Those steps were performed using MATLAB. CT Hounsfield units (HU) and SUVmean was acquired in different levels and regions of the lung. Relative differences between the differently corrected PETs were computed. Results Compared to the gold standard, reconstruction ii), iii) and iv) led to a relative underestimation of SUV in the posterior regions of -9.0%, -13.4% and -14.0%, respectively. Anterior and middle regions were less affected with an overestimation of about 6–8% in reconstructions ii)–iv). Conclusion It could be shown that both, differences in lung density and the vicinity of bone tissue in the μ-map may have an influence on SUV, mostly affecting the posterior lung regions. PMID:28562622

  11. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    in human subcutaneous adipose tissue by a microdialysis technique. Seven healthy young volunteers each had four microdialysis probes placed in the fat (subcutaneous) layer of the abdominal skin. After the administration of a 240-mg gentamicin intravenous bolus, consecutive measurements of the drug...

  12. Multimodal imaging of lung tissue using optical coherence tomography and two photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Geissler, Stefan; Meissner, Sven; Schnabel, Christian; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    In the context of protective artificial ventilation strategies for patients with severe lung diseases, the contribution of ventilator settings to tissue changes on the alveolar level of the lung is still a question under debate. To understand the impact of respiratory settings as well as the dynamic process of respiration, high-resolution monitoring and visualization of the dynamics of lung alveoli are essential. An instrument allowing 3D imaging of lung tissue as well as imaging of functional constituents, such as elastin fibers, in in situ experimental conditions is presented in this study using a combination of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and fiber-guided two photon microscopy. In a comparative study, fixed lung tissue, stained with sulforhodamine B for elastin fibers, was used to illustrate the ability of fiber-guided two photon excitation and single photon excitation for the visualization of elastin fibers within the tissue. Together with the fast 3D imaging capability of OCT, a new tool is given for the monitoring of alveolar lung dynamics in future in vivo experiments.

  13. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Runzhen; Liang, Xinrong; Zhao, Meimi; Liu, Shan-Lu; Huang, Yao; Idell, Steven; Li, Xiumin; Ji, Hong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII)-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  14. Correlation of apical fluid-regulating channel proteins with lung function in human COPD lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runzhen Zhao

    Full Text Available Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, and aquaporin 5 (AQP5 proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI and II (ATII-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD.

  15. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system.

  16. Blood volume fraction imaging of the human lung using intravoxel incoherent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Flavio; Meyer, Cord; Phys, Dipl; Breuer, Felix A; Triphan, Simon; Choli, Morwan; Phys, Dipl; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    To present a technique for non-contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of the blood volume fraction of the human lung. The technique is based on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) approach. However, a substantial novelty is introduced here: the need for external diffusion sensitizing gradients is eliminated by exploiting the internal magnetic field gradients typical of the lung tissue, due to magnetic susceptibility differences at air/tissue interfaces. A single shot turbo spin-echo sequence with stimulated-echo preparation and electrocardiograph synchronization was used for acquisition. Two images were acquired in a single breath-hold of 10 seconds duration: one reference image and one blood-suppressed image. The blood volume fraction was quantified using a two-compartment signal decay model, as given by the IVIM theory. Experiments were performed at 1.5T in eight healthy volunteers. Values of the blood volume fraction obtained within the lung parenchyma (36 ± 16%) are in good agreement with previous reports, obtained using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (33%), and show relatively good reproducibility. The presented technique offers a robust way to quantify the blood volume fraction of the human lung parenchyma without using contrast agents. Image acquisition can be accomplished in a single breath-hold and could be suitable for clinical applications on patients with lung diseases. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015;41:1454-1464. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  18. Enantioselective gas chromatographic separation of methylsulfonyl PCBs in seal blubber, pelican muscle and human adipose tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasek, L.; Rosmus, J. [Veterinary Institute Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemistry; Hajslova, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology (Czech Republic). Dept. of Food Chemistry and Analysis; Huehnerfuss, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie

    2004-09-15

    Methyl sulfone derivatives are known to represent primary metabolic products of PCBs (MeSO2- CB) and DDE (MeSO2-DDE). These metabolites are formed via mercapturic acid pathway and belong to persistent, lipophilic compounds which accumulate in the adipose, lung, liver and kidney tissues of mammals exposed to PCBs. In 1976 Jenssen and Jansson reported the identification of PCB methyl sulfones as metabolites of PCBs in Baltic grey seal blubber. Methyl sulfones are moderately polar compounds that are only slightly less hydrophobic than the parent PCBs, and their partition coefficients fulfill the requirements for bioaccumulation. The highest concentrations have been found in kidney and lung tissues of seals, otters, beluga whales, polar bears, fishes and in human tissues. In the present investigation two samples of seal blubber, two pelican muscles and eleven human adipose tissue samples were analysed with regard to their concentrations of PCB parent compounds as well as to the respective chiral methylsulfonyl metabolites.

  19. Autoreactive T and B cells induce the development of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Rebecca A; Williams, Jesse W; Perera, Jason; Berry, Elizabeth; Wu, Qiang; Cummings, Oscar W; Sperling, Anne I; Huang, Haochu

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis-related interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Studies in humans have found that the incidence of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) correlates with the severity of lung injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of BALT during systemic autoimmunity remain unknown. We have determined whether systemic autoimmunity in a murine model of autoimmune arthritis can promote the development of BALT by generating a novel murine model derived from K/BxN mice. Transgenic mice with the KRN T-cell receptor specific for the autoantigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), were crossed with GPI-specific immunoglobulin heavy and light chain knock-in mice, producing mice with a majority of T and B cells specific for the same autoantigen. We found that 67% of these mice demonstrated lymphocytic infiltration in the lungs, localized to either the perivascular or peribronchial regions. Fifty percent of the mice with lymphocytic infiltration manifested lymphoid-like lesions resembling BALT, with distinct T and B cell follicles. The lungs from mice with lymphoid infiltrates had increased numbers of cytokine-producing T cells, including IL-17A(+) T cells and increased major histocompatibility complex Class II expression on B cells. Interestingly, challenge with bleomycin failed to elicit a significant fibrotic response, compared with wild-type control mice. Our data suggest that systemic autoreactivity promotes ectopic lymphoid tissue development in the lung through the cooperation of autoreactive T and B cells. However, these BALT-like lesions may not be sufficient to promote fibrotic lung disease at steady state or after inflammatory challenge.

  20. Lung Tissue Volume is Elevated in Obesity and Reduced by Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Arnoldo; Rivas, Eva; Rodríguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sánchez, Marcelo; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Arismendi, Ebymar; Venegas, José G

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) in severely obese subjects causes a significant reduction of body weight with lung function improvement. We have shown that abnormalities in pulmonary gas exchange in morbidly obese subjects are substantially improved with BS. These abnormalities were thought to be related to reduced lung volumes as well as to abnormal endothelial function induced by low-grade chronic inflammation linked to perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). In this study, we used computed tomography (CT) to assess whether BS also caused measurable structural changes in the lung tissue volume (Vtiss) and cross-sectional vessel analysis, hypothesizing that these measures could be related to the previously reported lung functional changes. This is a post hoc analysis of a previous reported prospective study. Pulmonary vessels and lung volumes, including Vtiss, were quantified in thoracic CT scans. We compared findings in 12 obese women before and after BS and in 8 healthy lean women. Vtiss was significantly elevated in obese subjects before BS compared to control subjects and systematically reduced after BS (by 8 %); other CT lung volumes or vascular areas were not affected in a consistent manner. No relationship was observed between BS-induced individual changes in Vtiss and pulmonary vessel area. Vtiss is elevated in morbidly obese subjects, compared to lean individuals of similar body height, and is systematically reduced by BS. These effects do not appear related to vascular changes but may be caused by elevated extravascular lung water, due to low-grade inflammation, and/or hypertrophic PVAT in severe obesity.

  1. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Lung tissue and capillary blood volumes by rebreathing and morphometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapo, R O; Crapo, J D; Morris, A H

    1982-08-01

    Gas rebreathing measurements of lung tissue volume (Vt) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) were made in five anesthetized dogs. After the rebreathing measurements, the lungs were inflation fixed with glutaraldehyde and analyzed morphometrically. Each lung was morphometrically divided into alveolar and nonalveolar compartments and each compartment was divided into its air, tissue and blood components. Average rebreathing and morphometric measurements of Vc were 42 and 84 ml, respectively. The reasons for this difference remain unclear. The rebreathing Vt (198 ml) was 40 ml (25%) greater than the morphometric alveolar tissue and blood components (158 ml). Assuming that the rebreathing technique measures all of the alveolar compartment, the rebreathing measurement includes a significant fraction of the nonalveolar compartment.

  3. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J F; Stenderup, K; Hansen, F D

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...... line (hMSC-TERT). In the present study, we co-transduced hMSC-TERT with enhanced green fluorescent protein gene, and studied tissue distribution, engraftment, and cell survival after intracardiac and intravenous injections in immunodeficient mice. The pattern of organ distribution suggested...... that infused cells were efficiently arrested in microvasculature during first-pass, but only for a fraction of the infused cells was arrest followed by vascular emigration and tissue engraftment. Few engrafted cells in lungs, heart, and kidney glomeruli remained after 4 weeks. These observations are consistent...

  4. A HISTOLOGICAL STUDY OF HUMAN LUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Bora

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The lungs are the essential organ of respiration. Maturation of lung is divided into four stages pseudoglandular, canalicular, terminal sac and alveolar. By 16 weeks, all major elements have formed except those involved with gas exchange. Respiration is not possible; hence, foetuses born during this period are unable to survive. By 26 weeks, the terminal sacs are lined by squamous epithelial cells and scattered among them are round secretary epithelial cells, which secrete surfactant. Respiratory distress syndrome affects 2% live newborn infants, premature are more susceptible. Surfactant deficiency is the major cause of RDS. Sufficient alveolar sac and surfactant should be present to permit survival of a prematurely born infant. Keeping this in view, the present study was done to study the microstructure of lungs in different age groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh, for a period of one year. The study was carried out in specimens, which was collected from adult cadavers obtained for routine dissection of undergraduate students and also from the Department of Forensic Medicine. Specimens was also collected from perinatal cadavers from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh. The study has been carried out on three primary groups- Group 1, Group 2 and Group 3 according to the age. RESULTS In each of the groups, we have studied the right-sided and left-sided lungs separately and studied their histological parameters (presence/absence of pseudostratified columnar, columnar, cuboidal and squamous epithelium in the bronchial tree (lung. The results and observations obtained in the present study are compared with established findings of other workers. CONCLUSION Foetuses born prematurely at 24 to 26 weeks after fertilisation may survive if given intensive care; however, they suffer from

  5. Low CD4/CD8 Ratio in Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Is Associated with Lung Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, K V; Solomides, C; Cordova, F; Rogers, T J; Ciccolella, D; Criner, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) has been associated with lung allograft rejection in rat transplant models. In human transplant recipients, BALT has not been linked to clinically significant rejection. We hypothesize that the immunohistochemical composition of BALT varies with the presence of acute lung allograft rejection. Methods. We retrospectively examined 40 human lung allograft recipients transplanted from 3/1/1999 to 6/1/2008. Patients were grouped by frequency and severity of acute rejection based on International Society of Heart Lung Transplant (ISHLT) criteria. Transbronchial biopsies were reviewed for BALT by a blinded pathologist. BALT if present was immunohistochemically stained to determine T-and B-cell subpopulations. Results. BALT presence was associated with an increased frequency of acute rejection episodes in the first year after transplantation. Patients with a lower CD4/CD8 ratio had an increased rejection rate; however, BALT size or densities of T-cell and B-cell subpopulations did not correlate with rejection rate. Conclusion. The presence of BALT is associated with an increased frequency of rejection one year after transplant. The lower the CD4/CD8 ratio, the more acute rejection episodes occur in the first year after transplantation. The immunohistochemical composition of BALT may predict patients prone to frequent episodes of acute cellular rejection.

  6. Low CD4/CD8 Ratio in Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Is Associated with Lung Allograft Rejection

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    K. V. Shenoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT has been associated with lung allograft rejection in rat transplant models. In human transplant recipients, BALT has not been linked to clinically significant rejection. We hypothesize that the immunohistochemical composition of BALT varies with the presence of acute lung allograft rejection. Methods. We retrospectively examined 40 human lung allograft recipients transplanted from 3/1/1999 to 6/1/2008. Patients were grouped by frequency and severity of acute rejection based on International Society of Heart Lung Transplant (ISHLT criteria. Transbronchial biopsies were reviewed for BALT by a blinded pathologist. BALT if present was immunohistochemically stained to determine T-and B-cell subpopulations. Results. BALT presence was associated with an increased frequency of acute rejection episodes in the first year after transplantation. Patients with a lower CD4/CD8 ratio had an increased rejection rate; however, BALT size or densities of T-cell and B-cell subpopulations did not correlate with rejection rate. Conclusion. The presence of BALT is associated with an increased frequency of rejection one year after transplant. The lower the CD4/CD8 ratio, the more acute rejection episodes occur in the first year after transplantation. The immunohistochemical composition of BALT may predict patients prone to frequent episodes of acute cellular rejection.

  7. Incomplete Memories: The Natural Suppression of Tissue-Resident Memory CD8 T Cells in the Lung

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    Katie L. Reagin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The yearly, cyclic impact of viruses like influenza on human health and the economy is due to the high rates of mutation of traditional antibody targets, which negate any preexisting humoral immunity. However, the seasonality of influenza infections can equally be attributed to an absent or defective memory CD8 T cell response since the epitopes recognized by these cells are derived from essential virus proteins that mutate infrequently. Experiments in mouse models show that protection from heterologous influenza infection is temporally limited and conferred by a population of tissue-resident memory (TRM cells residing in the lung and lung airways. TRM are elicited by a diverse set of pathogens penetrating mucosal barriers and broadly identified by extravascular staining and expression of the activation and adhesion molecules CD69 and CD103. Interestingly, lung TRM fail to express these molecules, which could limit tissue retention, resulting in airway expulsion or death with concomitant loss of heterologous protection. Here, we make the case that respiratory infections uniquely evoke a form of natural immunosuppression whereby specific cytokines and cell–cell interactions negatively impact memory cell programming and differentiation. Respiratory memory is not only short-lived but most of the memory cells in the lung parenchyma may not be bona fide TRM. Given the quantity of microbes humans inhale over a lifetime, limiting cellular residence could be a mechanism employed by the respiratory tract to preserve organismal vitality. Therefore, successful efforts to improve respiratory immunity must carefully and selectively breach these inherent tissue barriers.

  8. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

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    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P., E-mail: thessa@isi.uu.nl; Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M. [Department of Radiology, Meander Medical Centre, 3813 TZ Amersfoort, The Netherlands and Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bozovic, Gracijela [Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate [Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, ES-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Rikxoort, Eva M. van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brown, Matthew S. [Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  9. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T J P; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Brown, Matthew S; de Jong, Pim A; Viergever, Max A; van Ginneken, Bram

    2014-08-01

    Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors' aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in challenging chest CT images. Both systems do

  10. Near-affine-invariant texture learning for lung tissue analysis using isotropic wavelet frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Van de Ville, Dimitri; Platon, Alexandra; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2012-07-01

    We propose near-affine-invariant texture descriptors derived from isotropic wavelet frames for the characterization of lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging. Affine invariance is desirable to enable learning of nondeterministic textures without a priori localizations, orientations, or sizes. When combined with complementary gray-level histograms, the proposed method allows a global classification accuracy of 76.9% with balanced precision among five classes of lung tissue using a leave-one-patient-out cross validation, in accordance with clinical practice.

  11. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

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    Chun-Nun Chao

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 and large cell carcinoma (H460 cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV, a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  12. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma.

  13. Long term ethanol consumption leads to lung tissue oxidative stress and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subir Kumar; Mukherjee, Sukhes

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a systemic disorder. The deleterious health effects of alcohol consumption may result in irreversible organ damage. By contrast, there currently is little evidence for the toxicity of chronic alcohol use on lung tissue. Hence, in this study we investigated long term effects of ethanol in the lung. Though body weight of rats increased significantly with duration of exposure compared to its initial weight, but there was no significant change in relative weight (g/100 g body weight) of lung due to ethanol exposure. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite, protein carbonyl, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), redox ratio (GSSG/GSH) and GST activity elevated; while reduced glutathione (GSH) level and activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na(+)K(+) ATPase reduced significantly with duration of ethanol exposure in the lung homogenate compared to the control group. Total matrix metalloproteinase activity elevated in the lung homogenate with time of ethanol consumption. Histopathologic examination also demonstrated that severity of lung injury enhanced with duration of ethanol exposure. 16-18 weeks old male albino Wistar strain rats weighing 200-220 g were fed with ethanol (1.6 g/ kg body weight/ day) up to 36 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were collected from reteroorbital plexus to determine blood alcohol concentration, and the animals were sacrificed. Various oxidative stress related biochemical parameters, total matrix metalloproteinase activity and histopathologic examinations of the lung tissues were performed. Results of this study indicate that long term ethanol administration aggravates systemic and local oxidative stress, which may be associated with lung tissue injury.

  14. Long-Term Ethanol Consumption Leadsto Lung Tissue Oxidative Stress and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subir Kumar; Mukherjee, Sukhes

    2010-01-01

    Background: Alcohol abuse is a systemic disorder. The deleterious health effects of alcohol consumption may result in irreversible organ damage. By contrast, there currently is little evidence for the toxicity of chronic alcohol use on lung tissue. Hence, in this study we investigated long-term effects of ethanol in the lung. Results: Though body weight of rats increased significantly with duration of exposure compared to its initial weight, there was no significant change in relative weight (g/100 g body weight) of lung due to ethanol exposure. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite, protein carbonyl, oxidized glutathione (GSS G), redox ratio (GSS G/ GSH ) and GST activity elevated; while reduced glutathione (GSH ) level and activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na+K+ATPase reduced significantly with duration of ethanol exposure in the lung homogenate compared to the control group. Total matrix metalloproteinase activity elevated in the lung homogenate with time of ethanol consumption. Histopathologic examination also demonstrated that severity of lung injury enhanced with duration of ethanol exposure. Methods: 16–18 week-old male albino Wistar strain rats weighing 200–220 g were fed with ethanol (1.6 g/kg body weight/day) up to 36 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, blood samples were collected from reteroorbital plexus to determine blood alcohol concentration and the animals were sacrificed. Various oxidative stress-related biochemical parameters, total matrix metalloproteinase activity and histopathologic examinations of the lung tissues were performed. Conclusions: Results of this study indicate that long-term ethanol administration aggravates systemic and local oxidative stress, which may be associated with lung tissue injury. PMID:21307643

  15. Expression and Clinical Significance of SHP2 in the Tumor Tissues of Smokers with Lung Cancer

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    Xuemei ZHAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proved that protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were important mechanisms in lung cancer development, and tobacco smoking is an important risk factor of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and clinical significance of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and small cell lung cancer (SCLC; the relationship between tobacco smoking and the expression of SHP2 is also studied. Methods Immunohistochemistry (Invision and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH were used to detect the expression of SHP2 and the augment of SHP2 mRNA in the 53 lung cancer specimens. Results The weak positive rate of SHP2 was 80% (which was also the total positive rate in normal bronchial epithelium. The weak, moderate and strong positive rates were 35.4%, 43.8% and 6.2% (total positive rate was 85.4% in 48 NSCLC patients, 0%, 80% and 20% (total positve rate was 100% in 5 SCLC patients, 40.7%, 37.4% and 3.7% (total positive rate was 81.5% in the tumor tissues of 27 NSCLC patients who didn’t smoke and 23.8%, 71.4% and 4.7% (total positive rate was 100% in the tumor tissues of 21 NSCLC patients whose smoking indexes were ≥400. Significant differences of SHP2 expression were observed between tumor tissues and normal bronchial epithelium, NSCLC and SCLC, and between different smoking indexes (P < 0.05. Conclusion The enhancement of SHP2 expression in the tumor tissues of NSCLC patients who smoke may be correlated with tobacco smoking; SHP2 may play certain role in the development of lung cancer; SHP2 prospectively provides new ideas for the drug research and development of lung cancer treatment.

  16. Oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in mice: impact on lung tissue and diaphragm muscle,

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    Samanta Portão de Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate oxidative damage (lipid oxidation, protein oxidation, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], and carbonylation and inflammation (expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin [p-AMPK and p-mTOR, respectively] in the lung parenchyma and diaphragm muscles of male C57BL-6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, or 60 days. METHODS: Thirty-six male C57BL-6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 6/group: a control group; and five groups exposed to CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control mice, CS-exposed mice presented lower body weights at 30 days. In CS-exposed mice (compared with control mice, the greatest differences (increases in TBARS levels were observed on day 7 in diaphragm-muscle, compared with day 45 in lung tissue; the greatest differences (increases in carbonyl levels were observed on day 7 in both tissue types; and sulfhydryl levels were lower, in both tissue types, at all time points. In lung tissue and diaphragm muscle, p-AMPK expression exhibited behavior similar to that of TBARS. Expression of p-mTOR was higher than the control value on days 7 and 15 in lung tissue, as it was on day 45 in diaphragm muscle. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CS exposure produces oxidative damage, not only in lung tissue but also (primarily in muscle tissue, having an additional effect on respiratory muscle, as is frequently observed in smokers with COPD.

  17. Effect of lung flooding and high-intensity focused ultrasound on lung tumours: an experimental study in an ex vivo human cancer model and simulated in vivo tumours in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Frank; Boltze, Carsten; Schubert, Harald; Bischoff, Sabine; Lesser, Thomas Günther

    2014-01-07

    High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valuable tool for minimally invasive tumour ablation. However, due to the air content in ventilated lungs, lung tumours have never been treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in ex vivo human and in vivo porcine lung cancer models. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of lung flooding and sonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound for lung tumour ablation in ex vivo human and in vivo animal models. Lung flooding was performed in four human lung lobes which were resected from non-small cell lung cancers. B-mode imaging and temperature measurements were simultaneously obtained during high-intensity focused ultrasonography of centrally located lung cancers. The tumour was removed immediately following insonation and processed for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase and H&E staining. In addition, the left lungs of three pigs were flooded. Purified BSA in glutaraldehyde was injected centrally into the left lower lung lobe to simulate a lung tumour. The ultrasound was focused transthoracically through the flooded lung into the simulated tumour with the guidance of sonography. The temperature of the tumour was simultaneously measured. The vital signs of the animal were monitored during the procedure. A well-demarcated lesion of coagulation necrosis was produced in four of four human lung tumours. There did not appear to be any damage to the surrounding lung parenchyma. After high-intensity focused ultrasound insonation, the mean temperature increase was 7.5-fold higher in the ex vivo human tumour than in the flooded lung tissue (52.1 K ± 8.77 K versus 7.1 K ± 2.5 K). The transthoracic high-intensity focused ultrasound of simulated tumours in the in vivo model resulted in a mean peak temperature increase up to 53.7°C (±4.5). All of the animals survived the procedure without haemodynamic complications. High

  18. Local tissue-weight-based nonrigid registration of lung images with application to regional ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, a new nonrigid image registration method is presented to align two volumetric lung CT datasets with an application to estimate regional ventilation. Instead of the sum of squared intensity difference (SSD), we introduce the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD) as the similarity criterion to take into account the variation of intensity due to respiration. This new criterion aims to minimize the local difference of tissue volume inside the lungs between two images scanned in the same session or over short periods of time, thus preserving the tissue weight of the lungs. Our approach is tested using a pair of volumetric lung datasets acquired at 15% and 85% of vital capacity (VC) in a single scanning session. The results show that the new SSTVD predicts a smaller registration error and also yields a better alignment of structures within the lungs than the normal SSD similarity measure. In addition, the regional ventilation derived from the new method exhibits a much more improved physiological pattern than that of SSD.

  19. Improved OCT imaging of lung tissue using a prototype for total liquid ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The quality of OCT images can be increased if the refraction index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. Until now, images of liquid-filled lungs were acquired in isolated and fixated lungs only, so that an in vivo measurement situation is not present. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, it was necessary to develop a liquid ventilator. Perfluorodecalin, a perfluorocarbon, was selected as breathing fluid because of its refraction index being similar to the one of water and the high transport capacity for carbon dioxide and oxygen. The setup is characterized by two independent syringe pumps to insert and withdraw the fluid into and from the lung and a custom-made control program for volume- or pressure-controlled ventilation modes. The presented results demonstrate the liquid-filling verified by optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy (IVM) and the advantages of liquid-filling to OCT imaging of subpleural alveoli.

  20. Progress in Tissue Specimens Alternative for the Driver Genes Testing of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yan SUN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Target treatment based on driver genes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer is very important currently. Tumor tissues is the gold standard for driver genes testing. However, most of patients could not get the gene information for lack of enough tissues. To explore the tissue specimens alternatives is a hot spot in clinical work. This report reviews the tissue specimen alternatives of driver gene testing in non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Mechanical characterization of human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, S; Sommer, G; Birkl, C; Langkammer, C; Haybaeck, J; Kohnert, J; Bauer, M; Paulsen, F; Steinmann, P; Kuhl, E; Holzapfel, G A

    2017-01-15

    Mechanics are increasingly recognized to play an important role in modulating brain form and function. Computational simulations are a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior of the human brain in health and disease. The success of these simulations depends critically on the underlying constitutive model and on the reliable identification of its material parameters. Thus, there is an urgent need to thoroughly characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue and to identify mathematical models that capture the tissue response under arbitrary loading conditions. However, most constitutive models have only been calibrated for a single loading mode. Here, we perform a sequence of multiple loading modes on the same human brain specimen - simple shear in two orthogonal directions, compression, and tension - and characterize the loading-mode specific regional and directional behavior. We complement these three individual tests by combined multiaxial compression/tension-shear tests and discuss effects of conditioning and hysteresis. To explore to which extent the macrostructural response is a result of the underlying microstructural architecture, we supplement our biomechanical tests with diffusion tensor imaging and histology. We show that the heterogeneous microstructure leads to a regional but not directional dependence of the mechanical properties. Our experiments confirm that human brain tissue is nonlinear and viscoelastic, with a pronounced compression-tension asymmetry. Using our measurements, we compare the performance of five common constitutive models, neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Demiray, Gent, and Ogden, and show that only the isotropic modified one-term Ogden model is capable of representing the hyperelastic behavior under combined shear, compression, and tension loadings: with a shear modulus of 0.4-1.4kPa and a negative nonlinearity parameter it captures the compression-tension asymmetry and the increase in shear stress under superimposed

  2. Effects of ozone on lung tissue of E-supplemented rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R.D.; Abedin, M.Z.; Alfin-Slater, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of dietary vitamin E (E) in protecting lung tissue of rats exposed to ozone were studied in male, pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats fed synthetic diets containing 0, 10 and 50 IU E/Kg for 6 wks. Thereafter, half of the animals in each group were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone for 4 days, the other half to filtered air, then all animals were killed. Plasma E levels increased with increasing dietary E in both ozone-exposed and air-breathing rats; values in both groups were 12 times higher at 50 IU than what was observed in E-free dietary controls. Even greater increases were seen in lung and liver. Ozone enhanced the observed increased levels in the lung but diminished those in the liver. Ozone produced lipid oxidation in the lung at 0 and 10 IU E as measured by a modified TBA test whereas 50 IU was protective. In the lung, mean organ weight, cytosolic protein content, and activities of NADPH-generating and sulfhydryl-metabolizing enzymes were not affected by the level of dietary E in air-breathing controls. Ozone exposure, however, increased these indices but the extent of increase varied inversely with the E level in the tissue. It is suggested that the enhanced enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in the lung reflects injury from ozone exposure. Reduction in the extent of these changes with increased tissue E suggests that dietary vitamin E may offer protection against the oxidant-induced lung injury.

  3. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  4. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of human brain metastasis of lung cancer analyzed by blind source separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Yu, Xinguang; Zhou, Lixin; Lin, Dongmei; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy offers a novel Optical Biopsy method in cancer discrimination by a means of enhancement in Raman scattering. It is widely acknowledged that the RR spectrum of tissue is a superposition of spectra of various key building block molecules. In this study, the Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of human metastasis of lung cancerous and normal brain tissues excited by a visible selected wavelength at 532 nm are used to explore spectral changes caused by the tumor evolution. The potential application of RR spectra human brain metastasis of lung cancer was investigated by Blind Source Separation such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA is a statistical procedure that uses an orthogonal transformation to convert a set of observations of possibly correlated variables into a set of values of linearly uncorrelated variables called principal components (PCs). The results show significant RR spectra difference between human metastasis of lung cancerous and normal brain tissues analyzed by PCA. To evaluate the efficacy of for cancer detection, a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier is utilized to calculate the sensitivity, and specificity and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are used to evaluate the performance of this criterion. Excellent sensitivity of 0.97, specificity (close to 1.00) and the Area Under ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.99 values are achieved under best optimal circumstance. This research demonstrates that RR spectroscopy is effective for detecting changes of tissues due to the development of brain metastasis of lung cancer. RR spectroscopy analyzed by blind source separation may have potential to be a new armamentarium.

  5. DEFECTIVE BRONCHUS-ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID-TISSUE IN LONG-TERM SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; PROP, J; GROEN, M; PETERSEN, AH; UYAMA, T; MEEDENDORP, B; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1995-01-01

    In a previous study we found that a local immune response did not develop in the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) of infected rat allografts. We hypothesized that the BALT in rat lung allografts was damaged after allotransplantation. Therefore, we investigated three prerequisites for a

  6. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Theriot, Corey; Zalesak, Selina; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of reactive dust, containing 1-2% of respirable fine dust (expression changes in the lung tissue. The expression of several of these genes were dose- and time- dependent, and were significantly correlated with other pathological. Our previous data showed that no pathological changes were detected in low dose groups. However, several genes, primarily produced by lung epithelial, were significantly altered persistently in response to low-dose dust exposure. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity, contributing not only the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also understandings of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  7. Metallic elements in lung tissues: results of a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; De Palma, Giuseppe; Mangili, Antje; Apostoli, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the levels of metallic elements in the pulmonary tissues of healthy subjects, patients with lung diseases and occupationally exposed subjects. The present meta-analysis was aimed at both assessing the possible contribution of metal exposure to the development of lung diseases, including lung cancer, and evaluating systematically the role and the weight of variability factors affecting the results of such studies. A literature research covering the period 1980-2007 was conducted using the public database PubMed. A standard scoring method was elaborated with a minimum score of 5 for inclusion and evaluation. Selected papers underwent a meta-analytical assessment. Fifty-eight papers were retrieved, but 21 of them could not be admitted to further analysis, due to failure to achieve the minimum score. The main limitations of individual studies included: limited sample sizes, poor control of smoking habits and differences in subjects' ages, lung tissue topography, sampling methods, storage procedures and data analysis. Copper and zinc were the most represented elements (121.96 +/- 0.74 and 12.98 +/- 0.07 microg/g dry weight, respectively). Among toxic metals, the highest concentrations were observed for chromium and lead (2.42 +/- 0.12 and 2.14 +/- 0.04 microg/g, respectively). Tissue concentrations were similar in unaffected tissues from both controls and lung cancer patients, whereas they were lower in lung tumor samples. A considerable intra- and inter-individual variability was noted. Such a variability of measures, combined with the very low metal concentrations calls for the definition and use of standardized procedures of sample collection, storage, and analysis.

  8. Physicochemical characteristics of homogeneous bovine lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme. Comparison with human serum enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R B; Wilson, I B

    1982-08-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (12 units/mg) from bovine lung tissue and from human serum using an affinity gel described previously (Harris et al., (1981) Anal. Biochem. 111, 227-234). The isoelectric point (4.5), molecular weight (145 000), S20,W (8.1), amino acid composition and carbohydrate content of the lung enzyme are all similar to the values obtained for the human serum enzyme. The NH2-terminus of the lung enzyme (Ala) is different from that of the serum enzyme (Tyr) but the COOH-terminal sequences are identical (-Leu-Ser-OH). Pure bovine lung enzyme was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated with iodo (14C1) acetamide to the extent predicted by the number of cysteine residues. Since no radioactivity was incorporated into denatured enzyme that was not reduced, all of the cysteine residues must be in the form of disulfide bonds. Reverse-phase HPLC was used to separate peptides obtained from the lung enzyme after degradation with either trypsin or cyanogen bromide. The number of peptides resolved (42 after trypsin, 31 after cyanogen bromide), were only 20% fewer than the number predicted from the amino acid analysis and therefore the possibility that the converting enzyme (a single polypeptide chain) might be a fused dimer is excluded.

  9. Physiochemical characteristics of homogeneous bovine lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme. Comparison with human serum enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.B.; Wilson, I.B. (Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1982-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity (12 units/mg) from bovine lung tissue from human serum using an affinity gel described previously. The isoelectric point (4.5), molecular weight (145 000) Ssub(20,w)(8.1), amino acid composition and carbohydrate content of the lung enzyme are all similar to the values obtained for the human serum enzyme. The NH/sub 2/-terminus of the lung enzyme (Ala) is different from that of the serum enzyme (Tyr) but the COOH-terminal sequences are identical (-Leu-Ser-OH). Pure bovine lung enzyme was reduced and carboxyamidomethylated with iodo (/sup 14/C/sub 1/) acetamide to the extent predicted by the number of cysteine residues. Since no radioactivity was incorporated into denatured enzyme that was not reduced, all of the cysteine residues must be in the form of disulfide bonds. Reverse-phase HPLC was used to separate peptides obtained from the lung enzyme after degradation with either trypsin or cyanogen bromide. The number of peptides resolved (42 after trypsin, 31 after cyanogen bromide), were only 20% fewer than the number predicted from the amino acid analysis and therefore the possibility that the converting enzyme ( a single polypeptide chain) might be a fused dimer is excluded.

  10. Tissue-based map of the human proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative...... transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human......, in all major tissues and organs in the human body....

  11. Oral recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin reduces Mycobacterium tuberculosis TDM induced granulomatous lung pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-01

    Trehalose 6'6-dimycolate (TDM) is the most abundant glycolipid on the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). TDM is capable of inducing granulomatous pathology in mouse models that resembles those induced by MTB infection. Using the acute TDM model, this work investigates the effect of recombinant human and mouse lactoferrin to reduce granulomatous pathology. C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with TDM at a dose of 25 μg·mouse -1 . At day 4 and 6, recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin (1 mg·(100 μL) -1 ·mouse -1 ) were delivered by gavage. At day 7 after TDM injection, mice were evaluated for lung pathology, cytokine production, and leukocyte populations. Mice given human or mouse lactoferrin had reduced production of IL-12p40 in their lungs. Mouse lactoferrin increased IL-6 and KC (CXCL1) in lung tissue. Increased numbers of macrophages were observed in TDM-injected mice given human or mouse lactoferrin. Granulomatous pathology, composed of mainly migrated leukocytes, was visually reduced in mice that received human or mouse lactoferrin. Quantitation of granulomatous pathology demonstrated a significant decrease in mice given human or mouse lactoferrin compared with TDM control mice. This report is the first to directly compare the immune modulatory effects of both heterologous recombinant human and homologous mouse lactoferrin on the development of TDM-induced granulomas.

  12. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice.

  13. Cellular binding proteins for vitamin A in human carcinomas and in normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Romney, S L

    1980-11-01

    Blinded analyses of the concentrations of binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid (CRABP) in homogenates of cancer and normal tissue aliquots obtained from human cervix, endometrium, ovary, breast, and lung were carried out by the sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation technique. In carcinomas of the cervix and endometrium, CRABP mean values of 50.4 and 123.2 pmol/g tissue, respectively were detected. Such concentrations represent a 3- and 4-fold increase over the mean values of CRABP in the normal cervix (16.9 pmol/g) and normal endometrium (30.8 pmol/g), respectively. In carcinomas of the ovary, the mean CRABP level was 128.6 pmol/g compared to the maximal mean value of less than or equal to 0.46 pmol/g in the normal ovary. Elevated levels of CRABP were also found in breast and lung carcinomas compared to the amounts detected in the same patient in normal tissue aliquots of the same organ. The differences between CRABP concentrations in cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and breast carcinomas and those in normal tissue are statistically significant. In contrast, cellular retinol-binding protein concentrations were reduced in the endometrial, ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas compared to normal tissues. There were no significant differences between the log-mean concentrations of cellular retinol-binding proteins in the cytosols from tissue aliquots of carcinoma of the cervix and those in the cytosols from tissue aliquots of normal cervix.

  14. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  15. Cigarette smoke induces an unfolded protein response in the human lung: a proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Duan, Xunbao; Ji, Rong; Perez, Oscar; Liu, Chunli; Merali, Salim

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, which exposes the lung to high concentrations of reactive oxidant species (ROS) is the major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies indicate that ROS interfere with protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and elicit a compensatory response termed the "unfolded protein response" (UPR). The importance of the UPR lies in its ability to alter expression of a variety of genes involved in antioxidant defense, inflammation, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. The present study used comparative proteomic technology to test the hypothesis that chronic cigarette smoking induces a UPR in the human lung. Studies were performed on lung tissue samples obtained from three groups of human subjects: nonsmokers, chronic cigarette smokers, and ex-smokers. Proteomes of lung samples from chronic cigarette smokers demonstrated 26 differentially expressed proteins (20 were up-regulated, 5 were down-regulated, and 1 was detected only in the smoking group) compared with nonsmokers. Several UPR proteins were up-regulated in smokers compared with nonsmokers and ex-smokers, including the chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calreticulin; a foldase, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI); and enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. In cultured human airway epithelial cells, GRP78 and the UPR-regulated basic leucine zipper, transcription factors, ATF4 and Nrf2, which enhance expression of important anti-oxidant genes, increased rapidly (< 24 h) with cigarette smoke extract. These data indicate that cigarette smoke induces a UPR response in the human lung that is rapid in onset, concentration dependent, and at least partially reversible with smoking cessation. We speculate that activation of a UPR by cigarette smoke may protect the lung from oxidant injury and the development of COPD.

  16. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  17. Mesothelin promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and tumorigenicity of human lung cancer and mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoqing; Wang, Liying; Riedel, Heimo; Wang, Kai; Yang, Yong; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2017-03-14

    Lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma are two of the most deadly forms of cancer. The prognosis of lung cancer and mesothelioma is extremely poor due to limited treatment modalities and lack of understanding of the disease mechanisms. We have identified mesothelin as a potentially unique therapeutic target that as a specific advantage appears nonessential in most cell types. Mesothelin (MSLN), a plasma membrane differentiation antigen, is expressed at a high level in many human solid tumors, including 70% of lung cancer and nearly all mesotheliomas. However, the role of MSLN in the disease process and underlying mechanisms is largely unknown. ShRNA knockdown and overexpression of MSLN were performed in human cancer cell lines and corresponding normal cells, respectively. Tumorigenic and metastatic effects of MSLN were examined by tumor sphere formation, migration, and invasion assays in vitro, as well as xenograft tumor assay in vivo. EMT and CSCs were detected by qPCR array, immunoblotting and flow cytometry. MSLN plays a key role in controlling epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem properties of human lung cancer and mesothelioma cells that control their tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Firstly, MSLN was found to be highly upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient tissues and in lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cell lines. Secondly, genetic knockdown of MSLN significantly reduced anchorage-independent cell growth, tumor sphere formation, cell adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro, as well as tumor formation and metastasis in vivo. Thirdly, ectopic overexpression of MSLN induced the malignant phenotype of non-cancerous cells, supporting its role as an oncogene. Finally, mechanistic studies revealed that knockdown of MSLN reversed EMT and attenuated stem cell properties, in addition to inhibiting tumor growth and metastasis. These results indicate an essential role of MSLN in controlling EMT and stem cell properties of human

  18. Tissue reservoirs of antiviral T cell immunity in persistent human CMV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Claire L.; Thome, Joseph J.C.; Igarashi, Suzu

    2017-01-01

    T cell responses to viruses are initiated and maintained in tissue sites; however, knowledge of human antiviral T cells is largely derived from blood. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) persists in most humans, requires T cell immunity to control, yet tissue immune responses remain undefined. Here, we investigated human CMV-specific T cells, virus persistence and CMV-associated T cell homeostasis in blood, lymphoid, mucosal and secretory tissues of 44 CMV seropositive and 28 seronegative donors. CMV-specific T cells were maintained in distinct distribution patterns, highest in blood, bone marrow (BM), or lymph nodes (LN), with the frequency and function in blood distinct from tissues. CMV genomes were detected predominantly in lung and also in spleen, BM, blood and LN. High frequencies of activated CMV-specific T cells were found in blood and BM samples with low virus detection, whereas in lung, CMV-specific T cells were present along with detectable virus. In LNs, CMV-specific T cells exhibited quiescent phenotypes independent of virus. Overall, T cell differentiation was enhanced in sites of viral persistence with age. Together, our results suggest tissue T cell reservoirs for CMV control shaped by both viral and tissue-intrinsic factors, with global effects on homeostasis of tissue T cells over the lifespan. PMID:28130404

  19. Biodegradability of para-aramid respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates (RFP) in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Reed, K L; Stonehuerner, J D; Ghio, A J; Webb, T R

    2006-01-01

    Using both in vivo (inhalation) and in vitro (cell culture) studies, we previously reported that p-aramid respirable fibers (RFP--defined as respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates) are biodegraded in lungs and lung cells of rats following exposures. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether shortening mechanisms of p-aramid RFP biodegradability are also operative in human lung cells. Cultures of human A549 lung epithelial cells (A549), primary alveolar macrophages (HBAL) (collected via bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]) from volunteers), and co-cultures (Co) of the A549 and HBAL were incubated with p-aramid RFP for either 1 h, 1 day, or 1 week to assess RFP shortening. Lengths of RFP were measured using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation, digestion of culture tissue components, and processing. Similar to findings using rat lung cells, only slight RFP shortening was measured in A549 cultures at 1-day and 1-week post-incubation. More importantly, in HBAL and Co groups, greater transverse cleavage of p-aramid RFP was measured at 1-day and 1-week postexposure compared to 1-h HBAL or Co groups, or in any A549 groups. In contrast, cellulose RFP, a biopersistent reference control fiber, were not measurably shortened under similar circumstances. Second, p-aramid RFP were incubated either with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or acellular BAL fluids from human volunteers or rats and processed for SEM analysis of RFP lengths. Mean lengths of p-aramid RFP incubated with human or rat BAL fluids were substantially decreased compared to PBS. Similar to our findings with rat lung cells, components of human lung fluids coat the p-aramid RFP as a prerequisite for subsequent enzymatic cleavage by human phagocytic lung cells and this finding reinforces the concept that inhaled p-aramid RFP are likely to be biodegradable in the lungs of humans.

  20. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jyoti; Dixit, Shivendra Kumar; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA), Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631). Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequence also revealed the identity of 98% with published

  1. Rapid detection of Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from bacterial culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to detect Mannheimia haemolytica in lung tissues of sheep and from a bacterial culture. Introduction: M. haemolytica is one of the most important and well-established etiological agents of pneumonia in sheep and other ruminants throughout the world. Accurate diagnosis of M. haemolytica primarily relies on bacteriological examination, biochemical characteristics and, biotyping and serotyping of the isolates. In an effort to facilitate rapid M. haemolytica detection, polymerase chain reaction assay targeting Pasteurella haemolytica serotype-1 specific antigens (PHSSA, Rpt2 and 12S ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes were used to detect M. haemolytica directly from lung tissues and from bacterial culture. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 archived lung tissues from sheep that died of pneumonia on an organized farm were used. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR based on two-amplicons targeted PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica were used for identification of M. haemolytica isolates in culture from the lung samples. All the 12 lung tissue samples were tested for the presence M. haemolytica by PHSSA and Rpt2 genes based PCR and its confirmation by sequencing of the amplicons. Results: All the 12 lung tissue samples tested for the presence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica by mPCR were found to be positive. Amplification of 12S rRNA gene fragment as internal amplification control was obtained with each mPCR reaction performed from DNA extracted directly from lung tissue samples. All the M. haemolytica were also positive for mPCR. No amplified DNA bands were observed for negative control reactions. All the three nucleotide sequences were deposited in NCBI GenBank (Accession No. KJ534629, KJ534630 and KJ534631. Sequencing of the amplified products revealed the identity of 99-100%, with published sequence of PHSSA and Rpt2 genes of M. haemolytica available in the NCBI database. Sheep specific mitochondrial 12S r

  2. Impact of Triple Combinations of Retinoic Acid, Mold Spores and Citral on the F344 Rat Lung Tissue Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    The impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) and Mold spores (MLD) in the development of lung pathology and in vivo tissue remodeling have not been well established in the literature. In addition, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology has not been ascertained in animal studies. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and Mold (MLD) exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that Citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse, ameliorate or improve the associated pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=40). Animals were exposed to seven different treatments including untreated control, MLD, ATRA, Citrals (C1 and C2) and their MLD combinations (MLD+ ATRA+ C1, and MLD+ ATRA+ C2) by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight and blood data were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21, and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from weight and blood data (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from histopathological analyses supported the findings that exposure of F344 rats to MLD combinations with ATRA and Citrals showed various levels of lung tissue damage that were impacted by either C1 or C2 exposure. This promising study showed impressive responses on the interaction of MLD, Citrals, and ATRA as related to their impact on associated lung tissue pathologies.

  3. Pleuro-pulmonary involvement in patients with connective tissue disease. The role of open lung biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubben, M J; Kerstens, P J; Wiersma, J M; Boerbooms, A M; Festen, J

    1993-12-01

    Pleuro-pulmonary involvement is frequently encountered in connective tissue disease. The pathological changes due to connective tissue disease are multifold. They include pleural, interstitial and nodular manifestations as well as airway lesions and vascular changes. In clinical decision making it is important to differentiate between effects of the underlying connective tissue disease, complications due to treatment, such as opportunistic infections, toxic and idiosyncratic drug reactions, and unrelated primary pulmonary diseases. We describe 2 patients with a connective tissue disease and pleuro-pulmonary complications. The diagnostic procedures are discussed. The result of the open lung biopsy was consistent with the diagnosis of rheumatic disease and also Sjögren's disease in the first patient and excluded infection and vasculitis in the second patient. Whenever histological investigation is needed to establish and/or exclude a diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disease, the open lung biopsy remains the "gold standard". We therefore propose a flow-chart for use in the clinical approach to the patient with interstitial lung disease of unknown origin.

  4. The expression of Egfl7 in human normal tissues and epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun; Yang, Lian-Yue; Wu, Fan; Tao, Yi-Ming; Liu, Lin-Sen; Zhang, Jin-Fan; He, Ya-Ning; Tang, Li-Li; Chen, Guo-Dong; Guo, Lei

    2013-04-23

    To investigate the expression of Egfl7 in normal adult human tissues and human epithelial tumors.
 RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to detect Egfl7 expression in normal adult human tissues and 10 human epithelial tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, malignant glioma, ovarian cancer and renal cancer. Immunohistochemistry and cytoimmunofluorescence were subsequently used to determine the localization of Egfl7 in human epithelial tumor tissues and cell lines. ELISA was also carried out to examine the serum Egfl7 levels in cancer patients. In addition, correlations between Egfl7 expression and clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC and breast cancer were also analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry results.
 Egfl7 was differentially expressed in 19 adult human normal tissues and was overexpressed in all 10 human epithelial tumor tissues. The serum Egfl7 level was also significantly elevated in cancer patients. The increased Egfl7 expression in HCC correlated with vein invasion, absence of capsule formation, multiple tumor nodes and poor prognosis. Similarly, upregulation of Egfl7 in breast cancer correlated strongly with TNM stage, lymphatic metastasis, estrogen receptor positivity, Her2 positivity and poor prognosis. 
 Egfl7 is significantly upregulated in human epithelial tumor tissues, suggesting Egfl7 to be a potential biomarker for human epithelial tumors, especially HCC and breast cancer.

  5. Lung tissue mechanics in the early stages of induced paracoccidioidomycosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikanai-Yasuda M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary dysfunction represents the most important cause of death in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PBM. In order to investigate the functional changes of the lungs in the early stages of PBM, a model of benign disease was developed by intratracheal challenge of 12-week old isogenic Wistar rats with 1 x 106 yeast forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Animals were studied 30 and 60 days after infection, when fully developed granulomas were demonstrable in the lungs. Measurements of airway resistance, lung elastance and tissue hysteresis were made during sinusoidal deformations (100 breaths/min, tidal volume = 2 ml with direct measurement of alveolar pressure using the alveolar capsule technique. Infection caused a significant increase in hysteresis (infected: 1.69, N = 13; control: 1.13, N = 12, P = 0.024, ANOVA, with no alterations in airway resistance or lung elastance. Histopathological analysis revealed the presence of fully developed granulomas located in the axial compartment of the lung interstitial space. These results suggest that alterations of tissue mechanics represent an early event in experimental PBM

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinase-19 Is a Key Regulator of Lung Fibrosis in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoying; Kovkarova-Naumovski, Elisabetha; Jara, Paul; Parwani, Anil; Kass, Daniel; Ruiz, Victor; Lopez-Otín, Carlos; Rosas, Ivan O.; Gibson, Kevin F.; Cabrera, Sandra; Ramírez, Remedios; Yousem, Samuel A.; Richards, Thomas J.; Chensny, Lara J.; Selman, Moisés; Kaminski, Naftali

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease characterized by epithelial phenotypic changes and fibroblast activation. Based on the temporal heterogeneity of IPF, we hypothesized that hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells regulate the fibrotic response. Objectives: To identify novel mediators of fibrosis comparing the transcriptional signature of hyperplastic epithelial cells and conserved epithelial cells in the same lung. Methods: Laser capture microscope and microarrays analysis were used to identify differentially expressed genes in IPF lungs. Bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis was evaluated in Mmp19-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice. The role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-19 was additionally studied by transfecting the human MMP19 in alveolar epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Laser capture microscope followed by microarray analysis revealed a novel mediator, MMP-19, in hyperplastic epithelial cells adjacent to fibrotic regions. Mmp19−/− mice showed a significantly increased lung fibrotic response to bleomycin compared with WT mice. A549 epithelial cells transfected with human MMP19 stimulated wound healing and cell migration, whereas silencing MMP19 had the opposite effect. Gene expression microarray of transfected A549 cells showed that PTGS2 (prostaglandin–endoperoxide synthase 2) was one of the highly induced genes. PTGS2 was overexpressed in IPF lungs and colocalized with MMP-19 in hyperplastic epithelial cells. In WT mice, PTGS2 was significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissues after bleomycin-induced fibrosis, but not in Mmp19−/− mice. Inhibition of Mmp-19 by siRNA resulted in inhibition of Ptgs2 at mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions: Up-regulation of MMP19 induced by lung injury may play a protective role in the development of fibrosis through the induction of PTGS2. PMID:22859522

  7. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung cancer cells. Jie Huang, Fa-jiu Li, Shi Chen, Yi Shi, Xiao-jiang Wang, Chuan-hai Wang, Qing- ..... method for the determination of green and black tea polyphenols in biomatrices by high-performance liquid chromatography with coulometric array detection.

  8. Tangeretin sensitises human lung cancer cells to TRAIL- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. (H1299 and H1975). Methods: ... Western blotting was performed to assess the expression of death receptors, apoptosis pathway proteins, JNK and ERK1/2. ...... upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. World J.

  9. Serum and tissue leptin in lung cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiang; Ma, Yao; Zhou, Qilong; He, Jie; Peng, Bo; Liu, Sitong; Yan, Zhipeng; Yang, Xin; Fan, Hong

    2017-03-21

    Many studies have found that leptin is involved in tumorigenesis and the progression of lung cancer. However, these studies were inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the role of leptin in the patients with lung cancer. A systematic literature search in the several databases and on commercial Internet search engines was carried out to identify studies published up to July 8, 2016. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to investigate the effect sizes. Finally, 21 eligible articles were included in the current meta-analysis. Overall, there is no relationship between levels of serum leptin and lung cancer. However, a subgroup analysis in high-study quality group found a weak association between serum leptin concentrations and lung cancer in Chinese (SMD=0.77, P=0.035). Additionally, the meta-analysis indicates that the serum leptin levels were lower in the weight-losing group than in the sustained weight group (SMD=-0.80, P=0.001). Further, there was evidence of a significant association between expression levels of leptin protein in tissue and lung cancer (OR=7.35, Pleptin may be involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and tumor metastasis, especially among Chinese. However, the leptin may not appear to play an important role in cancer cachexia development.

  10. Vitamin D modulates prostaglandin E2 synthesis and degradation in human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangde; Nelson, Amy; Wang, Xingqi; Farid, Maha; Gunji, Yoko; Ikari, Jun; Iwasawa, Shun; Basma, Hesham; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Rennard, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency has been increasingly recognized in the general population worldwide and has been associated with several lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and respiratory tract infections. Fibroblasts play a critical role in tissue repair and remodeling, which is a key feature of COPD and asthma. Fibroblasts modulate tissue repair by producing and modifying extracellular matrix components and by releasing mediators that act as autocrine or paracrine modulators of tissue remodeling. The current study was designed to investigate if vitamin D alters fibroblast release of key autocrine/paracrine repair factors. First, we demonstrated that human fetal lung (HFL)-1 cells express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and that vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] induce VDR nuclear translocation and increase VDR-DNA binding activity. We next demonstrated that vitamin D, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D significantly reduced prostaglandin (PG)E2 production by human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) but had no effect on transforming growth factor β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, or fibronectin production. Vitamin D, 25(OH)D, and 1,25(OH)2D significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced microsomal PGE synthase (mPGES)-1 expression; in contrast, all three forms of vitamin D stimulated 15-hydroxy PG dehydrogenase, an enzyme that degrades PGE2. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 and the other two PGE2 synthases (mPGES-2 and cytosolic PGE synthase) were not altered by vitamin D, 25(OH)D, or 1,25(OH)2D. Finally, the effect of PGE2 inhibition by 25(OH)D was observed in adult lung fibroblasts. These findings suggest that vitamin D can regulate PGE2 synthesis and degradation and by this mechanism can modulate fibroblast-mediated tissue repair function.

  11. Interleukin-13, but Not Indomethacin, Increases Cysteinyl-Leukotriene Synthesis in Human Lung Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD is associated with constitutively elevated synthesis of bronchoconstrictor cysteinyl-leukotrienes, associated with increased expression of leukotriene (LTC4 synthase and Th2 cytokines and airway eosinophilia. We examined whether interleukin-13 can increase LTC4 synthase gene transcription and cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in macrophages isolated from resected human lung tissue and whether an NSAID (indomethacin can trigger further cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in these cells. Overnight culture of human lung macrophages with IL-13 (10 ng/mL increased spontaneous and ionophore-stimulated production of cysteinyl-leukotrienes by 42% (P=0.02 and 52% (P=0.005, respectively, as quantified by enzyme immunoassays, but PCR gene transcription assays did not demonstrate an effect on LTC4S mRNA. The addition of indomethacin (100 μM did not modulate cysteinyl-leukotriene production in either IL-13-treated or untreated macrophages. We conclude that while IL-13 enhances cysteinyl-leukotriene synthesis in human lung macrophages, it does not replicate the enhanced LTC4 synthase expression observed in the AERD lung nor confer sensitivity to NSAIDs.

  12. Characterization and Quantification of Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets in Human Lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien C De Grove

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILC are a new family of innate immune cells that have emerged as important regulators of tissue homeostasis and inflammation. However, limited data are available concerning the relative abundance and characteristics of ILC in the human lung.The aim of this study was to characterize and enumerate the different ILC subsets in human lung by multi-color flow cytometry.Within the CD45+ Lin- CD127+ pulmonary ILC population, we identified group 1 (ILC1, group 2 (ILC2 and group 3 (ILC3 innate lymphoid cells using specific surface markers (i.e. IL12Rβ2, CRTH2 and CD117 respectively and key transcription factors (i.e. T-bet, GATA-3 and RORγT respectively. Based on the presence of NKp44, ILC3 were further subdivided in natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR+ and NCR- ILC3. In addition, we demonstrated the production of signature cytokines IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-17A, IL-22 and GM-CSF in the pulmonary ILC population. Interestingly, we observed a tendency to a higher frequency of NCR- ILC3 in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD compared with controls.We show that the three main ILC subsets are present in human lung. Importantly, the relative abundance of ILC subsets tended to change in COPD patients in comparison to control individuals.

  13. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Dongxia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17 cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands, epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin, oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain

  14. Quantification of Chitinase mRNA Levels in Human and Mouse Tissues by Real-Time PCR: Species-Specific Expression of Acidic Mammalian Chitinase in Stomach Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Misa; Togashi, Yuto; Tsuda, Kyoko; Okawa, Kazuaki; Kamaya, Minori; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes chitin, which is an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polymer that is present in a wide range of organisms, including insects, parasites and fungi. Although mammals do not contain any endogenous chitin, humans and mice express two active chitinases, chitotriosidase (Chit1) and acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase). Because the level of expression of these chitinases is increased in many inflammatory conditions, including Gaucher disease and mouse models of asthma, both chitinases may play important roles in the pathophysiologies of these and other diseases. We recently established a quantitative PCR system using a single standard DNA and showed that AMCase mRNA is synthesized at extraordinarily high levels in mouse stomach tissues. In this study, we applied this methodology to the quantification of chitinase mRNAs in human tissues and found that both chitinase mRNAs were widely expressed in normal human tissues. Chit1 mRNA was highly expressed in the human lung, whereas AMCase mRNA was not overexpressed in normal human stomach tissues. The levels of these mRNAs in human tissues were significantly lower than the levels of housekeeping genes. Because the AMCase expression levels were quite different between the human and mouse stomach tissues, we developed a quantitative PCR system to compare the mRNA levels between human and mouse tissues using a human-mouse hybrid standard DNA. Our analysis showed that Chit1 mRNA is expressed at similar levels in normal human and mouse lung. In contrast, the AMCase expression level in human stomach was significantly lower than that expression level observed in mouse stomach. These mRNA differences between human and mouse stomach tissues were reflecting differences in the chitinolytic activities and levels of protein expression. Thus, the expression level of the AMCase in the stomach is species-specific.

  15. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Rizzo

    Full Text Available Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health.

  16. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  17. Over-expression of thymosin β4 in granulomatous lung tissue with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun; Yoo, Young-Bin; Chun, Bong-Kwon; Oak, Chul-Ho; Cha, Hee-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that thymosin β4 (Tβ4) stimulates angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a type of granulomatous disease, is accompanied by intense angiogenesis and VEGF levels have been reported to be elevated in serum or tissue inflamed by pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated the expression of Tβ4 in granulomatous lung tissues at various stages of active pulmonary tuberculosis, and we also examined the expression patterns of VEGF and HIF-1α to compare their Tβ4 expression patterns in patients' tissues and in the tissue microarray of TB patients. Tβ4 was highly expressed in both granulomas and surrounding lymphocytes in nascent granulomatous lung tissue, but was expressed only surrounding tissues of necrotic or caseous necrotic regions. The expression pattern of HIF-1α was similar to that of Tβ4. VEGF was expressed in both granulomas and blood vessels surrounding granulomas. The expression pattern of VEGF co-localized with CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, PECAM-1), a blood endothelial cell marker, and partially co-localized with Tβ4. However, the expression of Tβ4 did not co-localize with alveolar macrophages. Stained alveolar macrophages were present surrounding regions of granuloma highly expressing Tβ4. We also analyzed mRNA expression in the sputum of 10 normal and 19 pulmonary TB patients. Expression of Tβ4 was significantly higher in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis than in normal controls. These data suggest that Tβ4 is highly expressed in granulomatous lung tissue with active pulmonary TB and is associated with HIF-1α- and VEGF-mediated inflammation and angiogenesis. Furthermore, the expression of Tβ4 in the sputum of pulmonary tuberculosis patients can be used as a potential marker for diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The level of RORγt increases in rat lung tissues of bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Wu, Fuling; Li, Yingying; Shi, Tao; Tian, Lijun; Han, Tingting; Wang, Haiying

    2015-11-01

    To study the level of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) in rat lung tissues of bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and its implication. The rats were randomly divided into normal group and bronchiolitis group. After the model of bronchiolitis was established successfully by nasal dripping, the pathological changes of lung tissues were detected by HE staining; the plasma levels of interleukin 23 (IL-23), IL-17 were detected by ELISA; the level of RORγt mRNA in lung tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were detected by real-time quantitative PCR; the level of RORγt protein in lung tissues was examined by Western blotting. Compared with the normal group, the rats with bronchiolitis presented with pulmonary interstitial hyperemia and edema, more inflammatory cell infiltration, wider alveolar septa and bronchial collapse and deformation. Compared with the normal group, the level of RORγt mRNA in the lung tissues and PBMCs increased in rats with bronchiolitis. The level of RORγt protein in lung tissues and the plasma levels of IL-23 and IL -17 were higher in rats with bronchiolitis than in normal rats. The level of RORγt was elevated in the lung tissues of rats with RSV-induced bronchiolitis.

  19. Optical pathology of human brain metastasis of lung cancer using combined resonance Raman and spatial frequency spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has become widely used for diagnostic purpose of breast, lung and brain cancers. This report introduced a new approach based on spatial frequency spectra analysis of the underlying tissue structure at different stages of brain tumor. Combined spatial frequency spectroscopy (SFS), Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic method is used to discriminate human brain metastasis of lung cancer from normal tissues for the first time. A total number of thirty-one label-free micrographic images of normal and metastatic brain cancer tissues obtained from a confocal micro- Raman spectroscopic system synchronously with examined RR spectra of the corresponding samples were collected from the identical site of tissue. The difference of the randomness of tissue structures between the micrograph images of metastatic brain tumor tissues and normal tissues can be recognized by analyzing spatial frequency. By fitting the distribution of the spatial frequency spectra of human brain tissues as a Gaussian function, the standard deviation, σ, can be obtained, which was used to generate a criterion to differentiate human brain cancerous tissues from the normal ones using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This SFS-SVM analysis on micrograph images presents good results with sensitivity (85%), specificity (75%) in comparison with gold standard reports of pathology and immunology. The dual-modal advantages of SFS combined with RR spectroscopy method may open a new way in the neuropathology applications.

  20. Lung Cancer Signature Biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of Digital Differential Display (DDD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Mousami

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used ‘Gene Ontology semantic similarity score’ to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal and disease (cancer sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Results Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95 identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1–4. Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1, chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2, hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3 and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4. Conclusions Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3, HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1

  1. Lung cancer signature biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of digital differential display (DDD) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mousami; Khurana, Pankaj; Sugadev, Ragumani

    2012-11-02

    The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD) rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used 'Gene Ontology semantic similarity score' to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal) and disease (cancer) sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95) identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1-4). Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1), chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2), hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3) and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4). Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3), HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1/SAG, AIB1 and AZIN1) are significantly down regulated

  2. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothausmann, Roman; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Grothausmann R, Knudsen L, Ochs M, Mühlfeld C. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 312: L243-L257, 2017. First published December 2, 2016; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00326.2016-The alveolar capillary network (ACN) provides an enormously large surface area that is necessary for pulmonary gas exchange. Changes of the ACN during normal or pathological development or in pulmonary diseases are of great functional impact and warrant further analysis. Due to the complexity of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the ACN, 2D approaches are limited in providing a comprehensive impression of the characteristics of the normal ACN or the nature of its alterations. Stereological methods offer a quantitative way to assess the ACN in 3D in terms of capillary volume, surface area, or number but lack a 3D visualization to interpret the data. Hence, the necessity to visualize the ACN in 3D and to correlate this with data from the same set of data arises. Such an approach requires a large sample volume combined with a high resolution. Here, we present a technically simple and cost-efficient approach to create 3D representations of lung tissue ranging from bronchioles over alveolar ducts and alveoli up to the ACN from more than 1 mm sample extent to a resolution of less than 1 μm. The method is based on automated image acquisition of serially sectioned epoxy resin-embedded lung tissue fixed by vascular perfusion and subsequent automated digital reconstruction and analysis of the 3D data. This efficient method may help to better understand mechanisms of vascular development and pathology of the lung. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Viscoelastic parameter identification of human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, S; Sommer, G; Holzapfel, G A; Steinmann, P; Kuhl, E

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the constitutive behavior of the human brain is critical to interpret the physical environment during neurodevelopment, neurosurgery, and neurodegeneration. A wide variety of constitutive models has been proposed to characterize the brain at different temporal and spatial scales. Yet, their model parameters are typically calibrated with a single loading mode and fail to predict the behavior under arbitrary loading conditions. Here we used a finite viscoelastic Ogden model with six material parameters-an elastic stiffness, two viscoelastic stiffnesses, a nonlinearity parameter, and two viscous time constants-to model the characteristic nonlinearity, conditioning, hysteresis and tension-compression asymmetry of the human brain. We calibrated the model under shear, shear relaxation, compression, compression relaxation, and tension for four different regions of the human brain, the cortex, basal ganglia, corona radiata, and corpus callosum. Strikingly, unconditioned gray matter with 0.36kPa and white matter with 0.35kPa were equally stiff, whereas conditioned gray matter with 0.52kPa was three times stiffer than white matter with 0.18kPa. While both unconditioned viscous time constants were larger in gray than in white matter, both conditioned constants were smaller. These rheological differences suggest a different porosity between both tissues and explain-at least in part-the ongoing controversy between reported stiffness differences in gray and white matter. Our unconditioned and conditioned parameter sets are readily available for finite element simulations with commercial software packages that feature Ogden type models at finite deformations. As such, our results have direct implications on improving the accuracy of human brain simulations in health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contribution of Human Lung Parenchyma and Leukocyte Influx to Oxidative Stress and Immune System-Mediated Pathology following Nipah Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaffre, Olivier; Saito, Tais B; Juelich, Terry L; Ikegami, Tetsuro; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David D; Atkins, Colm; Levine, Corri B; Huante, Matthew B; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Endsley, Janice J; Freiberg, Alexander N; Rockx, Barry

    2017-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic emerging paramyxovirus that can cause fatal respiratory illness or encephalitis in humans. Despite many efforts, the molecular mechanisms of NiV-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remain unclear. We previously showed that NiV replicates to high titers in human lung grafts in NOD-SCID/γ mice, resulting in a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, these mice can undergo human immune system reconstitution by the bone marrow, liver, and thymus (BLT) reconstitution method, in addition to lung tissue engraftment, giving altogether a realistic model to study human respiratory viral infections. Here, we characterized NiV Bangladesh strain (NiV-B) infection of human lung grafts from human immune system-reconstituted mice in order to identify the overall effect of immune cells on NiV pathogenesis of the lung. We show that NiV-B replicated to high titers in human lung grafts and caused similar cytopathic effects irrespective of the presence of human leukocytes in mice. However, the human immune system interfered with virus spread across lung grafts, responded to infection by leukocyte migration to small airways and alveoli of the lung grafts, and accelerated oxidative stress in lung grafts. In addition, the presence of human leukocytes increased the expression of cytokines and chemokines that regulate inflammatory influx to sites of infection and tissue damage. These results advance our understanding of how the immune system limits NiV dissemination and contributes to ALI and inform efforts to identify therapeutic targets. IMPORTANCE Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause a lethal respiratory and neurological disease in humans. Only limited data are available on NiV pathogenesis in the human lung, and the relative contribution of the innate immune response and NiV to acute lung injury (ALI) is still unknown. Using human lung grafts in a human immune system-reconstituted mouse model, we showed that the NiV Bangladesh

  5. YBX1 regulates tumor growth via CDC25a pathway in human lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wendan; Li, Jinxiu; Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Zhenlong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Yixiang; Wang, Ziyi; Wang, Peng; Li, Yechi; Li, Fengzhou; Sun, Zhe; Xuan, Yang; Tang, Ranran; Deng, Wu-guo; Guo, Wei; Gu, Chundong

    2016-01-01

    Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1) is involved in the multi-tumor occurrence and development. However, the regulation of YBX1 in lung tumorigenesis and the underlying mechanisms, especially its relationship with CDC25a, was remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of YBX1 and CDC25a in lung adenocarcinoma and identified their roles in the regulation of lung cancer growth. The retrospective analysis of 116 patients with lung adenocarcinoma indicated that YBX1 was positively correlated with CDC25a expression. The Cox-regression analysis showed only high-ranking TNM stage and low CDC25a expression were an independent risk factor of prognosis in enrolled patients. High expression of YBX1 or CDC25a protein was also observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with HLF cells. ChIP assay demonstrated the binding of endogenous YBX1 to the CDC25a promoter region. Overexpression of exogenous YBX1 up-regulated the expression of the CDC25a promoter-driven luciferase. By contrast, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA markedly decreased the capability of YBX1 binding to CDC25a promoter in A549 and H322 cells. Inhibition of YBX1 expression also blocked cell cycle progression, suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via the CDC25a pathway in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA suppressed tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model and down-regulated the expression of YBX1, CDC25a, Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 in the tumor tissues of mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate inhibition of YBX1 suppressed lung cancer growth partly via the CDC25a pathway and high expression of YBX1/CDC25a predicts poor prognosis in human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27384875

  6. Tumor Associated Neutrophils in Human Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    isolated from the samepatientwithNSCLC.Tcellproliferation in responsetoCD3/CD28wasperformedasdescribed inMaterials andMethods. Cell proliferationwas...PMNswere isolated as described inMaterials andMethods and then added to allogeneic MLR in the presence of neutralizing mouse anti-human LOX-1 antibody (10 mg

  7. Results of total lung irradiation and chemotherapy in comparison with partial lung irradiation in metastatic undifferentiated soft tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, N.; Fuerst, G.; Pape, H.; Bannach, B.; Schmitt, G.; Molls, M.

    1988-07-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with unresectable pulmonary metastases of soft tissue sarcoma is well known. In order to evaluate the beneficial effect of radiotherapy, we have treated 44 patients with pulmonary metastases of grade 3 soft tissue sarcoma from 1980 to 1986. In 36 patients the treatment volume was restricted to the single metastases up to a dose of 50 to 60 (9 to 10 Gy/week). The survival rate at one year was 18% and at two years 6%. Eight patients were treated with a combined regimen, consisting of cisplatin and ifosfamide with simultaneous whole lung irradiation. Irradiation was performed with 8 or 16 MV photons at a hyperfractionation of 2x0,8 Gy/day (8 Gy/week). After a dose of 12 Gy, the single metastases were boosted up to 50 to 60 Gy, with a second course of chemotherapy. In six of eight patients complete remissions were achieved, one patient showed a partial remission. The survival rate at 27 months was 50%. The patients with partial remission died from pulmonary progression at 23 months. One patient died after twelve months from a loco-regional recurrence in the tonsillar fossa without evidence of pulmonary disease. Side effects included alopecia and moderate bone marrow suppression approximately twelve days after each chemotherapy cycle. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed only at the high dose volume without impairment of respiratory function. From these observations the conclusion is drawn that whole lung irradiation simultaneously with cisplatin and ifosfamide chemotherapy provides good palliative results without relevant morbidity in patients with high grade unresectable pulmonary metastases of soft tissue sarcomas.

  8. Expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Cancer tissue and adjacent normal lung tissue were collected and mRNA contents of Klf8 were detected; lung cancer A549 cell lines were cultured, and after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, cell cycle, cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were detected. Results: mRNA contents of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue were higher than those in adjacent normal lung tissue; after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, Klf8 mRNA inhibition rate was 74.31%; G0/G1 phase ratio of Klf8 siRNA group was higher than that of negative control siRNA group; ratios of S-phase and G2/M phase cells, mRNA contents of Cyclin D1 and number of cells invading to the outer side of the transwell microporous membrane were lower than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of CDH1 and CK18 as well as Snail and Slug of Klf8 siRNA group were higher than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of VIM and N-cadherin were lower than those of negative control siRNA group. Conclusion: The expression of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue abnormally elevates; downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines can inhibit malignant biological effect of cells, manifested as cell cycle arrest as well as the inhibition of cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes.

  9. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Fluorescence characteristics of human breast tissues are investigated through wavelet transform and principal component analysis (PCA). Wavelet transform of polarized fluorescence spectra of human breast tissues is found to localize spectral features that can reliably differentiate different tissue types.

  10. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  11. Airway Microbiota Determines Innate Cell Inflammatory or Tissue Remodeling Profiles in Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Eric; Pattaroni, Céline; Koutsokera, Angela; Pison, Christophe; Kessler, Romain; Benden, Christian; Soccal, Paola M; Magnan, Antoine; Aubert, John-David; Marsland, Benjamin J; Nicod, Laurent P

    2016-11-15

    In lung transplant recipients, long-term graft survival relies on the control of inflammation and tissue remodeling to maintain graft functionality and avoid chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Although advances in clinical practice have improved transplant success, the mechanisms by which the balance between inflammation and remodeling is maintained are largely unknown. To assess whether host-microbe interactions in the transplanted lung determine the immunologic tone of the airways, and consequently could impact graft survival. Microbiota DNA and host total RNA were isolated from 203 bronchoalveolar lavages obtained from 112 patients post-lung transplantation. Microbiota composition was determined using 16S ribosomal RNA analysis, and expression of a set of genes involved in prototypic macrophage functions was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We show that the characteristics of the pulmonary microbiota aligned with distinct innate cell gene expression profiles. Although a nonpolarized activation was associated with bacterial communities consisting of a balance between proinflammatory (e.g., Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas) and low stimulatory (e.g., Prevotella and Streptococcus) bacteria, "inflammatory" and "remodeling" profiles were linked to bacterial dysbiosis. Mechanistic assays provided direct evidence that bacterial dysbiosis could lead to inflammatory or remodeling profiles in macrophages, whereas a balanced microbial community maintained homeostasis. The crosstalk between bacterial communities and innate immune cells potentially determines the function of the transplanted lung offering novel pathways for intervention strategies.

  12. Tissue prints for the rapid diagnosis of malignancy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strâmbu, Irina Ruxandra; Şerbescu, Aneta; Leonte, Diana Gabriela; Cordoş, Ioan; Dobre, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of malignancy during oncological surgery is crucial for making decisions related to the extension of the resection. The tissue prints, used initially for plant biology but also for prostate or breast cancer diagnosis, might be useful as a rapid cytological diagnosis. Tissue prints were done from freshly sectioned excised tissue fragments in patients operated between March 2010 and February 2012 in the Department of Surgery for cancer or benign lesions. Tissue prints were examined by a cytologist and considered as malignant or benign. Same fragments were then processed in the pathology laboratory using the typical paraffin-embedding method. All slides were examined by the same pathologist and considered the golden standard for malignancy and histological type. Three hundred and eleven fragments were examined, obtained from lung masses, lymph nodes, pleura and mediastinal masses, pathology showed 208 malignant and 103 benign. Tissue prints identified 227 malignant and 84 benign. For identifying malignancy, tissue prints had a sensibility of 0.91, specificity 0.64. Positive predictive value was 0.86 and negative predictive value 0.78. For lymph nodes, the specificity was better. In lymphomas and adenocarcinomas, tissue prints identified also the histology type in most cases. Tissue prints are rapid, easy to perform, cheap, with high sensibility but specificity lower than literature data on frozen sections. This might be improved by a better selection of cases where tissue prints are used for rapid diagnosis.

  13. Effects of S-Nitroso-N-Acetyl-Penicillamine (SNAP) on Inflammation, Lung Tissue Apoptosis and iNOS Activity in a Rabbit Model of Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosutova, P; Mikolka, P; Kolomaznik, M; Balentova, S; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by lung edema, surfactant dysfunction, and inflammation. The main goal of our study was to evaluate effects of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) on migration of cells into the lung and their activation, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbits. ALI was induced by repetitive lung lavage with saline. The animals were divided into the following groups: (1) ALI without therapy, (2) lung injury treated with SNAP (ALI + SNAP), and (3) healthy animals (Control). After 5 h of ventilation, total and differential counts of cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were assessed. Concentrations of interleukins (IL)-1ß, IL-6, and IL-8, endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (esRAGE), sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)3, caspase-3, and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in lung tissue and nitrite/nitrate in plasma were analyzed. In the right lung, apoptotic cells were evaluated by TUNEL assay. In the animals with ALI, higher counts of cells, mainly neutrophils, in BALF and increased production of pro-inflammatory substances were observed compared with controls. SNAP therapy reduced a leak of cells into the lung and decreased concentrations of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic markers, reduced mRNA expression of iNOS, and decreased apoptotic index in the lung.

  14. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  16. Pulmonary haptoglobin (pHp) is part of the surfactant system in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mahdi; Goldmann, Torsten

    2012-11-20

    Since the existence of pHp was demonstrated, it has been shown that this molecule and its receptor CD163 are regulated by different stimuli. Furthermore, a comparably fast secretion of pHp was described as well as the immuno-stimulatory effects. The intention of this study was to elucidate the role of pHp in the human lungs further. Here we show, by means of confocal microscopy and immune-electron-microscopy, a clear co-localization of pHp with surfactant protein-B in lamellar bodies of alveolar epithelial cells type II. These results are underlined by immunohistochemical stainings in differently fixed human lung tissues, which show pHp in vesicular and released form. The images of the released form resemble the intended position of surfactant in the human alveolus. pHp is secreted by Alveolar epithelial cells type II as previously shown. Moreover, pHp is co-localized with Surfactant protein-B. We conclude that the presented data shows that pHp is a native part of the surfactant system in the human lung. http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2563584738239912.

  17. Diagnosis and prevalence of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma in lung tissues of naturally infected farm sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh G. Sonawane

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to detect ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA in sheep flocks affected with pulmonary disorders at organized farm. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 sheep died naturally were thoroughly examined for the lesions of OPA during necropsy. Tissue sections from affected portion of the lungs from each animal were collected aseptically and divided into two parts; one each for polymerase chain reaction (PCR and another for histopathology. Results: On PCR examination of lung tissues, six sheep (8% were found to be positive for JSRV. Two of them were 3-6 months of age and did not show clinical signs/gross lesions of OPA. Four adult sheep positive on PCR revealed characteristic lesions of OPA on gross and histopathological examination. Conclusion: In the absence of known specific antibody response to the infection with JSRV, there is no diagnostic serological test available. The PCR assay employed in this study on lung tissues, using primers based on the U3 region of the viral long terminal repeat for JSRV would be helpful in the screening of preclinical and clinical cases of OPA in sheep.

  18. Fusing visual and clinical information for lung tissue classification in high-resolution computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Racoceanu, Daniel; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Cohen, Gilles; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the influence of the clinical context of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of the chest on tissue classification. 2D regions of interest in HRCT axial slices from patients affected with an interstitial lung disease are automatically classified into five classes of lung tissue. Relevance of the clinical parameters is studied before fusing them with visual attributes. Two multimedia fusion techniques are compared: early versus late fusion. Early fusion concatenates features in one single vector, yielding a true multimedia feature space. Late fusion consisting of the combination of the probability outputs of two support vector machines. The late fusion scheme allowed a maximum of 84% correct predictions of testing instances among the five classes of lung tissue. This represents a significant improvement of 10% compared to a pure visual-based classification. Moreover, the late fusion scheme showed high robustness to the number of clinical parameters used, which suggests that it is appropriate for mining clinical attributes with missing values in clinical routine. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative performance analysis of state-of-the-art classification algorithms applied to lung tissue categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and with healthy tissue. The evaluated classifiers are naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbor, J48 decision trees, multilayer perceptron, and support vector machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. These are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 88.3% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  20. A novel human ex vivo model for the analysis of molecular events during lung cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Dagmar S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC causes most of cancer related deaths in humans and is characterized by poor prognosis regarding efficiency of chemotherapeutical treatment and long-term survival of the patients. The purpose of the present study was the development of a human ex vivo tissue culture model and the analysis of the effects of conventional chemotherapy, which then can serve as a tool to test new chemotherapeutical regimens in NSCLC. Methods In a short-term tissue culture model designated STST (Short-Term Stimulation of Tissues in combination with the novel *HOPE-fixation and paraffin embedding method we examined the responsiveness of 41 human NSCLC tissue specimens to the individual cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, vinorelbine or gemcitabine. Viability was analyzed by LIFE/DEAD assay, TUNEL-staining and colorimetric MTT assay. Expression of Ki-67 protein and of BrdU (bromodeoxyuridine uptake as markers for proliferation and of cleaved (activated effector caspase-3 as indicator of late phase apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Transcription of caspase-3 was analyzed by RT-PCR. Flow cytometry was utilized to determine caspase-3 in human cancer cell lines. Results Viability, proliferation and apoptosis of the tissues were moderately affected by cultivation. In human breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and human cell lines (CPC-N, HEK proliferative capacity was clearly reduced by all 3 chemotherapeutic agents in a very similar manner. Cleavage of caspase-3 was induced in the chemo-sensitive types of cancer (breast cancer, SCLC. Drug-induced effects in human NSCLC tissues were less evident than in the chemo-sensitive tumors with more pronounced effects in adenocarcinomas as compared to squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusion Although there was high heterogeneity among the individual tumor tissue responses as expected, we clearly demonstrate specific multiple drug-induced effects simultaneously. Thus, STST

  1. Increased local expression of coagulation factor X contributes to the fibrotic response in human and murine lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Chris J.; Krupiczojc, Malvina A.; Königshoff, Melanie; Mercer, Paul F.; Lee, Y.C. Gary; Kaminski, Naftali; Morser, John; Post, Joseph M.; Maher, Toby M.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Moffatt, James D.; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Derian, Claudia K.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the coagulation cascade contributes to the pathophysiology of several conditions, including acute and chronic lung diseases. Coagulation zymogens are considered to be largely derived from the circulation and locally activated in response to tissue injury and microvascular leak. Here we report that expression of coagulation factor X (FX) is locally increased in human and murine fibrotic lung tissue, with marked immunostaining associated with bronchial and alveolar epithelia. FXa was a potent inducer of the myofibroblast differentiation program in cultured primary human adult lung fibroblasts via TGF-β activation that was mediated by proteinase-activated receptor–1 (PAR1) and integrin αvβ5. PAR1, αvβ5, and α-SMA colocalized to fibrotic foci in lung biopsy specimens from individuals with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, we demonstrated a causal link between FXa and fibrosis development by showing that a direct FXa inhibitor attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. These data support what we believe to be a novel pathogenetic mechanism by which FXa, a central proteinase of the coagulation cascade, is locally expressed and drives the fibrotic response to lung injury. These findings herald a shift in our understanding of the origins of excessive procoagulant activity and place PAR1 central to the cross-talk between local procoagulant signaling and tissue remodeling. PMID:19652365

  2. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  3. Quantitative detection of Merkel cell virus in human tissues and possible mode of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyo, Myriam; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Brait, Mariana; Hoque, Mohmammad O; Chuang, Alice; Kim, Myoung S; Sharma, Rajni; Liégeois, Nanette J; Koch, Wayne M; Califano, Joseph A; Westra, William H; Sidransky, David

    2010-06-15

    Merkel Cell Virus (MCV) is a newly discovered polyomavirus, recently found in a rare skin cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). However, MCV has also been detected in some normal tissue samples. We tested and compared the relative quantity of the MCV in a set of diverse human tissue samples with the MCC samples. The levels of MCV in MCCs were over 60 times higher than the highest values in all other tissues. Low quantities of MCV were detected in diverse tissue samples independently of malignant or benign histologic status. Higher levels of the virus were found in the upper aerodigestive tract, digestive system, and saliva compared to the lung and genitourinary system samples. These results confirm that MCV is widespread in the human body and suggest a possible fecal-oral transmission route similar to the Hepatitis A virus. Despite widespread presence of the virus, it appears that only neuroendocrine skin cells are susceptible to transformation by MCV.

  4. [Human lung topography in the early fetal period of ontogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznov, L M; Shcherbakov, S M

    2012-01-01

    Lung holotopy, skeletotopy and syntopy were studied in 70 human fetuses at developmental weeks 16-24 with N. I. Pirogov method, macro-microscopical preparation and using histotopographical sections in three imutually perpendicular planes. It was found that during weeks 16-18, the apex of the left lung was located posteriorly at the level of I intercostal space, at weeks 22-24--at the level of lower surface of I rib. At the right side, the apex was located at the level of upper surface of I rib during the whole period. The lower margin of the right lung was located at the level of IV rib during the whole period, while that of the left lung was detected at the level of III rib only during the beginning of the period. In the early fetal period, the projection of the root of the right lung extended from the lower margin of T(III) vertebral body toT(VI), while that one of the left lung was located at the level of the upper margins of T(IV)-T(VII) vertebral bodies. In the late period, these projections were found at the level of T(IV) (upper vertebral margin)--T(VII) (lower vertebral margin), and T(IV) (lower vertebral margin)--T(VIII) (upper vertebral margin) respectively. Intraorgan bronchi and pulmonary vessels were most clearly visualized in horizontal sections at T(III) -T(IX) levels. The results obtained should be taken into account when carrying out of diagnostic ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies of the fetus and surgical interventions on fetuses.

  5. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  6. FORUM Human tissue and organ transplant provisions: Chapter 8 of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    permanent residents; (iii) donations of human bodies and tissue of deceased persons; (iv) consent to donations of human tissue on behalf of deceased persons; (v) allocation and use of human organs of ... It is also an offence to sell or trade.

  7. Handbook of Human Tissue Sources. A National Resource of Human Tissue Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    supplemental calcium for the prevention of preeclampsia during pregnancy. Five clinical centers, enrolling 4,500 women over a two-year period...Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Institutes 106 National Center for Environmental Health 106 National Center for Infectious Diseases...and Prevention Complementary DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) xxiv Handbook of Human Tissue Sources CFRBCS CGOP CHR CHTN CJD CLIA CLSS CME CMV

  8. Post-mortem detection of gasoline residues in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahor, Kevin; Olson, Greg; Forbes, Shari L

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gasoline residues could be detected post-mortem in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims. The lungs and heart blood were investigated to determine whether they were suitable samples for collection and could be collected without contamination during an autopsy. Three sets of test subjects (pig carcasses) were investigated under two different fire scenarios. Test subjects 1 were anaesthetized following animal ethics approval, inhaled gasoline vapours for a short period and then euthanized. The carcasses were clothed and placed in a house where additional gasoline was poured onto the carcass post-mortem in one fire, but not in the other. Test subjects 2 did not inhale gasoline, were clothed and placed in the house and had gasoline poured onto them in both fires. Test subjects 3 were clothed but had no exposure to gasoline either ante- or post-mortem. Following controlled burns and suppression with water, the carcasses were collected, and their lungs and heart blood were excised at a necropsy. The headspace from the samples was analysed using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Gasoline was identified in the lungs and heart blood from the subjects that were exposed to gasoline vapours prior to death (test subjects 1). All other samples were negative for gasoline residues. These results suggest that it is useful to analyse for volatile ignitable liquids in lung tissue and blood as it may help to determine whether a victim was alive and inhaling gases at the time of a fire.

  9. Influence of lung CT changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on the human lung microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Engel

    Full Text Available Changes in microbial community composition in the lung of patients suffering from moderate to severe COPD have been well documented. However, knowledge about specific microbiome structures in the human lung associated with CT defined abnormalities is limited.Bacterial community composition derived from brush samples from lungs of 16 patients suffering from different CT defined subtypes of COPD and 9 healthy subjects was analyzed using a cultivation independent barcoding approach applying 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragment amplicons.We could show that bacterial community composition in patients with changes in CT (either airway or emphysema type changes, designated as severe subtypes was different from community composition in lungs of patients without visible changes in CT as well as from healthy subjects (designated as mild COPD subtype and control group (PC1, Padj = 0.002. Higher abundance of Prevotella in samples from patients with mild COPD subtype and from controls and of Streptococcus in the severe subtype cases mainly contributed to the separation of bacterial communities of subjects. No significant effects of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on bacterial community composition were detected within COPD cases with and without abnormalities in CT in PCoA. Co-occurrence analysis suggests the presence of networks of co-occurring bacteria. Four communities of positively correlated bacteria were revealed. The microbial communities can clearly be distinguished by their associations with the CT defined disease phenotype.Our findings indicate that CT detectable structural changes in the lung of COPD patients, which we termed severe subtypes, are associated with alterations in bacterial communities, which may induce further changes in the interaction between microbes and host cells. This might result in a changed interplay with the host immune system.

  10. Effect of lung fibrosis on glycogen content in different extrapulmonary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Elizabeth Lage; de Barros Pinheiro, Marina; Prata, Luana Oliveira; Sales, Wesley Araújo; Silva, Yuri Augusto Junqueira Belém; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria Glória; da Glória Rodrigues-Machado, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Patients with pulmonary fibrosis often exhibit reduced lung function and diminished health-related quality of life. Studies have shown that paraquat-induced, extrapulmonary, acute lung injury affects the metabolic profile of glycogen content in different tissues. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the process of pulmonary fibrosis induced by continuous exposure to the toxic herbicide paraquat or by a local insult from bleomycin affects the glycogen content in tissues. In the paraquat experiment, Wistar rats (n = 5 per group) received either saline (controls) or an intraperitoneal injection of a paraquat solution (7.0 mg/kg; experimental group) once a week for 4 weeks. In the bleomycin experiment, Balb/c mice (n = 5 per group) received either saline (controls) or 6.25 U/kg of bleomycin through intratracheal instillation in single dose (experimental group). Glycogen content in different tissues (mg/g tissue) was measured using the anthrone reagent. The lungs submitted to histopathological and quantitative analyses of fibrosis. Paraquat-induced fibrosis led to lower glycogen content in the gastrocnemius muscle (2.7 ± 0.1 vs. 3.4 ± 0.1; 79 %) compared with the controls, whereas no changes in glycogen content were found in the diaphragm or heart. Bleomycin-induced fibrosis led to lower glycogen content in the diaphragm (0.43 ± 0.02 vs. 0.79 ± 0.09, 54 %), gastrocnemius muscle (0.62 ± 0.11 vs. 1.18 ± 0.06, 52 %), and heart (0.68 ± 0.11 vs. 1.39 ± 0.1, 49 %) compared with the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, the area of fibrous connective tissue (μm(2)) in the lungs was significantly increased in paraquat-induced fibrosis (3,463 ± 377 vs. 565 ± 89) and bleomycin-induced fibrosis (3,707 ± 433.9 vs. 179 ± 51.28) compared with the controls. The findings suggest that the effects of fibrogenesis in the lungs are not limited to local alterations but also lead to a reduction in glycogen content in the heart

  11. Enoxacin penetration into human prostatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M G; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent enoxacin concentrations in serum and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. The mean ratios of enoxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 1.4 +/- 0.2 (standard error of the mean). The levels in serum and prostatic tissue were above the MICs for most urinary pathogens. PMID:3196004

  12. Dielectric characterisation of human tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Nennie, F.; Deiana, D.; Veen, A.J. van der; Monni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues samples are required for investigation and simulation purposes in biomedical applications of EM sensors. While available open literature mostly deals with ex-vivo characterization of isolated tissues, knowledge on dielectric properties of these tissues in their

  13. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Wound infections frequently originate from the subcutaneous tissue. The effect of gentamicin in subcutaneous tissue has, however, normally been evaluated from concentrations in blood or wound fluid. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of gentamicin in hu...... the presence of sufficient concentrations in the adipose tissue to be effective against common bacteria....

  14. Assessment of Control Tissue for Gene and Protein Expression Studies: A Comparison of Three Alternative Lung Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R. Passmore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of an appropriate control group in human research is essential in investigating the level of a pathological disorder. This study aimed to compare three alternative sources of control lung tissue and to determine their suitability for gene and protein expression studies. Gene and protein expression levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and gelatinase families and their receptors were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene expression levels of VEGFA, placental growth factor (PGF, and their receptors, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1, and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and the inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly higher in lung cancer resections. The gene expression level of MMP-9 was significantly lower in the corresponding samples. Altered protein expression was also detected, depending on the area assessed. The results of this study show that none of the three control groups studied are completely suitable for gene and protein studies associated with the VEGF and gelatinase families, highlighting the need for researchers to be selective in which controls they opt for.

  15. Association of Inorganics Accumulation with the Activation of NF-κB Signaling Pathway and the iNOS Expression of Lung Tissue in Xuanwei Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiapeng YANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Indoor air pollution induces asthma, leads to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and may promote lung cancer. Our previous studies found that the accumulation of inorganic particulate matter that is due to indoor air pollution can lead to damage to alveolar cells and activation of signaling pathway, and ultimately provoke tumorigenesis. The aim of this study is to explore the accumulation of inorganics and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS signaling pathway of lung tissue in Xuanwei lung cancer patients. Methods From December 2013 to November 2014, 48 cases Xuanwei patients with lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment from the Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University were enrolled in this study and compared with lung cancer patients from other regions. The ultrastructure of postoperative specimens was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM to explore the occurrence of inorganic particles. Serum cytokines were analyzed. Then, the expression levels of NF-κB-p65 protein and iNOS protein in postoperative specimens was explored by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Finally, 8-OHdG accumulation in lung cancer tissues and urine was measured. Results A large number of nanoscale inorganics were observed in alveolar type II cells and macrophages located in adjacent tissues of lung cancer with Xuanwei patients. Silicon (Si content was found in inorganic elemental analysis. The serum interleukin (IL-1β levels (31.50±19.16 pg/mL of Xuanwei lung-cancer patients were remarkably higher than those from other regions (11.33±6.94 pg/mL (P<0.01, with statistically significant difference. The pathological tissues of Xuanwei lung-cancer patients express NF-κB-p65, and iNOS expression were significantly higher than those of patients from non-Xuanwei regions. No significant difference was found between cancerous and normal adjacent tissues. Xuanwei lung

  16. Expression of PEPT2 mRNA in Lung Tissue of Rats with Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pulmonary fibrosis is a common pathological phenomenon in lung cancer patients after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also a key hindrance to the transport of drugs to lung tissue. Peptide transporters have become a target of the rational design of peptides and peptide drugs. The aim of this study is to investigates the expression of peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2 mRNA in the lungs of rats with bleomycin (BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods Fifty healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. One group was untreated (control, the second group was injected with normal saline solution (NS, and the three remaining groups were treated with a single dose of bleomycin to induce pulmonary fibrosis (BLM. Rats from the NS group were killed by exsanguination on day 14. Rats from the BLM group were killed by exsanguination on days 7, 14, and 28. The lung samples were observed under light microscopy and the hydroxyproline concentration was determined. The expression levels of PEPT2 mRNA were measured by RT-PCR. Results The morphological study showed that collagenous fiber proliferated in the lungs of rats injected with BLM, indicating pulmonary fibrosis. This proliferation was apparent at 14 d post-injection and especially at 28 d post-injection. Hydroxyproline levels increased seven days post-injection compared with the control group and NS group, but there was no significant statistical difference (P>0.05. Hydroxyproline levels significantly increased (P0.05. Conclusion PEPT2 is a potential peptide drug target in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, although there were no significant changes of PEPT2 mRNA expression in the lungs of rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. [Expression of PEPT2 mRNA in lung tissue of rats with pulmonary fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Dianhua; Zhang, Xuan; Song, Xin; Ma, Xiaobiao; Hu, Zaoxiu

    2013-10-20

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a common pathological phenomenon in lung cancer patients after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also a key hindrance to the transport of drugs to lung tissue. Peptide transporters have become a target of the rational design of peptides and peptide drugs. The aim of this study is to investigates the expression of peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) mRNA in the lungs of rats with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Fifty healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. One group was untreated (control), the second group was injected with normal saline solution (NS), and the three remaining groups were treated with a single dose of bleomycin to induce pulmonary fibrosis (BLM). Rats from the NS group were killed by exsanguination on day 14. Rats from the BLM group were killed by exsanguination on days 7, 14, and 28. The lung samples were observed under light microscopy and the hydroxyproline concentration was determined. The expression levels of PEPT2 mRNA were measured by RT-PCR. The morphological study showed that collagenous fiber proliferated in the lungs of rats injected with BLM, indicating pulmonary fibrosis. This proliferation was apparent at 14 d post-injection and especially at 28 d post-injection. Hydroxyproline levels increased seven days post-injection compared with the control group and NS group, but there was no significant statistical difference (P>0.05). Hydroxyproline levels significantly increased (Ppulmonary PEPT2 mRNA expression levels among the different groups (P>0.05). PEPT2 is a potential peptide drug target in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, although there were no significant changes of PEPT2 mRNA expression in the lungs of rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. Partial characterization of lysyl oxidase from several human tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuivaniemi, H

    1985-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase activity was assayed in urea extracts of a number of human tissues, proving to be highest in skin. Antibodies to human placental lysyl oxidase completely inhibited the activity of crude lysyl oxidase from all the human tissues studied, with no significant differences in the amounts of antiserum required for 50% inhibition. By contrast, marked differences were found in this value between skin tissue samples from different species. The Mr of lysyl oxidase in crude extracts of huma...

  19. Quantifying heterogeneity in emphysema from high-resolution computed tomography: a lung tissue research consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M; Patel, Nova C; Hsia, Connie C W

    2013-02-01

    To quantify spatial distribution of emphysema using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), we applied semiautomated analysis with internal attenuation calibration to measure regional air volume, tissue volume, and fractional tissue volume (FTV = tissue/[air + tissue] volume) in well-characterized patients studied by the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC). HRCT was obtained at supine end-inspiration and end-expiration, and prone end-inspiration from 31 patients with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe emphysema (stages II-V, forced expiratory volume at 1 second >75%, 51%-75%, 21%-50% and ≤20% predicted, respectively). Control data were from 20 healthy non-smokers (stage I). Each lobe was analyzed separately. Heterogeneity of FTV was assessed from coefficients of variation (CV) within and among lobes, and the kurtosis and skewness of FTV histograms. In emphysema, lobar air volume increased up to 177% above normal except in the right middle lobe. Lobar tissue volume increased up to 107% in mild-moderate stages then normalized in advanced stages. Normally, FTV was up to 82% higher in lower than upper lobes. In mild-moderate emphysema, lobar FTV increased by up to 74% above normal at supine inspiration. In severe emphysema, FTV declined below normal in all lobes and positions in correlation with pulmonary function (P < .05). Markers of FTV heterogeneity increased steadily with disease stage in correlation with pulmonary function (P < .05); the pattern is distinct from that seen in interstitial lung disease (ILD). CT-derived biomarkers differentiate the spatial patterns of emphysema distribution and heterogeneity from that in ILD. Early emphysema is associated with elevated tissue volume and FTV, consistent with hyperemia, inflammation or atelectasis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  2. A Human Antibody That Binds to the Sixth Ig-Like Domain of VCAM-1 Blocks Lung Cancer Cell Migration In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Ra Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 is closely associated with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the relevance and role of VCAM-1 in lung cancer have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we found that VCAM-1 was highly overexpressed in lung cancer tissue compared with that of normal lung tissue, and high VCAM-1 expression correlated with poor survival in lung cancer patients. VCAM-1 knockdown reduced migration of A549 human lung cancer cells into Matrigel, and competitive blocking experiments targeting the Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 (VCAM-1-D6 demonstrated that the VCAM-1-D6 domain was critical for VCAM-1 mediated A549 cell migration into Matrigel. Next, we developed a human monoclonal antibody specific to human and mouse VCAM-1-D6 (VCAM-1-D6 huMab, which was isolated from a human synthetic antibody library using phage display technology. Finally, we showed that VCAM-1-D6 huMab had a nanomolar affinity for VCAM-1-D6 and that it potently suppressed the migration of A549 and NCI-H1299 lung cancer cell lines into Matrigel. Taken together, these results suggest that VCAM-1-D6 is a key domain for regulating VCAM-1-mediated lung cancer invasion and that our newly developed VCAM-1-D6 huMab will be a useful tool for inhibiting VCAM-1-expressing lung cancer cell invasion.

  3. A Human Antibody That Binds to the Sixth Ig-Like Domain of VCAM-1 Blocks Lung Cancer Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ra; Jang, Ji Hye; Park, Chang Sik; Kim, Taek-Keun; Kim, Youn-Jae; Chung, Junho; Shim, Hyunbo; Nam, In Hyun; Han, Jung Min; Lee, Sukmook

    2017-03-06

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is closely associated with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the relevance and role of VCAM-1 in lung cancer have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we found that VCAM-1 was highly overexpressed in lung cancer tissue compared with that of normal lung tissue, and high VCAM-1 expression correlated with poor survival in lung cancer patients. VCAM-1 knockdown reduced migration of A549 human lung cancer cells into Matrigel, and competitive blocking experiments targeting the Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 (VCAM-1-D6) demonstrated that the VCAM-1-D6 domain was critical for VCAM-1 mediated A549 cell migration into Matrigel. Next, we developed a human monoclonal antibody specific to human and mouse VCAM-1-D6 (VCAM-1-D6 huMab), which was isolated from a human synthetic antibody library using phage display technology. Finally, we showed that VCAM-1-D6 huMab had a nanomolar affinity for VCAM-1-D6 and that it potently suppressed the migration of A549 and NCI-H1299 lung cancer cell lines into Matrigel. Taken together, these results suggest that VCAM-1-D6 is a key domain for regulating VCAM-1-mediated lung cancer invasion and that our newly developed VCAM-1-D6 huMab will be a useful tool for inhibiting VCAM-1-expressing lung cancer cell invasion.

  4. Expression of connexin32 and connexin43 gap junction proteins and E-cadherin in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Y; Ichioka, M; Marumo, F

    1998-05-15

    We used immunohistochemical staining to examine the expression of the gap junction proteins connexin32 and connexin43 and of the intercellular adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, that is thought to be a prerequisite for gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), in 24 specimens of human lung cancer. Connexin32 was not found in cancer tissue and there were significantly fewer spots of connexin43 in the poorly differentiated versus the well differentiated (P = 0.0005) and moderately differentiated (P = 0.0002) adenocarcinomas and in the poorly differentiated versus the well differentiated (P = 0.0182) and moderately differentiated (P = 0.004) squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. E-Cadherin was expressed in all but three cases of poorly differentiated non-small cell lung cancer that showed a heterogeneously decreased expression of E-cadherin. These findings suggest that GJIC is decreased in poorly differentiated non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Quantifying Heterogeneity in Emphysema from High Resolution Computed Tomography: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M.; Patel, Nova C.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objective To quantify spatial distribution of emphysema using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), we applied semi-automated analysis with internal attenuation calibration to measure regional air volume, tissue volume, and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[air+tissue] volume) in well-characterized patients studied by the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC). Methods HRCT was obtained at supine end-inspiration and end-expiration, and prone end-inspiration from 31 patients with mild, moderate, severe, or very severe emphysema (stages II–V, FEV1>75%, 51–75%, 21–50% and ≤20% predicted, respectively). Control data were from 20 healthy non-smokers (stage I). Each lobe was analyzed separately. Heterogeneity of FTV was assessed from coefficients of variation (CV) within and among lobes, and the kurtosis and skewness of FTV histograms. Results In emphysema, lobar air volume increased up to 177% except in the right middle lobe. Lobar tissue volume increased up to 107% in mild-moderate stages then normalized in advanced stages. Normally, FTV was up to 82% higher in lower than upper lobes. In mild-moderate emphysema, lobar FTV increased by up to 74% above normal at supine inspiration. In severe emphysema FTV declined below normal in all lobes and positions in correlation with pulmonary function (pemphysema distribution and heterogeneity from that in ILD. Early emphysema is associated with elevated tissue volume and FTV, consistent with hyperemia, inflammation or atelectasis. PMID:23122057

  6. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M.; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide...... a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome...... in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts....

  7. Benefit of adjunctive tacrolimus in connective tissue disease-interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Leah J.; Demchuk, Carley; Curran, James J.; Strek, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of adjunctive tacrolimus therapy with conventional immunosuppression in patients with severe connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). We included patients from our interstitial lung disease (ILD) registry with CTD-ILD, in whom tacrolimus was added to corticosteroids and an additional immunosuppressive agent. Demographic data, clinical features, lung function, radiographic images, and pathologic findings were reviewed. Effectiveness was assessed by comparing pulmonary function tests (PFTs) closest to tacrolimus initiation to PFTs approximately 6–12 months later. Corticosteroid dose at these time points was also evaluated. We report adverse events attributed to tacrolimus. Seventeen patients with CTD-ILD were included in adverse event analysis; twelve were included in efficacy analysis. Length of tacrolimus therapy ranged from 6 to 110 months (mean 38.8 months ± 31.4). The mean improvement in percent predicted total lung capacity was 7.5% ± 11.7 (p=0.02). Forced vital capacity mean improvement was 7.4% ± 12.5 (p=0.06). The average decrease in corticosteroid dose at follow-up was 20.3mg ± 25.2 (p=0.02) with complete discontinuation in six patients. No patients experienced a life-threatening adverse event attributed to tacrolimus. Tacrolimus can be effective and is well tolerated as an adjunctive therapy and allows tapering of corticosteroids. PMID:26762710

  8. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  9. Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma Cells as an in vivo model: Lung Colonization and Effects of Tissue Environment on Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcuende, Jose A.; Stevens, Jeff W.; Scheetz, Todd E.; de Fatima Bonaldoc, Maria; Casavant, Thomas L.; Otero, Jesse E.; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2012-01-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells have been used extensively for biochemical studies of extra-cellular matrix metabolism in cartilage. However, these cells also possess tumor-like behavior in vivo and are useful in investigation of chondrosarcoma biology. the current study was designed to develop a metastatic model using swarm rat chondrosarcoma cells, and to assess the effect of tissue-environment on tumor behavior in vivo. Tumors were implanted subcutaneously or into bone, and animals were assessed radiographically and microscopically for tumor growth and metastasis. The subcutaneous tumor grew to an average mass of 35 g, while tumor implanted into bone grew 75 mg. Transplantation of the cells into the bone led to extensive bone remodeling with invasion of the medullary cavity and destruction of the bone cortex. Light microscopy demonstrated no significant differences in the number of mitoses, cellular atypia or extracellular matrix staining between the two sites of tumor implantation. Interestingly, lung colonization was observed in none of the animals in the subcutaneous tumor injection group, while tumors colonized the lungs in 95% of the rats with tumor injected into bone. Analysis of cDNA libraries from subcutaneous and bone-transplanted tumors demonstrated a complex and diverse array of expressed transcripts, and there were significant differences in gene expression between tumors at different sites. The results of this study suggest swarm rat chondrosarcoma is a model that resembles human chondrosarcoma mimicking its ability to infiltrate and remodel local bone and to colonize the lungs. Furthermore, the interaction between host-tissue and tumor cells plays a major role in the tumor behavior in this model. Identifying these interactions will lead to further understanding of chondrosarcoma and contribute to therapeutic targets in the future. PMID:23576921

  10. Impact of chorioamnionitis on the development of human fetal lung: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglou, P; Deftereou, T H E; Lambropoulou, M; Katotomichelakis, M; Lambropoulou, V; Pagonopoulou, O; Gkantsinikoudis, N; Papadopoulos, N; Dimitriou, T H

    2015-01-01

    Current studies suggest that changes of chorioamnionitis are associated with the appearance of bronchial-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT), during fetal development. The aim of this study was to examine and analyse apart from the appearance of BALT, the expression of structural proteins in the lung parenchyma during gestation. A series of 149 paraffin-embedded human fetal lung specimens at the second trimester of development were examined by immuunohistochemistry using the monoclonal antibodies CD20, CD3, Tenascin-C, Vimentin, and Fibronectin. The results of this study showed that (1) BALT does not develop in fetal period and (2) BALT which develops during fetal period is probably in response to antigenic stimulation where in the present cases occurs to be changes of chorioamnionitis which decreased the expression of filaments proteins in the intermediate cells of lung parenchyma in comparison with the normal ones. The expressions' pattern of intermediate filaments proteins in the lung parenchyma can be modified by the presence of chorioamnionitis in the fetal membranes.

  11. Calculation of hygroscopic particle deposition in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler-Heil, Renate; Ferron, George; Hofmann, Werner

    2014-02-01

    Inhaled hygroscopic aerosols will absorb water vapor from the warm and humid air of the human lung, thus growing in size and consequently changing their deposition properties. The objectives of the present study are to study the effect of a stochastic lung structure on individual particle growth and related deposition patterns and to predict local deposition patterns for different hygroscopic aerosols. The hygroscopic particle growth model proposed by Ferron et al. has been implemented into the stochastic asymmetric lung deposition model IDEAL. Deposition patterns were calculated for sodium chloride (NaCl), cobalt chloride (CoCl2 · 6H2O), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4 · 7H2O) aerosols, representing high, medium and low hygroscopic growth factors. Hygroscopic growth decreases deposition of submicron particles compared to hydrophobic particles with equivalent diameters due to a less efficient diffusion mechanism, while the more efficient impaction and sedimentation mechanisms increase total deposition for micron-sized particles. Due to the variability and asymmetry of the human airway system, individual trajectories of inhaled particles are associated with individual growth factors, thereby enhancing the variability of the resulting deposition patterns. Comparisons of model predictions with several experimental data for ultrafine and micrometer-sized particles indicate good agreement, considering intersubject variations of morphometric parameters as well as differences between experimental conditions and modeling assumptions.

  12. Natural innate cytokine response to immunomodulators and adjuvants in human precision-cut lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switalla, S; Lauenstein, L; Prenzler, F; Knothe, S; Förster, C; Fieguth, H-G; Pfennig, O; Schaumann, F; Martin, C; Guzman, C A; Ebensen, T; Müller, M; Hohlfeld, J M; Krug, N; Braun, A; Sewald, K

    2010-08-01

    Prediction of lung innate immune responses is critical for developing new drugs. Well-established immune modulators like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can elicit a wide range of immunological effects. They are involved in acute lung diseases such as infections or chronic airway diseases such as COPD. LPS has a strong adjuvant activity, but its pyrogenicity has precluded therapeutic use. The bacterial lipopeptide MALP-2 and its synthetic derivative BPPcysMPEG are better tolerated. We have compared the effects of LPS and BPPcysMPEG on the innate immune response in human precision-cut lung slices. Cytokine responses were quantified by ELISA, Luminex, and Meso Scale Discovery technology. The initial response to LPS and BPPcysMPEG was marked by coordinated and significant release of the mediators IL-1β, MIP-1β, and IL-10 in viable PCLS. Stimulation of lung tissue with BPPcysMPEG, however, induced a differential response. While LPS upregulated IFN-γ, BPPcysMPEG did not. This traces back to their signaling pathways via TLR4 and TLR2/6. The calculated exposure doses selected for LPS covered ranges occurring in clinical studies with human beings. Correlation of obtained data with data from human BAL fluid after segmental provocation with endotoxin showed highly comparable effects, resulting in a coefficient of correlation >0.9. Furthermore, we were interested in modulating the response to LPS. Using dexamethasone as an immunosuppressive drug for anti-inflammatory therapy, we found a significant reduction of GM-CSF, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. The PCLS-model offers the unique opportunity to test the efficacy and toxicity of biological agents intended for use by inhalation in a complex setting in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Cell and Tissue Establishment Registration Public Query

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides Human Cell and Tissue registration information for registered, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by Establishment Name,...

  14. MicroRNA expression in lung tissue and blood isolated from pigs suffering from bacterial pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Wendt, Karin Tarp; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly evolutionarily conserved group of small non-coding RNA molecules, which regulate the activity of other genes at the post-transcriptional level. Recently it has become evident that miRNA plays an important role in modulating and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive...... immune responses. Still, little is known about the impact of miRNAs in the development and pathogenesis of lung infections. Expression of miRNA, known to be induced by bacterial (i.e., LPS) ligands and thus supposed to play a role in the regulation of antimicrobial defence, were studied in lung tissue...... from pigs experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 and 6. Circulating miRNAs were studied in blood from pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 using real time-qPCR (RT-qPCR). Expression profiles of miRNA in blood of seven animals before and after infection...

  15. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Ameliorating effects of CAPE on oxidative damage caused by pneumoperitoneum in rat lung tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarci, Isil; Alp, Harun; Ozgur, Tumay; Karcioglu, Murat; Tuzcu, Kasim; Evliyaoglu, Osman; Motor, Sedat; Durgun Yetim, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the biochemical and histopathological effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against oxidative stress causing lung injury induced by pneumoperitoneum. Twenty-eight rats were selected at random and seven rats were assigned to each of the following groups. The control group (S) was subjected to a sham operation without pneumoperitoneum. The other groups were subjected to CO2 pneumoperitoneum 15 mmHg for 60 min. The laparoscopy group (L) had no additional drugs administered, the laparoscopy + alcohol (LA) group had 1 ml of 70% ethyl alcohol administered 1 h before the desufflation period, and the laparoscopy + CAPE (LC) group had CAPE administered at 10 μmol/kg 1 h before the desufflation period. The total oxidative status levels of lung and plasma were significantly increased in the LA group as compared with the LC and S group. When the LC group was compared with the L group, there was a decrease in the level of total oxidant status and increase in the levels of total antioxidant status and paraoxonase in lung tissue. The level of total antioxidative status in the S group was increased compared with the L group in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. TNF-α and IL-6 were found significantly elevated in the L group compared with the LC and S groups in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There was a similar increase in plasma levels of IL-6. These results were supported by histopathological examination. CAPE was found to considerably reduce oxidative stress and inflammation induced by pneumoperitoneum. PMID:25126167

  17. Local aromatase activity in human breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J H; Daroszewski, J; Milewicz, A; Blankenstein, M A

    1993-03-01

    The presence of oestradiol in malignant breast cells is considered to be an important factor in the promotion of growth of the tumor. Therefore the regulation of the local high intra-tissue oestradiol concentrations, regardless of plasma concentrations, has been investigated. Experimental evidence suggests that in situ biosynthesis of oestrogens is at least partly responsible for the local accumulation of these steroids. In this paper we report further data on measurements in fatty and tumor tissues of local aromatase activities and of concentrations of substrates and products of this enzyme. Data are given on localization of aromatase and on steroid concentrations in tumors and in adipose tissues dissected from different quadrants of breasts with malignant tumors. In adipose tissues small variations in steroid concentrations in fatty tissues were found. No tumor-directed gradients in the adipose tissue-concentrations of the androgens dehydro-epiandrosterone, 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione and testosterone and of the oestrogens oestradiol, oestrone and their sulfates could be detected. Furthermore no consistent pattern could be recognized in the aromatase activities in the fatty tissues dissected from tumor-bearing and non-affected quadrants of the same breast. No correlations between aromatase activity measured in vitro and product concentrations in vivo were found. Therefore the mechanisms for regulation of the local oestradiol levels in breast tissues remain unknown.

  18. Ceftibuten concentrations in human tonsillar tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, F; Pintucci, J P; Demartini, G; Dugnani, S

    1996-12-01

    In a study designed to determine ceftibuten concentrations in tonsillar tissue, subjects scheduled to undergo tonsillectomy were administered 400 mg of ceftibuten in a single oral dose. Between 2 and 24 h after the dose was given, tonsillar tissue samples were taken during surgery and assayed for ceftibuten. Mean concentrations in tonsillar tissue 4.4 h and 24.6 h after the 400 mg dose were 5.3 +/- 2.7 and 0.3 +/- mg/g, respectively. Concurrent mean serum concentrations were 7.42 +/- 1.66 and 0.15 +/- 0.13 mg/ml, respectively. The apparent half-life of drug in the tissue was 5.3 h. The presence of high ceftibuten concentrations in tonsillar tissue suggests that a once-daily regimen may be effective in treating tonsillitis and pharyngitis.

  19. Expression heterogeneity research of ITGB3 and BCL-2 in lung adenocarcinoma tissue and adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zong-Jiang; Hu, Wei; Wang, Yue-Bin; Zhou, Kun; Sun, Guo-Ju

    2014-06-01

    To analyze expression heterogeneity of Integrin beta 3 (ITGB3) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) in lung adenocarcinoma tissue and adenocarcinoma cell line and further provide theoretical direction for molecular biological research of lung adenocarcinoma. Tissue microarray was used to observe relation among expression, heterogeneitpy and clinical characteristics of ITGB3 and BCL-2 in lung cancer. ITGB3 and BCL-2 increased significantly in A549 cells in CAFs group withβ-actin as control; the expression level of BCL-2 also increased in ITGB3 transfected cells with GFP plasmid transfected A549 cells as control; immunohistochemistry staining showed that positive rates of ITGB3, ITGB1 and BCL-2 in normal lung tissues were 0, the positive rates in lung adenocarcinoma were 7.04%, 84.51% and 4.23%, respectively; in the results of immunohistochemistry staining, the expression of Girdin protein in lung adenocarcinoma was homogeneous, however protein expression of ITGB3, ITGB1 and BCL-2 showed different patterns in the same location with significant heterogeneity; majority of ITGB3, ITGB1 or BCL-2 positive tissue showed heterogeneity that expression in trailing edge was higher than that of trailing edge in lung adenocarcinoma tissue, the patients with BCL-2 heterogeneity showed higher lymph node metastasis ratio and lower clinical stage (P0.05). Expression of ITGB3 and BCL-2 in lung adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell line showed heterogeneity that expression in trailing edge was higher than that of trailing edge, which may play an important role in promoting tumor lymph node metastasis and vascular invasion, and provides a new research direction for exploration of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human tissue legislation in South Africa: Focus on stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... under the Human Tissue Act 65 of 1983, which was repealed with the enactment of the final sections of the NHA in 2012.[5]. Chapter 8 of the NHA covers seven areas that are relevant to human tissues. These include: • Blood and blood products. • Assisted reproductive technology. • Cell-based therapy.

  1. Partial relief from the regulatory vacuum involving human tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human tissue legislation in South. Africa. Concerning human tissue legislation, the law has traditionally struggled to match the pace of scientific and technological advances.1. In this respect, the National Health Act2 (NHA) assented to by the. President on 18 July 2004 came into force on 2 May 2005. At that time matters ...

  2. BJ-TSA-9, a novel human tumor-specific gene, has potential as a biomarker of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyan; Dong, Xueyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Su, Yanrong; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Pang, Xuewen; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Weifeng

    2005-12-01

    Using bioinformatics, we have identified a novel tumor-specific gene BJ-TSA-9, which has been validated by Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). BJ-TSA-9 mRNA was expressed in 52.5% (21 of 40) of human lung cancer tissues and was especially higher in lung adenocarcinoma (68.8%). To explore the potential application of BJ-TSA-9 for the detection of circulating cancer cells in lung cancer patients, nested RT-PCR was performed. The overall positive detection rate was 34.3% (24 of 70) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with various types of lung cancers and was 53.6% (15 of 28) in PBMCs of lung adenocarcinoma patients. In combination with the detection of two known marker genes SCC and LUNX, the detection rate was increased to 81.4%. A follow-up study was performed in 37 patients after surgical removal of tumor mass. Among nine patients with persistent detection of two to three tumor marker transcripts in PBMCs, six patients had recurrence/metastasis. In contrast, 28 patients with transient detection of one tumor marker or without detection of any tumor marker were all in remission. Thus, BJ-TSA-9 may serve as a marker for lung cancer diagnosis and as a marker, in combination with two other tumor markers, for the prediction of the recurrence and prognosis of lung cancer patients.

  3. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  4. Lipolysis in human adipose tissue during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Lorentsen, Jeanne; Isaksson, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis was studied in vivo by Fick's arteriovenous (a-v) principle using either calculated (microdialysis) or directly measured (catheterization) adipose tissue venous glycerol concentration. We compared results during steady-state (rest and prolonged continuous...... exercise), as well as during non-steady-state (onset of exercise and early exercise) experimental settings. Fourteen healthy women [age: 74 +/- 1 (SE) yr] were studied at rest and during 60-min continuous bicycling at 60% of peak O(2) uptake. Calculated and measured subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue...

  5. Proteomic analysis of human saliva from lung cancer patients using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Hui; Lee, Jay M; Garon, Edward B; Wong, David T W

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer is often asymptomatic or causes only nonspecific symptoms in its early stages. Early detection represents one of the most promising approaches to reduce the growing lung cancer burden. Human saliva is an attractive diagnostic fluid because its collection is less invasive than that of tissue or blood. Profiling of proteins in saliva over the course of disease progression could reveal potential biomarkers indicative of oral or systematic diseases, which may be used extensively in future medical diagnostics. There were 72 subjects enrolled in this study for saliva sample collection according to the approved protocol. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis combined with MS was the platform for salivary proteome separation, quantification, and identification from two pooled samples. Candidate proteomic biomarkers were verified and prevalidated by using immunoassay methods. There were 16 candidate protein biomarkers discovered by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and MS. Three proteins were further verified in the discovery sample set, prevalidation sample set, and lung cancer cell lines. The discriminatory power of these candidate biomarkers in lung cancer patients and healthy control subjects can reach 88.5% sensitivity and 92.3% specificity with AUC = 0.90. This preliminary data report demonstrates that proteomic biomarkers are present in human saliva when people develop lung cancer. The discriminatory power of these candidate biomarkers indicate that a simple saliva test might be established for lung cancer clinical screening and detection.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Host Defense in the Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Tysheena P; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-04-01

    Immunosuppression associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts all components of host defense against pulmonary infection. Cells within the lung have altered immune function and are important reservoirs for HIV infection. The host immune response to infected lung cells further compromises responses to a secondary pathogenic insult. In the upper respiratory tract, mucociliary function is impaired and there are decreased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A. Host defenses in the lower respiratory tract are controlled by alveolar macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As HIV infection progresses, lung CD4 T cells are reduced in number causing a lack of activation signals from CD4 T cells and impaired defense by macrophages. CD8 T cells, on the other hand, are increased in number and cause lymphocytic alveolitis. Specific antibody responses by B-lymphocytes are decreased and opsonization of microorganisms is impaired. These observed defects in host defense of the respiratory tract explain the susceptibility of HIV-infected persons for oropharyngeal candidiasis, bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and other opportunistic infections. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Multimodal non-linear optical imaging for label-free differentiation of lung cancerous lesions from normal and desmoplastic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Jie; Thrall, Michael J; Liu, Zhengfan; Wang, Xi; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, and non-small cell carcinoma accounts for 85% of all lung cancer cases. One major characteristic of non-small cell carcinoma is the appearance of desmoplasia and deposition of dense extracellular collagen around the tumor. The desmoplastic response provides a radiologic target but may impair sampling during traditional image-guided needle biopsy and is difficult to differentiate from normal tissues using single label free imaging modality; for translational purposes, label-free techniques provide a more promising route to clinics. We thus investigated the potential of using multimodal, label free optical microscopy that incorporates Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), Two-Photon Excited AutoFluorescence (TPEAF), and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) techniques for differentiating lung cancer from normal and desmoplastic tissues. Lung tissue samples from patients were imaged using CARS, TPEAF, and SHG for comparison and showed that the combination of the three non-linear optics techniques is essential for attaining reliable differentiation. These images also illustrated good pathological correlation with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections from the same tissue samples. Automated image analysis algorithms were developed for quantitative segmentation and feature extraction to enable lung tissue differentiation. Our results indicate that coupled with automated morphology analysis, the proposed tri-modal nonlinear optical imaging technique potentially offers a powerful translational strategy to differentiate cancer lesions reliably from surrounding non-tumor and desmoplastic tissues.

  8. [Expression of high mobility group box-1 in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-min; Yang, Hua

    2013-07-01

    To explore the expression of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and to explore its relationship with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-1β. Sixty samples of lung tissues were obtained from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had underwent pneumonectomy in Department of Chest Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from June 2010 to December 2011. At the same period, 40 normal lung samples were also obtained from patients with pulmonary contusion and lung cancer by surgical resections as the control group. The mRNA expressions of HMGB1 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein level of HMGB1 was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays in lung tissue. Blood samples were taken from 89 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary tuberculosis group), including hematogenous disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (type II) in 35 cases and secondary pulmonary tuberculosis (type III) in 54 cases, and 50 healthy volunteers (control group). Furthermore, the 54 patients with secondary pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into different subgroups according to cavity formation and the lung fields involved: patients without lung cavity (35 cases) vs those with lung cavity (19 cases), patients with involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis (69 ± 29) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (22 ± 12) (t = 2.389, P pulmonary tuberculosis (786 ± 86) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (202 ± 60) (t = 3.872, P pulmonary tuberculosis group were (5.0 ± 3.2) µg/L, (118 ± 77) ng/L and (33 ± 20) ng/L, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group [(1.7 ± 1.0) µg/L, (40 ± 11) ng/L and (18 ± 12) ng/L, respectively], the respective t values being -0.928, 4.268 and 11.064, all P pulmonary tuberculosis, the serum concentration of HMGB

  9. The use of functional human tissues in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunton, David

    2010-12-01

    Drug development currently depends on animal models to provide an accurate prediction of human physiology and pathophysiology. However, as is clear from clinical trial failures during phases II and III, such in vivo models do not always predict the effects that a drug can elicit in humans. Tests with human tissues, which are obviously considered to be the closest model of human in vivo function, could fill the gap between animal-based tests and trials in patients. Despite clear advantages, logistical and ethical barriers prevent fresh human tissues from being widely used during drug development. Biopta is aiming to make human tissue testing a regular element of drug development, and works to lower the barriers surrounding the availability of tissue and practicalities of experimental work. 2010 FRAME.

  10. Transforming growth factor-β1 downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor-D expression in human lung fibroblasts via the Jun NH2-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ye; Osorio, Juan C; Risquez, Cristobal; Wang, Hao; Shi, Ying; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Morse, Danielle; Rosas, Ivan O; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2014-03-20

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D, a member of the VEGF family, induces both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3 on the surface of endothelial cells. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been shown to stimulate VEGF-A expression in human lung fibroblast via the Smad3 signaling pathway and to induce VEGF-C in human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on VEGF-D regulation are unknown. To investigate the regulation of VEGF-D, human lung fibroblasts were studied under pro-fibrotic conditions in vitro and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue. We demonstrate that TGF-β1 downregulates VEGF-D expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human lung fibroblasts. This TGF-β1 effect can be abolished by inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor kinase and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), but not by Smad3 knockdown. In addition, VEGF-D knockdown in human lung fibroblasts induces G1/S transition and promotes cell proliferation. Importantly, VEGF-D protein expression is decreased in lung homogenates from IPF patients compared with control lung. In IPF lung sections, fibroblastic foci show very weak VEGF-D immunoreactivity, whereas VEGF-D is abundantly expressed within alveolar interstitial cells in control lung. Taken together, our data identify a novel mechanism for downstream signal transduction induced by TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts, through which they may mediate tissue remodeling in IPF.

  11. Innate lymphoid cells: the role in respiratory infections and lung tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głobińska, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2017-10-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent a diverse family of cells of the innate immune system, which play an important role in regulation of tissue homeostasis, immunity and inflammation. Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of ILCs in both protective immunity to respiratory infections and their pathological roles in the lungs. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge, interpret and integrate it into broader perspective, enabling greater insight into the role of ILCs in respiratory diseases. Areas covered: In this review we highlighted the role of ILCs in the lungs, citing the most recent studies in this area. PubMed searches (2004- July 2017) were conducted using the term 'innate lymphoid cells respiratory viral infections' in combination with other relevant terms including various respiratory viruses. Expert commentary: Since studies of ILCs have opened new areas of investigation, understanding the role of ILCs in respiratory infections may help to clarify the mechanisms underlying viral-induced exacerbations of lung diseases, providing the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Potential therapeutic targets have already been identified. So far, the most promising strategy is cytokine-targeting, although further clinical trials are needed to verify its effectiveness.

  12. Human nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulates EMT by targeting the TGF-ß signaling pathway in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lu; Qi, Lisha; Zhang, Lin; Song, Wangzhao; Yu, Yue; Xu, Cong; Li, Lingmei; Guo, Yuhong; Yang, Lingyi; Liu, Changxu; Huang, Qiujuan; Wang, Yalei; Sun, Baocun; Meng, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Wenfeng

    2017-09-10

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a highly conserved pathway that selectively degrades aberrant RNA transcripts. In this study, we proved that NMD regulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Moreover, we found that NMD core factor UP-frameshift 1 tends to be expressed at lower levels in human ADC tissues than in normal lung tissues, thereby raising the possibility that NMD may be downregulated to permit ADC oncogenesis. Our experiments in human ADC cell lines showed that downregulating NMD can promote EMT. Moreover, EMT can be inhibited by upregulating NMD. We tested the role of TGF-ß signaling and found that NMD influences EMT by targeting the TGF-ß signaling pathway. Our findings reveal that NMD is a potential tumor regulatory mechanism and may be a potential therapeutic target for ADC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of embelin in A549 cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Seung; Cho, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Yumi; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kwanil; Jung, Hee-Jae; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2018-02-01

    Allergic asthma is the most common type in asthma, which is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether embelin (Emb), the major component of Ardisia japonica BL. (AJB), exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on allergic asthma via inhibition of NF-κB activity using A549 cells and asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Inflammation was induced in A549 cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, by IL-1β (10 ng/ml) treatment for 4 h. The effects of Emb on NF-κB activity and COX-2 protein expression in inflamed airway epithelial cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues were analyzed via western blot. The secretion levels of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines, including IL-4, 6, 9, 13, TNF-α and eotaxin, were measured by a multiplex assay. Emb significantly blocked NF-κB activity in IL-1β-treated A549 cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. COX-2 expression was also reduced in both IL-1β-treated A549 cells and asthmatic tissues Emb application. Emb significantly reduced the secretion of IL-4, IL-6 and eotaxin in human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues by inhibiting activity of NF-κB. The results of this study suggest that Emb may be used as an anti-inflammatory agent via inhibition of NF-κB and related cytokines.

  14. Epigenetic clustering of lung adenocarcinomas based on DNA methylation profiles in adjacent lung tissue: Its correlation with smoking history and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Arai, Eri; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kanai, Yae

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the significance of DNA methylation alterations during lung carcinogenesis. Infinium assay was performed using 139 paired samples of non-cancerous lung tissue (N) and tumorous tissue (T) from a learning cohort of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs). Fifty paired N and T samples from a validation cohort were also analyzed. DNA methylation alterations on 1,928 probes occurred in N samples relative to normal lung tissue from patients without primary lung tumors, and were inherited by, or strengthened in, T samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using DNA methylation levels in N samples on all 26,447 probes subclustered patients into Cluster I (n = 32), Cluster II (n = 35) and Cluster III (n = 72). LADCs in Cluster I developed from the inflammatory background in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in heavy smokers and were locally invasive. Most patients in Cluster II were non-smokers and had a favorable outcome. LADCs in Cluster III developed in light smokers were most aggressive (frequently showing lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and an advanced pathological stage), and had a poor outcome. DNA methylation levels of hallmark genes for each cluster, such as IRX2, HOXD8, SPARCL1, RGS5 and EI24, were again correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in the validation cohort. DNA methylation profiles reflecting carcinogenetic factors such as smoking and COPD appear to be established in non-cancerous lung tissue from patients with LADCs and may determine the aggressiveness of tumors developing in individual patients, and thus patient outcome.

  15. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  16. Differential in vivo expression of mycobacterial antigens in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected lungs and lymph node tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tehmina; Leversen, Nils Anders; Sviland, Lisbet; Wiker, Harald Gotten

    2014-10-03

    The clinical course of tuberculosis (TB) infection, bacterial load and the morphology of lesions vary between pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. Antigens expressed in abundance during infection could represent relevant antigens in the development of diagnostic tools, but little is known about the in vivo expression of various M. tuberculosis antigens in different clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to study the differences in the presence of major secreted as well as somatic mycobacterial antigens in host tissues during advanced rapidly progressing and fatal pulmonary disease with mainly pneumonic infiltrates and high bacterial load, and to compare this to the presence of the same antigens in TB lymphadenitis cases, which is mainly chronic and self-limiting disease with organised granulomas and lower bacterial load. Human pulmonary (n = 3) and lymph node (n = 17) TB biopsies, and non-TB controls (n = 12) were studied. Ziehl-Neelsen stain, nested PCR 1S6110 and immunohistochemistry were performed. Major secreted (MPT32, MPT44, MPT46, MPT51, MPT53, MPT59, MPT63, and MPT64) and somatic mycobacterial antigens (Mce1A, Hsp65, and MPT57) were detected by using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Plenty of bacilli were detectable with Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the lung biopsies while no bacilli were detected in the lymph node biopsies. All the cases were shown to be positive by PCR. Both secretory and somatic antigens were expressed in abundance in pulmonary infiltrates, while primarily somatic antigens were detected in the lymphadenitis cases. Of the secreted antigens, only MPT64 was consistently detected in both cases, indicating a preferential accumulation of this antigen within the inflammatory cells, even if the cells of the granuloma can efficiently restrict bacterial growth and clear away the secreted antigens. This study shows that major secreted mycobacterial antigens were found in high amounts in advanced pulmonary lesions without proper granuloma

  17. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT) are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification ...

  18. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine protects against emphysema in mice via suppressing p16Ink4a expression in lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He ZH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Hui He,1 Yan Chen,2 Ping Chen,2 Sheng-Dong He,2 Hui-Hui Zeng,2 Ji-Ru Ye,2 Da Liu,2 Jun Cao3 1Intensive Care Unit, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hunan Provincial People’s Hospital, Changsha, China Background: There is a growing realization that COPD, or at least emphysema, involves several processes presenting in aging and cellular senescence. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neovascularization and play an important role in the development of COPD. The gene for p16Ink4a is a major dominant senescence one. The aim of the present study was to observe changes in lung function, histomorphology of lung tissue, and expression of p16Ink4a in lung tissue and bone marrow-derived EPCs in emphysematous mice induced by cigarette-smoke extract (CSE, and further to search for a potential candidate agent protecting against emphysema induced by CSE. Materials and methods: An animal emphysema model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of CSE. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR was administered to the emphysematous mice. Lung function and histomorphology of lung tissue were measured. The p16Ink4a protein and mRNA in EPCs and lung tissues were detected using Western blotting and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results: CSE induced emphysema with increased p16Ink4a expression in lung tissue and bone marrow-derived EPCs. 5-Aza-CdR partly protected against emphysema, especially in the lung-morphology profile, and partly protest against the overexpression of p16Ink4a in EPCs and lung tissue induced by CSE. Conclusion: 5-Aza-CdR partly protected against emphysema in mice via suppressing p16Ink4a expression in EPCs and lung tissue. Keywords: 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, cigarette smoke, emphysema, endothelial progenitor cells, p16Ink4a

  19. Microbial volatile communication in human organotypic lung models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Layla J; Procknow, Clare L; Álvarez-García, Yasmín R; Niu, Mengyao; Jiménez-Torres, José A; Brockman-Schneider, Rebecca A; Gern, James E; Denlinger, Loren C; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Keller, Nancy P; Berthier, Erwin; Beebe, David J

    2017-11-24

    We inhale respiratory pathogens continuously, and the subsequent signaling events between host and microbe are complex, ultimately resulting in clearance of the microbe, stable colonization of the host, or active disease. Traditional in vitro methods are ill-equipped to study these critical events in the context of the lung microenvironment. Here we introduce a microscale organotypic model of the human bronchiole for studying pulmonary infection. By leveraging microscale techniques, the model is designed to approximate the structure of the human bronchiole, containing airway, vascular, and extracellular matrix compartments. To complement direct infection of the organotypic bronchiole, we present a clickable extension that facilitates volatile compound communication between microbial populations and the host model. Using Aspergillus fumigatus, a respiratory pathogen, we characterize the inflammatory response of the organotypic bronchiole to infection. Finally, we demonstrate multikingdom, volatile-mediated communication between the organotypic bronchiole and cultures of Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  1. Histological changes in lung tissues related with sub-chronic exposure to ambient urban levels of PM2.5 in Córdoba, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera Busso, Iván; Vera, Anahí; Mateos, Ana Carolina; Amarillo, Ana Carolina; Carreras, Hebe

    2017-10-01

    Concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is one of the most important environmental parameters to estimate health impacts attributable to air pollution. Despite the fact there are many studies regarding PM2.5 effects on human health, most of them were performed under conditions that do not simulate the natural particles interaction with the organism. In the present paper, we studied the effects of mammals' sub-chronic exposure to PM2.5 on the lower respiratory tract, addressing realistic exposure conditions to normal urban air. Thus, we exposed Wistar rats under controlled settings to the same normal urban air, with and without particles. Next, we analyzed chemical composition of PM2.5 and lungs samples, performed a histologic examination and run the comet assay to assess genotoxic effects. We found a strong agreement between lung tissues and PM2.5 elemental composition suggesting that metals found in lungs came from the particles inhaled. Histological analysis showed a mild to moderate infiltration, with a reduction of alveoli lumen and increment of alveolar macrophages and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) (+) cells in treated animals. We also observed an increase in the number of nuclei with comets, mostly comets type 3, with a high DNA fragmentation as well. These results provide strong evidence that sub-chronic exposure to low particle levels, even below the 24 h WHO standard, can cause injuries in lungs tissues and DNA damage, as well.

  2. French legal framework relating to human tissues and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, P; Damour, O; Colpart, J J; Braye, F

    2000-03-01

    Thousands of patients receive human tissue grafts every year. Developments in cell and tissue engineering have also increased considerably the number of available products of human origin. France has very strict regulations, in part stimulated by problems of public health and ethics that have emerged in recent years and also in part as a result of a report by the 'Inspection Générale des Affaires Sociales' on the removal and grafting of human tissues in May 1993. These have resulted in two laws on bio-ethics being passed, in July 1994, that are the basis of current legislation and represent the first steps in differentiating between organs and tissues or cells. Henceforth, the French legal framework covering tissues and cells of human origin has been increased to include a large number of legislative texts and regulations. The fundamental ethical principles that are consent, free donation, anonymity, no publicity and respect for public health have become a major ethical imperative that applies to all products originating from the human body including tissue and cells. In addition, specific provisions have been made covering: removal (conditions for removal and system for authorization); conservation, transformation, distribution, packaging, import and export of tissues and cells; and tissue and cell grafts. Finally, penal and administrative sanctions have been foreseen where there is non-compliance with these regulations.

  3. The Role of Serotonin Transporter in Human Lung Development and in Neonatal Lung Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. C. Castro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Failure of the vascular pulmonary remodeling at birth often manifests as pulmonary hypertension (PHT and is associated with a variety of neonatal lung disorders including a uniformly fatal developmental disorder known as alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV. Serum serotonin regulation has been linked to pulmonary vascular function and disease, and serotonin transporter (SERT is thought to be one of the key regulators in these processes. We sought to find evidence of a role that SERT plays in the neonatal respiratory adaptation process and in the pathomechanism of ACD/MPV. Methods. We used histology and immunohistochemistry to determine the timetable of SERT protein expression in normal human fetal and postnatal lungs and in cases of newborn and childhood PHT of varied etiology. In addition, we tested for a SERT gene promoter defect in ACD/MPV patients. Results. We found that SERT protein expression begins at 30 weeks of gestation, increases to term, and stays high postnatally. ACD/MPV patients had diminished SERT expression without SERT promoter alteration. Conclusion. We concluded that SERT/serotonin pathway is crucial in the process of pulmonary vascular remodeling/adaptation at birth and plays a key role in the pathobiology of ACD/MPV.

  4. Distribution of a major connective tissue protein, fibronectin, in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S; Vaheri, A

    1978-04-01

    Fibronectin is a major surface-associated glycoprotein of cultured fibroblasts and it is also present in human plasma. Antiserum specific for human fibronectin was used to study the distribution of fibronectin in normal adult human tissues. The protein was detected (a) characteristically in various basement membranes including capillary walls: (b) around individual smooth muscle cells and in the sarcolemma of striated muscle fibers; and (c) in the stroma of lymphatic tissue and as thin fibers in loose connective tissue. The distribution of fibronectin was distinct from that of collagen and elastic fibers, but was very similar to reticulin, as demonstrated by conventional histological staining. The results indicate that fibronectin is a major component of connective tissue matrix. The distribution also indicates that most types of adherent cells abut fibronectin-containing structures. This supports the possible role of fibronectin in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in tissues.

  5. Identification and validation of differentially expressed transcripts by RNA-sequencing of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung tissue from patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmirovic, Milica; Herazo-Maya, Jose D; Blackmon, John; Skodric-Trifunovic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Dragana; Pavlovic, Sonja; Stojsic, Jelena; Zeljkovic, Vesna; Yan, Xiting; Homer, Robert; Stefanovic, Branko; Kaminski, Naftali

    2017-01-12

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal lung disease of unknown etiology. A major limitation in transcriptomic profiling of lung tissue in IPF has been a dependence on snap-frozen fresh tissues (FF). In this project we sought to determine whether genome scale transcript profiling using RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) could be applied to archived Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) IPF tissues. We isolated total RNA from 7 IPF and 5 control FFPE lung tissues and performed 50 base pair paired-end sequencing on Illumina 2000 HiSeq. TopHat2 was used to map sequencing reads to the human genome. On average ~62 million reads (53.4% of ~116 million reads) were mapped per sample. 4,131 genes were differentially expressed between IPF and controls (1,920 increased and 2,211 decreased (FDR < 0.05). We compared our results to differentially expressed genes calculated from a previously published dataset generated from FF tissues analyzed on Agilent microarrays (GSE47460). The overlap of differentially expressed genes was very high (760 increased and 1,413 decreased, FDR < 0.05). Only 92 differentially expressed genes changed in opposite directions. Pathway enrichment analysis performed using MetaCore confirmed numerous IPF relevant genes and pathways including extracellular remodeling, TGF-beta, and WNT. Gene network analysis of MMP7, a highly differentially expressed gene in both datasets, revealed the same canonical pathways and gene network candidates in RNA-Seq and microarray data. For validation by NanoString nCounter® we selected 35 genes that had a fold change of 2 in at least one dataset (10 discordant, 10 significantly differentially expressed in one dataset only and 15 concordant genes). High concordance of fold change and FDR was observed for each type of the samples (FF vs FFPE) with both microarrays (r = 0.92) and RNA-Seq (r = 0.90) and the number of discordant genes was reduced to four. Our results demonstrate that RNA sequencing of RNA

  6. Construction of retroviral recombinant containing human tissue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correct orientation was verified by restriction endonuclease digestion. Human full length TIMP-2 gene was ligated into a plasmid, which was then transfected into PA317 cell line. G418-resistant individual clones were selected to transfect human SGC-7901 cell line. Cell proliferation, cell electrophoresis, soft agar colony ...

  7. Demonstration of non-degraded Aleutian disease virus (ADV) proteins in lung tissue from experimentally infected mink kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Uttenthal, Åse; Aasted, B.

    1986-01-01

    Isolates of ADV replicate to rather high quantities in lungs from neonatally infected mink kits. The virus was analysed for polypeptide composition, and for the first time high molecular weight polypeptides have been observed inin vivo produced ADVs. These polypeptides are analogous to those ofin...... described forin vitro produced ADV-G. Presence of the ADV coded, non-structural polypeptide with the molecular weight of 71kD (p71) was also demonstrated in the lung tissue from mink kits....

  8. Natural Rubber Nanocomposite with Human-Tissue-Like Mechanical Characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murniati, Riri; Novita, Nanda; Sutisna; Wibowo, Edy; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2017-07-01

    The blends of synthetic rubber and natural rubber with nanosilica were prepared using a blending technique in presence of different filler volume fraction. The effect of filler on morphological and mechanical characteristics was studied. Utilization of human cadaver in means of medical study has been commonly used primarily as tools of medical teaching and training such as surgery. Nonetheless, human cadaver brought inevitable problems. So it is necessary to find a substitute material that can be used to replace cadavers. In orthopaedics, the materials that resemble in mechanical properties to biological tissues are elastomers such as natural rubber (latex) and synthetic rubber (polyurethanes, silicones). This substitution material needs to consider the potential of Indonesia to help the development of the nation. Indonesia is the second largest country producer of natural rubber in the world. This paper aims to contribute to adjusting the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) to the recommended range of biological tissue value and thus allow the development of phantoms with greater stability and similarity to human tissues. Repeatability for the phantom fabrication process was also explored. Characteristics were then compared to the control and mechanical characteristics of different human body part tissue. Nanosilica is the best filler to produce the best nanocomposite similarities with human tissue. We produced composites that approaching the properties of human internal tissues.

  9. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cavity, particularly after trauma Surgery to remove small balloon-like tissues (blebs) that cause lung collapse ( pneumothorax ) ... this surgery include: Failure of the lung to expand Injury to the lungs or blood vessels Need ...

  10. [Metabolism of ornithine in human gingival tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, G G; Chessa, G; Luglié, P F; Trova, R; Sisini, A

    1989-11-01

    The behavior of two enzymes of the ornithine pathway, leading to the formation of proline and, eventually, of collagen, arginase and ornithine oxo-acid aminotransferase has been investigated in normal and inflamed gingival tissue. Both enzymatic activities show a statistically significant decrease in pathological samples as compared to normal ones. The data on arginase activity may be in agreement with the already documented low level of urea in pathological gingival fluid, while a decrease of the ornithine aminotransferase activity could be linked to the phenomenon of gingival retraction, i.e. the lack of complete regeneration of gingival tissue usually observed in chronically inflamed subjects, that would be reasonably parallel to a decreased proline/collagen synthesis.

  11. Cigarette smoke exposure inhibits extracellular MMP-2 (gelatinase A activity in human lung fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappello Francesco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to cigarette smoke is considered a major risk factor for the development of lung diseases, since its causative role has been assessed in the induction and maintenance of an inflamed state in the airways. Lung fibroblasts can contribute to these processes, due to their ability to produce proinflammatory chemotactic molecules and extracellular matrix remodelling proteinases. Among proteolytic enzymes, gelatinases A and B have been studied for their role in tissue breakdown and mobilisation of matrix-derived signalling molecules. Multiple reports linked gelatinase deregulation and overexpression to the development of inflammatory chronic lung diseases such as COPD. Methods In this study we aimed to determine variations in the gelatinolytic pattern of human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1 cell line exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE. Gelatinolytic activity levels were determined by using gelatin zymography for the in-gel detection of the enzymes (proenzyme and activated forms, and the subsequent semi-quantitative densitometric evaluation of lytic bands. Expression of gelatinases was evaluated also by RT-PCR, zymography of the cell lysates and by western blotting. Results CSE exposure at the doses used (1–10% did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects on fibroblasts. Zymographic analysis showed that CSE exposure resulted in a linear decrease of the activity of gelatinase A. Control experiments allowed excluding a direct inhibitory effect of CSE on gelatinases. Zymography of cell lysates confirmed the expression of MMP-2 in all conditions. Semi-quantitative evaluation of mRNA expression allowed assessing a reduced transcription of the enzyme, as well as an increase in the expression of TIMP-2. Statistical analyses showed that the decrease of MMP-2 activity in conditioned media reached the statistical significance (p = 0.0031 for 24 h and p = 0.0012 for 48 h, while correlation analysis showed that this result was

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of growth factor-regulated channel (GRC) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowase, Takanori; Nakazato, Yoichi; Yoko-O, Hideaki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Kojima, Itaru

    2002-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I activates a calcium-permeable cation channel GRC (growth factor-regulated channel). In the present study, we investigated the immunohistochemical localization of GRC in human tissues using a polyclonal anti-GRC antibody. Immunoreactive GRC was detected in the stomach, duodenum, large intestine and prostate. In these tissues, GRC-expressing cells were distributed solitarily in the epithelium and coexpressed chromogranin-A, a marker of neuroendocrine cells. GRC was also expressed in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct, mammary gland, parotid gland, and submandibular gland. Epithelial cells of the renal tubule and the tracheal gland were also stained with anti-GRC antibody. In the lung, alveolar macrophages expressed GRC. In the brain, Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and arachnoid cells of the meningitis expressed GRC. These results indicate that GRC is expressed in restricted types of cells in particular tissues, and that GRC may modulate calcium entry in these cells.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Lung Tissue in a Rat Acute Lung Injury Model: Identification of PRDX1 as a Promoter of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains a high morbidity and mortality disease entity in critically ill patients, despite decades of numerous investigations into its pathogenesis. To obtain global protein expression changes in acute lung injury (ALI lung tissues, we employed a high-throughput proteomics method to identify key components which may be involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. In the present study, we analyzed lung tissue proteomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced ALI rats and identified eighteen proteins whose expression levels changed more than twofold as compared to normal controls. In particular, we found that PRDX1 expression in culture medium was elevated by a lipopolysaccharide (LPS challenge in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of PRDX1 increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-8 (IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, whereas knockdown of PRDX1 led to downregulated expression of cytokines induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings provide a global alteration in the proteome of lung tissues in the ALI rat model and indicate that PRDX1 may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ARDS by promoting inflammation and represent a novel strategy for the development of new therapies against ALI.

  14. Differential reduction of reactive oxygen species by human tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swati Paliwal

    2017-06-24

    Jun 24, 2017 ... Clinical trials using human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in the treatment of various diseases. Different tissue sources, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, dental pulp and umbilical cord, are being routinely used in regenerative medicine. MSCs are known to reduce ...

  15. Differential reduction of reactive oxygen species by human tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clinical trials using human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in the treatment of variousdiseases. Different tissue sources, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, dental pulp and umbilical cord, are being routinelyused in regenerative medicine. MSCs are known to reduce increased oxidative ...

  16. TGF-β signaling is dynamically regulated during the alveolarization of rodent and human lungs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Alejandre-Alcázar (Miguel); M. Michiels-Corsten (Matthias); A.G. Vicencio (Alfin); I.K.M. Reiss (Irwin); J. Ryu (Julie); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); G.G. Haddad (Gabriel); D. Tibboel (Dick); W. Seeger (Werner); O. Eickelberg (Oliver); R.E. Morty

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAlthough transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling negatively regulates branching morphogenesis in early lung development, few studies to date have addressed the role of this family of growth factors during late lung development. We describe here that the expression, tissue

  17. Antiproliferative action of metformin in human lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashinuma, Hironori; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Kitazono-Saitoh, Miyako; Kitamura, Atsushi; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Tada, Yuji; Kurosu, Katsushi; Sakaida, Emiko; Sekine, Ikuo; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2012-07-01

    The oral antidiabetic agent metformin has anticancer properties, probably via adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation. In the present study, growth inhibition was assessed by a clonogenic and by a cell survival assay, apoptosis induction was assessed by Hoechst staining and caspase activities and cell cycle alteration after exposure to metformin, and the interaction of metformin with cisplatin in vitro were elucidated in four human lung cancer cell lines representing squamous, adeno-, large cell and small cell carcinoma. Clonogenicity and cell proliferation were inhibited by metformin in all the cell lines examined. This inhibitory effect was not specific to cancer cells because it was also observed in a non-transformed human mesothelial cell line and in mouse fibroblast cell lines. Inhibition of clonogenicity was observed only when the cells were exposed to metformin for a long period, (10 days) and the surviving fraction, obtained after inhibiting proliferation by increasing the dose, reached a plateau at approximately 0.1-0.3, indicating the cytostatic characteristics of metformin. Metformin induced significant apoptosis only in the small cell carcinoma cell line. A tendency of cell cycle accumulation at the G0/G1 phase was observed in all four cell lines. Cisplatin, in a dose-dependent manner, severely antagonized the growth inhibitory effect of metformin, and even reversed the effect in three cell lines but not in the adenocarcinoma cell line. The present data obtained using various histological types of human lung cancer cell lines in vitro illustrate the cytostatic nature of metformin and its cytoprotective properties against cisplatin.

  18. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  19. Identification of novel tissue-specific genes by analysis of microarray databases: a human and mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    Full Text Available Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1 in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2 in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved.

  20. Identification of novel tissue-specific genes by analysis of microarray databases: a human and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Ahn, Jinsoo; Suh, Yeunsu; Davis, Michael E; Lee, Kichoon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1) in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2) in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC) in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved.

  1. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  2. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  3. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  4. DNA repair gene expression level in peripheral blood and tumour tissue from non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Marina; Guarrera, Simonetta; Buffoni, Lucio; Salvadori, Angelica; Voglino, Floriana; Allione, Alessandra; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Ruffini, Enrico; Garzino-Demo, Paolo; Bustreo, Sara; Consito, Lorena; Bironzo, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    The nucleotide excision repair pathway is crucial for cellular DNA integrity and the ERCC1 helicase is also potentially involved in resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy, and high levels of ERCC1 mRNA in tumours have been associated with cisplatin resistance in different human cancers. The aim of this work was to investigate the correlation between DNA repair gene expression levels in tumour tissue, normal tissue and peripheral blood samples from patients with two common human cancers, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), to test if blood gene expression could be a proxy for tumour tissue gene expression to predict response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Using RT-qPCR we determined ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, XPA, XPC, XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX, OGG1, MGMT mRNA levels in fresh NSCLC, normal lung and HNSCC tissue, as well as blood, from NSCLC and HNSCC patients who were treated surgically. Target gene expression in NSCLC and HNSCC tissue was higher than in blood. A statistically significant correlation (pAPEX, ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, XRCC1 and XRCC3 in HNSCC. The existence of a significant correlation between blood and tumour tissue expression of some genes of clinical interest, such as ERCC1 in NSCLC and HNSCC, could allow the introduction in clinical practice of a simple test that would measure mRNA levels of DNA repair genes in peripheral blood samples instead of tissue samples to determine prognostic and predictive factors in NSCLC and HNSCC patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  6. Metallic artifact mitigation and organ-constrained tissue assignment for Monte Carlo calculations of permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Miksys, N.; Thomson, R. M., E-mail: rthomson@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Furutani, K. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate methods of generating accurate patient-specific computational phantoms for the Monte Carlo calculation of lung brachytherapy patient dose distributions. Methods: Four metallic artifact mitigation methods are applied to six lung brachytherapy patient computed tomography (CT) images: simple threshold replacement (STR) identifies high CT values in the vicinity of the seeds and replaces them with estimated true values; fan beam virtual sinogram replaces artifact-affected values in a virtual sinogram and performs a filtered back-projection to generate a corrected image; 3D median filter replaces voxel values that differ from the median value in a region of interest surrounding the voxel and then applies a second filter to reduce noise; and a combination of fan beam virtual sinogram and STR. Computational phantoms are generated from artifact-corrected and uncorrected images using several tissue assignment schemes: both lung-contour constrained and unconstrained global schemes are considered. Voxel mass densities are assigned based on voxel CT number or using the nominal tissue mass densities. Dose distributions are calculated using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose for{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds and are compared directly as well as through dose volume histograms and dose metrics for target volumes surrounding surgical sutures. Results: Metallic artifact mitigation techniques vary in ability to reduce artifacts while preserving tissue detail. Notably, images corrected with the fan beam virtual sinogram have reduced artifacts but residual artifacts near sources remain requiring additional use of STR; the 3D median filter removes artifacts but simultaneously removes detail in lung and bone. Doses vary considerably between computational phantoms with the largest differences arising from artifact-affected voxels assigned to bone in the vicinity of the seeds. Consequently, when metallic artifact reduction and constrained tissue

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor in lung tissue of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Carmela; Bargagli, Elena; Inghilleri, Simona; Campo, Ilaria; Cintorino, Marcella; Rottoli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disorder characterized by a pattern of Usual Interstitial Pneumonia where the presence of fibroblastic foci is the hallmark of the disease. In the present study, we analyzed the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression in lung tissue of IPF patients compared with healthy controls and organizing pneumonia (OP) patients focusing into MIF potential role in fibroblastic foci development. The immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 10 IPF patients (7 male), 3 OP patients (2 male), and 3 healthy controls (all male) using the streptavidin-biotin method (Dako). In IPF samples, MIF resulted overexpressed in the areas of active fibrosis and, in particular, in the alveolar epithelium, bronchiolar epithelium, and in the peripheral zones of fibroblastic foci. Bronchiolar epithelium from organizing pneumonia patients resulted only weakly positive for MIF while no evidence of MIF expression was reported for alveolar epithelium. In the control subject group, MIF was unexpressed except for a weak presence in the bronchiolar epithelium. In conclusion, MIF is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of IPF being mainly expressed in the areas of remodeling and active fibrosis, in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium, and in the peripheral zone of fibroblastic foci.

  8. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Jackson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of ‘non-animal human tissue’ models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models.

  9. Sterols of Pneumocystis carinii hominis organisms isolated from human lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaneshiro, E S; Amit, Z; Chandra, Jan Suresh

    1999-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii causes pneumonia (P. carinii pneumonia, or PCP) in immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. Rat-derived P. carinii carinii organisms have distinct sterols which are not synthesized by mammals and not found in other microbes infecting...... mammalian lungs. The dominant sterol present in the organism is cholesterol (which is believed to be scavenged from the host), but other sterols in P. carinii carinii have an alkyl group at C-24 of the sterol side chain (C(28) and C(29) 24-alkylsterols) and a double bond at C-7 of the nucleus. Recently...... in conjunction with analyses of chemically synthesized authentic standards. The sterol composition of isolated P. carinii hominis organisms has yet to be reported. If P. carinii from animal models is to be used for identifying potential drug targets and for developing chemotherapeutic approaches to clear human...

  10. Proteomic Study of Differential Protein Expression in Mouse Lung Tissues after Aerosolized Ricin Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhendong Guo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning.

  11. Chemical Probes for Visualizing Intact Animal and Human Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hei Ming; Ng, Wai-Lung; Gentleman, Steve M; Wu, Wutian

    2017-06-22

    Newly developed tissue clearing techniques can be used to render intact tissues transparent. When combined with fluorescent labeling technologies and optical sectioning microscopy, this allows visualization of fine structure in three dimensions. Gene-transfection techniques have proved very useful in visualizing cellular structures in animal models, but they are not applicable to human brain tissue. Here, we discuss the characteristics of an ideal chemical fluorescent probe for use in brain and other cleared tissues, and offer a comprehensive overview of currently available chemical probes. We describe their working principles and compare their performance with the goal of simplifying probe selection for neuropathologists and stimulating probe development by chemists. We propose several approaches for the development of innovative chemical labeling methods which, when combined with tissue clearing, have the potential to revolutionize how we study the structure and function of the human brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  13. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB, a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human tropoelastin (HTE, the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N. Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  14. Protective effect of gel form of gastric gavage applicated aloe vera on ischemia reperfusion injury in renal and lung tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hasan; Yener, Ali Umit; Karaboga, Ihsan; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Dogu, Tugba; Altinisik, Hatice Betul; Altinisik, Ugur; Simsek, Tuncer

    2017-12-30

    The aloe vera plant has become increasingly popular in recent years. This study aimed to research the effect of aloe vera to prevent renal and lung tissue damage in an experimental ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model. The study included 21 male Wistar Albino rats, which were categorized into control group, n = 7 (no procedures), Sham group n = 7 (I/R); and aloe vera therapy group, n = 7 (aloe vera and I/R). Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated from lung and kidney tissues for biochemical investigations. As histopathological, hematoxylin and eosin and anti-iNOS were also examined. In biochemical investigations, SOD, CAT, and GPx levels of the Sham group were found to be lower compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). The aloe vera therapy group was not statistically different from control groups but significantly different compared with the Sham group. In the same way, the MDA levels of kidney and lung tissues were statistically significant in the aloe vera therapy group, compared to the Sham group. In the Sham group, the peribronchial and perialveolar edema were observed in lung parenchyma. Also, excess interstitial hemorrhage, leukocyte infiltration, and alveolar wall thickening were identified in ischemic groups. The histopathological changes were much lighter than in the aloe vera therapy group. In renal tissues, excess epithelial cell deterioration, tubular desqumination, and glomerular atrophy were observed in the Sham group. The histopathological changes were markedly reduced in the aloe vera therapy  group. In the kidney and lung tissue, the level of iNOS activity in the Sham group was significantly higher than in the control and aloe vera therapy group. This study indicated that aloe vera is protective against oxidative damage formed by I/R in distant organs like the lungs and kidneys.

  15. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  16. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part I - Influence from Bystander Effects - A Microdose Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2010-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI report in 1999 on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, at low domestic and workplace radon levels, in particular the Bystander Effect (BE) and the Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). We analyzed the microbeam and broadbeam alpha particle data of Miller et al. (1995, 1999), Zhou et al. (2001, 2003, 2004), Nagasawa and Little (1999, 2002), Hei et al. (1999), Sawant et al. (2001a) and found that the shape of the cellular response to alphas is relatively independent of cell species and LET of the alphas. The same alpha particle traversal dose response behavior should be true for human lung tissue exposure to radon progeny alpha particles. In the Bystander Damage Region of the alpha particle response, there is a variation of RBE from about 10 to 35. There is a transition region between the Bystander Damage Region and Direct Damage Region of between one and two microdose alpha particle traversals indicating that perhaps two alpha particle “hits” are necessary to produce the direct damage. Extrapolation of underground miners lung cancer risks to human risks at domestic and workplace levels may not be valid. PMID:21731539

  17. Pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin in bovine plasma, lung tissue, and bronchial fluid (from live, nonanesthetized cattle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, M; Rose, M; Bohland, C; Zschiesche, E; Kilp, S; Metz, W; Allan, M; Röpke, R; Nürnberger, M

    2012-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin (Zuprevo(®) 180 mg/mL solution for injection for cattle), a novel 16-membered macrolide for treatment, control, and prevention of bovine respiratory disease, were investigated in studies collecting blood plasma, lung tissue, and in vivo samples of bronchial fluid (BF) from cattle. After single subcutaneous (s.c.) injection at 4 mg/kg body weight, maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) was 0.7 μg/mL. T(max) was 23 min. Mean residence time from the time of dosing to the time of last measurable concentration (MRT(last)) and terminal half-life (T(1/2) ) was 6 and 9 days, respectively. A strong dose-response relationship with no significant sex effect was shown for both C(max) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last sampling time with a quantifiable drug concentration (AUC(last) ) over the range of doses up to 6 mg/kg. Absolute bioavailability was 78.9%. The volume of distribution based on the terminal phase (V(z)) was 49.4 L/kg, and the plasma clearance was 144 mL/h/kg. The time-concentration profile of tildipirosin in BF and lung far exceeded those in blood plasma. In lung, tildipirosin concentrations reached 9.2 μg/g at 4 h, peaked at 14.8 μg/g at day 1, and slowly declined to 2.0 μg/g at day 28. In BF, the concentration of tildipirosin reached 1.5 and 3.0 μg/g at 4 and 10 h, maintained a plateau of about 3.5 μg/g between day 1 and 3, and slowly declined to 1.0 at day 21. T(1/2) in lung and BF was approximately 10 and 11 days. Tildipirosin is rapidly and extensively distributed to the respiratory tract followed by slow elimination. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Global surveillance of DDT and DDE levels in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaga, Kushik; Dharmani, Chandrabhan

    2003-01-01

    The organochlorine insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was initially introduced for control of vector-borne discases It was banned in the United States by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1972 because of potential harmful effects on humans, wildlife and the environment. Since it is a potential human carcinogen, the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) has recently restricted the use of DDT in developing countries until alternative methods of vector control are sought. DDT and its metabolite, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDE) are lipid soluble, and bioaccumulate more in human adipose tissue, than breast milk and serum. This article is a review of DDT and DDE levels in human tissues from different countries in the world. Data on p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE levels in human adipose tissue, breast milk and serum were selected from more recent literature. It was discovered that countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America with more recent exposure to DDT and DDE have higher levels in human tissue than in Europe and the United States. The global concern for DDT and DDE is the environmental spread and persistence in the food chain. Hypothetically, there is a potential risk of harmful effects of DDT and DDE to human health. UNEP has cautiously taken action to protect human health, the environment and the earth from further destruction by persistent organic pollutants. Further exposure to DDT should be prevented to achieve this goal.

  19. Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battle, Alexis; Brown, Christopher D.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Aguet, François; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Gelfand, Ellen T.; Getz, Gad; Hadley, Kane; Handsaker, Robert E.; Huang, Katherine H.; Kashin, Seva; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Lek, Monkol; Li, Xiao; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Nedzel, Jared L.; Nguyen, Duyen T.; Noble, Michael S.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Trowbridge, Casandra A.; Tukiainen, Taru; Abell, Nathan S.; Balliu, Brunilda; Barshir, Ruth; Basha, Omer; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Brown, Andrew; Castel, Stephane E.; Chen, Lin S.; Chiang, Colby; Conrad, Donald F.; Cox, Nancy J.; Damani, Farhan N.; Davis, Joe R.; Delaneau, Olivier; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eskin, Eleazar; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Frésard, Laure; Gamazon, Eric R.; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Gewirtz, Ariel D. H.; Gliner, Genna; Gloudemans, Michael J.; Guigo, Roderic; Hall, Ira M.; Han, Buhm; He, Yuan; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Howald, Cedric; Kyung Im, Hae; Jo, Brian; Yong Kang, Eun; Kim, Yungil; Kim-Hellmuth, Sarah; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Li, Gen; Li, Xin; Liu, Boxiang; Mangul, Serghei; McCarthy, Mark I.; McDowell, Ian C.; Mohammadi, Pejman; Monlong, Jean; Muñoz-Aguirre, Manuel; Ndungu, Anne W.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Nobel, Andrew B.; Oliva, Meritxell; Ongen, Halit; Palowitch, John J.; Panousis, Nikolaos; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Park, Yoson; Parsana, Princy; Payne, Anthony J.; Peterson, Christine B.; Quan, Jie; Reverter, Ferran; Sabatti, Chiara; Saha, Ashis; Sammeth, Michael; Scott, Alexandra J.; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Sodaei, Reza; Stephens, Matthew; Stranger, Barbara E.; Strober, Benjamin J.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Tsang, Emily K.; Urbut, Sarah; van de Bunt, Martijn; Wang, Gao; Wen, Xiaoquan; Wright, Fred A.; Xi, Hualin S.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Zappala, Zachary; Zaugg, Judith B.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Akey, Joshua M.; Bates, Daniel; Chan, Joanne; Claussnitzer, Melina; Demanelis, Kathryn; Diegel, Morgan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Fernando, Marian S.; Halow, Jessica; Hansen, Kasper D.; Haugen, Eric; Hickey, Peter F.; Hou, Lei; Jasmine, Farzana; Jian, Ruiqi; Jiang, Lihua; Johnson, Audra; Kaul, Rajinder; Kellis, Manolis; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lee, Kristen; Billy Li, Jin; Li, Qin; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Shin; Linder, Sandra; Linke, Caroline; Liu, Yaping; Maurano, Matthew T.; Molinie, Benoit; Nelson, Jemma; Neri, Fidencio J.; Park, Yongjin; Pierce, Brandon L.; Rinaldi, Nicola J.; Rizzardi, Lindsay F.; Sandstrom, Richard; Skol, Andrew; Smith, Kevin S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Tang, Hua; Wang, Li; Wang, Meng; van Wittenberghe, Nicholas; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Nierras, Concepcion R.; Branton, Philip A.; Carithers, Latarsha J.; Guan, Ping; Moore, Helen M.; Rao, Abhi; Vaught, Jimmie B.; Gould, Sarah E.; Lockart, Nicole C.; Martin, Casey; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Volpi, Simona; Addington, Anjene M.; Koester, Susan E.; Little, A. Roger; Brigham, Lori E.; Hasz, Richard; Hunter, Marcus; Johns, Christopher; Johnson, Mark; Kopen, Gene; Leinweber, William F.; Lonsdale, John T.; McDonald, Alisa; Mestichelli, Bernadette; Myer, Kevin; Roe, Brian; Salvatore, Michael; Shad, Saboor; Thomas, Jeffrey A.; Walters, Gary; Washington, Michael; Wheeler, Joseph; Bridge, Jason; Foster, Barbara A.; Gillard, Bryan M.; Karasik, Ellen; Kumar, Rachna; Miklos, Mark; Moser, Michael T.; Jewell, Scott D.; Montroy, Robert G.; Rohrer, Daniel C.; Valley, Dana R.; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Undale, Anita H.; Smith, Anna M.; Tabor, David E.; Roche, Nancy V.; McLean, Jeffrey A.; Vatanian, Negin; Robinson, Karna L.; Sobin, Leslie; Barcus, Mary E.; Valentino, Kimberly M.; Qi, Liqun; Hunter, Steven; Hariharan, Pushpa; Singh, Shilpi; Um, Ki Sung; Matose, Takunda; Tomaszewski, Maria M.; Barker, Laura K.; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Siminoff, Laura A.; Traino, Heather M.; Flicek, Paul; Juettemann, Thomas; Ruffier, Magali; Sheppard, Dan; Taylor, Kieron; Trevanion, Stephen J.; Zerbino, Daniel R.; Craft, Brian; Goldman, Mary; Haeussler, Maximilian; Kent, W. James; Lee, Christopher M.; Paten, Benedict; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Vivian, John; Zhu, Jingchun; Brown, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Duyen Y.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Addington, Anjene; Koester, Susan; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Roe, Bryan; Valley, Dana; He, Amy Z.; Kang, Eun Yong; Quon, Gerald; Ripke, Stephan; Shimko, Tyler C.; Teran, Nicole A.; Zhang, Hailei; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Guigó, Roderic

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression

  20. Immunolocalization of transforming growth factor alpha in normal human tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    anchorage-independent growth of normal cells and was, therefore, considered as an "oncogenic" growth factor. Later, its immunohistochemical presence in normal human cells as well as its biological effects in normal human tissues have been demonstrated. The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate...... the distribution of the growth factor in a broad spectrum of normal human tissues. Indirect immunoenzymatic staining methods were used. The polypeptide was detected with a polyclonal as well as a monoclonal antibody. The polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies demonstrated almost identical immunoreactivity. TGF......-alpha was found to be widely distributed in cells of normal human tissues derived from all three germ layers, most often in differentiated cells. In epithelial cells, three different kinds of staining patterns were observed, either diffuse cytoplasmic, cytoplasmic in the basal parts of the cells, or distinctly...

  1. A GPU-based symmetric non-rigid image registration method in human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Babak; D Ellingwood, Nathan; Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) of the lungs plays an increasing role in identifying sub-phenotypes of pathologies previously lumped into broad categories such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Methods for image matching and linking multiple lung volumes have proven useful in linking structure to function and in the identification of regional longitudinal changes. Here, we seek to improve the accuracy of image matching via the use of a symmetric multi-level non-rigid registration employing an inverse consistent (IC) transformation whereby images are registered both in the forward and reverse directions. To develop the symmetric method, two similarity measures, the sum of squared intensity difference (SSD) and the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD), were used. The method is based on a novel generic mathematical framework to include forward and backward transformations, simultaneously, eliminating the need to compute the inverse transformation. Two implementations were used to assess the proposed method: a two-dimensional (2-D) implementation using synthetic examples with SSD, and a multi-core CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation with SSTVD for three-dimensional (3-D) human lung datasets (six normal adults studied at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC)). Success was evaluated in terms of the IC transformation consistency serving to link TLC to FRC. 2-D registration on synthetic images, using both symmetric and non-symmetric SSD methods, and comparison of displacement fields showed that the symmetric method gave a symmetrical grid shape and reduced IC errors, with the mean values of IC errors decreased by 37%. Results for both symmetric and non-symmetric transformations of human datasets showed that the symmetric method gave better results for IC errors in all cases, with mean values of IC errors for the symmetric method lower than the non-symmetric methods using both SSD and SSTVD

  2. Tissue hyaluronan expression, as reflected in the sputum of lung cancer patients, is an indicator of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, M.P.; Sá, V.K. de; Martins, V. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, J.R.M. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Endocrinologia e Metabolismo, Laboratório de Endocrinologia Molecular e Translacional-LEMT, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Parra, E.R. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mendes, A. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, P.C. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.M. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Longatto-Filho, A. [Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Braga (Portugal); ICVS/3B' s - PT Government Associate Laboratory, Guimarães (Portugal); Laboratório de Investigação Médica (LIM 14), Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, C.Z. [Centro de Pesquisa em Oncologia Molecular, Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Fundação Pio XII, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, T. [Divisão de Pneumologia, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carraro, D.M. [Centro Internacional de Pesquisa/CIPE, AC Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nader, H.B. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Capelozzi, V.L. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-05-08

    Hyaluronan (HA) shows promise for detecting cancerous change in pleural effusion and urine. However, there is uncertainty about the localization of HA in tumor tissue and its relationship with different histological types and other components of the extracellular matrix, such as angiogenesis. We evaluated the association between HA and degree of malignancy through expression in lung tumor tissue and sputum. Tumoral tissue had significantly increased HA compared to normal tissue. Strong HA staining intensity associated with cancer cells was significant in squamous cell carcinoma compared to adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma. A significant direct association was found between tumors with a high percentage of HA and MVD (microvessel density) in tumoral stroma. Similarly significant was the direct association between N1 tumors and high levels of HA in cancer cells. Cox multivariate analysis showed significant association between better survival and low HA. HA increased in sputum from lung cancer patients compared to cancer-free and healthy volunteers and a significant correlation was found between HA in sputum and HA in cancer tissue. Localization of HA in tumor tissue was related to malignancy and reflected in sputum, making this an emerging factor for an important diagnostic procedure in patients suspected to have lung cancer. Further study in additional patients in a randomized prospective trial is required to finalize these results and to validate our quantitative assessment of HA, as well as to couple it to gold standard sputum cytology.

  3. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  4. Ultrastructural Changes in Human Trabecular Meshwork Tissue after Laser Trabeculoplasty

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    Jeffrey R. SooHoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare morphologic changes in human trabecular meshwork (TM after selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT and argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT. Design. Laboratory evaluation of ex vivo human eye TM after laser trabeculoplasty. Methods. Corneoscleral rims from human cadaver eyes were sectioned and treated with varying powers of either SLT or ALT. Specimens were examined using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Results. TEM of SLT at all powers resulted in disrupted TM cells with cracked and extracellular pigment granules. SEM of SLT samples treated at high power revealed tissue destruction with scrolling of trabecular beams. SEM of ALT-treated tissue showed increasing destruction with exposure to higher power. The presence or absence of “champagne” bubbles during SLT did not alter the histologic findings. Conclusions. SLT-treated human TM revealed disruption of TM cells with cracked, extracellular pigment granules, particularly at higher treatment powers. Tissue scrolling was noted at very high SLT energy levels. ALT-treated tissue showed significant damage to both the superficial and deeper TM tissues in a dose-dependent fashion. Further studies are needed to guide titration of treatment power to maximize the IOP-lowering effect while minimizing both energy delivered and damage to target tissues.

  5. Effect of Fetal Mouse Lung Tissue Co-Culture on In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Immature Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbasi, Masomeh; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali; Gholamitabar Tabari, Maryam; Khanbabaei, Ramzan

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fetal mouse lung tissue co-culture on in vitro maturation (IVM) of mouse immature oocytes. In this experimental study, germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes from ovaries of a group of 25 female mice, 6-8 weeks of age, were dissected after being stimulated by 7.5 IU pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) through an intraperitoneal (IP) injection. The fetal lung tissues were then prepared and cultured individually. A total number of 300 oocytes were cultured in the following three groups for 24 hours: control group (n=100) containing only base medium, group I (n=100) containing base medium co-cultured with 11.5- to 12.5-day old fetal mouse lung tissues, and group II (n=100) containing base medium co-cultured with 12.5- to 13.5-day old fetal mouse lung tissues. The proportion of GV and metaphase І (MI) oocytes matured into MІІ oocytes were compared among the three groups using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Correlation test were also used to evaluate the successful rate of IVM oocytes. The proportions of GV oocytes reaching MІІ stage were 46, 65, and 56%, in control, I and II groups, respectively (Ptissue co-culture method increased the percentage of GV oocytes reaching MII stage.

  6. [Changes of apelin and its receptor in lung tissue of rats with pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Gui-Qin; Pang, Ling-Xia; Xue, Feng; Chen, Xing-Yan; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiao-Xia; Gong, Yong-Sheng; Fan, Xiao-Fang

    2013-03-01

    To observe the change of apelin and its receptor (APJ) in the lung tissue of rats with pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline and to explore its significance. Twenty-five male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (n = 10) and monocrotaline group (n = 15). On the twenty-first day after the rats were intraperitoneally injected 60 mg/kg monocrotaline for monocrotaline group or equal volume vehicle for control group, the mean pulmonary artery pressure was measured by right heart catheterization. Histopathological study of lung tissue was done with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome staining. The concentration of apelin in the plasma was measured by radioimmunoassay. The expressions of apelin/APJ proteins and genes in lung tissue were measured respectively by Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular remodeling index, content of apelin protein in lung tissue of monocrotaline group were higher than those in control group. APJ protein and gene expression in monocrotaline group were significantly lower than those in control group (P pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline.

  7. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in the lungs of children who had died from sudden infant death syndrome and other causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernig, T; Kleemann, W J; Pabst, R

    1995-06-01

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is well characterised in rabbits and rats. In humans, however, it does not seem to be present in the healthy adult lung, although it can develop after certain microbial stimulation. In the present study a consecutive series of lungs from 88 children who had died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and 34 control cases of comparable age were examined for the presence of BALT. BALT was present in 36.4% of the patients who had died of SIDS and in 44.1% of the control cases. The probability of finding BALT increased with age, with similar kinetics in both groups. Future studies need to define when and at what rate BALT disappears as children get older. In young children BALT may act as an entry site for antigens to initiate an immune response, as is well documented for the gut-associated lymphoid system.

  8. Elemental analysis of lung tissue particles and intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophages in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

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    Ohkubo Takeru

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disease occurred by idiopathic (autoimmune or secondary to particle inhalation. The in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE system performs elemental analysis of materials by irradiation with a proton microbeam, and allows visualization of the spatial distribution and quantitation of various elements with very low background noise. The aim of this study was to assess the secondary PAP due to inhalation of harmful particles by employing in-air micro-PIXE analysis for particles and intracellular iron in parafin-embedded lung tissue specimens obtained from a PAP patient comparing with normal lung tissue from a non-PAP patient. The iron inside alveolar macrophages was stained with Berlin blue, and its distribution was compared with that on micro-PIXE images. Results The elements composing particles and their locations in the PAP specimens could be identified by in-air micro-PIXE analysis, with magnesium (Mg, aluminum (Al, silicon (Si, phosphorus (P, sulfur (S, scandium (Sc, potassium (K, calcium (Ca, titanium (Ti, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, manganase (Mn, iron (Fe, and zinc (Zn being detected. Si was the major component of the particles. Serial sections stained by Berlin blue revealed accumulation of sideromacrophages that had phagocytosed the particles. The intracellular iron content of alveolar macrophage from the surfactant-rich area in PAP was higher than normal lung tissue in control lung by both in-air micro-PIXE analysis and Berlin blue staining. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the efficacy of in-air micro-PIXE for analyzing the distribution and composition of lung particles. The intracellular iron content of single cells was determined by simultaneous two-dimensional and elemental analysis of paraffin-embedded lung tissue sections. The results suggest that secondary PAP is associated with exposure to inhaled particles and accumulation of iron in

  9. Overexpression of OLC1 in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tissues is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Patients

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    Kunpeng ZHANG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective OLC1 (overexpressed in lung cancer 1, screened out and cloned in our previous research, is a new gene associated with lung cancer. It is highly expressed in lung cancer and many other malignant tumors, and is associated with poor prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, ovarian cancer, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. The aim of this research was to detect the expression level of OLC1 in the tumor tissues of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and explore its relationship with the prognosis of lung cancer patients. Methods Lung cancer tissues of 108 SCC and 90 ADC was dealed with immunohistochemical staining to detect the expression level of OLC1. The relationship between the expression level of OLC1 and clinical parameters and prognosis was analyzed. Results The rate of high expression of OLC1 staining in ADC was significantly higher than that in SCC (87.5% vs 55.3%, P<0.001. The overexpression of OLC1 in tumor tissues did not have a significant relationship with the prognosis of patients with ADC, but it was related with a poor prognosis of SCC patients as the univariate analysis showed. However the multivariate regression analysis showed that correlation between the overexpression of OLC1 and poor prognosis of SCC patients did not have a statistical significance (P=0.05. Conclusion The expression of OLC1 in ADC might be higher than that in SCC. A higher score of OLC1 staining in tumor tissue was associated with a poorer prognosis of patients with SCC, but could not be an independent predictor for a shorter overall survival in patients with SCC.

  10. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis-Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Wu, Honglu; Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine respirable dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dustinduced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 milligrams per cubic meters of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected by lavaging with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A zymosan-induced luminolbased chemiluminescence assay was used to assess the activity of BAL cells. The lavaged lung tissue was snap frozen in LN2 and total RNA was isolated using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The expression of 84 fibrosisrelated genes were analyzed using the RT2 Profiler PCR Array technique. The expression of 18 genes of interest were further measured using real-time PCR technique in all the samples. 10 out of 18 genes of interest showed persistently significant expression changes in the local lung tissue exposed to lunar dust, indicating a prolonged proinflammatory response. The expressions of several of these genes were dose- and time-dependent and were significantly correlated with other pathological parameters. The potential signaling pathways and upstream regulators were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool based on the gene expression data. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explore the

  11. Cyclin D1 Gene Silencing by siRNA in Ex Vivo Human Tissue Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ornella; Russo, Ilaria; Bochicchio, Sabrina; Barba, Anna Angela; Lamberti, Gaetano; Zeppa, Pio; Crescenzo, Vincenzo Di; Carrizzo, Albino; Vecchione, Carmine; Ciacci, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are double-stranded RNA molecules able to specifically targeting genes products responsible for human diseases. Cyclin D1 (CyD1) is a cell cycleregulatory molecule, up-regulated at sites of inflammation in several tissues. CyD1 is a very interesting potential target in lung and colon inflammatory diseases. The aim of this paper was testing CyD1 expression in human lung and colon tissues after the application of an inflammatory stimulus, and verifying its gene silencing by using siRNA for CyD1 (siCyD1). Colon and pulmonary biopsies were treated with siCyD1 by using two different transfection carriers: a) invivofectamine and b) ad hoc produced nanoliposomes. After 24 hours of incubation with nanoliposomes encapsulating siRNA or invivofectamine-CyD1siRNA, in presence or absence of ECLPS, we analysed the protein expression of CyD1 through Western-Blotting. After EC-LPS treatment, in both colon and pulmonary biopsies, an overexpression of CyD1was found (about 64% and 40% respectively). Invivofectamine-CyD1 siRNA reduced the expression of CyD1 approximately by 46% compared to the basal condition, and by around 65% compared to EC-LPS treated colon samples. In lung, following in vivo fectamine siRNA silencing in the presence of EC-LPS, no reduction was observed. Ad hoc nanoliposomes were able to enter colon and lung tissues, but CyD1 silencing was reported in 2 colon samples out of 4 and no efficacy was demonstrated in the only lung sample we studied. The silencing of Cyclin D1 expression in vitro "organ culture" model is possible. Our preliminary results encourage further investigations, using different siRNA concentrations delivered by nanoliposomes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. The future perspectives of natural materials for pulmonary drug delivery and lung tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sally Yunsun; Wong, Alice Hai May; Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-06-01

    Search for new, functional biomaterials that can be used to synergistically deliver a drug, enhance its adsorption and stimulate the post-injury recovery of tissue function, is one of the priorities in biomedicine. Currently used materials for drug delivery fail to satisfy one or more of these functionalities, thus they have limited potential and new classes of materials are urgently needed. Natural materials, due to their origin, physical and chemical structure can potentially fulfill these requirements and there is already strong evidence of their usefulness in drug delivery. They are increasingly utilized in various therapeutic applications due to the obvious advantages over synthetic materials. Particularly in pulmonary drug delivery, there have been limitations in the use of synthetic materials such as polymers and lipids, leading to an increase in the use of natural and protein-based materials such as silk, keratin, elastin and collagen. Literature search in each specialized field, namely, silk, keratin and collagen was conducted, and the benefits of each material for future application in pulmonary drug delivery are highlighted. The natural materials discussed in this review have been well established in their use for other applications, yet further studies are required in the application of pulmonary drug delivery. The properties exhibited by these natural materials seem positive for their application in lung tissue engineering, which may allow for more extensive testing for validation of pulmonary drug delivery systems.

  13. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

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    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  14. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  15. Use of various microdosimetric models for the prediction of radon induced damage in human lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, R.; Nikodemov, D.; Holy, K

    2003-07-01

    Exposure to radon and radon decay products in some residential areas and at workplaces constitutes one of the greatest risks from natural sources of ionising radiation. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to the precise estimations of this health risk by numerous models. The compartmental model published in ICRP Publication 66 (HRTM) has been used for calculating alpha activity concentration in human lung. Energy deposition in the tissue was calculated by the Bethe-Bloch equation. The aim of this study was to check the performance and to compare the reliability of the microdosimetric models. In this work different thicknesses of mucus in the cases of non-smokers and smokers has been considered. Transformed cells were considered as the radiation risk parameters. The radiation risk evaluation for different exposure levels was based on homogeneous and heterogeneous distributions of target cells. The results of application of these procedures were compared with the epidemiological study of Czechoslovakian uranium miners. (author)

  16. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin, a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum, Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Reiter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H2O2 using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus, including multi-drug resistant (MDR strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH. Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  18. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin), a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum), Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jana; Levina, Natalja; van der Linden, Mark; Gruhlke, Martin; Martin, Christian; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2017-10-12

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure) by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H₂O₂ using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas , Streptococcus , and Staphylococcus , including multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH). Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  19. MiR-564 functions as a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer by targeting ZIC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Jia, Lin [Department of Nephrology, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Guo, Qiaojuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Provincial Clinical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350000 (China); Ren, Hui; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Ren, Qingrong [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Hu, Yanping, E-mail: huyp1989@163.com [Department of Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China); Xie, Tao, E-mail: xietao930@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China)

    2015-11-27

    Although miR-564 was reported to be dysregulated in human malignancy, the function and mechanism of miR-564 in tumorigenesis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that miR-564 frequently downregulated in lung cancer cells and significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, motility, and the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells. Moreover, we identified zic family member 3 (ZIC3) as a direct target of miR-564. ZIC3 overexpression impaired the suppressive effects of miR-564 on the capacity of lung cancer cells for proliferation and motility. Finally, we detected the expression level of miR-564 and ZIC3 protein in tissue specimens, and found a significant negative correlation between them. Patients with low levels of miR-564 showed a poorer overall survival. Taken together, our present study revealed the tumor suppressor role of miR-564, indicating restoration of miR-564 as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • MiR-564 inhibits cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, and invasion. • miR-564 suppresses the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cell in vivo. • ZIC3 is a direct and functional target of miR-564. • The expression of miR-564 was negatively correlated with ZIC3 protein in tumors. • Both low miR-564 and high ZIC3 was associated with tumor stage and prognosis.

  20. Evoked corticospinal output to the human scalene muscles is altered by lung volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Anna L; Taylor, Janet L; Anand, Ashima; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2012-03-15

    Increases in lung volume inhibit the inspiratory output from the medulla, but the effect of lung inflation on the voluntary control of breathing in humans is not known. We tested corticospinal excitability using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to evoke a response in the scalene muscles. TMS was delivered at rest at three different lung volumes between functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) during incremental inspiratory and incremental expiratory manoeuvres. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in scalenes were ∼50% larger at a high lung volume (FRC+∼90% inspiratory capacity [IC]) compared to lower lung volumes (FRC and FRC+∼40% IC) in both inspiratory and expiratory manoeuvres (plung inflation on the automatic and voluntary control of breathing in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Low or undetectable TPO receptor expression in malignant tissue and cell lines derived from breast, lung, and ovarian tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson-Miller Connie L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous efficacious chemotherapy regimens may cause thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R agonists, such as eltrombopag, represent a novel approach for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. The TPO-R MPL is expressed on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors, although little is known about its expression on other tissues. Methods Breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples were analyzed for MPL expression by microarray and/or quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and for TPO-R protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Cell line proliferation assays were used to analyze the in vitro effect of eltrombopag on breast, lung, and ovarian tumor cell proliferation. The lung carcinoma cell lines were also analyzed for TPO-R protein expression by Western blot. Results MPL mRNA was not detectable in 118 breast tumors and was detectable at only very low levels in 48% of 29 lung tumors studied by microarray analysis. By qRT-PCR, low but detectable levels of MPL mRNA were detectable in some normal (14-43% and malignant (3-17% breast, lung, and ovarian tissues. A comparison of MPL to EPOR, ERBB2, and IGF1R mRNA demonstrates that MPL mRNA levels were far lower than those of EPOR and ERBB2 mRNA in the same tissues. IHC analysis showed negligible TPO-R protein expression in tumor tissues, confirming mRNA analysis. Culture of breast, lung, and ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no increase, and in fact, showed a decrease in proliferation following incubation with eltrombopag. Western blot analyses revealed no detectable TPO-R protein expression in the lung carcinoma cell lines. Conclusions Multiple analyses of breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples and/or cell lines show no evidence of MPL mRNA or TPO-R protein expression. Eltrombopag does not stimulate growth of breast, lung, or ovarian tumor cell lines at doses likely to exert their actions on megakaryocytes and

  2. Low or undetectable TPO receptor expression in malignant tissue and cell lines derived from breast, lung, and ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson-Miller, Connie L; Pillarisetti, Kodandaram; Kirchner, Jennifer; Figueroa, David J; Ottesen, Lone; Martin, Anne-Marie; Liu, Yuan; Kamel, Yasser Mostafa; Messam, Conrad

    2012-09-11

    Numerous efficacious chemotherapy regimens may cause thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonists, such as eltrombopag, represent a novel approach for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. The TPO-R MPL is expressed on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors, although little is known about its expression on other tissues. Breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples were analyzed for MPL expression by microarray and/or quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and for TPO-R protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cell line proliferation assays were used to analyze the in vitro effect of eltrombopag on breast, lung, and ovarian tumor cell proliferation. The lung carcinoma cell lines were also analyzed for TPO-R protein expression by Western blot. MPL mRNA was not detectable in 118 breast tumors and was detectable at only very low levels in 48% of 29 lung tumors studied by microarray analysis. By qRT-PCR, low but detectable levels of MPL mRNA were detectable in some normal (14-43%) and malignant (3-17%) breast, lung, and ovarian tissues. A comparison of MPL to EPOR, ERBB2, and IGF1R mRNA demonstrates that MPL mRNA levels were far lower than those of EPOR and ERBB2 mRNA in the same tissues. IHC analysis showed negligible TPO-R protein expression in tumor tissues, confirming mRNA analysis. Culture of breast, lung, and ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no increase, and in fact, showed a decrease in proliferation following incubation with eltrombopag. Western blot analyses revealed no detectable TPO-R protein expression in the lung carcinoma cell lines. Multiple analyses of breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples and/or cell lines show no evidence of MPL mRNA or TPO-R protein expression. Eltrombopag does not stimulate growth of breast, lung, or ovarian tumor cell lines at doses likely to exert their actions on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors.

  3. Tissue engineering and surgery: from translational studies to human trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranckx Jan Jeroen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering was introduced as an innovative and promising field in the mid-1980s. The capacity of cells to migrate and proliferate in growth-inducing medium induced great expectancies on generating custom-shaped bioconstructs for tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering represents a unique multidisciplinary translational forum where the principles of biomaterial engineering, the molecular biology of cells and genes, and the clinical sciences of reconstruction would interact intensively through the combined efforts of scientists, engineers, and clinicians. The anticipated possibilities of cell engineering, matrix development, and growth factor therapies are extensive and would largely expand our clinical reconstructive armamentarium. Application of proangiogenic proteins may stimulate wound repair, restore avascular wound beds, or reverse hypoxia in flaps. Autologous cells procured from biopsies may generate an ‘autologous’ dermal and epidermal laminated cover on extensive burn wounds. Three-dimensional printing may generate ‘custom-made’ preshaped scaffolds – shaped as a nose, an ear, or a mandible – in which these cells can be seeded. The paucity of optimal donor tissues may be solved with off-the-shelf tissues using tissue engineering strategies. However, despite the expectations, the speed of translation of in vitro tissue engineering sciences into clinical reality is very slow due to the intrinsic complexity of human tissues. This review focuses on the transition from translational protocols towards current clinical applications of tissue engineering strategies in surgery.

  4. Variability in responses observed in human white adipose tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Borowsky, Francis E; Alonzo, Carlo A; Zieba, Adam; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L

    2017-09-06

    Obesity is a risk factor for a myriad of diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular dysfunction, cirrhosis, and cancer, and there is a need for new systems to study how excess adipose tissue relates to the onset of disease processes. This study provides proof-of-concept patient-specific tissue models of human white adipose tissue to accommodate the variability in human samples. Our 3D tissue engineering approach established lipolytic responses and changes in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake from small volumes of human lipoaspirate, making this methodology useful for patient specific sample source assessments of treatment strategies, drug responses, disease mechanisms, and other responses that vary between patients. Mature unilocular cells were maintained ex vivo in silk porous scaffolds for up to a month of culture and imaged non-invasively with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Interestingly, differences in responsiveness between tissues were observed in terms of magnitude of lipolysis, ability to suppress lipolysis, differences in glucose uptake, and lipid droplet size. Body mass index was not a factor in determining tissue responsiveness; rather, it is speculated that other unknown variables in the backgrounds of different patients (ethnicity, athleticism, disease history, lifestyle choices, etc.) likely had a more significant effect on the observed differences. This study reinforces the need to account for the variability in backgrounds and genetics within the human population to determine adipose tissue responsiveness. In the future, this tissue system could be used to inform individualized care strategies-enhancing therapeutic precision, improving patient outcomes, and reducing clinical costs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Epo receptors are not detectable in primary human tumor tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Elliott

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo is a cytokine that binds and activates an Epo receptor (EpoR expressed on the surface of erythroid progenitor cells to promote erythropoiesis. While early studies suggested EpoR transcripts were expressed exclusively in the erythroid compartment, low-level EpoR transcripts were detected in nonhematopoietic tissues and tumor cell lines using sensitive RT-PCR methods. However due to the widespread use of nonspecific anti-EpoR antibodies there are conflicting data on EpoR protein expression. In tumor cell lines and normal human tissues examined with a specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody to human EpoR (A82, little/no EpoR protein was detected and it was not functional. In contrast, EpoR protein was reportedly detectable in a breast tumor cell line (MCF-7 and breast cancer tissues with an anti-EpoR polyclonal antibody (M-20, and functional responses to rHuEpo were reported with MCF-7 cells. In another study, a functional response was reported with the lung tumor cell line (NCI-H838 at physiological levels of rHuEpo. However, the specificity of M-20 is in question and the absence of appropriate negative controls raise questions about possible false-positive effects. Here we show that with A82, no EpoR protein was detectable in normal human and matching cancer tissues from breast, lung, colon, ovary and skin with little/no EpoR in MCF-7 and most other breast and lung tumor cell lines. We show further that M-20 provides false positive staining with tissues and it binds to a non-EpoR protein that migrates at the same size as EpoR with MCF-7 lysates. EpoR protein was detectable with NCI-H838 cells, but no rHuEpo-induced phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3, pS6RP or STAT5 was observed suggesting the EpoR was not functional. Taken together these results raise questions about the hypothesis that most tumors express high levels of functional EpoR protein.

  6. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  7. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  8. The Negative Impact of Combining Retinoic Acid (ATRA) and Mold Spores on F344 Rat Lung and Improvement of Tissue Pathology by Citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) and Mold spores (MLD) in the development of lung pathology and in vivo tissue remodeling have not been well established in the literature. In addition, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology has not been ascertained in animal studies. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and Mold (MLD) exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that Citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse, ameliorate or improve the associated pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=40). Animals were exposed to eight different treatments including vehicle, MLD, ATRA, Citrals (C1 and C2) and their MLD combinations (MLD+ ATRA, MLD+ C1, and MLD+ C2) by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight and blood data were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21, and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from weight and blood data (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from histopathological analyses supported the findings that exposure of F344 rats to MLD combinations with ATRA and Citrals showed various levels of lung tissue damage that were impacted by either C1 or C2. This promising study showed impressive responses on the interaction of MLD, Citrals, and ATRA as related to their impact on associated lung tissue pathologies.

  9. IMPACT OF PAIRED COMBINATIONS OF RETINOIC ACID (ATRA) AND OVALBUMIN ON F344 RAT LUNG TISSUES AND IMPROVEMENT OF RELATED PATHOLOGY BY CITRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O.; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A.; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    The impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of lung pathology and tissue remodeling are not well established in the literature. As well, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology was not ascertained under an in vivo setting. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and ovalbumin exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse or ameliorate the related pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=40). Animals were exposed to 8 different treatments including vehicle, OVA, ATRA, citrals (C1 and C2) and their ovalbumin combinations (OVA+ ATRA, OVA+ C1, and OVA+ C2) by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight data and blood were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21 and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from weights and blood (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from the histopatholgical analysis supported the findings that exposure of F344 rats to OVA combinations with ATRA and citrals showed various levels of lung tissue damage that was improved or worsened by either C1 or C2. This promising study showed variable responses on the interaction of ovalbumin, citrals, and ATRA as related to their damage/improvement of related lung tissue pathologies. PMID:25405454

  10. The Negative Impact of Combining Retinoic Acid (ATRA) and Mold Spores on F344 Rat Lung and Improvement of Tissue Pathology by Citral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O.; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A.; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) and Mold spores (MLD) in the development of lung pathology and in vivo tissue remodeling have not been well established in the literature. In addition, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology has not been ascertained in animal studies. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and Mold (MLD) exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that Citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse, ameliorate or improve the associated pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=40). Animals were exposed to eight different treatments including vehicle, MLD, ATRA, Citrals (C1 and C2) and their MLD combinations (MLD+ ATRA, MLD+ C1, and MLD+ C2) by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight and blood data were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21, and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from weight and blood data (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from histopathological analyses supported the findings that exposure of F344 rats to MLD combinations with ATRA and Citrals showed various levels of lung tissue damage that were impacted by either C1 or C2. This promising study showed impressive responses on the interaction of MLD, Citrals, and ATRA as related to their impact on associated lung tissue pathologies PMID:25996741

  11. Impact of paired combinations of retinoic Acid (atra) and ovalbumin on f344 rat lung tissues and improvement of related pathology by citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Holt Gray, Charlene; Cameron, Joseph A; Tucci, Michelle A; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of lung pathology and tissue remodeling are not well established in the literature. As well, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology was not ascertained under an in vivo setting. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and ovalbumin exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse or ameliorate the related pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=40). Animals were exposed to 8 different treatments including vehicle, OVA, ATRA, citrals (C1 and C2) and their ovalbumin combinations (OVA+ ATRA, OVA+ C1, and OVA+ C2) by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight data and blood were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21 and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from weights and blood (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from the histopatholgical analysis supported the findings that exposure of F344 rats to OVA combinations with ATRA and citrals showed various levels of lung tissue damage that was improved or worsened by either C1 or C2. This promising study showed variable responses on the interaction of ovalbumin, citrals, and ATRA as related to their damage/improvement of related lung tissue pathologies.

  12. Evidence against a role for jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A Dusty; De Las Heras, Marcelo; Yu, Jingyou; Zhang, Fushun; Liu, Shan-Lu; Vaughan, Andrew E; Vaughan, Thomas L; Rosadio, Raul; Rocca, Stefano; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Goedert, James J; Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2017-01-20

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) causes a contagious lung cancer in sheep and goats that can be transmitted by aerosols produced by infected animals. Virus entry into cells is initiated by binding of the viral envelope (Env) protein to a specific cell-surface receptor, Hyal2. Unlike almost all other retroviruses, the JSRV Env protein is also a potent oncoprotein and is responsible for lung cancer in animals. Of concern, Hyal2 is a functional receptor for JSRV in humans. We show here that JSRV is fully capable of infecting human cells, as measured by its reverse transcription and persistence in the DNA of cultured human cells. Several studies have indicated a role for JSRV in human lung cancer while other studies dispute these results. To further investigate the role of JSRV in human lung cancer, we used highly-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal antiserum against JSRV Env to test for JSRV expression in human lung cancer. JSRV Env expression was undetectable in lung cancers from 128 human subjects, including 73 cases of bronchioalveolar carcinoma (BAC; currently reclassified as lung invasive adenocarcinoma with a predominant lepidic component), a lung cancer with histology similar to that found in JSRV-infected sheep. The BAC samples included 8 JSRV DNA-positive samples from subjects residing in Sardinia, Italy, where sheep farming is prevalent and JSRV is present. We also tested for neutralizing antibodies in sera from 138 Peruvians living in an area where sheep farming is prevalent and JSRV is present, 24 of whom were directly exposed to sheep, and found none. We conclude that while JSRV can infect human cells, JSRV plays little if any role in human lung cancer.

  13. Human amnion cells reverse acute and chronic pulmonary damage in experimental neonatal lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in neonatal care, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD remains a significant contributor to infant mortality and morbidity. While human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs have shown promise in small and large animal models of BPD, there is scarce information on long-term benefit and clinically relevant questions surrounding administration strategy remain unanswered. In assessing the therapeutic potential of hAECs, we investigated the impact of cell dosage, administration routes and timing of treatment in a pre-clinical model of BPD. Methods Lipopolysaccharide was introduced intra-amniotically at day 16 of pregnancy prior to exposure to 65% oxygen (hyperoxia at birth. hAECs were administered either 12 hours (early or 4 days (late after hyperoxia commenced. Collective lung tissues were subjected to histological analysis, multikine ELISA for inflammatory cytokines, FACS for immune cell populations and 3D lung stem cell culture at neonatal stage (postnatal day 7 and 14. Invasive lung function test and echocardiography were applied at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Results hAECs improved the tissue-to-airspace ratio and septal crest density in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of administration route. Early administration of hAECs, coinciding with the commencement of postnatal hyperoxia, was associated with reduced macrophages, dendritic cells and natural killer cells. This was not the case if hAECs were administered when lung injury was established. Fittingly, early hAEC treatment was more efficacious in reducing interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Early hAEC treatment was also associated with reduced airway hyper-responsiveness and normalisation of pressure–volume loops. Pulmonary hypertension and right ventricle hypertrophy were also prevented in the early hAEC treatment group, and this persisted until 10 weeks of age. Conclusions Early hAEC treatment appears to

  14. Methanolic extract of adlay seed suppresses COX-2 expression of human lung cancer cells via inhibition of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wen-Chun; Chang, Hui-Chiu

    2003-12-03

    Previous results demonstrated that the methanolic extract of adlay seed exerted an antiproliferative effect on human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and might prevent tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. In this study, the methanolic extract of adlay seed was tested for its regulation of COX-2 expression of human lung cancer cells. Western blot analysis showed that the methanolic extract of adlay seed inhibited basal and TPA-induced COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas COX-1 expression was not affected. By using a promoter activity assay, it was found that the methanolic extract inhibited basal and TPA-stimulated COX-2 expression at the transcription level. The effect of the methanolic extract on COX-2 expression in vivo was then investigated. The data demonstrated that treatment of the methanolic extract reduced the PGE(2) level in serum and inhibited COX-2 expression of tumor tissues in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is one of the mechanisms by which the methanolic extract of adlay seed inhibits cancer growth and prevents lung tumorigenesis.

  15. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  16. Using fresh tissue dissection to teach human anatomy in the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan G; Metten, Shaleen; Guiton, Gretchen; Berek, Jonathan

    2004-07-01

    Gross anatomy is taught in medical school with textbooks, cadaver dissection, plastic models, and multimedia illustration, but all lack the reality of color and texture that is possible with fresh tissue dissection. The authors studied the use of fresh tissue dissection of the thorax and abdomen of the rat to teach human anatomy. In a half-day exercise, 52 fourth-year medical students paired off and completed an exercise to dissect in less than three hours the thorax and abdomen of a euthanized rat. Observation of organs was augmented by active manipulation such as passing a tube down the esophagus, cannulating the trachea and inflating the lungs, injecting dye in the kidney to trace the ureter and bladder, and pulling the testis through the inguinal canal. Comparison of the rat and human was emphasized to enhance the education. The exercise ended with practice suturing fresh tissue. Students rated the exercise to teach anatomy as 4.9 positive on a 5.0 (high) scale. The significant positive structures (p context. Fresh tissue dissection is an efficient innovative method to provide a global review of anatomy of the thorax and abdomen during the busy clinical years of medical education.

  17. Detection and expression of human papillomavirus oncogenes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, Marco; Giuliani, Laura; Ambrogi, Vincenzo; Ronci, Corrado; Benedetto, Arrigo; Mineo, Tommaso C; Syrjänen, Kari; Favalli, Cartesio

    2006-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in lung cancer cases with variable frequency. In the present study, we analysed a series of 38 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (21 paraffin-embedded archival samples and 17 fresh surgical specimens) for the presence of E6 and E7 oncogenes of HPV16, 18 and 31. Eight of the tumours were positive (21%): six HPV16, one HPV16+18, and one HPV31. The normal tissue surrounding the HPV-positive tumour was negative for the presence of the virus. Sequencing analysis of URR, of HPV16, which was the most frequently found HPV type in our cases, showed an adenosine deletion at nucleotide 7861 (E2-binding site) in four out of six patients. Sequencing of the entire E6 and E7 genes of HPV16 showed a T to G transition at nucleotide position 350 of E6, in all examined cases. This mutation is associated to the European variant of HPV16. Analysis of E6 and E7 transcripts was performed on the six fresh surgical specimens infected by HPV16. Our study showed that all of the tumours investigated, except one, contained E6 and E7 transcripts. Only in one case could we identify an unspliced form of the E6 transcript. Our results strengthen the relationship between HPV and NSCLC and support the hypothesis that HPV infection could play a role in bronchial carcinogenesis.

  18. Molecular analysis of human papillomavirus in never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Shun-Ichi; Kurahara, Yu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Tamiya, Akihiro; Omachi, Naoki; Asami, Kazuhiro; Okishio, Kyoichi; Utsumi, Tomoki; Ito, Norimasa; Yoon, Hyung-Eun; Matsumura, Akihide; Atagi, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya

    2015-02-01

    The causes of lung cancer in never-smokers remain unclear. The potential contribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) to the carcinogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been reported. In 2008, a prospective registry of never-smokers with NSCLC was established at the Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, Sakai, Osaka, Japan. Never-smokers with NSCLC were consecutively enrolled onto the registry. Of these patients, 114 with large tumor specimens, the majority of which were surgical tissues, were selected. In total, 23 of the most clinically relevant HPV types were assayed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the viral genome. Following exclusion of samples with suboptimal quality, DNA was extracted from 96 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. These 96 cases consisted of 82 females (85.4%) and 14 males (14.6%), with a median age of 67 years (range, 29-83). Almost all cases (93.8%) were of the adenocarcinoma histological subtype. Despite confirmation of the quality and amount of DNA, HPV type 6 was detected in only one case (1.1%). Furthermore, no other samples examined were positive for any other HPV types. The results therefore suggest that HPV does not play a major role as the driving oncogenic event in never-smokers with NSCLC.

  19. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  20. Differential distribution of the JC virus receptor-type sialic acid in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, Sylvia; Tavares, Rosemarie; Stopa, Edward G; Robbins, Scott H; Brossay, Laurent; Atwood, Walter J

    2004-02-01

    JC virus (JCV), a member of the polyomavirus family, causes a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Although glial cells are the principal target of JCV productive infection in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patients, little is known regarding the site of JCV persistence and the mechanisms by which the virus spreads to the CNS to cause disease. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of replicating JCV DNA in B lymphocytes from peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen and it has been hypothesized that lymphocytes may be one site of JCV persistence. Detection of viral gene products in renal tubules and excretion of JC virions in the urine suggests JCV persistence in the kidney. A respiratory route of viral transmission has also been hypothesized implicating the lung as another possible site of persistent JCV infection. Earlier studies from our laboratory have shown that terminal alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid is a critical component of the JCV receptor. In this report we examined the tissue distribution of this JCV receptor-type sialic acid in a panel of normal human tissues. Our results demonstrate that in normal brain JCV receptor-type sialic acids are expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but not on cortical neurons. The receptor-type sialic acid is also more highly expressed on B lymphocytes than on T lymphocytes in normal human spleen and tonsil. In addition, both the kidney and lung express abundant levels of alpha 2-6-linked sialic acids. Our data show a striking correlation between the expression of the JCV receptor-type sialic acid on cells and their susceptibility to infection by the virus. These findings also support the hypothesis of JCV persistence in lymphoid tissue and B-cell-facilitated viral dissemination to the CNS.

  1. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieken, Tina J; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C; Knutson, Keith L; Kalari, Krishna R; Yao, Janet Z; Baddour, Larry M; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-08-03

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention.

  2. Mapping of NKp46+ cells in healthy human lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eTomasello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding Natural Killer (NK cell anatomical distribution is key to dissect the role of these unconventional lymphocytes in physiological and disease conditions. In mouse, NK cells have been detected in various lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, while in humans the current knowledge of NK cell distribution at steady state is mainly restricted to lymphoid tissues. The translation to humans of findings obtained in mice is facilitated by the identification of NK cell markers conserved between these two species. The Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor (NCR NKp46 is a marker of the NK cell lineage evolutionary conserved in mammals. In mice, NKp46 is also present on rare T cell subsets and on a subset of gut Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs expressing the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor t (RORt transcription factor. Here, we documented the distribution and the phenotype of human NKp46+ cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues isolated from healthy donors. Human NKp46+ cells were found in splenic red pulp, in lymph nodes, in lungs and gut lamina propria, thus mirroring mouse NKp46+ cell distribution. We also identified a novel cell subset of CD56dimNKp46low cells that includes RORt+ILCs with a lineage-CD94-CD117brightCD127bright phenotype. The use of NKp46 thus contributes to establish the basis for analyzing quantitative and qualitative changes of NK cell and ILC subsets in human diseases.

  3. Tea polyphenols prevent lung from preneoplastic lesions and effect p53 and bcl-2 gene expression in rat lung tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qihua; Hu, Chengping; Chen, Qiong; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the cancers that have the highest incidence and the highest mortality rate, and it is of great interest to identify ways to prevent its occurrence. We had established an animal model by using 3,4-benzopyrene intra-pulmonary injection in our previous study, and had observed that the rats lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were significantly reduced by green tea administration. This study further investigated the effect of tea polyphenols on rat lung preneoplastic lesions using the lung carcinoma model established by 3,4-benzopyrene intra-pulmonary injection. Sprague–Dawley rats of the same age were randomly divided into 10 groups and treated with 3,4-benzopyrene by intra-pulmonary injection. Five groups were given 0.3% solution of tea polyphenols (equivalent to 1.2% of green tea) in drinking water, while the other 5 groups were given pure drinking water. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 1, 4, 8 and 16 weeks after carcinogen treatment. In the control groups of rats, local bronchial inflammation were observed at 1 week after 3,4-benzopyrene treatment. From 4 weeks to 16 weeks after carcinogen treatment, hyperplasia, cell hyperproliferation, heterogeneity were observed in the bronchial epithelium. Meanwhile, the expression of p53 mRNA and protein, as well as the level of bcl-2, increased in the bronchial epithelial lesion. Tea polyphenols treatment significantly alleviated the bronchial epithelial lesions. At the same time, tea polyphenols treatment enhanced p53 expression, but reduced bcl-2 expression. These results indicated that tea polyphenols may have preventive effect against lung preneoplasm lesions, possibly through regulating the expression of some critical genes such as p53 and bcl-2. PMID:23923070

  4. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  5. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Lung cancer is considered to be the most common malignancy and a leading cause of death globally. Despite significant advances made during the past several decades in the treatment of lung cancer, the overall 5-year survival rate of patients is still low (Branko 2007). Dysregulation of apoptosis is a common feature of.

  6. Magnetic studies of iron-entities in human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slawska-Waniewska, A. E-mail: slaws@ifpan.edu.pl; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Nedelko, N.; Galazka-Friedman, J.; Friedman, A

    2004-05-01

    Iron-entities in the human liver, brain and blood tissues have been investigated by means of EPR spectroscopy and magnetization measurements over the temperature range 4-300 K. The identification of the most typical forms of iron in the human body (i.e. isolated Fe-ions bonded in hemoglobin and transferrin as well as exchange coupled Fe-ions in nanosized ferritin cores) is presented.

  7. Spatial Variation in the Healthy Human Lung Microbiome and the Adapted Island Model of Lung Biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Freeman, Christine M; McCloskey, Lisa; Beck, James M; Huffnagle, Gary B; Curtis, Jeffrey L

    2015-06-01

    The lung microbiome is spatially heterogeneous in advanced airway diseases, but whether it varies spatially in health is unknown. We postulated that the primary determinant of lung microbiome constitution in health is the balance of immigration and elimination of communities from the upper respiratory tract (URT; "adapted island model of lung biogeography"), rather than differences in regional bacterial growth conditions. To determine if the lung microbiome is spatially varied in healthy adults. Bronchoscopy was performed on 15 healthy subjects. Specimens were sequentially collected in the lingula and right middle lobe (by bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]), then in the right upper lobe, left upper lobe, and supraglottic space (by protected-specimen brush). Bacterial 16S ribosmal RNA-encoding genes were sequenced using MiSeq (Illumina, San Diego, CA). There were no significant differences between specimens collected by BAL and protected-specimen brush. Spatially separated intrapulmonary sites, when compared with each other, did not contain consistently distinct microbiota. On average, intrasubject variation was significantly less than intersubject variation (P = 0.00003). By multiple ecologic parameters (community richness, community composition, intersubject variability, and similarity to source community), right upper lobe microbiota more closely resembled those of the URT than did microbiota from more distal sites. As predicted by the adapted island model, community richness decreased with increasing distance from the source community of the URT (P microbiota within an individual is significantly less than variation across individuals. The lung microbiome in health is more influenced by microbial immigration and elimination (the adapted island model) than by the effects of local growth conditions on bacterial reproduction rates, which are more determinant in advanced lung diseases. BAL of a single lung segment is an acceptable method of sampling the healthy lung

  8. Ischemia and reperfusion of the lung tissues induced increase of lung permeability and lung edema is attenuated by dimethylthiourea (PP69).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K H; Chao, D; Liu, C F; Chen, C F; Wang, D

    2010-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether oxygen radical scavengers of dimethylthiourea (DMTU), superoxide dismutase (SOD), or catalase (CAT) pretreatment attenuated ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced lung injury. After isolation from a Sprague-Dawley rat, the lungs were perfused through the pulmonary artery cannula with rat whole blood diluted 1:1 with a physiological salt solution. An acute lung injury was induced by 10 minutes of hypoxia with 5% CO2-95% N2 followed by 65 minutes of ischemia and then 65 minutes of reperfusion. I/R significantly increased microvascular permeability as measured by the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight-to-body weight ratio (LW/BW), and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (PCBAL). DMTU pretreatment significantly attenuated the acute lung injury. The capillary filtration coefficient (P<.01), LW/BW (P<.01) and PCBAL (P<.05) were significantly lower among the DMTU-treated rats than hosts pretreated with SOD or CAT. The possible mechanisms of the protective effect of DMTU in I/R-induced lung injury may relate to the permeability of the agent allowing it to scavenge intracellular hydroxyl radicals. However, whether superoxide dismutase or catalase antioxidants showed protective effects possibly due to their impermeability of the cell membrane not allowing scavenging of intracellular oxygen radicals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease and interstitial lung disease: Trying to define patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, María Laura; Paulin, Francisco; Toledo, Heidegger Mateos; Fernández, Martín Eduardo; Caro, Fabián Matías; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge; Mejía, Mayra Edith

    2016-12-12

    To identify clinical or immunological features in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), in order to group them and recognize different functional and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) behavior. Retrospective cohort study. Patients meeting Kinder criteria for UCTD were included. We defined the following predictive variables: 'highly specific' connective tissue disease (CTD) manifestations (Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eyes or arthritis), high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer (above 1: 320), and 'specific' ANA staining patterns (centromere, cytoplasmic and nucleolar patterns). We evaluated the following outcomes: change in the percentage of the predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%) during the follow-up period, and HRCT pattern. Sixty-six patients were included. Twenty-nine (43.94%) showed at least one 'highly specific' CTD manifestation, 16 (28.57%) had a 'specific' ANA staining pattern and 29 (43.94%) high ANA titer. Patients with 'highly specific' CTD manifestations were younger (mean [SD] 52 years [14.58] vs 62.08 years [9.46], P<.001), were more likely men (10.34% vs 48.65%, P<.001) and showed a smaller decline of the FVC% (median [interquartile range] 1% [-1 to 10] vs -6% [-16 to -4], P<.006). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of highly specific manifestations was associated with improvement in the FVC% (B coefficient of 13.25 [95% confidence interval, 2.41 to 24.09]). No association was observed in relation to the HRCT pattern. The presence of 'highly specific' CTD manifestations was associated with female sex, younger age and better functional behavior. These findings highlight the impact of the clinical features in the outcome of patients with UCTD ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. The Expression of the Ubiquitin Ligase SIAH2 (Seven In Absentia Homolog 2 Is Increased in Human Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moreno

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Overall 5-year survival has shown little improvement over the last decades. Seven in absentia homolog (SIAH proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate proteasomal protein degradation by poly-ubiquitination. Even though SIAH proteins play a key role in several biological processes, their role in human cancer remains controversial. The aim of the study was to document SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (mRNA, protein level and immunohistochemistry in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC samples compared to surrounding healthy tissue from the same patient, and to analyse the association with clinicopathological features.One hundred and fifty-two samples from a patient cohort treated surgically for primary lung cancer were obtained for the study. Genic and protein expression levels of SIAH2 were analysed and compared with clinic-pathologic variables.The present study is the first to analyze the SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (RNA, protein expression and immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We found that SIAH2 protein expression is significantly enhanced in human lung adenocarcinoma (ADC and squamous cell lung cancer (SCC. Paradoxically, non-significant changes at RNA level were found, suggesting a post-traductional regulatory mechanism. More importantly, an increased correlation between SIAH2 expression and tumor grade was detected, suggesting that this protein could be used as a prognostic biomarker to predict lung cancer progression. Likewise, SIAH2 protein expression showed a strong positive correlation with fluorodeoxyglucose (2-deoxy-2(18Ffluoro-D-glucose uptake in primary NSCLC, which may assist clinicians in stratifying patients at increased overall risk of poor survival. Additionally, we described an inverse correlation between the expression of SIAH2 and the levels of one of its substrates, the serine/threonine kinase

  11. Tissue localization of human trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Ole; Tornøe, Ida

    2007-01-01

    pattern of the three trefoil factors analyzing mRNA from a panel of 20 human tissues by conventional reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR and, in addition, by real-time PCR. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded human tissues using rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised......Trefoil factors (TTFs) are small, compact proteins coexpressed with mucins in the gastrointestinal tract. Three trefoil factors are known in mammals: TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3. They are implicated to play diverse roles in maintenance and repair of the gastrointestinal channel. We compared the expression...... against these factors. TFF1 showed highest expression in the stomach and colon, whereas TFF2 and TFF3 showed highest expression in stomach and colon, respectively. All three TFFs were found in the ducts of pancreas. Whereas TFF2 was found to be restricted to these two tissues, the structurally more...

  12. Infrared absorption of human breast tissues in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chenglin [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Zhang Yuan [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yan Xiaohui [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China) and Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)]. E-mail: xy-zhang@fudan.edu.cn; Li Chengxiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Yang Wentao [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi Daren [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2006-07-15

    The spectral characteristics of human breast tissues in normal status and during different cancerous stages have been investigated by synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) absorption spectroscopy. Thanks to the excellent synchrotron radiation infrared (IR) source, higher resolving power is achieved in SR-FTIR absorption spectra than in conventional IR absorption measurements. Obvious variations in IR absorption spectrum of breast tissues were found as they change from healthy to diseased, or say in progression to cancer. On the other hand, some specific absorption peaks were found in breast cancer tissues by SR-FTIR spectroscopic methods. These spectral characteristics of breast tissue may help us in early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  13. Comparison of Methods for Analyzing Human Adipose Tissue Macrophage Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Harteneck, Debra; Jaeger, Philippa

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between inflammation, obesity, and adverse metabolic conditions is associated with adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). This study compared the measurements of human ATM using flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of ...

  14. Human Bites of the Face with Tissue Losses in Cosmopolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Milaki Asuku

    Abstract. A retrospective series of thirty-six cases of human bites to the face with tissue losses requiring reconstruction during a five-year period, January 1999 to December 2003 is presented. The unmarried female in her third decade dominated both as victim and assailant in incidences related to love affairs and love gone ...

  15. Human Bites of the Face with Tissue Losses in Cosmopolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective series of thirty-six cases of human bites to the face with tissue losses requiring reconstruction during a five-year period, January 1999 to December 2003 is presented. The unmarried female in her third decade dominated both as victim and assailant in incidences related to love affairs and love gone sour.

  16. Proteome analysis of human colorectal cancer tissue using 2-D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteome analysis of human colorectal cancer tissue using 2-D DIGE and tandem mass spectrometry for identification of disease-related proteins. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The cDNA of the differential protein was transfected into colorectal cancer cells, and the biological behavior of these cells was observed.

  17. Assessment of CCL2 and CXCL8 chemokines in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue samples from dogs affected with canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, Elodie; Krafft, Emilie; Farnir, Frederic; Holopainen, Saila; Laurila, Henna P; Rajamäki, Minna M; Day, Michael J; Antoine, Nadine; Pirottin, Dimitri; Clercx, Cecile

    2015-10-01

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (CIPF) is a progressive disease of the lung parenchyma that is more prevalent in dogs of the West Highland white terrier (WHWT) breed. Since the chemokines (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) have been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis in humans, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether these same chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of CIPF. CCL2 and CXCL8 concentrations were measured by ELISA in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from healthy dogs and WHWTs affected with CIPF. Expression of the genes encoding CCL2 and CXCL8 and their respective receptors, namely (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) and (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2), was compared in unaffected lung tissue and biopsies from dogs affected with CIPF by quantitative PCR and localisation of CCL2 and CXCL8 proteins were determined by immunohistochemistry. Significantly greater CCL2 and CXCL8 concentrations were found in the BALF from WHWTs affected with CIPF, compared with healthy dogs. Significantly greater serum concentrations of CCL2, but not CXCL8, were found in CIPF-affected dogs compared with healthy WHWTs. No differences in relative gene expression for CCL2, CXCL8, CCR2 or CXCR2 were observed when comparing lung biopsies from control dogs and those affected with CIPF. In affected lung tissues, immunolabelling for CCL2 and CXCL8 was observed in bronchial airway epithelial cells in dogs affected with CIPF. The study findings suggest that both CCL2 and CXCL8 are involved in the pathogenesis of CIPF. Further studies are required to determine whether these chemokines might have a clinical use as biomarkers of fibrosis or as targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromosome 7 Multiplication in EGFR-positive Lung Carcinomas Based on Tissue Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiambas, Evangelos; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Lefas, Alicia Y; Georgiannos, Stavros N; Ragos, Vasileios; Fotiades, Panagiotis P; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Karameris, Andreas; Peschos, Dimitrios; Patsouris, Efstratios; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-activation is observed in significant proportions of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Our aim was to investigate the role of chromosome 7 multiplication with regard to its influence in EGFR expression, combined or not with gene amplification. Using tissue microarray technology, fifty (n=50) primary NSCLCs were cored and re-embedded into the final recipient block. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and also chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) were performed. EGFR expression at any level was detected in 40/50 (80%) cores. Over-expression was observed in 23/40 (57.5%) cases. Gene amplification was identified in 11/50 (22%) cases whereas chromosome 7 polysomy in 8/50 (16%) cases. Pure chromosome 7 multiplication alone led to low or moderate levels of expression. Overall EGFR expression was correlated with gene (p=0.001) and interestingly with chromosome 7 centromere numerical imbalances (p=0.004). EGFR expression is associated not only with amplification, but also with chromosome 7 centromere multiple copies. Chromosome 7 multiplication -due to centromere region amplification or true polysomy- is critical for applying monoclonal antibody targeted therapeutic strategies excluding the pure non-amplified cases. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Bronchial associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma presenting as chronic lung sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeritzauer, Anne Ingrid; Venkatraman, Laskshmi; Manus, Kieran Mc; Kettle, Paul; Sah, Shatrugan; Elborn, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred from her general practitioner to the respiratory clinic with a 2 year history of recurrent pulmonary infections, mucus hypersecretion and right lobe consolidation following a severe pneumonic illness in 2006. She had no significant risk factors for respiratory disease. Chest computed tomography showed an air bronchogram and right lower lobe consolidation. On initial routine investigation IgA and IgG were normal; however, a discrete IgM paraprotein band in the mid gamma region was seen on serum electrophoresis. She was referred for haematological investigations. Bone marrow biopsy was positive for monoclonal lymphoplasmocytoid B cells and the patient was diagnosed with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia. Due to recurrent infections and an unclear diagnosis of the lung process, a right lower lobectomy and wedge resection of the middle lobe was performed. This showed bronchial associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma arising in the marginal zone. She has been well since surgery with no further respiratory infections.

  20. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  1. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases in human breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Chellakkan Selvanesan; Babu, Somasundaram Dinesh; Radhakrishna, Selvi; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Ravi Sankar, Bhaskaran

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the world today. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases that can degrade extracellular matrix proteins and promote cell invasion and metastasis. MMPs are differentially expressed and their expressions are often associated with a poor prognosis for patients. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the expression of MMPs in different grades of human breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues. We collected 39 breast cancer samples (24 grade II and 15 grade III) along with 16 normal breast tissues from outside the tumor margin during cancer removal surgery. The samples were analysed for the expression of all known MMPs using real-time quantitative PCR. The results indicate that mRNA expressions of MMP-1, -9,-11,-15,-24 and -25 were upregulated in breast cancer tissues when compared to normal breast tissues. But, the mRNA expressions of MMP-10 and MMP-19 were downregulated in cancer tissue. In membrane associated MMPs like MMP-15 and MMP-24 we found a grade dependent increase of their mRNA expression. Our studies demonstrate that MMPs are differentially regulated in breast cancer tissues and they might play various roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Thus, MMPs are of immense value to be studied as diagnostic markers and drug target.

  2. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Compartmentalization of vascular endothelial growth factor to the epithelial surface of the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, R J; Crystal, R G

    2001-04-01

    Based on assessment of mRNA expression, the lung is a major site of expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, largely from type II alveolar epithelial cells. With the knowledge that VEGF can function to induce vascular leak, we hypothesized that to protect the lung from pulmonary edema, the VEGF produced in the lung must be compartmentalized from the pulmonary endothelium, and thus must be compartmentalized to the surface of the respiratory epithelium. To assess this hypothesis, we quantified the levels of VEGF in human respiratory epithelial lining fluid recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal individuals. Strikingly, human respiratory epithelial lining fluid contains 11 +/- 5 ng/mL as quantified by ELISA, a 500-fold greater concentration than plasma (22 +/- 10 pg/mL, p Damocles sword" poised to induce lung endothelial permeability in conditions of acute lung injury when the integrity of the alveolar epithelial barrier is breached.

  4. Forcing lateral electron disequilibrium to spare lung tissue: a novel technique for stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Gaede, Stewart; Mulligan, Matthew; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has quickly become a preferred treatment option for early-stage lung cancer patients who are ineligible for surgery. This technique uses tightly conformed megavoltage (MV) x-ray beams to irradiate a tumour with ablative doses in only a few treatment fractions. Small high energy x-ray fields can cause lateral electron disequilibrium (LED) to occur within low density media, which can reduce tumour dose. These dose effects may be challenging to predict using analytic dose calculation algorithms, especially at higher beam energies. As a result, previous authors have suggested using low energy photons (5 × 5 cm2) for lung cancer patients to avoid the negative dosimetric effects of LED. In this work, we propose a new form of SBRT, described as LED-optimized SBRT (LED-SBRT), which utilizes radiotherapy (RT) parameters designed to cause LED to advantage. It will be shown that LED-SBRT creates enhanced dose gradients at the tumour/lung interface, which can be used to manipulate tumour dose, and/or normal lung dose. To demonstrate the potential benefits of LED-SBRT, the DOSXYZnrc (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON) Monte Carlo (MC) software was used to calculate dose within a cylindrical phantom and a typical lung patient. 6 MV or 18 MV x-ray fields were focused onto a small tumour volume (diameter ˜1 cm). For the phantom, square fields of 1 × 1 cm2, 3 × 3 cm2, or 5 × 5 cm2 were applied. However, in the patient, 3 × 1 cm2, 3 × 2 cm2, 3 × 2.5 cm2, or 3 × 3 cm2 field sizes were used in simulations to assure target coverage in the superior-inferior direction. To mimic a 180° SBRT arc in the (symmetric) phantom, a single beam profile was calculated, rotated, and beams were summed at 1° segments to accumulate an arc dose distribution. For the patient, a 360° arc was modelled with 36 equally weighted (and spaced) fields focused on the tumour centre. A planning target volume (PTV) was generated by considering the

  5. Microvesicles Derived From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Human Lungs Rejected for Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennai, S; Monsel, A; Hao, Q; Park, J; Matthay, M A; Lee, J W

    2015-09-01

    The need to increase the donor pool for lung transplantation is a major public health issue. We previously found that administration of mesenchymal stem cells "rehabilitated" marginal donor lungs rejected for transplantation using ex vivo lung perfusion. However, the use of stem cells has some inherent limitation such as the potential for tumor formation. In the current study, we hypothesized that microvesicles, small anuclear membrane fragments constitutively released from mesenchymal stem cells, may be a good alternative to using stem cells. Using our well established ex vivo lung perfusion model, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells increased alveolar fluid clearance (i.e. ability to absorb pulmonary edema fluid) in a dose-dependent manner, decreased lung weight gain following perfusion and ventilation, and improved airway and hemodynamic parameters compared to perfusion alone. Microvesicles derived from normal human lung fibroblasts as a control had no effect. Co-administration of microvesicles with anti-CD44 antibody attenuated these effects, suggesting a key role of the CD44 receptor in the internalization of the microvesicles into the injured host cell and its effect. In summary, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells were as effective as the parent mesenchymal stem cells in rehabilitating marginal donor human lungs. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. The roles of diol epoxide and o-quinone pathways in mouse lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a)pyrene: relevance to human lung carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is sufficient epidemiological evidence supported by experimental data that some PAH-containing complex environmental mixtures pose risks to human health by increasing lung cancer incidence. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that human respirator...

  7. Single cell analysis of human tissues and solid tumors with mass cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelatian, Nalin; Doxie, Deon B; Greenplate, Allison R; Mobley, Bret C; Lehman, Jonathan M; Sinnaeve, Justine; Kauffmann, Rondi M; Werkhaven, Jay A; Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Weaver, Kyle D; Thompson, Reid C; Massion, Pierre P; Hooks, Mary A; Kelley, Mark C; Chambless, Lola B; Ihrie, Rebecca A; Irish, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Mass cytometry measures 36 or more markers per cell and is an appealing platform for comprehensive phenotyping of cells in human tissue and tumor biopsies. While tissue disaggregation and fluorescence cytometry protocols were pioneered decades ago, it is not known whether established protocols will be effective for mass cytometry and maintain cancer and stromal cell diversity. Tissue preparation techniques were systematically compared for gliomas and melanomas, patient derived xenografts of small cell lung cancer, and tonsil tissue as a control. Enzymes assessed included DNase, HyQTase, TrypLE, collagenase (Col) II, Col IV, Col V, and Col XI. Fluorescence and mass cytometry were used to track cell subset abundance following different enzyme combinations and treatment times. Mechanical disaggregation paired with enzymatic dissociation by Col II, Col IV, Col V, or Col XI plus DNase for 1 h produced the highest yield of viable cells per gram of tissue. Longer dissociation times led to increasing cell death and disproportionate loss of cell subsets. Key markers for establishing cell identity included CD45, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD64, HLA-DR, CD11c, CD56, CD44, GFAP, S100B, SOX2, nestin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and CD31. Mass and fluorescence cytometry identified comparable frequencies of cancer cell subsets, leukocytes, and endothelial cells in glioma (R = 0.97), and tonsil (R = 0.98). This investigation establishes standard procedures for preparing viable single cell suspensions that preserve the cellular diversity of human tissue microenvironments. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  8. Higher Tissue Levels of Thymidylate Synthase Determined by ELISA Are Associated with Poor Prognosis of Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Takayuki; Saito, Gaku; Sakaizawa, Takao; Agatsuma, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Yoshiaki; Hyogotani, Akira; Hamanaka, Kazutoshi; Toishi, Masayuki; Takasuna, Keiichiro; Kondo, Ryoichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Ito, Ken-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is essential in thymidylate biosynthesis and DNA replication. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a rate-limiting enzyme in pyrimidine catabolism and is important in catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The significance of TS and DPD expressed in lung cancer remains controversial. Here we analyzed the relationship between TS and DPD expression and clinicopathological features of lung cancer. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to measure TS and DPD levels in paired tumor and non-tumor lung tissues obtained from 168 patients (107 adenocarcinomas, 39 squamous cell carcinomas, and 22 others), who had operations at the Shinshu University Hospital from 2004 to 2007 and were followed up for a median of 57.0 months. TS and DPD expression levels were higher in tumor tissues, and TS expression levels were significantly lower in adenocarcinomas than those in other subtypes. In addition, patients with low TS levels survived longer compared with patents with high TS levels. By contrast, DPD expression levels were not correlated with overall patient survival. Importantly, patients with low TS and DPD levels exhibited significantly prolonged survival than those with high TS and DPD. Among the 168 patients, 59 patients were treated with tegafur-uracil (UFT), a DPD-inhibitory fluoropyrimidine, and the UFT-treated patients with high TS and high DPD levels showed worst prognosis. Our study demonstrates a significant correlation between low TS expression levels and long-term prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Thus, ELISA is a clinically useful method to measure TS and DPD expression in lung cancer tissues.

  9. Profiling RNA editing in human tissues: towards the inosinome Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Ernesto; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Aiello, Italia; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Adenine to Inosine RNA editing is a widespread co- and post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes acting on double stranded RNA. It has a plethora of biological effects, appears to be particularly pervasive in humans with respect to other mammals, and is implicated in a number of diverse human pathologies. Here we present the first human inosinome atlas comprising 3,041,422 A-to-I events identified in six tissues from three healthy individuals. Matched directional total-RNA-Seq and whole genome sequence datasets were generated and analysed within a dedicated computational framework, also capable of detecting hyper-edited reads. Inosinome profiles are tissue specific and edited gene sets consistently show enrichment of genes involved in neurological disorders and cancer. Overall frequency of editing also varies, but is strongly correlated with ADAR expression levels. The inosinome database is available at: http://srv00.ibbe.cnr.it/editing/. PMID:26449202

  10. Zicam-induced damage to mouse and human nasal tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae H Lim

    Full Text Available Intranasal medications are used to treat various nasal disorders. However, their effects on olfaction remain unknown. Zicam (zinc gluconate; Matrixx Initiatives, Inc, a homeopathic substance marketed to alleviate cold symptoms, has been implicated in olfactory dysfunction. Here, we investigated Zicam and several common intranasal agents for their effects on olfactory function. Zicam was the only substance that showed significant cytotoxicity in both mouse and human nasal tissue. Specifically, Zicam-treated mice had disrupted sensitivity of olfactory sensory neurons to odorant stimulation and were unable to detect novel odorants in behavioral testing. These findings were long-term as no recovery of function was observed after two months. Finally, human nasal explants treated with Zicam displayed significantly elevated extracellular lactate dehydrogenase levels compared to saline-treated controls, suggesting severe necrosis that was confirmed on histology. Our results demonstrate that Zicam use could irreversibly damage mouse and human nasal tissue and may lead to significant smell dysfunction.

  11. LGL1 modulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Sweezey, Neil B; Kaplan, Feige

    2015-02-15

    Rapid growth and formation of new gas exchange units (alveogenesis) are hallmarks of the perinatal lung. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), common in very premature infants, is characterized by premature arrest of alveogenesis. Mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts) regulate both lung branching and alveogenesis through mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. Temporal or spatial deficiency of late-gestation lung 1/cysteine-rich secretory protein LD2 (LGL1/CRISPLD2), expressed in and secreted by lung fibroblasts, can impair both lung branching and alveogenesis (LGL1 denotes late gestation lung 1 protein; LGL1 denotes the human gene; Lgl1 denotes the mouse/rat gene). Absence of Lgl1 is embryonic lethal. Lgl1 levels are dramatically reduced in oxygen toxicity rat models of BPD, and heterozygous Lgl1(+/-) mice exhibit features resembling human BPD. To explore the role of LGL1 in mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in developing lung, we developed a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible RNA-mediated LGL1 knockdown cellular model in human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC5(LGL1KD)). We assessed the impact of LGL1 on cell proliferation, cell migration, apoptosis, and wound healing. DOX-induced MRC5(LGL1KD) suppressed cell growth and increased apoptosis of annexin V(+) staining cells and caspase 3/7 activity. LGL1-conditioned medium increased migration of fetal rat primary lung epithelial cells and human airway epithelial cells. Impaired healing by MRC5(LGL1KD) cells of a wound model was attenuated by addition of LGL1-conditioned medium. Suppression of LGL1 was associated with dysregulation of extracellular matrix genes (downregulated MMP1, ColXVα1, and ELASTIN) and proapoptosis genes (upregulated BAD, BAK, CASP2, and TNFRSF1B) and inhibition of 44/42MAPK phosphorylation. Our findings define a role for LGL1 in fibroblast expansion and migration, epithelial cell migration, and mesenchymal-epithelial signaling, key processes in fetal lung development. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological

  12. Comparative synchronous fluorescence spectrophotometry and 32P-postlabeling analysis of PAH-DNA adducts in human lung and the relationship to TP53 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Åshild; Kure, Elin H.; Nielsen, Per Sabro

    1996-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts were studied in human lung from 39 lung cancer patients by synchronous fluorescence spectrophotometric (SFS) and 32P-postlabeling assays. Regression analysis of the samples failed to detect any correlation between benzo[a]pyrene-diolepoxide (BPDE......)-DNA adducts detected by SFS and the BPDE co-migrating spot detected by 32P-postlabeling. We have also analyzed the relationship between adduct levels and TP53 mutations. By postlabeling diagonal radioactive zone (DRZ) adducts were detected in 37 of 39 (95%) lung tissues from lung cancer patients...... and the adduct level ranged from 6.81 to 108.50 adducts/10(8) nucleotide. Thirty-three of 39 (85%) had detectable levels of BPDE-DNA adducts (> 1 adduct/10(9) nucleotide). Current heavy smokers (> 20 cigarettes/day) have significantly higher DRZ adduct levels compared to individuals smoking less than 20...

  13. [Elevated expression of endothelin 2 in lung tissues of asthmatic rats after exposed to cigarette smoke and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Shuyang; Chen, Bi; Li, Jingjing

    2017-08-01

    Objective To study the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the expression of endothelin 2 (ET-2) in bronchial epithelium of asthmatic rats. Methods Asthma models were established through intraperitoneal injection of 1 mL chicken ovalbumin (OVA)/Al(OH)3 mixture (asthma model group, n=6); based on the asthma models, exposure to smoking gas lasted four weeks with 10 cigarettes per day (smoke-exposed asthma group, n=6); based on the smoke-exposed asthma models, the rats were treated with intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone 2 mg/(kg.d), intragastric administration of ET receptor inhibitor bosentan 100 mg/(kg.d) and combined use, respectively named dexamethasone treated group, bosentan treated group, and dexamethasone-bosentan treated group, 6 rats in every group. What's more, other 6 rats were only subjected to intraperitoneal injection of 1 mL normal saline as normal controls; in addition to the injection of saline, cigarette smoke control group (n=6) was set up by the exposure to smoking gas for four weeks with 10 cigarettes per day. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected from the upper lobe of the left lung for cell counting and classification. Pathological changes of the right upper lung lobe tissues were observed by HE staining. In other lung tissues, the expression of JNK1/2 was detected by Western blotting; ET-2 was tested by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay and trace enzyme standard method were used to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH), respectively. Results Compared with normal control group, the number of airway inflammation cells increased in the BALF, and the expressions of ET-2, JNK1/2, MDA and GSH increased in the lung tissues of cigarette smoke control group, asthma model group and cigarette smoke-exposed asthma group. Compared with cigarette smoke-exposed asthma group, the number of airway inflammation cells decreased in the BALF, and the expressions of

  14. The interaction of asbestos and iron in lung tissue revealed by synchrotron-based scanning X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Schneider, Giulia; Salomé, Murielle; Schneider, Manuela; Calligaro, Carla; Kiskinova, Maya; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos is a potent carcinogen associated with malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer but its carcinogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Asbestos toxicity is ascribed to its particular physico-chemical characteristics, and one of them is the presence of and ability to adsorb iron, which may cause an alteration of iron homeostasis in the tissue. This observational study reports a combination of advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and micro-spectroscopic methods that provide correlative morphological and chemical information for shedding light on iron mobilization features during asbestos permanence in lung tissue. The results show that the processes responsible for the unusual distribution of iron at different stages of interaction with the fibres also involve calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. It has been confirmed that the dominant iron form present in asbestos bodies is ferritin, while the concurrent presence of haematite suggests alteration of iron chemistry during asbestos body permanence. PMID:23350030

  15. Integrative proteomics and tissue microarray profiling indicate the association between overexpressed serum proteins and non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Liu

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1, two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases.

  16. Guards at the gate: physiological and pathological roles of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cells in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Jin, Chengyan; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Shan; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Jingtao

    2017-12-01

    The lung is an important open organ and the primary site of respiration. Many life-threatening diseases develop in the lung, e.g., pneumonia, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. In the lung, innate immunity serves as the frontline in both anti-irritant response and anti-tumor defense and is also critical for mucosal homeostasis; thus, it plays an important role in containing these pulmonary diseases. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), characterized by their strict tissue residence and distinct function in the mucosa, are attracting increased attention in innate immunity. Upon sensing the danger signals from damaged epithelium, ILCs activate, proliferate, and release numerous cytokines with specific local functions; they also participate in mucosal immune-surveillance, immune-regulation, and homeostasis. However, when their functions become uncontrolled, ILCs can enhance pathological states and induce diseases. In this review, we discuss the physiological and pathological functions of ILC subsets 1 to 3 in the lung, and how the pathogenic environment affects the function and plasticity of ILCs.

  17. Health Impact of Retinoic Acid (ATRA) on Ovalbumin-Sensitized F344 Rat Lung and Improvement of Tissue Pathology by Citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The health impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of lung pathology and tissue remodeling has not been well established in the literature. Equally, the role of Citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology has not been ascertained in vivo. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and Ovalbumin (Egg albumin; OVA) exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse or ameliorate the related pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=35). Animals were sensitized to OVA and then exposed to six different treatments; negative control (-ve), ATRA, Citrals (C1 and C2) and their triple combinations (OVA+ ATRA + C1, OVA+ ATRA + C2), by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight data and blood were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21, and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from rat weights and blood (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from the histopathological analysis of exposing the F344 rats to OVA in combinations with ATRA and citrals, revealed various levels of lung tissue damage that was impacted by exposure to citral. We conclude that OVA+ATRA+C1 combination treatment did improve lung pathology as compared to single individual treatments. However, the OVA+ATRA+C2 combination not only failed to improve these parameters, but even worsened the lung pathology of this model. This promising study showed variable responses on the interaction of Ovalbumin, citrals, and ATRA as related to their damage/improvement of related lung tissue pathologies.

  18. Lipase member H is a novel secreted protein selectively upregulated in human lung adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Yoshida, Yukihiro [Department of Surgery, Asahi General Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Thoracic Surgery, The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ishimine, Hisako [Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshimasa [Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Sumitomo, Kenya [Department of Internal Medicine, JA Kochi Hospital, Kochi (Japan); Nakajima, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fukayama, Masashi [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo (Japan); Michiue, Tatsuo [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Life Science Center of Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance (TARA), The University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kurisaki, Akira, E-mail: akikuri@hotmail.com [Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Most of the adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas were LIPH-positive. • LIPH is necessary for the proliferation of lung cancer cells in vitro. • A high level of LIPH in serum is correlated with better survival in early phase lung-cancer patients after surgery. - Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most frequent causes of cancer-related death worldwide. However, molecular markers for lung cancer have not been well established. To identify novel genes related to lung cancer development, we surveyed publicly available DNA microarray data on lung cancer tissues. We identified lipase member H (LIPH, also known as mPA-PLA1) as one of the significantly upregulated genes in lung adenocarcinoma. LIPH was expressed in several adenocarcinoma cell lines when they were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blotting, and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemical analysis detected LIPH expression in most of the adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas tissue sections obtained from lung cancer patients. LIPH expression was also observed less frequently in the squamous lung cancer tissue samples. Furthermore, LIPH protein was upregulated in the serum of early- and late-phase lung cancer patients when they were analyzed by ELISA. Interestingly, high serum level of LIPH was correlated with better survival in early phase lung cancer patients after surgery. Thus, LIPH may be a novel molecular biomarker for lung cancer, especially for adenocarcinoma and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.

  19. Slow-freezing versus vitrification for human ovarian tissue cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Silke; Bündgen, Nana; Köster, Frank; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula; Griesinger, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Ovarian tissue can be cryopreserved prior to chemotherapy using either the slow-freezing or the vitrification method; however, the data on the equality of the procedures are still conflicting. In this study, a comparison of the cryo-damage of human ovarian tissue induced by either vitrification or slow-freezing was performed. Ovarian tissue from 23 pre-menopausal patients was cryopreserved with either slow-freezing or vitrification. After thawing/warming, the tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically analyzed and cultured in vitro. During tissue culture the estradiol release was assessed. No significant difference was found in the proportion of high-quality follicles after thawing/warming in the slow-freezing and vitrification group, respectively (72.7 versus 66.7 %, p = 0.733). Estradiol secretion by the ovarian tissue was similar between groups during 18 days in vitro culture (area-under-the-curve 5,411 versus 13,102, p = 0.11). Addition of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate or Activin A to the culture medium did not alter estradiol release in both groups. The proportion of Activated Caspase-3 or 'Proliferating-Cell-Nuclear-Antigen' positive follicles at the end of the culture period was similar between slow-freezing and vitrification. Slow-freezing and vitrification result in similar morphological integrity after cryopreservation, a similar estradiol release in culture, and similar rates of follicular proliferation and apoptosis after culture.

  20. Chrysotile effects on human lung cell carcinoma in culture: 3-D reconstruction and DNA quantification by image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado-Santelli Glaucia M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chrysotile is considered less harmful to human health than other types of asbestos fibers. Its clearance from the lung is faster and, in comparison to amphibole forms of asbestos, chrysotile asbestos fail to accumulate in the lung tissue due to a mechanism involving fibers fragmentation in short pieces. Short exposure to chrysotile has not been associated with any histopathological alteration of lung tissue. Methods The present work focuses on the association of small chrysotile fibers with interphasic and mitotic human lung cancer cells in culture, using for analyses confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions. The main goal was to perform the analysis of abnormalities in mitosis of fibers-containing cells as well as to quantify nuclear DNA content of treated cells during their recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Results HK2 cells treated with chrysotile for 48 h and recovered in additional periods of 24, 48 and 72 h in normal medium showed increased frequency of multinucleated and apoptotic cells. DNA ploidy of the cells submitted to the same chrysotile treatment schedules showed enhanced aneuploidy values. The results were consistent with the high frequency of multipolar spindles observed and with the presence of fibers in the intercellular bridge during cytokinesis. Conclusion The present data show that 48 h chrysotile exposure can cause centrosome amplification, apoptosis and aneuploid cell formation even when long periods of recovery were provided. Internalized fibers seem to interact with the chromatin during mitosis, and they could also interfere in cytokinesis, leading to cytokinesis failure which forms aneuploid or multinucleated cells with centrosome amplification.

  1. Divergent expression of claudin -1, -3, -4, -5 and -7 in developing human lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehtonen Siri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claudins are the main components of tight junctions, structures which are associated with cell polarity and permeability. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of claudins 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 in developing human lung tissues from 12 to 40 weeks of gestation. Methods 47 cases were analyzed by immunohistochemisty for claudins 1, 3, 4, 5 and 7. 23 cases were also investigated by quantitative RT-PCR for claudin-1, -3 and -4. Results Claudin-1 was expressed in epithelium of bronchi and large bronchioles from week 12 onwards but it was not detected in epithelium of developing alveoli. Claudin-3, -4 and -7 were strongly expressed in bronchial epithelium from week 12 to week 40, and they were also expressed in alveoli from week 16 to week 40. Claudin-5 was expressed strongly during all periods in endothelial cells. It was expressed also in epithelium of bronchi from week 12 to week 40, and in alveoli during the canalicular period. RT-PCR analyses revealed detectable amounts of RNAs for claudins 1, 3 and 4 in all cases studied. Conclusion Claudin-1, -3, -4, -5, and -7 are expressed in developing human lung from week 12 to week 40 with distinct locations and in divergent quantities. The expression of claudin-1 was restricted to the bronchial epithelium, whereas claudin-3, -4 and -7 were positive also in alveolar epithelium as well as in the bronchial epithelium. All claudins studied are linked to the development of airways, whereas claudin-3, -4, -5 and -7, but not claudin-1, are involved in the development of acinus and the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells.

  2. Dexmedetomidine Inhibits Inflammatory Reaction in Lung Tissues of Septic Rats by Suppressing TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wu

    2013-01-01

    and 20 μg/kg significantly decreased mortality and pulmonary inflammation of septic rats, as well as suppressed CLP-induced elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 and inhibited TLR4/MyD88 expression and NF-κB activation. These results suggest that dexmedetomidine may decrease mortality and inhibit inflammatory reaction in lung tissues of septic rats by suppressing TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway.

  3. Evidence for cytotoxic T lymphocyte response against human lung cancer: reconstitution of antigenic epitope with peptide eluted from lung adenocarcinoma MHC class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, R F; Naziruddin, B; Enriquez-Rincon, F; Duffy, B F; Ritter, J M; Sundaresan, S; Patterson, G A; Cooper, J D; Mohanakumar, T

    2000-07-01

    Cancer-associated, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted peptide antigens have been elucidated in human melanomas and ovarian, breast, and renal carcinomas; but relatively little is known about lung cancer antigens. To work toward delineation of lung cancer-associated antigens, we developed tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived cytolytic T cell lines (CTL), autologous lung cancer cell lines, and normal lung cell lines from 17 patients undergoing lung cancer resections. The TILs and CTL lines were subsequently evaluated for markers of activation and specific lysis of autologous or allogeneic lung cancer cell lines or both. Freshly isolated TILs contained a more activated T cell population compared with the patients' peripheral blood T cells as evidenced by an increased expression of HLA-DR, CD25, and CD45RO. TILs isolated from 15 patients lysed allogeneic lung cancer lines. TILs lysed autologous lung cancer but not autologous normal lung or Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cell lines (B-LCL) in 4 of 8 cases tested, suggesting tumor specificity. A CTL line (RHPBL57.1) was generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an HLA-A24(+) patient by stimulation against an established HLA-A24(+) allogeneic lung cancer cell line. RHPBL57.1 lysed the lung cancer cell line in an HLA-A24-restricted manner. Moreover, RHPBL57.1 specifically lysed autologous B-LCL pulsed with peptides, eluted from MHC class I and isolated from the HLA-A24(+) lung cancer cell line. TILs isolated from patients with lung cancer are predominantly an activated population of T cells with evidence of tumor and MHC class I-restricted lysis. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a lung cancer-associated, MHC class I-bound peptide antigen(s) that reconstitutes the epitope recognized by a lung cancer specific CD8(+) T cell line derived from a patient with lung cancer.

  4. Bcl2 Family Functions as Signaling Target in Nicotine-/NNK-Induced Survival of Human Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and has a strong etiological association with cigarette smoking. Nicotine and nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) are two major components in cigarette smoke that significantly contribute to the development of human lung cancer. Nicotine is able to stimulate survival of both normal human lung epithelial and lung cancer cells. In contrast to nicotine, NNK is a more potent carcinogen that not only induces single-stran...

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus-16 DNA in archived clinical samples of breast and lung cancer patients from North Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilahi, Naureen Ehsan; Anwar, Sobia; Noreen, Mamoona; Hashmi, Shoaib Naiyar; Murad, Sheeba

    2016-12-01

    Over the past few decades, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recorded as a key player in the development of various genital cancers, most notably cervical cancer. It has also been associated with some non-genital cancers. A subset of oropharyngeal cancers are known to be caused by HPV. Its aetiological involvement has been suggested for breast and lung cancer as well. However, reports regarding the HPV DNA detection vary widely from different parts of the world. Due to scarcity of local data in this regard, the current study aimed at retrospective detection of HPV presence in the archival samples of breast and lung cancer patients from north part of the country. A total of 55 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast (n = 46) and lung (n = 9) were collected for this study. Genotyping for HPV16 and 18 was carried out through PCR. HPV16 DNA was found in both breast and lung carcinoma samples with the prevalence rate of 17 and 11 %, respectively. An interesting association was found between ER/PR (Oestrogen/Progesterone receptor) and HER2/Neu (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) positivity with HPV occurrence in breast tumours. Current study shows the presence of HPV16 DNA in archived clinical biopsy sections from breast and lung cancers (17, 11 %), respectively. A positive correlation of HPV16 presence was found with ER/PR and HER2-positive breast cancers. These initial findings warrant further investigation in order to determine HPV prevalence and aetiological role in local cancers, especially in ER/PR/HER2-positive breast cancers on a larger scale.

  6. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  8. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  9. MicroRNA-26a modulates transforming growth factor beta-1-induced proliferation in human fetal lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoou [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Liu, Lian [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Shen, Yongchun; Wang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Xu, Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Wen, Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.com [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital, West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Endogenous miR-26a inhibits TGF-beta 1 induced proliferation of lung fibroblasts. • miR-26a induces G1 arrest through directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2. • TGF indispensable receptor, TGF-beta R I, is regulated by miR-26a. • miR-26a acts through inhibiting TGF-beta 2 feedback loop to reduce TGF-beta 1. • Collagen type I and connective tissue growth factor are suppressed by miR-26a. - Abstract: MicroRNA-26a is a newly discovered microRNA that has a strong anti-tumorigenic capacity and is capable of suppressing cell proliferation and activating tumor-specific apoptosis. However, whether miR-26a can inhibit the over-growth of lung fibroblasts remains unclear. The relationship between miR-26a and lung fibrosis was explored in the current study. We first investigated the effect of miR-26a on the proliferative activity of human lung fibroblasts with or without TGF-beta1 treatment. We found that the inhibition of endogenous miR-26a promoted proliferation and restoration of mature miR-26a inhibited the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts. We also examined that miR-26a can block the G1/S phase transition via directly targeting 3′-UTR of CCND2, degrading mRNA and decreasing protein expression of Cyclin D2. Furthermore, we showed that miR-26a mediated a TGF-beta 2-TGF-beta 1 feedback loop and inhibited TGF-beta R I activation. In addition, the overexpression of miR-26a also significantly suppressed the TGF-beta 1-interacting-CTGF–collagen fibrotic pathway. In summary, our studies indicated an essential role of miR-26a in the anti-fibrotic mechanism in TGF-beta1-induced proliferation in human lung fibroblasts, by directly targeting Cyclin D2, regulating TGF-beta R I as well as TGF-beta 2, and suggested the therapeutic potential of miR-26a in ameliorating lung fibrosis.

  10. An Introduction to The Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtahi Naeimeh Sadat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available From December 2000 until 2010, the researchers at Royan Institute conducted a wide range of investigations on ovarian tissue cryopreservation with the intent to provide fertility pres- ervation to cancer patients that were considered to be candidates for these services. In 2010, Royan Institute established the Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank as a subgroup of the Embryology Department. Since its inception, approximately 180 patients between the ages of 747 years have undergone consultations. Ovarian samples were cryopreserved from 47 patients (age: 7-35 years diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma (n=9; breast carcinoma (n=7, Ewing’s sarcoma (n=7, opposite side ovarian tumor (n=7, endometrial adenocarci- noma (n=4, malignant colon tumors (n=3, as well as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, major thalas- semia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=1-2 patients for each disease. Additionally, two patients requested ovarian tissue transplantation after completion of their treatments.

  11. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  12. CD5-positive marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terada Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD5-positive marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT of the lung is very rare. An 82-year-old Japanese woman was found to have an abnormal lung shadow on chest X-ray photography, and was admitted to our hospital. Imaging modaliti