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Sample records for human intestinal transit

  1. Relationship between postprandial motor activity in the human small intestine and the gastrointestinal transit of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, N.W.; Al-Janabi, M.N.; Edwards, C.A.; Barber, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Profiles for gastric emptying and colonic filling were determined in 20 normal volunteers by means of a gamma camera and dedicated minicomputer after ingestion of a radiolabeled solid meal. These were compared with intraluminal pressure activity, recorded simultaneously from three sites (each separated by 50 cm) in the small intestine by infusion manometry. Recordings were continued for at least 8 h or until all the radioactivity appeared in the colon. Colonic filling was approximately linear, occurring at an average rate of 16% of the meal residues per hour. There were significant inverse correlations (p less than 0.01) between the pressure activity in the proximal jejunum during the first 3 h after ingestion and the times taken for 50% and 80% of the meal residues to enter the colon, and direct correlations between total small intestinal pressure activity and the half-time for gastric emptying. Phase III of the interdigestive migrating motor complex appeared between 3 and 9 h after ingestion (when between 15% and 80% of the meal remained in the small intestine), but did not necessarily migrate to the next recording site until much later. The time of appearance of phase III in the proximal jejunum was directly correlated with the half-time for gastric emptying (p less than 0.05) and with the intraluminal pressure activity recorded at that site during the first 3 h after food ingestion (p less than 0.01). The time at which 80% of the meal residues had entered the colon was significantly shorter in 6 subjects, in whom a postprandial activity front appeared to migrate throughout the small bowel, compared with 13 subjects, in whom this did not occur (5.0 +/- 0.5 h vs. 7.0 +/- 0.4 h, p less than 0.01). These studies have shown that gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal is related to both fed and fasted intraluminal pressure activity in the small intestine

  2. Influence of atropine and loperamide on reduced intestinal transit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Calotropis procera latex alone and in the presence of loperamide and atropine on intestinal transit in rats were determined to elucidate the action of C. procera on intestinal transit. Six groups of rats containing ten rats per group were used. Each rat in the control group (I) received 0.5 ml of normal saline.

  3. Effect of ageing on the gastro-intestinal transit of a lactulose-supplemented mixed solid-liquid meal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, M; Börsch, G; Schaffstein, J; Lüth, I; Rickels, R; Ricken, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal transit of a mixed solid-liquid meal containing wheat bread, scrambled eggs, coffee labelled with 99mTc, orange juice with lactulose and indigocarmine was evaluated in 21 young control (mean age 33.5 years) and 25 elderly subjects (mean age 81.7 years) without gastrointestinal complaints or severe medical illness. The rate of gastric emptying was determined by an anterior gamma camera technique, mouth-to-caecum transit by the hydrogen breath test and whole-gut transit by the first stool passage of indigocarmine. Gastric emptying was significantly prolonged in older subjects: t1/2 = 136 +/- (SEM) 13 versus 81 +/- 4 min; p less than 0.001. Concerning mouth-to-caecum or whole-gut transit time, significant differences between the two study groups were not detected.

  4. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsøe, Jonas; Fynne, Lotte; Gregersen, Tine; Schlageter, Vincent; Christensen, Lisbet A; Dahlerup, Jens F; Rijkhoff, Nico J M; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2011-12-29

    Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland) is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4) giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, φ). Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1) with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam); (2) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Experiment (1) showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min) and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min). Comparing experiments (1) and (2) there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2) and (3), short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1) (p = 0.03). MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  5. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal parasitic infections constitute a global health burden causing clinical morbidity. Parasitic protozoa and helminthes are responsible for some of the most devastating and prevalent diseases of human. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among patients attending Federal ...

  6. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Intestinal parasitic infections constitute a global health burden causing clinical morbidity. Parasitic protozoa and helminthes are responsible for some of the most devastating and prevalent diseases of human. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among patients attending ...

  7. The Human Intestinal Microbiome: A New Frontier of Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D.

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative o...

  8. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WorsØe Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. Methods A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4 giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, ϕ. Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1 with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam; (2 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Results Experiment (1 showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min. Comparing experiments (1 and (2 there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2 and (3, short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1 (p = 0.03. Conclusion MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  9. The Contributions of Human Mini-Intestines to the Study of Intestinal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huimin; Hasan, Nesrin M; In, Julie G; Estes, Mary K; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-02-10

    The lack of accessibility to normal and diseased human intestine and the inability to separate the different functional compartments of the intestine even when tissue could be obtained have held back the understanding of human intestinal physiology. Clevers and his associates identified intestinal stem cells and established conditions to grow "mini-intestines" ex vivo in differentiated and undifferentiated conditions. This pioneering work has made a new model of the human intestine available and has begun making contributions to the understanding of human intestinal transport in normal physiologic conditions and the pathophysiology of intestinal diseases. However, this model is reductionist and lacks many of the complexities of normal intestine. Consequently, it is not yet possible to predict how great the advances using this model will be for understanding human physiology and pathophysiology, nor how the model will be modified to include multiple other intestinal cell types and physical forces necessary to more closely approximate normal intestine. This review describes recent studies using mini-intestines, which have readdressed previously established models of normal intestinal transport physiology and newly examined intestinal pathophysiology. The emphasis is on studies with human enteroids grown either as three-dimensional spheroids or two-dimensional monolayers. In addition, comments are provided on mouse studies in cases when human studies have not yet been described.

  10. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and human intestinal health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miquel, S.; Martin, R.; Rossi, O.; Bermudez-Humaran, L.G.; Chatel, J.M.; Sokol, H.; Thomas, M.; Wells, J.M.; Langella, P.

    2013-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is the most abundant bacterium in the human intestinal microbiota of healthy adults, representing more than 5% of the total bacterial population. Over the past five years, an increasing number of studies have clearly described the importance of this highly metabolically

  11. Increased intestinal marker absorption due to regional permeability changes and decreased intestinal transit during sepsis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Pantzar, N.; Jeppson, B.; Westroem, B.R.; Karlsson, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The intestinal barrier properties are impaired during inflammation and sepsis, but the mechanisms behind this are unknown and were therefore investigated during experimental sepsis in rats. The different-sized intestinal absorption markers 51 Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ovalbumin were gavaged to rats made septic by intra-abdominal bacterial implantation and to sham-operated rats. Regional tissue permeability was measured in diffusion chambers, and intestinal transit was evaluated by intestinal accumulation of gavaged 51 Cr-EDTA. In comparison with the sham-operated rats, septic rats had higher 51 Cr-EDTA levels in blood and urine and showed a prolonged intestinal transit. Septic rats also had a lower tissue permeability to both markers in the small intestines but higher permeability to ovalbumin in the colon. Rats receiving morphine to decrease intestinal motility showed similar changes, with a decreased intestinal transit and increased marker absorption. Thr results suggest that the increased intestinal absorption during sepsis was due to regional permeability changes and prolonged intestinal transit. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The human intestinal microbiome: a new frontier of human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masahira; Taylor, Todd D

    2009-02-01

    To analyze the vast number and variety of microorganisms inhabiting the human intestine, emerging metagenomic technologies are extremely powerful. The intestinal microbes are taxonomically complex and constitute an ecologically dynamic community (microbiota) that has long been believed to possess a strong impact on human physiology. Furthermore, they are heavily involved in the maturation and proliferation of human intestinal cells, helping to maintain their homeostasis and can be causative of various diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. A simplified animal model system has provided the mechanistic basis for the molecular interactions that occur at the interface between such microbes and host intestinal epithelia. Through metagenomic analysis, it is now possible to comprehensively explore the genetic nature of the intestinal microbiome, the mutually interacting system comprising the host cells and the residing microbial community. The human microbiome project was recently launched as an international collaborative research effort to further promote this newly developing field and to pave the way to a new frontier of human biology, which will provide new strategies for the maintenance of human health.

  13. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Erkus, O.; Boekhorst, J.; Goffau, M. de; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  14. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed

  15. Robust bioengineered 3D functional human intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Lin, Yinan; Davis, Kimberly M; Wang, Qianrui; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Li, Chunmei; Isberg, Ralph R; Kumamoto, Carol A; Mecsas, Joan; Kaplan, David L

    2015-09-16

    Intestinal functions are central to human physiology, health and disease. Options to study these functions with direct relevance to the human condition remain severely limited when using conventional cell cultures, microfluidic systems, organoids, animal surrogates or human studies. To replicate in vitro the tissue architecture and microenvironments of native intestine, we developed a 3D porous protein scaffolding system, containing a geometrically-engineered hollow lumen, with adaptability to both large and small intestines. These intestinal tissues demonstrated representative human responses by permitting continuous accumulation of mucous secretions on the epithelial surface, establishing low oxygen tension in the lumen, and interacting with gut-colonizing bacteria. The newly developed 3D intestine model enabled months-long sustained access to these intestinal functions in vitro, readily integrable with a multitude of different organ mimics and will therefore ensure a reliable ex vivo tissue system for studies in a broad context of human intestinal diseases and treatments.

  16. Characterization of Mucosal Disaccharidases from Human Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Amiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used a brush border membrane (BBM preparation from human small intestine to analyze the proportion and the activity of major intestinal disaccharidases, including sucrase-isomaltase (SI, maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH. SI, MGAM and LPH respectively constituted 8.2%, 2.7% and 1.4% of total BBM protein. The activity of SI and LPH decreased threefold after purification from the brush border membrane, which highlights the effect of membrane microdomains on the functional capacity of these enzymes. All of the disaccharidases showed optimal activity at pH 6, over 50% residual activity between pH 5 to pH 7, and increasing activity with rising temperatures up to 45 °C, along with a stable functional structure. Therefore the enzymes can withstand mild intraluminal pH alterations with adequate function, and are able to increase their activity with elevated core body temperature. Our data provide a functional measure for characterization of intestinal disaccharidases under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Alternative Functional In Vitro Models of Human Intestinal Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Kauffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically relevant sources of absorptive intestinal epithelial cells are crucial for human drug transport studies. Human adenocarcinoma-derived intestinal cell lines, such as Caco-2, offer conveniences of easy culture maintenance and scalability, but do not fully recapitulate in vivo intestinal phenotypes. Additional sources of renewable physiologically relevant human intestinal cells would provide a much needed tool for drug discovery and intestinal physiology. We sought to evaluate and compare two alternative sources of human intestinal cells, commercially available primary human intestinal epithelial cells (hInEpCs and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived intestinal cells to Caco-2, for use in in vitro transwell monolayer intestinal transport assays. To achieve this for iPSC-derived cells, our previously described 3-dimensional intestinal organogenesis method was adapted to transwell differentiation. Intestinal cells were assessed by marker expression through immunocytochemical and mRNA expression analyses, monolayer integrity through Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER measurements and molecule permeability, and functionality by taking advantage the well-characterized intestinal transport mechanisms. In most cases, marker expression for primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells appeared to be as good as or better than Caco-2. Furthermore, transwell monolayers exhibited high TEER with low permeability. Primary hInEpCs showed molecule efflux indicative of P-glycoprotein transport. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived cells also showed neonatal Fc receptor-dependent binding of immunoglobulin G variants. Primary hInEpCs and iPSC-derived intestinal cells exhibit expected marker expression and demonstrate basic functional monolayer formation, similar to or better than Caco-2. These cells could offer an alternative source of human intestinal cells for understanding normal intestinal epithelial physiology and drug transport.

  18. Farewell to Animal Testing: Innovations on Human Intestinal Microphysiological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyun Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human intestine is a dynamic organ where the complex host-microbe interactions that orchestrate intestinal homeostasis occur. Major contributing factors associated with intestinal health and diseases include metabolically-active gut microbiota, intestinal epithelium, immune components, and rhythmical bowel movement known as peristalsis. Human intestinal disease models have been developed; however, a considerable number of existing models often fail to reproducibly predict human intestinal pathophysiology in response to biological and chemical perturbations or clinical interventions. Intestinal organoid models have provided promising cytodifferentiation and regeneration, but the lack of luminal flow and physical bowel movements seriously hamper mimicking complex host-microbe crosstalk. Here, we discuss recent advances of human intestinal microphysiological systems, such as the biomimetic human “Gut-on-a-Chip” that can employ key intestinal components, such as villus epithelium, gut microbiota, and immune components under peristalsis-like motions and flow, to reconstitute the transmural 3D lumen-capillary tissue interface. By encompassing cutting-edge tools in microfluidics, tissue engineering, and clinical microbiology, gut-on-a-chip has been leveraged not only to recapitulate organ-level intestinal functions, but also emulate the pathophysiology of intestinal disorders, such as chronic inflammation. Finally, we provide potential perspectives of the next generation microphysiological systems as a personalized platform to validate the efficacy, safety, metabolism, and therapeutic responses of new drug compounds in the preclinical stage.

  19. [Metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huixue; Tan, Zhenyuan; Deng, Jiagang; Liang, Qiuyun; Nong, Yumei; Song, Nianmei

    2011-02-01

    To study the metabolism of mangiferin by human intestinal bacteria in vitro. Human intestinal bacteria and mangiferin were incubated under anaerobic conditions in vitro. The metabolite was separated and purified by D101 macroporous resin column and preparation high performance liquid chromatography, and its structure was identified by MS and NMR. After 12 h incubation with human intestinal bacteria, the content of mangiferin metabolite reached the maximum, and it was determined as 1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen by MS and NMR. Mangiferin can be metabolized in vitro by human intestinal bacteria into its aglycone (1, 3, 6, 7-tetrahydroxyxanthen).

  20. Lactic Acid Bacteria and the Human Intestinal Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The great interest in the human microbiome has revived attention paid to LAB presence in the human intestine. This chapter first discusses the LAB associated with the human intestinal microbiota and their potential roles in health and diseases. It then addresses recent metagenomic studies that

  1. Extensive Intestinal Resection Triggers Behavioral Adaptation, Intestinal Remodeling and Microbiota Transition in Short Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Mayeur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extensive resection of small bowel often leads to short bowel syndrome (SBS. SBS patients develop clinical mal-absorption and dehydration relative to the reduction of absorptive area, acceleration of gastrointestinal transit time and modifications of the gastrointestinal intra-luminal environment. As a consequence of severe mal-absorption, patients require parenteral nutrition (PN. In adults, the overall adaptation following intestinal resection includes spontaneous and complex compensatory processes such as hyperphagia, mucosal remodeling of the remaining part of the intestine and major modifications of the microbiota. SBS patients, with colon in continuity, harbor a specific fecal microbiota that we called “lactobiota” because it is enriched in the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc group and depleted in anaerobic micro-organisms (especially Clostridium and Bacteroides. In some patients, the lactobiota-driven fermentative activities lead to an accumulation of fecal d/l-lactates and an increased risk of d-encephalopathy. Better knowledge of clinical parameters and lactobiota characteristics has made it possible to stratify patients and define group at risk for d-encephalopathy crises.

  2. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and human gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Cancers of the gastrointestinal tract account for 25 % of all cancers and for 9 % of all causes of cancer death in the world, so gastrointestinal cancers represent a major health problem. In the past decades, an emerging role has been attributed to the interactions between the gastrointestinal content and the onset of neoplasia. Thus, exogenous microbial administration of peculiar bacterial strains (probiotics) has been suggested as having a profound influence on multiple processes associated with a change in cancer risk. Probiotics are mono or mixed cultures of live microorganisms that might beneficially affect the host by improving the characteristics of indigenous microflora. Although the effects of probiotic administration has been intensively investigated in vitro, in animal models, in healthy volunteers, and in some human gastrointestinal diseases, very little is still known about the possible cross-interactions among probiotic administration, changes of intestinal flora, and the neoplastic transformation of gastrointestinal mucosa. Theoretically, probiotics are able to reduce cancer risk by a number of mechanisms: (a) binding and degradation of potential carcinogens; (b) quantitative, qualitative and metabolic alterations of the intestinal microflora; (c) production of anti-tumorigenic or anti-mutagenic compounds; (d) competitive action towards pathogenic bacteria; (e) enhancement of the host's immune response; (f) direct effects on cell proliferation. This review will attempt to highlight the literature on the most widely recognized effects of probiotics against neoplastic transformation of gastrointestinal mucosa and in particular on their effects on cell proliferation.

  3. A new approach to predict human intestinal absorption using porcine intestinal tissue and biorelevant matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhout, Joost; van de Steeg, Evita; Grossouw, Dimitri; Zeijdner, Evelijn E; Krul, Cyrille A M; Verwei, Miriam; Wortelboer, Heleen M

    2014-10-15

    A reliable prediction of the oral bioavailability in humans is crucial and of high interest for pharmaceutical and food industry. The predictive value of currently used in silico methods, in vitro cell lines, ex vivo intestinal tissue and/or in vivo animal studies for human intestinal absorption, however, is often insufficient, especially when food-drug interactions are evaluated. Ideally, for this purpose healthy human intestinal tissue is used, but due to its limited availability there is a need for alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of healthy porcine intestinal tissue mounted in a newly developed InTESTine™ system to predict human intestinal absorption of compounds with different chemical characteristics, and within biorelevant matrices. To that end, first, a representative set of compounds was chosen of which the apparent permeability (Papp) data in both Caco-2 cells and human intestinal tissue mounted in the Ussing chamber system, and absolute human oral bioavailability were reported. Thereafter, Papp values of the subset were determined in both porcine jejunal tissue and our own Caco-2 cells. In addition, the feasibility of this new approach to study regional differences (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) in permeability of compounds and to study the effects of luminal factors on permeability was also investigated. For the latter, a comparison was made between the compatibility of porcine intestinal tissue, Caco-2 cells, and Caco-2 cells co-cultured with the mucin producing HT29-MTX cells with biorelevant samples as collected from an in vitro dynamic gastrointestinal model (TIM). The results demonstrated that for the paracellularly transported compounds atenolol, cimetidine, mannitol and ranitidine porcine Papp values are within 3-fold difference of human Papp values, whereas the Caco-2 Papp values are beyond 3-fold difference. Overall, the porcine intestinal tissue Papp values are more comparable to human Papp values (9 out

  4. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Finkbeiner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Short bowel syndrome (SBS is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, called human intestinal organoids (HIOs, have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  6. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  7. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Poston; Bhuiyan, Nasir U.; Redd, R. Alex; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-01-01

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents

  8. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug?s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorpti...

  9. the intestinal expulsion of the roundworm Ascaris suum is associated with eosinophils, intra-epithelial T cells and decreased intestinal transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masure, Dries; Wang, Tao; Vlaminck, Johnny; Claerhoudt, Sarah; Chiers, Koen; Van den Broeck, Wim; Saunders, Jimmy; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides remains the most common endoparasite in humans, yet there is still very little information available about the immunological principles of protection, especially those directed against larval stages. Due to the natural host-parasite relationship, pigs infected with A. suum make an excellent model to study the mechanisms of protection against this nematode. In pigs, a self-cure reaction eliminates most larvae from the small intestine between 14 and 21 days post infection. In this study, we investigated the mucosal immune response leading to the expulsion of A. suum and the contribution of the hepato-tracheal migration. Self-cure was independent of previous passage through the liver or lungs, as infection with lung stage larvae did not impair self-cure. When animals were infected with 14-day-old intestinal larvae, the larvae were being driven distally in the small intestine around 7 days post infection but by 18 days post infection they re-inhabited the proximal part of the small intestine, indicating that more developed larvae can counter the expulsion mechanism. Self-cure was consistently associated with eosinophilia and intra-epithelial T cells in the jejunum. Furthermore, we identified increased gut movement as a possible mechanism of self-cure as the small intestinal transit time was markedly decreased at the time of expulsion of the worms. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanisms of self-cure that occur during A. suum infections.

  10. the intestinal expulsion of the roundworm Ascaris suum is associated with eosinophils, intra-epithelial T cells and decreased intestinal transit time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dries Masure

    Full Text Available Ascaris lumbricoides remains the most common endoparasite in humans, yet there is still very little information available about the immunological principles of protection, especially those directed against larval stages. Due to the natural host-parasite relationship, pigs infected with A. suum make an excellent model to study the mechanisms of protection against this nematode. In pigs, a self-cure reaction eliminates most larvae from the small intestine between 14 and 21 days post infection. In this study, we investigated the mucosal immune response leading to the expulsion of A. suum and the contribution of the hepato-tracheal migration. Self-cure was independent of previous passage through the liver or lungs, as infection with lung stage larvae did not impair self-cure. When animals were infected with 14-day-old intestinal larvae, the larvae were being driven distally in the small intestine around 7 days post infection but by 18 days post infection they re-inhabited the proximal part of the small intestine, indicating that more developed larvae can counter the expulsion mechanism. Self-cure was consistently associated with eosinophilia and intra-epithelial T cells in the jejunum. Furthermore, we identified increased gut movement as a possible mechanism of self-cure as the small intestinal transit time was markedly decreased at the time of expulsion of the worms. Taken together, these results shed new light on the mechanisms of self-cure that occur during A. suum infections.

  11. Intestinal fructose transport and malabsorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hilary F; Butler, Ross N; Brooks, Doug A

    2011-02-01

    Fructose is a hexose sugar that is being increasingly consumed in its monosaccharide form. Patients who exhibit fructose malabsorption can present with gastrointestinal symptoms that include chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain. However, with no clearly established gastrointestinal mechanism for fructose malabsorption, patient analysis by the proxy of a breath hydrogen test (BHT) is controversial. The major transporter for fructose in intestinal epithelial cells is thought to be the facilitative transporter GLUT5. Consistent with a facilitative transport system, we show here by analysis of past studies on healthy adults that there is a significant relationship between fructose malabsorption and fructose dose (r = 0.86, P fructose malabsorption with age have been observed in human infants, and this may parallel the developmental regulation of GLUT5 expression. Moreover, a GLUT5 knockout mouse has displayed the hallmarks associated with profound fructose malabsorption. Fructose malabsorption appears to be partially modulated by the amount of glucose ingested. Although solvent drag and passive diffusion have been proposed to explain the effect of glucose on fructose malabsorption, this could possibly be a result of the facilitative transporter GLUT2. GLUT5 and GLUT2 mRNA have been shown to be rapidly upregulated by the presence of fructose and GLUT2 mRNA is also upregulated by glucose, but in humans the distribution and role of GLUT2 in the brush border membrane are yet to be definitively decided. Understanding the relative roles of these transporters in humans will be crucial for establishing a mechanistic basis for fructose malabsorption in gastrointestinal patients.

  12. Human intestinal mucus proteins isolated by transanal irrigation and proctosigmoidoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Andrea Gómez Buitrago; Carlos Augusto González Correa; Mario Santacoloma Osorio; Gonzalo Taborda Ocampo; Marco Aurelio Zezzi Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Human intestinal mucus essentially consists of a network of Mucin2 glycoproteins embedded in many lower molecular weight proteins. This paper contributes to the proteomic study of human intestinal mucus by comparing two sample collection methods (transanal irrigation and brush cytology during proctosigmoidoscopy) and analysis techniques (electrophoresis and digestion in solution). The entire sample collection and treatment process is explained, including protein extraction, digestion and desa...

  13. Sulfate-reducing bacteria slow intestinal transit in a bismuth-reversible fashion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, N L; Lin, D M; Wilson, M R; Barton, L L; Lin, H C

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) serves as a mammalian cell-derived gaseous neurotransmitter. The intestines are exposed to a second source of this gas by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Bismuth subsalicylate binds H 2 S rendering it insoluble. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that SRB may slow intestinal transit in a bismuth-reversible fashion. Eighty mice were randomized to five groups consisting of Live SRB, Killed SRB, SRB+Bismuth, Bismuth, and Saline. Desulfovibrio vulgaris, a common strain of SRB, was administered by gavage at the dose of 1.0 × 10 9 cells along with rhodamine, a fluorescent dye. Intestinal transit was measured 50 minutes after gavage by euthanizing the animals, removing the small intestine between the pyloric sphincter and the ileocecal valve and visualizing the distribution of rhodamine across the intestine using an imaging system (IVIS, Perkin-Elmer). Intestinal transit (n=50) was compared using geometric center (1=minimal movement, 100=maximal movement). H 2 S concentration (n=30) was also measured when small intestinal luminal content was allowed to generate this gas. The Live SRB group had slower intestinal transit as represented by a geometric center score of 40.2 ± 5.7 when compared to Saline: 73.6 ± 5.7, Killed SRB: 77.9 ± 6.9, SRB+Bismuth: 81.0 ± 2.0, and Bismuth: 73.3 ± 4.2 (Pfashion in mice. Our results demonstrate that intestinal transit is slowed by SRB and this effect could be abolished by H 2 S-binding bismuth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Absorption of l-methionine from the human small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedl, Harold P.; Pierce, Charles E.; Rider, Alan; Clifton, James A.

    1968-01-01

    Absorption of L-methionine was measured in all parts of the human small intestine using transintestinal intubation and perfusion. In four normal subjects, adsorption was higher in the proximal than in the distal intestine. In two patients with nontropical sprue in relapse, there was a proximal zone of low absorption with higher absorption distally. In all parts of the small intestine, absorption showed rate-limiting kinetics as methionine concentration was increased. In normal subjects, the proximal Km (Michaelis constant) was more than 3 times higher than the distal, which suggests a difference in transport mechanisms between the two segments. PMID:12066784

  16. Impact of transition from microscopy to molecular screening for detection of intestinal protozoa in Dutch patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svraka-Latifovic, S; Bouter, S; Naus, H; Bakker, L J; Timmerman, C P; Dorigo-Zetsma, J W

    2014-11-01

    Detection of intestinal protozoa by PCR methods has been described as being sensitive and specific, and as improving the diagnostic yield. Here we present the outcome of the transition from microscopy to molecular screening for detection of a select group of intestinal protozoa in faeces in our laboratory. Introduction of molecular screening for intestinal protozoa resulted in higher sensitivity, reduced hands-on-time, reduced time-to-results, leading to improved diagnostic efficiency. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. Intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae of Toxoplasma gondii induced acute ileitis in mice harboring a human gut microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane von Klitzing

    Full Text Available Within seven days following peroral high dose infection with Toxoplasma gondii susceptible conventionally colonized mice develop acute ileitis due to an underlying T helper cell (Th -1 type immunopathology. We here addressed whether mice harboring a human intestinal microbiota developed intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic sequelae upon ileitis induction.Secondary abiotic mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and associated with a complex human intestinal microbiota following peroral fecal microbiota transplantation. Within three weeks the human microbiota had stably established in the murine intestinal tract as assessed by quantitative cultural and culture-independent (i.e. molecular 16S rRNA based methods. At day 7 post infection (p.i. with 50 cysts of T. gondii strain ME49 by gavage human microbiota associated (hma mice displayed severe clinical, macroscopic and microscopic sequelae indicating acute ileitis. In diseased hma mice increased numbers of innate and adaptive immune cells within the ileal mucosa and lamina propria and elevated intestinal secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, IL-12 and nitric oxide could be observed at day 7 p.i. Ileitis development was accompanied by substantial shifts in intestinal microbiota composition of hma mice characterized by elevated total bacterial loads and increased numbers of intestinal Gram-negative commensals such as enterobacteria and Bacteroides / Prevotella species overgrowing the small and large intestinal lumen. Furthermore, viable bacteria translocated from the inflamed ileum to extra-intestinal including systemic compartments. Notably, pro-inflammatory immune responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract as indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in extra-intestinal (i.e. liver and kidney and systemic compartments including spleen and serum.With respect to the intestinal microbiota composition "humanized" mice display

  18. Human zonulin, a potential modulator of intestinal tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Goldblum, S E; Fasano, A

    2000-12-01

    Intercellular tight junctions are dynamic structures involved in vectorial transport of water and electrolytes across the intestinal epithelium. Zonula occludens toxin derived from Vibrio cholerae interacts with a specific intestinal epithelial surface receptor, with subsequent activation of a complex intracellular cascade of events that regulate tight junction permeability. We postulated that this toxin may mimic the effect of a functionally and immunologically related endogenous modulator of intestinal tight junctions. Affinity-purified anti-zonula occludens toxin antibodies and the Ussing chamber assay were used to screen for one or more mammalian zonula occludens toxin analogues in both fetal and adult human intestine. A novel protein, zonulin, was identified that induces tight junction disassembly in non-human primate intestinal epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Comparison of amino acids in the active zonula occludens toxin fragment and zonulin permitted the identification of the putative receptor binding domain within the N-terminal region of the two proteins. Zonulin likely plays a pivotal role in tight junction regulation during developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including tissue morphogenesis, movement of fluid, macromolecules and leukocytes between the intestinal lumen and the interstitium, and inflammatory/autoimmune disorders.

  19. Opioid peptides inhibit intestinal transit in the rat by a central mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J; Burks, T F

    1982-11-05

    Opiates and opioid peptides can alter gastrointestinal motility and delay transit of intraluminal contents. These experiments were designed to characterize the effects of beta-endorphin and [D-Ala2,Met5]enkephalinamide (DALA) on small intestinal transit in the rat. Rats were implanted with a polyethylene cannula in the right lateral cerebral ventricle and a silastic cannula in the proximal duodenum. Drugs were administered via the cerebral cannula or intraperitoneally (i.p.) Interstitial transit was assessed by instilling radiochromium into the duodenum and calculating the geometric center of the distribution of marker in the small intestine. beta-Endorphin and DALA produced a dose-related decrease in intestinal transit when the peptides were given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) however, neither peptide was effective when i.p. [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalinamide and dynorphin-(1-13) did not alter intestinal transit. The inhibitory effects of beta-endorphin and DALA were antagonized by pretreatment with naloxone or naltrexone. A quaternary amine containing opiate antagonist. N,N-diallylnormorphinium given i.p. did not alter the response to either peptide but was effective in blocking the antitransit effects of i.p. loperamide, a peripherally acting opioid agonist. In addition, DALA reduced the body weight loss produced by castor oil-induced diarrhea while beta-endorphin had no effect. These results indicate that opioid peptides can alter intestinal motility by an action within the central nervous system. While DALA and beta-endorphin produce quantitatively the same effects on small intestinal motility, qualitatively they may differ in their mechanisms of action.

  20. Human intestinal mucus proteins isolated by transanal irrigation and proctosigmoidoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Andrea Gómez Buitrago

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal mucus essentially consists of a network of Mucin2 glycoproteins embedded in many lower molecular weight proteins. This paper contributes to the proteomic study of human intestinal mucus by comparing two sample collection methods (transanal irrigation and brush cytology during proctosigmoidoscopy and analysis techniques (electrophoresis and digestion in solution. The entire sample collection and treatment process is explained, including protein extraction, digestion and desalination and peptide characterisation using a nanoAcquity UPLC chromatograph coupled to an HDMS spectrometer equipped with a nanoESI source. Collecting mucus via transanal irrigation provided a larger sample volume and protein concentration from a single patient. The proctosigmoidoscopy sample could be analysed via digestion in solution after depleting albumin. The analysis indicates that a simple mucus lysis method can evaluate the electrophoresis and digestion in solution techniques. Studying human intestinal mucus complexes is important because they perform two essential survival functions for humans as the first biochemical and physical defences for the gastrointestinal tract and a habitat for intestinal microbiota, which are primarily hosted in the colon and exceeds the human genetic information and cell number 100- and 10-fold (1.

  1. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  2. In Silico Modelling of the Human Intestinal Microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamerman, Derk Jan; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    2002-01-01

    The ecology of the human intestinal microflora and its interaction with the host are poorly understood. Though more and more data are being acquired, in part using modern molecular methods, development of a quantitative theory has not kept pace with this development. This is in part due to the

  3. Long-term monitoring of the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Tims, S.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    The microbiota that colonizes the human intestinal tract is complex and its structure is specific for each of us. In this study we expand the knowledge about the stability of the subject-specific microbiota and show that this ecosystem is stable in short-term intervals (¿10 years). The faecal

  4. Biotransformation of Food Dyes by Human Intestinal Bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biotransformation of food dyes (Tartrazine and Quinoline yellow) by Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal microflora was investigated. Decolourisation of the media containing the dyes was used as an index of biotransformation. Biotransformation was higher under aerobic than under ...

  5. Intestinal parasites: a study of human appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Schrottenbaum, M; Kliment, V

    1991-01-01

    Histological sections of 414 appendices were examined parasitologically. Enterobius vermicularis was found in 8.7%, eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides in 0.5%, trophozites of Dientamoeba fragilis in 4.8%, Endolimax nana in 2.2%, Entamoeba coli in 1% and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in 1.9% of cases. Appendicopathies associated with Enterobius were most frequent in the age group from 6 to 10 years (24.3%) and from 21 to 25 years (12.2%). Patients older than 15 years were practically women only. Dientamoeba was most frequent in the age group from 11 to 15 years (11.3%). In women D. fragilis was three times more frequent than in men. The coincidence of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis infections was 50%. No interactions were seen between the protozoans in the contents of the appendix and its mucous membrane. Statistical evaluation indicates possible etiologic role of E. vermicularis in the occurrence of acute appendicities. D. fragilis appears to be the most common intestinal protozoan parasite in Bohemia.

  6. Neural influences on human intestinal epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Dagmar; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Schemann, Michael

    2016-01-15

    We present the first systematic and, up to now, most comprehensive evaluation of the basic features of epithelial functions, such as basal and nerve-evoked secretion, as well as tissue resistance, in over 2200 surgical specimens of human small and large intestine. We found no evidence for impaired nerve-evoked epithelial secretion or tissue resistance with age or disease pathologies (stomach, pancreas or colon cancer, polyps, diverticulitis, stoma reversal). This indicates the validity of future studies on epithelial secretion or resistance that are based on data from a variety of surgical specimens. ACh mainly mediated nerve-evoked and basal secretion in the small intestine, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide and nitric oxide were the primary pro-secretory transmitters in the large intestine. The results of the present study revealed novel insights into regional differences in nerve-mediated secretion in the human intestine and comprise the basis by which to more specifically target impaired epithelial functions in the diseased gut. Knowledge on basic features of epithelial functions in the human intestine is scarce. We used Ussing chamber techniques to record basal tissue resistance (R-basal) and short circuit currents (ISC; secretion) under basal conditions (ISC-basal) and after electrical field stimulation (ISC-EFS) of nerves in 2221 resectates from 435 patients. ISC-EFS was TTX-sensitive and of comparable magnitude in the small and large intestine. ISC-EFS or R-basal were not influenced by the patients' age, sex or disease pathologies (cancer, polyps, diverticulitis). Ion substitution, bumetanide or adenylate cyclase inhibition studies suggested that ISC-EFS depended on epithelial cAMP-driven chloride and bicarbonate secretion but not on amiloride-sensitive sodium absorption. Although atropine-sensitive cholinergic components prevailed for ISC-EFS of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, PG97-269-sensitive [vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor 1

  7. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2017-11-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) + /vimentin + and EGFP + /α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) + coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium.

  8. Ricin crosses polarized human intestinal cells and intestines of ricin-gavaged mice without evident damage and then disseminates to mouse kidneys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa D Flora

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potent toxin found in the beans of Ricinus communis and is often lethal for animals and humans when aerosolized or injected and causes significant morbidity and occasional death when ingested. Ricin has been proposed as a bioweapon because of its lethal properties, environmental stability, and accessibility. In oral intoxication, the process by which the toxin transits across intestinal mucosa is not completely understood. To address this question, we assessed the impact of ricin on the gastrointestinal tract and organs of mice after dissemination of toxin from the gut. We first showed that ricin adhered in a specific pattern to human small bowel intestinal sections, the site within the mouse gut in which a variable degree of damage has been reported by others. We then monitored the movement of ricin across polarized human HCT-8 intestinal monolayers grown in transwell inserts and in HCT-8 cell organoids. We observed that, in both systems, ricin trafficked through the cells without apparent damage until 24 hours post intoxication. We delivered a lethal dose of purified fluorescently-labeled ricin to mice by oral gavage and followed transit of the toxin from the gastrointestinal tracts to the internal organs by in vivo imaging of whole animals over time and ex vivo imaging of organs at various time points. In addition, we harvested organs from unlabeled ricin-gavaged mice and assessed them for the presence of ricin and for histological damage. Finally, we compared serum chemistry values from buffer-treated versus ricin-intoxicated animals. We conclude that ricin transverses human intestinal cells and mouse intestinal cells in situ prior to any indication of enterocyte damage and that ricin rapidly reaches the kidneys of intoxicated mice. We also propose that mice intoxicated orally with ricin likely die from distributive shock.

  9. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  10. Are Human Intestinal Eukaryotes Beneficial or Commensals?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Julius; Stensvold, C.R.; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Parfrey, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2015), e1005039 E-ISSN 1553-7374 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : human gut microbiota * Blastocystis * infection * diversity * parasites * impact Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.003, year: 2015

  11. [Interaction between humans and intestinal bacteria as a determinant for intestinal health : intestinal microbiome and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Dirk; Hörmannsperger, G

    2015-02-01

    Recent scientific results underline the importance of the intestinal microbiome, the totality of all intestinal microbes and their genes, for the health of the host organism. The intestinal microbiome can therefore be considered as a kind of "external organ". It has been shown that the intestinal microbiota is a complex and dynamic ecosystem that influences host immunity and metabolism beyond the intestine. The composition and functionality of the intestinal microbiota is of major importance for the development and maintenance of intestinal functions. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by dysregulated interactions between the host and its microbiota.The present contribution summarizes current knowledge of the composition and development of the intestinal microbiome and gives an overview of the bidirectional interaction between host and microbiota. The contribution informs about insights regarding the role of the intestinal microbiota in IBD and finally discusses the protective potential of microbial therapies in the context of IBD.

  12. Development of the human infant intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chana Palmer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost immediately after a human being is born, so too is a new microbial ecosystem, one that resides in that person's gastrointestinal tract. Although it is a universal and integral part of human biology, the temporal progression of this process, the sources of the microbes that make up the ecosystem, how and why it varies from one infant to another, and how the composition of this ecosystem influences human physiology, development, and disease are still poorly understood. As a step toward systematically investigating these questions, we designed a microarray to detect and quantitate the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA gene sequences of most currently recognized species and taxonomic groups of bacteria. We used this microarray, along with sequencing of cloned libraries of PCR-amplified SSU rDNA, to profile the microbial communities in an average of 26 stool samples each from 14 healthy, full-term human infants, including a pair of dizygotic twins, beginning with the first stool after birth and continuing at defined intervals throughout the first year of life. To investigate possible origins of the infant microbiota, we also profiled vaginal and milk samples from most of the mothers, and stool samples from all of the mothers, most of the fathers, and two siblings. The composition and temporal patterns of the microbial communities varied widely from baby to baby. Despite considerable temporal variation, the distinct features of each baby's microbial community were recognizable for intervals of weeks to months. The strikingly parallel temporal patterns of the twins suggested that incidental environmental exposures play a major role in determining the distinctive characteristics of the microbial community in each baby. By the end of the first year of life, the idiosyncratic microbial ecosystems in each baby, although still distinct, had converged toward a profile characteristic of the adult gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Gastric emptying, small intestinal transit and fecal output in dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which results from deficiency in dystrophin, a sarcolemma protein of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle, is characterized by progressive striated muscle degeneration, but various gastrointestinal clinical manifestations have been observed. The aim was to evaluate the possible impact of the dystrophin loss on the gastrointestinal propulsion in mdx mice (animal model for DMD). The gastric emptying of a carboxymethyl cellulose/phenol red dye non-nutrient meal was not significantly different at 20 min from gavaging between wild-type and mdx mice. The intestinal transit and the fecal output were significantly decreased in mdx versus normal animals, although the length of the intestine was similar in both animals. The present results provide evidence for motor intestinal alterations in mdx mice in in vivo conditions.

  14. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Guerrant. 2007. Heavy cryptosporidial infections in children in northeast Brazil: comparison of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum...Asgharpour, C. T. Ng, D. P. Calfee, R. L. Guerrant, V. Maro, S. Ole-Nguyaine, and J. F. Shao. 2005. Short report: asymptomatic Cryptosporidium hominis ...JAN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection 5a

  15. Human Enteroids as a Model of Upper Small Intestinal Ion Transport Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Foulke-Abel (Jennifer); J. In (Julie); Yin, J. (Jianyi); N.C. Zachos (Nicholas C.); O. Kovbasnjuk (Olga); M.K. Estes (Mary K.); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); M. Donowitz (Mark)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims Human intestinal crypt-derived enteroids are a model of intestinal ion transport that require validation by comparison with cell culture and animal models. We used human small intestinal enteroids to study neutral Na+ absorption and stimulated fluid and anion secretion

  16. Transition of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein on hypothermic circulatory arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Hiroya; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Okita, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) is increasingly employed as a highly specific marker of intestinal necrosis. However, the value of this marker associated with cardiovascular surgery with hypothermic circulatory arrest is unclear. The aim of this study was to measure serum I-FABP levels and provide the transition of I-FABP levels with hypothermic circulatory arrest to help in the management of intestinal perfusion. From August 2011 to September 2013, 33 consecutive patients who had aortic arch surgery with hypothermic circulatory arrest or heart valve surgery performed were enrolled in the study. Twenty patients had aortic surgery with hypothermic (23-29°C) circulatory arrest and 13 patients had heart valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (33°C). I-FABP levels increased, both in patients undergoing aortic surgery with hypothermic circulatory arrest and heart valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, reaching peak levels shortly after the administration of protamine. I-FABP levels in patients with aortic surgery were significantly higher with circulatory arrest. They reached peak levels immediately after recirculation and there was a significant drop at the end of surgery (parrest than in patients with heart valve surgery. However, no postoperative reperfusion injury occurred in the intestinal tract due to the use of hypothermic organ protection. Plasma I-FABP monitoring could be a valuable method for finding an intestinal ischemia in patients with cardiovascular surgery.

  17. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    : To examine the effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Each volunteer was examined during intravenous infusion...... of glyceryl trinitrate 1 microg/kg x min or saline. A gamma camera technique was used to measure gastric emptying and small intestinal transit after a 1600-kJ mixed liquid and solid meal. Furthermore, duodenal motility was assessed by manometry. RESULTS: Glyceryl trinitrate did not change gastric mean...... emptying time, gastric half emptying time, gastric retention at 15 min or small intestinal mean transit time. Glyceryl trinitrate did not influence the frequency of duodenal contractions, the amplitude of duodenal contractions or the duodenal motility index. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous infusion of glyceryl...

  18. Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit in anesthetized rats by a Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troncon L.E.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a fraction (T1 of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom prepared by gel filtration on gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in male Wistar rats. Fasted animals were anesthetized with urethane, submitted to tracheal intubation and right jugular vein cannulation. Scorpion toxin (250 µg/kg or saline was injected iv and 1 h later a bolus of saline (1.0 ml/100 g labeled with 99m technetium-phytate (10 MBq was administered by gavage. After 15 min, animals were sacrificed and the radioactivity remaining in the stomach was determined. Intestinal transit was evaluated by instillation of a technetium-labeled saline bolus (1.0 ml through a cannula previously implanted in the duodenum. After 60 min, the progression of the marker throughout 7 consecutive gut segments was estimated by the geometric center method. Gastric retention of the liquid test meal in rats injected with scorpion toxin (median: 88%; range: 52-95% was significantly higher (P<0.02 than in controls (54%; 21-76%, an effect which was not modified by gastric secretion blockade with ranitidine. The progression of the isotope marker throughout the small intestine was significantly slower (P<0.05 in rats treated with toxin (1.2; 1.0-2.5 than in control animals (2.3; 1.0-3.2. Inhibition of both gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats injected with scorpion toxin suggests an increased resistance to aboral flow, which might be caused by abnormal neurotransmitter release or by the local effects of venom on smooth muscle cells.

  19. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after...... than after ingestion of glucose (P = 0.0128). In healthy humans, malabsorption of small amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture accelerates small bowel transit....

  20. An Ecological Network of Polysaccharide Utilization Among Human Intestinal Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Coyne, Michael J.; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: The human intestine is colonized with trillions of microorganisms important to health and disease. There has been an intensive effort to catalog the species and genetic content of this microbial ecosystem. However, little is known of the ecological interactions between these microbes, a prerequisite to understanding the dynamics and stability of this host-associated microbial community. Here we perform a systematic investigation of public goods-based syntrophic interactions among the abundant human gut bacteria, the Bacteroidales. Results: We find evidence for a rich interaction network based on the breakdown and use of polysaccharides. Species that utilize a particular polysaccharide (producers) liberate polysaccharide breakdown products (PBP) that are consumed by other species unable to grow on the polysaccharide alone (recipients). Cross-species gene addition experiments demonstrate that recipients can grow on a polysaccharide if the producer-derived glycoside hydrolase, responsible for PBP generation, is provided. These producer-derived glycoside hydrolases are public goods transported extracellularly in outer membrane vesicles allowing for the creation of PBP and concomitant recipient growth spatially distant from the producer. Recipients can exploit these ecological interactions and conditionally outgrow producers. Finally, we show that these public good-based interactions occur among Bacteroidales species co-resident within a natural human intestinal community. Conclusions: This study examines public-goods based syntrophic interactions between bacterial members of the critically important gut microbial ecosystem. This polysaccharide-based network likely represents foundational relationships creating organized ecological units within the intestinal microbiota, knowledge of which can be applied to impact human health. PMID:24332541

  1. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Marguerite Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including, metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique used for decades to study environmental microorganisms but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community independent of identity to known genes by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host. Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex community and its human host.

  2. Transition to a Tube Feeding Formula With Real Food Ingredients in Pediatric Patients With Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samela, Kate; Mokha, Jasmeet; Emerick, Karan; Davidovics, Zev H

    2017-04-01

    Due to concerns related primarily to allergic response and malabsorption, enteral nutrition therapy has traditionally relied on the use of elemental formulas in children with intestinal failure (IF). Blended food diets via a gastrostomy tube have been reported to improve feeding tolerance in pediatric populations receiving long-term enteral nutrition therapy. Complex macronutrients have been shown to stimulate intestinal adaptation in animal models. We report on our experience in children with IF who had an overall improvement in stool output when transitioned from an elemental formula to a tube feeding formula with real food ingredients (TFRF). Data were collected in a retrospective chart review of children with IF, >1 year of age, who were receiving enteral nutrition via continuous infusion, bolus feeding, or both. Indications for the TFRF trial were diarrhea or inconsistent stooling patterns. Ten children with a mean small bowel length of 48.3 cm were trialed on TFRF. Nine of 10 (90%) children tolerated the transition to 100% TFRF, of which 7 of 9 (78%) had their entire colon in continuity. The average age at successful transition was 29.2 months, and the average length of time to transition to 100% TFRF was 67.3 days. TFRF is well tolerated in children >1 year of age with IF; it also improves their stooling patterns. A commercially available TFRF is a cost-effective and nutritionally adequate means of providing nutrition to this patient population.

  3. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  4. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    intestinal lumen Cell Migration Radiation damages proliferating crypt cells, causing mitotic arrest and delaying regeneration Burns can...04-08-2016 Technical Report A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures HDTRA1...the small intestine , reducing the density of the gut barrier. A reduced epithelial lining can result in suppressed nutrient absorption, bacterial

  6. Scintigraphic small intestinal transit time and defaecography in patients with J-pouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mie Dilling; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch...... function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch...... mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365). Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF) was 49% (3–77) and 62% (17–98) after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360). A median daily stool frequency of nine (4...

  7. The human intestinal IgA response; burning questions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo eSpencer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that generate the human intestinal IgA response is fundamentally important if effective mucosal vaccination is to be successful and broadly applied. There have been several major advances in this field recently that have allowed us to feel optimistic that this will be achieved. However, there are still many unanswered questions. These questions have been used as a scaffold for this review that considers findings at the current leading edge alongside the many uncertainties in this field.

  8. Computational approaches for modeling human intestinal absorption and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Govindan; Kitchen, Douglas B

    2006-07-01

    Human intestinal absorption (HIA) is an important roadblock in the formulation of new drug substances. Computational models are needed for the rapid estimation of this property. The measurements are determined via in vivo experiments or in vitro permeability studies. We present several computational models that are able to predict the absorption of drugs by the human intestine and the permeability through human Caco-2 cells. The training and prediction sets were derived from literature sources and carefully examined to eliminate compounds that are actively transported. We compare our results to models derived by other methods and find that the statistical quality is similar. We believe that models derived from both sources of experimental data would provide greater consistency in predictions. The performance of several QSPR models that we investigated to predict outside the training set for either experimental property clearly indicates that caution should be exercised while applying any of the models for quantitative predictions. However, we are able to show that the qualitative predictions can be obtained with close to a 70% success rate.

  9. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after ingestion of glucose did not differ from that after ingestion of the fructose-sorbitol mixture (P = 0.7897). However, the mouth-to-cecum transit of the radiolabeled marker was faster (P = 0.0033) and the percentage content of the marker in colon was higher after ingestion of the fructose-sorbitol mixture than after ingestion of glucose (P = 0.0128). In healthy humans, malabsorption of small amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture accelerates small bowel transit.

  10. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Dilling Kjaer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL. This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365. Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF was 49% (3–77 and 62% (17–98 after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360. A median daily stool frequency of nine (4–25 was reported and three (14% patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90% patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful.

  11. Effects of casoxin 4 on morphine inhibition of small animal intestinal contractility and gut transit in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen S Patten

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Glen S Patten1,2, Richard J Head1, Mahinda Y Abeywardena1,21CSIRO Preventative Health National Research Flagship, Adelaide, Australia; 2CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground and aims: Chronic opioid analgesia has the debilitating side-effect of constipation in human patients. The major aims of this study were to: 1 characterize the opioid-specific antagonism of morphine-induced inhibition of electrically driven contraction of the small intestine of mice, rats, and guinea pigs; and 2 test if the oral delivery of small milk-derived opioid antagonist peptides could block morphine-induced inhibition of intestinal transit in mice.Methods: Mouse, rat, and guinea pig intact ileal sections were electrically stimulated to contract and inhibited with morphine in vitro. Morphine inhibition was then blocked by opioid subtype antagonists in the mouse and guinea pig. Using a polymeric dye, Poly R-478, the opioid antagonists casoxin 4 and lactoferroxin A were tested orally for blocking activity of morphine inhibition of gut transit in vivo by single or double gavage techniques.Results: The guinea pig tissue was more sensitive to morphine inhibition compared with the mouse or the rat (IC50 [half maximal inhibitory concentration] values as nmol/L ± SEM were 34 ± 3, 230 ± 13, and 310 ± 14 respectively (P < 0.01. The inhibitory influence of opioid agonists (IC50 in electrically driven ileal mouse preparations were DADLE ([D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin ≥ met-enkephalin ≥ dynorphin A ≥ DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin > morphine > morphiceptin as nmol/L 13.9, 17.3, 19.5, 23.3, 230, and 403 respectively. The mouse demonstrated predominantly Κ- and δ-opioid receptor activity with a smaller µ-opioid receptor component. Both mouse and guinea pig tissue were sensitive to casoxin 4 antagonism of morphine inhibition of contraction. In contrast to naloxone, relatively high oral doses of the µ-opioid receptor antagonists

  12. First report of human intestinal sarcocystosis in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Marti, Hanspeter; Chhay, Saomony; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Human intestinal sarcocystosis (HIS), caused by Sarcocystis species, is acquired by eating undercooked meat from sarcocyst-containing cattle (S. hominis, S. heydorni) and pigs (S. suihominis). We report on the detection of human intestinal Sarcocystis infections in a cross-sectional survey of Strongyloides stercoralis in early 2014, in Rovieng District, Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Among 1081 participants, 108 (10.0%) were diagnosed with Sarcocystis spp. oocysts in stool samples. Males had a significantly higher risk of infection than females (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9, p=0.001). None of the reported symptoms (abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, muscle pain and itching skin) occurring in the two weeks preceding the examinations were associated with a Sarcocystis infection. Many Sarcocystis cases were found among those who had participated in a wedding celebration and Chinese New Year festivities, where they had consumed raw or insufficiently cooked beef (83.3%) and pork (38.9%) based dishes. This report documents the first HIS cases in Cambodia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of drug intestinal absorption in human using the Ussing chamber system: A comparison of intestinal tissues from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Masateru; Koga, Toshihisa; Kondo, Satoshi; Yoda, Noriaki; Emoto, Chie; Mukai, Tadashi; Toguchi, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    An adequate evaluation system for drug intestinal absorption is essential in the pharmaceutical industry. Previously, we established a novel prediction system of drug intestinal absorption in humans, using the mini-Ussing chamber equipped with human intestinal tissues. In this system, the TI value was defined as the sum of drug amounts transported to the basal-side component (X corr ) and drug amounts accumulated in the tissue (T corr ), which are normalized by AUC of a drug in the apical compartment, as an index for drug absorption. In order to apply this system to the screening assay, it is important to understand the differences between animal and human tissues in the intestinal absorption of drugs. In this study, the transport index (TI) values of three drugs, with different levels of membrane permeability, were determined to evaluate the rank order of drug absorbability in intestinal tissues from rats, dogs, and monkeys. The TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs showed a good correlation with those in humans. On the other hand, the correlation of TI values in monkeys was lower compared to rats and dogs. The rank order of the correlation coefficient between human and investigated animal tissues was as follows: dog (r 2 =0.978), rat (r 2 =0.955), and monkey (r 2 =0.620). TI values in large intestinal tissues from rats (r 2 =0.929) and dogs (r 2 =0.808) also showed a good correlation. The obtained TI values in small intestinal tissues in rats and dogs were well correlated with the fraction of drug absorbed (F a ) in humans. From these results, the mini-Ussing chamber, equipped with intestinal tissues in rats and dogs, would be useful as a screening tool in the drug discovery stage. In addition, the obtained TI values can be used for the prediction of the F a in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. INTESTINAL VIROME AND NORMAL MICROFLORA OF HUMAN: FEATURES OF INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobyr V.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Intestinal bacteria defend the host organism and narrow pathogenic bacterial colonization. However, the microbiome effect to enteric viruses is unexplored largely as well as role of microbiota in the pathogenesis of viral infections in general. This review focuses on precisely these issues. Keywords: microbiome, virome, normal microflora, enteric viruses, contagiousness. In this review article, facts about viral persistence in the human gut are summarized. It is described the role of viral populations during health and diseases. After analyzing of the literary facts it was concluded that the gastrointestinal tract is an environment for one from the most complex microbial ecosystems, which requires of more deeper study of its composition, role in physiological processes, as well as the dynamics of changes under influence of the environment. Normal microflora performs a different important functions providing the physiological homeostasis of the human body, including, in particular, an important role in the human metabolic processes, supporting of homeostasis, limiting of colonization by infectious bacteria. The multifactorial significance of the normal gastrointestinal microflora can be divided into immunological, structural and metabolic functions. At the same time, interaction between intestinal microflora and enteric viruses has not been studied largely. In recent years, much attention is paid to study of viruses-bacteria associations, and it is possible, obtained results should change our understanding of microbiota role in the systematic pathogenesis of the diseases with viral etiology. In contrast to the well-known benefits of normal microflora to the host, the viruses can use intestinal microflora as a trigger for replication at the optimal region. Recent studies give a reason for assumption that depletion of normal microflora with antibiotics can determining the antiviral effect. Thus, the role of commensal bacteria in viral

  15. The predominant cholecystokinin in human plasma and intestine is cholecystokinin-33

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F; Sun, G; Christensen, T

    2001-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) occurs in multiple molecular forms; the major ones are CCK-58, -33, -22, and -8. Their relative abundance in human plasma and intestine, however, is debated. To settle the issue, extracts of intestinal biopsies and plasma from 10 human subjects have been examined...... is the second most abundant ( approximately 34% and 30%, respectively). In contrast, CCK-58 is less abundant in human intestines ( approximately 18%) and plasma ( approximately 11%). Its predominance in feline intestines, however, was confirmed. Hence, the results show a significant species variation...... and emphasize the necessity of highly specific and well characterized assays in molecular studies of CCK....

  16. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, P.; Zhou, Y.; Qin, H.; Shen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithel...

  17. Common occurrence of antibacterial agents in human intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eDrissi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments have revealed many active mechanisms by which bacteria can inhibit the growth of other organisms. Bacteriocins are a diverse group of natural ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by a wide range of bacteria and which seem to play an important role in mediating competition within bacterial communities. In this study, we have identified and established the structural classification of putative bacteriocins encoded by 317 microbial genomes in the human intestine. On the basis of homologies to available bacteriocin sequences, mainly from lactic acid bacteria, we report the widespread occurrence of bacteriocins across the gut microbiota: 175 bacteriocins were found to be encoded in Firmicutes, 79 in Proteobacteria, 34 in Bacteroidetes and 25 in Actinobacteria. Bacteriocins from gut bacteria displayed wide differences among phyla with regard to class distribution, net positive charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure, but the α-helix was the most abundant structure. The peptide structures and physiochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by the most abundant bacteria in the gut, the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes, seem to ensure low antibiotic activity and participate in permanent intestinal host defence against the proliferation of harmful bacteria. Meanwhile, the potentially harmful bacteria, including the Proteobacteria, displayed highly effective bacteriocins, probably supporting the virulent character of diseases. These findings highlight the eventual role played by bacteriocins in gut microbial competition and their potential place in antibiotic therapy.

  18. Community and genomic analysis of the human small intestine microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.

    2013-01-01

    Our intestinal tract is densely populated by different microbes, collectively called microbiota, of which the majority are bacteria. Research focusing on the intestinal microbiota often use fecal samples as a representative of the bacteria that inhabit the end of the large intestine.

  19. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS

  20. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  1. Advanced approaches to characterize the human intestinal microbiota by computational meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikkilä, J.; Vos, de W.M.

    2010-01-01

    GOALS: We describe advanced approaches for the computational meta-analysis of a collection of independent studies, including over 1000 phylogenetic array datasets, as a means to characterize the variability of human intestinal microbiota. BACKGROUND: The human intestinal microbiota is a complex

  2. Rapid intestinal transit as a primary cause of severe chronic diarrhea in patients with amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirl, Michael J; Högenauer, Christoph; Santa Ana, Carol A; Porter, Jack L; Little, Katherine H; Stone, Marvin J; Fordtran, John S

    2003-10-01

    The cause of severe diarrhea in patients with systemic amyloidosis is obscure. We therefore performed pathophysiological studies in three such patients in an effort to determine the mechanism of amyloid diarrhea. Epithelial cell absorption rate of electrolytes was measured during steady state GI perfusion of a saline-mannitol solution. GI transit time of PEG and absorption of radiolabeled bile acid were measured simultaneously while subjects ingested three meals per day. To obtain a diarrhea control group for transit time and bile acid absorption, normal subjects were studied when they had diarrhea caused by ingestion of Milk of Magnesia (MOM). Diarrhea could not be explained by malabsorption of ingested nutrients, bacterial overgrowth, bile acid malabsorption, or epithelial cell malabsorption of electrolytes. However, 25% of polyethylene glycol (PEG) ingested with a standard meal was recovered in stool in 45 min, which is 10 times faster than in normal subjects with equally severe diarrhea caused by ingestion of MOM. All of the patients had autonomic neuropathy that remained unrecognized for 15-36 months after onset of chronic diarrhea; it seems likely that this was the cause of rapid transit. Severe chronic diarrhea in three patients with systemic amyloidosis was mediated by extremely rapid transit of chyme and digestive secretions through the intestine.

  3. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  4. Giardia duodenalis induces pathogenic dysbiosis of human intestinal microbiota biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Akierman, Sarah V; Motta, Jean-Paul; Muise, Stacy; Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Bhargava, Amol; Beck, Paul L; Rioux, Kevin P; McKnight, Gordon Webb; Wallace, John L; Buret, Andre G

    2017-05-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a prevalent cause of acute diarrheal disease worldwide. However, recent outbreaks in Italy and Norway have revealed a link between giardiasis and the subsequent development of chronic post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome. While the mechanisms underlying the causation of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome remain obscure, recent findings suggest that alterations in gut microbiota communities are linked to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we use a laboratory biofilm system to culture and enrich mucosal microbiota from human intestinal biopsies. Subsequently, we show that co-culture with Giardia induces disturbances in biofilm species composition and biofilm structure resulting in microbiota communities that are intrinsically dysbiotic - even after the clearance of Giardia. These microbiota abnormalities were mediated in part by secretory-excretory Giardia cysteine proteases. Using in vitro cell culture and germ-free murine infection models, we show that Giardia-induced disruptions of microbiota promote bacterial invasion, resulting in epithelial apoptosis, tight junctional disruption, and bacterial translocation across an intestinal epithelial barrier. Additionally, these dysbiotic microbiota communities resulted in increased activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signalling pathway, and overproduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in humanized germ-free mice. Previous studies that have sought explanations and risk factors for the development of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome have focused on features of enteropathogens and attributes of the infected host. We propose that polymicrobial interactions involving Giardia and gut microbiota may cause persistent dysbiosis, offering a new interpretation of the reasons why those afflicted with giardiasis are predisposed to gastrointestinal disorders post-infection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights

  5. Quantitative prediction of intestinal metabolism in humans from a simplified intestinal availability model and empirical scaling factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, Keitaro; Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Gato, Katsuhiko; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to establish a practical and convenient method of predicting intestinal availability (F(g)) in humans for highly permeable compounds at the drug discovery stage, with a focus on CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. We constructed a "simplified F(g) model," described using only metabolic parameters, assuming that passive diffusion is dominant when permeability is high and that the effect of transporters in epithelial cells is negligible. Five substrates for CYP3A4 (alprazolam, amlodipine, clonazepam, midazolam, and nifedipine) and four for both CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (nicardipine, quinidine, tacrolimus, and verapamil) were used as model compounds. Observed fraction of drug absorbed (F(a)F(g)) values for these compounds were calculated from in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters, whereas in vitro intestinal intrinsic clearance (CL(int,intestine)) was determined using human intestinal microsomes. The CL(int,intestine) for the model compounds corrected with that of midazolam was defined as CL(m,index) and incorporated into a simplified F(g) model with empirical scaling factor. Regardless of whether the compound was a P-gp substrate, the F(a)F(g) could be reasonably fitted by the simplified F(g) model, and the value of the empirical scaling factor was well estimated. These results suggest that the effects of P-gp on F(a) and F(g) are substantially minor, at least in the case of highly permeable compounds. Furthermore, liver intrinsic clearance (CL(int,liver)) can be used as a surrogate index of intestinal metabolism based on the relationship between CL(int,liver) and CL(m,index). F(g) can be easily predicted using a simplified F(g) model with the empirical scaling factor, enabling more confident selection of drug candidates with desirable PK profiles in humans.

  6. Human in vivo regional intestinal permeability: quantitation using site-specific drug absorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Lennernäs, Hans

    2015-06-01

    Application of information on regional intestinal permeability has been identified as a key aspect of successful pharmaceutical product development. This study presents the results and evaluation of an approach for the indirect estimation of site-specific in vivo intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in humans. Plasma concentration-time profiles from 15 clinical studies that administered drug solutions to specific intestinal regions were collected and analyzed. The intestinal absorption rate for each drug was acquired by deconvolution, using historical intravenous data as reference, and used with the intestinal surface area and the dose remaining in the lumen to estimate the Peff. Forty-three new Peff values were estimated (15 from the proximal small intestine, 11 from the distal small intestine, and 17 from the large intestine) for 14 active pharmaceutical ingredients representing a wide range of biopharmaceutical properties. A good correlation (r(2) = 0.96, slope = 1.24, intercept = 0.030) was established between these indirect jejunal Peff estimates and jejunal Peff measurements determined directly using the single-pass perfusion double balloon technique. On average, Peff estimates from the distal small intestine and large intestine were 90% and 40%, respectively, of those from the proximal small intestine. These results support the use of the evaluated deconvolution method for indirectly estimating regional intestinal Peff in humans. This study presents the first comprehensive data set of estimated human regional intestinal permeability values for a range of drugs. These biopharmaceutical data can be used to improve the accuracy of gastrointestinal absorption predictions used in drug development decision-making.

  7. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells

  8. Decreased gastric emptying and gastrointestinal and intestinal transits of liquid after complete spinal cord transection in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondim F. de-A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of complete spinal cord transection (SCT on gastric emptying (GE and on gastrointestinal (GI and intestinal transits of liquid in awake rats using the phenol red method. Male Wistar rats (N = 65 weighing 180-200 g were fasted for 24 h and complete SCT was performed between C7 and T1 vertebrae after a careful midline dorsal incision. GE and GI and intestinal transits were measured 15 min, 6 h or 24 h after recovery from anesthesia. A test meal (0.5 mg/ml phenol red in 5% glucose solution was administered intragastrically (1.5 ml and the animals were sacrificed by an iv thiopental overdose 10 min later to evaluate GE and GI transit. For intestinal transit measurements, 1 ml of the test meal was administered into the proximal duodenum through a cannula inserted into a gastric fistula. GE was inhibited (P<0.05 by 34.3, 23.4 and 22.7%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. GI transit was inhibited (P<0.05 by 42.5, 19.8 and 18.4%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Intestinal transit was also inhibited (P<0.05 by 48.8, 47.2 and 40.1%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. Mean arterial pressure was significantly decreased (P<0.05 by 48.5, 46.8 and 41.5%, respectively, at 15 min, 6 h and 24 h after SCT. In summary, our report describes a decreased GE and GI and intestinal transits in awake rats within the first 24 h after high SCT.

  9. Complex Interactions Among Diet, Gastrointestinal Transit, and Gut Microbiota in Humanized Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Purna C.; Marcobal, Angela; Ursell, Luke K.; Larauche, Muriel; Duboc, Henri; Earle, Kristen A.; Sonnenburg, Erica D.; Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Higginbottom, Steven K.; Million, Mulugeta; Tache, Yvette; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Knight, Rob; Farrugia, Gianrico; Sonnenburg, Jusin l.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Diet has major effects on the intestinal microbiota, but the exact mechanisms that alter complex microbial communities have been difficult to elucidate. In addition to the direct influence that diet exerts on microbes, changes in microbiota composition and function can alter host functions such as gastrointestinal (GI) transit time, which in turn can further affect the microbiota. Methods We investigated the relationships among diet, GI motility, and the intestinal microbiota using mice that are germ-free (GF) or humanized (ex-GF mice colonized with human fecal microbiota). Results Analysis of gut motility revealed that humanized mice fed a standard polysaccharide-rich diet had faster GI transit and increased colonic contractility compared with GF mice. Humanized mice with faster transit due to administration of polyethylene glycol or a nonfermentable cellulose-based diet had similar changes in gut microbiota composition, indicating that diet can modify GI transit, which then affects the composition of the microbial community. However, altered transit in mice fed a diet of fermentable fructooligosaccharide indicates that diet can change gut microbial function, which can affect GI transit. Conclusions Based on studies in humanized mice, diet can affect GI transit through microbiota-dependent or microbiota-independent pathways, depending on the type of dietary change. The effect of the microbiota on transit largely depends on the amount and type (fermentable vs non-fermentable) of polysaccharides present in the diet. These results have implications for disorders that affect GI transit and gut microbial communities, including irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23380084

  10. Innovative methods to study human intestinal drug metabolism in vitro : Precision-cut slices compared with Ussing chamber preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhof, Esther G.; Ungell, Anna-Lena B.; Sjoberg, Asa K.; de Jager, Marina H.; Hilgendorf, Constanze; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2006-01-01

    Predictive in vitro methods to investigate drug metabolism in the human intestine using intact tissue are of high importance. Therefore, we studied the metabolic activity of human small intestinal and colon slices and compared it with the metabolic activity of the same human intestinal segments

  11. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; Winchenbach, K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination.

  12. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Intestinal parasite infections and associated risk factors in communities exposed to wastewater in urban and peri-urban transition zones in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrimann, Samuel; Winkler, Mirko S; Pham-Duc, Phuc; Do-Trung, Dung; Schindler, Christian; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2016-10-10

    Infections with intestinal parasites (helminths and intestinal protozoa) are endemic in Southeast Asia and inappropriate management and reuse of wastewater might exacerbate the risk of human infections. In rapidly growing urban settings, little is known about the extent of intestinal parasite infections. We assessed the point-prevalence and risk factors of intestinal parasite infections in population groups differently exposed to wastewater in urban and peri-urban transition zones in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey was carried out between April and June 2014 in people aged ≥ 18 years at risk of wastewater exposure from To Lich River: workers maintaining wastewater treatment facilities; urban farmers reusing wastewater; and urban dwellers at risk of flooding events. For comparison, two peri-urban population groups living in close proximity to the Red River were chosen: farmers using river water for irrigation purposes; and people living in the same communities. A single stool sample was subjected to Kato-Katz and formalin-ether concentration methods for the diagnosis of helminth and intestinal protozoa infections. A questionnaire was administered to determine risk factors and self-reported signs and symptoms. A total of 681 individuals had complete data records. Highest point-prevalence rates of intestinal parasite infections were observed for peri-urban farmers (30 %). Hookworm and Trichuris trichiura were the predominant helminth species (25 % and 5 %, respectively). Peri-urban farmers were at higher odds of infection with intestinal parasites than any other groups (adjusted odds ratio 5.8, 95 % confidence interval 2.5 to 13.7). Lack of access to improved sanitation and not receiving deworming within the past 12 months were associated with higher infection risk, while higher educational attainment and socioeconomic status were negatively associated with intestinal parasite infections. Our results suggest that exposure to

  14. Study of Human Gastro-Intestinal Parasites Among Primary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest a very high prevalence of intestinal parasitosis (40.9%) among the pupils. Four different intestinal parasites were encountered. The respective infection rates of each parasite were; Ascaris lumbricoides (14.9%), Entamoeba histolytica (13.7%), Trichuris trichiura (6.9%) and hookworms (5.4%). Infections ...

  15. Small intestinal MUC2 synthesis in human preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Schierbeek, Henk; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2009-01-01

    Mucin 2 (MUC2) is the structural component of the intestinal protective mucus layer, which contains high amounts of threonine in its peptide backbone. MUC2 synthesis rate might be a potential parameter for intestinal barrier function. In this study, we aimed to determine whether systemic threonine

  16. Effect of breast milk and weaning on epithelial growth of the small intestine in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, A G; Thompson, F M

    2002-01-01

    Breast feeding and weaning are important physiologically significant luminal events that influence the growth of the small intestine in humans. A variety of factors including genetic preprogramming, systemic and local hormones, and permissive factors contribute and modulate intestinal growth. Here, we offer a view that integrates some of these factors, especially those relating to breast feeding and weaning.

  17. Effect of breast milk and weaning on epithelial growth of the small intestine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, A G; Thompson, F M

    2002-11-01

    Breast feeding and weaning are important physiologically significant luminal events that influence the growth of the small intestine in humans. A variety of factors including genetic preprogramming, systemic and local hormones, and permissive factors contribute and modulate intestinal growth. Here, we offer a view that integrates some of these factors, especially those relating to breast feeding and weaning.

  18. Development and Characterization of a Human and Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cell Monolayer Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kozuka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We describe the development and characterization of a mouse and human epithelial cell monolayer platform of the small and large intestines, with a broad range of potential applications including the discovery and development of minimally systemic drug candidates. Culture conditions for each intestinal segment were optimized by correlating monolayer global gene expression with the corresponding tissue segment. The monolayers polarized, formed tight junctions, and contained a diversity of intestinal epithelial cell lineages. Ion transport phenotypes of monolayers from the proximal and distal colon and small intestine matched the known and unique physiology of these intestinal segments. The cultures secreted serotonin, GLP-1, and FGF19 and upregulated the epithelial sodium channel in response to known biologically active agents, suggesting intact secretory and absorptive functions. A screen of over 2,000 pharmacologically active compounds for inhibition of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon cultures led to the identification of a tool compound. : Siegel and colleagues describe their development of a human and mouse intestinal epithelial cell monolayer platform that maintains the cellular, molecular, and functional characteristics of tissue for each intestinal segment. They demonstrate the platform's application to drug discovery by screening a library of over 2,000 compounds to identify an inhibitor of potassium ion transport in the mouse distal colon. Keywords: intestinal epithelium, organoids, monolayer, colon, small intestine, phenotype screening assays, enteroid, colonoid

  19. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie G; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K; Zachos, Nicholas C; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human 'mini-guts' has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5 + intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt-villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host-pathogen interactions.

  20. Human mini-guts: new insights into intestinal physiology and host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Julie G.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Estes, Mary K.; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Donowitz, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The development of indefinitely propagating human ‘mini-guts’ has led to a rapid advance in gastrointestinal research related to transport physiology, developmental biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology. These mini-guts, also called enteroids or colonoids, are derived from LGR5+ intestinal stem cells isolated from the small intestine or colon. Addition of WNT3A and other growth factors promotes stemness and results in viable, physiologically functional human intestinal or colonic cultures that develop a crypt–villus axis and can be differentiated into all intestinal epithelial cell types. The success of research using human enteroids has highlighted the limitations of using animals or in vitro, cancer-derived cell lines to model transport physiology and pathophysiology. For example, curative or preventive therapies for acute enteric infections have been limited, mostly due to the lack of a physiological human intestinal model. However, the human enteroid model enables specific functional studies of secretion and absorption in each intestinal segment as well as observations of the earliest molecular events that occur during enteric infections. This Review describes studies characterizing these human mini-guts as a physiological model to investigate intestinal transport and host pathogen interactions. PMID:27677718

  1. Human organoids: a model system for intestinal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegerinck, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    You are what you eat. A common saying that indicates that your physical or mental state can be influenced by your choice of food. Unfortunately, not all people have the luxury to choose what to eat; this can be related to place of birth, social, economic state, or the physical inability of the diseased intestine to take up certain food. A cell layer, the epithelium, covers the intestine, and harbors the main functions of the intestine: uptake, digestion of food, and a barrier against unwanted...

  2. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the

  3. Human milk oligosaccharide effects on intestinal function and inflammation after preterm birth in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine O.; Martin, Lena; Østergaard, Mette V.

    2017-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) may mediate prebiotic and anti-inflammatory effects in newborns. This is particularly important for preterm infants who are highly susceptible to intestinal dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesized that HMO supplementation of infant formu...

  4. Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, Peter A.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert Jan; Cani, Patrice D.; Mercenier, Annick; MacDonald, Thomas T.; Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is

  5. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification...... and HIF indicate that the simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF-V1 and FeSSIF-V1) represent rather simplified models of the real human intestinal environment in terms of coexisting colloidal particles. It is hypothesized that the different supramolecular assemblies detected differ in their lipid composition...

  6. Congruent strain specific intestinal persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in an intestine-mimicking in vitro system and in human volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermien van Bokhorst-van de Veen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An important trait of probiotics is their capability to reach their intestinal target sites alive to optimally exert their beneficial effects. Assessment of this trait in intestine-mimicking in vitro model systems has revealed differential survival of individual strains of a species. However, data on the in situ persistence characteristics of individual or mixtures of strains of the same species in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy human volunteers have not been reported to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GI-tract survival of individual L. plantarum strains was determined using an intestine mimicking model system, revealing substantial inter-strain differences. The obtained data were correlated to genomic diversity of the strains using comparative genome hybridization (CGH datasets, but this approach failed to discover specific genetic loci that explain the observed differences between the strains. Moreover, we developed a next-generation sequencing-based method that targets a variable intergenic region, and employed this method to assess the in vivo GI-tract persistence of different L. plantarum strains when administered in mixtures to healthy human volunteers. Remarkable consistency of the strain-specific persistence curves were observed between individual volunteers, which also correlated significantly with the GI-tract survival predicted on basis of the in vitro assay. CONCLUSION: The survival of individual L. plantarum strains in the GI-tract could not be correlated to the absence or presence of specific genes compared to the reference strain L. plantarum WCFS1. Nevertheless, in vivo persistence analysis in the human GI-tract confirmed the strain-specific persistence, which appeared to be remarkably similar in different healthy volunteers. Moreover, the relative strain-specific persistence in vivo appeared to be accurately and significantly predicted by their relative survival in the intestine-mimicking in vitro

  7. Climate change, human health, and epidemiological transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Charles, Joel W; Temte, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    The health of populations depends on the availability of clean air, water, food, and sanitation, exposure to pathogens, toxins and environmental hazards, and numerous genetic, behavioral and social factors. For many thousands of years, human life expectancy was low, and population growth was slow. The development of technology-based civilizations facilitated what Abdel Omran called "epidemiological transition," with increasing life expectancy and rapid population growth. To a large extent, the spectacular growth of human populations during the past two centuries was made possible by the energy extracted from fossil fuels. We have now learned, however, that greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion are warming the planet's surface, causing changes in oceanic and atmospheric systems, and disrupting weather and hydrological patterns. Climate change poses unprecedented threats to human health by impacts on food and water security, heat waves and droughts, violent storms, infectious disease, and rising sea levels. Whether or not humanity can reduce greenhouse gas emissions quickly enough to slow climate change to a rate that will allow societies to successfully adapt is not yet known. This essay reviews the current state of relevant knowledge, and points in a few directions that those interested in human health may wish to consider. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Sensitive Medium-Throughput Method to Predict Intestinal Absorption in Humans Using Rat Intestinal Tissue Segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Laís Cristina; Da Silva, Taynara Lourenço; Antunes, Alisson Henrique; Rezende, Kênnia Rocha

    2015-09-01

    A range of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo approaches are currently used for drug development. Highly predictive human intestinal absorption models remain lagging behind the times because of numerous variables concerning permeability through gastrointestinal tract in humans. However, there is a clear need for a drug permeability model early in the drug development process that can balance the requirements for high throughput and effective predictive potential. The present study developed a medium throughput screening Snapwell (MTS-Snapwell) ex vivo model to provide an alternative method to classify drug permeability. Rat small intestine tissue segments were mounted in commercial Snapwell™ inserts. Unidirectional drug transport (A-B) was measured by collecting samples at different time points. Viability of intestinal tissue segments was measured by examining transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and phenol red and caffeine transport. As a result, the apparent permeability (Papp; ×10(-6) cm/s) was determined for atenolol (10.7 ± 1.2), caffeine (17.6 ± 3.1), cimetidine (6.9 ± 0.1), metoprolol (12.6 ± 0.7), theophylline (15.3 ± 1.6) and, ranitidine (3.8 ± 0.4). All drugs were classified in high/low permeability according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System showing high correlation with human data (r = 0.89). These findings showed a high correlation with human data (r = 0.89), suggesting that this model has potential predictive capacity for paracellular and transcellular passively absorbed molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Anatomical localization and some pharmacological effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in human and monkey corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, W D; McConnell, J; Benson, G S

    1984-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide is hypothesized to be a nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmitter important in the physiology of penile erection. To further explore this concept, anatomical localization of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, in vitro muscle bath studies and in vivo injection experiments were undertaken in the monkey and man. Using immunohistochemical techniques vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was localized at the light microscopic level to nerves within the monkey and human penis. Ultrastructurally, a modified peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique was used to identify large vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive vesicles within peptidergic and cholinergic varicosities. In the in vitro muscle bath, the addition of 10(-7) M vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not alter the baseline tension of strips of monkey and human corpus cavernosum. During contraction produced by norepinephrine stimulation, however, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (10(-7) M) caused relaxation of the monkey (41 +/- 18 per cent, no. = 8) and human (23 +/- 8 per cent, no. = 5) corpus cavernosum. Intracorporal injection of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (0.75 X 10(-9) to 3.75 X 10(-9) moles/kg.) had no effect on the monkey penis. Administration of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (1.25 X 10(-9) to 2.5 X 10(-9) moles/kg.) into the internal iliac artery of the monkey, while having no effect on the flaccid penis, caused detumescence of the erect penis obtained by cavernous nerve stimulation (2-5 V, 40 Hz, 2 msec.). Although vasoactive intestinal polypeptide can be found within the nerves of the penis, its apparent in vitro and in vivo effects raise further questions concerning the role of this peptide in penile erection.

  10. Isolation and identification of intestinal CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using human intestinal microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N; Brantley, Scott J; Paine, Mary F; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2011-02-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC(50)) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we...... set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis...

  12. Molecular characterisation of non-absorptive and absorptive enterocytes in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, N; Newrzella, D; Böhm, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Perturbation of differentiation of the crypt-villus axis of the human small intestine is associated with several intestinal disorders of clinical importance. At present, differentiation of small intestinal enterocytes in the crypt-villus axis is not well characterised. SUBJECTS...... genes, and vesicle/transport related genes was found. CONCLUSION: Two types of enterocytes were dissected at the molecular level, the non-absorptive enterocyte located in the upper part of crypts and the absorptive enterocyte found in the middle of villi. These data improve our knowledge about...... the physiology of the crypt-villus architecture in human small intestine and provide new insights into pathophysiological phenomena, such as villus atrophy, which is clinically important....

  13. Prevalence of Human Intestinal Helminthiasis in Njikoka Area of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These included: Ancyclostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoiides,Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides steroralis, Taenia spp, and Schistosoma mansoni. Of the 1,059 stool specimens examined, 527 were infected giving a prevalence of 49.7%. The prevalence of intestinal helminth ...

  14. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    19

    Hence, it was proposed to study the differences in the uptake of these compounds using Caco-2. 57 cell line as a model of the intestinal barrier. Although there are various reports on the natural. 58 sources of antioxidants, cereal grains being one among them, information on the bioavailability. 59 of these phenolic ...

  15. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gavirangappa Hithamani

    compounds, as well as the uptake of phenolic compounds from finger millet, green gram, and onion, was investigated in. Caco-2 monolayer model. ... potential as well as their influence on related gene expression. (Zhang 2015; Calabriso et al. 2016) ... standard' of intestinal cell models (Hubatsch et al. 2007), is an excellent ...

  16. Impact of Diet on Human Intestinal Microbiota and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salonen, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Our intestinal microbiota is involved in the breakdown and bioconversion of dietary and host components that are not degraded and taken up by our own digestive system. The end products generated by our microbiota fuel our enterocytes and support growth but also have signaling functions that generate

  17. Human intestinal parasitism in a rural settlement of northern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other parasites were Entamoeba coli 3.3%, Hookworm 6.0%, Schistosoma mansoni 1.3%, Taenia species 7.3%, while the least common parasite encountered was Strongyloides stercoralis 0.6%.. None of the respondents had access to pipe borne water or bore hole. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in Mbangough ...

  18. Effect of cheese on intestinal transit time and other indicators of bowel function in residents of a retirement home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykkänen, H M; Karhunen, L J; Korpela, R; Salminen, S

    1994-01-01

    Effects of increased intake of cheese on intestinal transit time and other indicators of bowel function were studied in 21 retirement home residents (18 women and 3 men; age, 68-87 years). The study was divided into four succeeding periods: 1) 1-week basal period (usual diet); 2)3-week cheese period (extra cheese was offered as such on bread or used in cooking); 3) 3-week no-cheese period (all cheese on bread was replaced with cured meats and cold cuts, and no cheese was used in cooking); 4) 3-week follow-up period (usual diet). During the last week of each period a questionnaire was filled out on fecal frequencies, consistency of feces (soft, normal, hard), and occurrence of abdominal pain and flatulence. Use of laxative medications and therapeutic foods (prunes) was registered. Eleven of the 21 subjects collected fecal samples for the determination of fecal wet weight and intestinal transit time by means of radiopaque Sitzmark capsules. Intakes of cheese, fiber-containing foods, and fluids by these 11 subjects during meals offered in the cafeteria were recorded on a prefilled questionnaire. In spite of a 10-fold increase in the intake of cheese no change in intestinal transit time, fecal frequency, fecal wet weight, consistency of feces, and occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms was observed. The use of laxative medication was higher during the cheese period, but no change in the combined use of laxative medication and therapeutic foods (prunes) was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Development of Functional Microfold (M Cells from Intestinal Stem Cells in Primary Human Enteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Rouch

    Full Text Available Intestinal microfold (M cells are specialized epithelial cells that act as gatekeepers of luminal antigens in the intestinal tract. They play a critical role in the intestinal mucosal immune response through transport of viruses, bacteria and other particles and antigens across the epithelium to immune cells within Peyer's patch regions and other mucosal sites. Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that M cells are generated from Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs, and that infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases M cell formation. However, it is not known whether and how these findings apply to primary human small intestinal epithelium propagated in an in vitro setting.Human intestinal crypts were grown as monolayers with growth factors and treated with recombinant RANKL, and assessed for mRNA transcripts, immunofluorescence and uptake of microparticles and S. Typhimurium.Functional M cells were generated by short-term culture of freshly isolated human intestinal crypts in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. RANKL stimulation of the monolayer cultures caused dramatic induction of the M cell-specific markers, SPIB, and Glycoprotein-2 (GP2 in a process primed by canonical WNT signaling. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a pseudopod phenotype of GP2-positive M cells that preferentially take up microparticles. Furthermore, infection of the M cell-enriched cultures with the M cell-tropic enteric pathogen, S. Typhimurium, led to preferential association of the bacteria with M cells, particularly at lower inoculum sizes. Larger inocula caused rapid induction of M cells.Human intestinal crypts containing ISCs can be cultured and differentiate into an epithelial layer with functional M cells with characteristic morphological and functional properties. This study is the first to demonstrate that M cells can be induced to form from primary human intestinal epithelium, and that S. Typhimurium preferentially infect these cells in an

  20. Molecular basis of an agarose metabolic pathway acquired by a human intestinal symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluvinage, Benjamin; Grondin, Julie M; Amundsen, Carolyn; Klassen, Leeann; Moote, Paul E; Xiao, Yao; Thomas, Dallas; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Anele, Anuoluwapo; Martens, Eric C; Inglis, G Douglas; Uwiera, Richard E R; Boraston, Alisdair B; Abbott, D Wade

    2018-03-13

    In red algae, the most abundant principal cell wall polysaccharides are mixed galactan agars, of which agarose is a common component. While bioconversion of agarose is predominantly catalyzed by bacteria that live in the oceans, agarases have been discovered in microorganisms that inhabit diverse terrestrial ecosystems, including human intestines. Here we comprehensively define the structure-function relationship of the agarolytic pathway from the human intestinal bacterium Bacteroides uniformis (Bu) NP1. Using recombinant agarases from Bu NP1 to completely depolymerize agarose, we demonstrate that a non-agarolytic Bu strain can grow on GAL released from agarose. This relationship underscores that rare nutrient utilization by intestinal bacteria is facilitated by the acquisition of highly specific enzymes that unlock inaccessible carbohydrate resources contained within unusual polysaccharides. Intriguingly, the agarolytic pathway is differentially distributed throughout geographically distinct human microbiomes, reflecting a complex historical context for agarose consumption by human beings.

  1. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-08-29

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  2. Probiotic supplementation decreases intestinal transit time: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2013-08-07

    To determine the efficacy of probiotic supplementation on intestinal transit time (ITT) and to identify factors that influence these outcomes. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of probiotic supplementation that measured ITT in adults was conducted by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE using relevant key word combinations. Main search limits included RCTs of probiotic supplementation in healthy or constipated adults that measured ITT. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. A random effects meta-analysis was performed with standardized mean difference (SMD) of ITT between probiotic and control groups as the primary outcome. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the impact of moderator variables on ITT SMD. A total of 11 clinical trials with 13 treatment effects representing 464 subjects were included in this analysis. Probiotic supplementation was associated with decreased ITT in relation to controls, with an SMD of 0.40 (95%CI: 0.20-0.59, P probiotics in meta-regression. Subgroup analyses demonstrated statistically greater reductions in ITT with probiotics in subjects with vs without constipation and in older vs younger subjects [both SMD: 0.59 (95%CI: 0.39-0.79) vs 0.17 (95%CI: -0.08-0.42), P = 0.01]. Medium to large treatment effects were identified with Bifidobacterium Lactis (B. lactis) HN019 (SMD: 0.72, 95%CI: 0.27-1.18, P products yielded small treatment effects. Overall, short-term probiotic supplementation decreases ITT with consistently greater treatment effects identified in constipated or older adults and with certain probiotic strains.

  3. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    Existing in vitro models of the human intestine such as the established epithelial cell line, Caco-2, cultured on porous membranes have been extensively used for assessing and predicting permeability and absorption of oral drugs in the pharmaceutical industries. However, such in vitro human intes...

  4. Intestinal microbiota in human health and disease: the impact of probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonise the human gastrointestinal tract play an important role in human health. The development of culture-independent molecular techniques has provided new insights in the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota. Here, we summarise the

  5. Comprehensive postmortem analyses of intestinal microbiota changes and bacterial translocation in human flora associated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M Heimesaat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmortem microbiological examinations are performed in forensic and medical pathology for defining uncertain causes of deaths and for screening of deceased tissue donors. Interpretation of bacteriological data, however, is hampered by false-positive results due to agonal spread of microorganisms, postmortem bacterial translocation, and environmental contamination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a kinetic survey of naturally occurring postmortem gut flora changes in the small and large intestines of conventional and gnotobiotic mice associated with a human microbiota (hfa applying cultural and molecular methods. Sacrificed mice were kept under ambient conditions for up to 72 hours postmortem. Intestinal microbiota changes were most pronounced in the ileal lumen where enterobacteria and enterococci increased by 3-5 orders of magnitude in conventional and hfa mice. Interestingly, comparable intestinal overgrowth was shown in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation in mice and men. In hfa mice, ileal overgrowth with enterococci and enterobacteria started 3 and 24 hours postmortem, respectively. Strikingly, intestinal bacteria translocated to extra-intestinal compartments such as mesenteric lymphnodes, spleen, liver, kidney, and cardiac blood as early as 5 min after death. Furthermore, intestinal tissue destruction was characterized by increased numbers of apoptotic cells and neutrophils within 3 hours postmortem, whereas counts of proliferative cells as well as T- and B-lymphocytes and regulatory T-cells decreased between 3 and 12 hours postmortem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that kinetics of ileal overgrowth with enterobacteria and enterococci in hfa mice can be used as an indicator for compromized intestinal functionality and for more precisely defining the time point of death under defined ambient conditions. The rapid translocation of intestinal bacteria starting within a few minutes after death will help

  6. Human Intestinal Tissue with Adult Stem Cell Properties Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Forster

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

  7. Protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the assessment of immune inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yi Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the protective effect of perioperative recombinant human growth hormone (r-hGH application on intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with intestinal obstruction and the influence on the immune inflammatory response. Methods: 60 patients with intestinal obstruction who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital between February 2013 and July 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into the control group (n=34 who received conventional surgical treatment and the observation group (n=26 who received surgery combined with perioperative r-hGH treatment. The serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of intestinal mucosal barrier indexes, immunoglobulin and inflammatory response indicators were not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. After treatment, serum intestinal mucosal barrier indexes Endotoxin, D-Lactate and DAO levels in observation group were lower than those in control group, immunoglobulin IgA, IgM and IgG levels were higher than those in control group, and inflammatory response indicators IL-1, IL-6, PCT and TNF-α levels were lower than those in control group patients. Conclusion: Perioperative r-hGH application in patients with intestinal obstruction can protect the intestinal mucosal barrier, also optimize the humoral immunity and suppress the systemic inflammatory response.

  8. [Transit-slowing anastomosis by 180 degree axial rotation of the upper intestinal segment after massive resection of the small intestine. Preliminary note on an experimental study in the adult dog].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomao, J; Bosgiraud, F; Vayre, P

    1976-01-01

    After massive resection of 85 p. cent of the small intestine in the dog, there occurs diarrhoea and malabsorption. These consequences may be palliated by an oblique end-to-end anastomosis with 180 rotation on the intestinal axis of the jejunal sugment above in relation to the ileal segment below. The authors noted slowing of the transit in the 10 operated dogs. The experimental conditions and the results obtained suggest that the technic may be applicable in man.

  9. Intestinal pH and gastrointestinal transit profiles in cystic fibrosis patients measured by wireless motility capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfond, Daniel; Ma, Changxing; Semler, Jack; Borowitz, Drucy

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) defect in pancreatic insufficient (PI) patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) on the gastrointestinal pH profile is poorly defined. Adequate and efficient neutralization of the gastric acidity in the duodenum is important for nutrient absorption and timely release of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). We utilized a wireless motility capsule (WMC) to study intestinal pH profile and gastrointestinal transit profile in CF subjects. WMC studies were done on ten adult CF patients with PI while off acid suppression medication and ten age, gender and BMI matched healthy controls. Mean pH over 1 min increments and area under the pH curve over 5 min increments was calculated for the first hour post gastric emptying. Paired t-test was used to compare means of the pH recordings, transit profiles and analysis of time interval required to reach and maintain pH >5.5 and 6.0. A statistically significant difference was observed between mean pH values during the first 23 min of small bowel transit (p pH 5.5 and pH 6.0 (p < 0.001), which is required for PERT dissolution. Only small bowel transit in CF subjects was noted to be significantly delayed (p = 0.004) without a compensatory increase in whole gut transit time. We have demonstrated a significant delay in the small intestinal transit and a deficient buffering capacity required to neutralize gastric acid in the proximal small bowel of patients with CF.

  10. [Evaluation of stomach emptying under extreme obstruction of gastrointestinal transit treated with gastro-intestinal or duodenal-intestinal anastomosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowiec, S; Górka, Z; Jonderko, K; Nalewajka-Kołodziejczak, J; Gruszka, Z; Kuśnierz, K; Leidgens, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare gastric emptying in two groups of dogs in which a gastrojejunal or duodenojejunal Roux-en-Y anastomosis was performed over the site of an experimental obstruction in the distal duodenum. The experiment was carried out on 10 mongrel dogs. Gastric emptying was assessed twice in each dog before the experiment (control examination); the solid phase of the test meal was labelled with 99mTc. Following a control examination, the dogs were divided into two groups of 5 animals each, and subjected to the above mentioned surgical procedures. Postoperative gastric emptying was carried out 3 weeks after the operation, and then at 3 and 6 months following the procedure. The following parameters describing quantitatively gastric emptying were determined: mean transit time MTT0-60. MTT0-120 and total mean transit time MTT0-180. The comparison of these parameters revealed statistically significant differences confirming delay of gastric emptying in dogs with a gastrojejunal anastomosis.

  11. Life and death at the mucosal-luminal interface: New perspectives on human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootjans, Joep; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Buurman, Wim A; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Derikx, Joep P M

    2016-03-07

    Intestinal ischemia is a frequently observed phenomenon. Morbidity and mortality rates are extraordinarily high and did not improve over the past decades. This is in part attributable to limited knowledge on the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in man, the paucity in preventive and/or therapeutic options and the lack of early diagnostic markers for intestinal ischemia. To improve our knowledge and solve clinically important questions regarding intestinal IR, we developed a human experimental intestinal IR model. With this model, we were able to gain insight into the mechanisms that allow the human gut to withstand short periods of IR without the development of severe inflammatory responses. The purpose of this review is to overview the most relevant recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of human intestinal IR, as well as the (potential) future clinical implications.

  12. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  13. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake and transport in the human intestinal cell model, Caco-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources of...

  14. Activation of AMPK inhibits cholera toxin stimulated chloride secretion in human and murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailín C Rogers

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal chloride secretion through chloride channels, such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, is one of the major molecular mechanisms underlying enterotoxigenic diarrhea. It has been demonstrated in the past that the intracellular energy sensing kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, can inhibit CFTR opening. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of AMPK can abrogate the increased chloride flux through CFTR occurring during cholera toxin (CTX mediated diarrhea. Chloride efflux was measured in isolated rat colonic crypts using real-time fluorescence imaging. AICAR and metformin were used to activate AMPK in the presence of the secretagogues CTX or forskolin (FSK. In order to substantiate our findings on the whole tissue level, short-circuit current (SCC was monitored in human and murine colonic mucosa using Ussing chambers. Furthermore, fluid accumulation was measured in excised intestinal loops. CTX and forskolin (FSK significantly increased chloride efflux in isolated colonic crypts. The increase in chloride efflux could be offset by using the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin. In human and mouse mucosal sheets, CTX and FSK increased SCC. AICAR and metformin inhibited the secretagogue induced rise in SCC, thereby confirming the findings made in isolated crypts. Moreover, AICAR decreased CTX stimulated fluid accumulation in excised intestinal segments. The present study suggests that pharmacological activation of AMPK effectively reduces CTX mediated increases in intestinal chloride secretion, which is a key factor for intestinal water accumulation. AMPK activators may therefore represent a supplemental treatment strategy for acute diarrheal illness.

  15. Morphological changes in the enteric nervous system caused by carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Godlewski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The innervations of the large intestine is responsible for it peristalsis and contractibility. Investigations of the enteric nervous system in many colon diseases have revealed changes in this structure. No study has been carried out on morphological changes of the enteric nervous system in the human large intestine with carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in the structure of the enteric neurons in patients with sigmoid and rectal cancer. Material for the study was obtained from patients undergoing operations due to carcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectum. Microscopic observation of the cancerous tumor of the human large intestine revealed changes in the enteric nervous system innervating this part of the gastrointestinal tract. In the region of the enteric plexuses located close to the tumour, disruption of their correct placement and structure was observed. The changes also consisted of the disappearance of neurons and nerve fibers forming these plexuses. In the solid cancerous tumour, elements of the enteric nervous system were not present. Destruction of the enteric nervous system in the course of carcinoma of the large intestine may cause disruption of proper intestinal function and may be responsible for part of symptoms which the patients suffer.

  16. In Silico Prediction for Intestinal Absorption and Brain Penetration of Chemical Pesticides in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedik, Lisa; Mias-Lucquin, Dominique; Bruyere, Arnaud; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-06-30

    Intestinal absorption and brain permeation constitute key parameters of toxicokinetics for pesticides, conditioning their toxicity, including neurotoxicity. However, they remain poorly characterized in humans. The present study was therefore designed to evaluate human intestine and brain permeation for a large set of pesticides ( n = 338) belonging to various chemical classes, using an in silico graphical BOILED-Egg/SwissADME online method based on lipophilicity and polarity that was initially developed for drugs. A high percentage of the pesticides (81.4%) was predicted to exhibit high intestinal absorption, with a high accuracy (96%), whereas a lower, but substantial, percentage (38.5%) displayed brain permeation. Among the pesticide classes, organochlorines ( n = 30) constitute the class with the lowest percentage of intestine-permeant members (40%), whereas that of the organophosphorus compounds ( n = 99) has the lowest percentage of brain-permeant chemicals (9%). The predictions of the permeations for the pesticides were additionally shown to be significantly associated with various molecular descriptors well-known to discriminate between permeant and non-permeant drugs. Overall, our in silico data suggest that human exposure to pesticides through the oral way is likely to result in an intake of these dietary contaminants for most of them and brain permeation for some of them, thus supporting the idea that they have toxic effects on human health, including neurotoxic effects.

  17. The mucin degrader Akkermansia muciniphila is an abundant resident of the human intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derrien, M.M.N.; Collado, M.C.; Ben-Amor, K.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2008-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted probe, MUC-1437, was designed and validated in order to determine the presence and numbers of cells of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin degrader, in the human intestinal tract. As determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization, A. muciniphila accounted more than 1% of the total

  18. High-throughput analysis of the impact of antibiotics on the human intestinal microbiota composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladirat, S.E.; Schols, H.A.; Nauta, A.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Montijn, R.C.; Gruppen, H.; Schuren, F.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments can lead to a disruption of the human microbiota. In this in-vitro study, the impact of antibiotics on adult intestinal microbiota was monitored in a new high-throughput approach: a fermentation screening-platform was coupled with a phylogenetic microarray analysis

  19. Naturally occurring products of proglucagon 111-160 in the porcine and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, T; Thim, L; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    and porcine proglucagon sequences, Ala117 is replaced by Thr, and Ile138, Ala144, Ile152 and Gln153 are replaced by Val, Thr, Leu, and His. By gel filtration and radioimmunoassay of intestinal extracts it was established that a large part of porcine and virtually all of human proglucagon are processed...

  20. Microbial Eco-Physiology of the human intestinal tract: a flow cytometric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, Ben K.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a multifaceted approach to further enhance our view of the complex human intestinal microbial ecosystem. This approach combines me advantages of flow cyrometry (FCM), a single cell and high-throughput technology, and molecular techniques that have proven themselves to be

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  2. Investigation of the interactions between Chrysanthemum morifolium flowers extract and intestinal bacteria from human and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jin-Hua; Duan, Jin-Ao; Qian, Yi-Yun; Qian, Da-Wei; Guo, Jian-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Flos Chrysanthemi, dried flower of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat, has drawn much attention recently owing to its potential beneficial health effects for human. Flos Chrysanthemi products are usually taken orally and metabolized by intestinal microflora. However, there has been no investigation of the comprehensive metabolic profile of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora owing to its chemical complexity and the limitations of analytical methods. In this paper, a rapid, sensitive and automated analysis method, ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry including MS E technology and automated data processing Metabolynx™ software, was developed and successfully applied for the biotransformation and metabolic profile of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract by intestinal flora from human and rat. A total of 32 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified in human and rat intestinal bacterial samples. These metabolites indicated that hydrolysis, hydroxylation, acetylation, methylation, hydrogenation and deoxygenation were the major conversion pathways of flavonoids in the Flos Chrysanthemi extract in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract on the growth of different intestinal bacteria were detected using an Emax precision microplate reader. Certain pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides were significantly inhibited by Flos Chrysanthemi, while commensal probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium were moderately promoted. Our observation provided further evidence for the importance of intestinal bacteria in the metabolism and potential activity of the Flos Chrysanthemi extract. The results will also be helpful for the further pharmacokinetic study of Flos Chrysanthemi and to unravel how it works in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The effect of reducing numbers of Campylobacter in broiler intestines on human health risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauta, Maarten; Johannessen, Gro; Laureano Adame, Laura

    2016-01-01

    in concentration on the meat and a reduction in the human health risk of campylobacteriosis. In this study, two methods are presented and compared. The first is a linear regression model, based on count data from caecal contents and skin sample data, obtained after processing from the same flocks. Alternatively...... in concentration in the intestinal content has a large impact on the risk of campylobacteriosis due to the consumption of chicken meat: a relative risk reduction between 44% and 95%. Therefore it seems promising to aim interventions at a reduction of the concentration of Campylobacter in the broiler intestines...

  4. Human-derived probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains differentially reduce intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuying; Fatheree, Nicole Y; Mangalat, Nisha; Rhoads, Jon Marc

    2010-11-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) is a probiotic that inhibits the severity of enteric infections and modulates the immune system. Human-derived L. reuteri strains DSM17938, ATCC PTA4659, ATCC PTA 5289, and ATCC PTA 6475 have demonstrated strain-specific immunomodulation in cultured monocytoid cells, but information about how these strains affect inflammation in intestinal epithelium is limited. We determined the effects of the four different L. reuteri strains on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in small intestinal epithelial cells and in the ileum of newborn rats. IPEC-J2 cells (derived from the jejunal epithelium of a neonatal piglet) and IEC-6 cells (derived from the rat crypt) were treated with L. reuteri. Newborn rat pups were gavaged cow milk formula supplemented with L. reuteri strains in the presence or absence of LPS. Protein and mRNA levels of cytokines and histological changes were measured. We demonstrate that even though one L. reuteri strain (DSM 17938) did not inhibit LPS-induced IL-8 production in cultured intestinal cells, all strains significantly reduced intestinal mucosal levels of KC/GRO (∼IL-8) and IFN-γ when newborn rat pups were fed formula containing LPS ± L. reuteri. Intestinal histological damage produced by LPS plus cow milk formula was also significantly reduced by all four strains. Cow milk formula feeding (without LPS) produced mild gut inflammation, evidenced by elevated mucosal IFN-γ and IL-13 levels, a process that could be suppressed by strain 17938. Other cytokines and chemokines were variably affected by the different strains, and there was no toxic effect of L. reuteri on intestinal cells or mucosa. In conclusion, L. reuteri strains differentially modulate LPS-induced inflammation. Probiotic interactions with both epithelial and nonepithelial cells in vivo must be instrumental in modulating intrinsic anti-inflammatory effects in the intestine. We suggest that the terms anti- and proinflammatory be used only

  5. Transcriptional modulation of intestinal innate defense/inflammation genes by preterm infant microbiota in a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B; Claud, Erika C

    2015-01-01

    It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes.

  6. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    samples from a single individual indicated that Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium sp. and high G+C organisms are most abundant in the small intestine. The compositions of these populations fluctuated in time and correlated to the short-chain fatty acids profiles that were determined...... in parallel. Comparative functional analysis with fecal metagenomes identified functions that are overrepresented in the small intestine, including simple carbohydrate transport phosphotransferase systems (PTS), central metabolism and biotin production. Moreover, metatranscriptome analysis supported high...... level in-situ expression of PTS and carbohydrate metabolic genes, especially those belonging to Streptococcus sp. Overall, our findings suggest that rapid uptake and fermentation of available carbohydrates contribute to maintaining the microbiota in the human small intestine....

  7. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated....... Physiological postprandial ileal lipid concentrations dose dependently inhibited human digestive pancreatic protease and bile acid output, but not intestinal motor activity. Thus physiological postprandial ileal nutrient exposure may be of importance for the termination of digestive secretory responses...

  8. Interaction of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum with Primary Human and Bovine Intestinal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Amna; Mulcahy, Grace; Bourke, Billy; Clyne, Marguerite

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis in humans is caused by the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum and the anthroponotic pathogen Cryptosporidium hominis. To what extent the recently recognized C. hominis species differs from C. parvum is unknown. In this study we compared the mechanisms of C. parvum and C. hominis invasion using a primary cell model of infection. Cultured primary bovine and human epithelial intestinal cells were infected with C. parvum or C. hominis. The effects of the carbohydrate lecti...

  9. Interaction of Campylobacter spp. and human probiotics in chicken intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganan, M; Martinez-Rodriguez, A J; Carrascosa, A V; Vesterlund, S; Salminen, S; Satokari, R

    2013-03-01

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial food-borne diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. The principal risk of human contamination is handling and consumption of contaminated poultry meat. To colonize poultry, Campylobacter adheres to and persists in the mucus layer that covers the intestinal epithelium. Inhibiting adhesion to the mucus could prevent colonization of the intestine. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the protective effect of defined commercial human probiotic strains on the adhesion of Campylobacter spp. to chicken intestinal mucus, in a search for alternatives to antibiotics to control this food-borne pathogen. The probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS and a starter culture strain Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis adhered well to chicken intestinal mucus and were able to reduce the binding of Campylobacter spp. when the mucus was colonized with the probiotic strain before contacting the pathogen. Human-intended probiotics could be useful as prophylactics in poultry feeding for controlling Campylobacter spp. colonization. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feiye; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Fangming; Ji, Jinjun; Xie, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC) model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms. Study Design A prospective experimental animal study. Methods The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP) and the P substance (SP) in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level. Conclusion The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP. PMID:27478893

  11. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiye Zhu

    Full Text Available Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms.A prospective experimental animal study.The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP and the P substance (SP in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level.The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP.

  12. Autoradiographic and enzyme histochemical studies of intestinal metaplasia in human stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between growth potency and alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal metaplasia of human stomach was studied using enzyme histochemical and autoradiographic technique. Both alkaline phosphatase positive and negative glands were seen in the intestinal metaplasia. Two types of alkaline phosphatase positive glands were observed, one in which alkaline phosphatase positive cells were distributed from the lower part to the surface of the gland and the other in which alkaline phosphatase positive cells were localized only at the surface of the gland. 3 H-Thymidine labelled cells in the former gland were localized only at the bottom but the labelled cells in the latter were distributed in the lower part of the gland. 3 H-Thymidine labelled cells in alkaline phosphatase negative gland were distributed from the bottom to middle part of the gland. These results imply that the intestinal metaplasia in which cell proliferative zone was localized at the bottom of the gland showed alkaline phosphatase activity just like the activity in the small intestine, however the gland in which the cell proliferative zone was prolonged showed the alkaline phosphatase activity different from the small intestine. (author)

  13. Long-term Renewable Human Intestinal Epithelial Stem Cells as Monolayers: A Potential for Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew; Rouch, Joshua D; Jabaji, Ziyad; Khalil, Hassan A; Solorzano, Sergio; Lewis, Michael; Martín, Martín G.; Stelzner, Matthias G.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current culture schema for human intestinal stem cells (hISCs) frequently rely on a 3D culture system using Matrigel™, a laminin-rich matrix derived from murine sarcoma that is not suitable for clinical use. We have developed a novel 2D culture system for the in vitro expansion of hISCs as an intestinal epithelial monolayer without the use of Matrigel. Methods Cadaveric duodenal samples were processed to isolate intestinal crypts from the mucosa. Crypts were cultured on a thin coat of type I collagen or laminin. Intestinal epithelial monolayers were supported with growth factors to promote self-renewal or differentiation of the hISCs. Proliferating monolayers were sub-cultured every 4–5 days. Results Intestinal epithelial monolayers were capable of long-term cell renewal. Less differentiated monolayers expressed high levels of gene marker LGR5, while more differentiated monolayers had higher expressions of CDX2, MUC2, LYZ, DEF5, and CHGA. Furthermore, monolayers were capable of passaging into a 3D culture system to generate spheroids and enteroids. Conclusion This 2D system is an important step to expand hISCs for further experimental studies and for clinical cell transplantation. PMID:26995514

  14. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-11-01

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus , four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis , and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica . Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/μL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus . Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  15. Naturally occurring glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) receptors in human intestinal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Anette; Hastrup, Sven; Andersen, Marie; Thim, Lars

    2006-02-17

    Although clinical trials with GLP-2 receptor agonists are currently ongoing, the mechanisms behind GLP-2-induced intestinal epithelial growth remain to be understood. To approach the GLP-2 mechanism of action this study aimed to identify intestinal cell lines endogenously expressing the GLP-2 receptor. Here we report the first identification of a cell line endogenously expressing functional GLP-2 receptors. The human intestinal epithelial cell line, FHC, expressed GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and GLP-2 receptor protein (Western blot). In cultured FHC cells, GLP-2 induced concentration dependent cAMP accumulation (pEC(50)=9.7+/-0.04 (mean+/-S.E.M., n=4)). In addition, a naturally occurring human intestinal fibroblast cell line, 18Co, endogenously expressing GLP-2 receptor encoding mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (Western blot) was identified. No receptor functionality (binding or G-protein signalling) could be demonstrated in 18Co cells. The identified gut-relevant cell lines provide tools for future clarification of the mechanisms underlying GLP-2-induced epithelial growth.

  16. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair eWalsham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC A/E lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  17. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Alistair D S; MacKenzie, Donald A; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  18. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsham, Alistair D. S.; MacKenzie, Donald A.; Cook, Vivienne; Wemyss-Holden, Simon; Hews, Claire L.; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC attaching/effacing (A/E) lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26973622

  19. Human Rights and Transitional Societies: Contemporary Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Obel

    2008-01-01

    societies are said to have an obligation to apply criminal justice in dealing with such past violations. In Rwanda, the transitional government decided to prosecute the perpetrators of the 1994 genocide. As a result of widespread participation in the genocide and a devastated legal sector, difficulties...... in respecting the rights of the accused arose. A group of paralegals known as the "Corps of Judicial Defenders" was thus relied upon as to provide legal assistance for genocide suspects, but also for civil parties. This paper describes the work of these paralegals relating to the transitional trials, and, more...

  20. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology......-CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine....

  1. Epidemiology of infections with intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among sugar-estate residents in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanet, A. L.; Sahlu, T.; Rinke de Wit, T.; Messele, T.; Masho, W.; Woldemichael, T.; Yeneneh, H.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections could play an important role in the progression of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), by further disturbing the immune system whilst it is already engaged in the fight against HIV. HIV and intestinal parasitic infections were investigated in 1239,

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA populations in faeces with higher homology to intestinal populations than to blood populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoek, L.; Sol, C. J.; Snijders, F.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Boom, R.; Goudsmit, J.

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in faeces is representative of the HIV-1 population in intestinal tissue, we studied HIV-1 V3 variation in faeces, intestinal biopsies and serum from two individuals. Phylogenic analysis of HIV-1 V3-coding RNA in faeces from one

  3. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Boekhorst, te J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus

  4. Congruent Strain Specific Intestinal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in an Intestine-Mimicking In Vitro System and in Human Volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst-van de Veen, H. van; Swam, I. van; Wels, M.W.; Bron, P.A.; Kleerebezem, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important trait of probiotics is their capability to reach their intestinal target sites alive to optimally exert their beneficial effects. Assessment of this trait in intestine-mimicking in vitro model systems has revealed differential survival of individual strains of a species.

  5. Congruent Strain Specific Intestinal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in an Intestine-Mimicking In Vitro System and in Human Volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Swam, van I.; Wels, M.; Bron, P.A.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important trait of probiotics is their capability to reach their intestinal target sites alive to optimally exert their beneficial effects. Assessment of this trait in intestine-mimicking in vitro model systems has revealed differential survival of individual strains of a species.

  6. Differentiation-dependent activation of the human intestinal alkaline phosphatase promoter by HNF-4 in intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Bressendorff, Simon; Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-01-01

    The intestinal alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPI) encodes a digestive brush-border enzyme, which is highly upregulated during small intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. To identify new putative promoter motifs responsible for the regulation of ALPI expression during differentiation of the en...

  7. Extensive diversity of intestinal trichomonads of non-human primates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smejkalová, P.; Petrželková, Klára Judita; Pomajbíková, K.; Modrý, David; Čepička, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 1 (2012), s. 92-102 ISSN 0031-1820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : trichomonads * Parabasalia * non-human primates * diversity * host specificity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2012

  8. Similarity of hydrolyzing activity of human and rat small intestinal disaccharidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oku T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneyuki Oku¹, Kenichi Tanabe¹, Shigeharu Ogawa², Naoki Sadamori¹, Sadako Nakamura¹¹Graduate School of Human Health Science, University of Nagasaki, Siebold, Nagayo, Japan; ²Juzenkai Hospital, Kagomachi, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to clarify whether it is possible to extrapolate results from studies of the hydrolyzing activity of disaccharidases from rats to humans.Materials and methods: We measured disaccharidase activity in humans and rats using identical preparation and assay methods, and investigated the similarity in hydrolyzing activity. Small intestinal samples without malignancy were donated by five patients who had undergone bladder tumor surgery, and homogenates were prepared to measure disaccharidase activity. Adult rat homogenates were prepared using small intestine.Results: Maltase activity was the highest among the five disaccharidases, followed by sucrase and then palatinase in humans and rats. Trehalase activity was slightly lower than that of palatinase in humans and was similar to that of sucrase in rats. Lactase activity was the lowest in humans, but was similar to that of palatinase in rats. Thus, the hydrolyzing activity of five disaccharidases was generally similar in humans and rats. The relative activity of sucrose and palatinase versus maltase was generally similar between humans and rats. The ratio of rat to human hydrolyzing activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase was 1.9–3.1, but this was not a significant difference. Leaf extract from Morus alba strongly inhibited the activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase, but not trehalase and lactase, and the degree of inhibition was similar in humans and rats. L-arabinose mildly inhibited sucrase activity, but hardly inhibited the activity of maltase, palatinase, trehalase and lactase in humans and rats. The digestibility of 1-kestose, galactosylsucrose, and panose by small intestinal enzymes was very similar between humans and

  9. Hydrolysis of Pyrethroids by Human and Rat Tissues: Examination of Intestinal, Liver and Serum Carboxylesterases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver, and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ~2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (~40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin, and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected. Together

  10. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ∼ 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (∼ 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected

  11. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  12. An In-Depth View into Human Intestinal Fluid Colloids: Intersubject Variability in Relation to Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethorst, Danny; Baatsen, Peter; Remijn, Caroline; Mitra, Amitava; Tack, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-10-03

    Intestinal fluids dictate the intraluminal environment, and therefore, they substantially affect the absorption of orally taken drugs. The characterization of human intestinal fluids (HIF) and the design of simulated intestinal fluids (SIF) mainly focus on composition, not necessarily taking into account the ultrastructure of HIF. Colloidal structures in HIF and SIF can enhance the solubilizing capacity for lipophilic drugs while decreasing the bioaccessible fraction. As such, colloids present in HIF play a crucial role and require an in-depth characterization. Therefore, the present study pursued a comprehensive characterization of the ultrastructure of fasted and fed state HIF, focusing on (i) intersubject variability in relation to composition and (ii) differences between the ultrastructure of HIF and SIF. Individual as well as pooled HIF were collected from human volunteers near the ligament of Treitz and compositionally characterized previously. A HIF population pool (20 healthy volunteers) for both fasted (FaHIF) and fed state (FeHIF) was compared to current SIF, as well as selected HIF from different individuals. The selected individual HIF represented the full spectrum of compositional characteristics. Three complementary electron microscopy techniques, cryo-TEM (transmission electron microscopy), negative stain TEM, and cryo-SEM (scanning electron microscopy), were employed to provide a comprehensive view of the colloidal structures in HIF and SIF. The use of complementary EM techniques provided a unique insight into the ultrastructure of HIF, including their native conformation. These characterizations showed that FaHIF and FaSSIF (fasted state simulated intestinal fluids) only consist of (mixed)-micelles with minimal intersubject variability. Ultrastructures in FeSSIF (fed state simulated intestinal fluids) and FeSSIF-v2 are not representative of the colloids in FeHIF since SIF lack (multi)-lamellar vesicles and lipid droplets. Furthermore, the images

  13. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  14. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomeus Van den Bogert

    Full Text Available The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  15. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  16. Metabolomics Analysis of Cistus monspeliensis Leaf Extract on Energy Metabolism Activation in Human Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Shimoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is a very important process to improve and maintain health from the point of view of physiology. It is well known that the intracellular ATP production is contributed to energy metabolism in cells. Cistus monspeliensis is widely used as tea, spices, and medical herb; however, it has not been focusing on the activation of energy metabolism. In this study, C. monspeliensis was investigated as the food resources by activation of energy metabolism in human intestinal epithelial cells. C. monspeliensis extract showed high antioxidant ability. In addition, the promotion of metabolites of glycolysis and TCA cycle was induced by C. monspeliensis treatment. These results suggest that C. monspeliensis extract has an ability to enhance the energy metabolism in human intestinal cells.

  17. The Influence of Different Apple Based Supplements on the Intestinal Microbiota of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective: The present project is part of the large ISAFRUIT project, where one of the objectives is to identify effects of apple and apple product on parameters related to gut health. In a previous rat study we observed changes in the intestinal microbiota of rats fed whole apples...... supplements did not show any effect on the microbiota by DGGE. Conclusion: Consumption of whole apples or pomace is able to modify the intestinal microbiota of humans......., pomace or apple pectin ([1], and we were interested in finding out if the same effect can be observed in humans. Method: The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled 5 x 28 days cross-over study with 24 healthy persons of both genders. The persons were following a pectin- and polyphenol free...

  18. Canine intestinal contents vs. simulated media for the assessment of solubility of two weak bases in the human small intestinal contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantzi, Lida; Persson, Eva; Polentarutti, Britta; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Goumas, Konstantinos; Dressman, Jennifer B; Reppas, Christos

    2006-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relative usefulness of canine intestinal contents and simulated media in the prediction of solubility of two weak bases (dipyridamole and ketoconazole) in fasted and fed human intestinal aspirates that were collected under conditions simulating those in bioavailability/bioequivalence studies. After administration of 250 mL of water or 500 mL of Ensure plus [both containing 10 mg/mL polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 as nonabsorbable marker], intestinal aspirates were collected from the fourth part of the duodenum of 12 healthy adults and from the mid-jejunum of four Labradors. Pooled samples were analyzed for PEG, pH, buffer capacity, osmolality, surface tension, pepsin, total carbohydrates, total protein content, bile salts, phospholipids, and neutral lipids. The shake-flask method was used to measure the solubility of dipyridamole and ketoconazole in pooled human and canine intestinal contents and in fasted-state-simulating intestinal fluid (FaSSIF) and fed-state-simulating intestinal fluid (FeSSIF) containing various bile salts and pH-buffering agents. For both compounds, solubility in canine contents may be predictive of human intralumenal solubility in the fasting state but not in the fed state. The poor agreement of results in canine and human aspirates can be attributed to the higher bile salt content in canine bile. Solubility in FaSSIF containing a mixture of bile salts from crude bile predicted satisfactorily the intralumenal solubility of both drugs in the fasted state in humans. Solubility in FeSSIF, regardless of the identity of bile salts or of the buffering species, deviated from intralumenal values in the fed human aspirates by up to 40%. This was attributed to the lack of lipolytic products in FeSSIF, the higher bile salt content of FeSSIF, and the lower pH of FeSSIF. FaSSIF containing a mixture of bile salts from crude bile, and FeSSIF containing lipolytic products and, perhaps, having lower bile salt content but

  19. The Influence of Different Apple Based Supplements on the Intestinal Microbiota of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Wilcks, Andrea; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2010-01-01

    restriction diet during the control period, and in the four other periods it was supplied with four different apple based supplements. Between the diets there was a 2-week wash-out period still on the restriction diet. The four apple based supplements were: 1) whole apples, 2) clear apple juice (pectin...... supplements did not show any effect on the microbiota by DGGE. Conclusion: Consumption of whole apples or pomace is able to modify the intestinal microbiota of humans....

  20. A General O-Glycosylation System Important to the Physiology of a Major Human Intestinal Symbiont

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, C. Mark; Coyne, Michael J.; Villa, Otto F.; Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    The Bacteroides are a numerically dominant genus of the human intestinal microbiota. These organisms harbor a rare bacterial pathway for incorporation of exogenous fucose into capsular polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The infrequency of glycoprotein synthesis by bacteria prompted a more detailed analysis of this process. Here, we demonstrate that Bacteroides fragilis has a general O-glycosylation system. The proteins targeted for glycosylation include those predicted to be involved in prote...

  1. Consensus hologram QSAR modeling for the prediction of human intestinal absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2012-04-15

    Consistent in silico models for ADME properties are useful tools in early drug discovery. Here, we report the hologram QSAR modeling of human intestinal absorption using a dataset of 638 compounds with experimental data associated. The final validated models are consistent and robust for the consensus prediction of this important pharmacokinetic property and are suitable for virtual screening applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Naturally occurring products of proglucagon 111-160 in the porcine and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, T; Thim, L; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the glucagon gene is expressed in the mammalian intestine. Here it codes for "glicentin" (proglucagon 1-69) and a glucagon-like peptide, proglucagon 78-107, recently isolated from porcine intestine. We studied the fate of the remaining COOH-terminal part of progl...... that this is the structure of the naturally occurring human peptide....... of proglucagon (proglucagon 111-160) using radioimmunoassays against proglucagon 111-123 and 126-160. Two peptides were isolated from acid ethanol extracts of porcine ileal mucosa and sequenced: one corresponding to proglucagon 126-158 and one probably corresponding to proglucagon 111-158. By comparing human...... and porcine proglucagon sequences, Ala117 is replaced by Thr, and Ile138, Ala144, Ile152 and Gln153 are replaced by Val, Thr, Leu, and His. By gel filtration and radioimmunoassay of intestinal extracts it was established that a large part of porcine and virtually all of human proglucagon are processed...

  3. Transitional justice as social control: political transitions, human rights norms and the reclassification of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, Ron

    2017-09-12

    This article offers an interpretation of transitional justice policies - the efforts of post-conflict and post-dictatorship societies to address the legacy of past abuses - as a form of social control. While transitional justice is commonly conceptualized as responding to a core problem of impunity, this article argues that such formulation is too narrow and leads to lack of coherence in the analysis of the diverse array of transitional mechanisms, which include among others trials, truth commissions, reparations for victims and apologies. Building on the work of Stanley Cohen, the article contends that the core transitional problem is the denial of human rights violations, and consequently that the common purpose of all transitional justice mechanisms is to reclassify the past: redefining as deviant some acts and individuals which prior to the transition were considered 'normal'. The article identifies and analyses three themes in the application of a social control framework to transitional justice: (1) truth, memory and retroactive social control, pertains to the way truth-seeking transitional justice mechanisms reclassify past events by engaging in social control of and through memory; (2) censure, celebration and transitional social control refers to the reclassification of categories of individuals through expressions of both social disapproval and praise; and (3) civil society and social control from below concerns the role of social movements, organizations and groups as informal agents of social control during transitions. The concluding section recaps and briefly explores the concept of 'good moral panic' in the context of political transitions. While the concept of social control tends to have negative connotations for critical sociologists, this work suggests that efforts to categorize, punish and disapprove certain behaviours as deviant may not only be viewed as supporting a conservative status-quo, but also as promoting fledging human rights norms.

  4. Smooth muscle actin as a novel serologic marker of severe intestinal damage in rat intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and human necrotising enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evennett, Nicholas; Cerigioni, Elisabetta; Hall, Nigel J; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Despite emergence of markers of intestinal mucosal damage such as intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (i-FABP), there are no specific markers of damage extending into the muscle layers. We hypothesized that smooth muscle actin (SMA) released from the intestinal muscularis would be detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury. Serial blood samples were collected from rats (n = 10) undergoing intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and controls (n = 5). Additionally, admission and/or preoperative plasma samples were collected from twelve neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and five age- and weight-matched controls. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein (rat) or i-FABP (human) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and plasma SMA was detected by western blotting. Plasma ileal fatty-acid binding protein was low in both the control group and IRI at baseline, but became rapidly elevated in the IRI group even during ischemia. SMA was detected in reperfusion plasma samples of all IRI rats, but in none of the control samples. Plasma i-FABP was higher in infants with NEC than age- and weight-matched controls. Although i-FABP was higher in infants with severe surgical disease compared with focal disease, there was no difference between the operative and nonoperative groups. SMA was detected in the plasma of all four neonates with severe surgical NEC, but not in those with focal disease or those who were successfully conservatively managed. SMA is detectable in plasma after severe intestinal injury and maybe a clinically useful maker of intestinal muscle damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of storage time of human red cells on intestinal microcirculatory oxygenation in a rat isovolemic exchange model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raat, N. J.; Verhoeven, A. J.; Mik, E. G.; Gouwerok, C. W.; Verhaar, R.; Goedhart, P. T.; de Korte, D.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the storage time of human leukodepleted red blood cell concentrates compromises intestinal microvascular oxygen concentration oxygen (muPo(2)) during isovolemic exchange transfusion at low hematocrit. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting:

  6. Radiolabeled keratin: an undigestible marker for gastro-intestinal transit investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedig, G.; Tellier, P.; Vulpillat, M.

    1983-01-01

    A new marker for undigestible food is described in this paper. Labeling of keratin fibers with radioactive chromium 51 was operated by a simple process. A 90 % labeling efficiency was obtained. Assessment of in vitro chromium binding stability was performed by incubating fibers in different solutions (24 hours, 37 0 C). Remaining activity on fibers was found to be 92+-2% in a pepsin solution, and 97+-1% in a pancreatic extract solution. Acid or basic solutions (pH 1 to pH 11) did not yield significant elution. In Man, scintigraphic views displayed a focal distribution of the radioactivity in the digestive tractus. Patient's irradiation during such an exploration was estimated by dosimetric calculation and found to be acceptable. Scintigraphic survey of fibers progression was possible throughout the whole digestive tractus, particularly in the intestine. This marker should become mainly interesting for intestinal studies, since it is one of the only two undigestible markers, with radiolabeled alpha-cellulose. Properties related to its original structure, and advantages of a simple labeling process should be valuable in a promizing way of exploration [fr

  7. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    -, č. 77 (2007), s. 1-34 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labor markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://ipc.umich.edu/ working papers/ipc-77-jurajda,terrell,regional-unemployment-human- capital -transition-economies.pdf

  8. Ex vivo permeability experiments in excised rat intestinal tissue and in vitro solubility measurements in aspirated human intestinal fluids support age-dependent oral drug absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaert, Pieter; Brouwers, Joachim; Bijnens, Ann; Lammert, Frank; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-01-31

    The possible influence of advanced age on intestinal drug absorption was investigated by determining the effects of aging on (i) solubility of model drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF) obtained from two age groups (18-25 years; 62-72 years); and (ii) transepithelial permeation of model drugs across intestinal tissue excised from young, adult and old rats. Average equilibrium solubility values for 10 poorly soluble compounds in HIF aspirated from both age groups showed high interindividual variability, but did not reveal significant differences. Characterization of the HIF from both age groups demonstrated comparable pH profiles, while concentrations of individual bile salts showed pronounced variability between individuals, however without statistical differences between age groups. Transepithelial permeation of the transcellular probe metoprolol was significantly increased in old rats (38 weeks) compared to the younger age groups, while the modulatory role of P-glycoprotein in transepithelial talinolol transport was observed in adult and old rats but not in young rats. In conclusion, age-dependent permeability of intestinal tissue (rather than age-dependent luminal drug solubility) may contribute to altered intestinal drug absorption in older patients compared to young adults. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Permeability of plumbagin across human intestinal cell in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumsakul, Wiriyaporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2016-03-01

    Plumbagin is the active compound isolated from plants used in traditional medicine for treatment of various diseases such as activities malaria, leishmaniasis, viral infections and cancers. The aim of the study was to investigate the permeability of plumbagin across Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) cell monolayer and its effects on the expression and function of P-glycoprotein. The integrity of Caco-2 cell monolayer was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance and permeation (Papp) of Lucifer yellow across the cell monolayer. The effect of plumbagin on P-glycoprotein was detected by measuring its interference with the transport of the P-glycoprotein substrate (R123) and the effect on MDR-1 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. The Papp of plumbagin (2-8 µM) for the apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical directions were 10.29-15.96 × 10(-6) and 7.40-9.02 × 10(-6) cm/s, respectively, with the efflux ratios of 0.57-0.73. Plumbagin is not either a substrate or inhibitor of P-glycoprotein. It did not interfere with the P-glycoprotein-mediated R123 transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer, as well as the function of P-glycoprotein and the expression of MDR-1 mRNA. Results suggest moderate permeability of plumbagin across the Caco-2 cell monolayer in both directions. The transport mechanism is likely to be a passive transport.

  10. In vitro enteroid-derived three-dimensional tissue model of human small intestinal epithelium with innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available There is a need for functional in vitro 3D human intestine systems that can bridge the gap between conventional cell culture studies and human trials. The successful engineering in vitro of human intestinal tissues relies on the use of the appropriate cell sources, biomimetic scaffolds, and 3D culture conditions to support vital organ functions. We previously established a compartmentalized scaffold consisting of a hollow space within a porous bulk matrix, in which a functional and physiologically relevant intestinal epithelium system was generated using intestinal cell lines. In this study, we adopt the 3D scaffold system for the cultivation of stem cell-derived human small intestinal enteriods (HIEs to engineer an in vitro 3D model of a nonstransformed human small intestinal epithelium. Characterization of tissue properties revealed a mature HIE-derived epithelium displaying four major terminally differentiated epithelial cell types (enterocytes, Goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells, with tight junction formation, microvilli polarization, digestive enzyme secretion, and low oxygen tension in the lumen. Moreover, the tissue model demonstrates significant antibacterial responses to E. coli infection, as evidenced by the significant upregulation of genes involved in the innate immune response. Importantly, many of these genes are activated in human patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, implicating the potential application of the 3D stem-cell derived epithelium for the in vitro study of host-microbe-pathogen interplay and IBD pathogenesis.

  11. In vitro enteroid-derived three-dimensional tissue model of human small intestinal epithelium with innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhou, Wenda; Roh, Terrence; Estes, Mary K; Kaplan, David L

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for functional in vitro 3D human intestine systems that can bridge the gap between conventional cell culture studies and human trials. The successful engineering in vitro of human intestinal tissues relies on the use of the appropriate cell sources, biomimetic scaffolds, and 3D culture conditions to support vital organ functions. We previously established a compartmentalized scaffold consisting of a hollow space within a porous bulk matrix, in which a functional and physiologically relevant intestinal epithelium system was generated using intestinal cell lines. In this study, we adopt the 3D scaffold system for the cultivation of stem cell-derived human small intestinal enteriods (HIEs) to engineer an in vitro 3D model of a nonstransformed human small intestinal epithelium. Characterization of tissue properties revealed a mature HIE-derived epithelium displaying four major terminally differentiated epithelial cell types (enterocytes, Goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells), with tight junction formation, microvilli polarization, digestive enzyme secretion, and low oxygen tension in the lumen. Moreover, the tissue model demonstrates significant antibacterial responses to E. coli infection, as evidenced by the significant upregulation of genes involved in the innate immune response. Importantly, many of these genes are activated in human patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), implicating the potential application of the 3D stem-cell derived epithelium for the in vitro study of host-microbe-pathogen interplay and IBD pathogenesis.

  12. Correlation between oral drug absorption in humans and apparent drug permeability coefficients in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artursson, P.; Karlsson, J. (Uppsala Univ., (Sweden))

    1991-03-29

    Monolayers of a well differentiated human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, were used as a model to study passive drug absorption across the intestinal epithelium. Absorption rate constants (expressed as apparent permeability coefficients) were determined for 20 drugs and peptides with different structural properties. The permeability coefficients ranged from approximately 5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} to 5 x 10{sup {minus} 5} cm/s. A good correlation was obtained between data on oral absorption in humans and the results in the Caco-2 model. Drugs that are completely absorbed in humans had permeability coefficients greater than 1 x 10{sup {minus} 6} cm/s. Drugs that are absorbed to greater than 1% but less than 100% had permeability coefficients of 0.1-1.0 x 10{sup {minus} 6} cm/s while drugs and peptides that are absorbed to less than 1% had permeability coefficients of less than or equal to 1 x 10{sup {minus} 7} cm/s. The results indicate that Caco-2 monolayers can be used as a model for studies on intestinal drug absorption.

  13. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. PMID:26370977

  14. The Ussing Chamber Assay to Study Drug Metabolism and Transport in the Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Beatrice; Mangelsen, Eva; Wingolf, Caroline; Partecke, Lars Ivo; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Tannergren, Christer; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus

    2017-06-22

    The Ussing chamber is an old but still powerful technique originally designed to study the vectorial transport of ions through frog skin. This technique is also used to investigate the transport of chemical agents through the intestinal barrier as well as drug metabolism in enterocytes, both of which are key determinants for the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. More contemporary model systems, such as Caco-2 cell monolayers or stably transfected cells, are more limited in their use compared to the Ussing chamber because of differences in expression rates of transporter proteins and/or metabolizing enzymes. While there are limitations to the Ussing chamber assay, the use of human intestinal tissue remains the best laboratory test for characterizing the transport and metabolism of compounds following oral administration. Detailed in this unit is a step-by-step protocol for preparing human intestinal tissue, for designing Ussing chamber experiments, and for analyzing and interpreting the findings. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-09-08

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  16. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Kamiloglu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  17. Subversion of human intestinal mucosa innate immunity by a Crohn's disease-associated E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarry, A; Crémet, L; Caroff, N; Bou-Hanna, C; Mussini, J M; Reynaud, A; Servin, A L; Mosnier, J F; Liévin-Le Moal, V; Laboisse, C L

    2015-05-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), associated with Crohn's disease, are likely candidate contributory factors in the disease. However, signaling pathways involved in human intestinal mucosa innate host response to AIEC remain unknown. Here we use a 3D model of human intestinal mucosa explant culture to explore the effects of the AIEC strain LF82 on two innate immunity platforms, i.e., the inflammasome through evaluation of caspase-1 status, and NFκB signaling. We showed that LF82 bacteria enter and survive within a few intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, without altering the mucosa overall architecture. Although 4-h infection with a Salmonella strain caused crypt disorganization, caspase-1 activation, and mature IL-18 production, LF82 bacteria were unable to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-18 production. In parallel, LF82 bacteria activated NFκB signaling in epithelial cells through IκBα phosphorylation, NFκBp65 nuclear translocation, and TNFα secretion. In addition, NFκB activation was crucial for the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis upon LF82 infection. In conclusion, here we decipher at the whole-mucosa level the mechanisms of the LF82-induced subversion of innate immunity that, by maintaining host cell integrity, ensure intracellular bacteria survival.

  18. Human driven transitions in complex model ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfoot, Mike; Newbold, Tim; Tittinsor, Derek; Purves, Drew

    2015-04-01

    Human activities have been observed to be impacting ecosystems across the globe, leading to reduced ecosystem functioning, altered trophic and biomass structure and ultimately ecosystem collapse. Previous attempts to understand global human impacts on ecosystems have usually relied on statistical models, which do not explicitly model the processes underlying the functioning of ecosystems, represent only a small proportion of organisms and do not adequately capture complex non-linear and dynamic responses of ecosystems to perturbations. We use a mechanistic ecosystem model (1), which simulates the underlying processes structuring ecosystems and can thus capture complex and dynamic interactions, to investigate boundaries of complex ecosystems to human perturbation. We explore several drivers including human appropriation of net primary production and harvesting of animal biomass. We also present an analysis of the key interactions between biotic, societal and abiotic earth system components, considering why and how we might think about these couplings. References: M. B. J. Harfoot et al., Emergent global patterns of ecosystem structure and function from a mechanistic general ecosystem model., PLoS Biol. 12, e1001841 (2014).

  19. Optimization of micro-fabricated porous membranes for intestinal epithelial cell culture and in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair Gourikutty Sajay, Bhuvanendran; Yin, Chiam Su; Ramadan, Qasem

    2017-12-01

    In vitro modeling of organs could provide a controlled platform for studying physiological events and has great potential in the field of pharmaceutical development. Here, we describe the characterization of in vitro modeling of the human intestinal barrier mimicked using silicon porous membranes as a substrate. To mimic an intestinal in vivo setup as closely as possible, a porous substrate is required in a dynamic environment for the cells to grow rather than a static setup with an impermeable surface such as a petri dish. In this study, we focus on the detailed characterization of Caco-2 cells cultured on a silicon membrane with different pore sizes as well as the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the model. The porous silicon membrane together with continuous perfusion of liquid applying shear stress on the cells enhances the differentiation of polarized cells by providing access to the both their basal and apical surfaces. Membranes with pore sizes of 0.5-3 µm were used and a shear stress of ~0.03 dyne cm-2 was created by applying a low flow rate of 20 nl s-1. By providing these optimized conditions, cells were able to differentiate with columnar morphology, which developed microvilli structures on their apical side and tight junctions between adjacent cells like those in a healthy human intestinal barrier. In this setup, it is possible to study the important cellular functions of the intestine such as transport, absorption and secretion, and thus this model has great potential in drug screening.

  20. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  1. Splitting the scotoperiod: effects on feeding behaviour, intestinal fill and digestive transit time in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duve, Linda Rosager; Steenfeldt, Sanna; Thodberg, Karen

    2011-01-01

    points (n¼192). Digestive transit time was estimated on d 29 using a chromic oxide marker; production variables and the extent of foot pad dermatitis were also recorded. 4. In the 3 h prior to a scotoperiod, feeding activity increased in chickens from DARK 8 but not DARK 4þ4. This increase was reflected...

  2. Evaluation of jojoba oil as a low-energy fat. 2. Intestinal transit time, stomach emptying and digestibility in short-term feeding studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, P M; Nugteren, D H

    1989-01-01

    The influence of jojoba oil (JO) incorporation in the diet on stomach emptying and intestinal transit time, and the digestion and absorption of JO were investigated in short-term feeding studies in rats. The animals were fed purified diets containing 18% (w/w) fat, of which half consisted of a mixture of lard and sunflower seed oil (SF) supplemented with an equivalent amount of JO. The control animals were fed a mixture of lard and SF (18%). No treatment-related differences were observed in the rate of stomach emptying or the intestinal transit time. Comparative lipid analysis of lymph, intestinal content, intestinal mucosa and faeces indicated that most of the ingested JO was degraded and absorbed. Part of the JO was present as wax ester in the lymph. Hydrolysis of JO was much slower than that of triacylglycerols and continued in the alimentary tract beyond the small intestine due to bacterial processes. JO did not influence the absorption of the conventional fat.

  3. Intestinal Commitment and Maturation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Is Independent of Exogenous FGF4 and R-spondin1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Tamminen

    Full Text Available Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a central role in guiding the differentiation of the posterior parts of the primitive gut tube into intestinal structures in vivo and some studies suggest that FGF4 is another crucial factor for intestinal development. The aim of this study was to define the effects of Wnt and FGF4 on intestinal commitment in vitro by establishing conditions for differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC into posterior endoderm (hindgut and further to self-renewing intestinal-like organoids. The most prominent induction of the well-established intestinal marker gene CDX2 was achieved when hPSC-derived definitive endoderm cells were treated with Wnt agonist molecule CHIR99021 during differentiation to hindgut. FGF4 was found to be dispensable during intestinal commitment, but it had an early role in repressing development towards the hepatic lineage. When hindgut stage cells were further cultured in 3D, they formed self-renewing organoid structures containing all major intestinal cell types even without exogenous R-spondin1 (RSPO1, a crucial factor for the culture of epithelial organoids derived from adult intestine. This may be explained by the presence of a mesenchymal compartment in the hPSC-derived organoids. Addition of WNT3A increased the expression of the Paneth cell marker Lysozyme in hPSC-derived organoid cultures, whereas FGF4 inhibited both the formation and maturation of intestinal-like organoids. Similar hindgut and organoid cultures were established from human induced pluripotent stem cells, implying that this approach can be used to create patient-specific intestinal tissue models for disease modeling in vitro.

  4. Effect of intravenous infusion of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric and small intestinal motor function in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Fuglsang, Stefan; Graff, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glyceryl trinitrate is a donor of nitric oxide that relaxes smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about the effect of glyceryl trinitrate on gastric emptying and no data exist on the possible effect of glyceryl trinitrate on small intestinal transit. AIM: ...

  5. Intestinal Coccidia

    OpenAIRE

    MJ Ggaravi

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal Coccidia are a subclass of Apicomplexa phylum. Eucoccidida are facultative heteroxenous, but some of them are monoxenous. They have sexual and asexual life cycle. Some coccidia are human pathogens, for example: Cryptosporidium: Cryptosporidiums has many species that are mammalian intestinal parasites.C. Parvum specie is a human pathogenic protozoa. Cryptosporidum has circle or ellipse shapes and nearly 4-6 mm. It is transmitted in warm seasons. Oocyst is obtained insexual life cycl...

  6. Prediction of Human Intestinal Absorption of Compounds Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Information about Pharmacokinetics of compounds is an essential component of drug design and development. Modeling the pharmacokinetic properties require identification of the factors effecting absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of compounds. There have been continuous attempts in the prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds using various Artificial intelligence methods in the effort to reduce the attrition rate of drug candidates entering to preclinical and clinical trials. Currently, there are large numbers of individual predictive models available for absorption using machine learning approaches. Six Artificial intelligence methods namely, Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis were used for prediction of absorption of compounds. Prediction accuracy of Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis for prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds was found to be 91.54%, 88.33%, 84.30%, 86.51%, 79.07% and 80.08% respectively. Comparative analysis of all the six prediction models suggested that Support vector machine with Radial basis function based kernel is comparatively better for binary classification of compounds using human intestinal absorption and may be useful at preliminary stages of drug design and development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Human milk oligosaccharides in premature infants: absorption, excretion, and influence on the intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Mark A; Gaerlan, Stephanie; De Leoz, Maria Lorna A; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Kalanetra, Karen M; Lemay, Danielle G; German, J Bruce; Mills, David A; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2015-12-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) shape the intestinal microbiota in term infants. In premature infants, alterations in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) are associated with risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis, and the influence of HMOs on the microbiota is unclear. Milk, urine, and stool specimens from 14 mother-premature infant dyads were investigated by mass spectrometry for HMO composition. The stools were analyzed by next-generation sequencing to complement a previous analysis. Percentages of fucosylated and sialylated HMOs were highly variable between individuals but similar in urine, feces, and milk within dyads. Differences in urine and fecal HMO composition suggest variability in absorption. Secretor status of the mother correlated with the urine and fecal content of specific HMO structures. Trends toward higher levels of Proteobacteria and lower levels of Firmicutes were noted in premature infants of nonsecretor mothers. Specific HMO structures in the milk, urine, and feces were associated with alterations in fecal Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. HMOs may influence the intestinal microbiota in premature infants. Specific HMOs, for example those associated with secretor mothers, may have a protective effect by decreasing pathogens associated with sepsis and NEC, while other HMOs may increase dysbiosis in this population.

  8. Inhibitory Influence of Panax notoginseng Saponins on Aspirin Hydrolysis in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongxi; Wu, Yali; Yang, Bing; Zhu, Baochen; Hu, Shaonan; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Du, Shouying

    2018-02-18

    Herb-drug interactions are important safety concerns in clinical practice. The interactions occur firstly in the intestinal absorption for orally administered drugs. Aspirin and Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS)-based drugs are often combined in China to prevent larger-artery atherosclerosis. Here, we aimed to characterize the aspirin transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers, a model of the intestinal absorption, and further to evaluate the influence of PNS on aspirin hydrolysis and the relating mechanisms. Transcellular transport of aspirin and the influence of PNS were explored using Caco-2 cell monolayers. The protein expression of human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and hCE2 in Caco-2 cells after PNS treatment was analyzed by ELISA, and the mRNA level were determined by qRT-PCR. In the study, Caco-2 cells showed high level of hydrolase activity, and most aspirin was hydrolyzed inside the cells during the transport process. Interestingly, PNS were demonstrated to inhibit the esterase activities responsible for aspirin hydrolysis in Caco-2 cells. PNS could also decrease the protein expression of hCE1 and hCE2, whereas exhibited minor effect on the mRNA expression. These results indicated that oral administration of PNS-based drugs might inhibit the hydrolysis of aspirin during intestinal absorption thus promoting its bioavailability.

  9. Poliovirus mutants excreted by a chronically infected hypogammaglobulinemic patient establish persistent infections in human intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labadie, Karine; Pelletier, Isabelle; Saulnier, Aure; Martin, Javier; Colbere-Garapin, Florence

    2004-01-01

    Immunodeficient patients whose gut is chronically infected by vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) may excrete large amounts of virus for years. To investigate how poliovirus (PV) establishes chronic infections in the gut, we tested whether it is possible to establish persistent VDPV infections in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Four type 3 VDPV mutants, representative of the viral evolution in the gut of a hypogammaglobulinemic patient over almost 2 years [J. Virol. 74 (2000) 3001], were used to infect both undifferentiated, dividing cells, and differentiated, polarized enterocytes. A VDPV mutant excreted 36 days postvaccination by the patient was lytic in both types of intestinal cell cultures, like the parental Sabin 3 (S3) strain. In contrast, three VDPVs excreted 136, 442, and 637 days postvaccination, established persistent infections both in undifferentiated cells and in enterocytes. Thus, viral determinants selected between day 36 and 136 conferred on VDPV mutants the capacity to infect intestinal cells persistently. The percentage of persistently VDPV-infected cultures was higher in enterocytes than in undifferentiated cells, implicating cellular determinants involved in the differentiation of enterocytes in persistent VDPV infections. The establishment of persistent infections in enterocytes was not due to poor replication of VDPVs in these cells, but was associated with reduced viral adsorption to the cell surface

  10. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected and Noninfected Persons in a High Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevalence Region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Tchameni, Sandrine Mboula; Nkenfou, Carine Nguefeu; Djataou, Patrice; Simo, Ulrich Florian; Nkoum, Alexandre Benjamin; Estrin, William

    2017-09-01

    The problem of intestinal parasitic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people requires careful consideration in the developing world where poor nutrition is associated with poor hygiene and several coinfecting diseases. Studies have addressed this issue in Cameroon, especially in the low HIV prevalence area. The current study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis in people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Adamaoua and to identify associated risk factors. Stool and blood specimens from study participants were screened for intestinal parasites and anti-HIV antibodies, respectively. Of 235 participants, 68 (28.9%) were HIV positive, 38 of them on antiretroviral treatment (ART). The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites was 32.3%. Of 68 PLHIV, 32.3% (22/68) were infected with intestinal parasites, compared with 32.3% (54/167) of the HIV-negative patients. Univariate analysis showed no difference between the prevalence of intestinal parasites among PLHIV and HIV-negative patients ( P = 0.69). ART was not associated with the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Multivariate analysis showed that the quality of water and the personal hygiene were the major risk factors associated to intestinal parasitosis. The level of education was associated with HIV serostatus: the higher the level of education, the lower the risk of being infected with HIV ( P = 0.00). PLHIV and the general population should be screened routinely for intestinal parasites and treated if infected.

  11. Exogenous HIV-1 Nef upsets the IFN-γ-induced impairment of human intestinal epithelial integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giovanna Quaranta

    Full Text Available The mucosal tissues play a central role in the transmission of HIV-1 infection as well as in the pathogenesis of AIDS. Despite several clinical studies reported intestinal dysfunction during HIV infection, the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced impairments of mucosal epithelial barrier are still unclear. It has been postulated that HIV-1 alters enterocytic function and HIV-1 proteins have been detected in several cell types of the intestinal mucosa. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of the accessory HIV-1 Nef protein on human epithelial cell line.We used unstimulated or IFN-γ-stimulated Caco-2 cells, as a model for homeostatic and inflamed gastrointestinal tracts, respectively. We investigated the effect of exogenous recombinant Nef on monolayer integrity analyzing its uptake, transepithelial electrical resistance, permeability to FITC-dextran and the expression of tight junction proteins. Moreover, we measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators. Exogenous Nef was taken up by Caco-2 cells, increased intestinal epithelial permeability and upset the IFN-γ-induced reduction of transepithelial resistance, interfering with tight junction protein expression. Moreover, Nef inhibited IFN-γ-induced apoptosis and up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-3α production by Caco-2 cells while down-regulated IL-10 production. The simultaneous exposure of Caco-2 cells to Nef and IFN-γ did not affect cytokine secretion respect to untreated cells. Finally, we found that Nef counteracted the IFN-γ induced arachidonic acid cascade.Our findings suggest that exogenous Nef, perturbing the IFN-γ-induced impairment of intestinal epithelial cells, could prolong cell survival, thus allowing for accumulation of viral particles. Our results may improve the understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, supporting the discovery of new therapeutic interventions.

  12. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... ingestion of glucose did not differ from that after ingestion of the fructose-sorbitol mixture (P = 0.7897). However, the mouth-to-cecum transit of the radiolabeled marker was faster (P = 0.0033) and the percentage content of the marker in colon was higher after ingestion of the fructose-sorbitol mixture...... than after ingestion of glucose (P = 0.0128). In healthy humans, malabsorption of small amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture accelerates small bowel transit....

  13. Dietary emulsifiers directly alter human microbiota composition and gene expression ex vivo potentiating intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Bodt, Jana; Marzorati, Massimo; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a central role in the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including IBD and metabolic syndrome. Administration of substances that alter microbiota composition, including the synthetic dietary emulsifiers polysorbate 80 (P80) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), can promote such inflammatory disorders. However, that inflammation itself impacts microbiota composition has obfuscated defining the extent to which these compounds or other substances act directly upon the microbiota versus acting on host parameters that promote inflammation, which subsequently reshapes the microbiota. We examined the direct impact of CMC and P80 on the microbiota using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME) model that maintains a complex stable human microbiota in the absence of a live host. This approach revealed that both P80 and CMC acted directly upon human microbiota to increase its proinflammatory potential, as revealed by increased levels of bioactive flagellin. The CMC-induced increase in flagellin was rapid (1 day) and driven by altered microbiota gene expression. In contrast, the P80-induced flagellin increase occurred more slowly and was closely associated with altered species composition. Transfer of both emulsifier-treated M-SHIME microbiotas to germ-free recipient mice recapitulated many of the host and microbial alterations observed in mice directly treated with emulsifiers. These results demonstrate a novel paradigm of deconstructing host-microbiota interactions and indicate that the microbiota can be directly impacted by these commonly used food additives, in a manner that subsequently drives intestinal inflammation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Nutrient Fortification of Human Donor Milk Affects Intestinal Function and Protein Metabolism in Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Yanqi; Nguyen, Duc Ninh

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutrient fortification of human milk is often required to secure adequate growth and organ development for very preterm infants. There is concern that formula-based fortifiers (FFs) induce intestinal dysfunction, feeding intolerance, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Bovine colostrum...... heights relative to DHM+BC or DHM pigs (30-90% differences, P incidence but DHM+BC pigs had lower colonic interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 concentrations relative to the remaining pigs (-30%, P = 0.06). DHM+FF pigs had higher stomach bacterial load than did DHM...

  15. Land Use Transition and Human Health in the Eastern Himalayas ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ICIMOD (International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development) will manage the project and provide support and capacity building to the three teams. The aim is to better understand the links between land use transition and human health in mountain habitats and jointly design a program for better managing the ...

  16. Relationship between faecal character and intestinal transit time in normal dogs and diet-sensitive dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, V E; Adams, C A; Butterwick, R F; Batt, R M

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between stool character and whole gut transit time (WGTT), which is the average time for the passage of material through the lumen of the alimentary tract from ingestion to defecation, was studied in eight control dogs and 12 dogs with non-specific dietary sensitivity. Dogs were fed four diets in a cross-over design, and faecal quality was assessed daily and WGTT determined using plastic pellets. Faecal quality was unaffected by diet in the control dogs. Dogs with dietary sensitivity produced looser faeces compared with the control dogs, and this was significant for two of the diets. There was no significant effect of diet on mean WGTT within or between groups. Minimum WGTT, which was the interval to the first appearance of markers in faeces, was shorter in sensitive dogs compared with controls, and this was significant for two of the four diets. There were significant, inverse relationships between minimum WGTT and both mean faeces score and percentage unacceptable defecations. These data suggest that rapid transit of certain dietary components may impact negatively on stool quality and contribute to loose faeces in dogs with non-specific dietary sensitivity.

  17. Plasma endocannabinoid levels in lean, overweight and obese humans: relationships with intestinal permeability markers, inflammation and incretin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Tanya J; Cvijanovic, Nada; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Argueta, Donovan A; Rayner, Christopher K; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Young, Richard L

    2018-02-13

    Intestinal production of endocannabinoid and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is impaired in high-fat diet/obese rodents, leading to reduced satiety. Such diets also alter the intestinal microbiome in association with enhanced intestinal permeability and inflammation, however little is known of these effects in humans. This study aimed to: (i) evaluate effects of lipid on plasma anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) and OEA in humans, and (ii) examine relationships with intestinal permeability, inflammation markers and incretin hormone secretion. 20 lean, 18 overweight and 19 obese participants underwent intraduodenal Intralipid® infusion (2 kcal/min) with collection of endoscopic duodenal biopsies and blood. Plasma AEA, 2-AG, and OEA (HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) (multiplex), and duodenal expression of occludin, zona-occludin-1 (ZO-1), intestinal-alkaline-phosphatase (IAP), and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) (RT-PCR), were assessed. Fasting plasma AEA was increased in obese, compared with lean and overweight (Plean (Plean and overweight. The relationships between plasma AEA with duodenal ZO-1 and IAP, and GIP, suggest that altered endocannabinoid signalling may contribute to changes in intestinal permeability, inflammation and incretin release in human obesity.

  18. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Consumption of milk from transgenic goats expressing human lysozyme in the mammary gland results in the modulation of intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Elizabeth A; Walker, Richard L; Anderson, Gary B; Murray, James D

    2006-08-01

    Lysozyme is a key antimicrobial component of human milk that has several health-promoting functions including the development of a healthy intestinal tract. However, levels of lysozyme in the milk of dairy animals are negligible. We have generated transgenic dairy goats that express human lysozyme (HLZ) in their milk in an attempt to deliver the benefits of human milk in a continual fashion. To test the feasibility of this transgenic approach to achieve a biological impact at the level of the intestine, feeding trials were conducted in two animal models. Pasteurized milk from HLZ transgenic animals was fed to both kid goats (ruminant model) and young pigs (human model), and the numbers of total coliforms and Escherichia coli present in the small intestine were determined. Data from this proof-of-principle study demonstrate that milk from transgenic animals was capable of modulating the bacterial population of the gut in both animal models. Pigs that consumed pasteurized milk from HLZ transgenic goats had fewer numbers of coliforms and E. coli in their intestine than did those receiving milk from non-transgenic control animals. The opposite effect was seen in goats. Milk from these transgenic animals not only represent one of the first transgenic food products with the potential of benefiting human health, but are also a unique model to study the development and role of intestinal microflora on health, well-being and resistance to disease.

  20. Metabolism and transfer of the mycotoxin zearalenone in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videmann, Bernadette; Mazallon, Michelle; Tep, Jonathan; Lecoeur, Sylvaine

    2008-10-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is found worldwide as contaminant in cereals and grains. It is implicated in reproductive disorders and hyperestrogenic syndromes in animals and humans exposed by food. We investigated metabolism and transfer of ZEA using the human Caco-2 cell line as a model of intestinal epithelial barrier. Cells exposed to 10-200 microM ZEA showed efficacious metabolism of the toxin. alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol were the measured preponderant metabolites (respectively 40.7+/-3.1% and 31.9+/-4.9% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA), whereas ZEA-glucuronide and alpha-zearalenol glucuronide were less produced (respectively 8.2+/-0.9% and 19.1+/-1.3% of total metabolites, after a 3h exposure to 10 microM ZEA). Cell production of reduced metabolites was strongly inhibited by alpha-and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors, and Caco-2 cells exhibited alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II and beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I mRNA. After cell apical exposure to ZEA, alpha-zearalenol was preponderantly found at the basal side, whereas beta-zearalenol and both glucuronides were preferentially excreted at the apical side. As alpha-zearalenol shows the strongest estrogenic activity, the preferential production and basal transfer of this metabolite suggests that intestinal cells may contribute to the manifestation of zearalenone adverse effects.

  1. Impact of food grade and nano-TiO2 particles on a human intestinal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudefoi, William; Moniz, Kristy; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Walker, Virginia K

    2017-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) are used as an additive (E171 or INS171) in foods such as gum, candy and puddings. To address concerns about the potential hazardous effects of ingested NPs, the toxicity of these food-grade NPs was investigated with a defined model intestinal bacterial community. Each titania preparation (food-grade TiO 2 formulations, E171-1 and E171-6a) was tested at concentrations equivalent to those found in the human intestine after sampling 1-2 pieces of gum or candy (100-250 ppm). At the low concentrations used, neither the TiO 2 food additives nor control TiO 2 NPs had an impact on gas production and only a minor effect on fatty acids profiles (C16:00, C18:00, 15:1 w5c, 18:1 w9c and 18:1 w9c, p human gut microbiota when tested in vitro at relevant low concentrations. However, the cumulative effects of chronic TiO 2 NP ingestion remain to be tested. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Generation of L cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate funct...... lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes.......Upon a nutrient challenge, L cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate...... functional L cells from three-dimensional cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids selectively increase the number of L cells, resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by the upregulation of transcription factors associated with the endocrine...

  3. Non-specific activation of human eosinophil functional responses by vasoactive intestinal peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr El-Shazly

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils and neuropeptides are thought to play effector roles in allergic diseases, such as rhinitis; however, little is known about the biological effects of neuromediators, especially vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, on eosinophil functional responses. In the present study, it is shown that VIP induces eosinophil chemotaxis and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN release in potency comparable with that induced by platelet activator factor, and in a novel synergistic manner with recombinant human interleukin-5. Contrary to chemotaxis, EDN release was sensitive to staurosporine, the protein kinase C inhibitor, as well as intracellular calcium chelation. However, eosinophil treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (herbimycin A and phosphatases (pervanadate resulted in a dose-dependent potentiation and blockage of VIP-induced eosinophil chemotaxis, respectively. Treatment of eosinophils with VIP receptor antagonist did not modify VIP-induced chemotaxis or EDN release. Furthermore, exploration of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor I expression was lacking in human eosinophils, but not lymphocytes. These results demonstrate two different mechanisms in triggering eosinophil activation of functional responses by VIP, a calcium-dependent degranulation and a calcium-independent chemotaxis, and elaborate on a novel cytokine–neuropeptide interaction in eosinophilic inflammation.

  4. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  5. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Sharp, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55) increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  6. Comparing Dog and Human Intestinal Fluids: Implications on Solubility and Biopharmaceutical Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Paul L; Stellabott, Joyce; Nofsinger, Rebecca; Xu, Wei; Levorse, Dorothy; Galipeau, Kendra; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2017-05-01

    Despite many documented differences in gut physiology compared to humans, the beagle dog has been successfully used as a preclinical model for assessing the relative bioavailability of dosage forms during formulation development. However, differences in pH and bile salt concentration and micellar structure between dog and human intestinal fluids may influence the solubility and dissolution behavior of especially BCS II/IV compounds. Recently, a canine fasted simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIFc) mimicking the composition in the lumen of the beagle dog under the fasted state has been proposed. In this manuscript, we present the utilization of FaSSIFc to compare solubility of several preclinical candidates against human FaSSIF. While solubility of free bases and neutral compounds was easily predicted by the relative amounts of sodium taurocholate in the fluids, free acids were shown to be much more soluble in FaSSIFc owing to both the solubility at higher pH as well as the increased bile salt concentration. For one of the model compounds, we demonstrate that the high solubility necessitates the need for a formulation comparison at a relatively higher dose in the dog to mimic the outcome of a human relative bioavailability study. Finally, we show how using the solubility value in FaSSIFc for the same compound results in better predictability of the plasma concentration profiles in dogs from a physiologically based absorption model. The collective data indicate that caution and more detailed measurements are required if the dog is used as the preclinical model for the development of formulations of weak acids.

  7. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdam, F.J.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Jonge, de C.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Erbil, R.; Greve, J.W.; Buurman, W.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Rensen, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fecal

  8. Intestinal microbiome landscaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss

  9. Human intestinal parasites in the past: new findings and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luiz Carvalho Gonçalves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all known human specific parasites have been found in ancient feces. A review of the paleoparasitological helminth and intestinal protozoa findings available in the literature is presented. We also report the new paleoparasitologic findings from the examination performed in samples collected in New and Old World archaeological sites. New finds of ancylostomid, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichostrongylus spp., Diphyllobothrium latum, Hymenolepis nana and Acantocephalan eggs are reported. According to the findings, it is probable that A. lumbricoides was originally a human parasite. Human ancylostomids, A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura, found in the New World in pre-Columbian times, have not been introduced into the Americas by land via Beringia. These parasites could not supported the cold climate of the region. Nomadic prehistoric humans that have crossed the Bering Land Bridge from Asia to the Americas in the last glaciation, probably during generations, would have lost these parasites, which life cycles need warm temperatures in the soil to be transmitted from host to host. Alternative routes are discussed for human parasite introduction into the Americas.

  10. Intestinal infections in humans in the Rocky Mountain region, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Cynthia; Neill, Andrea; Schotthoefer, Anna M

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the seasonal prevalence of human intestinal parasites in the western states of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Montana, fecal samples were examined as part of routine diagnostic testing from patients experiencing gastrointestinal discomfort in August (summer) 2006, January (winter), and April (spring) 2007. Parasite identification in positive samples was confirmed using light microscopy after wet mount and trichrome staining techniques. Seventy-eight of the 1,083 patients surveyed (7.2%) in August tested positive for at least 1 species of intestinal parasite. Forty-eight of 726 (6.6%) patients and 51 of 795 (6.4%) patients tested positive for at least 1 species in January and April, respectively. Blastocystis sp. was the most prevalent, followed by Giardia lamblia. Approximately 25% of the parasite occurrences were multiple infections involving fecal-oral transmitted species. Co-infections with Entamoeba spp. and Blastocystis sp. were common, suggesting a possible fecal-oral transmission for the latter parasite. Entamoeba spp. were more likely to co-occur than independently. Other species detected included Endolimax nana, Diphyllobothrium latum, Hymenolepis nana, Dientamoeba fragilis, and Iodamoeba butschlii.

  11. Role of intestinal microbiota and metabolites on gut homeostasis and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2017-01-06

    A vast diversity of microbes colonizes in the human gastrointestinal tract, referred to intestinal microbiota. Microbiota and products thereof are indispensable for shaping the development and function of host innate immune system, thereby exerting multifaceted impacts in gut health. This paper reviews the effects on immunity of gut microbe-derived nucleic acids, and gut microbial metabolites, as well as the involvement of commensals in the gut homeostasis. We focus on the recent findings with an intention to illuminate the mechanisms by which the microbiota and products thereof are interacting with host immunity, as well as to scrutinize imbalanced gut microbiota (dysbiosis) which lead to autoimmune disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and systemic immune syndromes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to their well-recognized benefits in the gut such as occupation of ecological niches and competition with pathogens, commensal bacteria have been shown to strengthen the gut barrier and to exert immunomodulatory actions within the gut and beyond. It has been realized that impaired intestinal microbiota not only contribute to gut diseases but also are inextricably linked to metabolic disorders and even brain dysfunction. A better understanding of the mutual interactions of the microbiota and host immune system, would shed light on our endeavors of disease prevention and broaden the path to our discovery of immune intervention targets for disease treatment.

  12. Presence of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, M; Kono, M; Hoshina, S; Komatsu, M; Kitagawa, Y; Iizuka, M; Watanabe, S

    2000-08-01

    There is currently no information regarding microbial agents inside the intestinal lymph follicles. Biopsy or resected specimens, mostly from macroscopically normal areas, were sectioned with a cryostat. DNA was extracted from microdissected samples, exclusively from the lymph follicle. Amplification of DNA was performed using universal primers designed from conserved regions of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Several clones with inserts of around 400 base pairs were subjected to DNA sequence analysis followed by a database homology search. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments were detected in the lymph follicle in 2 of 14 (14%) non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) cases, 4 of 14 (28%) Crohn disease cases, and in 2 of 5 (40%) ulcerative colitis cases. Nineteen 16S rRNA gene segments were recognized in the eight positive cases. Five segments showed 100% identity to known bacterial 16S rRNAs, namely staphylococcus species, Streptococcus sanguis, and Paracoccus marcusii. However, the other 14 segments showed below 100% identity, indicating either the presence of unknown bacteria or of bacteria without known DNA data. No single identified or unidentified bacterium, characteristic of IBD, including Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Listeria monocytogenes, was detected. The present study confirms the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA gene segments in human intestinal lymph follicles and paves the way for new investigations into the microbiology of the lymph follicle. Whether or not bacteria inside the lymph follicle is a primary stimulus in IBD has yet to be clarified.

  13. Transepithelial transport of putrescine across monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovic, Vladan; Turchanowa, Lyudmila; Stein, Jürgen; Caspary, Wolfgang F.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the transepithelial transport characteristics of the polyamine putrescine in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers to elucidate the mechanisms of the putrescine intestinal absorption. METHODS: The transepithelial transport and the cellular accumulation of putrescine was measured using Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable filters. RESULTS: Transepithelial transport of putrescine in physiological concentrations ( > 0.5 mM) from the apical to basolateral side was linear. Intracellular accumulation of putrescine was higher in confluent than in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells, but still negligible (less than 0.5%) of the overall transport across the monolayers in apical to basolateral direction.EGF enhanced putrescine accumulation in Caco-2 cells by four fold, as well as putrescine conversion to spermidine and spermine by enhancing the activity of S adenosylmethionine decarboxylase. However, EGF did not have any significant influence on putrescine flux across the Caco- 2 cell monolayers. Excretion of putrescine from Caco-2 cells into the basolateral medium did not exceed 50 picomoles, while putrescine passive flux from the apical to the basolateral chamber, contributed hundreds of micromoles polyamines to the basolateral chamber. CONCLUSION: Transepithelial transport of putrescine across Caco-2 cell monolayers occurs in passive diffusion, and is not influenced when epithelial cells are stimulated to proliferate by a potent mitogen such as EGF. PMID:11819759

  14. Stem Cell-Derived Human Intestinal Organoids as an Infection Model for Rotaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Utama, Budi; Atmar, Robert L.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Estes, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directed differentiation of stem cell lines into intestine-like tissue called induced human intestinal organoids (iHIOs) is now possible (J. R. Spence, C. N. Mayhew, S. A. Rankin, M. F. Kuhar, J. E. Vallance, K. Tolle, E. E. Hoskins, V. V. Kalinichenko, S. I. Wells, A. M. Zorn, N. F. Shroyer, and J. M. Wells, Nature 470:105-109, 2011). We tested iHIOs as a new model to cultivate and study fecal viruses. Protocols for infection of iHIOs with a laboratory strain of rotavirus, simian SA11, were developed. Proof-of-principle analyses showed that iHIOs support replication of a gastrointestinal virus, rotavirus, on the basis of detection of nonstructural viral proteins (nonstructural protein 4 [NSP4] and NSP2) by immunofluorescence, increased levels of viral RNA by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and production of infectious progeny virus. iHIOs were also shown to support replication of 12/13 clinical rotavirus isolates directly from stool samples. An unexpected finding was the detection of rotavirus infection not only in the epithelial cells but also in the mesenchymal cell population of the iHIOs. This work demonstrates that iHIOs offer a promising new model to study rotaviruses and other gastrointestinal viruses. PMID:22761392

  15. Partial Characterization of Bacteriocins Produced by Two New Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed at characterizing two novel bacteriocin-producing enterococcal strains isolated from human intestine. A total of 200 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from a woman stool sample. Two of them were selected for characterization due to their high antimicrobial activity against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes. The selected bacteria were identified as two different strains of Enterococcus faecium and designated MT 104 and MT 162. The bacteriocins produced by MT 104 and MT 162 were stable at different pH ranging from 2 to 11 and were active after different treatments such as heat, enzymes, detergents, and γ-irradiation. The two isolated strains exhibited some probiotic properties such as survival in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid, lack of expression of bile salt hydrolase or hemolytic activity, adhesion to Caco-2 cells efficiently, and sensitivity to clinical antimicrobial agents. Thus, the two isolated strains of E. faecium could become new probiotic bacteria and their bacteriocins could be used for controlling L. monocytogenes in combination with irradiation for food preservation.

  16. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kaleczyc

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15, and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5 and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM, substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be

  17. Vitamin A metabolism in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, T.C.; Ong, D.E. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, described as enterocyte-like in a number of studies, was examined for its ability to carry out the metabolism of vitamin A normally required in the absorptive process. Caco-2 cells contained cellular retinol-binding protein II, a protein which is abundant in human villus-associated enterocytes and may play an important role in the absorption of vitamin A. Microsomal preparations from Caco-2 cells contained retinal reductase, acyl-CoA-retinol acyltransferase (ARAT), and lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) activites, which have previously been proposed to be involved in the metabolism of dietary vitamin A in the enterocyte. When intact Caco-2 cells were provided with {beta}-carotene, retinyl acetate, or retinyl acetate, or retinol, synthesis of retinyl palmitoleate, oleate, palmitate, and small amounts of stearate resulted. However, exogenous retinyl palmitate or stearate was not used by Caco-2 cells as a source of retinol for ester synthesis. While there was a disproportionate synthesis of monoenoic fatty acid esters of retinol in Caco-2 cells compared to the retinyl esters typically found in human chylomicrons or the esters normally synthesized in rat intestine, the pattern was consistent with the substantial amount of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly 18:1 and 16:1, found in the sn-1 position of Caco-2 microsomal phosphatidylcholine, the fatty acyl donor for LRAT. Both ARAT and LRAT have been proposed to be responsible for retinyl ester synthesis in the enterocyte. These data suggest the LRAT may be the physiologically important enzyme for the esterification of retinol in Caco-2 cells.

  18. Clinical value of radionuclide small intestine transit time measurement combined with lactulose hydrogen breath test for the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yanli; Lou, Cen; Huang, Zhongke; Chen, Dongfang; Huang, Huacheng; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Bucheng; Dai, Ning; Zhao, Jianmin; Zhen, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may be a pathogenetic factor for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This syndrome cannot be explained by structural abnormalities and has no specific diagnostic laboratory tests or biomarkers. We studied quantitatively and semi-quantitatively, using lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT), small intestinal transit time (SITT) (99m)technetium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) in order to examine the mobility of small intestine as an indication of bacterial overgrowth in patients. Eighty nine consecutive patients who met Rome criteria for IBS were retrospectively studied. According to the diagnostic criteria, all patients were divided into two groups: the SIBO group and the non-SIBO group. The tracer was a mixture of 10g lactulose, 37MBq (99m)Tc-DTPA and 100mL water. The patient drank the whole mixture during 1min and the SITT study started immediately. The SITT and the LHBT followed every 15min for up to 3h after emptying the urine bladder. Spearman's rank correlation was applied to assess the correlation of oro-cecum transit time (OCTT) between imaging and LHBT. The semi-quantitative index between the SIBO group and the non-SIBO group was analyzed with Wilcoxon's rank sum test. If there was significant group difference, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used. Pintestinal transit time study using a lactose hydrogen breath test and (99m)Tc-DTPA is a real-time test for small intestine bacteria overgrowth in IBS patients and can be used as an indicator of the disease.

  19. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  20. Identification of glucose-fermenting bacteria present in an in vitro model of the human intestine by RNA-stable isotope probing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.; Graaf, A.A. de; Maathuis, A.; Waard, P. de; Plugge, C.M.; Smidt, H.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Dijkema, C.; Vos, W.M. de; Venema, K.

    2007-01-01

    16S rRNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling were used to identify bacteria fermenting glucose under conditions simulating the human intestine. The TIM-2 in vitro model of the human intestine was inoculated with a GI tract

  1. Substrate specificity and some properties of phenol sulfotransferase from human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranczyk-Kuzma, A.; Garren, J.A.; Hidalgo, I.J.; Borchardt, R.T. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The phase 2 metabolic reactions, sulfation and glucuronidation, were studied in a human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2), which has been developed as a model of intestinal enterocytes. Phenol sulfotransferase was isolated from Caco-2 cells cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days. The enzyme catalyzed the sulfation of both p-nitrophenol and catecholamines as well as most catecholamine metabolites. The affinity (K{sub m}) of PST for dopamine was much higher than for p-nitrophenol, and the specific activity of PST with both substrates increased with the age of the cells. The thermal stability of Caco-2 PST increased with cell age and was not dependent on the acceptor substrate used. The thermolabile PST from 7-day old cells was more sensitive to NEM than was the thermostable enzyme from 21-day old cells. No UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity was detected in 7-, 14- and 21-day old Caco-2 cells with any of the methods used.

  2. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with...... distinguished from fibroblasts or macrophages in the region. They ramified in the inner zone of the outer division of circular muscle, penetrated the inner-most circular layer, and were also found at the submucosal border. They were in close, synapselike contact with nerve terminals of the deep muscular plexus...

  3. Development and application of an in vitro methodology to determine the transit tolerance of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the upper human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charteris, W P; Kelly, P M; Morelli, L; Collins, J K

    1998-05-01

    An in vitro methodology which mimics in vivo human upper gastrointestinal transit was developed. The transit tolerance of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was determined by exposing washed cell suspensions at 37 degrees C to a simulated gastric juice (pH 2.0), containing pepsin (0.3% w/v) and sodium chloride (0.5% w/v), and a simulated small intestinal juice (pH 8.0), containing pancreatin USP (1 g l-1) and sodium chloride (5 g l-1), and monitoring changes in total viable count periodically. The methodology was also employed to determine the effect of adding milk proteins (1 g l-1), hog gastric mucin (1 g l-1) and soyabean trypsinchymotrypsin inhibitor [SBTCI] (1 g l-1) on transit tolerance. The majority (14 of 15) of isolates lost > 90% viability during simulated gastric transit. Only one isolate, Lactobacillus fermentum KLD, was considered intrinsically resistant. The addition of milk proteins, singly and in combination, generally improved gastric transit tolerance. In this regard, two isolates, Lact. casei 212.3 and Bifidobacterium infantis 25962, exhibited 100% gastric transit tolerance in the presence of milk proteins. In general, the addition of hog gastric mucin did not influence simulated gastric transit tolerance of lactobacilli but tended to increase that of bifidobacteria. However, it increased that of Lact. casei 242 and Lact. salivarius 43338 but diminished that of B. bifidum 2715 and B. animalis Bo. Selected bile salts-resistant isolates were intrinsically tolerant to simulated small intestinal transit. Only Lact. casei F19 and B. adolescentis 15703T showed significant reduction in viability after 240 min. In general, the addition of milk proteins and SBTCI did not affect simulated small intestinal transit tolerance. However, they significantly improved the intrinsic resistance of Lact. casei F19 but diminished that of B. breve 15700T. It is concluded that, whereas the majority of bile salts-resistant lactobacilli and

  4. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  5. Cholinergic interactions between donepezil and prucalopride in human colon: potential to treat severe intestinal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, J; Kung, V W S; Boundouki, G; Aziz, Q; De Maeyer, J H; Knowles, C H; Sanger, G J

    2013-11-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine are used for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, but cardio-bronchial side-effects limit use. To minimize side-effects, lower doses could be combined with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, which also facilitates intestinal cholinergic activity. However, safety concerns, especially in the elderly, require drugs with good selectivity of action. These include the AChE inhibitor donepezil (used for Alzheimer's disease, with reduced cardio-bronchial liability) and prucalopride, the first selective, clinically available 5-HT4 receptor agonist. This study examined their individual and potential synergistic activities in human colon. Neuronally mediated muscle contractions and relaxations of human colon were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and defined phenotypically as cholinergic, nitrergic or tachykinergic using pharmacological tools; the effects of drugs were determined as changes in 'area under the curve'. Prucalopride increased cholinergically mediated contractions (EC50 855 nM; 33% maximum increase), consistent with its ability to stimulate intestinal motility; donepezil (477%) and neostigmine (2326%) had greater efficacy. Concentrations of donepezil (30-100 nM) found in venous plasma after therapeutic doses had minimal ability to enhance cholinergic activity. However, donepezil (30 nM) together with prucalopride (3, 10 μM) markedly increased EFS-evoked contractions compared with prucalopride alone (P = 0.04). For example, the increases observed with donepezil and prucalopride 10 μM together or alone were, respectively, 105 ± 35%, 4 ± 6% and 35 ± 21% (n = 3-7, each concentration). Potential synergy between prucalopride and donepezil activity calls for exploration of this combination as a safer, more effective treatment of colonic pseudo-obstruction. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Effects of nonpathogenic bacteria on cytokine secretion by human intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borruel, Natalia; Casellas, Francesc; Antolín, María; Llopis, Marta; Carol, Monica; Espíin, Eloy; Naval, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Malagelada, Juan R

    2003-04-01

    The human intestine harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, and the mucosa is the interface between the immune system and the luminal environment. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether host-bacteria interactions influence mucosal cytokine production. Macroscopically normal colonic specimens were obtained at surgery from eight patients with neoplasm, and inflamed ileal specimens were obtained from two patients with Crohn's disease. Mucosal explants were cultured for 24 h with either nonpathogenic Escherichia coli ECOR-26, Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001, L. casei DN-114 056, L. casei ATCC-334, or Lactobacillus bulgaricus LB-10. Each study included blank wells with no bacteria. Tissue and bacteria viability were confirmed by LDH release and culture. Concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, transforming growth factor beta1, interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-10 was measured in supernatants. In parallel experiments, neutralizing anti-TNFalpha antibody was added to the culture. Co-culture of mucosa with bacteria did not modify LDH release. Co-culture with L. casei strains significantly reduced TNFalpha release, whereas E. coli increased it. These effects were observed both in normal and inflamed mucosa. In combination studies, L. casei DN-114 001 prevented TNFalpha stimulation by E. coli. L. casei DN-114 001 also reduced IL-8 release via a TNFalpha-independent pathway. L. casei DN-114 056 or E. coli increased IL-10 release in the presence of neutralizing anti-TNFalpha. Nonpathogenic bacteria interact with human intestinal mucosa and can induce changes in cytokine production that are strain specific.

  7. Induction of P-glycoprotein expression and function in human intestinal epithelial cells (T84).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, I S; Jones, K; Coleman, T; Simmons, N L

    2008-10-01

    Intestinal induction of Pgp is known to limit the oral availability of certain drug compounds and give rise to detrimental drug-drug interactions. We have investigated the induction of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1) activity in a human intestinal epithelial cell line (T84) following pre-exposure to a panel of drug compounds, reported to be Pgp substrates, inhibitors or inducers. Human MDR1-transfected MDCKII epithelial monolayers were used to assess Pgp substrate interactions and inhibition of digoxin secretion by the selected drug compounds. The T84 cell line was used to assess induction of Pgp-mediated digoxin secretion following pre-exposure to the same compounds. Changes in gene expression (MDR1, MRP2, PXR and CAR) were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Net transepithelial digoxin secretion was increased (1.3 fold, n=6, Pfollowing pre-exposure to the PXR activator hyperforin (100nM, 72h), as was MDR1 mRNA expression (3.0 fold, n=4, P<0.05). A number of Pgp substrates (quinidine, amprenavir, irinotecan, topotecan, atorvastatin and erythromycin) induced net digoxin secretion, as did the non-Pgp substrate artemisinin. Various non-Pgp substrates demonstrated inhibition of digoxin secretion (verapamil, mifepristone, clotrimazole, mevastatin, diltiazem and isradipine) but did not induce Pgp-mediated digoxin secretion. Of the compounds that increased Pgp secretion, quinidine, topotecan, atorvastatin and amprenavir pre-exposure also elevated MDR1 mRNA levels, whereas erythromycin, irinotecan and artemisinin displayed no change in transcript levels. This indicates possible post-translational regulation of digoxin secretion. Finally, a strong correlation between drug modulation of MRP2 and PXR mRNA expression levels was evident.

  8. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induce attaching and effacing lesions and hemorrhagic colitis in human and bovine intestinal xenograft models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Golan

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans worldwide. The two major virulence determinants of EHEC are the Shiga toxins (Stx and the type III secretion system (T3SS, including the injected effectors. Lack of a good model system hinders the study of EHEC virulence. Here, we investigated whether bovine and human intestinal xenografts in SCID mice can be useful for studying EHEC and host tissue interactions. Fully developed, germ-free human and bovine small intestine and colon were established by subcutaneous transplantation of human and bovine fetal gut into SCID mice. Xenografts were allowed to develop for 3–4 months and thereafter were infected by direct intraluminal inoculation of Stx-negative derivatives of EHEC O157:H7, strain EDL933. The small intestine and colon xenografts closely mimicked the respective native tissues. Upon infection, EHEC induced formation of typical attaching and effacing lesions and tissue damage that resembled hemorrhagic colitis in colon xenografts. By contrast, xenografts infected with an EHEC mutant deficient in T3SS remained undamaged. Furthermore, EHEC did not attach to or damage the epithelium of small intestinal tissue, and these xenografts remained intact. EHEC damaged the colon in a T3SS-dependent manner, and this model is therefore useful for studying the molecular details of EHEC interactions with live human and bovine intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx and gut microflora are not essential for EHEC virulence in the human gut.

  9. [Studies on the biotransformation of escin Ia by human intestinal bacteria and the anti-tumor activities of desacylescin I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiu-Wei; Zhao, Jing; Cui, Jing-Rong; Guo, Wei

    2004-02-01

    To study Biotransformation of escin Ia by the crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria and Lactobacillus brevis, determine the structures of biotransformation products and assay the inhibitory effect of desacylescin I on the tumor cell growth. The escin Ia was incubated with crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria and Lactobacillus brevis in vitro, respectively. The biotransformation products were isolated and purified by the chromatographic methods and the structures were determined by the spectroscopic techniques. Escin Ia was converted into isoescin Ia, desacylescin I, 21beta-O-tigloylprotoaescigenin and protoaescigenin by crude enzymes of human intestinal bacteria and Lactobacillus brevis. Desacylescin I showed potentially inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth of mouse sarcoma-180, hepatic carcinoma H(22) and lung carcinoma in vivo. The results suggest that Escin Ia was a prodrug and its structure can be converted by human intestinal bacteria and Lactobacillus brevis. Desacylescin I as a biotransformation product showed potentially inhibitory effects on mouse tumor, and a potential candidate for anti tumor agents.

  10. Human Inferences about Sequences: A Minimal Transition Probability Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Meyniel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain constantly infers the causes of the inputs it receives and uses these inferences to generate statistical expectations about future observations. Experimental evidence for these expectations and their violations include explicit reports, sequential effects on reaction times, and mismatch or surprise signals recorded in electrophysiology and functional MRI. Here, we explore the hypothesis that the brain acts as a near-optimal inference device that constantly attempts to infer the time-varying matrix of transition probabilities between the stimuli it receives, even when those stimuli are in fact fully unpredictable. This parsimonious Bayesian model, with a single free parameter, accounts for a broad range of findings on surprise signals, sequential effects and the perception of randomness. Notably, it explains the pervasive asymmetry between repetitions and alternations encountered in those studies. Our analysis suggests that a neural machinery for inferring transition probabilities lies at the core of human sequence knowledge.

  11. Effect of absorbable and nonabsorbable sugars on intestinal calcium absorption in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griessen, M.; Speich, P.V.; Infante, F.; Bartholdi, P.; Cochet, B.; Donath, A.; Courvoisier, B.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1989-03-01

    The effects of glucose, galactose, and lactitol on intestinal calcium absorption and gastric emptying were studied in 9, 8, and 20 healthy subjects, respectively. Calcium absorption was measured by using a double-isotope technique and the kinetic parameters were obtained by a deconvolution method. The gastric emptying rate was determined with /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and was expressed as the half-time of the emptying curve. Each subject was studied under two conditions: (a) with calcium alone and (b) with calcium plus sugar. Glucose and galactose increased the calcium mean transit time and improved the total fractional calcium absorption by 30% (p less than 0.02). Lactitol decreased the mean rate of absorption (p less than 0.001) and reduced the total fractional calcium absorption by 15% (p less than 0.001). The gastric emptying rate did not appear to influence directly the kinetic parameters of calcium absorption. These results show that both glucose and galactose exert the same stimulatory effect as lactose on calcium absorption in subjects with normal lactase whereas lactitol mimics the effects of lactose in lactase-deficient patients. Thus the absorbability of sugars determines their effect on calcium absorption.

  12. Effect of absorbable and nonabsorbable sugars on intestinal calcium absorption in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griessen, M.; Speich, P.V.; Infante, F.; Bartholdi, P.; Cochet, B.; Donath, A.; Courvoisier, B.; Bonjour, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of glucose, galactose, and lactitol on intestinal calcium absorption and gastric emptying were studied in 9, 8, and 20 healthy subjects, respectively. Calcium absorption was measured by using a double-isotope technique and the kinetic parameters were obtained by a deconvolution method. The gastric emptying rate was determined with /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and was expressed as the half-time of the emptying curve. Each subject was studied under two conditions: (a) with calcium alone and (b) with calcium plus sugar. Glucose and galactose increased the calcium mean transit time and improved the total fractional calcium absorption by 30% (p less than 0.02). Lactitol decreased the mean rate of absorption (p less than 0.001) and reduced the total fractional calcium absorption by 15% (p less than 0.001). The gastric emptying rate did not appear to influence directly the kinetic parameters of calcium absorption. These results show that both glucose and galactose exert the same stimulatory effect as lactose on calcium absorption in subjects with normal lactase whereas lactitol mimics the effects of lactose in lactase-deficient patients. Thus the absorbability of sugars determines their effect on calcium absorption

  13. Carboxylated nanodiamonds are neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic on liver, kidney, intestine and lung human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Grall, R; Altmeyer-Morel, S; Girard, H A; Petit, T; Gesset, C; Mermoux, M; Bergonzo, P; Arnault, J C; Chevillard, S

    2014-08-01

    Although nanodiamonds (NDs) appear as one of the most promising nanocarbon materials available so far for biomedical applications, their risk for human health remains unknown. Our work was aimed at defining the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of two sets of commercial carboxylated NDs with diameters below 20 and 100 nm, on six human cell lines chosen as representative of potential target organs: HepG2 and Hep3B (liver), Caki-1 and Hek-293 (kidney), HT29 (intestine) and A549 (lung). Cytotoxicity of NDs was assessed by measuring cell impedance (xCELLigence® system) and cell survival/death by flow cytometry while genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double-strand breaks. To validate and check the sensitivity of the techniques, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were used as positive control in all assays. Cell incorporation of NDs was also studied by flow cytometry and luminescent N-V center photoluminescence (confirmed by Raman microscopy), to ensure that nanoparticles entered the cells. Overall, we show that NDs effectively entered the cells but NDs do not induce any significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on the six cell lines up to an exposure dose of 250 µg/mL. Taken together these results strongly support the huge potential of NDs for human nanomedicine but also their potential as negative control in nanotoxicology studies.

  14. Alteration of a human intestinal microbiota under extreme life environment in the Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Touyama, Mutsumi; Yamada, Shin; Yamazaki, Takashi; Benno, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota (HIM) settles from birth and continues to change phenotype by some factors (e.g. host's diet) throughout life. However, the effect of extreme life environment on human HIM composition is not well known. To understand HIM fluctuation under extreme life environment in humans, fecal samples were collected from six Japanese men on a long Antarctic expedition. They explored Antarctica for 3 months and collected their fecal samples at once-monthly intervals. Using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, the composition of HIM in six subjects was investigated. Three subjects presented restoration of HIM after the expedition compared versus before and during the expedition. Two thirds samples collected during the expedition belonged to the same cluster in dendrogram. However, all through the expedition, T-RFLP patterns showed interindividual variability. Especially, Bifidobacterium spp. showed a tendency to decrease during and restore after the expedition. A reduction of Bifidobacterium spp. was observed in five subjects the first 1 month of the expedition. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which is thought to proliferate during emotional stress, significantly decreased in one subject, indicating that other factors in addition to emotional stress may affect the composition of HIM in this study. These findings could be helpful to understand the effect of extreme life environment on HIM.

  15. Activation of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Factor Snail Mediated Acetaldehyde-Induced Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elamin, E.; Masclee, A.; Troost, F.; Dekker, J.; Jonkers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background : Acetaldehyde (AcH) is mutagenic and can reach high concentrations in colonic lumen after ethanol consumption and is associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction and an increased risk of progressive cancers, including colorectal carcinoma. Snail, the transcription factor of

  16. Rapid reversal of human intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced damage by shedding of injured enterocytes and reepithelialisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joep P M Derikx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR is a phenomenon related to physiological conditions (e.g. exercise, stress and to pathophysiological events (e.g. acute mesenteric ischemia, aortic surgery. Although intestinal IR has been studied extensively in animals, results remain inconclusive and data on human intestinal IR are scarce. Therefore, an experimental harmless model for human intestinal IR was developed, enabling us to clarify the sequelae of human intestinal IR for the first time. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In 30 patients undergoing pancreatico-duodenectomy we took advantage of the fact that in this procedure a variable length of jejunum is removed. Isolated jejunum (5 cm was subjected to 30 minutes ischemia followed by reperfusion. Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP arteriovenous concentration differences across the bowel segment were measured before and after ischemia to assess epithelial cell damage. Tissue sections were collected after ischemia and at 25, 60 and 120 minutes reperfusion and stained with H&E, and for I-FABP and the apoptosis marker M30. Bonferroni's test was used to compare I-FABP differences. Mean (SEM arteriovenous concentration gradients of I-FABP across the jejunum revealed rapidly developing epithelial cell damage. I-FABP release significantly increased from 290 (46 pg/ml before ischemia towards 3,997 (554 pg/ml immediately after ischemia (p<0.001 and declined gradually to 1,143 (237 pg/ml within 1 hour reperfusion (p<0.001. Directly after ischemia the intestinal epithelial lining was microscopically normal, while subepithelial spaces appeared at the villus tip. However, after 25 minutes reperfusion, enterocyte M30 immunostaining was observed at the villus tip accompanied by shedding of mature enterocytes into the lumen and loss of I-FABP staining. Interestingly, within 60 minutes reperfusion the epithelial barrier resealed, while debris of apoptotic, shedded epithelial cells was observed in the lumen

  17. A comparative analysis of the intestinal metagenomes present in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and humans (Homo sapiens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrand, Falk; Ebersbach, Tine; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    the guinea pig microbiome to existing human gut metagenome data from the MetaHIT project. Results: We found that the bacterial richness obtained for human samples was lower than for guinea pig samples. The intestinal microbiotas of both species were dominated by the two phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes......Background: Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is an important model for human intestinal research. We have characterized the faecal microbiota of 60 guinea pigs using Illumina shotgun metagenomics, and used this data to compile a gene catalogue of its prevalent microbiota. Subsequently, we compared......, but at genus level, the majority of identified genera (320 of 376) were differently abundant in the two hosts. For example, the guinea pig contained considerably more of the mucin-degrading Akkermansia, as well as of the methanogenic archaea Methanobrevibacter than found in humans. Most microbiome functional...

  18. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induce attaching and effacing lesions and hemorrhagic colitis in human and bovine intestinal xenograft models

    OpenAIRE

    Golan, Lilach; Gonen, Erez; Yagel, Simcha; Rosenshine, Ilan; Shpigel, Nahum Y.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is an important cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans worldwide. The two major virulence determinants of EHEC are the Shiga toxins (Stx) and the type III secretion system (T3SS), including the injected effectors. Lack of a good model system hinders the study of EHEC virulence. Here, we investigated whether bovine and human intestinal xenografts in SCID mice can be useful for studying EHEC and...

  19. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  20. An ex-vivo human intestinal model to study Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra Bansal

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis (a human intestinal infection affecting 50 million people every year is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying human colon invasion by E. histolytica, we have set up an ex vivo human colon model to study the early steps in amoebiasis. Using scanning electron microscopy and histological analyses, we have established that E. histolytica caused the removal of the protective mucus coat during the first two hours of incubation, detached the enterocytes, and then penetrated into the lamina propria by following the crypts of Lieberkühn. Significant cell lysis (determined by the release of lactodehydrogenase and inflammation (marked by the secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin 1 beta, interferon gamma, interleukin 6, interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor were detected after four hours of incubation. Entamoeba dispar (a closely related non-pathogenic amoeba that also colonizes the human colon was unable to invade colonic mucosa, lyse cells or induce an inflammatory response. We also examined the behaviour of trophozoites in which genes coding for known virulent factors (such as amoebapores, the Gal/GalNAc lectin and the cysteine protease 5 (CP-A5, which have major roles in cell death, adhesion (to target cells or mucus and mucus degradation, respectively were silenced, together with the corresponding tissue responses. Our data revealed that the signalling via the heavy chain Hgl2 or via the light chain Lgl1 of the Gal/GalNAc lectin is not essential to penetrate the human colonic mucosa. In addition, our study demonstrates that E. histolytica silenced for CP-A5 does not penetrate the colonic lamina propria and does not induce the host's pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion.

  1. Evaluation of Fetal Intestinal Cell Growth and Antimicrobial Biofunctionalities of Donor Human Milk After Preparative Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaprach, Pasinee; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Supapannachart, Sarayut; Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Chutipongtanate, Somchai

    2018-04-01

    Donor human milk is considered the next best nutrition following mother's own milk to prevent neonatal infection and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants who are admitted at neonatal intensive care unit. However, donor milk biofunctionalities after preparative processes have rarely been documented. To evaluate biofunctionalities preserved in donor milk after preparative processes by cell-based assays. Ten pools of donor milk were produced from 40 independent specimens. After preparative processes, including bacterial elimination methods (holder pasteurization and cold-sterilization microfiltration) and storage conditions (-20°C freezing storage and lyophilization) with varied duration of storage (0, 3, and 6, months), donor milk biofunctionalities were examined by fetal intestinal cell growth and antimicrobial assays. At baseline, raw donor milk exhibited 193.1% ± 12.3% of fetal intestinal cell growth and 42.4% ± 11.8% of antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli. After bacteria eliminating processes, growth promoting activity was better preserved in pasteurized donor milk than microfiltrated donor milk (169.5% ± 14.3% versus 146.0% ± 11.8%, respectively; p pasteurized donor milk was further examined for the effects of storage conditions at 3 and 6 months. Freezing storage, but not lyophilization, could preserve higher growth-promoting activity during 6 months of storage (163.0% ± 9.4% versus 72.8% ± 6.2%, respectively; p milk biofunctionalities and support the utilization of donor milk within 3 months after preparative processes.

  2. Epidemiology of human fascioliasis and intestinal parasitosis among schoolchildren in Lake Tana Basin, northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fentie, Tsegaw; Erqou, Sebhat; Gedefaw, Molla; Desta, Almaw

    2013-08-01

    Parasitic diseases are the second most frequent cause of outpatient morbidity in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Lake Tana Basin, northwest Ethiopia, from November 2007 to February 2008, to assess the magnitude and associated risk factors for parasitic diseases, including human fascioliasis. We examined 520 stool samples from randomly selected schoolchildren in six schools by microscopy. Rapid sedimentation and Kato-Katz techniques were used to detect and count Fasciola and Schistosoma eggs. The formol-ether concentration method was used for the identification of other helminth eggs, larvae and cysts of protozoan parasites. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was 71.3% (95% CI 67.3-75.1%). Hookworm was the predominant intestinal parasite (23.5%, 95% CI 19.8-27.1%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (18.5%, 95% CI 15.2-21.9%) and Schistosoma mansoni (16.7%, 95% CI 13.5-19.9%). One hundred and sixty-three (31.4%) children had multiple parasitic infections. The most relevant finding was a prevalence of Fasciola spp. of 3.3% in an area where only sporadic cases have been reported previously. The risk of Fasciola spp. infection was significantly associated with raw vegetable consumption, use of unsafe drinking water sources, irrigation practices and sheep and/or cattle ownership. Irrigation practices, male gender, raw vegetable consumption and use of unsafe drinking water sources were risk factors for S. mansoni infection. A high prevalence of parasitic infections among children in the region was found, including a relatively high prevalence of Fasciola spp. infection. Epidemiological studies on the magnitude of parasitic infections in different regions will enable high-risk communities to be identified and allow for planning of appropriate interventions.

  3. Two-dimensional gel proteome reference map of human small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canzonieri Vincenzo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The small intestine is an important human organ that plays a central role in many physiological functions including digestion, absorption, secretion and defense. Duodenal pathologies include, for instance, the ulcer associated to Helicobacter Pylori infection, adenoma and, in genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease. Alterations in the bowel reduce its capability to absorb nutrients, minerals and fat-soluble vitamins. Anemia and osteopenia or osteoporosis may develop as a consequence of vitamins malabsorption. Adenoma is a benign tumor that has the potential to become cancerous. Adult celiac disease patients present an overall risk of cancer that is almost twice than that found in the general population. These disease processes are not completely known. To date, a two dimensional (2D reference map of proteins expressed in human duodenal tissue is not yet available: the aim of our study was to characterize the 2D protein map, and to identify proteins of duodenal mucosa of adult individuals without duodenal illness, to create a protein database. This approach, may be useful for comparing similar protein samples in different laboratories and for the molecular characterization of intestinal pathologies without recurring to the use of surgical material. Results The enrolled population comprised five selected samples (3 males and 2 females, aged 19 to 42, taken from 20 adult subjects, on their first visit at the gastroenterology unit for a suspected celiac disease, who did not turn to be affected by any duodenal pathology after gastrointestinal and histological evaluations. Proteins extracted from the five duodenal mucosal specimens were singly separated by 2D gel electrophoresis. After image analysis of each 2D gel, 179 protein spots, representing 145 unique proteins, from 218 spots tested, were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF ms analysis. Normalized volumes, for each protein, have been reported for every gel

  4. Isolation of Human Intestinal Bacteria Capable of Producing the Bioactive Metabolite Isourolithin A from Ellagic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selma, María V; Beltrán, David; Luna, María C; Romo-Vaquero, María; García-Villalba, Rocío; Mira, Alex; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2017-01-01

    Urolithins are intestinal microbial metabolites produced from ellagitannin- and ellagic acid-containing foods such as walnuts, strawberries, and pomegranates. These metabolites, better absorbed than their precursors, can contribute significantly to the beneficial properties attributed to the polyphenols ellagitannins and ellagic acid (EA). However, both the ability of producing the final metabolites in this catabolism (urolithins A, B and isourolithin A) and the health benefits associated with ellagitannin consumption differ considerably among individuals depending on their gut microbiota composition. Three human urolithin metabotypes have been previously described, i.e., metabotype 0 (urolithin non-producers), metabotype A (production of urolithin A as unique final urolithin) and metabotype B (urolithin B and/or isourolithin A are produced besides urolithin A). Although production of some intermediary urolithins has been recently attributed to intestinal species from Eggerthellaceae family named Gordonibacter urolithinfaciens and Gordonibacter pamelaeae , the identification of the microorganisms responsible for the complete transformation of EA into the final urolithins, especially those related to metabotype B, are still unknown. In the present research we illustrate the isolation of urolithin-producing strains from human feces of a healthy adult and their ability to transform EA into different urolithin metabolites, including isourolithin A. The isolates belong to a new genus from Eggerthellaceae family. EA transformation and urolithin production arisen during the stationary phase of the growth of the bacteria under anaerobic conditions. The HPLC-DAD-MS analyses demonstrated the sequential appearance of 3,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-urolithin (urolithin M6), 3,8,9-trihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin C) and 3,9-dihydroxy-urolithin (isourolithin A) while 3,8-dihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin A) and 3-hydroxy-urolithin (urolithin B) were not detected. For the first time

  5. Isolation of Human Intestinal Bacteria Capable of Producing the Bioactive Metabolite Isourolithin A from Ellagic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María V. Selma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urolithins are intestinal microbial metabolites produced from ellagitannin- and ellagic acid-containing foods such as walnuts, strawberries, and pomegranates. These metabolites, better absorbed than their precursors, can contribute significantly to the beneficial properties attributed to the polyphenols ellagitannins and ellagic acid (EA. However, both the ability of producing the final metabolites in this catabolism (urolithins A, B and isourolithin A and the health benefits associated with ellagitannin consumption differ considerably among individuals depending on their gut microbiota composition. Three human urolithin metabotypes have been previously described, i.e., metabotype 0 (urolithin non-producers, metabotype A (production of urolithin A as unique final urolithin and metabotype B (urolithin B and/or isourolithin A are produced besides urolithin A. Although production of some intermediary urolithins has been recently attributed to intestinal species from Eggerthellaceae family named Gordonibacter urolithinfaciens and Gordonibacter pamelaeae, the identification of the microorganisms responsible for the complete transformation of EA into the final urolithins, especially those related to metabotype B, are still unknown. In the present research we illustrate the isolation of urolithin-producing strains from human feces of a healthy adult and their ability to transform EA into different urolithin metabolites, including isourolithin A. The isolates belong to a new genus from Eggerthellaceae family. EA transformation and urolithin production arisen during the stationary phase of the growth of the bacteria under anaerobic conditions. The HPLC-DAD-MS analyses demonstrated the sequential appearance of 3,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-urolithin (urolithin M6, 3,8,9-trihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin C and 3,9-dihydroxy-urolithin (isourolithin A while 3,8-dihydroxy-urolithin (urolithin A and 3-hydroxy-urolithin (urolithin B were not detected. For the first time

  6. Two-dimensional gel proteome reference map of human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simula, Maria Paola; Cannizzaro, Renato; Marin, Maria Dolores; Pavan, Alessandro; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; De Re, Valli

    2009-03-19

    The small intestine is an important human organ that plays a central role in many physiological functions including digestion, absorption, secretion and defense. Duodenal pathologies include, for instance, the ulcer associated to Helicobacter Pylori infection, adenoma and, in genetically predisposed individuals, celiac disease. Alterations in the bowel reduce its capability to absorb nutrients, minerals and fat-soluble vitamins. Anemia and osteopenia or osteoporosis may develop as a consequence of vitamins malabsorption. Adenoma is a benign tumor that has the potential to become cancerous. Adult celiac disease patients present an overall risk of cancer that is almost twice than that found in the general population. These disease processes are not completely known.To date, a two dimensional (2D) reference map of proteins expressed in human duodenal tissue is not yet available: the aim of our study was to characterize the 2D protein map, and to identify proteins of duodenal mucosa of adult individuals without duodenal illness, to create a protein database. This approach, may be useful for comparing similar protein samples in different laboratories and for the molecular characterization of intestinal pathologies without recurring to the use of surgical material. The enrolled population comprised five selected samples (3 males and 2 females, aged 19 to 42), taken from 20 adult subjects, on their first visit at the gastroenterology unit for a suspected celiac disease, who did not turn to be affected by any duodenal pathology after gastrointestinal and histological evaluations. Proteins extracted from the five duodenal mucosal specimens were singly separated by 2D gel electrophoresis. After image analysis of each 2D gel, 179 protein spots, representing 145 unique proteins, from 218 spots tested, were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF ms analysis. Normalized volumes, for each protein, have been reported for every gel. Proteins have been grouped according to their

  7. Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization Approach as Effective Tool for Diagnosing Human Intestinal Parasites from Scarce Archaeological Remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Lauren Hubert; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2014-01-01

    Paleoparasitology is the science that uses parasitological techniques for diagnosing parasitic diseases in the past. Advances in molecular biology brought new insights into this field allowing the study of archaeological material. However, due to technical limitations a proper diagnosis and confirmation of the presence of parasites is not always possible, especially in scarce and degraded archaeological remains. In this study, we developed a Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization (MPH) approach using ancient DNA (aDNA) hybridization to confirm and complement paleoparasitological diagnosis. Eight molecular targets from four helminth parasites were included: Ascaris sp., Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The MPH analysis using 18th century human remains from Praça XV cemetery (CPXV), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, revealed for the first time the presence E. vermicularis aDNA (50%) in archaeological sites of Brazil. Besides, the results confirmed T. trichiura and Ascaris sp. infections. The prevalence of infection by Ascaris sp. and E. vermicularis increased considerably when MPH was applied. However, a lower aDNA detection of T. trichiura (40%) was observed when compared to the diagnosis by paleoparasitological analysis (70%). Therefore, based on these data, we suggest a combination of Paleoparasitological and MPH approaches to verify the real panorama of intestinal parasite infection in human archeological samples. PMID:25162694

  8. Using human intestinal biopsies to study the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Y; Boeckxstaens, G E; Wouters, M M; Schemann, M; Vanner, S

    2014-04-01

    Although animal models of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have provided important insights, there are no models that fully express the features of this complex condition. One alternative approach is the use of human intestinal biopsies obtained during endoscopic procedures to examine peripheral mechanisms in this disorder. These studies have served to confirm the existence of peripheral pathways in humans with IBS and have provided many new mechanistic insights. Two general approaches have been employed; one approach has been to examine the biological activity of mediators within the mucosal tissue of IBS patients and the other has been to examine changes in the structural properties of key signaling pathways contained within the biopsies. Using these approaches, important changes have been discovered involving the enteric nervous system and the extrinsic sensory pathway (dorsal root ganglia neurons), the immune system, and epithelial signaling in IBS patients compared to healthy subjects. This review will systematically explore these mechanistic pathways, highlight the implications of these novel findings and discuss some of the important limitations of this approach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The shaping of human diversity: filters, boundaries and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazón Lahr, Marta

    2016-07-05

    The evolution of modern humans was a complex process, involving major changes in levels of diversity through time. The fossils and stone tools that record the spatial distribution of our species in the past form the backbone of our evolutionary history, and one that allows us to explore the different processes-cultural and biological-that acted to shape the evolution of different populations in the face of major climate change. Those processes created a complex palimpsest of similarities and differences, with outcomes that were at times accelerated by sharp demographic and geographical fluctuations. The result is that the population ancestral to all modern humans did not look or behave like people alive today. This has generated questions regarding the evolution of human universal characters, as well as the nature and timing of major evolutionary events in the history of Homo sapiens The paucity of African fossils remains a serious stumbling block for exploring some of these issues. However, fossil and archaeological discoveries increasingly clarify important aspects of our past, while breakthroughs from genomics and palaeogenomics have revealed aspects of the demography of Late Quaternary Eurasian hominin groups and their interactions, as well as those between foragers and farmers. This paper explores the nature and timing of key moments in the evolution of human diversity, moments in which population collapse followed by differential expansion of groups set the conditions for transitional periods. Five transitions are identified (i) at the origins of the species, 240-200 ka; (ii) at the time of the first major expansions, 130-100 ka; (iii) during a period of dispersals, 70-50 ka; (iv) across a phase of local/regional structuring of diversity, 45-25 ka; and (v) during a phase of significant extinction of hunter-gatherer diversity and expansion of particular groups, such as farmers and later societies (the Holocene Filter), 15-0 ka.This article is part of the

  10. Human Breast Milk and Infant Formulas Differentially Modify the Intestinal Microbiota in Human Infants and Host Physiology in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenmin; Roy, Nicole C; Guo, Yanhong; Jia, Hongxin; Ryan, Leigh; Samuelsson, Linda; Thomas, Ancy; Plowman, Jeff; Clerens, Stefan; Day, Li; Young, Wayne

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of human breast milk, infant and follow-on formulas can still promote efficient growth and development. However, infant formulas can differ in their nutritional value. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of human milk (HM) and infant formulas in human infants and a weanling rat model. In a 3 wk clinical randomized controlled trial, babies (7- to 90-d-old, male-to-female ratio 1:1) were exclusively breastfed (BF), exclusively fed Synlait Pure Canterbury Stage 1 infant formula (SPCF), or fed assorted standard formulas (SFs) purchased by their parents. We also compared feeding HM or SPCF in weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 d. We examined the effects of HM and infant formulas on fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and bacterial composition in human infants, and intestinal SCFAs, the microbiota, and host physiology in weanling rats. Fecal Bifidobacterium concentrations (mean log copy number ± SEM) were higher (P = 0.003) in BF (8.17 ± 0.3) and SPCF-fed infants (8.29 ± 0.3) compared with those fed the SFs (6.94 ± 0.3). Fecal acetic acid (mean ± SEM) was also higher (P = 0.007) in the BF (5.5 ± 0.2 mg/g) and SPCF (5.3 ± 2.4 mg/g) groups compared with SF-fed babies (4.3 ± 0.2 mg/g). Colonic SCFAs did not differ between HM- and SPCF-fed rats. However, cecal acetic acid concentrations were higher (P = 0.001) in rats fed HM (42.6 ± 2.6 mg/g) than in those fed SPCF (30.6 ± 0.8 mg/g). Cecal transcriptome, proteome, and plasma metabolite analyses indicated that the growth and maturation of intestinal tissue was more highly promoted by HM than SPCF. Fecal bacterial composition and SCFA concentrations were similar in babies fed SPCF or HM. However, results from the rat study showed substantial differences in host physiology between rats fed HM and SPCF. This trial was registered at Shanghai Jiào tong University School of Medicine as XHEC-C-2012-024. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathia Papafragkou

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407 or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2 growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin. Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8. At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  12. The intestinal archaea Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii activate human dendritic cells.

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    Corinna Bang

    Full Text Available The methanoarchaea Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii are known to be part of the indigenous human gut microbiota. Although the immunomodulatory effects of bacterial gut commensals have been studied extensively in the last decade, the impact of methanoarchaea in human's health and disease was rarely examined. Consequently, we studied and report here on the effects of M. stadtmanae and M. smithii on human immune cells. Whereas exposure to M. stadtmanae leads to substantial release of proinflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs, only weak activation was detected after incubation with M. smithii. Phagocytosis of M. stadtmanae by moDCs was demonstrated by confocal microscopy as well as transmission electronic microscopy (TEM and shown to be crucial for cellular activation by using specific inhibitors. Both strains, albeit to different extents, initiate a maturation program in moDCs as revealed by up-regulation of the cell-surface receptors CD86 and CD197 suggesting additional activation of adaptive immune responses. Furthermore, M. stadtmanae and M. smithii were capable to alter the gene expression of antimicrobial peptides in moDCs to different extents. Taken together, our findings strongly argue that the archaeal gut inhabitants M. stadtmanae and M. smithii are specifically recognized by the human innate immune system. Moreover, both strains are capable of inducing an inflammatory cytokine response to different extents arguing that they might have diverse immunomodulatory functions. In conclusion, we propose that the impact of intestinal methanoarchaea on pathological conditions involving the gut microbiota has been underestimated until now.

  13. An in vitro study to assess the impact of tetracycline on the human intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Young; Ahn, Youngbeom; Khare, Sangeeta; Gokulan, Kuppan; Piñeiro, Silvia A; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2018-02-01

    The human intestinal microbiome, a generally stable ecosystem, could be potentially altered by the ingestion of antimicrobial drug residues in foods derived from animals. Data and the scientific published literature on the effects of antimicrobial residues on the human intestinal microbiome are reviewed by national regulatory authorities as part of the human food safety evaluation of veterinary antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals. In this study, we determined if tetracycline, at low residue concentrations, could impact the human intestinal microbiome structure and the resistance-gene profile, following acute and subchronic exposure. The effects of 0.15, 1.5, 15, and 150 μg/ml of tetracycline, after 24 h and 40 days of exposure, in 3% human fecal suspensions, collected from three individuals (A, B, and C) were investigated using in vitro batch cultures. Results were variable, with either no change or minor changes in total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies after exposure of fecal samples to tetracycline, because of the inter-individual variation of human gastrointestinal tract microbiota. Bacterial community analysis using rRNA-based pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in the three fecal samples; the ratio of phylotypes varied among individuals. The evaluation of bacterial community changes at the genus level, from control to tetracycline-treated fecal samples, suggested that tetracycline under the conditions of this study could lead to slight differences in the composition of intestinal microbiota. The genus Bacteroides (of the Bacteroidetes) was consistently altered from 1.68 to 5.70% and 4.82-8.22% at tetracycline concentrations of 0.15 μg/ml or above at both time points for individual A, respectively, and increased 5.13-13.50% and 10.92-22.18% for individual B, respectively. Clostridium family XI increased 3.50-25.34% in the presence of tetracycline at 40 days for individual C. Principal

  14. Exploring drug solubility in fasted human intestinal fluid aspirates: Impact of inter-individual variability, sampling site and dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Moreno, Mariangeles Pérez; Montejo, Consuelo; Aguilar-Ros, Antonio; Dewe, Walthère; Beck, Benoît; Stappaerts, Jef; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-08-07

    One of the main factors defining intestinal drug absorption is the solubility of the compound in the gastrointestinal environment. This study reports the solubility of a series of 27 commonly used acidic, neutral and basic drugs in human intestinal fluid samples collected from the duodenum or jejunum of healthy volunteers under fasted state conditions. The interindividual variability as well as the impact of factors such as pH, sampling site and bile salts on the solubility in human intestinal fluids was investigated. The solubility measurements were evaluated using a statistical experimental design. Variability in solubility across volunteers and sampling sites was highly compound-specific and appeared to be substantial for weak acids and bases and for lipophilic drugs. Both pH of the samples and the abundance of amphiphilic components were responsible for the variability observed in the solubility values obtained. The results confirm strong interindividual differences in intraluminal solubility, especially for compounds with high lipophilicity and/or compounds with a pKa value within the physiological pH range. It is important to recognize this variability in intestinal drug solubility as it may considerably influence the therapeutic outcome among patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A microengineered collagen scaffold for generating a polarized crypt-villus architecture of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Gunasekara, Dulan B; Reed, Mark I; DiSalvo, Matthew; Bultman, Scott J; Sims, Christopher E; Magness, Scott T; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The human small intestinal epithelium possesses a distinct crypt-villus architecture and tissue polarity in which proliferative cells reside inside crypts while differentiated cells are localized to the villi. Indirect evidence has shown that the processes of differentiation and migration are driven in part by biochemical gradients of factors that specify the polarity of these cellular compartments; however, direct evidence for gradient-driven patterning of this in vivo architecture has been hampered by limitations of the in vitro systems available. Enteroid cultures are a powerful in vitro system; nevertheless, these spheroidal structures fail to replicate the architecture and lineage compartmentalization found in vivo, and are not easily subjected to gradients of growth factors. In the current work, we report the development of a micropatterned collagen scaffold with suitable extracellular matrix and stiffness to generate an in vitro self-renewing human small intestinal epithelium that replicates key features of the in vivo small intestine: a crypt-villus architecture with appropriate cell-lineage compartmentalization and an open and accessible luminal surface. Chemical gradients applied to the crypt-villus axis promoted the creation of a stem/progenitor-cell zone and supported cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. This new approach combining microengineered scaffolds, biophysical cues and chemical gradients to control the intestinal epithelium ex vivo can serve as a physiologically relevant mimic of the human small intestinal epithelium, and is broadly applicable to model other tissues that rely on gradients for physiological function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Compartment-specific distribution of human intestinal innate lymphoid cells is altered in HIV patients under effective therapy.

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    Benjamin Krämer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphocyte cells (ILCs, a novel family of innate immune cells are considered to function as key orchestrators of immune defences at mucosal surfaces and to be crucial for maintaining an intact intestinal barrier. Accordingly, first data suggest depletion of ILCs to be involved in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated damage of the intestinal mucosa and subsequent microbial translocation. However, although ILCs are preferentially localized at mucosal surfaces, only little is known regarding distribution and function of ILCs in the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we show that in HIV(- individuals composition and functional capacity of intestinal ILCs is compartment-specific with group 1 ILCs representing the major fraction in the upper gastrointestinal (GI tract, whereas ILC3 are the predominant population in ileum and colon, respectively. In addition, we present first data indicating that local cytokine concentrations, especially that of IL-7, might modulate composition of gut ILCs. Distribution of intestinal ILCs was significantly altered in HIV patients, who displayed decreased frequency of total ILCs in ileum and colon owing to reduced numbers of both CD127(+ILC1 and ILC3. Of note, frequency of colonic ILC3 was inversely correlated with serum levels of I-FABP and sCD14, surrogate markers for loss of gut barrier integrity and microbial translocation, respectively. Both expression of the IL-7 receptor CD127 on ILCs as well as mucosal IL-7 mRNA levels were decreased in HIV(+ patients, especially in those parts of the GI tract with reduced ILC frequencies, suggesting that impaired IL-7 responses of ILCs might contribute to incomplete reconstitution of ILCs under effective anti-retroviral therapy. This is the first report comparing distribution and function of ILCs along the intestinal mucosa of the entire human gastrointestinal tract in HIV(+ and HIV(- individuals.

  17. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  18. The role of metabolism in Diclofenac-induced intestinal toxicity in human ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    2012-01-01

    The use of Diclofenac (DCF: 2-(2,6-dichloranilino) phenyl acetic acid ), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is associated with severe gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo rat studies suggest that reactive metabolites of DCF, produced by the liver, play an important role in the intestinal

  19. The role of metabolism in diclofenac-induced intestinal toxicity in rat and human in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    The use of Diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is associated with severe gastro-intestinal side-effects. The mechanisms of drug-induced intestinal toxicity are largely unknown due to the lack of in vitro models. In vivo rat studies suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF

  20. Does small intestinal atresia affect epithelial protein expression in human newborns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; Yamanouchi, Takeshi; van Nispen, Danielle J. P. M.; Raatgeep, Rolien H. C.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Tibboel, Dick; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Renes, Ingrid B.

    2006-01-01

    Bowel segments distal to a congenital intestinal obstruction have been suggested to be immature. In other words, luminal components such as amniotic fluid (before birth) and/or enteral nutrition (after birth) may be required to activate intestinal epithelial protein expression, thereby influencing

  1. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  2. Characterization of human, mouse, and rat cultures of enteric glial cells and their effect on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, R; Coquenlorge, S; Cossais, F; Meurette, G; Rolli-Derkinderen, M; Neunlist, M

    2013-11-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) are major regulators of neuronal and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) functions. Simple isolation methods of EGC, especially human tissues, remain scarce and limit their study. We present herein a method to isolate EGC and we characterize EGC phenotype and their functional impact on IEC. Longitudinal muscle and myenteric plexus preparations of rat, mouse, or human intestine were obtained by microdissection. After mechanical and enzymatic dissociation, individual ganglionic or interganglionic structures were seeded into plates, maintained in culture several weeks and passaged up to 4 times. Purity of cultures was assessed by immunocytochemistry using antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β and Sox10 or smooth muscle actin. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on intracellular Ca²⁺ signaling in EGC were studied. Co-cultures of EGC with IEC line, Caco-2, were performed for 2-6 days to analyze their impact on monolayer resistance, cell proliferation, and cell spreading. More than 80% of DAPI-positive cells were GFAP, S100β, and Sox10-immunoreactive. EGC expressed these glial markers over 4 consecutive passages, and the majority of them responded to ATP by an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. In addition, rat, mouse, and human EGC increased intestinal barrier resistance, IEC size, and reduced IEC number. We have developed a simple method to isolate and culture human, rat, or mouse EGC. EGC exhibit similar functional properties on the intestinal barrier independently of the species. This study sets the basis for exploring glial biology and functions in human health and diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. In vitro extraction and fermentation of polyphenols from grape seeds (Vitis vinifera) by human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jun; Ding, Yu; Pan, Zhouqiang; Zhao, Ya; Zhang, Renkang; Hu, Bing; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2016-04-01

    The effects of several parameters on the extraction yield of total polyphenols from grape seeds by pressurized liquid extraction were investigated. The highest recovery of total polyphenols occurred at 80 °C within 5 min, and a single extraction allowed a recovery of more than 97% of total polyphenols. Following the purification with macroporous resin, the effects of grape polyphenols (>94.8%) on human intestinal microbiota were monitored over 36 h incubation by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured by HPLC. The result showed that the grape polyphenols promoted the changes in the relevant microbial populations and shifted the profiles of SCFAs. Fermentation of grape polyphenols resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus-Enterococcus group and inhibition in the growth of the Clostridium histolyticum group and the Bacteroides-Prevotella group, with no significant effect on the population of total bacteria. The findings suggest that grape polyphenols have potential prebiotic effects on modulating the gut microbiota composition and generating SCFAs that contribute to the improvements of host health.

  4. Assessment of the prebiotic effect of quinoa and amaranth in the human intestinal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Beatriz; Gullón, Patricia; Tavaria, Freni K; Yáñez, Remedios

    2016-09-14

    Quinoa and amaranth belong to the group of the so called "superfoods" and have a nutritional composition that confers multiple benefits. In this work, we explored the possibility of these foods exhibiting a prebiotic effect. These pseudocereals were subjected to an in vitro digestion and used as carbon sources in batch cultures with faecal human inocula. The effects on the microbiota composition and their metabolic products were determined by assessment of variations in pH, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and changes in the dynamic bacterial populations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 48 h of incubation, the total SCFAs were 106.5 mM for quinoa and 108.83 mM for amaranth, in line with the decrease in pH. Considerable differences (p < 0.05) were found in certain microbial groups, including Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus-Enterococcus, Atopobium, Bacteroides-Prevotella, Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia intestinalis. Our research suggests that these pseudocereals can have the prebiotic potential and that their intake may improve dysbiosis or maintain the gastrointestinal health through a balanced intestinal microbiota, although additional studies are necessary.

  5. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, F.; Cerniglia, C.E. [Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Intestinal parasitic infections and eosinophilia in an human immunedeficiency virus positive population in Honduras

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    Rina G Kaminsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, their regional distribution and their relations to eosinophilia were studied in 133 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals from Honduras. After signing an informed consent, participants answered a socio-demographic and risk factor questionnaire, a complete physical examination, medical history, and a series of laboratory tests. All participants were HIV positive but not acquired immunodeficiency syndrome positive. Of them, 67% were co-infected with pathogen and non pathogen parasites. Overall occurrence of nematodes was: 44.3% for Trichuris trichiura, 24% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for Hookworm and 7.5% for Strongyloides stercoralis. No cases of Giardia lamblia, acute amebiasis or cryptosporidiasis were diagnosed. Mean eosinophil percents for participants were consistently and significantly higher in infected than in non infected individuals: 22% for Hookworm vs 7.2% (p < 0.001, 11% for Trichuris compared to 5.2% (p < 0.001, 13.2% compared to 7.5% for S. stercoralis (p < 0.05, and 12% compared to 6% for Ascaris cases (p < 0.05. Helminths and non pathogenic protozoa, as single or mixed infections, occurred among the participants. There was a strong correlation between eosinophilia and helminthiasis infections; however, none was identified between CD4 levels and eosinophilia. Because parasitic infections aggravate malnutrition and promote a disbalanced Th2 response in a potentially immuno-compromised host, their effect on HIV disease progression needs further study, mainly in countries were HIV and parasitic infections are highly prevalent.

  7. Transport of Antihypertensive Peptide RVPSL, Ovotransferrin 328-332, in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Long; Wang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transepithelial transport of RVPSL (Arg-Val-Pro-Ser-Leu), an egg-white-derived peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive activity, in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results revealed that RVPSL could be passively transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers. However, during the process of transport, 36.31% ± 1.22% of the initial RVPSL added to the apical side was degraded, but this degradation decreased to 23.49% ± 0.68% when the Caco-2 cell monolayers were preincubated with diprotin A (P transport from the apical side to the basolateral side was investigated, the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) was (6.97 ± 1.11) × 10(-6) cm/s. The transport route of RVPSL appears to be the paracellular pathway via tight junctions, as only cytochalasin D, a disruptor of tight junctions (TJs), significantly increased the transport rate (P transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers was studied by mutation of RVPSL. It was found that N-terminal Pro residues were more beneficial for transport of pentapeptides across Caco-2 cell monolayers than Arg and Val. Furthermore, RVPSL could be more easily transported as smaller peptides, especially in the form of dipeptides and tripeptides.

  8. Understanding the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steg, Linda; Perlaviciute, Goda; van der Werff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change threatens the health, economic prospects, and basic food and water sources of people. A wide range of changes in household energy behavior is needed to realize a sustainable energy transition. We propose a general framework to understand and encourage sustainable energy behaviors, comprising four key issues. First, we need to identify which behaviors need to be changed. A sustainable energy transition involves changes in a wide range of energy behaviors, including the adoption of sustainable energy sources and energy-efficient technology, investments in energy efficiency measures in buildings, and changes in direct and indirect energy use behavior. Second, we need to understand which factors underlie these different types of sustainable energy behaviors. We discuss three main factors that influence sustainable energy behaviors: knowledge, motivations, and contextual factors. Third, we need to test the effects of interventions aimed to promote sustainable energy behaviors. Interventions can be aimed at changing the actual costs and benefits of behavior, or at changing people's perceptions and evaluations of different costs and benefits of behavioral options. Fourth, it is important to understand which factors affect the acceptability of energy policies and energy systems changes. We discuss important findings from psychological studies on these four topics, and propose a research agenda to further explore these topics. We emphasize the need of an integrated approach in studying the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition that increases our understanding of which general factors affect a wide range of energy behaviors as well as the acceptability of different energy policies and energy system changes.

  9. Transcriptome-wide Analysis Reveals Hallmarks of Human Intestine Development and Maturation In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Finkbeiner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal organoids (HIOs are a tissue culture model in which small intestine-like tissue is generated from pluripotent stem cells. By carrying out unsupervised hierarchical clustering of RNA-sequencing data, we demonstrate that HIOs most closely resemble human fetal intestine. We observed that genes involved in digestive tract development are enriched in both fetal intestine and HIOs compared to adult tissue, whereas genes related to digestive function and Paneth cell host defense are expressed at higher levels in adult intestine. Our study also revealed that the intestinal stem cell marker OLFM4 is expressed at very low levels in fetal intestine and in HIOs, but is robust in adult crypts. We validated our findings using in vivo transplantation to show that HIOs become more adult-like after transplantation. Our study emphasizes important maturation events that occur in the intestine during human development and demonstrates that HIOs can be used to model fetal-to-adult maturation.

  10. Evaluation of an FDA approved library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Jennifer; Panic, Gordana; Adelfio, Roberto; Cowan, Noemi; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Treatment options for infections with soil-transmitted helminths (STH) - Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and the two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus - are limited despite their considerable global health burden. The aim of the present study was to test the activity of an openly available FDA library against laboratory models of human intestinal nematode infections. All 1,600 drugs were first screened against Ancylostoma ceylanicum third-stage larvae (L3). Active compounds were scrutinized and toxic compounds, drugs indicated solely for topical use, and already well-studied anthelmintics were excluded. The remaining hit compounds were tested in parallel against Trichuris muris first-stage larvae (L1), Heligmosomoides polygyrus third-stage larvae (L3), and adult stages of the three species in vitro. In vivo studies were performed in the H. polygyrus and T. muris mice models. Fifty-four of the 1,600 compounds tested revealed an activity of > 60 % against A. ceylanicum L3 (hit rate of 3.4 %), following incubation at 200 μM for 72 h. Twelve compounds progressed into further screens. Adult A. ceylanicum were the least affected (1/12 compounds active at 50 μM), while eight of the 12 test compounds revealed activity against T. muris L1 (100 μM) and adults (50 μM), and H. polygyrus L3 (200 μM). Trichlorfon was the only compound active against all stages of A. ceylanicum, H. polygyrus and T. muris. In addition, trichlorfon achieved high worm burden reductions of 80.1 and 98.9 %, following a single oral dose of 200 mg/kg in the T. muris and H. polygyrus mouse model, respectively. Drug screening on the larval stages of intestinal parasitic nematodes is feasible using small libraries and important given the empty drug discovery and development pipeline for STH infections. Differences and commonalities in drug activities across the different STH species and stages were confirmed. Hits identified might serve as a

  11. Factors Affecting the Bioaccessibility and Intestinal Transport of Difenoconazole, Hexaconazole, and Spirodiclofen in Human Caco-2 Cells Following in Vitro Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Xiao, Jin-Jing; Feng, Rong-Peng; Liu, Yu-Ying; Liao, Min; Wu, Xiang-Wei; Hua, Ri-Mao; Cao, Hai-Qun

    2017-10-18

    This study examined how gastrointestinal conditions affect pesticide bioaccessibility and intestinal transepithelial transport of pesticides (difenoconazole, hexaconazole, and spirodiclofen) in humans. We used an in vitro model combining human gastric and intestinal digestion, followed with Caco-2 cell model for human intestinal absorption. Bioaccessibility of three tested pesticides ranged from 25.2 to 76.3% and 10.6 to 79.63% in the gastric and intestinal phases, respectively. A marked trend similar to the normal distribution was observed between bioaccessibility and pH, with highest values observed at pH 2.12 in gastric juice. No significant differences were observed with increasing digestion time; however, a significant negative correlation was observed with the solid-liquid (S/L) ratio, following a logarithmic equation. R 2 ranged from 0.9198 to 0.9848 and 0.9526 to 0.9951 in the simulated gastric and intestinal juices, respectively, suggesting that the S/L ratio is also a major factor affecting bioaccessibility. Moreover, significant dose- and time-response effects were subsequently observed for intestinal membrane permeability of difenoconazole, but not for hexaconazole or spirodiclofen. This is the first study to demonstrate the uptake of pesticides by human intestinal cells, aiding quantification of the likely effects on human health and highlighting the importance of considering bioaccessibility in studies of dietary exposure to pesticide residues.

  12. Improvement in Human Immune Function with Changes in Intestinal Microbiota by Salacia reticulata Extract Ingestion: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriko Oda

    Full Text Available Plants belonging to the genus Salacia in the Hippocrateaceae family are known to inhibit sugar absorption. In a previous study, administration of Salacia reticulata extract in rats altered the intestinal microbiota and increased expression of immune-relevant genes in small intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to investigate the effect of S. reticulata extract in human subjects by examining the gene expression profiles of blood cells, immunological indices, and intestinal microbiota. The results revealed an improvement in T-cell proliferation activity and some other immunological indices. In addition, the intestinal microbiota changed, with an increase in Bifidobacterium and a decrease in Clostridium bacteria. The expression levels of many immune-relevant genes were altered in blood cells. We concluded that S. reticulata extract ingestion in humans improved immune functions and changed the intestinal microbiota.UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000011732.

  13. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Froukje J; Fuentes, Susana; de Jonge, Charlotte; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Erbil, Runi; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; de Vos, Willem M; Rensen, Sander S

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. Fecal microbiota composition of 28 subjects (BMI 18.6-60.3 kg m(-2) ) was analyzed by a phylogenetic profiling microarray. Fecal calprotectin and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined to evaluate intestinal and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HbA1c , and plasma levels of transaminases and lipids were analyzed. Gastroduodenal, small intestinal, and colonic permeability were assessed by a multisaccharide test. Based on microbiota composition, the study population segregated into two clusters with predominantly obese (15/19) or exclusively nonobese (9/9) subjects. Whereas intestinal permeability did not differ between clusters, the obese cluster showed reduced bacterial diversity, a decreased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, and an increased abundance of potential proinflammatory Proteobacteria. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin was only detectable in subjects within the obese microbiota cluster (n = 8/19, P = 0.02). Plasma C-reactive protein was also increased in these subjects (P = 0.0005), and correlated with the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (rs = -0.41, P = 0.03). Intestinal microbiota alterations in obese subjects are associated with local and systemic inflammation, suggesting that the obesity-related microbiota composition has a proinflammatory effect. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  14. Prevalence of Campylobacter species in adult Crohn's disease and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine.

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    Vikneswari Mahendran

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. A high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus was previously detected in paediatric CD and adult UC. Currently, the prevalence of C. concisus in adult CD and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine are unknown. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter species in biopsies collected from multiple anatomic sites of adult patients with IBD and controls. METHODS: Three hundred and one biopsies collected from ileum, caecum, descending colon and rectum of 28 patients IBD (15 CD and 13 UC and 33 controls were studied. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and detection of Campylobacter species by PCR-sequencing and Campylobacter cultivation. RESULTS: A significantly higher prevalence of C. concisus in colonic biopsies of patients with CD (53% was detected as compared with the controls (18%. Campylobacter genus-PCR positivity and C. concisus positivity in patients with UC were 85% and 77% respectively, being significantly higher than that in the controls (48% and 36%. C. concisus was more often detected in descending colonic and rectal biopsies from patients with IBD in comparison to the controls. C. concisus was isolated from patients with IBD. CONCLUSION: The high intestinal prevalence of C. concisus in patients with IBD, particularly in the proximal large intestine, suggests that future studies are needed to investigate the possible involvement of C. concisus in a subgroup of human IBD. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the association between adult CD and C. concisus as well as the first study of the preferential colonization sites of C. concisus in the human intestine.

  15. Prevalence of Campylobacter Species in Adult Crohn's Disease and the Preferential Colonization Sites of Campylobacter Species in the Human Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Vikneswari; Riordan, Stephen M.; Grimm, Michael C.; Tran, Thi Anh Tuyet; Major, Joelene; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Mitchell, Hazel; Zhang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus was previously detected in paediatric CD and adult UC. Currently, the prevalence of C. concisus in adult CD and the preferential colonization sites of Campylobacter species in the human intestine are unknown. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter species in biopsies collected from multiple anatomic sites of adult patients with IBD and controls. Methods Three hundred and one biopsies collected from ileum, caecum, descending colon and rectum of 28 patients IBD (15 CD and 13 UC) and 33 controls were studied. Biopsies were used for DNA extraction and detection of Campylobacter species by PCR-sequencing and Campylobacter cultivation. Results A significantly higher prevalence of C. concisus in colonic biopsies of patients with CD (53%) was detected as compared with the controls (18%). Campylobacter genus-PCR positivity and C. concisus positivity in patients with UC were 85% and 77% respectively, being significantly higher than that in the controls (48% and 36%). C. concisus was more often detected in descending colonic and rectal biopsies from patients with IBD in comparison to the controls. C. concisus was isolated from patients with IBD. Conclusion The high intestinal prevalence of C. concisus in patients with IBD, particularly in the proximal large intestine, suggests that future studies are needed to investigate the possible involvement of C. concisus in a subgroup of human IBD. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the association between adult CD and C. concisus as well as the first study of the preferential colonization sites of C. concisus in the human intestine. PMID:21966525

  16. Rapid conversion of the ester prodrug abiraterone acetate results in intestinal supersaturation and enhanced absorption of abiraterone: in vitro, rat in situ and human in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappaerts, Jef; Geboers, Sophie; Snoeys, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intestinal disposition of abiraterone acetate, an ester prodrug of the anticancer agent abiraterone. Stability of the prodrug and solubility and dissolution characteristics of both abiraterone and abiraterone acetate were monitored in vitro. Moreover, the in vivo intraluminal concentrations of abiraterone and abiraterone acetate upon intake of one tablet of 250 mg abiraterone acetate were assessed in healthy volunteers. The intestinal absorption resulting from the intraluminal behavior of the ester prodrug was determined using the rat in situ intestinal perfusion technique with mesenteric blood sampling. Simulated and aspirated human intestinal fluids of the fasted state were used as solvent systems. Upon incubation of abiraterone acetate in human intestinal fluids in vitro, rapid hydrolysis of the prodrug was observed, generating abiraterone concentrations largely exceeding the apparent solubility of abiraterone, suggesting the existence of intestinal supersaturation. These findings were confirmed in vivo, by intraluminal sampling of duodenal fluids upon oral intake of an abiraterone acetate tablet by healthy volunteers. Rat in situ intestinal perfusion experiments performed with suspensions of abiraterone and abiraterone acetate in human intestinal fluids of the fasted state revealed significantly higher flux values upon perfusion with the prodrug than with abiraterone. Moreover, rat in situ intestinal perfusion with abiraterone acetate suspensions in simulated fluids of the fasted state in presence or absence of esterases demonstrated that increased hydrolytic activity of the perfusion medium was beneficial to the intestinal absorption of abiraterone. In conclusion, the rapid hydrolysis of abiraterone acetate in the intraluminal environment appears to result in fast and extensive generation of abiraterone supersaturation, creating a strong driving force for abiraterone absorption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  17. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

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    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  18. Ecological Effect of Ceftaroline-Avibactam on the Normal Human Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Söderberg-Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2015-08-01

    Ceftaroline-avibactam is a new combination of the antibiotic ceftaroline with a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor, avibactam. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of ceftaroline-avibactam on the human intestinal microbiota. Fourteen healthy volunteers received ceftaroline-avibactam (600 mg ceftaroline fosamil and 600 mg avibactam) intravenously over 2 h every 8 h on days 1 to 6 and as a single dose on day 7. Fecal samples were collected on day -1 (within 24 h of the first infusion on day 1) and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21. Escherichia coli numbers decreased during the study and normalized on day 21. An increased number of Klebsiella bacteria appeared on day 14 and normalized on day 21. The number of other enterobacteria decreased during the study, and the number of enterococci decreased from days 2 to 7 and normalized on day 9. Candida numbers increased from days 5 to 9 and normalized after day 14. The number of lactobacilli decreased during the study and recovered on day 14. The number of bifidobacteria decreased on day 2 and normalized on day 21. The number of Bacteroides bacteria was unchanged. Clostridium difficile numbers decreased on days 7 and 9 and increased on days 14 and 21. A toxigenic C. difficile strain was detected in one volunteer on day 21 with no reported adverse events. Plasma samples were collected on days -1, 2, 5, and 7. Ceftaroline and avibactam concentrations were 0 to 34.5 mg/liter and 0 to 61.6 mg/liter, respectively, in plasma and 0 to 35.4 mg/kg and 0 to 98.5 mg/kg, respectively, in feces. (This study is registered in the European Clinical Trials Database [https://eudract.ema.europa.eu/] under number EudraCT 2012 004921-25.). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Proteomic responses of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to silver nanoparticles and ionic silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberemm, Axel; Hansen, Ulf; Böhmert, Linda; Meckert, Christine; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    Even although quite a number of studies have been performed so far to demonstrate nanoparticle-specific effects of substances in living systems, clear evidence of these effects is still under debate. The present study was designed as a comparative proteomic analysis of human intestinal cells exposed to a commercial silver nanoparticle reference material and ions from AgNO3. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MALDI mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was conducted after 24-h incubation of differentiated Caco-2 cells with non-cytotoxic and low cytotoxic silver concentrations (2.5 and 25 µg ml(-1) nanosilver, 0.5 and 5 µg ml(-1) AgNO3). Out of an overall number of 316 protein spots differentially expressed at a fold change of ≥ 1.4 or ≤ -1.4 in all treatments, 169 proteins could be identified. In total, 231 spots were specifically deregulated in particle-treated groups compared with 41 spots, which were limited to AgNO3-treatments. Forty-four spots (14 %) were commonly deregulated by both types of treatment. A considerable fraction of the proteins differentially expressed after treatment with nanoparticles is related to protein folding, synthesis or modification of proteins as well as cellular assembly and organization. Overlays of networks obtained for particulate and ionic treatments showed matches, indicating common mechanisms of combined particle and ionic silver exposure and exclusive ionic silver treatment. However, proteomic responses of Caco-2 cells treated with higher concentrations of silver species also showed some differences, for example regarding proteins related to fatty acid and energy metabolism, suggesting an induction of also some different molecular mechanisms for particle exposure and ionic treatment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Genotoxic effects of camphorquinone and DMT on human oral and intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Miriam; Rimkus, Julia; Leyhausen, Gabriele; Volk, Joachim; Geurtsen, Werner

    2015-10-01

    Released components of oral biomaterials can leach into the oral cavity and may subsequently reach the gastrointestinal tract. Camphorquinone (CQ) is the most common used photoinitiator in resinous restorative materials and is often combined with the co-initiator N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMT). It has been shown that CQ exerts cytotoxic effects, at least partially due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objective of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of CQ in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT2) and immortalized epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Furthermore, the effects of visible-light irradiation and the co-initiator DMT were investigated as well as the generation of ROS, the potential protective effect of glutathione (GSH) and a recovery period of CQ-treated Caco-2 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to determine DNA damage. Additionally, an enzyme modified comet assay was applied, which detects 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoguanine), a reliable marker for oxidative stress. Our data revealed that high concentrations of CQ induced DNA lesions in OKF6/TERT2 cells. This DNA damage is at least partly caused by the generation of 8-oxoguanine. In addition, CQ and DMT increased ROS formation and induced DNA damage in Caco-2 cells. CQ-treatment resulted in generation of 8-oxoguanine. The antioxidant GSH efficiently prevented CQ-associated DNA damage. Furthermore, a recovery following CQ-treatment significantly reduced DNA damage. We conclude that CQ-induced DNA damage is caused by oxidative stress in oral and intestinal cells. These lesions can be prevented and possibly repaired by GSH-treatment and recovery of cells after the photoinitiator is removed from cultures. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of enterodiol from defatted flaxseeds through biotransformation by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Ma, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Dong-Hui; Guo, Zhi-Rong; Liu, Gui-Rong; Zhao, Ge-Xin; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Ma, Miao; Cai, Shao-Qing; Ku, Bao-Shan; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2010-04-16

    The effects of enterolignans, e.g., enterodiol (END) and particularly its oxidation product, enterolactone (ENL), on prevention of hormone-dependent diseases, such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipemia, breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer and menopausal syndrome, have attracted much attention. To date, the main way to obtain END and ENL is chemical synthesis, which is expensive and inevitably leads to environmental pollution. To explore a more economic and eco-friendly production method, we explored biotransformation of enterolignans from precursors contained in defatted flaxseeds by human intestinal bacteria. We cultured fecal specimens from healthy young adults in media containing defatted flaxseeds and detected END from the culture supernatant. Following selection through successive subcultures of the fecal microbiota with defatted flaxseeds as the only carbon source, we obtained a bacterial consortium, designated as END-49, which contained the smallest number of bacterial types still capable of metabolizing defatted flaxseeds to produce END. Based on analysis with pulsed field gel electrophoresis, END-49 was found to consist of five genomically distinct bacterial lineages, designated Group I-V, with Group I strains dominating the culture. None of the individual Group I-V strains produced END, demonstrating that the biotransformation of substrates in defatted flaxseeds into END is a joint work by different members of the END-49 bacterial consortium. Interestingly, Group I strains produced secoisolariciresinol, an important intermediate of END production; 16S rRNA analysis of one Group I strain established its close relatedness with Klebsiella. Genomic analysis is under way to identify all members in END-49 involved in the biotransformation and the actual pathway leading to END-production. Biotransformation is a very economic, efficient and environmentally friendly way of mass-producing enterodiol from defatted flaxseeds.

  2. Production of enterodiol from defatted flaxseeds through biotransformation by human intestinal bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Miao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of enterolignans, e.g., enterodiol (END and particularly its oxidation product, enterolactone (ENL, on prevention of hormone-dependent diseases, such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipemia, breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer and menopausal syndrome, have attracted much attention. To date, the main way to obtain END and ENL is chemical synthesis, which is expensive and inevitably leads to environmental pollution. To explore a more economic and eco-friendly production method, we explored biotransformation of enterolignans from precursors contained in defatted flaxseeds by human intestinal bacteria. Results We cultured fecal specimens from healthy young adults in media containing defatted flaxseeds and detected END from the culture supernatant. Following selection through successive subcultures of the fecal microbiota with defatted flaxseeds as the only carbon source, we obtained a bacterial consortium, designated as END-49, which contained the smallest number of bacterial types still capable of metabolizing defatted flaxseeds to produce END. Based on analysis with pulsed field gel electrophoresis, END-49 was found to consist of five genomically distinct bacterial lineages, designated Group I-V, with Group I strains dominating the culture. None of the individual Group I-V strains produced END, demonstrating that the biotransformation of substrates in defatted flaxseeds into END is a joint work by different members of the END-49 bacterial consortium. Interestingly, Group I strains produced secoisolariciresinol, an important intermediate of END production; 16S rRNA analysis of one Group I strain established its close relatedness with Klebsiella. Genomic analysis is under way to identify all members in END-49 involved in the biotransformation and the actual pathway leading to END-production. Conclusion Biotransformation is a very economic, efficient and environmentally friendly way of mass

  3. Spectroscopic markers of the TR quaternary transition in human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Cammarata, Marco; Levantino, Matteo; Cupane, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    In this work, we use a sol-gel protocol to trap and compare the R and T quaternary states of both the deoxygenated (deoxyHb) and carbonmonoxide (HbCO) derivatives of human hemoglobin. The near infrared optical absorption band III and the infrared CO stretching band are used to detect the effect of quaternary structure on the spectral properties of deoxyHb and HbCO; comparison with myoglobin allows for an assessment of tertiary and quaternary contributions to the measured band shifts. The RT transition is shown to cause a blue shift of the band III by approximately 35 cm(-1) for deoxyHb and a red shift of the CO stretching band by only approximately 0.3 cm(-1) for HbCO. This clearly shows that quaternary structure changes are transmitted to the heme pocket and that effects on deoxyHb are much larger than on HbCO, at least as far as the band energies are concerned. Experiments performed in the ample temperature interval of 300-10K show that the above quaternary structure effects are "static" and do not influence the dynamic properties of the heme pocket, at least as probed by the temperature dependence of band III and of the CO stretching band. The availability of quaternary structure sensitive spectroscopic markers and the quantitative measurement of the quaternary structure contribution to band shifts will be of considerable help in the analysis of flash-photolysis experiments on hemoglobin. Moreover, it will enable one to characterize the dynamic properties of functionally relevant hemoglobin intermediates and to study the kinetics of both the T-->R and R-->T quaternary transitions through time-resolved spectroscopy.

  4. Acetonic Extract from the Feijoa sellowiana Berg. Fruit Exerts Antioxidant Properties and Modulates Disaccharidases Activities in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Fabio; Palumbo, Ilaria; Andreozzi, Paolo; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Ruberto, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Basile, Adriana; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Feijoa sellowiana fruit has been shown to possess various biological activities, such as anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties, in a variety of cellular models, but its activity on human intestinal epithelial cells has never been tested. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the acetonic extract of F. sellowiana fruits on the viability, membrane peroxidation, disaccharidases activities and proliferation of in vitro models of human intestinal epithelial cells. To obtain this goal, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were exposed to the acetonic extract for 24 h. Cell proliferation, viability, lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity and H2 O2 -induced membrane lipid peroxidation were tested. We found that, compared to control conditions, the acetonic extract significantly increased lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity in Caco-2, but not HT-29, cells, decreased proliferation, had no effects on viability and restored lipid peroxidation in both cell models. This study suggests that the acetonic extract improves lactase and sucrase-isomaltase activity, inhibits cell proliferation, have no cytotoxic effects and prevent lipid peroxidation of intestinal epithelial cells. These effects may be exploited in case of disaccharidases deficit and also as an adjuvant treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Demethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome suppresses iNOS induction in an in vitro inflamed human intestinal mucosa model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somchit, Mayura; Changtam, Chatchawan; Kimseng, Rungruedi; Utaipan, Tanyarath; Lertcanawanichakul, Monthon; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Chunglok, Warangkana

    2014-01-01

    It is known that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) plays an integral role during intestinal inflammation, an important factor for colon cancer development. Natural compounds from Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae) have long been a potential source of bioactive materials with various beneficial biological functions. Among them, a major active curcuminoid, demethoxycurcumin (DMC) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages or microglia cells. However, the role of DMC on iNOS expression and NO production in an in vitro inflamed human intestinal mucosa model has not yet been elucidated. This study concerned inhibitory effects on iNOS expression and NO production of DMC in inflamed human intestinal Caco-2 cells. An in vitro model was generated and inhibitory effects on NO production of DMC at 65 μM for 24-96 h were assessed by monitoring nitrite levels. Expression of iNOS mRNA and protein was also investigated. DMC significantly decreased NO secretion by 35-41% in our inflamed cell model. Decrease in NO production by DMC was concomitant with down-regulation of iNOS at mRNA and protein levels compared to proinflammatory cytokine cocktail and LPS-treated controls. Mechanism of action of DMC may be partly due to its potent inhibition of the iNOS pathway. Our findings suggest that DMC may have potential as a therapeutic agent against inflammation-related diseases, especially in the gut.

  6. Anatomical study on The Arm Greater Yang Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Sik, Park

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried to identify the component of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle in human, dividing the regional muscle group into outer, middle, and inner layer. the inner part of body surface were opened widely to demonstrate muscles, nerve, blood vessels and the others, displaying the inner structure of Small Intestine Meridian Muscle. We obtained the results as follows; 1. Small Intestine Meridian Muscle is composed of the muscle, nerve and blood vessels. 2. In human anatomy, it is present the difference between a term of nerve or blood vessels which control the muscle of Meridian Muscle and those which pass near by Meridian Muscle. 3. The inner composition of meridian muscle in human arm is as follows ; 1 Muscle ; Abd. digiti minimi muscle(SI-2, 3, 4, pisometacarpal lig.(SI-4, ext. retinaculum. ext. carpi ulnaris m. tendon.(SI-5, 6, ulnar collateral lig.(SI-5, ext. digiti minimi m. tendon(SI-6, ext. carpi ulnaris(SI-7, triceps brachii(SI-9, teres major(SI-9, deltoid(SI-10, infraspinatus(SI-10, 11, trapezius(Sl-12, 13, 14, 15, supraspinatus(SI-12, 13, lesser rhomboid(SI-14, erector spinae(SI-14, 15, levator scapular(SI-15, sternocleidomastoid(SI-16, 17, splenius capitis(SI-16, semispinalis capitis(SI-16, digasuicus(SI-17, zygomaticus major(Il-18, masseter(SI-18, auriculoris anterior(SI-19 2 Nerve ; Dorsal branch of ulnar nerve(SI-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, br. of mod. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6, 7, br. of post. antebrachial cutaneous n.(SI-6,7, br. of radial n.(SI-7, ulnar n.(SI-8, br. of axillary n.(SI-9, radial n.(SI-9, subscapular n. br.(SI-9, cutaneous n. br. from C7, 8(SI-10, 14, suprascapular n.(SI-10, 11, 12, 13, intercostal n. br. from T2(SI-11, lat. supraclavicular n. br.(SI-12, intercostal n. br. from C8, T1(SI-12, accessory n. br.(SI-12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, intercostal n. br. from T1,2(SI-13, dorsal scapular n.(SI-14, 15, cutaneous n. br. from C6, C7(SI-15, transverse cervical n.(SI-16, lesser occipital n. & great auricular n. from

  7. Suppressive effect of nobiletin and epicatechin gallate on fructose uptake in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsu, Hideo; Awara, Sohei; Unno, Tomonori; Shimizu, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Inhibition of excessive fructose intake in the small intestine could alleviate fructose-induced diseases such as hypertension and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the effect of phytochemicals on fructose uptake using human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells which express the fructose transporter, GLUT5. Among 35 phytochemicals tested, five, including nobiletin and epicatechin gallate (ECg), markedly inhibited fructose uptake. Nobiletin and ECg also inhibited the uptake of glucose but not of L-leucine or Gly-Sar, suggesting an inhibitory effect specific to monosaccharide transporters. Kinetic analysis further suggested that this reduction in fructose uptake was associated with a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface GLUT5 molecules, and not with a change in the affinity of GLUT5 for fructose. Lastly, nobiletin and ECg suppressed the permeation of fructose across Caco-2 cell monolayers. These findings suggest that nobiletin and ECg are good candidates for preventing diseases caused by excessive fructose intake.

  8. Transcriptional response of HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells to human and bovine milk oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan A; O'Callaghan, John; Carrington, Stephen D; Hickey, Rita M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been shown to interact directly with immune cells. However, large quantities of HMO are required for intervention or clinical studies, but these are unavailable in most cases. In this respect, bovine milk is potentially an excellent source of commercially viable analogues of these unique molecules. In the present study, we compared the transcriptional response of colonic epithelial cells (HT-29) to the entire pool of HMO and bovine colostrum oligosaccharides (BCO) to determine whether the oligosaccharides from bovine milk had effects on gene expression that were similar to those of their human counterparts. Gene set enrichment analysis of the transcriptional data revealed that there were a number of similar biological processes that may be influenced by both treatments including a response to stimulus, signalling, locomotion, and multicellular, developmental and immune system processes. For a more detailed insight into the effects of milk oligosaccharides, the effect on the expression of immune system-associated glycogenes was chosen as a case study when performing validation studies. Glycogenes in the current context are genes that are directly or indirectly regulated in the presence of glycans and/or glycoconjugates. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMO and BCO influenced the expression of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8, colony-stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage) (GM-CSF2), IL-17C and platelet factor 4 (PF4)), chemokines (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 6 (CXCL6), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1) and CXCL2) and cell surface receptors (interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2) and IL-10 receptor α (IL10RA)). The present study suggests

  9. [Human infection by intestinal protozoa and helminths in Calbuco County, X Region, Chile, 1997].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, R; Otto, J P; Musleh, M; Pérez, M

    1997-01-01

    By the performance of parasitological examination of one fecal sample per individual, a total of 256 persons from a rural county in the X Region (41 degrees 50 minutes South lat., 73 degrees 05 minutes West long.) were studied. The general rates of infection by intestinal parasite and/or commensal protozoa and helminths found were: Giardia intestinalis 14.1%, Entamoeba histolytica 11.7%, Blastocystis hominis 36.0%, Entamoeba coli 9.8%, Endolimax nana 16.4%, Iodamoeba buetschlii 1.2%, Chilomastix mesnili 0.8%, Ascaris lumbricoides 13.7% and Trichuris trichiura 9.8%. The prevalence rates of intestinal infection led us to conclude that environmental conditions favorable for its transmission remain and show that intestinal parasitoses are still a public health problem in this region, affecting mostly children.

  10. Urban transitions: on urban resilience and human-dominated ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstson, Henrik; van der Leeuw, Sander E; Redman, Charles L; Meffert, Douglas J; Davis, George; Alfsen, Christine; Elmqvist, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Urbanization is a global multidimensional process paired with increasing uncertainty due to climate change, migration of people, and changes in the capacity to sustain ecosystem services. This article lays a foundation for discussing transitions in urban governance, which enable cities to navigate change, build capacity to withstand shocks, and use experimentation and innovation in face of uncertainty. Using the three concrete case cities--New Orleans, Cape Town, and Phoenix--the article analyzes thresholds and cross-scale interactions, and expands the scale at which urban resilience has been discussed by integrating the idea from geography that cities form part of "system of cities" (i.e., they cannot be seen as single entities). Based on this, the article argues that urban governance need to harness social networks of urban innovation to sustain ecosystem services, while nurturing discourses that situate the city as part of regional ecosystems. The article broadens the discussion on urban resilience while challenging resilience theory when addressing human-dominated ecosystems. Practical examples of harnessing urban innovation are presented, paired with an agenda for research and policy.

  11. Effects of prostaglandins E1 and E2 on human, guinea-pig and rat isolated small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A.; Eley, K. G.; Scholes, G. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. Prostaglandins E1 and E2 contracted the longitudinal muscle of human, guinea-pig and rat isolated ileum. 2. The site of action varied with the species. In the rat and in some strips of human tissue prostaglandin appeared to have only a direct action on or in the muscle cells. In the other strips of human tissue and in guinea-pig ileum the prostaglandins seemed to stimulate both the intrinsic cholinergic nerves and the muscle cells. 3. In contrast to the longitudinal muscle, the circular muscle of human, guinea-pig and rat isolated ileum was usually inhibited by prostaglandin, apparently by an action directly on the muscle cells. 4. Prostaglandins may play a part in the control of intestinal motility. PMID:5726791

  12. Metabolism of sinigrin (2-propenyl glucosinolate) by the human colonic microflora in a dynamic in vitro large-intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krul, Cyrille; Humblot, Christèle; Philippe, Catherine; Vermeulen, Martijn; van Nuenen, Marleen; Havenaar, Robert; Rabot, Sylvie

    2002-06-01

    Cruciferous vegetables, such as Brassica, which contain substantial quantities of glucosinolates, have been suggested to possess anticarcinogenic activity. Cutting and chewing of cruciferous vegetables releases the thioglucosidase enzyme myrosinase, which degrades glucosinolates to isothiocyanates and other minor metabolites. Cooking of cruciferous vegetables inactivates the myrosinase enzyme, allowing intact glucosinolates to reach the large intestine, where they can be degraded by the indigenous microflora into isothiocyanates. This local release of isothiocyanates may explain the protective effect of cruciferous vegetables on the colon epithelium. However, little is known about the amounts and identities of glucosinolate metabolites produced by the human microflora. The production of allyl isothiocyanate from sinigrin was investigated in a dynamic in vitro large-intestinal model, after inoculation with a complex microflora of human origin. Sinigrin and allyl isothiocyanate concentrations were analysed in the lumen and dialysis fluid of the model. Peak levels of allyl isothiocyanate were observed between 9 and 12 h after the addition of sinigrin. The model was first set up with a pooled and cultured human microflora, in which 1 and 4% of, respectively, 1 and 15 mM sinigrin, was converted into AITC. However, the conversion rate was remarkably higher if different individual human microflora were used. Between 10% and 30% (mean 19%) of the sinigrin was converted into allyl isothiocyanate. The results of this study suggest that allyl isothiocyanate is converted further into other, yet unknown, metabolites.

  13. Symptoms of Functional Intestinal Disorders Are Common in Patients with Celiac Disease Following Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Graff, Lesley A; Rigaux, Lisa; Bernstein, Charles N; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciarán P; Walker, John R; Duerksen, Donald R

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease and functional intestinal disorders may overlap, yet the natural history of functional symptoms in patients with celiac disease is unknown. To investigate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (FD), and functional bloating (FB) symptoms among patients with celiac disease at diagnosis and during the first year of a gluten-free diet. Adults with a new diagnosis of celiac disease were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year using standardized measures for intestinal symptoms [Rome III diagnostic questionnaire and celiac symptom index (CSI)] and gluten-free diet adherence [gluten-free eating assessment tool (GF-EAT) and celiac diet adherence test]. At diagnosis, two-thirds fulfilled Rome III diagnostic questionnaire symptom criteria for IBS (52%), functional dyspepsia (27%), and/or functional bloating (9%). One year post-diagnosis, there was high adherence to a gluten-free diet as 93% reported gluten exposure less than once per month on the GF-EAT and only 8% had ongoing celiac disease symptoms (CSI score >45). The rates of those meeting IBS (22%) and functional dyspepsia (8%) symptom criteria both decreased significantly on a gluten-free diet. The prevalence of functional symptoms (any of IBS, FD or FB) at 1 year was 47%. Long-term follow-up of patients with celiac disease is necessary because many patients with celiac disease who are adherent to a gluten-free diet have persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

  14. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  15. The Effect of Lactulose on the Composition of the Intestinal Microbiota and Short-chain Fatty Acid Production in Human Volunteers and a Computer-controlled Model of the Proximal Large Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Nuenen, M.H.M.C. van; Heuvel, E.G. van den; Pool, W.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the in vivo effect of lactulose on faecal parameters with the effect in a dynamic, computer-controlled in vitro model of the proximal large intestine (TIM-2). Faecal samples from 10 human volunteers collected before (non-adapted) and after 1 week of

  16. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human endocrine islet cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Moreno-Amador

    Full Text Available β-cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT when expanded in monolayer culture and give rise to highly proliferative mesenchymal cells that retain the potential to re-differentiate into insulin-producing cells.To investigate whether EMT takes place in the endocrine non-β cells of human islets.Human islets isolated from 12 multiorgan donors were dissociated into single cells, purified by magnetic cell sorting, and cultured in monolayer.Co-expression of insulin and the mesenchymal marker vimentin was identified within the first passage (p1 and increased subsequently (insulin+vimentin+ 7.2±6% at p1; 43±15% at p4. The endocrine non-β-cells did also co-express vimentin (glucagon+vimentin+ 59±1.5% and 93±6%, somatostatin+vimentin+ 16±9.4% and 90±10% at p1 and p4 respectively; PP+vimentin+ 74±14% at p1; 88±12% at p2. The percentage of cells expressing only endocrine markers was progressively reduced (0.6±0.2% insulin+, 0.2±0.1% glucagon+, and 0.3±0.2% somatostatin+ cells at p4, and 0.7±0.3% PP+ cells at p2. Changes in gene expression were also indicated of EMT, with reduced expression of endocrine markers and the epithelial marker CDH-1 (p<0.01, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers (CDH-2, SNAI2, ZEB1, ZEB2, VIM, NT5E and ACTA2; p<0.05. Treatment with the EMT inhibitor A83-01 significantly reduced the percentage of co-expressing cells and preserved the expression of endocrine markers.In adult human islets, all four endocrine islet cell types undergo EMT when islet cells are expanded in monolayer conditions. The presence of EMT in all islet endocrine cells could be relevant to design of strategies aiming to re-differentiate the expanded islet cells towards a β-cell phenotype.

  17. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  18. Selenium- and zinc-deficient cardiomyopathy in human intestinal malabsorption: preliminary results of selenium/zinc infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frustaci, Andrea; Sabbioni, Enrico; Fortaner, Salvador; Farina, Massimo; del Torchio, Riccardo; Tafani, Marco; Morgante, Emanuela; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Russo, Matteo A; Chimenti, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    Patients with intestinal malabsorption may develop cardiac dysfunction the origin of which is often unclear. We sought to investigate the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy in human malabsorption. Eighteen patients with intestinal bypass as treatment for severe obesity and cardiomyopathy underwent endomyocardial biopsy. Biopsies were processed by histology, electron microscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for cardiotropic viruses, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) of 33 myocardial trace elements, and assessment of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and LC3-II expression. Histology and electron microscopy showed hypertrophy/degeneration of cardiomyocytes with pronounced cell autophagy and high expression of LC3-II. PCR was negative for viral genomes. INAA showed severe myocardial selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) deficiency and reduced GPX activity vs. both patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and normal controls. Se and Zn were added to antifailing heart therapy in 10 patients (group A1) agreeing to a control biopsy, and the response was compared with that of 8 patients (group A2) on supportive therapy alone. After 6 months, myocardial normalization of Se, Zn, LC3-II, and GPX in group A1 was associated with recovery of cardiomyocyte degeneration and autophagy, and significant improvement in cardiac dimension and function, that remained unchanged in group A2. A reversible Se- and Zn-deficient cardiomyopathy may occur in patients with intestinal malabsorption. It is characterized by decline of myocardial antioxidant reserve, oxidative damage of cell membranes, and enhanced cell autophagy.

  19. Cellular mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of flufenamic acid on chloride secretion in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal Cl− secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory diarrheas including cholera. We recently demonstrated that flufenamic acid (FFA suppressed Vibrio cholerae El Tor variant-induced intestinal fluid secretion via mechanisms involving AMPK activation and NF-κB-suppression. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of FFA on transepithelial Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells. FFA inhibited cAMP-dependent Cl− secretion in T84 cell monolayers with IC50 of ∼8 μM. Other fenamate drugs including tolfenamic acid, meclofenamic acid and mefenamic acid exhibited the same effect albeit with lower potency. FFA also inhibited activities of CFTR, a cAMP-activated apical Cl− channel, and KCNQ1/KCNE3, a cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channel. Mechanisms of CFTR inhibition by FFA did not involve activation of its negative regulators. Interestingly, FFA inhibited Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion with IC50 of ∼10 μM. FFA inhibited activities of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels and KCa3.1, a Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels, but had no effect on activities of Na+–K+–Cl− cotransporters and Na+–K+ ATPases. These results indicate that FFA inhibits both cAMP and Ca2+-dependent Cl− secretion by suppressing activities of both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels. FFA and other fenamate drugs may be useful in the treatment of secretory diarrheas.

  20. CfaE tip mutations in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae define critical human intestinal binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K K; Levine, M M; Morison, J; Phillips, A; Barry, E M

    2009-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) use colonization factors to attach to the human intestinal mucosa, followed by enterotoxin expression that induces net secretion and diarrhoeal illness. ETEC strain H10407 expresses CFA/I fimbriae, which are composed of multiple CfaB structural subunits and a CfaE tip subunit. Currently, the contribution of these individual fimbrial subunits in intestinal binding remains incompletely defined. To identify the role of CfaE in attachment in the native ETEC background, an R181A single-amino-acid substitution was introduced by recombination into the H10407 genome. The substitution of R181A eliminated haemagglutination and binding of intestinal mucosa biopsies in in vitro organ culture assays, without loss of CFA/I fimbriae expression. Wild-type in trans plasmid-expressed cfaE restored the binding phenotype. In contrast, in trans expression of cfaE containing amino acid 181 substitutions with similar amino acids, lysine, methionine and glutamine did not restore the binding phenotype, indicating that the loss of the binding phenotype was due to localized areas of epitope disruption. R181 appears to have an irreplaceable role in the formation of a receptor-binding feature on CFA/I fimbriae. The results specifically indicate that the CfaE tip protein is a required binding factor in CFA/I-mediated ETEC colonization, making it a potentially important vaccine antigen. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse

    2006-01-01

    The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples...... gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with universal 16S rRNA gene primers revealed significant changes in the intestinal microbiota of animals dosed with spores. Vero cell assays and a commercial kit (BCET-RPLA) did not reveal any enterotoxin production from B. cereus F4433/73R in the intestinal tract....

  2. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and peptide histidine methionine. Presence in human follicular fluid and effects on DNA synthesis and steroid secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, S; Ovesen, P; Andersen, A N

    1994-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine methionine (PHM) originate from the same precursor molecule, prepro VIP. In the present study we examined the concentrations of VIP and PHM in human follicular fluid and their effects on cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. Follicular...... fluid and cells were obtained from patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization for tubal infertility. The concentrations of VIP and PHM in pre-ovulatory human follicular fluid were measured radioimmunochemically. Granulosa/lutein cells isolated from follicular fluid were cultured under serum....... We conclude that VIP and PHM are present in human preovulatory follicular fluid and that VIP stimulates DNA synthesis and oestradiol secretion in cultured human granulosa/lutein cells. This indicates that VIP and perhaps PHM participate in the local nervous regulation of human ovarian function....

  3. Ecological Effect of Solithromycin on Normal Human Oropharyngeal and Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Rosenborg, Staffan; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Holm, Johan; Söderberg Löfdal, Karin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-07-01

    Solithromycin is a new fluoroketolide. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of orally administered solithromycin on the human oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota. Thirteen healthy volunteers (median age, 27.3 years) received oral solithromycin at 800 mg on day 1 followed by 400 mg daily on days 2 to 7. Fecal and saliva samples were collected at baseline and on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21 for pharmacokinetic and microbiological analyses. Plasma samples were collected predose on days 2, 5, and 7 as proof of exposure, and solithromycin concentration ranges were 21.9 to 258 ng/ml, 18.0 to 386 ng/ml, and 16.9 to 417 ng/ml, respectively. The solithromycin concentrations in feces were 15.8 to 65.4 mg/kg, 24.5 to 82.7 mg/kg, 21.4 to 82.7 mg/kg, 12.1 to 72.4 mg/kg, 0.2 to 25.6 mg/kg, and 0 to 0.5 mg/kg on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, and 21, respectively. The numbers of enterobacteria and enterococci decreased and were normalized on day 14. The numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria decreased from day 2 to day 14 and were normalized on day 21. The clostridia decreased on days 2, 7, and 14 and were normalized on day 21. No Clostridium difficile strains or toxins were detected during the study period. The number of Bacteroides strains was not significantly changed. The solithromycin concentrations in saliva were 0 to 1.2 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, 0 to 0.5 mg/liter, and 0 to 0.1 mg/liter on days 2, 5, 7, and 9, respectively. The numbers of streptococci decreased on day 2 and were normalized on day 5. The numbers of lactobacilli, prevotellae, fusobacteria, and leptotrichiae decreased from day 2 and were normalized on day 21. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. [Human intestinal parasites in Subsaharan Africa. II. Sao Tomé and Principe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampiglione, S; Visconti, S; Pezzino, G

    1987-04-01

    In 1983 the authors carried out a survey in the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Principe, analysing 1050 specimens of stools collected among the population from apparently healthy subjects chosen at random and in a number proportional to the distribution of the population in the regions of the country (about 1% of the population was examined). The examined subjects were divided into 3 age groups (0-3, 4-12, more than 12 years old), to have homogeneous groups in relation principally to modalities of life and nutritional patterns. There were 488 male subjects and 562 females. The survey was preceded by a sensitization of the people to the problem of intestinal parasites and by two preliminary surveys about the number of existing latrines and about people's believes and attitudes in relation to helmintiasis. The tests were made according to the modified Ritchie technique on fecal specimens preserved with 10% formol solution. The following results were found: a) Protozoa: Entamoeba coli, 43.0%; Iodamoeba buetschlii, 9.0%; Giardia intestinalis, 8.8%; Endolimax nana, 7.0%; E. histolytica, 5.5%; E. hartmanni, 2.5%; Chilomastix mesnili, 2.3%; Trichomonas intestinalis, 0.2%; Balantidium coli, 0.1%. b) Helminths: Trichuris trichiura, 87.7%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 64.3%; Ancylostomatidae, 40.5%; Strongyloides stercoralis, 6.8%; Hymenolepis diminuta, 0.3%; H. nana, 0.2%; Schistosoma haematobium, 0.2%. In 28.2% of the specimens (with more than 50% of subjects in some villages) eggs of Heterophyidae were found, very similar to Metagonimus yokogawai, but not yet identified by us, with the following characteristics: elliptical shape, average size 25 mu (22.2-27.7) X 18.5 mu (17-21), thick wall, operculum difficult to see, not sticking out from the outline but visible by focusing being in a different refractiveness, presence of a small polar knob, colour slightly brownish, asymmetric miracidium. Further investigations are necessary to identify the species of this trematode and

  5. Effect of 4 x 250 mg erythromycin on human gastrointestinal transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberschaer, B; Ewe, K; Alles, U; Schmidtmann, I

    1995-07-01

    The motilin agonist erythromycin affects gastrointestinal motility. We studied its influence on gastric, intestinal, and colonic transit of indigestible solids. Ten healthy volunteers measured the gastrointestinal transit of a 6-8 mm metal sphere by metal detector with oral intake of 250 mg erythromycin q.i.d. or placebo in randomized order. Postprandial gastric emptying of the sphere after a standard meal was measured after a single i.v. dose of 250 mg erythromycin, subsequently followed by determination of small and large bowel transit. Motilin serum levels were measured for one hour. Gastric transit of the sphere was shortened from 243 +/- 34 to 72 +/- 46 min (mean +/- SD) (p = 0.002) and shifted from the interdigestive to the digestive phase. Small and large bowel transit were not influenced, and gastric transit times and motilin serum levels were not correlated. In conclusion, 250 mg erythromycin shortened postprandial gastric emptying of indigestible solids, most likely due to overcoming of pyloric sieving function by strong gastric antral contractions without effecting the transit through the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Evidence that nitric oxide mechanisms regulate small intestinal motility in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, A.; Fraser, R.; Adachi, K.; Horowitz, M.; Boeckxstaens, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-cholinergic non-adrenergic neural mechanisms involving nerves containing NO have been shown to modulate smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal tract, and it has been suggested that release from tonic NO inhibition may be important in the regulation of cyclical fasting small intestinal

  7. Human intestinal P-glycoprotein activity estimated by the model substrate digoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, U L; Hyldahl Olesen, L; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg

    2007-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) plays a part in the intestinal uptake of xenobiotics and has been associated with susceptibility to ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to examine Pgp activity in relation to age, gender, medical treatment (rifampicin or ketoconazole) and the multidrug resistance (MDR...

  8. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  9. Intestinal handling-induced mast cell activation and inflammation in human postoperative ileus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, F. O.; Bennink, R. J.; Ankum, W. M.; Buist, M. R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.; Van der Heide, S.; van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    Background: Murine postoperative ileus results from intestinal inflammation triggered by manipulation-induced mast cell activation. As its extent depends on the degree of handling and subsequent inflammation, it is hypothesised that the faster recovery after minimal invasive surgery results from

  10. Digestion of so-called resistant starch sources in the human small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Hagedoorn, RE; de Graaff, R; Elzinga, H; Tabak, S; Yang, YX; Stellaard, F

    Background: Resistant starch sources, which are only partially digested in the small intestine, can be used to increase colonic availability of short-chain fatty acids. Objective: To study the characteristics of the fermentation of resistant starch, the digestion of resistant starch in the small

  11. Changes of intestinal mucosa in hand-fed rats-model for human coeliac disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozáková, Hana; Štěpánková, Renata; Kolínská, Jiřina; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (1998), s. 336 ISSN 0044-2771. [European Intestinal Transport Group Meeting /15./. Sundvollen, 17.05.1998-21.05.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/96/1256; GA ČR GA311/97/0784; GA MZd IZ3761 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.890, year: 1998

  12. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103 + and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  13. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  14. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. VESGEN Mapping of Bioactive Protection against Intestinal Inflammation: Application to Human Spaceflight and ISS Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Chen, X.; Kelly, C. P.; Reinecker, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Challenges to successful space exploration and colonization include adverse physiological reactions to micro gravity and space radiation factors. Constant remodeling of the microvasculature is critical for tissue preservation, wound healing, and recovery after ischemia. Regulation of the vascular system in the intestine is particularly important to enable nutrient absorption while maintaining barrier function and mucosal defense against micro biota. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular circuits regulating neovascularization, our knowledge of the adaptations of the vascular system to environmental challenges in the intestine remains incomplete. This is in part because of the lack of methods to observe and quantify the complex processes associated with vascular responses in vivo. Developed by GRC as a mature beta version, pre-release research software, VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) maps and quantifies the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching for novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and microvascular remodeling. Here we demonstrate that VESGEN can be used to characterize the dynamic vascular responses to acute intestinal inflammation and mucosal recovery from in vivo confocal microscopic 3D image series. We induced transient intestinal inflammation in mice by DSS treatment and investigated whether the ability of the pro biotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) to protect against intestinal inflammation was due to regulation of vascular remodeling. A primary characteristic of inflammation is excessive neovascularization (angiogenesis) resulting in fragile vessels prone to bleeding. Morphological parameters for triplicate specimens revealed that Sb treatment greatly reduced the inflammatory response of vascular networks by an average of 78%. This resulted from Sb inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling, a major

  16. Raloxifene glucuronidation in liver and intestinal microsomes of humans and monkeys: contribution of UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Naoki; Takasuka, Akane; Kokawa, Yuki; Isobe, Takashi; Taguchi, Maho; Shigeyama, Masato; Murata, Mikio; Suno, Manabu; Hanioka, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    1. Raloxifene is an antiestrogen that has been marketed for the treatment of osteoporosis, and is metabolized into 6- and 4'-glucuronides by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. In this study, the in vitro glucuronidation of raloxifene in humans and monkeys was examined using liver and intestinal microsomes and recombinant UGT enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A9). 2. Although the K(m) and CL(int) values for the 6-glucuronidation of liver and intestinal microsomes were similar between humans and monkeys, and species differences in Vmax values (liver microsomes, humans > monkeys; intestinal microsomes, humans monkeys) were observed, no significant differences were noted in the K(m) or S50, Vmax and CL(int) or CLmax values for the 4'-glucuronidation of liver and intestinal microsomes between humans and monkeys. 3. The activities of 6-glucuronidation in recombinant UGT enzymes were UGT1A1 > UGT1A8 >UGT1A9 for humans, and UGT1A8 > UGT1A1 > UGT1A9 for monkeys. The activities of 4'-glucuronidation were UGT1A8 > UGT1A1 > UGT1A9 in humans and monkeys. 4. These results demonstrated that the profiles for the hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene by microsomes were moderately different between humans and monkeys.

  17. Epidermal growth factor inhibits glycylsarcosine transport and hPepT1 expression in a human intestinal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Amstrup, J; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal cell line Caco-2 was used as a model system to study the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on peptide transport. EGF decreased apical-to-basolateral fluxes of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine ([(14)C]Gly-Sar) up to 50.2 +/- 3.6% (n = 6) of control values. Kinetic analysis......) in cells treated with EGF. Western blotting indicated a decrease in hPepT1 protein in cell lysates. We conclude that EGF treatment decreases Gly-Sar transport in Caco-2 cells by decreasing the number of peptide transporter molecules in the apical membrane....

  18. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33......, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide...

  19. Ascaris Suum Infection Downregulates Inflammatory Pathways in the Pig Intestine In Vivo and in Human Dendritic Cells In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, Helene L. E.; Acevedo, Nathalie; Skallerup, Per

    2018-01-01

    Ascaris suum is a helminth parasite of pigs closely related to its human counterpart, A. lumbricoides, which infects almost 1 billion people. Ascaris is thought to modulate host immune and inflammatory responses, which may drive immune hyporesponsiveness during chronic infections. Using...... data provide an insight into mucosal immune modulation during Ascaris infection, and show that A. suum profoundly suppresses immune and inflammatory pathways...... transcriptomic analysis, we show here that pigs with a chronic A. suum infection have a substantial suppression of inflammatory pathways in the intestinal mucosa, with a broad downregulation of genes encoding cytokines and antigen-processing and costimulatory molecules. A. suum body fluid (ABF) suppressed...

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the human Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 by serotonin in intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Md Ruhul; Ghannad, Leda; Othman, Ahmad; Gill, Ravinder K.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Malakooti, Jaleh

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) decreases NHE2 and NHE3 activities under acute conditions in human intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we have investigated the effects of 5-HT on expression of the human NHE3 gene and the mechanisms underlying its transcriptional regulation in differentiated C2BBe1 cells. Treatment of the human intestinal epithelial cell line, C2BBe1, with 5-HT (20 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NHE3 mRNA and protein expression. In transient transfection studies, 5-HT repressed the NHE3 promoter activity by ∼55%. The repression of the NHE3 promoter activity in response to 5-HT was accompanied by reduced DNA-binding activity of transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3 to the NHE3 promoter without alteration in their nuclear levels. Pharmacological inhibitors of protein kinase C reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-HT on the promoter activity. Our data indicate that 5-HT suppresses the transcriptional activity of the NHE3 promoter and this effect may be mediated by PKCα and modulation of DNA-binding affinities of Sp1 and Sp3.

  1. Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides modulate intestinal microbiota and metabolic parameters of humanized gnotobiotic diet induced obesity mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Respondek

    Full Text Available Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS. Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia.

  2. Alterations in human milk leptin and insulin are associated with early changes in the infant intestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemas, Dominick J; Young, Bridget E; Baker, Peter R; Tomczik, Angela C; Soderborg, Taylor K; Hernandez, Teri L; de la Houssaye, Becky A; Robertson, Charles E; Rudolph, Michael C; Ir, Diana; Patinkin, Zachary W; Krebs, Nancy F; Santorico, Stephanie A; Weir, Tiffany; Barbour, Linda A; Frank, Daniel N; Friedman, Jacob E

    2016-05-01

    Increased maternal body mass index (BMI) is a robust risk factor for later pediatric obesity. Accumulating evidence suggests that human milk (HM) may attenuate the transfer of obesity from mother to offspring, potentially through its effects on early development of the infant microbiome. Our objective was to identify early differences in intestinal microbiota in a cohort of breastfeeding infants born to obese compared with normal-weight (NW) mothers. We also investigated relations between HM hormones (leptin and insulin) and both the taxonomic and functional potentials of the infant microbiome. Clinical data and infant stool and fasting HM samples were collected from 18 NW [prepregnancy BMI (in kg/m(2)) 30.0) mothers and their exclusively breastfed infants at 2 wk postpartum. Infant body composition at 2 wk was determined by air-displacement plethysmography. Infant gastrointestinal microbes were estimated by using 16S amplicon and whole-genome sequencing. HM insulin and leptin were determined by ELISA; short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured in stool samples by using gas chromatography. Power was set at 80%. Infants born to obese mothers were exposed to 2-fold higher HM insulin and leptin concentrations (P < 0.01) and showed a significant reduction in the early pioneering bacteria Gammaproteobacteria (P = 0.03) and exhibited a trend for elevated total SCFA content (P < 0.06). Independent of maternal prepregnancy BMI, HM insulin was positively associated with both microbial taxonomic diversity (P = 0.03) and Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae; P = 0.04) and was negatively associated with Lactobacillales (e.g., Streptococcaceae; P = 0.05). Metagenomic analysis showed that HM leptin and insulin were associated with decreased bacterial proteases, which are implicated in intestinal permeability, and reduced concentrations of pyruvate kinase, a biomarker of pediatric gastrointestinal inflammation. Our results indicate that, although maternal obesity may

  3. Alterations in human milk leptin and insulin are associated with early changes in the infant intestinal microbiome12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemas, Dominick J; Young, Bridget E; Baker, Peter R; Tomczik, Angela C; Soderborg, Taylor K; Hernandez, Teri L; de la Houssaye, Becky A; Robertson, Charles E; Rudolph, Michael C; Ir, Diana; Patinkin, Zachary W; Krebs, Nancy F; Santorico, Stephanie A; Weir, Tiffany; Barbour, Linda A; Frank, Daniel N; Friedman, Jacob E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased maternal body mass index (BMI) is a robust risk factor for later pediatric obesity. Accumulating evidence suggests that human milk (HM) may attenuate the transfer of obesity from mother to offspring, potentially through its effects on early development of the infant microbiome. Objectives: Our objective was to identify early differences in intestinal microbiota in a cohort of breastfeeding infants born to obese compared with normal-weight (NW) mothers. We also investigated relations between HM hormones (leptin and insulin) and both the taxonomic and functional potentials of the infant microbiome. Design: Clinical data and infant stool and fasting HM samples were collected from 18 NW [prepregnancy BMI (in kg/m2) 30.0) mothers and their exclusively breastfed infants at 2 wk postpartum. Infant body composition at 2 wk was determined by air-displacement plethysmography. Infant gastrointestinal microbes were estimated by using 16S amplicon and whole-genome sequencing. HM insulin and leptin were determined by ELISA; short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were measured in stool samples by using gas chromatography. Power was set at 80%. Results: Infants born to obese mothers were exposed to 2-fold higher HM insulin and leptin concentrations (P < 0.01) and showed a significant reduction in the early pioneering bacteria Gammaproteobacteria (P = 0.03) and exhibited a trend for elevated total SCFA content (P < 0.06). Independent of maternal prepregnancy BMI, HM insulin was positively associated with both microbial taxonomic diversity (P = 0.03) and Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae; P = 0.04) and was negatively associated with Lactobacillales (e.g., Streptococcaceae; P = 0.05). Metagenomic analysis showed that HM leptin and insulin were associated with decreased bacterial proteases, which are implicated in intestinal permeability, and reduced concentrations of pyruvate kinase, a biomarker of pediatric gastrointestinal inflammation. Conclusion: Our

  4. Crosstalk between Entamoeba histolytica and the human intestinal tract during amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruyère, Elisabeth; Thibeaux, Roman; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guillén, Nancy

    2017-12-07

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the microbial agent of amoebiasis - an infection that is endemic worldwide and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. As the disease develops, virulent E. histolytica deplete the mucus layer, interact with the intestinal epithelium, and then degrade the colonic mucosa and disrupt the extracellular matrix (ECM). Our research demonstrated that virulent parasites with an invasive phenotype display rapid, highly specific changes in their transcriptome (notably for essential factors involved in carbohydrate metabolism and the processing of glycosylated residues). Moreover, combined activation of parasite and host lytic enzymes leads to the destruction of the intestinal parenchyma. Together, these enzymes degrade the mucus layer and the ECM, and trigger the inflammatory response essential to the development of amoebiasis.

  5. FOXA2 regulates a network of genes involved in critical functions of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosalia, Nehal; Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box A (FOXA) family of pioneer transcription factors is critical for the development of many endoderm-derived tissues. Their importance in regulating biological processes in the lung and liver is extensively characterized, though much less is known about their role in intestine. Here we investigate the contribution of FOXA2 to coordinating intestinal epithelial cell function using postconfluent Caco2 cells, differentiated into an enterocyte-like model. FOXA2 binding sites genome-wide were determined by ChIP-seq and direct targets of the factor were validated by ChIP-qPCR and siRNA-mediated depletion of FOXA1/2 followed by RT-qPCR. Peaks of FOXA2 occupancy were frequent at loci contributing to gene ontology pathways of regulation of cell migration, cell motion, and plasma membrane function. Depletion of both FOXA1 and FOXA2 led to a significant reduction in the expression of multiple transmembrane proteins including ion channels and transporters, which form a network that is essential for maintaining normal ion and solute transport. One of the targets was the adenosine A2B receptor, and reduced receptor mRNA levels were associated with a functional decrease in intracellular cyclic AMP. We also observed that 30% of FOXA2 binding sites contained a GATA motif and that FOXA1/A2 depletion reduced GATA-4, but not GATA-6 protein levels. These data show that FOXA2 plays a pivotal role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function. Moreover, that the FOXA and GATA families of transcription factors may work cooperatively to regulate gene expression genome-wide in the intestinal epithelium. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Changes of E-cadherin and á-catenin in human and mouse intestinal tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šloncová, Eva; Frič, P.; Kučerová, Dana; Lojda, Z.; Tuháčková, Zdena; Sovová, Vlasta

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2001), s. 13-17 ISSN 0018-2214 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV312/96/K205; GA ČR GA301/00/0269; GA MZd IZ4217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : E-cadherin * beta-catenin * intestinal tumours Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.169, year: 2001

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Nasrin; Razmjou, Elham; Hashemi-Hafshejani, Saeideh; Motevalian, Abbas; Akhlaghi, Lameh; Meamar, Ahmad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods. The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3-38). Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7-33.0). The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli , Giardia intestinalis , Dientamoeba fragilis , Iodamoeba butschlii , Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite , Chilomastix mesnilii , and Enterobius vermicularis . Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii . E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections. This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population.

  8. Polarity of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in a human intestinal cell line (CACO-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotter, P.J.; Storch, J. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Free fatty acids (ffa) can enter the intestinal cell via the apical (AP) or basolateral (BL) membrane. The authors are using the Caco-2 intestinal cell line to examine the polarity of ffa uptake and metabolism in the enterocyte. Cells are grown on permeable polycarbonate Transwell filters in order to obtain access to both AP and BL compartments. Differentiated Caco-2 cells form tight polarized monolayers which express small intestine-specific enzymes and are impermeable to the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow. Submicellar concentrations of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid (2uM) were added to AP or BL sides of Caco-2 monolayers at 37{degrees}C and cells were incubated for various times between 2 and 120 minutes. Total AP and BL uptake is similar; however, when relative membrane surface areas are accounted for, AP uptake is about 2-fold higher. The metabolism of AP and BL ffa is not significantly different: triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine account for most of the metabolites (32{plus minus}4 and 24{plus minus}2% respectively at 5 minutes). Little ffa oxidation is observed. Preincubation with albumin-bound 2-monoolein (100uM) and palmitate (50uM) increases the level of TG metabolites. The results suggest that in this cell line the uptake of AP ffa may be greater than BL ffa, but that AP (dietary) ffa and BL (plasma) ffa are metabolized similarly.

  9. Polarity of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in a human intestinal cell line (CACO-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, P.J.; Storch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Free fatty acids (ffa) can enter the intestinal cell via the apical (AP) or basolateral (BL) membrane. The authors are using the Caco-2 intestinal cell line to examine the polarity of ffa uptake and metabolism in the enterocyte. Cells are grown on permeable polycarbonate Transwell filters in order to obtain access to both AP and BL compartments. Differentiated Caco-2 cells form tight polarized monolayers which express small intestine-specific enzymes and are impermeable to the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow. Submicellar concentrations of 3 H-palmitic acid (2uM) were added to AP or BL sides of Caco-2 monolayers at 37 degrees C and cells were incubated for various times between 2 and 120 minutes. Total AP and BL uptake is similar; however, when relative membrane surface areas are accounted for, AP uptake is about 2-fold higher. The metabolism of AP and BL ffa is not significantly different: triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine account for most of the metabolites (32±4 and 24±2% respectively at 5 minutes). Little ffa oxidation is observed. Preincubation with albumin-bound 2-monoolein (100uM) and palmitate (50uM) increases the level of TG metabolites. The results suggest that in this cell line the uptake of AP ffa may be greater than BL ffa, but that AP (dietary) ffa and BL (plasma) ffa are metabolized similarly

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta 3 alters intestinal smooth muscle function: implications for gastroschisis-related intestinal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Olufemi, S D; Olsen, A B; Hook-Dufresne, D M; Bandla, V; Cox, C S

    2015-05-01

    Gastroschisis (GS) is a congenital abdominal wall defect that results in the development of GS-related intestinal dysfunction (GRID). Transforming growth factor-β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has been shown to cause organ dysfunction through alterations in vascular and airway smooth muscle. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of TGF-β3 on intestinal smooth muscle function and contractile gene expression. Archived human intestinal tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for TGF-β isoforms and markers of smooth muscle gene and micro-RNA contractile phenotype. Intestinal motility was measured in neonatal rats ± TGF-β3 (0.2 and 1 mg/kg). Human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hiSMCs) were incubated with fetal bovine serum ± 100 ng/ml of TGF-β 3 isoforms for 6, 24 and 72 h. The effects of TGF-β3 on motility, hiSMC contractility and hiSMC contractile phenotype gene and micro-RNA expression were measured using transit, collagen gel contraction assay and RT-PCR analysis. Data are expressed as mean ± SEM, ANOVA (n = 6-7/group). GS infants had increased immunostaining of TGF-β3 and elevated levels of micro-RNA 143 & 145 in the intestinal smooth muscle. Rats had significantly decreased intestinal transit when exposed to TGF-β3 in a dose-dependent manner compared with Sham animals. TGF-β3 significantly increased hiSMC gel contraction and contractile protein gene and micro-RNA expression. TGF-β3 contributed to intestinal dysfunction at the organ level, increased contraction at the cellular level and elevated contractile gene expression at the molecular level. A hyper-contractile response may play a role in the persistent intestinal dysfunction seen in GRID.

  11. Study on human intestinal bacterium Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56 for the conversion of arctigenin to (-)-3'-desmethylarctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yue; Li, Meng; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Liu, Peng; Hao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Xiu-Mei

    2013-12-11

    Arctium lappa L. (A. lappa) is a popularly used vegetable as well as herbal medicine. Human intestinal microflora was reported to convert arctiin, the lignan compound with highest content in the dried fruits of Arctium lappa, to a series of metabolites. However, the specific bacterium responsible for the formation of 3'-desmethylarctigenin (3'-DMAG), the most predominant metabolite of arctiin by rat or human intestinal microflora, has not been isolated yet. In the present study, we isolated one single bacterium, which we named Blautia sp. AUH-JLD56, capable of solely biotransforming arctiin or arctigenin to (-)-3'-DMAG. The structure of the metabolite 3'-DMAG was elucidated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biotransforming kinetics and maximum biotransforming capacity of strain AUH-JLD56 was investigated. In addition, the metabolite 3'-DMAG showed significantly higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity than that of the substrate arctigenin at the concentrations tested.

  12. Intestinal Absorption of Triterpenoids and Flavonoids from Glycyrrhizae radix et rhizoma in the Human Caco-2 Monolayer Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Xue; Liu, Gui-Yan; Yang, Yan-Fang; Wu, Xiu-Wen; Xu, Wei; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2017-09-29

    Glycyrrhizae radix et rhizoma has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Triterpenoids and flavonoids from the plant have many beneficial effects and their chemical structures are modified in the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration. However, absorption of these triterpenoids and flavonoids still needs to be defined. Here, the uptake and transepithelial transport of the selected major triterpenoids, glycyrrhizin ( 1 ), glycyrrhetic acid-3- O -mono-β-d-glucuronide ( 2 ), and glycyrrhetinic acid ( 3 ); and the selected major flavonoids, licochalcone A ( 4 ), licochalcone B ( 5 ), licochalcone C ( 6 ), echinatin ( 7 ), isoliquiritin apioside ( 8 ), liquiritigenin ( 9 ), liquiritin apioside ( 10 ) isolated from Glycyrrhizae radix et rhizoma , were investigated in the human intestinal epithelium-like Caco-2 cell monolayer model. Compounds 3 , 5 - 7 , and 9 were designated as well-absorbed compounds, 2 and 4 were designated as moderately absorbed ones, and 1 , 8 , and 10 were assigned for the poorly absorbed ones. The absorption mechanism of well and moderately absorbed compound was mainly passive diffusion to pass through the human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayer. These findings provided useful information for predicting their oral bioavailability and the clinical application.

  13. Retracted: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Gab-Jin; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-07-01

    'Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans' by Soo Hyeon Bae, Wan-Su Park, Seunghoon Han, Gab-jin Park, Jongtae Lee, Taegon Hong, Sangil Jeon and Dong-Seok Yim The above article, published online on 06 February 2017 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, K. Sandy Pang, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The authors retracted the paper due to errors associated with use of log D vs. log P of telmisartan as inputs of the PBPK model. The authors concluded that there are too many changes in the article to be resolved by an Erratum, and had requested a retraction. Reference Bae, S. H., Park, W.-S., Han, S., Park, G., Lee, J., Hong, T., Jeon, S., and Yim, D.-S. (2016) Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans. Biopharm. Drug Dispos., doi: 10.1002/bdd.2060. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Bioaccessibility, Cellular Uptake, and Transport of Astaxanthin Isomers and their Antioxidative Effects in Human Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Ronghua; Zhu, Honghui; Zhang, Lianfu; Tsao, Rong

    2017-11-29

    The bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and antioxidative activities of three astaxanthin geometric isomers were investigated using an in vitro digestion model and human intestinal Caco-2 cells. This study demonstrated that the trans-cis isomerization of all-E-astaxanthin and the cis-trans isomerization of Z-astaxanthins could happen both during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and cellular uptake processes. 13Z-Astaxanthin showed higher bioaccessibility than 9Z- and all-E-astaxanthins during in vitro digestion, and 9Z-astaxanthin exhibited higher transport efficiency than all-E- and 13Z-astaxanthins. These might explain why 13Z- and 9Z-astaxanthins are found at higher concentrations in human plasma than all-E-astaxanthin in reported studies. All three astaxanthin isomers were effective in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis as seen in the antioxidant enzyme (CAT, SOD) activities ; 9Z- and 13Z- astaxanthins exhibited a higher protective effect than all-E-astaxanthin against oxidative stress as demonstrated by the lower cellular uptake of Z-astaxanthins and lower secretion and gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 in Caco-2 cells treated with H 2 O 2 . We conclude, for the first time, that Z-astaxanthin isomers may play a more important role in preventing oxidative stress induced intestinal diseases.

  15. Serum and intestinal isotype antibody responses to Wa human rotavirus in gnotobiotic pigs are modulated by maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Hodgins, D C; de Arriba, L; Kang, S Y; Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Tô, T L; Saif, L J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of passive antibodies on protection and active immune responses to human rotavirus were studied in gnotobiotic pigs. Pigs were injected at birth with saline or sow serum of high (immunized) or low (control) antibody titre and subsets of pigs were fed colostrum and milk from immunized or control sows. Pigs were inoculated at 3-5 days of age and challenged at 21 days post-inoculation (p.i.) with virulent Wa human rotavirus. Pigs receiving immune serum with or without immune colostrum/milk were partially protected against diarrhoea and virus shedding after inoculation, but had significantly lower IgA antibody titres in serum and small intestinal contents at 21 days p.i. and lower protection rates after challenge compared with pigs given control or no maternal antibodies. IgG antibody titres were consistently higher in small than in large intestinal contents. Pigs given control serum with control colostrum/milk had lower rates of virus shedding after inoculation than those given control serum alone. In summary, high titres of circulating maternal antibodies with or without local (milk) antibodies provided passive protection after inoculation but suppressed active mucosal antibody responses. These findings may have implications for the use of live, oral rotavirus vaccines in breast-fed infants.

  16. Transitional features in human atherosclerosis. Intimal thickening, cholesterol clefts, and cell loss in human aortic fatty streaks.

    OpenAIRE

    Guyton, J. R.; Klemp, K. F.

    1993-01-01

    The possible transition from a subset of fatty streaks to fibrous plaques in human atherosclerosis has long been postulated, but transitional features in lesions have rarely been demonstrated. We examined human aortic fatty streaks to determine whether significant tendencies toward intimal thickening and toward deep extracellular lipid deposition might be found. To provide accurate ultrastructural assessment of lipid, tissues were processed by new electron microscopic cytochemical techniques....

  17. Multiple forms of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: chemical and enzymatic properties, and circulating clearances of the fast- and slow-moving enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, T.; Sakagishi, Y.; Sekine, T.

    1981-01-01

    Two forms of alkaline phosphatase orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum, EC 3.1.3.1) have been purified from human small intestine by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and tyraminyl derivative affinity gel, and by preparative disc gel electrophoresis. Intestinal phosphatases were electrophoretically separated into two components, fast- and slow-moving enzymes, with apparent molecular weights of 140000 and 168000 and with subunit weights of 68000 and 80000, respectively. Organ distribution of injected 125 I-labelled enzymes indicates that the desialylated hepatic enzyme was selectively distributed in liver, while the degalactosylated intestinal enzyme was incorporated into liver, lymph fluid, and small intestine. These results suggest that the pathway of circulating clearance of alkaline phosphatase has several routes. (Auth.)

  18. Human Lactobacillus Strains from the Intestine can Suppress IgE-Mediated Degranulation of Rat Basophilic Leukaemia (RBL-2H3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaku Harata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells play a critical role in immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergic diseases, and the degranulation of mast cells is important in the pathogenesis of these diseases. A disturbance of the intestinal microflora, especially of endogenous lactic acid bacteria, might be a contributing factor for IgE-mediated allergic diseases. Additional knowledge regarding the interaction of human intestinal Lactobacilli with mast cells is still necessary. Twenty-three strains of Lactobacilli, including commercial and reference strains and strains from the human intestine, were tested for their ability to regulate degranulation of cells from rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells (RBL-2H3 in vitro based on a β-hexosaminidase release assay. Each of the tested Lactobacilli characteristically suppressed IgE-mediated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, and Lactobacillus GG showed the strongest inhibitory effect on the cells. Furthermore, the bacteria isolated from the human intestine significantly suppressed degranulation of RBL-2H3 cellsin comparison with the reference strains. These results suggest that Lactobacilli, particularly those from the human intestine, can affect the activation of mast cells in a strain-dependent manner. Further study should be conducted to analyse the understanding mechanism.

  19. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Juvenile Transition: A Developmental Switch Point in Human Life History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Marco; Angeleri, Romina; Manera, Valeria

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new perspective on the transition from early to middle childhood (i.e., human juvenility), investigated in an integrative evolutionary framework. Juvenility is a crucial life history stage, when social learning and interaction with peers become central developmental functions; here it is argued that the "juvenile transition"…

  1. Human factors of transitions in automated driving : A general framework and literature survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.; Happee, R.; Cabrall, C.D.D.; Kyriakidis, M.; de Winter, J.C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The topic of transitions in automated driving is becoming important now that cars are automated to ever greater extents. This paper proposes a theoretical framework to support and align human factors research on transitions in automated driving. Driving states are defined based on the allocation of

  2. Intestinal and Systemic Immune Responses upon Multi-drug ResistantPseudomonas aeruginosaColonization of Mice Harboring a Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliane, von Klitzing; Ekmekciu, Ira; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization has rated multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa as serious threat for human health. It is, however, unclear, whether intestinal MDR P. aeruginosa carriage is associated with inflammatory responses in intestinal or even systemic compartments. In the present study, we generated with respect to their microbiota "humanized" mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice. Following peroral challenge with a clinical P. aeruginosa isolate on two consecutive days, mice harboring a human or murine microbiota were only partially protected from stable intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization given that up to 78% of mice were P. aeruginosa -positive at day 28 post-infection (p.i.). Irrespective of the host-specificity of the microbiota, P. aeruginosa colonized mice were clinically uncompromised. However, P. aeruginosa colonization resulted in increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis that was accompanied by pronounced proliferative/regenerative cell responses. Furthermore, at day 7 p.i. increased innate immune cell populations such as macrophages and monocytes could be observed in the colon of mice harboring either a human or murine microbiota, whereas this held true at day 28 p.i. for adaptive immune cells such as B lymphocytes in both the small and large intestines of mice with murine microbiota. At day 7 p.i., pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was enhanced in the colon and mesenteric lymph nodes, whereas the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated in the former at day 28 p.i. Strikingly, cytokine responses upon intestinal P. aeruginosa colonization were not restricted to the intestinal tract, but could also be observed systemically, given that TNF and IFN-γ concentrations were elevated in spleens as early as 7 days p.i., whereas splenic IL-10 levels were dampened at day 28 p.i. of mice with human microbiota. In conclusion, mere intestinal carriage of MDR P. aeruginosa by clinically unaffected

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin HEMMATI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods.Results: The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3–38. Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7–33.0. The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli, Giardia intestinalis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite, Chilomastix mesnilii, and Enterobius vermicularis. Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii. E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections.Conclusion: This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population. 

  4. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  5. Identification of interstitial cells of Cajal. Significance for studies of human small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago by Ramón y Cajal a.o. as primitive neurons in the intestines. In the period 1900-1960 a large number of light microscopical studies of ICC were published, in which ICC were identified by heir characteristic morphology. After 1960...... muscle. These studies strongly suggested that ICC were fundamental regulators of external muscle function. These hypotheses have since been supported by independent morphological and electrophysiological evidence, strongly suggesting a pacemaker role of some ICC populations as well as other regulatory...

  6. Complete sequences of glucagon-like peptide-1 from human and pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, C; Bersani, M; Johnsen, A H

    1989-01-01

    intestine of the proglucagon precursor were determined by pairs of basic amino acid residues flanking the two peptides. Earlier studies have shown that synthetic glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) synthesized according to the proposed structure (proglucagon 71-108 or because residue 108 is Gly, 72-107 amide...... by hydrophobic, gel permeation, and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. By analysis of composition and sequence it was determined that the peptide corresponded to PG 78-107. By mass spectrometry the molecular mass was determined to be 3295, corresponding to PG 78-107 amide. Furthermore, mass...

  7. Understanding the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, Linda; Perlaviciute, Goda; van der Werff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change threatens the health, economic prospects, and basic food and water sources of people. A wide range of changes in household energy behavior is needed to realize a sustainable energy transition. We propose a general framework to understand and encourage sustainable energy

  8. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Halim (Danny); M.P. Wilson (Michael P.); D. Oliver (Daniel); E. Brosens (Erwin); J.B. Verheij (Joke); Y. Han (Yu); V. Nanda (Vivek); Q. Lyu (Qing); M. Doukas (Michael); H.A. Stoop (Hans A.); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); O.J. Slivano (Orazio J.); A.J. Burns (Alan); C.K. Christie (Christine K.); K.L. De Mesy Bentley (Karen L.); A.S. Brooks (Alice); D. Tibboel (Dick); S. Xu (Suowen); Z.G. Jin (Zheng Gen); T. Djuwantono (Tono); W. Yan (Wei); M.M. Alves (Maria); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); J.M. Miano (Joseph M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMegacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in

  9. Effects of Marine Oils, Digested with Human Fluids, on Cellular Viability and Stress Protein Expression in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid; Scheers, Nathalie

    2017-11-04

    In vitro digestion of marine oils has been reported to promote lipid oxidation, including the formation of reactive aldehydes (e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE)). We aimed to investigate if human in vitro digestion of supplemental levels of oils from algae, cod liver, and krill, in addition to pure MDA and HHE, affect intestinal Caco-2 cell survival and oxidative stress. Cell viability was not significantly affected by the digests of marine oils or by pure MDA and HHE (0-90 μM). Cellular levels of HSP-70, a chaperone involved in the prevention of stress-induced protein unfolding was significantly decreased (14%, 28%, and 14% of control for algae, cod and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.05). The oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) involved in reducing oxidative stress was also lower after incubation with the digested oils (26%, 53%, and 22% of control for algae, cod, and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). The aldehydes MDA and HHE did not affect HSP-70 or Trx-1 at low levels (8.3 and 1.4 μM, respectively), whilst a mixture of MDA and HHE lowered Trx-1 at high levels (45 μM), indicating less exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that human digests of the investigated marine oils and their content of MDA and HHE did not cause a stress response in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  10. Effects of Marine Oils, Digested with Human Fluids, on Cellular Viability and Stress Protein Expression in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Tullberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In vitro digestion of marine oils has been reported to promote lipid oxidation, including the formation of reactive aldehydes (e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA and 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE. We aimed to investigate if human in vitro digestion of supplemental levels of oils from algae, cod liver, and krill, in addition to pure MDA and HHE, affect intestinal Caco-2 cell survival and oxidative stress. Cell viability was not significantly affected by the digests of marine oils or by pure MDA and HHE (0–90 μM. Cellular levels of HSP-70, a chaperone involved in the prevention of stress-induced protein unfolding was significantly decreased (14%, 28%, and 14% of control for algae, cod and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.05. The oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1 involved in reducing oxidative stress was also lower after incubation with the digested oils (26%, 53%, and 22% of control for algae, cod, and krill oil, respectively; p ≤ 0.001. The aldehydes MDA and HHE did not affect HSP-70 or Trx-1 at low levels (8.3 and 1.4 μM, respectively, whilst a mixture of MDA and HHE lowered Trx-1 at high levels (45 μM, indicating less exposure to oxidative stress. We conclude that human digests of the investigated marine oils and their content of MDA and HHE did not cause a stress response in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

  11. The Bacterial Species Campylobacter jejuni Induce Diverse Innate Immune Responses in Human and Avian Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. John

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter remain the major cause of human gastroenteritis in the Developed World causing a significant burden to health services. Campylobacter are pathogens in humans and chickens, although differences in mechanistic understanding are incomplete, in part because phenotypic strain diversity creates inconsistent findings. Here, we took Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 100 from multi-locus sequence typed collections to assess their pathogenic diversity, through their inflammatory, cytotoxicity, adhesion, invasion and signaling responses in a high-throughput model using avian and human intestinal epithelial cells. C. jejuni induced IL-8 and CXCLi1/2 in human and avian epithelial cells, respectively, in a MAP kinase-dependent manner. In contrast, IL-10 responses in both cell types were PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent. C. jejuni strains showed diverse levels of invasion with high invasion dependent on MAP kinase signaling in both cell lines. C. jejuni induced diverse cytotoxic responses in both cell lines with cdt-positive isolates showing significantly higher toxicity. Blockade of endocytic pathways suggested that invasion by C. jejuni was clathrin- and dynamin-dependent but caveolae- independent in both cells. In contrast, IL-8 (and CXCLi1/2 production was dependent on clathrin, dynamin, and caveolae. This study is important because of its scale, and the data produced, suggesting that avian and human epithelial cells use similar innate immune pathways where the magnitude of the response is determined by the phenotypic diversity of the Campylobacter species.

  12. Structural Stability of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 Is Essential for Protective Effects Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro; Motomura, Kaori; Suzuki, Masashi [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Zakrzewska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw (Poland); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Laboratory, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) has radioprotective effects on the intestine, although its structural instability limits its potential for practical use. Several stable FGF1 mutants were created increasing stability in the order, wild-type FGF1, single mutants (Q40P, S47I, and H93G), Q40P/S47I, and Q40P/S47I/H93G. This study evaluated the contribution of the structural stability of FGF1 to its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Each FGF1 mutant was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 h before or after total body irradiation (TBI) with {gamma}-rays at 8-12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Q40P/S47I/H93G could activate all subtypes of FGF receptors in vitro much more strongly than the wild-type without endogenous or exogenous heparin. Preirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G significantly increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1 after TBI at 10 or 12 Gy, and postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G was effective in promoting crypt survival after TBI at 10, 11, or 12 Gy. In addition, crypt cell proliferation, crypt depth, and epithelial differentiation were significantly promoted by postirradiation treatment with Q40P/S47I/H93G. The level of stability of FGF1 mutants correlated with their mitogenic activities in vitro in the absence of heparin; however, preirradiation treatment with the mutants increased the crypt number to almost the same level as Q40P/S47I/H93G. When given 24 h after TBI at 10 Gy, all FGF1 mutants increased crypt survival more than wild-type FGF1, and Q40P/S47I/H93G had the strongest mitogenic effects in intestinal epithelial cells after radiation damage. Moreover, Q40P/S47I/H93G prolonged mouse survival after TBI because of the repair of intestinal damage. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the structural stability of FGF1 can contribute to the enhancement of protective effects against radiation-induced intestinal

  13. Heparin modulates human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cell proliferation and matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.; Perr, H.; Drucker, D.E.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    (HISM) cell proliferation and collagen production may play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal stricture in Crohn's disease. The present studies were performed to evaluate the effects of heparin, a known modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells, on HISM cell proliferation and collagen production. Heparin (100 μg/ml) was added daily to HISM cell cultures for cell proliferation studies and for 24 hours at various time points during culture for collagen synthesis studies. Collagen synthesis was determined by the uptake of 3 H proline into collagenase-sensitive protein. Heparin completely inhibited cell proliferation for 7 days, after which cell numbers increased but at a slower rate than controls. Cells released from heparin inhibition demonstrated catch-up growth to control levels. Collagen production was significantly inhibited by 24 hours exposure to heparin but only at those times during culture when collagen synthesis was maximal (8 to 12 days). Non-collagen protein synthesis was inhibited by heparin at all time points during culture. Heparin through its modulation of HISM cells may play an important role in the control of the extracellular matrix of the intestinal wall

  14. Dynamics of absorption, metabolism, and excretion of 5-aminolevulinic acid in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kei; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ota, Urara; Hatta, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a precursor for the biosynthesis of porphyrins and heme. Although the oral administration of ALA has been widely applied in clinical settings, the dynamics of its absorption, metabolism, and excretion within enterocytes remain unknown. In this study, after enterocytic differentiation, Caco-2 cells were incubated with 200 µM ALA and/or 100 µM sodium ferrous citrate (SFC) for up to 72 h. Both ALA and the combination of ALA and SFC promoted the synthesis of heme, without affecting the expression of genes involved in intestinal iron transport, such as DMT1 and FPN . The enhanced heme synthesis in Caco-2 cells was more pronounced under the effect of the combination of ALA and SFC than under the effect of ALA alone, as reflected by the induced expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), as well as a reduced protein level of the transcriptional corepressor Bach1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed Bach1 chromatin occupancy at the enhancer regions of HO-1, which were significantly decreased by the addition of ALA and SFC. Finally, Transwell culture of Caco-2 cells suggested that the administered ALA to the intestinal lumen was partially transported into vasolateral space. These findings enhance our understanding of the absorption and metabolism of ALA in enterocytes, which could aid in the development of a treatment strategy for various conditions such as anemia.

  15. Dynamics of absorption, metabolism, and excretion of 5-aminolevulinic acid in human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Saito

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA is a precursor for the biosynthesis of porphyrins and heme. Although the oral administration of ALA has been widely applied in clinical settings, the dynamics of its absorption, metabolism, and excretion within enterocytes remain unknown. In this study, after enterocytic differentiation, Caco-2 cells were incubated with 200 µM ALA and/or 100 µM sodium ferrous citrate (SFC for up to 72 h. Both ALA and the combination of ALA and SFC promoted the synthesis of heme, without affecting the expression of genes involved in intestinal iron transport, such as DMT1 and FPN. The enhanced heme synthesis in Caco-2 cells was more pronounced under the effect of the combination of ALA and SFC than under the effect of ALA alone, as reflected by the induced expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1, as well as a reduced protein level of the transcriptional corepressor Bach1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed Bach1 chromatin occupancy at the enhancer regions of HO-1, which were significantly decreased by the addition of ALA and SFC. Finally, Transwell culture of Caco-2 cells suggested that the administered ALA to the intestinal lumen was partially transported into vasolateral space. These findings enhance our understanding of the absorption and metabolism of ALA in enterocytes, which could aid in the development of a treatment strategy for various conditions such as anemia.

  16. Effects of the Probiotic Enterococcus faecium and Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains in a Pig and Human Epithelial Intestinal Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lodemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study has been to elucidate the effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 on epithelial integrity in intestinal epithelial cells and whether pre- and coincubation with this strain can reproducibly prevent damage induced by enterotoxigenic (ETEC and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Porcine (IPEC-J2 and human (Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with bacterial strains and epithelial integrity was assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER and mannitol flux rates. E. faecium alone increased TEER of Caco-2 cells without affecting mannitol fluxes whereas the E. coli strains decreased TEER and concomitantly increased mannitol flux rates in both cell lines. Preincubation with E. faecium had no effect on the TEER decrease induced by E. coli in preliminary experiments. However, in a second set of experiments using a slightly different protocol, E. faecium ameliorated the TEER decrease induced by ETEC at 4 h in IPEC-J2 and at 2, 4, and 6 h in Caco-2 cells. We conclude that E. faecium positively affected epithelial integrity in monoinfected Caco-2 cells and could ameliorate the damage on TEER induced by an ETEC strain. Reproducibility of the results is, however, limited when experiments are performed with living bacteria over longer periods.

  17. Butyrate Produced by Commensal Bacteria Potentiates Phorbol Esters Induced AP-1 Response in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  18. The transepithelial transport mechanism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in human intestine determined using a Caco-2 cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Kaiqiong; Yang, Dan; Zhong, Yufang; An, Jing; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xinyu

    2017-04-01

    Oral ingestion plays an important role in human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The uptake of PBDEs primarily occurs in the small intestine. The aim of the present study is to investigate the transepithelial transport characteristics and mechanisms of PBDEs in the small intestine using a Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The apparent permeability coefficients of PBDEs indicated that tri- to hepta-BDEs were poorly absorbed compounds. A linear increase in transepithelial transport was observed with various concentrations of PBDEs, which suggested that passive diffusion dominated their transport at the concentration range tested. In addition, the pseudo-first-order kinetics equation can be applied to the transepithelial transport of PBDEs. The rate-determining step in transepithelial transport of PBDEs was trans-cell transport including the trans-pore process. The significantly lower transepithelial transport rates at low temperature for bidirectional transepithelial transport suggested that an energy-dependent transport mechanism was involved. The efflux transporters (P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein) and influx transporters (organic cation transporters) participated in the transepithelial transport of PBDEs. In addition, the transepithelial transport of PBDEs was pH sensitive; however, more information is required to understand the influence of pH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) gene is regulated by HNF-4α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapper, Maja; Boehme, Mike; Nitz, Inke; Doering, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The cytosolic human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (hFABP2) is proposed to be involved in intestinal absorption of long-chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of hFABP2 by the endodermal hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α), involved in regulation of genes of fatty acid metabolism and differentiation. Electromobility shift assays demonstrated that HNF-4α binds at position -324 to -336 within the hFABP2 promoter. Mutation of this HNF-4 binding site abolished the luciferase reporter activity of hFABP2 in postconfluent Caco-2 cells. In HeLa cells, this mutation reduced the activation of the hFABP2 promoter by HNF-4α by about 50%. Thus, binding element at position -336/-324 essentially determines the transcriptional activity of promoter and may be important in control of hFABP2 expression by dietary lipids and differentiation. Studying genotype interactions of hFABP2 and HNF-4α, that are both candidate genes for diabetes type 2, may be a powerful approach

  20. Association between the human herpesvirus 8 and the diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the small intestine in common variable immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokuina, Elena; Dominguez Alvarez, Carlos; Noa Pedroso, Guillermo; Martinez Rodriguez Pedro Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the more frequent primary immunodeficiency in clinical field and its presentation forms are very variable. We describe the case of a women presenting with adult CVID with chronic diarrhea syndrome, weight loss and diffuse lymphadenopathies, where the more marked immunologic features were a deep hypogammaglobulinemia of the three major kinds of immunoglobulins and numerical decrease of B cells (CD19 +) and NK cells (CD3 -C D56 +) in peripheral blood. Biopsy of small intestine obtained by video-assisted panendoscope, showed the presence of a multinodular lymphoid hyperplasia with partial atrophy of hairinesses. Immunohistochemistry showed that nodules were high germinal centers with distribution of B cells (CD20 +) and T cells (CD3 +) , similar to that of normal follicle. There was not differential expression of the K and λ light chains. The real time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) method detected many copies from the genome of type 8 human herpesvirus (VHH-8) (133 copies/μL of DNA) in biopsy of intestinal nodule DNA. VHH-8 infection may to be a significant factor in pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients presenting with CVID

  1. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murano, Tatsuro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs

  2. Hes1 promotes the IL-22-mediated antimicrobial response by enhancing STAT3-dependent transcription in human intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murano, Tatsuro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Ryuichi, E-mail: rokamoto.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Go; Nakata, Toru; Hibiya, Shuji; Shimizu, Hiromichi; Fujii, Satoru; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Yui, Shiro; Akiyama-Morio, Junko; Nemoto, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Advanced GI Therapeutics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Mamoru [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Hes1 enhances IL-22-STAT3 signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. •Hes1 enhances REG family gene induction by IL-22-STAT3 signaling. •Protein level of Hes1 restricts the response to IL-22. •Present regulation of a cytokine signal represents a new mode of Hes1 function. -- Abstract: Notch signaling plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have previously shown that Notch signaling is up-regulated in the inflamed mucosa of ulcerative colitis (UC) and thereby plays an indispensable role in tissue regeneration. Here we show that in addition to Notch signaling, STAT3 signaling is highly activated in the inflamed mucosa of UC. Forced expression of the Notch target gene Hes1 dramatically enhanced the IL-22-mediated STAT3-dependent transcription in human IECs. This enhancement of STAT3-dependent transcription was achieved by the extended phosphorylation of STAT3 by Hes1. Microarray analysis revealed that Hes1-mediated enhancement of IL-22-STAT3 signaling significantly increased the induction of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as REG1A, REG3A and REG3G, in human IECs. Conversely, the reduction of Hes1 protein levels with a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly down-regulated the induction of those genes in IECs, resulting in a markedly poor response to IL-22. Our present findings identify a new role for the molecular function of Hes1 in which the protein can interact with cytokine signals and regulate the immune response of IECs.

  3. Effects of probiotic-containing products on stool frequency and intestinal transit in constipated adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Ibarra, Alvin

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are commonly recommended for the alleviation of constipation symptoms. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of probiotic-containing products on stool frequency and intestinal transit time (ITT) in constipated adults and to determine the factors that influence the efficacy of these products. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials that measured weekly stool frequency or ITT in constipated adults receiving probiotic-containing supplements. A random effects meta-analysis was performed; stool frequency was summarized by the mean difference statistic and ITT was summarized by the standardized mean difference (SMD) statistic. Meta-regression and diagnostic model performance testing were used to identify publication bias and sources of heterogeneity. A total of 21 studies (23 comparisons) comprising 2656 subjects were included. All studies utilized probiotics containing Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium species. Probiotic-containing products resulted in a mean increase in weekly stool frequency of 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-1.14, PProbiotic-containing products were also efficacious in reducing ITT (SMD=0.65, 95%CI 0.33-0.97, Pprobiotic species, the number of probiotic strains and the daily probiotic dosage had no influence on the outcomes. Supplementation with products containing Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium species increases stool frequency and reduces ITT in constipated adults. However, since significant heterogeneity in outcomes was detected among the studies analyzed, the results should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  5. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  6. Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to sugar beet fibre and decreasing intestinal transit time pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    based on newly developed scientific evidence related to sugar beet fibre and “decreasing intestinal transit time”. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is sugar beet fibre. This opinion applies to sugar beet fibre naturally present in foods and to those forms added to foods......Following an application from Nordic Sugar A/S, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Denmark, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim....... The Panel considers that sugar beet fibre is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect. The claimed effect is “decreasing intestinal transit time”. The target population proposed by the applicant is people who want to improve or maintain normal bowel function. The Panel considers...

  7. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Epidermal growth factor inhibits glycylsarcosine transport and hPepT1 expression in a human intestinal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Amstrup, J; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal cell line Caco-2 was used as a model system to study the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on peptide transport. EGF decreased apical-to-basolateral fluxes of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine ([(14)C]Gly-Sar) up to 50.2 +/- 3.6% (n = 6) of control values. Kinetic analysis......(max) decreased from 2.61 +/- 0.4 to 1.06 +/- 0.1 nmol x cm(-2) x min(-1) (n = 3, P T1 mRNA (using glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA as control......) in cells treated with EGF. Western blotting indicated a decrease in hPepT1 protein in cell lysates. We conclude that EGF treatment decreases Gly-Sar transport in Caco-2 cells by decreasing the number of peptide transporter molecules in the apical membrane....

  9. The prenylflavonoid isoxanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) is activated into the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin in vitro and in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possemiers, Sam; Bolca, Selin; Grootaert, Charlotte; Heyerick, Arne; Decroos, Karel; Dhooge, Willem; De Keukeleire, Denis; Rabot, Sylvie; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2006-07-01

    Hops, an essential beer ingredient, are a source of prenylflavonoids, including 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), one of the most potent phytoestrogens. Because 8-PN concentrations in beers are generally low, its health effects after moderate beer consumption were considered negligible. However, human intestinal microbiota may activate up to 4 mg/L isoxanthohumol (IX) in beer into 8-PN. Depending on interindividual differences in the intestinal transformation potential, this conversion could easily increase the 8-PN exposure 10-fold upon beer consumption. Here, we present a further investigation of the process both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments with the dynamic SHIME model showed that hop prenylflavonoids pass unaltered through the stomach and small intestine and that activation of IX into 8-PN (up to 80% conversion) occurs only in the distal colon. In vitro incubations of 51 fecal samples from female volunteers with IX enabled us to separate the fecal microbiota into high (8 of 51), moderate (11 of 51) and slow (32 of 51) 8-PN producers, clearly illustrating an interindividual variability. Three women, selected from the respective groups, received a daily dose of 5.59 mg IX for 4 d. Intestinal IX activation and urinary 8-PN excretion were correlated (R(2) = 0.6417, P < 0.01). These data show that intestinal conversion of IX upon moderate beer consumption can lead to 8-PN exposure values that might fall within the range of human biological activity.

  10. Rapid appraisal of human intestinal helminth infections among schoolchildren in Osh oblast, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Peter; Usubalieva, Jumagul; Imanalieva, Cholpon; Minbaeva, Gulnara; Stefiuk, Kayte; Jeandron, Aurelie; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-12-01

    A population-representative lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) survey was conducted in 2009 to determine the prevalence of intestinal helminth infections among schoolchildren across Osh oblast, Kyrgyzstan. The diagnostic approach consisted of duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears from a single stool sample and an adhesive tape test. A questionnaire was administered to identify risk factors for infections. A total of 1262 schoolchildren aged 6-15 years were recruited; 41% of them harboured at least one of the eight identified helminth species. The two most prevalent helminths were Ascaris lumbricoides (23.1%) and Enterobius vermicularis (19.3%). Lower prevalences were found for Hymenolepis nana (4.4%), Fasciola hepatica (1.9%) and Dicrocoelium dendriticum (1.8%). Washing raw vegetables was a protective factor with regard to A. lumbricoides infection (odds ratio (OR)=0.69, p=0.022); tap water was borderline protective (OR=0.56, p=0.057). Children of the richest families were at a lower risk of E. vermicularis infection than the poorest ones (OR=0.41, p=0.011). Sharing the bed with more than one person was a risk factor for E. vermicularis infection (OR=2.0, p=0.002). The results call for targeted interventions against intestinal helminths in Osh oblast. In a first stage, annual deworming of schoolchildren and other high-risk groups with albendazole or mebendazole should be implemented, and reliable diagnosis and additional anthelminthic drugs should be made available. Subsequently, transmission control including locally-adapted health education, improved water supply and adequate sanitation should become the central features. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced uptake and transport of (+)-catechin and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate in niosomal formulation by human intestinal Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinxin; Li, Danhui; Zhou, Yongzhi; Yang, Jie; Yang, Wanqi; Zhou, Guohua; Wen, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate (+)-catechin and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) cellular uptake and transport across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayer in both the absence and presence of niosomal carrier in variable conditions. The effect of free drugs and drug-loaded niosomes on the growth of Caco-2 cells was studied. The effects of time, temperature, and concentration on drug cellular uptake in the absence or presence of its niosomal delivery systems were investigated. The intestinal epithelial membrane transport of the drug-loaded niosomes was examined using the monolayer of the human Caco-2 cells. The kinetics of transport, and the effect of temperature, adenosine triphosphate inhibitor, permeability glycoprotein inhibitor, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 inhibitor, and the absorption enhancer on transport mechanism were investigated. It was found that the uptake of catechin, EGCG, and their niosomes by Caco-2 cells was 1.22±0.16, 0.90±0.14, 3.25±0.37, and 1.92±0.22 μg/mg protein, respectively (n=3). The apparent permeability coefficient values of catechin, EGCG, and their niosomes were 1.68±0.16, 0.88±0.09, 2.39±0.31, and 1.42±0.24 cm/second (n=3) at 37°C, respectively. The transport was temperature- and energy-dependent. The inhibitors of permeability glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and the absorption enhancer significantly enhanced the uptake amount. Compared with the free drugs, niosomal formulation significantly enhanced drug absorption. Additionally, drug-loaded niosomes exhibited stronger stability and lower toxicity. These findings showed that the oral absorption of tea flavonoids could be improved by using the novel drug delivery systems. PMID:24855353

  12. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Replication, Intracellular Trafficking, and Pathogenicity in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D.; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route. PMID

  13. In vitro impact of five pesticides alone or in combination on human intestinal cell line Caco-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Ilboudo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Burkina Faso, as in most Sahelian countries, the failure to follow good agricultural practices coupled with poor soil and climate conditions in the locust control context lead to high environmental contaminations with pesticide residues. Thus, consumers being orally exposed to a combination of multiple pesticide residues through food and water intake, the digestive tract is a tissue susceptible to be directly exposed to these food contaminants. The aim of our work was to compare in vitro the impact of five desert locust control pesticides (Deltamethrin DTM, Fenitrothion FNT, Fipronil FPN, Lambda-cyalothrine LCT, and Teflubenzuron TBZ alone and in combination on the human intestinal Caco-2 cells viability and function. Cells were exposed to 0.1–100 μM pesticides for 10 days alone or in mixture (MIX. Our results showed a cytotoxic effect of DTM, FNT, FPN, LCT, and TBZ alone or in combination in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The most efficient were shown to be FPN and FNT impacting the cell layer integrity and/or barrier function, ALP activity, antioxidant enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, Akt activation, and apoptosis. The presence of antioxidant reduced lipid peroxidation level and attenuated the pesticides-induced cell toxicity, suggesting that key mechanism of pesticides cytotoxicity may be linked to their pro-oxidative potential. A comparative analysis with the predicted cytotoxic effect of pesticides mixture using mathematical modeling shown that the combination of these pesticides led to synergistic effects rather than to a simple independent or dose addition effect.

  14. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yu

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin and microtubules (Nocodazole are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002 virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1 as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5, pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis virus replication, intracellular trafficking, and pathogenicity in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Achazi, Katharina; Möller, Lars; Schulzke, Joerg D; Niedrig, Matthias; Bücker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most important vector-borne viruses in Europe and Asia. Its transmission mainly occurs by the bite of an infected tick. However, consuming milk products from infected livestock animals caused TBEV cases. To better understand TBEV transmission via the alimentary route, we studied viral infection of human intestinal epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were used to investigate pathological effects of TBEV infection. TBEV-infected Caco-2 monolayers showed morphological changes including cytoskeleton rearrangements and cytoplasmic vacuolization. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and further enlargement to TBEV containing caverns. Caco-2 monolayers maintained an intact epithelial barrier with stable transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) during early stage of infection. Concomitantly, viruses were detected in the basolateral medium, implying a transcytosis pathway. When Caco-2 cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of cellular pathways of endocytosis TBEV cell entry was efficiently blocked, suggesting that actin filaments (Cytochalasin) and microtubules (Nocodazole) are important for PI3K-dependent (LY294002) virus endocytosis. Moreover, experimental fluid uptake assay showed increased intracellular accumulation of FITC-dextran containing vesicles. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of TBEV with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) as well as with sorting nexin-5 (SNX5), pointing to macropinocytosis as trafficking mechanism. In the late phase of infection, further evidence was found for translocation of virus via the paracellular pathway. Five days after infection TER was slightly decreased. Epithelial barrier integrity was impaired due to increased epithelial apoptosis, leading to passive viral translocation. These findings illuminate pathomechanisms in TBEV infection of human intestinal epithelial cells and viral transmission via the alimentary route.

  16. Intestinal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the obstruction along the intestines. Treatment Suction via nasogastric tube Fluids given by vein Surgery for strangulation Sometimes ... nose and placed in the stomach (called a nasogastric tube) or into the intestine. Suction is applied to ...

  17. The effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota on the intestinal microflora and immune parameters in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanhaak, S.; Havenaar, R.; Schaafsma, G.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of consumption of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (L. casei Shirota) on the composition and metabolic activities of the intestinal microflora, and immune parameters in humans. Subjects: Twenty healthy male subjects aged 40-65 years were

  18. In vitro study of soil arsenic release by human gut microbiota and its intestinal absorption by Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Naiyi; Cai, Xiaolin; Du, Huili; Zhang, Zhennan; Li, Zejiao; Chen, Xiaochen; Sun, Guoxin; Cui, Yanshan

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation is essential in assessing health risks from As-contaminated soil. Release of soil-bound arsenic, As transformation by human gut microbiota, and the subsequent intestinal absorption of soil As metabolites were evaluated. A colon microbial community in a dynamic human gut model and the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2 were cultured. Arsenic speciation analysis and absorption of different As species were undertaken. In this study, soil As release (3.7-581.2 mg kg -1 ) was observed in the colon. Arsenic in the colon digests was transformed more quickly than that in the soil solid phase. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis showed that 44.2-97.6% of arsenite [As(III)] generated due to arsenate [As(V)] reduction was in the soil solid phase after the colon phase. We observed a high degree of cellular absorption of soil As metabolites, exhibiting that the intestinal absorption of monomethylarsonic acid and As(III) (33.6% and 30.2% resp.) was slightly higher than that of dimethylarsinic acid and As(V) (25.1% and 21.7% resp.). Our findings demonstrate that human gut microbiota can directly release soil-bound arsenic, particularly As-bearing amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. Determining As transformation and intestinal absorption simultaneously will result in an accurate risk assessment of human health with soil As exposures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase: crystal structure of the N-terminal catalytic subunit and basis of inhibition and substrate specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) is one of the two enzymes responsible for catalyzing the last glucose-releasing step in starch digestion. MGAM is anchored to the small-intestinal brush-border epithelial cells and contains two homologous glycosyl hydrolase family 31 catalytic subunits: an N-termina...

  20. Novel polyfucosylated N-linked glycopeptides with blood group A, H, X and Y determinants from human small intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Finne, J.; Breimer, M.E.; Hansson, G.C.; Karlsson, K.-A.; Leffler, H.; Halbeek, H. van

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of N-linked glycopeptides representing a major part of the glycans in human small intestinal epithelial cells from blood group A and O individuals were isolated by gel filtrations and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I-Sepharose.

  1. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaile, Esther; Müller, Mario M; Schäfer, Miriam R; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E; Zipfel, Peter F; Singer, Bernhard B; Slevogt, Hortense

    2017-03-14

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans ) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans -induced CXCL8 secretion. IMPORTANCE The present study demonstrates for the first time that fungal pathogens can be recognized by at least four members of the immunomodulatory CEACAM receptor family: CEACAM1, -3, -5, and -6. Three of the four receptors (i.e., CEACAM1, -5, and -6) are expressed in mucosal cells of the intestinal tract, where they are implicated in immunomodulation and control of tissue homeostasis. Importantly, the interaction of the major fungal pathogen in humans Candida albicans with CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 resulted in an altered epithelial immune response. With respect to the broad impact of CEACAM receptors on various aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune responses, in particular epithelial, neutrophil, and T cell behavior, understanding the role of CEACAMs in the host response to fungal pathogens might help to improve management of

  3. Land Use Transition and Human Health in the context of Climate ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Land Use Transition and Human Health in the context of Climate Change in the Eastern Himalayas. Land use change is ... it at the communal level. The overall goal is to reduce the vulnerability of mountain people to health issues caused by land use change using ecosystem approaches to human health (Ecohealth).

  4. Localizations of Na(+)-D-glucose cotransporters SGLT1 and SGLT2 in human kidney and of SGLT1 in human small intestine, liver, lung, and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovac, Ivana; Balen Eror, Daniela; Klessen, Dirk; Burger, Christa; Breljak, Davorka; Kraus, Ognjen; Radović, Nikola; Jadrijević, Stipe; Aleksic, Ivan; Walles, Thorsten; Sauvant, Christoph; Sabolić, Ivan; Koepsell, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Novel affinity-purified antibodies against human SGLT1 (hSGLT1) and SGLT2 (hSGLT2) were used to localize hSGLT2 in human kidney and hSGLT1 in human kidney, small intestine, liver, lung, and heart. The renal locations of both transporters largely resembled those in rats and mice; hSGLT2 and SGLT1 were localized to the brush border membrane (BBM) of proximal tubule S1/S2 and S3 segments, respectively. Different to rodents, the renal expression of hSGLT1 was absent in thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) and macula densa, and the expression of both hSGLTs was sex-independent. In small intestinal enterocytes, hSGLT1 was localized to the BBM and subapical vesicles. Performing double labeling with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), hSGLT1 was localized to GLP-1-secreting L cells and GIP-secreting K cells as has been shown in mice. In liver, hSGLT1 was localized to biliary duct cells as has been shown in rats. In lung, hSGLT1 was localized to alveolar epithelial type 2 cells and to bronchiolar Clara cells. Expression of hSGLT1 in Clara cells was verified by double labeling with the Clara cell secretory protein CC10. Double labeling of human heart with aquaporin 1 immunolocalized the hSGLT1 protein in heart capillaries rather than in previously assumed myocyte sarcolemma. The newly identified locations of hSGLT1 implicate several extra renal functions of this transporter, such as fluid absorption in the lung, energy supply to Clara cells, regulation of enteroendocrine cells secretion, and release of glucose from heart capillaries. These functions may be blocked by reversible SGLT1 inhibitors which are under development.

  5. A Murine Model for Human ECO Syndrome Reveals a Critical Role of Intestinal Cell Kinase in Skeletal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mengmeng; Jin, Li; Xie, Lin; Park, So Hyun; Tong, Yixin; Wu, Di; Chhabra, A Bobby; Fu, Zheng; Li, Xudong

    2018-03-01

    An autosomal-recessive inactivating mutation R272Q in the human intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene caused profound multiplex developmental defects in human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome. ECO patients exhibited a wide variety of skeletal abnormalities, yet the underlying mechanisms by which ICK regulates skeletal development remained largely unknown. The goal of this study was to understand the structural and mechanistic basis underlying skeletal anomalies caused by ICK dysfunction. Ick R272Q knock-in transgenic mouse model not only recapitulated major ECO skeletal defects such as short limbs and polydactyly but also revealed a deformed spine with defective intervertebral disk. Loss of ICK function markedly reduced mineralization in the spinal column, ribs, and long bones. Ick mutants showed a significant decrease in the proliferation zone of long bones and the number of type X collagen-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes in the spinal column and the growth plate of long bones. These results implicate that ICK plays an important role in bone and cartilage development by promoting chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. Our findings provided new mechanistic insights into the skeletal phenotype of human ECO and ECO-like syndromes.

  6. Impact of probiotic drugs, based on Enterobacter faecium autostrains, on human intestinal microflora in confined habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Batov, Alexey; Usanova, Nonna

    The aim of research: Investigation of influence of probiotic drugs based on autostrains of Enter-obacter faecium, selected from the crew in long term isolation experiment in confined habitat. It is known that during long-term presence in confined habitat the risk of infectious diseases increases. One of the main infectious risk occurs during first 20 days of isolation as a result of exchange of strains and stress-mediated disbacterioses. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate activities of probiotics to avoid this risk. Furthermore, in case of super long term autonomous flight there should be possibilities of application of autochthonous microflora strains as pro-biotics to strengthen colonial resistance of crews. Materials and methods: In the experiment there were used probiotic drugs based on autostrains of E. faecium, selected from the crew before the experiment. Probiotic drugs were consumed during 30 days since the beginning of the experiment with the break of consumption between 10th to 19th day. Results: Comparing the state of intestinal microflora of the crew on the baseline and 14th day of experiment re-vealed remarkable changes of microflora: the increasing of concentration of bifidobacteria and E. faecium (approximately 10 times), elimination of hemolytic streptococcus, yeasts, reduction of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative non-fermenting rods, lactobacilli and normal E.coli. On the 45th day of isolation, 15 days after finishing of auto-strains administration, there fere signs of restoration of disbacteriosis: the quantitative decreasing lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and normal E.coli, increasing of the rate of S.aureus, hemolytic gramnegative nonfermentive rods. Conclusion: Thus we managed to avoid risk of pathogenicity potential growth in first 2 decades of isolation. Application of probiotic, based on the autostrains of E. faecium leads to insignificant changes of concentration of lactobacteries, bifidobacteries, normal E. coli and to

  7. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijter Jan M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, arginase-1 (ARG1, arginase-2 (ARG2, and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants.

  8. Fertility, Human Capital, and Economic Growth over the Demographic Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Do low fertility and population aging lead to economic decline if couples have fewer children, but invest more in each child? By addressing this question, this article extends previous work in which the authors show that population aging leads to an increased demand for wealth that can, under some conditions, lead to increased capital per worker and higher per capita consumption. This article is based on an overlapping generations (OLG) model which highlights the quantity–quality tradeoff and the links between human capital investment and economic growth. It incorporates new national level estimates of human capital investment produced by the National Transfer Accounts project. Simulation analysis is employed to show that, even in the absence of the capital dilution effect, low fertility leads to higher per capita consumption through human capital accumulation, given plausible model parameters. PMID:20495605

  9. Small-intestinal dysfunction accompanies the complex endocrinopathy of human proprotein convertase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Robert S; Creemers, John W M; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2003-01-01

    We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound heterozygos......We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound...

  10. Computational Studies of Drug Release, Transport and Absorption in the Human Intestines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behafarid, Farhad; Brasseur, J. G.; Vijayakumar, G.; Jayaraman, B.; Wang, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Following disintegration of a drug tablet, a cloud of particles 10-200 μm in diameter enters the small intestine where drug molecules are absorbed into the blood. Drug release rate depends on particle size, solubility and hydrodynamic enhancements driven by gut motility. To quantify the interrelationships among dissolution, transport and wall permeability, we apply lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the drug concentration field in the 3D gut released from polydisperse distributions of drug particles in the "fasting" vs. "fed" motility states. Generalized boundary conditions allow for both solubility and gut wall permeability to be systematically varied. We apply a local 'quasi-steady state' approximation for drug dissolution using a mathematical model generalized for hydrodynamic enhancements and heterogeneity in drug release rate. We observe fundamental differences resulting from the interplay among release, transport and absorption in relationship to particle size distribution, luminal volume, motility, solubility and permeability. For example, whereas smaller volume encourages higher bulk concentrations and reduced release rate, it also encourages higher absorption rate, making it difficult to generalize predictions. Supported by FDA.

  11. The impact of in vitro digestion on bioaccessibility of polyphenols from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their influence on iron absorption by human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lisa; Deußer, Hannah; Evers, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The composition of potatoes as determined by chemical extraction has been described extensively. It is thus quite well known that, among other compounds, potato is rich in polyphenols, vitamins and in some minerals. This paper underlines the important role of simulated gastro-intestinal in vitro digestion in the bioaccessibility of polyphenols (chlorogenic acid and derivatives, and rutin) from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their impact on iron uptake. Concentrations of polyphenols in the flesh of two potato cultivars (Nicola, white potato, and Vitelotte, purple potato) and sweet potato were measured by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography after boiling and after in vitro digestion. Chemical extraction underestimates polyphenol amounts that can be released during digestion and that are actually bioaccessible. Iron uptake, as evaluated by a ferritin assay, by intestinal human cells was decreased after incubation with the intestinal phase of in vitro digestion, presumably due to the presence of polyphenols.

  12. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected agai...

  13. Effects of Posture and Meal Volume on Gastric Emptying, Intestinal Transit, Oral Glucose Tolerance, Blood Pressure and Gastrointestinal Symptoms After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Debreceni, Tamara L; Burgstad, Carly M; Wishart, Judith M; Bellon, Max; Rayner, Chris K; Wittert, Gary A; Horowitz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of posture and drink volume on gastric/pouch emptying (G/PE), intestinal transit, hormones, absorption, glycaemia, blood pressure and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms after gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB)). Ten RYGB subjects were studied on four occasions in randomized order (sitting vs. supine posture; 50 vs. 150 ml of labelled water mixed with 3 g 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-OMG) and 50 g glucose). G/PE, caecal arrival time (CAT), blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), peptide YY (PYY), 3-OMG, blood pressure, heart rate and GI symptoms were assessed over 240 min. Controls were ten volunteers with no medical condition or previous abdominal surgery, who were studied with the 150-ml drink in the sitting position. Compared to controls, PE (P < 0.001) and CAT (P < 0.001) were substantially more rapid in RYGB subjects. In RYGB, PE was more rapid in the sitting position (2.5 ± 0.7 vs. 16.6 ± 5.3 min, P = 0.02) and tends to be faster after 150 ml than the 50-ml drinks (9.5 ± 2.9 vs. 14.0 ± 3.5 min, P = 0.16). The sitting position and larger volume drinks were associated with greater releases of insulin, GLP-1 and PYY, as well as more hypotension (P < 0.01), tachycardia (P < 0.01) and postprandial symptoms (P < 0.001). Pouch emptying, blood pressure and GI symptoms after RYGB are dependent on both posture and meal volume.

  14. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    -, č. 345 (2007), s. 1-34 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labor markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp345.pdf

  15. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2009), s. 241-274 ISSN 0967-0750 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labour markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.774, year: 2009

  16. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    -, č. 6569 (2007), s. 1-34 ISSN 0265-8003 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : human capital * unemployment * labour mobility Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cepr.org/pubs/new-dps/dplist.asp?dpno=6569.asp

  17. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-05-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease.

  18. Cysteine-Rich Intestinal Protein 1 Silencing Inhibits Migration and Invasion in Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guoyang; Zou, Liyuan; Zhou, Lin; Gao, Peiqiong; Qian, Xinlai; Cui, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine-rich intestinal protein 1 (CRIP1), a member of the LIM/double zinc finger protein family, is abnormally expressed in several tumour types. However, few data are available on the role of CRIP1 in cancer. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression profile and functions of CRIP1 in colorectal cancer. To examine the protein expression level of CRIP1, immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on 56 pairs of colon cancer tissue samples. Western blotting was performed to investigate CRIP1 protein expression in four colon cancer cell lines. The endogenous expression of CRIP1 was suppressed using short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Cell proliferation assays were used to determine whether CRIP1 silencing affected cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell apoptosis. The effects of silencing CRIP1 on cell migration and invasion was detected using the transwell and wound-healing assays. IHC analysis showed that protein level of CRIP1 was significantly higher in tumour tissue samples than in paired non-tumour tissue samples and that the CRIP1 level was higher in metastatic tissue samples than in non-metastatic tissue samples. In addition, protein levels of CRIP1 were higher in highly metastatic colon cancer cell lines than in colon cancer cell lines with low metastasis. Further, CRIP1 silencing had no effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis in SW620 and HT29 cells. CRIP1 silencing suppressed cell migration and invasion obviously in SW620 and HT29 cells. The present study provides new evidence that abnormal expression of CRIP1 might be related to the degree of metastasis in colorectal cancer and that CRIP1 silencing could effectively inhibit migration and invasion during colorectal cancer development. These findings might aid the development of a biomarker for colon cancer prognosis and metastasis, and thus help to treat this common type of cancer. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance the viability and proliferation of human fetal intestinal epithelial cells following hypoxic injury via paracrine mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Brent R; Markel, Troy A; Herrmann, Jeremy L; Abarbanell, Aaron M; Meldrum, Daniel R

    2009-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be used to treat injured tissues. The ability of MSCs to treat injured fetal intestinal epithelial cells (FIEs), similar to those in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis, has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that MSCs would enhance FIE viability and proliferation after hypoxic injury via paracrine mechanisms. LLC-PK1 cells (differentiated control [DC]) and human MSCs were exposed to 1 hour of hypoxia. Cells were reoxygenated for 24 hours and cell-free conditioned media were collected. Human FIEs were exposed to 1 hour of hypoxia and plated for experiments. FIEs were reoxygenated in nonconditioned media, DC-conditioned media, or MSC-conditioned media. Supernatants were analyzed for interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and cell counting. Proliferation was determined via 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Expression of caspases-3 and -8 was determined via Western blot. FIEs reoxygenated in MSC-conditioned media demonstrated enhanced viability and increased proliferation after hypoxic injury. Enhanced FIE viability and proliferation were associated with increased IL-6, HGF, and VEGF, as well as decreased expression of caspase-3. MSCs may increase the viability and proliferative capacity of FIEs after hypoxic injury via the paracrine release of IL-6, HGF, and VEGF, as well as downregulation of apoptotic signaling.

  20. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of recombinant human lysozyme in bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice promotes the growth of Bifidobacterium and inhibits the growth of Salmonella in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Lu; Liu, Shen; Shang, Shengzhe; Zhang, Huihua; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ning

    2018-04-20

    Targeted gene modification is a novel intervention strategy to increase disease resistance more quickly than traditional animal breeding. Human lysozyme, a natural, non-specific immune factor, participates in innate immunity, exerts a wide range of antimicrobial activities against pathogens, and has immuneregulatory effects. Therefore, it is a candidate gene for improved disease resistance in animals. In this study, we successfully generated a transgenic mouse model by microinjecting a modified bacterial artificial chromosome containing a recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) gene into the pronuclei of fertilized mouse embryos. rhLZ was expressed in serum, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine but not in milk. rhLZ protein concentrations in the serum of transgenic mice ranged from 2.09 to 2.60 mg/l. To examine the effect of rhLZ on intestinal microbiota, total aerobes, total anaerobes, Clostridium, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium, and Lactobacillus were measured in the intestines of transgenic and wild type mice. Results showed that Bifidobacteria were significantly increased (p < 0.001), whereas Salmonella were significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in transgenic mice compared to wild type mice. Our study suggests that rhLZ expression is a potential strategy to increase animal disease resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The human milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose attenuates the severity of experimental necrotising enterocolitis by enhancing mesenteric perfusion in the neonatal intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Jia, Hongpeng; Lu, Peng; Fulton, William B; Martin, Laura Y; Prindle, Thomas; Nino, Diego F; Zhou, Qinjie; Ma, Congrong; Ozolek, John A; Buck, Rachael H; Goehring, Karen C; Hackam, David J

    2016-10-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a common disease in premature infants characterised by intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. The only effective preventative strategy against NEC is the administration of breast milk, although the protective mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesise that an abundant human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) in breast milk, 2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), protects against NEC by enhancing intestinal mucosal blood flow, and we sought to determine the mechanisms underlying this protection. Administration of HMO-2'FL protected against NEC in neonatal wild-type mice, resulted in a decrease in pro-inflammatory markers and preserved the small intestinal mucosal architecture. These protective effects occurred via restoration of intestinal perfusion through up-regulation of the vasodilatory molecule endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as administration of HMO-2'FL to eNOS-deficient mice or to mice that received eNOS inhibitors did not protect against NEC, and by 16S analysis HMO-2'FL affected the microbiota of the neonatal mouse gut, although these changes do not seem to be the primary mechanism of protection. Induction of eNOS by HMO-2'FL was also observed in cultured endothelial cells, providing a link between eNOS and HMO in the endothelium. These data demonstrate that HMO-2'FL protects against NEC in part through maintaining mesenteric perfusion via increased eNOS expression, and suggest that the 2'FL found in human milk may be mediating some of the protective benefits of breast milk in the clinical setting against NEC.

  3. Law in Transition Biblioessay: Globalization, Human Rights, Environment, Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Marien

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available As globalization continues, many transformations in international and domestic laws areunderway or called for. There are too many laws and too few, too much law that is inadequateor obsolete, and too much law-breaking. This biblioessay covers some 100 recentbooks, nearly all recently published, arranged in four categories. 1 International Lawincludes six overviews/textbooks on comparative law, laws related to warfare and security,pushback against demands of globalization, and gender perspectives; 2 Human Rightsencompasses general overviews and normative visions, several books on how some statesviolate human rights, five items on how good laws can end poverty and promote prosperity,and laws regulating working conditions and health rights; 3 Environment/Resources coversgrowth of international environmental law, visions of law for a better environmental future,laws to govern genetic resources and increasingly stressed water resources, two books onprospects for climate change liability, and items on toxic hazards and problems of compliance;4 Technology, Etc. identifies eight books on global crime and the failed war on drugs,books on the response to terrorism and guarding privacy and mobility in our high-tech age,seven books on how infotech is changing law and legal processes while raising intellectualproperty questions, biomedical technologies and the law, and general views on the need forupdated laws and constitutions. In sum, this essay suggests the need for deeper and timelyanalysis of the many books on changes in law.

  4. Transition in the Human Exploration of Space at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Carla A.; Cabana, Robert

    2011-01-01

    NASA is taking the next step in human exploration, beyond low Earth orbit. We have been going to low Earth orbit for the past 50 years and are using this experience to work with commercial companies to perform this function. This will free NASA resources to develop the systems necessary to travel to a Near Earth Asteroid, the Moon, Lagrange Points, and eventually Mars. At KSC, we are positioning ourselves to become a multi-user launch complex and everything we are working on is bringing us closer to achieving this goal. A vibrant multi-use spaceport is to the 21st Century what the airport was to the 20th Century - an invaluable transportation hub that supports government needs while promoting economic development and commercial markets beyond Earth's atmosphere. This past year saw the end of Shuttle, but the announcements of NASA's crew module, Orion, and heavy-lift rocket, the SLS, as well as the establishment of the Commercial Crew Program. We have a busy, but very bright future ahead of us and KSC is looking forward to playing an integral part in the next era of human space exploration. The future is SLS, 21st Century Ground Systems Program, and the Commercial Crew Program; and the future is here.

  5. A gastro-resistant ovalbumin bi-layered mini-tablet-in-tablet system for the delivery of Lactobacillus acidophilus probiotic to simulated human intestinal and colon conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Mershen; Choonara, Yahya Essop; van Vuuren, Sandy; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness

    2015-07-01

    The viability of probiotic bacteria during formulation processes and delivery is vital to ensure health benefits. This study focuses on the use of gastro-resistant denatured ovalbumin for the targeted delivery of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus to simulated human intestinal and colon conditions through a bi-layered mini-tablet-in-tablet system (BMTTS). The BMTTS consists of two gastro-resistant ovalbumin mini-tablets containing L. acidophilus suspended in lactose and eudragit S100 for targeted intestinal and colonic delivery respectively. Luminescence has been utilized to ensure probiotic viability during formulation processes in addition to determining all probiotic release profiles. The mechanism of probiotic release from the ovalbumin matrix was ascertained using mathematical modelling and molecular docking studies. Magnetic resonance imaging and differential scanning calorimetry are also included as part of the in-vitro characterization of the ovalbumin system. The BMTTS was effective in the delivery of L. acidophilus to simulated human intestinal and colon conditions. Formulation processes were furthermore determined to maintain probiotic viability. Statistical analysis of the release data noted a significant effect of pH denaturation on the release properties of ovalbumin. Magnetic resonance imaging results have indicated a decrease in ovalbumin matrix size upon exposure to simulated intestinal fluid. Molecular docking studies carried out depicted the interaction and binding positions inherent to the ovalbumin-pancreatic trypsin interaction complex indicating the possible enzymatic degradation of ovalbumin leading to the release of the probiotic from the protein matrix. The BMTTS has been determined to be effective in the protection and delivery of probiotic L. acidophilus to simulated human intestinal and colonic conditions. Molecular docking analysis has noted that pancreatin exerts a significant effect on probiotic release from the gastro

  6. The intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol by hypercholesterolemic (type II) and normocholesterolemic humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, W E; Lin, D S

    1974-04-01

    The incomplete absorption of dietary cholesterol may represent an adaptive intestinal barrier that prevents hypercholesterolemia. To explore this mechanism, we compared cholesterol absorption in 15 normocholesterolemic and 6 hypercholesterolemic (type II) subjects fed background cholesterol-free formula diets with 40% of calories as fat. Each test meal consisted of a breakfast into which was incorporated scrambled egg yolk containing 300-500 mg of cholesterol and [4-(14)C]cholesterol (3-22 muCi), either naturally incorporated into the yolk cholesterol by previous isotope injection into the laying hen or added in peanut oil to the yolk of the test breakfast. In some instances [1alpha-(3)H]cholesterol was the radioactive marker. The radioactivity of the fecal neutral sterol fraction was determined in daily stool samples for the next 7 days to provide an estimate of unabsorbed dietary cholesterol. The amount of absorbed and reexcreted labeled cholesterol proved negligible. Most unabsorbed dietary cholesterol appeared in the stool on the second or third day after the meal, and 95% or more was recovered in the stool by 6 days. Plasma specific activity curves were usually maximal at 48 h. Normal subjects absorbed 44.5+/-9.3 (SD) of the administered cholesterol (range 25.9-60.3). Hypercholesterolemics absorbed the same percentage of cholesterol as normals: 47.6+/-12.6% (range 29.3-67.3). Absorption was similar whether the radiolabeled cholesterol was added to egg yolk or naturally incorporated in it (42.1+/-9.3 vs. 48.9+/-9.8%). Six normal subjects were fed a cholesterol-free formula for 4 wk, and then different amounts of cholesterol (110-610 mg/day) were added for another 4 wk. At the end of each period, single test meals containing either 110, 310, or 610 mg of cholesterol and [1alpha-(3)H]cholesterol were administered. Cholesterol absorption was 42.3+/-6.0% and 45.4+/-8.3% for the two dietary periods, respectively. The absolute cholesterol absorption was linearly

  7. Availability of intestinal microbial lysine for whole body lysine homeostasis in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metges, C C; El-Khoury, A E; Henneman, L; Petzke, K J; Grant, I; Bedri, S; Pereira, P P; Ajami, A M; Fuller, M F; Young, V R

    1999-10-01

    We have investigated whether there is a net contribution of lysine synthesized de novo by the gastrointestinal microflora to lysine homeostasis in six adults. On two separate occasions an adequate diet was given for a total of 11 days, and a 24-h (12-h fast, 12-h fed) tracer protocol was performed on the last day, in which lysine turnover, oxidation, and splanchnic uptake were measured on the basis of intravenous and oral administration of L-[1-(13)C]lysine and L-[6,6-(2)H(2)]lysine, respectively. [(15)N(2)]urea or (15)NH(4)Cl was ingested daily over the last 6 days to label microbial protein. In addition, seven ileostomates were studied with (15)NH(4)Cl. [(15)N]lysine enrichment in fecal and ileal microbial protein, as precursor for microbial lysine absorption, and in plasma free lysine was measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Differences in plasma [(13)C]- and [(2)H(2)]lysine enrichments during the 12-h fed period were observed between the two (15)N tracer studies, although the reason is unclear, and possibly unrelated to the tracer form per se. In the normal adults, after (15)NH(4)Cl and [(15)N(2)]urea intake, respectively, lysine derived from fecal microbial protein accounted for 5 and 9% of the appearance rate of plasma lysine. With ileal microbial lysine enrichment, the contribution of microbial lysine to plasma lysine appearance was 44%. This amounts to a gross microbial lysine contribution to whole body plasma lysine turnover of between 11 and 130 mg. kg(-1). day(-1), depending on the [(15)N]lysine precursor used. However, insofar as microbial amino acid synthesis is accompanied by microbial breakdown of endogenous amino acids or their oxidation by intestinal tissues, this may not reflect a net increase in lysine absorption. Thus we cannot reliably estimate the quantitative contribution of microbial lysine to host lysine homeostasis with the present paradigm. However, the results confirm the significant presence of

  8. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P.; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Burns, Alan J.; Christie, Christine K.; Bentley, Karen L. de Mesy; Brooks, Alice S.; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2

  9. The consequence of regional gradients of P-gp and CYP3A4 for drug-drug interactions by P-gp inhibitors and the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay in the human intestine ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, M.; Graaf, I.A.M. de; Steeg, E. van de; Jager, M.H. de; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal P-gp and CYP3A4 work coordinately to reduce the intracellular concentration of drugs, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on this interplay are of clinical importance and require pre-clinical investigation. Using precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) of human jejunum, ileum and

  10. Fermentation of D-Tagatose by Human Intestinal Bacteria and Dairy Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bertelsen, Hans; Andersen, Hans; Tvede, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A number of 174 normal or pathogenic human enteric bacteria and dairy lactic acid bacteria were screened for D-tagatose fermentation by incubation for 48 hours. Selection criteria for fermentation employed included a drop in pH below 5.5 and a distance to controls of more than 0.5. Only a few of the normal occurring enteric human bacteria were able to ferment D-tagatose, among those Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Lactobacillus strains. D-Tagatose fermentation seems to be comm...

  11. Gastric and intestinal myiasis due to Ornidia obesa (Diptera: Syrphidae in humans. First report in colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo López V

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasis are parasitic infestations of animals and humans tissues and is caused by fly larvae. This kind of infestation has Public Health importance. In the Colombian biomedical literature the reports about myiasis in humans are scarce. In this paper, we report two cases of patients with gastrointestinal myiasis where the etiologic agents involved were Ornidia obesa and Ornidia sp (Diptera: Syrphidae. The taxonomic identification of the larvae was done at the Colombian Institute of Tropical Medicine and taxonomic confirmation was done at the laboratory of medicine veterinary and Zoology of Sao Pablo University. These two cases of myiasis are of first report in Colombia

  12. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; Heijden OG van der; Giessen JWB van der; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Published data on infection of human hosts with various protozoa, bacteria, and viruses causing gastro-enteritis are used to establish a quantitative relationship between ingested dose and the risk of infection. For all data sets analysed, this relationship is determined by fitting either an

  13. Urban Transit System Microbial Communities Differ by Surface Type and Interaction with Humans and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tiffany; Joice, Regina; Vallarino, Jose; Abu-Ali, Galeb; Hartmann, Erica M; Shafquat, Afrah; DuLong, Casey; Baranowski, Catherine; Gevers, Dirk; Green, Jessica L; Morgan, Xochitl C; Spengler, John D; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Public transit systems are ideal for studying the urban microbiome and interindividual community transfer. In this study, we used 16S amplicon and shotgun metagenomic sequencing to profile microbial communities on multiple transit surfaces across train lines and stations in the Boston metropolitan transit system. The greatest determinant of microbial community structure was the transit surface type. In contrast, little variation was observed between geographically distinct train lines and stations serving different demographics. All surfaces were dominated by human skin and oral commensals such as Propionibacterium , Corynebacterium , Staphylococcus , and Streptococcus . The detected taxa not associated with humans included generalists from alphaproteobacteria, which were especially abundant on outdoor touchscreens. Shotgun metagenomics further identified viral and eukaryotic microbes, including Propionibacterium phage and Malassezia globosa . Functional profiling showed that Propionibacterium acnes pathways such as propionate production and porphyrin synthesis were enriched on train holding surfaces (holds), while electron transport chain components for aerobic respiration were enriched on touchscreens and seats. Lastly, the transit environment was not found to be a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. Our results suggest that microbial communities on transit surfaces are maintained from a metapopulation of human skin commensals and environmental generalists, with enrichments corresponding to local interactions with the human body and environmental exposures. IMPORTANCE Mass transit environments, specifically, urban subways, are distinct microbial environments with high occupant densities, diversities, and turnovers, and they are thus especially relevant to public health. Despite this, only three culture-independent subway studies have been performed, all since 2013 and all with widely differing designs and conclusions. In this study, we

  14. Perfil epidemiológico e morbimortalidade dos pacientes submetidos à reconstrução de trânsito intestinal: experiência de um centro secundário do Nordeste Brasileiro Epidemiologic profile and morbimortality of patients undergoing reconstruction intestinal transit: experience of a secundary health service in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeany Borges e Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A reconstrução do trânsito intestinal não está isenta de riscos cirúrgicos e apresenta taxas consideráveis de complicações pós-operatórias, sendo que a infecção continua a ser um dos maiores desafios existentes neste procedimento. OBJETIVO: Perfil epidemiológico e morbimortalidade dos pacientes submetidos à reconstrução de trânsito intestinal. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente 86 prontuários de pacientes com colostomia ou ileostomia, através de fatores que tivessem impacto sobre a morbimortalidade após a reconstrução de trânsito intestinal, de janeiro de 2003 a abril de 2009. RESULTADOS: Houve 20 mulheres e 60 homens, com idade média de 43 anos. A colostomia em alça (n=34 e o trauma abdominal indicando colostomia ou ileostomia foram as condições mais frequentes. O intervalo médio entre a confecção do estoma e a reconstrução de trânsito intestinal foi 15,7 meses. O índice de morbidade foi 56,8%, sendo a infecção incisional a complicação mais comum (27.47%. A permanência hospitalar média foi 7,6 dias. Houve regressão linear positiva entre permanência hospitalar pós-operatória e a idade do paciente. Demonstrou-se associação estatisticamente significativa entre o prolongamento da permanência hospitalar e a ocorrência de complicações (pBACKGROUND: The reconstruction of the intestinal tract is not surgical complications risk-free and is associated to postoperative complications high rates; furthermore, infection remains the hardest challenge in this procedure. AIM: Epidemiological profile and mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing reconstruction of intestinal transit. METHODS: Retrospectively, 86 patients with intestinal stomas were analyzed through factors that impact on the morbimortality afterwards intestinal transit reconstruction, since January 2003 to April 2009. RESULTS: Loop colostomy (n=34 and abdominal trauma implicating 38.2% of indications to colostomy or

  15. Returns to the market: valuing human capital in the post-transition Czech and Slovak Republics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filer, R.; Jurajda, Štěpán; Plánovský, J.

    -, č. 125 (1999), s. 1-26 ISSN 1211-3298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7085904 Keywords : human capital * post-transition Czech and Slovak Republics Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp125.pdf

  16. Multidomain analyses of a longitudinal human microbiome intestinal cleanout perturbation experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fukuyama

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Our work focuses on the stability, resilience, and response to perturbation of the bacterial communities in the human gut. Informative flash flood-like disturbances that eliminate most gastrointestinal biomass can be induced using a clinically-relevant iso-osmotic agent. We designed and executed such a disturbance in human volunteers using a dense longitudinal sampling scheme extending before and after induced diarrhea. This experiment has enabled a careful multidomain analysis of a controlled perturbation of the human gut microbiota with a new level of resolution. These new longitudinal multidomain data were analyzed using recently developed statistical methods that demonstrate improvements over current practices. By imposing sparsity constraints we have enhanced the interpretability of the analyses and by employing a new adaptive generalized principal components analysis, incorporated modulated phylogenetic information and enhanced interpretation through scoring of the portions of the tree most influenced by the perturbation. Our analyses leverage the taxa-sample duality in the data to show how the gut microbiota recovers following this perturbation. Through a holistic approach that integrates phylogenetic, metagenomic and abundance information, we elucidate patterns of taxonomic and functional change that characterize the community recovery process across individuals. We provide complete code and illustrations of new sparse statistical methods for high-dimensional, longitudinal multidomain data that provide greater interpretability than existing methods.

  17. Multidomain analyses of a longitudinal human microbiome intestinal cleanout perturbation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Julia; Rumker, Laurie; Sankaran, Kris; Jeganathan, Pratheepa; Dethlefsen, Les; Relman, David A; Holmes, Susan P

    2017-08-01

    Our work focuses on the stability, resilience, and response to perturbation of the bacterial communities in the human gut. Informative flash flood-like disturbances that eliminate most gastrointestinal biomass can be induced using a clinically-relevant iso-osmotic agent. We designed and executed such a disturbance in human volunteers using a dense longitudinal sampling scheme extending before and after induced diarrhea. This experiment has enabled a careful multidomain analysis of a controlled perturbation of the human gut microbiota with a new level of resolution. These new longitudinal multidomain data were analyzed using recently developed statistical methods that demonstrate improvements over current practices. By imposing sparsity constraints we have enhanced the interpretability of the analyses and by employing a new adaptive generalized principal components analysis, incorporated modulated phylogenetic information and enhanced interpretation through scoring of the portions of the tree most influenced by the perturbation. Our analyses leverage the taxa-sample duality in the data to show how the gut microbiota recovers following this perturbation. Through a holistic approach that integrates phylogenetic, metagenomic and abundance information, we elucidate patterns of taxonomic and functional change that characterize the community recovery process across individuals. We provide complete code and illustrations of new sparse statistical methods for high-dimensional, longitudinal multidomain data that provide greater interpretability than existing methods.

  18. No midterm advantages in the middle term using small intestinal submucosa and human amniotic membrane in Achilles tendon transverse tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yushu; Peng, Yinbo; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min; Redmond, Robert W; Ni, Tao

    2016-11-24

    The study was aimed to compare the effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and human amniotic membrane (HAM) on Achilles tendon healing. A total of 48 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups. A full-thickness transverse tenotomy was made at the right leg of the rabbits. Then, the laceration site was wrapped with HAM (P/A group) or SIS (P/S group). The ultimate stress (US) and Young's modulus (E) of the tendons were detected for biomechanical analysis. Histological evaluation was performed using hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical, and immunofluorescent stain. Expression of collagen I was detected by western blot analysis, and levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were measured. Finally, adhesion formation was evaluated. There were no significant differences in filamentous adhesion, cross-sectional areas of the laceration sites, levels of inflammatory response, and collagen type I expression between the P/A and P/S groups (p > 0.05). Compared with the P/A group, the US and E values were significantly higher in the P/S group at day 7 (p Achilles tendon injury in the early stage of healing.

  19. Effects of lactoferrin on the production of interferon-λ by the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kouichirou; Oda, Hirotsugu; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

    2017-02-01

    We examined the in-vitro effects of bovine lactoferrin (LF) on the production of interferon-λ (IFN-λ), an antiviral cytokine important for the defense of enterocytes, using the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT-29. HT-29 cell cultures were treated with LF for 1 h, and the cultures were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). LF increased the concentration of IFN-λ in the culture supernatant after stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. A similar increase in the concentration of IFN-λ was observed in the supernatant of cells washed between treatment with LF and stimulation with poly I:C. At 6 and 24 h after stimulation with poly I:C (early and late phases, respectively) treated cultures contained significantly higher concentrations of IFN-λ1 in the culture supernatant, and significantly higher IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2 mRNA levels, than controls. These results suggest that LF activates the innate cellular immunity of the enterocytes to double-stranded RNA and increases the production of IFN-λ.

  20. Selective growth-inhibiting effects of compounds identified in Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark on human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Kim, Jun-Ran; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Kyoung Soon; Takeoka, Gary R; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2005-02-23

    The growth-inhibiting activity of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid and lapachol identified in the inner bark of taheebo, Tabebuia impetiginosa, toward 10 human intestinal bacteria was evaluated by using a paper disk diffusion bioassay and compared to those of seven lapachol congeners (1,4-naphthoquinone, naphthazarin, menadione, lawsone, plumbagin, juglone, and dichlone) as well as two commercially available antibiotics, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid exhibited very strong growth inhibition of Clostridium paraputrificum at 1 microg/disk while 100 microg/disk of lapachol was needed for moderate growth inhibition of the same organism. These two isolates exhibited weak inhibition of Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli at 100 microg/disk while no adverse effects were observed on the growth of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei at 1000 microg/disk. Structure-activity relationships indicate that a methyl group in the C-2 position of 1,4-naphthoquinone derivatives might play an important role in antibacterial activity.

  1. The prevention of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells by salvianic acid A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The topic of radiation always provokes public debate, and the uses of radiation for therapeutic and other purposes have always been associated with some anxiety. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases including cerebrovascular diseases, coronary artery diseases, and myocardial infarction. Salvianolic acid A (SAA d (+-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid is the principal effective, watersoluble constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In our present study, radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC in the presence and absence of SAA were examined. We investigated the effects of SAA on ROS formation and the activity of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, the lipid peroxidative index and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidant (GSH. Finally, we investigated whether the reduction of radiation-induced cell death caused by SAA might be related to mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Present findings indicate that SAA is a promising radioprotective agent with a strong antioxidant activity. SAA exerted its protective action on the proliferative activity of HIEC cells as evidenced by decreased cytotoxicity after exposure to γ-radiation. It is possible that SAA achieved its radioprotective action, at least in part, by enhancing DNA repair and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, by scavenging ROS and by inhibiting the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  2. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok

    1992-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome

  3. Purification, crystallization and diffraction studies of the methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from antibiotic-resistant pathogens of the genus Bacteroides from the human intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Veerendra; Mallika, Nagarajan; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and diffraction of two methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two Bacteroides species of antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine are reported. The methyltransferases BT-2972 and BVU-3255 from two different Bacteroides species that are antibiotic-resistant pathogens from the human intestine were cloned, overexpressed and purified, yielding approximately 120 mg of each protein from 1 l culture. Apo BT-2972 and BVU-3255 and their complexes with S-adenosylmethionine or S-adenosylhomocysteine were crystallized in four different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. These crystals diffracted to resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 2.2 Å. Sequence analysis suggested that the two proteins are homologous small-molecule methyltransferases

  4. Rice Bran and Probiotics Alter the Porcine Large Intestine and Serum Metabolomes for Protection against Human Rotavirus Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Nora Jean; Yuan, Lijuan; Yang, Xingdong; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (HRV) is a leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea, and there is limited vaccine efficacy in the developing world. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs consuming a prophylactic synbiotic combination of probiotics and rice bran (Pro+RB) did not exhibit HRV diarrhea after challenge. Multiple immune, gut barrier protective, and anti-diarrheal mechanisms contributed to the prophylactic efficacy of Pro+RB when compared to probiotics (Pro) alone. In order to understand the molecular signature associated with diarrheal protection by Pro+RB, a global non-targeted metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the large intestinal contents and serum of neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry platform revealed significantly different metabolites (293 in LIC and 84 in serum) in the pigs fed Pro+RB compared to Pro, and many of these metabolites were lipids and amino acid/peptides. Lipid metabolites included 2-oleoylglycerol (increased 293.40-fold in LIC of Pro+RB, p = 3.04E-10), which can modulate gastric emptying, andhyodeoxycholate (decreased 0.054-fold in the LIC of Pro+RB, p = 0.0040) that can increase colonic mucus production to improve intestinal barrier function. Amino acid metabolites included cysteine (decreased 0.40-fold in LIC, p = 0.033, and 0.62-fold in serum, p = 0.014 of Pro+RB), which has been found to reduce inflammation, lower oxidative stress and modulate mucosal immunity, and histamine (decreased 0.18-fold in LIC, p = 0.00030, of Pro+RB and 1.57-fold in serum, p = 0.043), which modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as influences the enteric nervous system. Alterations to entire LIC and serum metabolic pathways further contributed to the anti-diarrheal and anti-viral activities of Pro+RB such as sphingolipid, mono/diacylglycerol, fatty acid, secondary bile acid, and polyamine metabolism. Sphingolipid and long chain fatty acid profiles influenced the ability of HRV to

  5. Rice Bran and Probiotics Alter the Porcine Large Intestine and Serum Metabolomes for Protection against Human Rotavirus Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth P. Ryan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human rotavirus (HRV is a leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea, and there is limited vaccine efficacy in the developing world. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs consuming a prophylactic synbiotic combination of probiotics and rice bran (Pro+RB did not exhibit HRV diarrhea after challenge. Multiple immune, gut barrier protective, and anti-diarrheal mechanisms contributed to the prophylactic efficacy of Pro+RB when compared to probiotics (Pro alone. In order to understand the molecular signature associated with diarrheal protection by Pro+RB, a global non-targeted metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the large intestinal contents and serum of neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry platform revealed significantly different metabolites (293 in LIC and 84 in serum in the pigs fed Pro+RB compared to Pro, and many of these metabolites were lipids and amino acid/peptides. Lipid metabolites included 2-oleoylglycerol (increased 293.40-fold in LIC of Pro+RB, p = 3.04E-10, which can modulate gastric emptying, andhyodeoxycholate (decreased 0.054-fold in the LIC of Pro+RB, p = 0.0040 that can increase colonic mucus production to improve intestinal barrier function. Amino acid metabolites included cysteine (decreased 0.40-fold in LIC, p = 0.033, and 0.62-fold in serum, p = 0.014 of Pro+RB, which has been found to reduce inflammation, lower oxidative stress and modulate mucosal immunity, and histamine (decreased 0.18-fold in LIC, p = 0.00030, of Pro+RB and 1.57-fold in serum, p = 0.043, which modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as influences the enteric nervous system. Alterations to entire LIC and serum metabolic pathways further contributed to the anti-diarrheal and anti-viral activities of Pro+RB such as sphingolipid, mono/diacylglycerol, fatty acid, secondary bile acid, and polyamine metabolism. Sphingolipid and long chain fatty acid profiles influenced the

  6. Interaction of graphene-related materials with human intestinal cells: an in vitro approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, M.; Rupper, P.; Sarrieu, C.; Melucci, M.; Treossi, E.; Schwarz, A.; León, V.; Kraegeloh, A.; Flahaut, E.; Vázquez, E.; Palermo, V.; Wick, P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell viability of exposed Caco-2 cells in respect to untreated GRM could be detected. Furthermore, we explored the interaction of four different GO and Caco-2 cells to identify relevant physicochemical properties for the establishment of a material property-biological response relationship. Despite close interaction with the cell surface and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), no acute toxicity was found for any of the applied GO (concentration range 0-80 μg ml-1) after 24 h and 48 h exposure. Graphene nanoplatelet aggregates led to low acute toxicity at high concentrations, indicating that aggregation, the number of layers or the C/O ratio have a more pronounced effect on the cell viability than the lateral size alone.Graphene-related materials (GRM) inherit unique combinations of physicochemical properties which offer a high potential for technological as well as biomedical applications. It is not clear which physicochemical properties are the most relevant factors influencing the behavior of GRM in complex biological environments. In this study we have focused on the interaction of GRM, especially graphene oxide (GO), and Caco-2 cells in vitro. We mimiked stomach transition by acid-treatment of two representative GRM followed by analysis of their physicochemical properties. No significant changes in the material properties or cell

  7. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of mycotoxins in human small intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Sørensen, Izel Fourie; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of foods and feeds with mycotoxins is of significant concern due to their adverse effects on pig productivity and on animal and human health. Development of scientifically sound in vitro systems for toxicological screening for mycotoxins is important for improvement of food safety...... with mycotoxins for 72 h, and viability was measured by AlamarBlue reduction. For apoptosis studies, cells were treated with mycotoxins for 24 h, and apoptosis was measured by caspase 3/7 activation. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of mycotoxins was calculated from sigmoidal dose-response plots...

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Nicotinergic Peptides SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 on Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Immunocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex I. Chernyavsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for novel and more efficient therapeutic modalities of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is one of the most important tasks of contemporary medicine. The anti-inflammatory action of nicotine in IBD might be therapeutic, but its toxicity due to off-target and nonreceptor effects limited its use and prompted a search for nontoxic nicotinergic drugs. We tested the hypothesis that SLURP-1 and -2—the physiological nicotinergic substances produced by the human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and immunocytes—can mimic the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine. We used human CCL-241 enterocytes, CCL-248 colonocytes, CCRF-CEM T-cells, and U937 macrophages. SLURP-1 diminished the TLR9-dependent secretion of IL-8 by CCL-241, and IFNγ-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 in both IEC types. rSLURP-2 inhibited IL-1β-induced secretion of IL-6 and TLR4- and TLR9-dependent induction of CXCL10 and IL-8, respectively, in CCL-241. rSLURP-1 decreased production of TNFα by T-cells, downregulated IL-1β and IL-6 secretion by macrophages, and moderately upregulated IL-10 production by both types of immunocytes. SLURP-2 downregulated TNFα and IFNγR in T-cells and reduced IL-6 production by macrophages. Combining both SLURPs amplified their anti-inflammatory effects. Learning the pharmacology of SLURP-1 and -2 actions on enterocytes, colonocytes, T cells, and macrophages may help develop novel effective treatments of IBD.

  9. GUTSS: An Alignment-Free Sequence Comparison Method for Use in Human Intestinal Microbiome and Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell J Brittnacher

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of gut microbiomes in clinical studies of human diseases typically rely on identification and quantification of species or genes. In addition to exploring specific functional characteristics of the microbiome and potential significance of species diversity or expansion, microbiome similarity is also calculated to study change in response to therapies directed at altering the microbiome. Established ecological measures of similarity can be constructed from species abundances, however methods for calculating these commonly used ecological measures of similarity directly from whole genome shotgun (WGS metagenomic sequence are lacking.We present an alignment-free method for calculating similarity of WGS metagenomic sequences that is analogous to the Bray-Curtis index for species, implemented by the General Utility for Testing Sequence Similarity (GUTSS software application. This method was applied to intestinal microbiomes of healthy young children to measure developmental changes toward an adult microbiome during the first 3 years of life. We also calculate similarity of donor and recipient microbiomes to measure establishment, or engraftment, of donor microbiota in fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT studies focused on mild to moderate Crohn's disease. We show how a relative index of similarity to donor can be calculated as a measure of change in a patient's microbiome toward that of the donor in response to FMT.Because clinical efficacy of the transplant procedure cannot be fully evaluated without analysis methods to quantify actual FMT engraftment, we developed a method for detecting change in the gut microbiome that is independent of species identification and database bias, sensitive to changes in relative abundance of the microbial constituents, and can be formulated as an index for correlating engraftment success with clinical measures of disease. More generally, this method may be applied to clinical evaluation of

  10. GUTSS: An Alignment-Free Sequence Comparison Method for Use in Human Intestinal Microbiome and Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Heltshe, Sonya L; Hayden, Hillary S; Radey, Matthew C; Weiss, Eli J; Damman, Christopher J; Zisman, Timothy L; Suskind, David L; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of gut microbiomes in clinical studies of human diseases typically rely on identification and quantification of species or genes. In addition to exploring specific functional characteristics of the microbiome and potential significance of species diversity or expansion, microbiome similarity is also calculated to study change in response to therapies directed at altering the microbiome. Established ecological measures of similarity can be constructed from species abundances, however methods for calculating these commonly used ecological measures of similarity directly from whole genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic sequence are lacking. We present an alignment-free method for calculating similarity of WGS metagenomic sequences that is analogous to the Bray-Curtis index for species, implemented by the General Utility for Testing Sequence Similarity (GUTSS) software application. This method was applied to intestinal microbiomes of healthy young children to measure developmental changes toward an adult microbiome during the first 3 years of life. We also calculate similarity of donor and recipient microbiomes to measure establishment, or engraftment, of donor microbiota in fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) studies focused on mild to moderate Crohn's disease. We show how a relative index of similarity to donor can be calculated as a measure of change in a patient's microbiome toward that of the donor in response to FMT. Because clinical efficacy of the transplant procedure cannot be fully evaluated without analysis methods to quantify actual FMT engraftment, we developed a method for detecting change in the gut microbiome that is independent of species identification and database bias, sensitive to changes in relative abundance of the microbial constituents, and can be formulated as an index for correlating engraftment success with clinical measures of disease. More generally, this method may be applied to clinical evaluation of human microbiomes

  11. Effects of phenol on barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line correlate with altered tight junction protein localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Ingrid C; Betanzos, Abigail; Weber, Dominique A; Nava, Porfirio; Miller, Gary W; Parkos, Charles A

    2009-11-15

    Phenol contamination of soil and water has raised concerns among people living near phenol-producing factories and hazardous waste sites containing the chemical. Phenol, particularly in high concentrations, is an irritating and corrosive substance, making mucosal membranes targets of toxicity in humans. However, few data on the effects of phenol after oral exposure exist. We used an in vitro model employing human intestinal epithelial cells (SK-CO15) cultured on permeable supports to examine effects of phenol on epithelial barrier function. We hypothesized that phenol disrupts epithelial barrier by altering tight junction (TJ) protein expression. The dose-response effect of phenol on epithelial barrier function was determined using transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran permeability measurements. We studied phenol-induced changes in cell morphology and expression of several tight junction proteins by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Effects on cell viability were assessed by MTT, Trypan blue, propidium iodide and TUNEL staining. Exposure to phenol resulted in decreased TER and increased paracellular flux of FITC-dextran in a dose-dependent manner. Delocalization of claudin-1 and ZO-1 from TJs to cytosol correlated with the observed increase in permeability after phenol treatment. Additionally, the decrease in TER correlated with changes in the distribution of a membrane raft marker, suggesting phenol-mediated effects on membrane fluidity. Such observations were independent of effects of phenol on cell viability as enhanced permeability occurred at doses of phenol that did not cause cell death. Overall, these findings suggest that phenol may affect transiently the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thus destabilizing TJ-containing microdomains.

  12. Modulation of pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion from HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells by commensal bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, Shomik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) secrete the chemokine CCL20 in response to infection by various enteropathogenic bacteria or exposure to bacterial flagellin. CCL20 recruits immature dendritic cells and lymphocytes to target sites. Here we investigated IEC responses to various pathogenic and commensal bacteria as well as the modulatory effects of commensal bacteria on pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with commensal bacteria (Bifidobacterium infantis or Lactobacillus salivarius), or with Salmonella typhimurium, its flagellin, Clostridium difficile, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, or Mycobacterium smegmatis for varying times. In some studies, HT-29 cells were pre-treated with a commensal strain for 2 hr prior to infection or flagellin stimulation. CCL20 and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Compared to untreated cells, S. typhimurium, C. difficile, M. paratuberculosis, and flagellin activated NF-kappaB and stimulated significant secretion of CCL20 and IL-8 by HT-29 cells. Conversely, B. infantis, L. salivarius or M. smegmatis did not activate NF-kappaB or augment CCL20 or IL-8 production. Treatment with B. infantis, but not L. salivarius, dose-dependently inhibited the baseline secretion of CCL20. In cells pre-treated with B. infantis, C. difficile-, S. typhimurium-, and flagellin-induced CCL20 were significantly attenuated. B. infantis did not limit M. Paratuberculosis-induced CCL20 secretion. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate that a commensal strain can attenuate CCL20 secretion in HT-29 IECs. Collectively, the data indicate that M. paratuberculosis may mediate mucosal damage and that B. infantis can exert immunomodulatory effects on IECs that mediate host responses to flagellin and flagellated enteric pathogens.

  13. Characterization of the Giardia intestinalis secretome during interaction with human intestinal epithelial cells: The impact on host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Liu, Jingyi; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergström Lind, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred; Bergquist, Jonas; Svärd, Staffan G

    2017-12-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a non-invasive protozoan parasite that causes giardiasis in humans, the most common form of parasite-induced diarrhea. Disease mechanisms are not completely defined and very few virulence factors are known. To identify putative virulence factors and elucidate mechanistic pathways leading to disease, we have used proteomics to identify the major excretory-secretory products (ESPs) when Giardia trophozoites of WB and GS isolates (assemblages A and B, respectively) interact with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in vitro. The main parts of the IEC and parasite secretomes are constitutively released proteins, the majority of which are associated with metabolism but several proteins are released in response to their interaction (87 and 41 WB and GS proteins, respectively, 76 and 45 human proteins in response to the respective isolates). In parasitized IECs, the secretome profile indicated effects on the cell actin cytoskeleton and the induction of immune responses whereas that of Giardia showed anti-oxidation, proteolysis (protease-associated) and induction of encystation responses. The Giardia secretome also contained immunodominant and glycosylated proteins as well as new candidate virulence factors and assemblage-specific differences were identified. A minor part of Giardia ESPs had signal peptides (29% for both isolates) and extracellular vesicles were detected in the ESPs fractions, suggesting alternative secretory pathways. Microscopic analyses showed ESPs binding to IECs and partial internalization. Parasite ESPs reduced ERK1/2 and P38 phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Giardia ESPs altered gene expression in IECs, with a transcriptional profile indicating recruitment of immune cells via chemokines, disturbances in glucose homeostasis, cholesterol and lipid metabolism, cell cycle and induction of apoptosis. This is the first study identifying Giardia ESPs and evaluating their effects on IECs. It highlights the importance of

  14. Characterization of the Giardia intestinalis secretome during interaction with human intestinal epithelial cells: The impact on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showgy Y Ma'ayeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia intestinalis is a non-invasive protozoan parasite that causes giardiasis in humans, the most common form of parasite-induced diarrhea. Disease mechanisms are not completely defined and very few virulence factors are known.To identify putative virulence factors and elucidate mechanistic pathways leading to disease, we have used proteomics to identify the major excretory-secretory products (ESPs when Giardia trophozoites of WB and GS isolates (assemblages A and B, respectively interact with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs in vitro.The main parts of the IEC and parasite secretomes are constitutively released proteins, the majority of which are associated with metabolism but several proteins are released in response to their interaction (87 and 41 WB and GS proteins, respectively, 76 and 45 human proteins in response to the respective isolates. In parasitized IECs, the secretome profile indicated effects on the cell actin cytoskeleton and the induction of immune responses whereas that of Giardia showed anti-oxidation, proteolysis (protease-associated and induction of encystation responses. The Giardia secretome also contained immunodominant and glycosylated proteins as well as new candidate virulence factors and assemblage-specific differences were identified. A minor part of Giardia ESPs had signal peptides (29% for both isolates and extracellular vesicles were detected in the ESPs fractions, suggesting alternative secretory pathways. Microscopic analyses showed ESPs binding to IECs and partial internalization. Parasite ESPs reduced ERK1/2 and P38 phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Giardia ESPs altered gene expression in IECs, with a transcriptional profile indicating recruitment of immune cells via chemokines, disturbances in glucose homeostasis, cholesterol and lipid metabolism, cell cycle and induction of apoptosis.This is the first study identifying Giardia ESPs and evaluating their effects on IECs. It highlights the

  15. Physicochemical properties of dietary phytochemicals can predict their passive absorption in the human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby-Pham, Sophie N B; Miller, Rosalind B; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank; Bennett, Louise E

    2017-05-16

    A diet high in phytochemical-rich plant foods is associated with reducing the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, diabetes and cancer. Oxidative stress and inflammation (OSI) is the common component underlying these chronic diseases. Whilst the positive health effects of phytochemicals and their metabolites have been demonstrated to regulate OSI, the timing and absorption for best effect is not well understood. We developed a model to predict the time to achieve maximal plasma concentration (T max ) of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables. We used a training dataset containing 67 dietary phytochemicals from 31 clinical studies to develop the model and validated the model using three independent datasets comprising a total of 108 dietary phytochemicals and 98 pharmaceutical compounds. The developed model based on dietary intake forms and the physicochemical properties lipophilicity and molecular mass accurately predicts T max of dietary phytochemicals and pharmaceutical compounds over a broad range of chemical classes. This is the first direct model to predict T max of dietary phytochemicals in the human body. The model informs the clinical dosing frequency for optimising uptake and sustained presence of dietary phytochemicals in circulation, to maximise their bio-efficacy for positively affect human health and managing OSI in chronic diseases.

  16. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  17. The origins of the Acheulean: past and present perspectives on a major transition in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Ignacio

    2016-07-05

    The emergence of the Acheulean from the earlier Oldowan constitutes a major transition in human evolution, the theme of this special issue. This paper discusses the evidence for the origins of the Acheulean, a cornerstone in the history of human technology, from two perspectives; firstly, a review of the history of investigations on Acheulean research is presented. This approach introduces the evolution of theories throughout the development of the discipline, and reviews the way in which cumulative knowledge led to the prevalent explanatory framework for the emergence of the Acheulean. The second part presents the current state of the art in Acheulean origins research, and reviews the hard evidence for the appearance of this technology in Africa around 1.7 Ma, and its significance for the evolutionary history of Homo erectusThis article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current ICl swell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The ICl swell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates ICl swell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect ICl swell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on ICl

  19. Uptake of phenolic compounds from plant foods in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hithamani, Gavirangappa; Kizhakayil, Dhanya; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2017-12-01

    In continuation of our studies on the bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds from food grains as influenced by domestic processing, we examined the uptake of phenolics from native/sprouted finger millet (Eleucine coracana) and green gram (Vigna radiata) and native/heat-processed onion (Allium cepa) in human Caco-2 cells. Absorption of pure phenolic compounds, as well as the uptake of phenolic compounds from finger millet, green gram, and onion, was investigated in Caco-2 monolayer model. Transport of individual phenolic compounds from apical compartment to the basolateral compartment across Caco-2 monolayer was also investigated. Sprouting enhanced the uptake of syringic acid from both these grains. Open-pan boiling reduced the uptake of quercetin from the onion. Among pure phenolic compounds, syringic acid was maximally absorbed, while the flavonoid isovitexin was least absorbed. Apparent permeability coefficient P (app) of phenolic compounds from their standard solutions was 2.02 x 10 -6 cm/s to 8.94 x 10 -6 cm/s. Sprouting of grains enhanced the uptake of syringic acid by the Caco-2 cells. Open-pan boiling drastically reduced the uptake of quercetin from the onion. The permeability of phenolic acids across Caco-2 monolayer was higher than those of flavonoids.

  20. Preliminary Comparison of Oral and Intestinal Human Microbiota in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edda Russo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS was used to analyze and compare human microbiota from three different compartments, i.e., saliva, feces, and cancer tissue (CT, of a selected cohort of 10 Italian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC vs. 10 healthy controls (saliva and feces. Furthermore, the Fusobacterium nucleatum abundance in the same body site was investigated through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the association with CRC. Differences in bacterial composition, F. nucleatum abundance in healthy controls vs. CRC patients, and the association of F. nucleatum with clinical parameters were observed. Taxonomic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, revealed the presence of three main bacterial phyla, which includes about 80% of reads: Firmicutes (39.18%, Bacteroidetes (30.36%, and Proteobacteria (10.65%. The results highlighted the presence of different bacterial compositions; in particular, the fecal samples of CRC patients seemed to be enriched with Bacteroidetes, whereas in the fecal samples of healthy controls Firmicutes were one of the major phyla detected though these differences were not statistically significant. The CT samples showed the highest alpha diversity values. These results emphasize a different taxonomic composition of feces from CRC compared to healthy controls. Despite the low number of samples included in the study, these results suggest the importance of microbiota in the CRC progression and could pave the way to the development of therapeutic interventions and novel microbial-related diagnostic tools in CRC patients.

  1. Precolonized human commensal Escherichia coli strains serve as a barrier to E. coli O157:H7 growth in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatham, Mary P; Banerjee, Swati; Autieri, Steven M; Mercado-Lubo, Regino; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2009-07-01

    Different Escherichia coli strains generally have the same metabolic capacity for growth on sugars in vitro, but they appear to use different sugars in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine (Fabich et al., Infect. Immun. 76:1143-1152, 2008). Here, mice were precolonized with any of three human commensal strains (E. coli MG1655, E. coli HS, or E. coli Nissle 1917) and 10 days later were fed 10(5) CFU of the same strains. While each precolonized strain nearly eliminated its isogenic strain, confirming that colonization resistance can be modeled in mice, each allowed growth of the other commensal strains to higher numbers, consistent with different commensal E. coli strains using different nutrients in the intestine. Mice were also precolonized with any of five commensal E. coli strains for 10 days and then were fed 10(5) CFU of E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 pathogen. E. coli Nissle 1917 and E. coli EFC1 limited growth of E. coli EDL933 in the intestine (10(3) to 10(4) CFU/gram of feces), whereas E. coli MG1655, E. coli HS, and E. coli EFC2 allowed growth to higher numbers (10(6) to 10(7) CFU/gram of feces). Importantly, when E. coli EDL933 was fed to mice previously co-colonized with three E. coli strains (MG1655, HS, and Nissle 1917), it was eliminated from the intestine (E. coli strains can provide a barrier to infection and suggest that it may be possible to construct E. coli probiotic strains that prevent growth of pathogenic E. coli strains in the intestine.

  2. Human Oral Isolate Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 Reduces Intestinal Barrier Integrity by Increasing the Turnover of Microtubules in Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel C.; Young, Wayne; Clerens, Stefan; Cookson, Adrian L.; McCann, Mark J.; Armstrong, Kelly M.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus fermentum is found in fermented foods and thought to be harmless. In vivo and clinical studies indicate that some L. fermentum strains have beneficial properties, particularly for gastrointestinal health. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), a measure of intestinal barrier integrity. The hypothesis was that L. fermentum AGR1487 decreases the expression of intestinal cell tight junction genes and proteins, thereby reducing barrier integrity. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Caco-2 cells (model of human intestinal epithelial cells) treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 were used to obtain a global view of the effect of the bacterium on intestinal epithelial cells. Specific functional characteristics by which L. fermentum AGR1487 reduces intestinal barrier integrity were examined using confocal microscopy, cell cycle progression and adherence bioassays. The effects of TEER-enhancing L. fermentum AGR1485 were investigated for comparison. L. fermentum AGR1487 did not alter the expression of Caco-2 cell tight junction genes (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485) and tight junction proteins were not able to be detected. However, L. fermentum AGR1487 increased the expression levels of seven tubulin genes and the abundance of three microtubule-associated proteins, which have been linked to tight junction disassembly. Additionally, Caco-2 cells treated with L. fermentum AGR1487 did not have defined and uniform borders of zona occludens 2 around each cell, unlike control or AGR1485 treated cells. L. fermentum AGR1487 cells were required for the negative effect on barrier integrity (bacterial supernatant did not cause a decrease in TEER), suggesting that a physical interaction may be necessary. Increased adherence of L. fermentum AGR1487 to Caco-2 cells (compared to L. fermentum AGR1485) was likely to facilitate this cell-to-cell interaction. These findings illustrate that bacterial strains of the same species can

  3. Human fibrinogen and thrombin patch for extraluminal protection of intestinal anastomosis

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    Paulo Gustavo Kotze

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of recent advances regarding equipment and surgical techniques in colorectal surgery, rates of anastomotic dehiscence (AD have remained stable throughout the years. The development of products to protect anastomosis aiming the reduction of AD rates has shown to be promising. Human fibrinogen and thrombin patch (HFTP Tachosil® have been used in experimental studies in animals and small case series in humans, with promising results. In this study, the authors describe the technique of HFTP use in details, aiming the protection of colorectal anastomosis, and retrospectively demonstrate the preliminary results in a pilot case series. HFTP was used in 4 patients submitted to conventional surgery. The procedures performed were: left colon resection, segmental colectomy (both for colorectal cancer, enteral anastomosis for fistula closure and right ileocolectomy. Anastomotic healing and absence of complications were observed in 3 patients, and the patient submitted to right ileocolectomy developed AD and died after reoperation. The use of HFTP is safe and can be indicated in selected cases. However, AD can occur even after the use of this strategy. Randomized controlled trials with larger samples of patients are needed in order to properly define the real benefits of this strategy in dehiscence prevention Resumo: Apesar dos avanços em equipamentos e técnica cirúrgica na cirurgia colorretal, os índices de deiscência de anastomose (DA tem permanecido estáveis nos últimos anos. O desenvolvimento de produtos que visam proteção das anastomoses para redução das taxas de DA tem se mostrado promissor. A membrana de fibrinogênio e trombina humanos (MFTH vem sendo utilizada em estudos experimentais e em pequenas séries de casos em humanos, com resultados promissores. Neste artigo os autores detalham a descrição técnica da utilização da MFTH na proteção de anastomoses colorretais, e demonstram os resultados preliminares em uma s

  4. 1-alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3up-regulates the expression of 2 types of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase alternative splicing variants in Caco-2 cells and may be an important regulator of their expression in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Seiko; Yamada, Asako; Nakaoka, Kanae; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis and also influences skeletal muscle functions, differentiation, and development. The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase the absorption of calcium from the intestine, and the level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a differentiation marker for intestinal epithelial cells, is regulated by vitamin D. Intestinal-type ALP is expressed at a high concentration in the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells, and is known to be affected by several kinds of nutrients. Recent reviews have highlighted the importance of intestinal-type ALP in gut homeostasis. Intestinal-type ALP controls bacterial endotoxin-induced inflammation by dephosphorylating lipopolysaccharide and is a gut mucosal defense factor. In this study, we investigated the influence of vitamin D on the expression of 2 types of alternative mRNA variants encoding the human alkaline phosphatase, intestinal (ALPI) gene in human Caco-2 cells as an in vitro model of the small intestinal epithelium. After treatment with 1-alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , the biologically active form of vitamin D 3 , there were significant increases in the ALP activities of Caco-2 cells. Inhibitor and thermal inactivation experiments showed that the increased ALP had properties of intestinal-type ALP. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that expression of the 2 types of alternative mRNA variants from the ALPI gene was markedly enhanced by vitamin D in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, these findings agree with the hypothesis: vitamin D up-regulated the expression of 2 types of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase alternative splicing variants in Caco-2 cells; vitamin D may be an important regulator of ALPI gene expression in gut homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Concord and Niagara Grape Juice and Their Phenolics Modify Intestinal Glucose Transport in a Coupled in Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Human Intestinal Model

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    Sydney Moser

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available While the potential of dietary phenolics to mitigate glycemic response has been proposed, the translation of these effects to phenolic rich foods such as 100% grape juice (GJ remains unclear. Initial in vitro screening of GJ phenolic extracts from American grape varieties (V. labrusca; Niagara and Concord suggested limited inhibitory capacity for amylase and α-glucosidase (6.2%–11.5% inhibition; p < 0.05. Separately, all GJ extracts (10–100 µM total phenolics did reduce intestinal trans-epithelial transport of deuterated glucose (d7-glu and fructose (d7-fru by Caco-2 monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, with 60 min d7-glu/d7-fru transport reduced 10%–38% by GJ extracts compared to control. To expand on these findings by assessing the ability of 100% GJ to modify starch digestion and glucose transport from a model starch-rich meal, 100% Niagara and Concord GJ samples were combined with a starch rich model meal (1:1 and 1:2 wt:wt and glucose release and transport were assessed in a coupled in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Digestive release of glucose from the starch model meal was decreased when digested in the presence of GJs (5.9%–15% relative to sugar matched control. Furthermore, transport of d7-glu was reduced 10%–38% by digesta containing bioaccessible phenolics from Concord and Niagara GJ compared to control. These data suggest that phenolics present in 100% GJ may alter absorption of monosaccharides naturally present in 100% GJ and may potentially alter glycemic response if consumed with a starch rich meal.

  6. Evaluation by computerized morphometry of histopathological alterations of the colon wall in segments with and without intestinal transit in rats Avaliação por morfometria computadorizada das alterações histopatológicas da parede cólica em segmentos com e sem trânsito intestinal em ratos

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    Marcos Vieira de Sousa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate histopathological alterations of the colon wall in segments with and without intestinal transit, by computer-assisted imaging, and to correlate these with the length of time diversion. METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats were subjected to intestinal transit diversion by a proximal colostomy and distal mucosa fistula. The animals were divided into three experimental groups according to how long after the initial surgical procedure they were sacrificed: six, twelve and eighteen weeks. Colon segments with and without transit were subjected to histopathological study. The variables colon crypt length, mucosal ulceration, muscle layer thickness of the muscularis mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria, vascular congestion, number of caliciform cells, inflammatory grade and degree of inflammation, comparing the two colon segments in the different experimental groups were studied. Intestinal crypt length, muscle layer thickness of the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria and caliciform cells were measured by computer-assisted imaging method. Mean equality, variance analysis and correlation tests were used in the statistical analysis, and the significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: Comparison between segments with and without transit showed that the latter presented reduced length of colon crypts and increased muscle layer thickness of the muscularis mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria. There were greater quantities of ulceration of the mucosal and greater degree of inflammation with increasing time without transit. Mucosal ulceration, submucosal vascular congestion, increased thickness of the submucosal and muscularis propria layers, presence of caliciform cells, inflammatory infiltrate and inflammatory grade correlated significantly with the length of time without transit. CONCLUSIONS: Histological alterations occurred in all layers of the colon wall, in the segments without intestinal transit. Ulcerations in the

  7. Screening in a Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus collection to select a strain able to survive to the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Clotilde; Botella-Carretero, José I; García-Albiach, Raimundo; Pozuelo, María J; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Baquero, Fernando; Baltadjieva, María A; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity and resistance of Lactobacillus bulgaricus sbsp. delbrueckii collection with 100 isolates from different home-made yogurt in rural Bulgarian areas were determined. The strain K98 was the most resistant to bile salts and low pH. Survival and effects on short chain fatty acids production were tested in 20 healthy volunteers. High genetic diversity was observed in the L. bulgaricus collection by RAPD, whereas the ability of tolerate high deoxycholic acid concentrations, and different acid pHs was variable. The strain K98 was selected and used to prepare a homemade yogurt which was administered to 20 healthy volunteers (500 ml/day during 15d). A basal faecal sample and another after yogurt intake were recovered. DGGE experiments, using both universal and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) primers, demonstrated no significant changes in the qualitative composition of gut microbiota. A band corresponding to L. bulgaricus was observed in all 20 samples. Viable L. bulgaricus K98 strain was only recovered in one volunteer. After yogurt intake we found an increase of LAB and Clostridium perfringens, and a decrease of Bacteroides- Prevotella-Porphyromonas. In addition, increases of acetic, butyric and 2-hydroxy-butyric acids in faeces were detected. Genetic diversity of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus especie is high We have isolated a probiotic resistant strain to bile and high acidity, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus-K98. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the intestinal microbiota are found after ingestion of a homemade yogurt containing this strain, with a concomitant increase in faecal SCFA. Our findings support the interest in developing further studies providing different amounts of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus-K98, and should evaluate its clinical effects in human disease. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome sequences and comparative genomics of two Lactobacillus ruminis strains from the bovine and human intestinal tracts

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity, which recent genomic analyses have further highlighted. However, the choice of species for sequencing has been non-random and unequal in distribution, with only a single representative genome from the L. salivarius clade available to date. Furthermore, there is no data to facilitate a functional genomic analysis of motility in the lactobacilli, a trait that is restricted to the L. salivarius clade. Results The 2.06 Mb genome of the bovine isolate Lactobacillus ruminis ATCC 27782 comprises a single circular chromosome, and has a G+C content of 44.4%. In silico analysis identified 1901 coding sequences, including genes for a pediocin-like bacteriocin, a single large exopolysaccharide-related cluster, two sortase enzymes, two CRISPR loci and numerous IS elements and pseudogenes. A cluster of genes related to a putative pilin was identified, and shown to be transcribed in vitro. A high quality draft assembly of the genome of a second L. ruminis strain, ATCC 25644 isolated from humans, suggested a slightly larger genome of 2.138 Mb, that exhibited a high degree of synteny with the ATCC 27782 genome. In contrast, comparative analysis of L. ruminis and L. salivarius identified a lack of long-range synteny between these closely related species. Comparison of the L. salivarius clade core proteins with those of nine other Lactobacillus species distributed across 4 major phylogenetic groups identified the set of shared proteins, and proteins unique to each group. Conclusions The genome of L. ruminis provides a comparative tool for directing functional analyses of other members of the L. salivarius clade, and it increases understanding of the divergence of this distinct Lactobacillus lineage from other commensal lactobacilli. The genome sequence provides a definitive resource to facilitate investigation of the genetics, biochemistry and host

  9. Intestinal Bacterial Communities of Trypanosome-Infected and Uninfected Glossina palpalis palpalis from Three Human African Trypanomiasis Foci in Cameroon

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    Franck Jacob

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glossina sp. the tsetse fly that transmits trypanosomes causing the Human or the Animal African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or AAT can harbor symbiotic bacteria that are known to play a crucial role in the fly's vector competence. We hypothesized that other bacteria could be present, and that some of them could also influence the fly's vector competence. In this context the objectives of our work were: (a to characterize the bacteria that compose the G. palpalis palpalis midgut bacteriome, (b to evidence possible bacterial community differences between trypanosome-infected and non-infected fly individuals from a given AAT and HAT focus or from different foci using barcoded Illumina sequencing of the hypervariable V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Forty G. p. palpalis flies, either infected by Trypanosoma congolense or uninfected were sampled from three trypanosomiasis foci in Cameroon. A total of 143 OTUs were detected in the midgut samples. Most taxa were identified at the genus level, nearly 50% at the species level; they belonged to 83 genera principally within the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Prominent representatives included Wigglesworthia (the fly's obligate symbiont, Serratia, and Enterobacter hormaechei. Wolbachia was identified for the first time in G. p. palpalis. The average number of bacterial species per tsetse sample was not significantly different regarding the fly infection status, and the hierarchical analysis based on the differences in bacterial community structure did not provide a clear clustering between infected and non-infected flies. Finally, the most important result was the evidence of the overall very large diversity of intestinal bacteria which, except for Wigglesworthia, were unevenly distributed over the sampled flies regardless of their geographic origin and their trypanosome infection status.

  10. Anti-Infective Activities of Lactobacillus Strains in the Human Intestinal Microbiota: from Probiotics to Gastrointestinal Anti-Infectious Biotherapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24696432

  11. Anti-infective activities of lactobacillus strains in the human intestinal microbiota: from probiotics to gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2014-04-01

    A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Expression of recombinant human lysozyme in transgenic chicken promotes the growth of Bifidobacterium in the intestine and improves postnatal growth of chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Wu, Hongping; Wang, Kejun; Cao, Zhichen; Yu, Kun; Lian, Ling; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-12-01

    Lysozyme is one kind of antimicrobial proteins and often used as feed additive which can defend against pathogenic bacteria and enhance immune function of animals. In this study, we have injected the lentiviral vector expressing recombinant human lysozyme (rhLZ) gene into the blastoderm of chicken embryo to investigate the effect of recombinant human lysozyme on postnatal intestinal microbiota distribution and growth performance of chicken. Successfully, we generated 194 transgenic chickens identified by Southern blot with a positive transgenic rate of 24%. The average concentration of rhLZ was 29.90 ± 6.50 μg/mL in the egg white. Lysozyme in egg white of transgenic chickens had a significantly higher antibacterial activity than those of non-transgenic chickens by lysoplate assay (P chickens were collected and five types of bacteria (Lactobacillus, Salmonella, Bifidobacterium, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli) were isolated and cultured to detect the impact of rhLZ on gut microbiota. Among the five bacteria, the number of Bifidobacterium in the intestine of those transgenic was significantly increased (P chickens were analyzed. It was found that the 6-week shank length, 6-week weight and 18-week weight of transgenic chickens were significantly increased than that of non-transgenic chickens. The results demonstrated that rhLZ-transgenic chicken could promote the growth of Bifidobacterium in the intestine and improve the postnatal growth of chicken.

  13. Anaerobic conditions promote expression of Sfp fimbriae and adherence of sorbitol-fermenting enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:NM to human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsken, Anne; Bielaszewska, Martina; Greune, Lilo; Schweppe, Christian H; Müthing, Johannes; Schmidt, Herbert; Schmidt, M Alexander; Karch, Helge; Zhang, Wenlan

    2008-02-01

    The sfp gene cluster, unique to sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:NM strains, encodes fimbriae that mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination in laboratory E. coli strains but are not expressed in wild-type SF EHEC O157:NM strains under standard laboratory conditions. We investigated whether Sfp fimbriae are expressed under conditions that mimic the intestinal environment and whether they contribute to the adherence of SF EHEC O157:NM strains to human intestinal epithelial cells. The transcription of sfpA (encoding the major fimbrial subunit) was upregulated in all strains investigated, and all expressed SfpA and possessed fimbriae that reacted with an anti-SfpA antibody when the strains were grown on solid media under anaerobic conditions. Sfp expression was absent under aerobic conditions and in liquid media. Sfp upregulation under anaerobic conditions was significantly higher on blood agar and a medium simulating the colonic environment than on a medium simulating the ileal environment (P Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains correlates with increased adherence to Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains is induced under conditions resembling those of the natural site of infection and that Sfp fimbriae may contribute to the adherence of the organisms to human intestinal epithelium.

  14. Anaerobic Conditions Promote Expression of Sfp Fimbriae and Adherence of Sorbitol-Fermenting Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:NM to Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsken, Anne; Bielaszewska, Martina; Greune, Lilo; Schweppe, Christian H.; Müthing, Johannes; Schmidt, Herbert; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge; Zhang, Wenlan

    2008-01-01

    The sfp gene cluster, unique to sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:NM strains, encodes fimbriae that mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination in laboratory E. coli strains but are not expressed in wild-type SF EHEC O157:NM strains under standard laboratory conditions. We investigated whether Sfp fimbriae are expressed under conditions that mimic the intestinal environment and whether they contribute to the adherence of SF EHEC O157:NM strains to human intestinal epithelial cells. The transcription of sfpA (encoding the major fimbrial subunit) was upregulated in all strains investigated, and all expressed SfpA and possessed fimbriae that reacted with an anti-SfpA antibody when the strains were grown on solid media under anaerobic conditions. Sfp expression was absent under aerobic conditions and in liquid media. Sfp upregulation under anaerobic conditions was significantly higher on blood agar and a medium simulating the colonic environment than on a medium simulating the ileal environment (P Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains correlates with increased adherence to Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains is induced under conditions resembling those of the natural site of infection and that Sfp fimbriae may contribute to the adherence of the organisms to human intestinal epithelium. PMID:18083855

  15. Intra-urban human mobility and activity transition: evidence from social media check-in data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lun; Zhi, Ye; Sui, Zhengwei; Liu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Most existing human mobility literature focuses on exterior characteristics of movements but neglects activities, the driving force that underlies human movements. In this research, we combine activity-based analysis with a movement-based approach to model the intra-urban human mobility observed from about 15 million check-in records during a yearlong period in Shanghai, China. The proposed model is activity-based and includes two parts: the transition of travel demands during a specific time period and the movement between locations. For the first part, we find the transition probability between activities varies over time, and then we construct a temporal transition probability matrix to represent the transition probability of travel demands during a time interval. For the second part, we suggest that the travel demands can be divided into two classes, locationally mandatory activity (LMA) and locationally stochastic activity (LSA), according to whether the demand is associated with fixed location or not. By judging the combination of predecessor activity type and successor activity type we determine three trip patterns, each associated with a different decay parameter. To validate the model, we adopt the mechanism of an agent-based model and compare the simulated results with the observed pattern from the displacement distance distribution, the spatio-temporal distribution of activities, and the temporal distribution of travel demand transitions. The results show that the simulated patterns fit the observed data well, indicating that these findings open new directions for combining activity-based analysis with a movement-based approach using social media check-in data.

  16. Intra-urban human mobility and activity transition: evidence from social media check-in data.