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Sample records for human immunodeficiency virus-specific

  1. Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Santra, Sampa; Fultz, Patricia N.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1999-01-01

    Chimpanzees have been important in studies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis and in evaluation of HIV-1 candidate vaccines. However, little information is available about HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in these animals. In the present study, in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected chimpanzees with HIV-1 Gag peptides was shown to be a sensitive, reproducible method of expanding HIV-1-specific CD8+ effector CTL. Of ...

  2. Predominant involvement of CD8+CD28- lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, S; Dalod, M; Olive, D; Guillet, J G; Gomard, E

    1996-01-01

    Distinct functional CD8+ T-cell populations have been observed during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. One of these functions is the inhibition of viral replication by a noncytotoxic mechanism, which was shown to be mediated by the CD8+CD28+ subpopulation. On the other hand, CD8+ T cells exert an HIV-specific cytotoxic activity. The present study shows that CD8+CD28- lymphocytes display this HIV-specific cytotoxic activity, which is detectable immediately after the cells are purified from peripheral blood. The CD28- population is also able to proliferate and to retain its cytotoxic activity after in vitro restimulation with autologous blast cells. Finally, HIV-specific cytotoxic T cells can be obtained in vitro from the CD8+CD28+ population. PMID:8627730

  3. Preclinical and clinical performance of the Efoora test, a rapid test for detection of human immunodeficiency virus-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Max Q; Mundy, Linda M; Amsterdam, Daniel; Barrett, J Tom; Bigg, Dan; Bruckner, David; Hanna, Bruce; Prince, Harry; Purington, Timothy; Hanna, Todd; Hewitt, Ross; Kalinka, Carolyn; Koppes, Thomas; Maxwell, Sarz; Moe, Ardis; Doymaz, Mehmet; Poulter, Melinda; Saber-Tehrani, Maryam; Simard, Lorenzo; Wilkins-Carmody, Donna; Vidaver, John; Berger, Cheryl; Davis, Alan H; Alzona, Mortimer T

    2005-05-01

    Barriers to effective diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be reduced with simple, reliable, and rapid detection methods. Our objective was to determine the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of a new rapid, lateral-flow immunochromatographic HIV-1 antibody detection device. Preclinical studies were performed using seroconversion, cross-reaction, and interference panels, archived clinical specimens, and fresh whole blood. In a multicenter, prospective clinical trial, a four-sample matrix of capillary (fingerstick) whole-blood specimens and venous whole blood, plasma, and serum was tested for HIV-1 antibodies with the Efoora HIV rapid test (Efoora Inc., Buffalo Grove, IL) and compared with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Abbott Laboratories) licensed by the Food and Drug Administration. Western blot and nucleic acid test supplemental assays were employed to adjudicate discordant samples. Preclinical testing of seroconversion panels showed that antibodies were often detected earlier by the rapid test than by a reference EIA. No significant interference or cross-reactions were observed. Testing of 4,984 archived specimens yielded a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 99.7%. A prospective multicenter clinical study with 2,954 adult volunteers demonstrated sensitivity and specificity for the Efoora HIV rapid test of 99.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99.3 and 99.98%) and 99.0% (95% CI, 98.5 and 99.4%), respectively. Reactive rapid HIV-1 antibody detection was confirmed in 99.6% of those with a known HIV infection (n = 939), 5.2% of those in the high-risk group (n = 1,003), and 0.1% of those in the low-risk group (n = 1,012). For 21 (0.71%) patients, there was discordance between the results of the rapid test and the confirmatory EIA/Western blot tests. We conclude that the Efoora HIV rapid test is a simple, rapid assay for detection of HIV-1 antibodies, with high sensitivity and specificity compared to a standardized

  4. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  5. Human influenza a virus-specific CD8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. van de Sandt (Carolien); M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAnimal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of influenza A virus (IAV)-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in heterosubtypic cross-protective immunity. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained intermittently from healthy HLA-typed blood donors

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  7. T Regulatory Cell Induced Foxp3 Binds the IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα Promoters in Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells from Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Nag, Mukta; Tuohy, Joanne L; De Paris, Kristina; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2017-11-17

    Polyfunctional CD8+ T cells play a critical role in controlling viremia during AIDS lentiviral infections. However, for most HIV-infected individuals, virus-specific CD8+ T cells exhibit loss of polyfunctionality, including loss of IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for AIDS lentiviral persistence, our laboratory has demonstrated that FIV-activated Treg cells target CD8+ T cells, leading to a reduction in IL2 and IFNγ production. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that Treg cells induce expression of the repressive transcription factor, Foxp3, in CD8+ T cells. Based upon these findings, we asked if Treg-induced Foxp3 could bind to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoter regions in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. Following coculture with autologous Treg cells, we demonstrated decreased mRNA levels of IL2 and IFNγ at weeks 4 and 8 postinfection and decreased TNFα at week 4 postinfection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We also clearly demonstrated Treg cell-induced Foxp3 expression in virus-specific CD8+ T cells at weeks 1, 4, and 8 postinfection. Finally, we documented Foxp3 binding to the IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ promoters at 8 weeks and 6 months postinfection in virus-specific CD8+ T cells following Treg cell coculture. In summary, the results here clearly demonstrate that Foxp3 inhibits IL2, TNFα, and IFNγ transcription by binding to their promoter regions in lentivirus-specific CD8+ T cells. We believe this is the first description of this process during the course of AIDS lentiviral infection.

  8. African green monkey TRIM5α restriction in simian immunodeficiency virus-specific rhesus macaque effector CD4 T cells enhances their survival and antiviral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sumiti; Trivett, Matthew T; Ayala, Victor I; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2015-04-01

    The expression of xenogeneic TRIM5α proteins can restrict infection in various retrovirus/host cell pairings. Previously, we have shown that African green monkey TRIM5α (AgmTRIM5α) potently restricts both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus mac239 (SIV(mac239)) replication in a transformed human T-cell line (L. V. Coren, et al., Retrovirology 12:11, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12977-015-0137-9). To assess AgmTRIM5α restriction in primary cells, we transduced AgmTRIM5α into primary rhesus macaque CD4 T cells and infected them with SIV(mac239). Experiments with T-cell clones revealed that AgmTRIM5α could reproducibly restrict SIV(mac239) replication, and that this restriction synergizes with an intrinsic resistance to infection present in some CD4 T-cell clones. AgmTRIM5α transduction of virus-specific CD4 T-cell clones increased and prolonged their ability to suppress SIV spread in CD4 target cells. This increased antiviral function was strongly linked to decreased viral replication in the AgmTRIM5α-expressing effectors, consistent with restriction preventing the virus-induced cytopathogenicity that disables effector function. Taken together, our data show that AgmTRIM5α restriction, although not absolute, reduces SIV replication in primary rhesus CD4 T cells which, in turn, increases their antiviral function. These results support prior in vivo data indicating that the contribution of virus-specific CD4 T-cell effectors to viral control is limited due to infection. The potential of effector CD4 T cells to immunologically modulate SIV/HIV infection likely is limited by their susceptibility to infection and subsequent inactivation or elimination. Here, we show that AgmTRIM5α expression inhibits SIV spread in primary effector CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, protection of effector CD4 T cells by AgmTRIM5α markedly enhanced their antiviral function by delaying SIV infection, thereby extending their viability

  9. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by RNA interference using long-hairpin RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, P.; de Vries, W.; Haasnoot, J.; ter Brake, O.; de Haan, P.; Berkhout, B.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of virus replication by means of RNA interference has been reported for several important human pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). RNA interference against these pathogens has been accomplished by introduction of virus-specific synthetic small interfering

  10. Induction of feline immunodeficiency virus specific antibodies in cats with an attenuated Salmonella strain expressing the Gag protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Tijhaar (Edwin); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); J.A. Karlas (Jos); M.C. Burger; F.R. Mooi (Frits); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSalmonella typhimurium aroA strains (SL3261), expressing high levels of the Gag protein of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) fused with maltose binding protein (SL3261-MFG), were constructed using an invertible promoter system that allows the stable expression of heterologous antigens

  11. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . This ...

  12. of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: With increasing feminization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic especially in Africa, more seropositive women are getting pregnant. There is therefore an increasing need for prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV and increased need for awareness by our women. Objective: ...

  13. Human inmmunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheffler Mendoza Selma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin replacement therapy has become a corner- stone in the treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PID. Currently indicated as first-line therapy for predominantly antibody deficiencies, severe combined immunodeficiencies, and some well-defined syndromes with immunodeficiencies, it is also indicated as adjunct therapy in many other PID. Although considered a high-cost medication, elegant studies had showed that patients correctly treated with human immunoglobulin replacement therapy result in lower costs derived from their health- attention. Major benefits of immunoglobulin replacement therapy include but are not restricted to: protection against infectious processes, organ damage progression-arrest, immune modulation and quality-of-life improvement. Two modalities of treatment are currently used, intravenous and subcutaneous, each has clear advantages and disadvantages when compared to the other, which are presented in this article. The correct use of human immunoglobulin for the treatment of patients with PID translates in better medical-practices improving survival and quality of life of affected patients.

  14. Increased T-bet is associated with senescence of influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells in aged humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolfi, Douglas V.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Polley, Antonio M.; Doyle, Susan A.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Pircher, Hanspeter; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Aged individuals have increased morbidity and mortality following influenza and other viral infections, despite previous exposure or vaccination. Mouse and human studies suggest increased senescence and/or exhaustion of influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells with advanced age. However, neither the relationship between senescence and exhaustion nor the underlying transcriptional pathways leading to decreased function of influenza virus-specific cellular immunity in elderly humans are well-defined. Here, we demonstrate that increased percentages of CD8 T cells from aged individuals express CD57 and KLRG1, along with PD-1 and other inhibitory receptors, markers of senescence, or exhaustion, respectively. Expression of T-box transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, were also increased in CD8 T cells from aged subjects and correlated closely with expression of CD57 and KLRG1. Influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells from aged individuals exhibited decreased functionality with corresponding increases in CD57, KLRG1, and T-bet, a molecular regulator of terminal differentiation. However, in contrast to total CD8 T cells, influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells had altered expression of inhibitory receptors, including lower PD-1, in aged compared with young subjects. Thus, our data suggest a prominent role for senescence and/or terminal differentiation for influenza virus-specific CD8 T cells in elderly subjects. PMID:23440501

  15. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. An estimated 42 million people worldwide are now infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. (HIV), (1) the causative agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome compared with. 30million people that were infected in 1997(2). Ninety per cent (90%) of these live in developing countries.

  16. Post exposure prophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... immunodeficiency virus post ex- posure prophylaxis (HIV PEP) among paediatricians in Nigeria. ... pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus. (HIV) during the course of providing care for their pa- tients. ..... Ford N, Shubber Z, Calmy A,. Irvine C, Rapparini C, Ajose O, et al. Choice of antiretroviral ...

  17. Promoting Cardiovascular Health in Patients Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robin

    2018-03-01

    Patients living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (PLWHA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease because of advances in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treatment and increased life expectancy. Cardiovascular health promotion in PLWHA includes strategies for risk factor reduction, disease prevention, early detection, and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiological Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olaleye

    ajol.com. Received: July 2007. Accepted (Revised):. October 2007. Published. January 2008. Full Length Research Article. Epidemiological Patterns of Human. Immunodeficiency Virus and Herpes Simplex. Virus Co-Infection in Ibadan, Nigeria.

  19. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to as...

  20. Psychosocial issues in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R K

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the psychosocial issues associated with pediatric human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Using a psychosocial model instead of the usual medical or rehabilitation model will challenge speech-language pathologists to incorporate an understanding of the psychosocial stresses that affect a child's progression through HIV/AIDS and ensure that they receive adequate consideration in a total treatment model. A case study illustrates the relationship between communication disorders and HIV/AIDS.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jake; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2016-08-01

    Improved survival with combination antiretroviral therapy has led to a dramatic increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals 50 years of age or older such that by 2020 more than 50% of HIV-infected persons in the United States will be above this age. Recent studies confirm that antiretroviral therapy should be offered to all HIV-infected patients regardless of age, symptoms, CD4+ cell count, or HIV viral load. However, when compared with HIV-uninfected populations, even with suppression of measurable HIV replication, older individuals are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, malignancies, liver disease, and other comorbidities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Bum Sik

    2017-01-01

    During the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), transmissions between humans and primates resulted in multiple HIV lineages in humans. This evolution has been rapid, giving rise to a complex classification and allowing for worldwide spread and intermixing of subtypes, which has consequently led to dozens of circulating recombinant forms. In the Republic of Korea, 12,522 cases of HIV infection have been reported between 1985, when AIDS was first identified, and 2015. This review fo...

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Related Knowledge, Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University, Kaski, Nepal,3Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, KLE University, Belgaum, Karnataka, India, 5Department of. Obstetrics and Gynecological Nursing, Institute of Nursing science, KLE University, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. Abstract. Background: Despite the implementation of anti‑human immunodeficiency virus ...

  4. Tools for genotyping human immunodeficiency virus, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Janini LM, Tanuri A, Schechter M, Peralta JM, Vicente AC, Dela Torre. N, Pieniazek NJ, Luo CC, Ramos A, Soriano V, Schochetman G,. Rayfield MA, Pieniazek D (1998). Horizontal and vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 dual infections caused by viruses of subtypes B and C. J ...

  5. Nigerian dental technology students and human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The rehabilitative dental care is important for maintaining adequate nutrition, guarding against wasting syndrome and malnutrition among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‑infected individuals. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the Nigerian dental technology students' knowledge and ...

  6. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study assessed the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori antibodies among Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It also examines whether anti H. pylori seroprevalence was associated with the severity of the HIV infection or the antiretroviral treatment. Material and Methods: ...

  7. Exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Disease. What Precautions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic is more pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa. The ever-increasing prevalence of HIV infection and the continued improvement in clinical management has increased the likelihood of these patients being managed by healthcare workers. The aim of the review ...

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychiatric patients are considered high risked group for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This has been found to be as a result of poor judgment and irrationality associated with some of the disorders. However, there is dearth of literature on the prevalence of HIV infection among psychiatric ...

  9. Ethnopharmacology of human immunodeficiency virus in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), continues to pose an unprecedented public health problem of enormous proportions worldwide. Current treatment options for HIV/AIDS have not been satisfactory and the quest for effective curative or ...

  10. Clinical characteristics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal failure is a common finding in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients, and it contributes significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive ...

  11. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is increasing world-wide and highly active antiretroviral treatment. (HAAT) is allowing afflicted individuals to live near normal life span and acquire surgical diseases of the aged as in the unaffected population. This pose occupational hazards to operating surgeons especially in ...

  12. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major cause of death in Africa today and it is estimated that 80% of the over 40 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS (PLWHA) world-wide are residing in sub-Saharan countries.[1] In Nigeria, AIDS was first reported in 1986 following the ...

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction and human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the pharmacological treatment thereof have both been shown to affect mitochondrial function in a number of tissues, and each may cause specific organ pathology through specific mitochondrial pathways. HIV has been shown to kill various tissue cells by activation of ...

  14. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gonçales FL Jr, Pereira JS, Da Silva C, Thomaz GR, Pavan MH,. Fais VC, et al. Hepatitis B virus DNA in sera of blood donors and of patients infected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003;10:718‑20. 25. Bahaf F, Tanomand A, Montazam H, Sany AA. Seroprevalence.

  15. Attitudes of patients towards voluntary human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes of patients towards voluntary human immunodeficiency virus counselling and testing in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals. ... Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download ...

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Occupational Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    potentially infected body fluids so that they can present themselves rapidly for risk assessment and commencement of ART if necessary in the event of an occupational exposure to HIV. INTRODUCTION. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. (AIDS). It can be ...

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus infection among migrant fishermen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: People migrate from place to place for diverse reasons chief among which is economic. Migrant fishermen like other migrant population lead high risk sexual lifestyle and are therefore, predisposed to Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HIV among migrant ...

  18. Post exposure prophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the level of awareness, knowledge and practice of human immunodeficiency virus post exposure prophylaxis (HIV PEP) among paediatricians in Nigeria. Methodology: The study was a cross sectional questionnairebased survey conducted among paediatrcians that attended the Paediatric ...

  19. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are diverse reports on the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive persons. Few studies have been carried out in developing countries in Sub.Saharan Africa. This study was aimed at comparing the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis of ...

  20. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: More than 40 oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been recorded and between 70% and 90% of persons with HIV infection will have at least one oral manifestation at some time during the course of their disease. Oral health-care workers (OHCWs) are therefore, key players ...

  1. Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus Infected Pregnant Women in Benin City, Nigeria. ... A differential leucocyte count was also done by the thin blood film method, stained with Leishman stain and examined microscopically. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was carried out using the

  2. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A seroprevalence study of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in new patients attending the eye clinic of LAUTECH. Teaching Hospital in Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria showed that twenty-nine patients 2.7%) were positive to HIV1. No patient was positive to HIV 2. There were 21 males (72.4%) and 8 ...

  3. Treatment Outcomes among Human Immunodeficiency Virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Tuberculosis (TB) infections may be magnified, in the presence of another potentially stressful condition like pregnancy. Though co-infection among pregnant women is rare, treatment outcomes may depend on accessibility to comprehensive ...

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconversion and Associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syphilis during ANC visit (P < 0.001) were found to be independent predictors of HIV seroconversion among pregnant women ... The syphilis screening among pregnant women in the ANC in Tanzania is based on the Venereal Disease ... booked at 4 months of gestation age [Table 1]. Human immunodeficiency virus ...

  5. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P. M. B. 12003, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria. E-mail: kumeiz09@gmail.com. Introduction. Exacerbated chronic periodontitis is part of the spectrum of periodontal diseases that has been described in association with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As far back as the early 1990s, studies exploring the possible.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2: pathogenesis and antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van der Ende (Marchina)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1), human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been identified as hither unknown primate members of the Lentivirinae subfamily of the family Retroviridae in 1983, 1986 and 1985 respectively, HIV-1

  7. Systematic review of vestibular disorders related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, B; Swanepoel, D W; Hofmeyr, L M

    2011-09-01

    Disorders of the auditory and vestibular system are often associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the extent and nature of these vestibular manifestations are unclear. To systematically review the current peer-reviewed literature on vestibular manifestations and pathology related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Systematic review of peer-reviewed articles related to vestibular findings in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several electronic databases were searched. We identified 442 records, reduced to 210 after excluding duplicates and reviews. These were reviewed for relevance to the scope of the study. We identified only 13 reports investigating vestibular functioning and pathology in individuals affected by human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This condition can affect both the peripheral and central vestibular system, irrespective of age and viral disease stage. Peripheral vestibular involvement may affect up to 50 per cent of patients, and central vestibular involvement may be even more prevalent. Post-mortem studies suggest direct involvement of the entire vestibular system, while opportunistic infections such as oto- and neurosyphilis and encephalitis cause secondary vestibular dysfunction resulting in vertigo, dizziness and imbalance. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome should routinely be monitored for vestibular involvement, to minimise functional limitations of quality of life.

  8. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  9. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...' perspective on current approaches to managing HIV, symptoms experienced because of HIV or its treatment, and...

  10. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  11. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...

  12. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b) of...

  13. [Construction of dengue virus-specific full-length fully human antibody libraries by mammalian display technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yangming; Lan, Kaijian; Wang, Junjie; Yu, Jingyi; Qu, Yarong; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Fuchun; Tan, Wanlong; Cao, Hong; Zhou, Chen

    2013-06-01

    To construct dengue virus-specific full-length fully human antibody libraries using mammalian cell surface display technique. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from convalescent patients with dengue fever. The reservoirs of the light chain and heavy chain variable regions (LCκ and VH) of the antibody genes were amplified by RT-PCR and inserted into the vector pDGB-HC-TM separately to construct the light chain and heavy chain libraries. The library DNAs were transfected into CHO cells and the expression of full-length fully human antibodies on the surface of CHO cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Using 1.2 µg of the total RNA isolated from the PBMCs as the template, the LCκ and VH were amplified and the full-length fully human antibody mammalian display libraries were constructed. The kappa light chain gene library had a size of 1.45×10(4) and the heavy chain gene library had a size of 1.8×10(5). Sequence analysis showed that 8 out of the 10 light chain clones and 7 out of the 10 heavy chain clones randomly picked up from the constructed libraries contained correct open reading frames. FACS analysis demonstrated that all the 15 clones with correct open reading frames expressed full-length antibodies, which could be detected on CHO cell surfaces. After co-transfection of the heavy chain and light chain gene libraries into CHO cells, the expression of full-length antibodies on CHO cell surfaces could be detected by FACS analysis with an expressible diversity of the antibody library reaching 1.46×10(9) [(1.45×10(4)×80%)×(1.8×10(5)×70%)]. Using 1.2 µg of total RNA as template, the LCκ and VH full-length fully human antibody libraries against dengue virus have been successfully constructed with an expressible diversity of 10(9).

  14. Selective Expression of CCR10 and CXCR3 by Circulating Human Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific CD8 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Peng, Tao; Cheng, Anqi; De Rosa, Stephen C; Wald, Anna; Laing, Kerry J; Jing, Lichen; Dong, Lichun; Magaret, Amalia S; Koelle, David M

    2017-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is restricted to epithelial cells and neurons and is controlled by CD8 T cells. These cells both traffic to epithelial sites of recurrent lytic infection and to ganglia and persist at the dermal-epidermal junction for up to 12 weeks after lesion resolution. We previously showed that cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA), a functional E-selectin ligand (ESL), is selectively expressed on circulating HSV-2-specific CD8 T cells. CLA/ESL mediates adhesion of T cells to inflamed vascular endothelium. Later stages in T-cell homing involve chemokines (Ch) and lymphocyte chemokine receptors (ChR) for vascular wall arrest and diapedesis. Several candidate ChR have been implicated in skin homing. We measured cell surface ChR on HSV-specific human peripheral blood CD8 T cells and extended our studies to HSV-1. We observed preferential cell surface expression of CCR10 and CXCR3 by HSV-specific CD8 T cells compared to CD8 T cells specific for control viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), and compared to bulk memory CD8 T cells. CXCR3 ligand mRNA levels were selectively increased in skin biopsy specimens from persons with recurrent HSV-2, while the mRNA levels of the CCR10 ligand CCL27 were equivalent in lesion and control skin. Our data are consistent with a model in which CCL27 drives baseline recruitment of HSV-specific CD8 T cells expressing CCR10, while interferon-responsive CXCR3 ligands recruit additional cells in response to virus-driven inflammation.IMPORTANCE HSV-2 causes very localized recurrent infections in the skin and genital mucosa. Virus-specific CD8 T cells home to the site of recurrent infection and participate in viral clearance. The exit of T cells from the blood involves the use of chemokine receptors on the T-cell surface and chemokines that are present in infected tissue. In this study, circulating HSV-2-specific CD8 T cells were identified using specific fluorescent tetramer reagents, and

  15. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Agents | Okolie | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article gives a brief review of anti-retroviral agents with activity against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) the causative agen of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It also outlines the principles, mode of action of anti-HIV agents and their sites of therapeutic intervention. Zidovudine or Azidothymidine ...

  16. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-03

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Arikan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in women of child-bearing age continue to increase both internationally and in Canada. The care of HIV-infected pregnant women is complex, and multiple issues must be addressed, including the current and future health of the woman, minimization of the risk of maternal-infant HIV transmission, and maintenance of the well-being of the fetus and neonate. Vertical transmission of HIV can occur in utero, intrapartum and postpartum, but current evidence suggests that the majority of transmission occurs toward end of term, or during labour and delivery. Several maternal and obstetrical factors influence transmission rates, which can be reduced by optimal medical and obstetrical care. Zidovudine therapy has been demonstrated to reduce maternal-infant transmission significantly, but several issues, including the short and long term safety of antiretrovirals and the optimal use of combination antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, remain to be defined. It is essential that health care workers providing care to these women fully understand the natural history of HIV disease in pregnancy, the factors that affect vertical transmission and the management issues during pregnancy. Close collaboration among a multidisciplinary team of knowledgeable health professionals and, most importantly, the woman herself can improve both maternal and infant outcomes.

  18. Role of cranial computed tomography in human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of cranial computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with generalised seizures. ... examination remains controversial, with the general impression being that emergency imaging is necessary because immunosuppression may blur clinical indicators of acute intracranial pathology.

  19. Sudden cardiac death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tseng, Zian H; Secemsky, Eric A; Dowdy, David; Vittinghoff, Eric; Moyers, Brian; Wong, Joseph K; Havlir, Diane V; Hsue, Priscilla Y

    2012-01-01

    ...) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As the HIV-infected population ages, cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality are increasing, but the incidence and features of SCD have not yet been described...

  20. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus infection presenting as a fatal case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-25

    CMV), Epstein-. Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C virus,. Mycoplasma. Pneumoniae,. Haemophilus influenzae and Campylobacter jejuni have all been implicated in. GBS.[6]. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has ...

  2. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nigeria which has one of the world's highest burden of children living with Sickle cell anaemia is also endemic for hepatitis B, C and the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study set out to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human ...

  3. The Magnitude and Specificity of Influenza A Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses in Humans Is Related to HLA-A and -B Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, A. C. M.; de Mutsert, G.; Graus, Y. M. F.; Fouchier, R. A. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.

    2002-01-01

    The repertoire of human cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) in response to influenza A viruses has been shown to be directed towards multiple epitopes, with a dominant response to the HLA-A2-restricted M158–66 epitope. These studies, however, were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of individuals selected randomly with respect to HLA phenotype or selected for the expression of one HLA allele without considering an influence of other HLA molecules. In addition, little information is available on the influence of HLA makeup on the overall CTL response against influenza viruses. Here, the influenza A virus-specific CTL response was investigated in groups of HLA-A and -B identical individuals. Between groups the individuals shared two or three of the four HLA-A and -B alleles. After in vitro stimulation of PBMC with influenza virus, the highest CTL activity was found in HLA-A2+ donors. A similar pattern was observed for the precursor frequency of virus-specific CTL (CTLp) ex vivo, with a higher CTLp frequency in HLA-A2-positive donors than in HLA-A2-negative donors, which were unable to recognize the immunodominant M158–66 epitope. In addition, CTL activity and frequency of CTLp for the individual influenza virus epitopes were determined. The frequency of CTLp specific for the HLA-B8-restricted epitope NP380–388 was threefold lower in HLA-B27-positive donors than in HLA-B27-negative donors. In addition, the frequency of CTLp specific for the HLA-A1-restricted epitope NP44–52 was threefold higher in HLA-A1-, -A2-, -B8-, and -B35-positive donors than in other donors, which was confirmed by measuring the CTL activity in vitro. These findings indicate that the epitope specificity of the CTL response is related to the phenotype of the other HLA molecules. Furthermore, the magnitude of the influenza virus-specific CTL response seems dependent on the HLA-A and -B phenotypes. PMID:11752149

  4. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy is of great importance for health planners and program managers. However, few published data on viral hepatitis and HIV are available in Sudan especially during pregnancy. Objectives: The current study was ...

  6. Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and seven (307) healthy blood donors aged 18 – 55 years were used to determine the sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Yola, Nigeria. The association between donors' age, occupation and marital status and the prevalence of the infections among blood ...

  7. Declining Rate of Infection with Maternal Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Declining Rate of Infection with Maternal Human Immunodeficiency Virus at Delivery Units in North-Central Nigeria. GE Imade, AS Sagay, J Musa, AN Ocheke, DS Adeniyi, M Idighri, R Powl, A Sendeht, JP Ogwuche, M Elujoba, CO Egbodo, T Oyebode, PH Daru, O Agbaji, IC Pam, ST Meloni, P Okonkwo, PJ Kanki ...

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis infections among long-distance truck ... Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed ...

  9. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are major health problems worldwide. HCV/HIV co-infection has been shown to increase the frequency of liver disease and also maternal-fetal transmission of HCV. Little data exist on the prevalence of co-infection of these viruses in ...

  10. Awareness and knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness and knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post exposure prophylaxis among Nigerian Family Physicians. ... Conclusion: This study shows that despite high levels of awareness and knowledge of HIV PEP, access to its use among family physicians in Nigeria is still sub‑optimal. Keywords: Family ...

  11. Mathematical Analysis of a Model for Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this paper is to present a mathematical model formulated to investigate the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The disease free equilibrium of the model was found to be locally and globally asymptotically stable. The endemic equilibrium point exists and it was discovered that the ...

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity and hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A total of 130 donors comprising 120 commercial donors and 10 voluntary donors were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B surface antigen in Benin city using Immunocomb HIV - 1 and 2 Biospot kit and Quimica Clinica Aplicada direct latex agglutination method respectively.

  13. C- Reactive Protein in Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the follow-up therapeutic response to tuberculosis (TB) among patients aged 19-68 years attending out-patient clinics of two hospitals in Abeokuta, Southwestern ...

  14. Early infant male circumcision for human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Swaziland has the highest prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the world at 26% of the adult population. ... Acceptability of medical circumcision was high in this study, but concerns about safety, pain, autonomy and cultural factors reduce the acceptability of infant circumcision more specifically.

  15. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. ... 6, No 3 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... A total of 10,032 pregnant women were screened for the possible occurrence of HIV 1 and HIV 2 within the period.

  16. prevalence of hepatitis a, b, c and human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-01

    Apr 1, 2004 ... PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS A, B, C AND HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ICTERIC .... computer software. The 95% confidence level was used to assess statistical significance. The Pearson chi-square test was utilised in assesing statistical ...

  17. Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related Opportunistic Infections Between High and Low/Middle-income Countries: Is Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Changing the ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader.

  18. Awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the level of awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among antenatal clients in Nnewi Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study of six hundred consecutive antenatal clients attending the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital and five private ...

  19. Awareness and practice of Human Immunodeficiency Virus And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) infections are global viral diseases with various seroprevalence rates in different parts of the world. They share similar modes of transmission and are very important in Transfusion Medicine. Aim/Objective: To determine the level of awareness ...

  20. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola, about 166 000 individuals are living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% ...

  1. Sexual orientation and risk factors for Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The issue of homosexuality attracts global debate, given that this constitutes risk factor for sexually transmitted diseases. An exploration of socio-cultural, religious and sexual activities of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex sector would inform future Human Immunodeficiency Virus programming.

  2. Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis viruses and their correlation with CD4 T-cell lymphocyte counts in pregnant women in the Buea Health District of Cameroon. ... Prior to this study, very few studies in Cameroon have addressed co-infection of HIV and hepatitis in pregnancy. The aim of this ...

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years ...

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and child sexual abuse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection and child sexual abuse. Hendrik Simon Schaaf. Child sexual abuse (CSA) has not previously been regarded as important in the overall transmission of HIV infection to. childrenY However, with both CSA'·' and HIV infection on the increase, the risk of acquiring HIV infection through ...

  5. Prevalence of Anaemia Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is the most commonly encountered haematological abnormality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with estimates climbing as high as 95% depending on clinical settings. The twin effects of HIV infection and anaemia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and ...

  6. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Co-infection in Nigerian Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia. Type of Article:CSWI. 1Lucy Eberechukwu Yaguo Ide, 2Seye Babatunde. Departments of 1Paediatrics And Child ... of haemolytic anemia and one of the most common in our society.1 It is a major cause of.

  7. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  8. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately... Assistance Number: 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public... Number 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public Health...

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection...

  10. Cross-presentation of viral antigens in dribbles leads to efficient activation of virus-specific human memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Xing, Yun; Paustian, Christopher; van de Ven, Rieneke; Moudgil, Tarsem; Hilton, Traci L; Fox, Bernard A; Urba, Walter J; Zhao, Wei; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2014-04-16

    Autophagy regulates innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens and tumors. We have reported that autophagosomes derived from tumor cells after proteasome inhibition, DRibbles (Defective ribosomal products in blebs), were excellent sources of antigens for efficient cross priming of tumor-specific CD8⁺ T cells, which mediated regression of established tumors in mice. But the activity of DRibbles in human has not been reported. DRibbles or cell lysates derived from HEK293T or UbiLT3 cell lines expressing cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp65 protein or transfected with a plasmid encoding dominant HLA-A2 restricted CMV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Influenza (Flu) epitopes (CEF) were loaded onto human monocytes or PBMCs and the response of human CMV pp65 or CEF antigen-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ memory T cells was detected by intracellular staining. The effect of cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ) TLR agonists (Lipopolysaccharide, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C), M52-CpG, R848, TLR2 ligand) and CD40 ligand on the cross-presentation of antigens contained in DRibbles or cell lysates was explored. In this study we showed that purified monocytes, or human PBMCs, loaded with DRibbles isolated from cells expressing CMV or CEF epitopes, could activate CMV- or CEF-specific memory T cells. DRibbles were significantly more efficient at stimulating CD8⁺ memory T cells compared to cell lysates expressing the same antigenic epitopes. We optimized the conditions for T-cell activation and IFN-γ production following direct loading of DRibbles onto PBMCs. We found that the addition of Poly(I:C), CD40 ligand, and GM-CSF to the PBMCs together with DRibbles significantly increased the level of CD8⁺ T cell responses. DRibbles containing specific viral antigens are an efficient ex vivo activator of human antigen-specific memory T cells specific for those antigens. This function could be enhanced by combining with Poly(I:C), CD40 ligand, and GM

  11. Primary human cytomegalovirus infection induces the expansion of virus-specific activated and atypical memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauby, Nicolas; Kummert, Caroline; Lecomte, Sandra; Liesnard, Corinne; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud

    2014-10-15

    Although neutralizing antibodies play a central role in the control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) dissemination, little is known about the response of B lymphocytes to primary human CMV infection. The proportion, phenotype, specificity, and functionality of B-cell subsets were studied in a cohort of pregnant women with primary CMV infection. CMV-seronegative pregnant women, as well as CMV-seronegative and CMV-seropositive healthy adults, were included as controls. Primary CMV infection was associated with a sustained expansion of activated (CD27(+)CD20(+)CD21(low)) and atypical (CD27(-)CD20(+)CD21(low)) memory B cells (MBCs). Both subsets expressed an effector phenotype, and their proportions were correlated with viremia. Activated MBCs expressed high levels of activation markers and included high frequencies of tumor necrosis α (TNF-α)-producing cells, whereas atypical MBCs expressed high levels of inhibitory receptors and had low TNF-α responses. Fluorescent-labeled antigen experiments indicated that activated and atypical MBCs were enriched in CMV-specific cells. Primary CMV infection mobilizes a large pool of memory B cells that includes activated and atypical MBCs. The functional regulation of CMV-specific MBCs may limit the production of antibodies and the control of viral dissemination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  13. Mandatory premarital testing for human immunodeficiency virus. The Illinois experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnock, B J; Kelly, C J

    1989-06-16

    During the first 6 months of legislatively mandated premarital testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Illinois, 8 of 70,846 applicants for marriage licenses were found to be seropositive, yielding a seroprevalence of 0.011%. The total cost of the testing program for 6 months is estimated at $2.5 million or $312,000 per seropositive individual identified. Half of the reported seropositive individuals reported a history of risk behavior. During the same period, the number of marriage licenses issued in Illinois decreased by 22.5%, while the number of licenses issued to Illinois residents in surrounding states increased significantly. We conclude that mandatory premarital testing is not a cost-effective method for the control of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

  14. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV) transmission in children. Blood transfusion-related HIV ... the human immuno‑deficiency virus among transfused sickle cell anemia patients. Subjects and Methods ... z = Confidence interval (1.96). P = Prevalence of HIV in a previous study ...

  15. Arterial Disease in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, James H.; Currier, Judith S.; HSUE, Priscilla Y

    2014-01-01

    With advances in antiretroviral therapy, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are living longer and increasingly die of non-HIV related diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several observational studies suggest that HIV-infected patients on ART are at increased CVD risk; however, the precise mechanisms underlying the association between HIV infection and CVD risk are uncertain. Atherosclerosis and arterial disease in HIV-infected individuals is a multifactor...

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROGMANAGER

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naïve adults in Jos,. North Central Nigeria. Anejo-Okopi J. A.1*, Agbaji O. O.1,2, Agaba P. A.1,3, Ugoagwu P. O.1, Were K.4, Onywera H.4,. Owiti P.4, Isa S. E1,2, Otecko N.4 ...

  17. Immunopathogenesis of Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    De Repentigny, Louis; Lewandowski, Daniel; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiases remain significant causes of morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, despite the dramatic ability of antiretroviral therapy to reconstitute immunity. Notable advances have been achieved in understanding, at the molecular level, the relationships between the progression of HIV infection, the acquisition, maintenance, and clonality of oral candidal populations, and the emergence of antifungal resistance. However, the critical i...

  18. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus and the airway

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analee Milner

    Therefore, it is still of value to recognise and understand the pathology caused by degrees of immune compromise from HIV/AIDS. Ironically, ART may impact on the airway owing to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and lipodystrophy. Keywords: AIDS, ART, airway, head and neck manifestation, HIV, human ...

  20. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus among tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem worldwide with an estimated one third of the world's population being infected by the agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The TB problem has escalated in the last two decades in the developing countries because of the recent pandemic of human ...

  1. Epidemiological patterns of human immunodeficiency virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no doubt that the greatest health problem threatening the human race these times is the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The greatest burden of this scourge is in sub-saharan African. This has undoubtedly increased the incidence of opportunistic infection like herpes simplex virus infection. This study investigated the ...

  2. Histoplasmosis in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Albert M.; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W.; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N.; Bamberger, David M.; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N.; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p 150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis. PMID:24378739

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and tropical diseases: a Brazilian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgado Mariza G

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes recent findings on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids, highlighting the role of co-infections with major tropical diseases. Such co-infections have been studied in the Brazilian context since the beginning of the Aids epidemic and are expected to be more frequent and relevant as the Aids epidemic in Brazil proceeds towards smaller municipalities and the countryside, where tropical diseases are endemic. Unlike opportunistic diseases that affect basically the immunocompromised host, most tropical diseases, as well as tuberculosis, are pathogenic on their own, and can affect subjects with mild or no immunossuppression. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapies (HAART, opportunistic diseases seem to be on decrease in Brazil, where such medicines are fully available. Benefiting from HAART in terms of restoration of the immune function, putative milder clinical courses are expected in the future for most co-infections, including tropical diseases. On the other hand, from an ecological perspective, the progressive geographic diffusion of Aids makes tropical diseases and tuberculosis a renewed challenge for Brazilian researchers and practitioners dealing with HIV/Aids in the coming years.

  4. Conditional virus replication as an approach to a safe live attenuated human immunodeficiency virus vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Verhoef, Koen; Marzio, Giuseppe; Klaver, Bep; Vink, Monique; Zhou, Xue; Das, Atze T.

    2002-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts, no safe and effective vaccine has been developed for the prophylaxis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Studies with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model demonstrated that live attenuated viruses are the most

  5. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae.

  6. Rapidly progressive periodontal disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Ali, Tazeen Saeed; Al-Askar, Mansour; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz

    2012-03-01

    Severe periodontal inflammation with generalized dental plaque accumulation, spontaneous and severe gingival bleeding, fungal infection, and interdental papillae necrosis are presented in a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bite-wing radiographs revealed a generalized horizontal alveolar bone loss of 7-8 millimetres in both arches. Erythematous patches were noted on the gingival mucosa in both jaws. DNA testing was performed to indentify the periodontopathogens. The patient had no signs or symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This case-report presents the massive periodontal destruction that occurred in a patient infected with HIV. Therefore, it is highly recommended that patients infected with HIV should be regularly monitored to aid in early detection and to provide proper management of periodontal inflammatory conditions to minimize its destruction.

  7. Modelling human myoblasts survival upon xenotransplantation into immunodeficient mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praud, Christophe; Vauchez, Karine; Zongo, Pascal; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas

    2018-03-15

    Cell transplantation has been challenged in several clinical indications of genetic or acquired muscular diseases, but therapeutic success were mitigated. To understand and improve the yields of tissue regeneration, we aimed at modelling the fate of CD56-positive human myoblasts after transplantation. Using immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice as recipients, we assessed the survival, integration and satellite cell niche occupancy of human myoblasts by a triple immunohistochemical labelling of laminin, dystrophin and human lamin A/C. The counts were integrated into a classical mathematical decline equation. After injection, human cells were essentially located in the endomysium, then they disappeared progressively from D0 to D28. The final number of integrated human nuclei was grossly determined at D2 after injection, suggesting that no more efficient fusion between donor myoblasts and host fibers occurs after the resolution of the local damages created by needle insertion. Almost 1% of implanted human cells occupied a satellite-like cell niche. Our mathematical model validated by histological counting provided a reliable quantitative estimate of human myoblast survival and/or incorporation into SCID muscle fibers. Informations brought by histological labelling and this mathematical model are complementary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human papilloma virus-specific T cells can be generated from naïve T cells for use as an immunotherapeutic strategy for immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Sarah E; Cruz, Conrad Russell Y; Wright, Kaylor E; Powell, Allison B; Lang, Haili; Trimble, Cornelia; Keller, Michael D; Fuchs, Ephraim; Bollard, Catherine M

    2018-01-10

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma and laryngeal cancer. Although treatments exist for HPV-associated malignancies, patients unresponsive to these therapies have a poor prognosis. Recent findings from vaccine studies suggest that T-cell immunity is essential for disease control. Because Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-specific T cells have been highly successful in treating or preventing EBV-associated tumors, we hypothesized that the development of a manufacturing platform for HPV-specific T cells from healthy donors could be used in a third-party setting to treat patients with high-risk/relapsed HPV-associated cancers. Most protocols for generating virus-specific T cells require prior exposure of the donor to the targeted virus and, because the seroprevalence of high-risk HPV types varies greatly by age and ethnicity, manufacturing of donor-derived HPV-specific T cells has proven challenging. We, therefore, made systematic changes to our current Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant protocols to improve antigen presentation, priming and expansion for the manufacture of high-efficacy HPV-specific T cells. Like others, we found that current methodologies fail to expand HPV-specific T cells from most healthy donors. By optimizing dendritic cell maturation and function with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ, adding interleukin (IL)-21 during priming and depleting memory T cells, we achieved reliable expansion of T cells specific for oncoproteins E6 and E7 to clinically relevant amounts (mean, 578-fold expansion; n = 10), which were polyfunctional based on cytokine multiplex analysis. In the third-party setting, such HPV-specific T-cell products might serve as a potent salvage therapy for patients with HPV-associated diseases. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring of Human Cytomegalovirus and Virus-Specific T-Cell Response in Young Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe; Zelini, Paola; Chiesa, Antonella; Rognoni, Vanina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Zecca, Marco; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients, outcome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results from balance between viral load/replication and pathogen-specific T-cell response. Using a cut-off of 30,000 HCMV DNA copies/ml blood for pre-emptive therapy and cut-offs of 1 and 3 virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells/µl blood for T-cell protection, we conducted in 131 young patients a prospective 3-year study aimed at verifying whether achievement of such immunological cut-offs protects from HCMV disease. In the first three months after transplantation, 55/89 (62%) HCMV-seropositive patients had infection and 36/55 (65%) were treated pre-emptively, whereas only 7/42 (17%) HCMV-seronegative patients developed infection and 3/7 (43%) were treated. After 12 months, 76 HCMV-seropositive and 9 HCMV-seronegative patients (cumulative incidence: 90% and 21%, respectively) displayed protective HCMV-specific immunity. Eighty of these 85 (95%) patients showed spontaneous control of HCMV infection without additional treatment. Five patients after reaching protective T-cell levels needed pre-emptive therapy, because they developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). HSCT recipients reconstituting protective levels of HCMV-specific T-cells in the absence of GvHD are no longer at risk for HCMV disease, at least within 3 years after transplantation. The decision to treat HCMV infection in young HSCT recipients may be taken by combining virological and immunological findings. PMID:22848556

  10. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  11. Interactions of human immunodeficiency virus-1 proteins with neurons : possible role in the development of human immunodeficiency virus-1-associated dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bovenkamp, M; Nottet, HSLM; Pereira, CF

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia is a severe neurological complication of HIV-1 infection that affects 15-20% of the patients in the late stages of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1-associated dementia is most probably a consequence of HIV-1 infection of the brain

  12. Science and ethics of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome controversies in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, David

    2011-09-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in Africa has raised important ethical issues for both researchers and clinicians. The most notorious controversy has been related to the zidovudine (AZT) trials in Africa in the late 1990s, in which the control groups were given a placebo rather than an effective drug to prevent vertical transmission. This raised concerns in the sponsoring country about exploitation of subjects, injustice and an ethical double standard between donor countries and resource-poor settings. However, the real double standard is between clinical practice standards in Western versus African countries, which must be addressed as part of the increasing global inequity of wealth both between countries and also within countries. There are important limitations to ethical declarations, principles and guidelines on their own without contextual ethical reasoning. The focus on research ethics with the HIV epidemic has led to a relative neglect of ethical issues in clinical practice. Although the scientific advances in HIV/AIDS have changed the ethical issues since the 1990s, there has also been progress in the bioethics of HIV/AIDS in terms of ethical review capability by local committees as well as in exposure to ethical issues by clinicians and researchers in Africa. However, serious concerns remain about the overregulation of research by bureaucratic agencies which could discourage African research on specifically African health issues. There is also a need for African academic institutions and researchers to progressively improve their research capacity with the assistance of research funders and donor agencies. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. Trends in contraceptive use among women with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengyang; Peipert, Jeffrey F; Zhao, Qiuhong; Wilson, Tracey E; Weber, Kathleen M; Sanchez-Keeland, Lorraine; DʼSouza, Gypsyamber; Young, Mary; Watts, D Heather; Keller, Marla J; Cohan, Deborah; Massad, L Stewart

    2012-10-01

    To estimate trends in contraceptive use, especially long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and condoms, among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. Human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women in a multicenter longitudinal cohort were interviewed semiannually between 1998 and 2010 about sexual behaviors and contraceptive use. Trends in contraceptive use by women aged 18-45 years who were at risk for unintended pregnancy but not trying to conceive were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Condoms were the dominant form of contraception for HIV-seropositive women and showed little change across time. Less than 15% of these women used no contraception. Between 1998 and 2010, LARC use increased among HIV-seronegative women from 4.8% (6 of 126) to 13.5% (19 of 141, P=.02), but not significantly among seropositive women (0.9% [4 of 438] to 2.8% [6 of 213], P=.09). Use of highly effective contraceptives, including pills, patches, rings, injectable progestin, implants, and intrauterine devices, ranged from 15.2% (53 of 348) in 1998 to 17.4% (37 of 213) in 2010 (P=.55). Human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative but not HIV-seropositive LARC users were less likely than nonusers to use condoms consistently (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.32-0.81, P=.004 for seronegative women; hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 0.96-1.23 for seropositive women). Although most HIV-seropositive women use contraception, they rely primarily on condoms and have not experienced the increase in LARC use seen among seronegative women. Strategies to improve simultaneous use of condoms and LARC are needed to minimize risk of unintended pregnancy as well as HIV transmission and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. II.

  14. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Update on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Yesufu, Omobolaji T; Gandhi, Rajesh T

    2011-03-15

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) occurs mainly in West Africa, but an increasing number of cases have been recognized in Europe, India, and the United States. In this era of global integration, clinicians must be aware of when to consider the diagnosis of HIV-2 infection and how to test for this virus. Although there is debate regarding when therapy should be initiated and which regimen should be chosen, recent trials have provided important information on treatment options for HIV-2 infection. In this review, we present information on recent clinical advances in our understanding of HIV-2 infection and highlight remaining diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

  16. Dermatophytosis And Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentamilselvi G

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV antibody through Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA technique was observed to be 2.5% among the 200 patients with dermatophytosis. The incidence was less (1% in those with chronic disease compared to those with nonchronic disease (4%. The positivity seemed to be more in females screened. The clinical presentation of dermatophytosis in HIV positive patients was similar to that screen in general population. Trichophyton rubrum was the commonest isolate. Unusual widespread lesions and atypical lesions of nails like proximal subungual white onychomycosis were not encountered in the present series.

  17. Management of Coinfections in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Sabra S

    2018-03-01

    In addition to chronic use of antiretrovirals to maintain suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), many persons living with HIV are coinfected with tuberculosis, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. These coinfections can be successfully treated or managed alongside HIV infection. Clinicians should follow practice guidelines to appropriately screen patients with HIV for these coinfections and initiate treatment when necessary. The most significant concern when treating any of these coinfections is to avoid drug-drug interactions with the patient's antiretrovirals. Several excellent practice guidelines exist for treatment of these common HIV coinfections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  20. Study of opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Mathur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intestinal parasites predominantly coccidian parasites are a common cause for diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted during January 2009-December 2010. A total of 1,088 stool samples from 544 seropositive HIV positive cases were examined microscopically for ova and cyst using wet mount preparations and stained smears. Out of 544 patients, 343 had prolonged diarrhea for more than 4 weeks, 57 had acute diarrhea of lesser than 7 days and 144 were asymptomatic cases who attended out-patient department; included in this study after taking consent from patients. Enteric pathogens were detected in 274 (50.36% of the 544 patients. Results and Conclusions: The parasites identified were Cryptosporidium (135, Isospora belli (42, Cyclospora (12, Microsporidia (02, Entamoeba histolytica (49, Hookworm (34. Intestinal parasites in chronic diarrhea were significantly higher than the acute diarrhea (63.05% vs. 7.35%; P < 0.05. Parasitic pathogens were frequently associated with HIV-positive patients with diarrhea in Western India. Stools of all HIV-positive patients with diarrhea should thoroughly be investigated to identify etiologic agents for proper management.

  1. Ceftriaxone protects against the neurotoxicity of human immunodeficiency virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A; Li, Guanhan; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2007-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins Tat and gp120 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV dementia by various mechanisms, including down-regulation of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT2), which is responsible for inactivation of synaptic glutamate. Recent work indicates that beta-lactam antibiotics are potent stimulators of EAAT2 expression. The authors treated mixed human fetal neuronal cultures with recombinant gp120 or Tat, in the presence or absence of ceftriaxone, and determined neurotoxicity by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal cell death. Ceftriaxone produced dose-dependent attenuation of the neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death caused by both viral proteins. This study demonstrates that this class of drugs may have therapeutic efficacy in HIV dementia.

  2. Pathogenesis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus lipodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyog Subhash Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced understanding about the way human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infects and causes infection in humans has led to invention and use of newer more effective antiretroviral drugs. As treatment for HIV is long term, side effects of the antiretrovirals become an important area of research focus. Antiretrovirals can cause severe metabolic abnormalities, collectively known as HIV lipodystrophy syndrome. If untreated, these metabolic abnormalities have the potential to increase stroke and cardiac ischemia. Management includes choice of nonoffending drugs, switch over to less toxic drugs, hypolipidemics, oral antidiabetics including thiazolidinediones, metformin and growth hormone analogs and finally facial surgeries. Updated knowledge about HIV lipodystrophy, and the hormone-related drugs used to treat it, is essential for physicians and endocrinologists to be able to diagnose the patients and effectively treat them.

  3. Separate worlds set to collide: smallpox, vaccinia virus vaccination, and human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorosa, Valerianna K; Isaacs, Stuart N

    2003-08-01

    Concerns about the possible release of smallpox by bioterrorists has led to policies that recommend smallpox vaccination of some health care providers, and, in the near future, the vaccine may become available to the general population on a voluntary basis. Both smallpox virus (variola virus) and the smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus) will have a significant impact on people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Given that populations with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and populations with immunosuppressed conditions due to solid organ and bone marrow transplantation were not present in the days when smallpox was prevalent, we will speculate on how smallpox might present in immunodeficient patients, and we will review the adverse events expected from the smallpox vaccine in hosts with HIV infection.

  4. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia.

  5. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. 

  6. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Marchesini, Emanuela; Awad, Tahany

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).......Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)....

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection screening in a dialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chi; Sun, Chia-Yi; Wu, Mai-Szu

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening is a routine for long-term hemodialysis patients because of a high risk for infection. Enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) is a simple tool for screening HIV, but clinically false-positive EIA is a frequent result. Other tests such as Western blot analysis (WB) and HIV DNA and RNA by polymerase chain reaction have better specificity and sensitivity, but they cannot be accessible in many dialysis units. Four hundred and four patients with end stage renal disease on long-term hemodialysis were screened with EIA for HIV antibodies. Repeated EIA was performed if the first test was positive result. WB was used as the confirmatory test. Two persons initially showed a positive EIA pattern among the 404 patients, but nobody had positive WB test result later. The ratio of false-positive EIA results for screening HIV is relatively high in long-term hemodialysis patients. Further tests should be employed to confirm the diagnosis.

  8. Hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus and metabolic syndrome: interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Significant concerns have been raised about the metabolic effects of antiretroviral medication, including the classic triad of dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance (IR) and characteristic alterations in fat distribution (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy). Co-infection with hepatitis C appears to exacerbate IR, reduce serum lipids and induce prothrombotic changes in the treated human immunodeficiency virus patient. The effects of co-infection are complex. While combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events through promotion of dyslipidaemia, IR and fat redistribution, co-infection exacerbates IR while reducing serum lipids. Co-infection also promotes a prothrombotic state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation, which may enhance risk for cardiovascular disease. Consideration must be given to selection of appropriate treatment regimens and timing of therapy in co-infected patients to minimize metabolic derangements and, ultimately, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  9. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... that specifically recognize stem-loop motifs in the viral genomes, an assay termed single virion analysis. These studies revealed that >90% of the HIV-2 particles contained viral RNAs and that RNAs derived from different viruses were copackaged frequently. Furthermore, the frequencies of heterozygous particles...... do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins...

  10. A Case of Fatal Congenital Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Uğur Hatipoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immune deficiency syndrome is a clinical condition caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV which can be transmitted either vertically or horizontally. More than 90% of children living with HIV in developing countries have been infected through mother to child transmission during pregnancy, around the time of birth, or through breastfeeding. In order to reduce the number of infected children, increasing emphasis should be placed on preventing mother to child transmission programs with the use of antiretroviral medications in the pregnant woman during pregnancy and at delivery and, starting immediately after birth for the exposed infant. Here, we present the case of a 60-day-old infant heavily immunocompromised due to an extremely high viral burden of HIV, which was acquired perinatally from an undiagnosed and untreated mother, leading to severe bronchopneumonia, sepsis, septic shock and death.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  12. Pulmonary disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, J D; Orholm, Marianne; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All parts of the hospital system are expected to be involved in the diagnosis and treatment of HIV infected patients in the coming years. Many different processes...... cause pulmonary disease alone or in combination. Bilateral interstitial infiltrates are the most frequent chest x-ray abnormality and are most frequently caused by infection with Pneumocystis carinii. Cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis and pulmonary Kaposi......'s sarcoma are the most important parts of the differential diagnosis. An aggressive approach to the diagnosis of pulmonary disease in this patient population is indicated in order to provide optimal care and assess new therapies....

  13. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Yi Tzung

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations are common and often the presenting feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, but a comprehensive study of HIV-associated skin lesions is not available in Taiwan. We reviewed all skin lesions in all HIV patients diagnosed in our department between 1990 and 1998 to document the spectrum of skin manifestations, the frequency of each disorder, and their relationship with CD4 counts. A total of 64 HIV patients were studied, including 38 with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS (CD4 < 200 × 106 cells/L and 26 who had not developed AIDS (non-AIDS. There were 142 episodes of skin conditions representing 25 different skin diseases, including oral candidiasis (15% in non-AIDS vs 71% in AIDS patients, drug eruptions, herpes simplex, seborrheic dermatitis, dermatophytosis, herpes zoster, secondary syphilis, condyloma acuminatum, Kaposi's sarcoma (16% among AIDS patients, hairy leukoplakia, and molluscum contagiosum (13% among AIDS patients, in decreasing order. Several unusual cases are briefly described, including verrucous herpes infection, condyloma-like molluscum contagiosum, and AIDS-associated pigmented erythroderma. In our study, 70% of all HIV patients had skin diseases, with an average of 2.2 conditions per patient (3.2 in AIDS patients vs 0.7 in non-AIDS patients; p < 0.001. A broad spectrum of HIV-associated skin diseases was observed in our series. The frequency of HIV-associated skin disease was 92% in AIDS patients and 39% in non-AIDS patients; 78% of skin lesions in AIDS patients were diagnosed when CD4 counts were below 100 × 106 cells/L.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    1990-01-01

    Provides update on what is currently known about neurobehavioral correlates of infection with human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1), causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Discusses methodological and theoretical issues complicating interpretation of existing data and suggests strategies for future research in this area. (NB)

  16. Human ocular-derived virus-specific CD4+ T cells control Varicella zoster virus replication in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Milikan (Johannes); G.S. Baarsma (Seerp); R.W.A.M. Kuijpers (Robert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-induced retinitis is characterized by the presence of virus-infected cells in the retinal layer and the ocular infiltration of VZV-specific T cells. Herein, the susceptibility of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to VZV infection and the

  17. Current approaches to diagnosis and management of ocular lesions in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Jyotirmay

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunovirus infection in India is rapidly increasing. Ocular lesions due to highly active antiretroviral therapy have been well recognized. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can affect all parts of the eye. However, posterior segment lesions are the most common and of these, Human immunodeficiency virus retinopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis predominate. Often clinical examination can establish the diagnosis of many ocular lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; therefore, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the more common ones. Various drugs in different routes can used to treat cytomegalovirus retinitis. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has remarkably reduced systemic and ocular morbidity among acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. To facilitate care of these patients aseptic precautions for ophthalmic care personnel are now well established and therefore ophthalmologist should not hesitate to provide ophthalmic care to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

  18. Immunopathogenesis of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Repentigny, Louis; Lewandowski, Daniel; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiases remain significant causes of morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, despite the dramatic ability of antiretroviral therapy to reconstitute immunity. Notable advances have been achieved in understanding, at the molecular level, the relationships between the progression of HIV infection, the acquisition, maintenance, and clonality of oral candidal populations, and the emergence of antifungal resistance. However, the critical immunological defects which are responsible for the onset and maintenance of mucosal candidiasis in patients with HIV infection have not been elucidated. The devastating impact of HIV infection on mucosal Langerhans' cell and CD4(+) cell populations is most probably central to the pathogenesis of mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients. However, these defects may be partly compensated by preserved host defense mechanisms (calprotectin, keratinocytes, CD8(+) T cells, and phagocytes) which, individually or together, may limit Candida albicans proliferation to the superficial mucosa. The availability of CD4C/HIV transgenic mice expressing HIV-1 in immune cells has provided the opportunity to devise a novel model of mucosal candidiasis that closely mimics the clinical and pathological features of candidal infection in human HIV infection. These transgenic mice allow, for the first time, a precise cause-and-effect analysis of the immunopathogenesis of mucosal candidiasis in HIV infection under controlled conditions in a small laboratory animal.

  19. [Discrimination and homophobia associated to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Núñez, Emanuel; Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo; Sucilla-Pérez, Héctor; García-Cerde, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    To describe a political mapping on discrimination and homophobia associated to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the context of public institutions in Mexico. The political mapping was conducted in six Mexican states. Stakeholders who were involved in HIV actions from public and private sectors were included. Semistructured interviews were applied to explore homophobia and discrimination associated with HIV. Information was systematized using the Policy Maker software, which is a good support for analyzing health policies. Discriminatory and homophobic practices in the public domain occurred, damaging people´s integrity via insults, derision and hate crimes. Most stakeholders expressed a supportive position to prevent discrimination and homophobia and some of them had great influence on policy-making decisions. It was found that state policy frameworks are less specific in addressing these issues. Homophobia and discrimination associated to HIV are still considered problematic in Mexico. Homophobia is a very sensitive issue that requires further attention. Also, an actual execution of governmental authority requires greater enforcement of laws against discrimination and homophobia.

  20. Role of CD4 endocytosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelchen-Matthews, A; Clapham, P; Marsh, M

    1995-12-01

    We have analyzed the role of CD4 endocytosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry by measuring the infection of HeLa cells expressing various CD4 constructs with endocytosis rates of between 0.2 and 30%/min in a quantitative infectious focus assay. For a number of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains, the highest levels of infection were found on cells with very limited CD4 endocytosis, while cells with efficient CD4 uptake were only poorly infectable, suggesting that CD4 internalization is not required for HIV entry. This was confirmed in a modified assay involving prebinding of HIV-1LAI to HeLa-CD4 cells at 4 degrees C, synchronized virus entry during warming to 37 degrees C, and neutralization of virions remaining at the cell surface with anti-V3 loop antibodies. Warming cells in hypertonic medium inhibited CD4 endocytosis but did not affect the rate or the extent of infection. These studies confirm that HIV infection does not require endocytosis and that laboratory-adapted virus strains can enter HeLa-CD4 cells by fusion at the plasma membrane.

  1. Cardiovascular disease associated with human immunodeficiency virus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luísa Amado; Almeida, Ana G

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have changed significantly following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. On one hand, HAART has altered the course of HIV disease, with longer survival of HIV-infected patients, and cardiovascular complications of HIV infection such as myocarditis have been reduced. On the other hand, HAART is associated with an increase in the prevalence of both peripheral and coronary arterial disease. As longevity increases in HIV-infected individuals, long-term effects, such as cardiovascular disease, are emerging as leading health issues in this population. In the present review article, we discuss HIV-associated cardiovascular disease, focusing on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, management and therapy. Cardiovascular involvement in treatment-naive patients is still important in situations such as non-adherence to treatment, late initiation of treatment, and/or limited access to HAART in developing countries. We therefore describe the cardiovascular consequences in treatment-naive patients and the potential effect of antiretroviral treatment on their regression, as well as the metabolic and cardiovascular implications of HAART regimens in HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. [Hematological changes associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, T; Hasselbalch, H C

    1993-05-10

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primarily involves a subgroup of T-lymphocytic cells, but other cell types are also invaded by the virus, including cell lines within the haematopoietic system. Together with infectious, inflammatory and neoplasic processes, invasion of haematopoietic tissue explains the haematological alterations which are seen during the course of infection with HIV-1. Anaemia develops in the large proportion of patients. Thrombocytopenia frequently occurs during the course of the disease, but may be seen in some patients already at the time of diagnosis, where the condition may be misdiagnosed as "idiopathic" thrombocytopenic purpura. Neutropenia is seen in all disease stages, but is most severe in patients with advanced disease. Bone marrow changes include varying degrees of dysplasia in one or more cell lines, which in some patients may mimic a myelodysplastic syndrome. The number of plasma cells is always increased. In many patients the bone marrow stroma exhibits an increased amount of reticular fibres. HIV-1 infection is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma. Acute myelogenous leukaemia and myelomatosis have been described in patients with advanced disease. Treatment of the above mentioned haematological abnormalities aims primarily at reducing replication of HIV-1, thereby diminishing suppression of haematopoiesis by the virus infection, and at controlling the opportunistic infections during the course of the disease. Specific antiviral therapy (AZT) is most successful in correcting thrombocytopenia. The possibility of bone marrow suppression mediated by a toxic drug effect should always be considered in this patient group.

  3. Syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and targeting prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkess, J R; Kudlac, J; Istre, G R

    1990-11-01

    To examine the interaction between syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Oklahoma, we conducted an unlinked HIV seroprevalence survey using serum specimens submitted to the Oklahoma State Department of Health for serologic test for syphilis. Of specimens with positive results from fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS), 6.3% were HIV-1 seropositive compared to 0.8% of those that had negative results from FTA-ABS. Among specimens positive for syphilis, HIV-1 seropositivity was found almost exclusively among those from persons 20 to 39 years of age and more often among those from men than those from women (9.9% vs 1.3%). Of syphilis-positive specimens from 20- to 39-year-old men, 17.6% were HIV-1 seropositive. In Oklahoma, an area with a relatively low overall prevalence of HIV-1 infection, targeting prevention efforts to young adults who test positive for syphilis should be an efficient way to reach some persons at high risk for HIV-1 infection.

  4. [Serology of the human immunodeficiency virus in saliva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcaba, V; Fernández, E; Rodríguez Junquera, M; García Amorín, Z; Alfonso, J; García Alonso, S

    1993-07-03

    The presence of immunoglobulins in saliva has allowed it to be proven that they are specific against certain antigens. Antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been observed in saliva. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection of the same by commercial enzymoinmmunoassay (EIA) and standardize the technique. In 78 intravenous drug user patients the presence of antibodies against HIV in serum and saliva were determined by recombinant EIA (Abbott HIV-1/HIV-2 recombinant EIA). The determinations in saliva were made taking volumes of 10 and 50 microliters. In 43 patients the presence of antibodies against HIV-1 was demonstrated in serum, 42 of which were positive in saliva in the determination with 50 microliters and 16 with 10 microliters. No false positives were reported. With the use of 50 microliters of saliva the test showed a sensitivity of 0.98, specificity of 1, predictive value of a positive result of 1, predictive value of negative result of 0.98 and diagnostic efficacy of 0.99. The determination of antibodies against HIV in saliva in intravenous drug users is a highly sensitive and specific method with the use of volumes of 50 microliters in the tests.

  5. Screening for human immunodeficiency virus antibody in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, D C; Avins, A L; Haynes-Sanstad, K; Eversley, R; Woods, W J

    1995-02-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of an investigational test for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope antibodies in urine. Matched blood and urine specimens were tested for HIV by two independent laboratories, both of which were blinded to all results at the other site. Duplicate positive enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) results were confirmed by immunofluorescent antibody or western blot. Six alcohol treatment centers in the San Francisco metropolitan area. Five hundred ninety-two recovering alcoholics. Diagnosis of HIV infection by blood and urine EIA and western blot. The experimental urine EIA, when confirmed by urine western blot, led to a correct diagnosis in all samples. One sample was negative by urine EIA screening, positive by blood EIA, and exhibited an indeterminate blood western blot pattern (p24 band only). We encountered no false positive or false negative results using an investigational HIV antibody test for urine samples. There are several important advantages to HIV testing of urine versus serum or blood; however, there are also cogent reasons for limiting the use of alternative specimens for HIV testing.

  6. Laboratorial atopy markers in children with human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rodrigues Cruz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in immune system functions are one of the most important consequences of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Studies have reported a higher prevalence of disease mediated by immunological hypersensitivity mechanisms in HIV-positive patients. This study aims to observe how immunological changes in HIV-infected children interfere in atopy determinants. Fifty-seven HIV-positive children were studied between June 2004-August 2005 to evaluate the possible modifications in atopy diagnosis from prick test environmental allergen reactivity. Patients were subjected to two evaluations: on both occasions, atopic and non-atopic groups were correlated with immunological (CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte concentrations and serum levels of IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE and viral parameters (HIV viral load. The percent atopy was 20.05 in the first and 29.82 in the second evaluation and atopy was diagnosed in patients without immunosuppression or with moderate immunosuppression. Six patients changed from a negative to a positive atopy profile. One patient with a decreased CD4+ T lymphocyte concentration failed to demonstrate prick test positivity between evaluations. Multivariate analysis showed that the variables associated with atopy diagnosis included a personal history of allergic diseases as well as elevated IgE for age and elevated IgE levels. Atopy development in HIV-infected children seems to be modulated by genetic and environmental factors as well as immunological condition.

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Host Defense in the Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Tysheena P; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-04-01

    Immunosuppression associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts all components of host defense against pulmonary infection. Cells within the lung have altered immune function and are important reservoirs for HIV infection. The host immune response to infected lung cells further compromises responses to a secondary pathogenic insult. In the upper respiratory tract, mucociliary function is impaired and there are decreased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A. Host defenses in the lower respiratory tract are controlled by alveolar macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. As HIV infection progresses, lung CD4 T cells are reduced in number causing a lack of activation signals from CD4 T cells and impaired defense by macrophages. CD8 T cells, on the other hand, are increased in number and cause lymphocytic alveolitis. Specific antibody responses by B-lymphocytes are decreased and opsonization of microorganisms is impaired. These observed defects in host defense of the respiratory tract explain the susceptibility of HIV-infected persons for oropharyngeal candidiasis, bacterial pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and other opportunistic infections. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Dermatomyositis in a human immunodeficiency virus infected person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marfatia Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is interesting to study an autoimmune condition like dermatomyositis (DM in the setting of immunosupression due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. An HIV seropositive female aged 30 years, presented with a nonitchy rash over the face, breathlessness, diarrhoea and difficulty in raising her hands above her head. A heliotrope rash around the eyes, Gottron′s papules and proximal muscle weakness were found to be present. C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and lactate dehydrogenase levels were raised, but creatinine phosphokinase and anti-nuclear antibody profile were normal. Her HIV serostatus was confirmed by Western blotting, keeping in mind the potential for false positive HIV serology in an autoimmune disorder. Her CD4 count was 379 cells/mm 3 . An X-ray of the chest showed bilateral pleural effusion with raised pleural fluid adenosine deaminase levels. Clinical findings and laboratory investigations favored the diagnosis of DM and HIV infection with tuberculous effusion in an HIV seropositive patient. She was treated with antibiotics, four-drug anti-tubercular treatment, systemic steroids and later, antiretroviral treatment. Chances of a false positive antibody test for HIV should be considered in a patient having an autoimmune disease such as DM.

  9. Global Considerations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Jamie; Meghji, Jamilah; Miller, Robert F; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory tract infection, particularly tuberculosis, is a major cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a dramatic increase in survival, although coverage of HIV treatment remains low in many parts of the world. There is a concurrent growing burden of chronic noninfectious respiratory disease as a result of increased survival. Many risk factors associated with the development of respiratory disease, such as cigarette smoking and intravenous drug use, are overrepresented among people living with HIV. In addition, there is emerging evidence that HIV infection may directly cause or accelerate the course of chronic lung disease. This review summarizes the clinical spectrum and epidemiology of respiratory tract infections and noninfectious pulmonary pathologies, and factors that explain the global variation in HIV-associated respiratory disease. The potential for enhancing diagnoses of noninfective chronic conditions through the use of clinical algorithms is discussed. We also consider issues in assessment and management of HIV-related respiratory disease in view of the increasing global scale up of ART. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. The oral microbiome in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kistler, James O; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Poovorawan, Yong; Dahlén, Gunnar; Wade, William G

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with a range of oral conditions, and increased numbers of disease-associated microbial species have previously been found in HIV-positive subjects...

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis infection and human immunodeficiency virus acquisition in African women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Barbara; Kwok, Cynthia; Pierre-Louis, Bosny; Rinaldi, Anne; Salata, Robert A.; Chen, Pai-Lien; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Mmiro, Francis; Mugerwa, Roy; Chipato, Tsungai; Morrison, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Trichomoniasis vaginalis is the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection (STI) worldwide, with a particularly high prevalence in regions of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) endemicity. However, its impact as a cofactor for HIV acquisition is poorly understood. Methods.

  12. Gender Reassignment Surgery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients: A Report of Two Cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that surgery on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is dangerous and should be avoided due to the possibility of postoperative infection of the patients or HIV occupational transmission to the medical staff...

  13. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; SahBandar, Ivo N.; Theelen, Bart; Hagen, Ferry; Poot, Ge; Meis, Jacques F.; Rozalyani, Anna; Sjam, Ridhawati; Widodo, Djoko; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Boekhout, Teun

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavueonazole and

  14. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, R.; SahBandar, IN; Theelen, B.; Hagen, F.; Poot, G.; Meis, J.F.; Rozalyani, A.; Sjam, R.; Widodo, D.; Djauzi, S.; Boekhout, T.

    2008-01-01

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavuconazole and

  15. Prevalence of Anal Dysplasia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Transgender Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takaaki; Sigel, Keith; Gaisa, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus-infected men who have sex with men are at high risk for anal cancer, little is known about the prevalence of anal dysplasia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected transgender women. Our study found that prevalence rates of abnormal anal cytology and histology in HIV-infected transgender women were similar to those in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

  16. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management

  17. Preferential HLA usage in the influenza virus-specific CTL response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Boon (Adrianus); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractTo study whether individual HLA class I alleles are used preferentially or equally in human virus-specific CTL responses, the contribution of individual HLA-A and -B alleles to the human influenza virus-specific CTL response was investigated. To this end, PBMC were obtained from three

  18. Ocular findings in human immunodeficiency virus patients in Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleem, Mona A; Ramsahai, Shweta; Del Fierro, Katrina; Rasul, Samad; Onumah, Chavon; Lerebours, Valerie; Gajjala, Jhansi; Copeland, Robert A; Jones, Leslie S

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of ocular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in Washington, DC in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This was a cross-sectional study of patients with HIV who were seen by the ophthalmology consultation service between September 2003 and May 2011 at a single academic institution in Washington, DC. Medical history and ophthalmic findings were reviewed. Patients with complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination were included. Descriptive statistics were performed. The records of 151 patients were included in the final analysis. All patients had complete laboratory data dated within 3 months of their presenting eye examination. Sixty-eight (45 %) patients and fifty-eight (50 %) of those with a diagnosis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. The leading anterior segment disease was herpes zoster ophthalmicus and the leading posterior segment disease was HIV retinopathy. Of the 151 included patients, 78 (52 %) were receiving HAART at the time of the examination. Thirty-one (42 %) of those not receiving HAART were diagnosed with an HIV-related ophthalmic disease. In this study, we find that the overall prevalence of ocular disease has decreased since the introduction of HAART. However, HIV patients continue to be predisposed to developing ophthalmic disease at higher rates than the general population. Visual dysfunction remains an important source of morbidity in HIV patients, particularly in those with AIDS. Measures for improvement include increased communication between infectious disease specialists and ophthalmologists to ensure adherence to HAART and routine eye examinations.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives : To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Prevalence of MetS was compared in patients who were not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART to patients who were on HAART. Materials and Methods: Seventy HIV positive cases were studied. Pregnant and lactating women, patients on drugs other than HAART known to cause metabolic abnormalities and those having diabetes or hypertension were excluded. Cases were evaluated for MetS by using National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel-III. Results: 47 cases were on HAART and 23 cases were not on HAART. Fasting Blood Glucose ≥100 mg/dl was present in 28.6% cases, out of whom 27.7% were on HAART and 30.4% were not on HAART (P = 0.8089. 12.9% cases had BP ≥130/≥85 mm Hg, out of whom 14.9% were on HAART and 8.7% were not on HAART (P = 0.4666. 42.9% cases had TG ≥150 mg/dl, out of whom 44.7% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.6894. HDL cholesterol was low (males <40 mg/dl, females <50 mg/dl in 50% cases, out of whom 55.3% were on HAART and 39.1% were not on HAART (P = 0.2035. Conclusions: Prevalence of MetS was 20%. Majority of patients had only one component of MetS (32.9%. Low HDL was present in 50%, followed by raised triglycerides in 42.9%. Waist circumference was not increased in any of the patients. There was no statistically significant difference between those on HAART and those not on HAART in distribution of risk factors and individual components of MetS.

  20. Psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients is being studied all over the world. There is paucity of Indian literature particularly in asymptomatic HIV individuals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish the prevalence and the determinants of psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic HIV patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess psychiatric morbidity as per ICD-10 dacryocystorhinostomy criteria in 100 consecutive asymptomatic seropositive HIV patients and an equal number of age, sex, education, economic and marital status matched HIV seronegative control. All subjects were assessed with the general health questionnaire (GHQ, mini mental status examination, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and sensation seeking scale (SSS and the scores were analyzed statistically. Results: Asymptomatic HIV positive patients had significantly higher GHQ caseness and depression but not anxiety on HADS as compared to HIV seronegative controls. On SSS asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects showed significant higher scores in thrill and adventure seeking, experience seeking and boredom susceptibility as compared to controls. HIV seropositive patients had significantly higher incidence of total psychiatric morbidity. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity is higher in asymptomatic HIV patients when compared to HIV seronegative controls. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. High sensation seeking and substance abuse found in HIV seropositive patients may play a vital role in engaging in high-risk behavior resulting in this dreaded illness.

  1. Low prevalence of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis C virus among patients with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the Brazilian Amazon basin

    OpenAIRE

    Braga,Wornei Silva Miranda; Castilho,Márcia da Costa; Santos,Isabelle Cristina Vale dos; Moura,Marco Antônio Sabóia; Segurado,Aluisio Cotrim

    2006-01-01

    Comorbidities in human immunodeficiency virus infection are of great interest due to their association with unfavorable outcomes and failure of antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the prevalence of coinfection by human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis in an endemic area for hepatitis B in the Western Amazon basin. Serological markers for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis D virus were tested in a consecutive sample of all patients referred for treatment of h...

  2. Human xenografts are not rejected in a naturally occurring immunodeficient porcine line: a human tumor model in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Pyle, Marla M; Dekkers, Jack C M; Wyatt, Carol R; Rowland, Robert R R; Anderson, David E; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-04-01

    Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans.

  3. Replication of different clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary fetal human astrocytes: enhancement of viral gene expression by Nef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, M; Bentsman, G; Sarkissian, N; Canki, M; Volsky, D J

    1999-04-01

    Dementia is a common complication of AIDS which is associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes are also infected in the brain but HIV-1 replication in these cells is restricted. To determine virus specificity of this restriction we tested the expression of 15 HIV-1 molecular clones in primary human fetal astrocytes by infection and DNA transfection. Infection with cell-free viruses was poorly productive and revealed no clone-specific differences. In contrast, transfected cells produced transiently high levels of HIV-1 p24 core antigen, up to 50 nanograms per ml culture supernatant, and nanogram levels of p24 were detected 3-4 weeks after transfection of some viral clones. The average peak expression of HIV-1 in astrocytes varied as a function of viral clone used by a factor of 15 but the differences and the subsequent virus spread did not correlate with the tropism of the viral clones to T cells or macrophages. Functional vif, vpu, and vpr genes were dispensable for virus replication from transfected DNA, but intact nef provided a detectable enhancement of early viral gene expression and promoted maintenance of HIV-1 infection. We conclude that primary astrocytes present no fundamental barriers to moderate expression of different strains of HIV-1 and that the presence of functional Nef is advantageous to virus infection in these cells.

  4. Direct comparisons of inhibitor sensitivities of reverse transcriptases from feline and human immunodeficiency viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    North, T W; Cronn, R C; Remington, K M; Tandberg, R T

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivities of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were directly compared. The two enzymes had similar sensitivities to three analogs of dTTP, namely, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine 5'-triphosphate. Each of these analogs demonstrated competitive inhibition of both enzymes. Ki values for inhibition of FIV RT by the...

  5. Prevalence of Oro-Facial Lesions in Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Oro-facial lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of HIV infection. These were commonly observed in HIV infected Nigerian women. Oral candidiasis the most common oral lesion observed in the series may therefore be used as a clinical indicator of early immunodeficiency associated with HIV.

  6. Mistrust and Endorsement of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Conspiracy Theories Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected African American Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Gibert, Cynthia; Fiellin, David; Fiellin, Lynn E; Jamison, Annah; Brown, Amber; Justice, Amy C

    2017-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has taken a disproportionate toll on the lives of African Americans, and many previous studies suggest HIV conspiracy beliefs and physician mistrust play important roles in this racial disparity. Because many HIV conspiracy theories tie government involvement with the origin and potential cure for HIV, an area for further examination is HIV+ African American veterans in Veterans Health Administration (VHA) care. In addition to HIV conspiracy beliefs, veterans may already be mistrustful of the VHA as a government healthcare provider. This mistrust is significantly associated with poor health outcomes, among both minority and nonminority persons living with HIV. We conducted interviews with 32 African American veterans at three VHA hospitals to assess HIV conspiracy beliefs and mistrust in physicians providing HIV care. A semistructured interview format allowed respondents to talk freely about their personal history with HIV, their perceptions about living with HIV, and their views on HIV conspiracy beliefs. Five major themes arose from these interviews, including that the government uses HIV to control minority populations; the Veterans Affairs healthcare providers may play a role in withholding HIV treatment, and many HIV-infected veterans are suspicious of HIV treatment regimens. Additionally, several HIV-infected veterans in our study disclosed that they did not follow the prescribed treatment recommendations to ensure adherence. A veteran's beliefs drive views of the healthcare system and trust of HIV-infected veterans' healthcare providers, and impact HIV-infected veterans' willingness to accept treatment for their medical conditions. Further research should continue to examine the impact of mistrust and endorsement of conspiracy beliefs among veterans receiving care in VHA. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: the breast-feeding dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Perre, P

    1995-08-01

    Human milk has been considered only recently as a source of transmission for the human immunodeficiency virus. The estimated postnatal transmission rate from mothers who acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection while lactating is 26% (95% confidence interval 13% to 39%) and may be in the range of 8% to 18% from mothers who were infected before becoming pregnant. Risk factors for postnatal transmission include maternal immune deficiency and the presence of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in milk. Some milk factors may be protective against postnatal transmission such as specific immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M and a molecule able to inhibit the binding of human immunodeficiency virus to CD4. In addition to its safety and its birth-spacing properties, breast-feeding provides immunologic protection and an ideal nutritional content to the infant. In a poor hygienic environment artificial feeding dramatically increases morbidity and mortality from diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections. Consequently, according to our current knowledge the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund reasonably recommend continuing breast-feeding promotion in women living in settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the primary causes of infant deaths such as in many developing countries. In settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are not the primary causes of infant deaths, such as in most of the settings in the developed world, the advisory group recommends against breast-feeding for mothers with proved human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

  8. Acute human immunodeficiency virus syndrome in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Mridula; Rein, Jeffrey

    2003-10-01

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroconversion illness is a difficult diagnosis to make because of its nonspecific and protean manifestations. We present such a case in an adolescent. A 15-year-old boy presented with a 5-day history of fever, sore throat, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient also reported a nonproductive cough, coryza, and fatigue. The patient's only risk factor for HIV infection was a history of unprotected intercourse with 5 girls. Physical examination was significant for fever, exudative tonsillopharyngitis, shotty cervical lymphadenopathy, and palpable purpura on both feet. Laboratory studies demonstrated lymphopenia and mild thrombocytopenia. Hemoglobin, serum creatinine, and urinalysis were normal. The following day, the patient remained febrile. Physical examination revealed oral ulcerations, conjunctivitis, and erythematous papules on the thorax; the purpura was unchanged. Serologies for hepatitis B, syphilis, HIV, and Epstein-Barr virus were negative. Bacterial cultures of blood and stool and viral cultures of throat and conjunctiva showed no pathogens. Coagulation profile and liver enzymes were normal. Within 1 week, all symptoms had resolved. The platelet count normalized. Repeat HIV serology was positive, as was HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent HIV viral load was 350 000, and the CD4 lymphocyte count was 351/mm3. HIV is the seventh leading cause of death among people aged 15 to 24 in the United States, and up to half of all new infections occur in adolescents. Our patient presented with many of the typical signs and symptoms of acute HIV infection: fever, fatigue, rash, pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, oral ulcers, emesis, and diarrhea. Other symptoms commonly reported include headache, myalgias, arthralgias, aseptic meningitis, peripheral neuropathy, thrush, weight loss, night sweats, and genital ulcers. Common seroconversion laboratory findings include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated transaminases. The

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus postexposure prophylaxis for adolescents and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, R C; Keshavarz, R

    2001-08-01

    Children and adolescents are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Transmission occurs through perinatal exposures, injecting drug use, consensual and nonconsensual sex, needle-stick and sharp injuries, and possibly some unusual contacts. Youth engaging in high-risk sexual activities are especially endangered. Half of the estimated worldwide 5.3 million new HIV infections occur in adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 24. Of 20 000 known new adult and adolescent cases in the United States, 25% involve 13- to 21-year-olds. More than 1.4 million children worldwide (aged 15 and younger) are believed to be infected, and >1640 new cases are diagnosed daily. Of the 432 000 people reported to be living with HIV or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States, 5575 are children under 13. HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) is a form of secondary HIV prevention that may reduce the incidence of HIV infections. HIV PEP is commonly conceived of as 2 types: occupational and nonoccupational. Occupational HIV PEP is an accepted form of therapy for health care workers exposed to HIV through their jobs. A landmark study of healthcare workers concluded that occupational HIV PEP may be efficacious. Well-established US national guidelines for occupational HIV PEP exist for this at-risk population. Nonoccupational HIV PEP includes all other forms of HIV PEP, such as that given after sexual assault and consensual sex, injecting drug use, and needle-stick and sharp injuries in non-health care persons. Pediatric HIV PEP is typically the nonoccupational type. The efficacy of nonoccupational HIV PEP is unknown. The presumed efficacy is based on a collection of animal and human data concerning occupational, perinatal, and nonoccupational exposures to HIV. In contrast to occupational HIV PEP, there are no national US guidelines for nonoccupational HIV PEP, and few recommendations are available for its use for adolescents and children. Regardless of this

  10. The loss of immunodominant epitopes affects interferon-γ production and lytic activity of the human influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); E.J. Verschuren (Esther); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A. Gruters (Rob); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study, we examined the effect of the loss of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*3501-restricted nucleoprotein (NP)418-426epitope on interferon (IFN)-γ-production and lytic activity of the human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in vitro. Extensive amino acid variation

  11. Rabies virus-specific human T cell clones provide help for an in vitro antibody response against neutralizing antibody-inducing determinants of the viral glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bunschoten; R.J. Klapmuts; I.J.Th.M. Claassen (Ivo); S.D. Reijneveld; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractHuman T cell clones were prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a vaccinated human donor and kept in culture in the presence of rabies virus antigen and growth factors. Phenotypic analysis of the T cell clones revealed expression of the CD3 and CD4 cell surface markers,

  12. Biventricular thrombi in dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoke, Clovis; Kuate, Liliane Mfeukeu; Luchuo, Engelbert Bain; Edie, Sandrine Dikosso; Boombhi, Jerome; Menanga, Alain

    2015-04-28

    Sub-Saharan Africa is undergoing epidemiological transition with an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases that will add to the already devastating burden of infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus infection. Human immunodeficiency virus infection is increasingly being recognized as an important etiological factor for dilated cardiomyopathy with the potential complication of intraventricular thrombus. However, biventricular thrombi are extremely rare. We report on a rare finding of biventricular thrombi in dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Cameroon. A 52-year old Cameroonian male patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection since 4 years, longstanding heavy alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking presented with gradually worsening shortness of breath, fatigue, persistent dry cough and lower extremity swelling of about two weeks duration. Congestive heart failure was diagnosed. Echocardiography showed left ventricular chamber enlargement with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and biventricular thrombi. The thrombi were immobile and regular in configuration, suggesting they were old. He was treated with a conventional heart failure treatment including loop diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and anticoagulants for the biventricular thrombi. Six months later, a control echocardiography showed a significant decrease in the size of the thrombi. There was no evidence of systemic or pulmonary embolization during follow up. Dilated cardiomyopathy may be seen in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, although other mechanisms needs to be assessed, but the occurrence of biventricular thrombi is rare.

  13. CD8+ T Cell Escape Mutations in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 Cause Fitness Defects In Vivo, and Many Revert after Transmission▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Mudd, Philip A.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Walsh, Andrew D.; León, Enrique J.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Maness, Nicholas J.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Watkins, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes select for escape mutations in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). To assess the effects of these mutations on viral fitness, we introduced escape mutations into 30 epitopes (bound by five major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I] molecules) in three different viruses. Two of these MHC-I alleles are associated with elite control. Two of the three viruses demonstrated reduced fitness in vivo, and 27% of the introd...

  14. Behavioral surveillance survey regarding human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among high school and junior college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosale S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: It is necessary to know the baseline knowledge, attitude, and practices about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among young people and the changes in these with intervention to guide prevention efforts. Methods: A cross-sectional pre- and post-survey with health education as a method of intervention was carried out in four different randomly selected schools and junior colleges among the Class IX-XII students of both sex. Instrument developed by the World Health Organization (WHO/UNAIDS in their best practice recommendations was used for data collection. Results: Knowledge about all correct methods was present in 61.23% of the respondents. Knowledge of at least two methods of prevention was present in 70.31% of the respondents. Misconceptions about prevention were that good diet (33.42%, avoiding mosquito bite (49.71% and avoiding public toilets (65.14% could help in the prevention. With intervention, there was an improvement in the knowledge. However, the proportion of students with misconceptions did not come down. Correct knowledge about two methods of prevention also did not reach the WHO recommendation of 90%. Conclusion: It is very difficult to change the attitude and practices by a single health educational intervention and an ongoing behavior change communication is recommended.

  15. Targeted interventions in Rajasthan, India: How informed are the beneficiaries about transmission of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Questions: What is the present level of knowledge among the high-risk groups regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and what is the source of such knowledge? What role do the stakeholders play in enhancing their level of knowledge? Objectives: To assess the efficacy of interventions focused on high-risk groups, and to find out indications on the needs to work with the general population. Study Design : Community-based cross-sectional survey about transmission of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS; Study Period: December 2002. Participants: 1792 respondents, which included 1001 truckers, 389 migrants, 206 street children, and 196 commercial sex workers (CSWs. Setting: In intervention sites under SACS in Rajasthan Analysis: Frequency distribution and Chi-square tests. Results: Knowledge about all the four methods of transmission of HIV/AIDS was found to be relatively poor among the targeted intervention subjects. Of those who knew about HIV/AIDS about 67 per cent of the spouses of out migrants (55% over one-third of the in migrants (35%, 45 per cent of the female commercial sex workers and 0.8 per cent truckers knew about all the correct modes of transmission of HIV/AIDS. TV/Radio emerged as the main source of knowledge about the correct modes of transmission for most of the respondents. The state health services and NGO workers, though primarily responsible for imparting knowledge to the subjects were found to be playing marginal role in the same.

  16. Behavioral surveillance survey regarding human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among high school and junior college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, S B; Jadhav, S L; Singru, Samir A; Banerjee, Amitav

    2010-01-01

    It is necessary to know the baseline knowledge, attitude, and practices about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among young people and the changes in these with intervention to guide prevention efforts. A cross-sectional pre- and post-survey with health education as a method of intervention was carried out in four different randomly selected schools and junior colleges among the Class IX-XII students of both sex. Instrument developed by the World Health Organization (WHO)/UNAIDS in their best practice recommendations was used for data collection. Knowledge about all correct methods was present in 61.23% of the respondents. Knowledge of at least two methods of prevention was present in 70.31% of the respondents. Misconceptions about prevention were that good diet (33.42%), avoiding mosquito bite (49.71%) and avoiding public toilets (65.14%) could help in the prevention. With intervention, there was an improvement in the knowledge. However, the proportion of students with misconceptions did not come down. Correct knowledge about two methods of prevention also did not reach the WHO recommendation of 90%. It is very difficult to change the attitude and practices by a single health educational intervention and an ongoing behavior change communication is recommended.

  17. Determinants of risk behavior for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, S D; Trumbetta, S L; Mueser, K T; Goodman, L A; Osher, F C; Vidaver, R M; Metzger, D S

    2001-01-01

    We examined the prevalence and correlates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) risk behaviors in a large sample of severely mentally ill (SMI) patients. Risk levels were correlated with demographic factors, diagnosis, symptom severity, trauma history, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorder (SUD), and sexual orientation. SMI clients from urban and rural settings (N = 275) were assessed regarding HIV/AIDS risk behaviors, and hypothesized risk factors. Patients exhibited substantial levels of risky behavior, particularly sexual risk. Correlates of increased risk included SUD, trauma, male homosexual orientation, younger age, and symptom severity. Structural equation modeling identified SUD and sexual orientation as the primary determinants of both drug and sexual risk behavior. We conclude that specific illness related variables appear to have less impact on risk behavior among people with SMI than previously hypothesized. Substance abuse prevention and treatment may be the most effective means of reducing HIV risk in this population. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  18. The human immunodeficiency virus preventive vaccine research at the French National Agency for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fischer

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS epidemic is of unprecedented gravity and is spreading rapidly, notably in the most disadvantaged regions of the world. The search for a preventive vaccine is thus an absolute priority. For over 10 years the French National Agency for AIDS research (ANRS has been committed to an original program combining basic science and clinical research. The HIV preventive vaccine research program run by the ANRS covers upstream research for the definition of immunogens, animal models, and clinical research to evaluate candidate vaccines. Most researchers in 2004 believe that it should be possible to obtain partial vaccine protection through the induction of a strong and multiepitopic cellular response. Since 1992, the ANRS has set up 15 phases I and II clinical trials in order to evaluate the safety and the capacity of the candidate vaccines for inducing cellular immune responses. The tested candidate vaccines were increasingly complex recombinant canarypox viruses (Alvac containing sequences coding for certain viral proteins, utilized alone or combined with other immunogens (whole or truncated envelope proteins. ANRS has also been developing an original strategy based on the utilization of lipopeptides. These comprise synthetic fragments of viral proteins associated with lipids that facilitate the induction of a cellular immune response. These approaches promptly allowed the assessment of a prime-boost strategy combining a viral vector and lipopeptides.

  19. Prevalence and prognostic significance of infection with TT virus in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JK; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Sørensen, M

    2000-01-01

    No clear association between human disease and TT virus (TTV) has been documented. A possible pathogenic role of TTV was investigated in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). TTV serum concentrations were estimated in 185 HIV-infected patients by dilution polymerase chain rea...... TTV viremia (Psuspected to be an opportunistic pathogen with an independent influence on HIV progression....

  20. Genetic instability of live, attenuated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Verhoef, K.; van Wamel, J. L.; Back, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Live, attenuated viruses have been the most successful vaccines in monkey models of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, there are several safety concerns about using such an anti-HIV vaccine in humans, including reversion of the vaccine strain to virulence and

  1. Augmentation of alphavirus vector-induced human papilloma virus-specific immune and anti-tumour responses by co-expression of interleukin-12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Regts, Joke; Chen, Margaret; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2009-01-01

    To enhance the efficacy of a therapeutic immunisition strategy against human papillomavirus-induced cervical cancer we evaluated the adjuvant effect of interleukin-12 (IL12) expressed by a Semliki Forest virus vector (SFV) in mice. Depending on the dose and schedule. SFV-IL12 Stimulated

  2. The magnitude and specificity of influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in humans is related to HLA-A and -B phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Boon (Adrianus); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); Y.M.F. Graus; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe repertoire of human cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) in response to influenza A viruses has been shown to be directed towards multiple epitopes, with a dominant response to the HLA-A2-restricted M1(58-66) epitope. These studies, however, were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear

  3. Human Ubc9 Contributes to Production of Fully Infectious Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L.; Wood, Charles; West, John T.; Weldon, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold les...

  4. Induction of alpha interferon by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in human monocyte-macrophage cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Szebeni, J; Dieffenbach, C; Wahl, S M; Venkateshan, C N; Yeh, A; Popovic, M.; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Peterfy, M; Friedman, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The induction of interferon (IFN) by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary, nonstimulated monocyte-macrophage cultures was studied. HIV-1 infection, as confirmed by p24 antigen levels in the cell supernatant, led to the production of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) over 7 to 21 days following infection. In two of seven experiments, the IFN detected was acid labile. Coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the induction of IFN-alpha mRNA in cells...

  5. Tuberculosis screening and treatment compliance in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Viveiros

    2013-05-01

    (76,6% aderiram ao rastreio. A descentralização dos cuidados de saúde mostrou estar associada a uma maior adesão ao rastreio (p < 0,001; enquanto ter uma doença definidora de sida (p = 0,002 ou ter mais idade (p = 0,04 foram associados a uma menor adesão ao rastreio.O diagnóstico de TB infeção latente foi feito em 14 doentes e de TB ativa em 18; 14 casos de TB ativa foram diagnosticados posteriormente durante o seguimento em consulta hospitalar. Nos doentes com TB ativa, estar em terapêutica HAART mostrou associação com a adesão ao tratamento da TB (p = 0,03. Nesta população, a melhoria no acesso aos cuidados de saúde foi importante na aceitação do rastreio de tuberculose. Keywords: Tracing, Tuberculosis, Adherence, Risk population, Human immunodeficiency virus, Palavras-chave: Rastreio, Tuberculose, Adesão, População de risco, Vírus da imunodeficiência humana

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection acquired through a traditional healer's ritual: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallangyo, Pedro; Nicholaus, Paulina; Mayala, Henry; Kabeho, Andrew; Nkinda, Anna; Janabi, Mohamed

    2017-10-26

    Globally, over 36 million people were infected with human immunodeficiency virus by the end of 2015. The Sub-Saharan African region home to less than one-fifth of the global population disproportionately harbors over two-thirds of the total infections and related deaths. Residents of Sub-Saharan Africa continue to face limited access to allopathic medicine and it is estimated that over 80% of primary health care needs in the region are met through traditional healing practices. It is known that some of these practices are performed in groups and the use of unsterilized instruments is common thus potentiating the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. A 29-year-old business woman of African origin residing in rural Tanzania presented at a screening event to confirm her human immunodeficiency virus status. Her past medical history was unremarkable and so were two past pregnancies. As per the antenatal clinic card for the second pregnancy, her human immunodeficiency virus serostatus was negative. She reported that she had been taken to a traditional healer to take an oath of remaining faithful during her husband's absence. The oath involved cutting of the healer's skin followed by hers using the same instrument. Approximately 4 months following this traditional ritual she developed a febrile illness accompanied by enlarged lymph nodes of her neck. She was investigated for malaria, typhoid fever, and urinary tract infection which were negative but she tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Owing to her disbelief regarding the human immunodeficiency virus status, she went to three other care and treatment clinics and the results remained similar. She denied any history of transfusion or extramarital affairs. She tested positive at the screening event and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus performed at our institution was reactive. Tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz antiretroviral combination was initiated. Persistence

  7. Practice Bulletin No. 167 Summary: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. For information on screening guidelines, refer to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee Opinion No. 596, Routine Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening (2).

  8. Variation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase within the simian immunodeficiency virus genome of RT-SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A Wadford

    Full Text Available RT-SHIV is a chimera of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV containing the reverse transcriptase (RT-encoding region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 within the backbone of SIVmac239. It has been used in a non-human primate model for studies of non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTI and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. We and others have identified several mutations that arise in the "foreign" HIV-1 RT of RT-SHIV during in vivo replication. In this study we catalogued amino acid substitutions in the HIV-1 RT and in regions of the SIV backbone with which RT interacts that emerged 30 weeks post-infection from seven RT-SHIV-infected rhesus macaques. The virus set points varied from relatively high virus load, moderate virus load, to undetectable virus load. The G196R substitution in RT was detected from 6 of 7 animals at week 4 post-infection and remained in virus from 4 of 6 animals at week 30. Virus from four high virus load animals showed several common mutations within RT, including L74V or V75L, G196R, L214F, and K275R. The foreign RT from high virus load isolates exhibited as much variation as that of the highly variable envelope surface glycoprotein, and 10-fold higher than that of the native RT of SIVmac239. Isolates from moderate virus load animals showed much less variation in the foreign RT than the high virus load isolates. No variation was found in SIVmac239 genes known to interact with RT. Our results demonstrate substantial adaptation of the foreign HIV-1 RT in RT-SHIV-infected macaques, which most likely reflects selective pressure upon the foreign RT to attain optimal activity within the context of the chimeric RT-SHIV and the rhesus macaque host.

  9. Alteration in pancreatic islet function in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind the defects in insulin production and secretion associated with antihuman immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapy and the development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) are discussed in this article. Data suggesting insulin resistance on the beta cell...... and defects in first-phase insulin release of HALS patients are presented. Hepatic extraction of insulin, nonglucose insulin secretagogues and insulin-like growth factor release may exert influence on the demand of circulating insulin and on insulin secretion in HIV-infected patients. Finally, the paucity...... in understanding the incretin effects in HIV and HIV therapy in relation to insulin secretion is highlighted....

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection And Hypertension. Is There A Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanidas, Elias; Papadopoulos, Dimitris P; Velliou, Maria; Tsioufis, Kostas; Barbetseas, John; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2017-12-06

    Data support that hypertension is prevalent among HIV patients contributing to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Immunodeficiency and prolonged antiretroviral treatment along with common risk factors including older age, male gender and high body mass index might conduce to greater incidence of hypertension. The purpose of this review was to summarize recent evidence of the increased cardiovascular risk in these patents linking HIV infection to hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activity of novel pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuno, Takumi; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko

    2015-08-15

    In the present study, we describe the synthesis of a novel set of pyridine/pyridinium-type fullerene derivatives. The products were assessed for human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition activities. All novel fullerene derivatives showed potent human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase inhibition without cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A new immunodeficiency disorder in humans involving NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, J C; Haliotis, T; Klein, M; Korec, S; Jett, J R; Ortaldo, J; Heberman, R B; Katz, P; Fauci, A S

    1980-04-10

    Immunodeficiency disorders have provided much information on the development and interaction of the various B and T lymphoid components in the immune system of man. As the lymphoid system becomes increasingly divided into functional subsets of cells it will be important to find immunodeficiencies affecting newly discovered cell types. Natural killer (NK) cells are a recently described but ill-defined subpopulation of lymphocytes which is thought to play an important part in surveillance against tumour development. Mice homozygous for the beige gene were found to have a selective deficiency in NK function and were more susceptible to transplantation of syngeneic tumours as predicted. We report here that patients carrying the analogous, autosomal recessive Chediak-Higashi (CH) gene have a profound defect in their ability to spontaneously lyse various tumour cells in vitro by either antibody-dependent or independent mechanisms. Since other cell-mediated cytolytic functions were relatively normal, these results suggest that the beige or Chediak-Higashi gene in both man and mouse controls NK function.

  13. Infection of rabbits with human immunodeficiency virus 1. A small animal model for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Injection of rabbits with a human T cell line infected with HIV-1 caused seroconversion within 6 wk, and HIV-1 could be isolated from PBL cultures of infected rabbits. Identity of the isolated virus with HIV-1 was shown by analysis of products amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. HIV-1 infection was seen in rabbits injected with HIV-1- infected cells alone as well as in those that were first infected with HTLV-1 and subsequently with HIV-1. There were no consistent signs of disease in ...

  14. A second-site mutation that restores replication of a Tat-defective human immunodeficiency virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, K.; Berkhout, B.

    1999-01-01

    We previously constructed a large set of mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Tat with conservative amino acid substitutions in the activation domain. These Tat variants were analyzed in the context of the infectious virus, and several mutants were found to

  15. Efficient human immunodeficiency virus replication requires a fine-tuned level of transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marzio, Giuseppe; Vink, Monique; Verhoef, Koen; de Ronde, Anthony; Berkhout, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Transcription represents a crucial step in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is highly regulated. Here we show that the strength of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter is optimized for efficient replication. Artificially increasing the rate of LTR-driven

  16. Timing of HAART initiation and clinical outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, Michele; Fusco, Jennifer S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Thomas, James C.; Porter, Kholoud; Kaufman, Jay S.; Davidian, Marie; White, Alice D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Eron, Joseph J.; del Amo, Julia; Meyer, Laurence; Bucher, Heiner C.; Chene, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Prins, Maria; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Lodi, Sara; Coughlin, Kate; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Muga, Roberto; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Ramacciotti, Tim; Gelgor, Linda; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Guiguet, Marguerite; Vanhems, Philippe; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Ghosn, Jade; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Kücherer, Claudia; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Pantazis, Nikos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Rezza, Giovanni; Dorrucci, Maria; Balotta, Claudia; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Geskus, Ronald; van der Helm, Jannie; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sannes, Mette; Brubakk, Oddbjorn; Bakken Kran, Anne-Marte; Rosinska, Magdalena; Gniewosz, Joanna; Camacho, Ricardo; Smolskaya, Tatyana; Tor, Jordi; Garcia de Olalla, Patricia; Cayla, Joan; del Romero, Jorge; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Rickenbach, Martin; Francioli, Patrick; Malyuta, Ruslan; Brettle, Ray; Delpech, Valerie; Lattimore, Sam; Murphy, Gary; Johnson, Anne; Phillips, Andrew; Jaffe, Harold; Morrison, Charles; Salata, Robert; Mugerwa, Roy; Chipato, Tsungai; Amornkul, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the clinical benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation vs deferral in a given month in patients with CD4 cell counts less than 800/μL. In this observational cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters from CASCADE (Concerted Action on

  17. Heat-shock induction of the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, J. L.; Minnaar, R. P.; Boom, R.; van der Noordaa, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Rat cell lines were established in which the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR) was stably integrated. The cell lines showed a repressed phenotype for CAT expression, but could be induced for it by

  18. Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) share similar properties such as modes of transmission. This study was therefore designed to find out the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection in Zawan village. Three hundred subjects were recruited into the study through simple random sampling method ...

  19. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the

  20. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Continuum of Care in European Union Countries in 2013: Data and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gourlay, Annabelle; Noori, Teymur; Pharris, Anastasia; Axelsson, Maria; Costagliola, Dominique; Cowan, Susan; Croxford, Sara; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; del Amo, Julia; Delpech, Valerie; Díaz, Asunción; Girardi, Enrico; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Hernando, Victoria; Jose, Sophie; Leierer, Gisela; Nikolopoulos, Georgios; Obel, Niels; Op de Coul, Eline; Paraskeva, Dimitra; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Sasse, André; Schmid, Daniela; Sonnerborg, Anders; Spina, Alexander; Suligoi, Barbara; Supervie, Virginie; Touloumi, Giota; van Beckhoven, Dominique; van Sighem, Ard; Vourli, Georgia; Zangerle, Robert; Porter, Kholoud

    2017-01-01

    Background. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a "90-90-90" target to curb the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic by 2020, but methods used to assess whether countries have reached this target are not standardized, hindering comparisons. Methods. Through a

  1. Aspirin-like molecules that inhibit human immunodeficiency virus 1 replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, Cândida F.; Paridaen, Judith T. M. L.; Rutten, Karla; Huigen, Marleen C. D. G.; van de Bovenkamp, Marja; Middel, Jeena; Beerens, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Schuurman, Rob; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Verhoef, Jan; Nottet, Hans S. L. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some anti-inflammatory molecules are also known to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. We found that o-(acetoxyphenyl)hept-2-ynyl sulfide (APHS), a recently synthesized non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecule can inhibit HIV-1 replication. The aim of this study was to clarify

  2. Semen quality remains stable during 96 weeks of untreated human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Prins, Jan M.; Reiss, Peter; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate semen parameters during the natural course of asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. DESIGN: A longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic of the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. PATIENT(S): 55 men infected with

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  4. Gag sequence variation in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission cluster influences viral replication fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F.; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2013-01-01

    Three men from a proven homosexual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission cluster showed large variation in their clinical course of infection. To evaluate the effect of evolution of the same viral variant in these three patients, we analysed sequence variation in the capsid

  5. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection.

  6. Normal T-cell telomerase activity and upregulation in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, KC; Otto, SA; Wisman, GBA; Fleury, S; Reiss, P; ten Kate, RW; van der Zee, AGJ; Miedema, F

    1999-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, decrease of telomere length is mainly found in CD8(+) T cells and not in CD4(+) T cells. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that can synthesize telomeric sequence onto chromosomal ends, can compensate for telomere loss. Here, we investigated if

  7. High human immunodeficiency virus incidence in a cohort of Rwandan female sex workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstein, Sarah L.; Ingabire, Chantal M.; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Uwizera, Aline Umutoni; Mwamarangwe, Lambert; Ntirushwa, Justin; Nash, Denis; Veldhuijzen, Nienke J.; Nel, Annalene; Vyankandondera, Joseph; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) incidence among female sex workers in Rwanda is a key part of preparing for HIV prevention trials. HIV-negative, nonpregnant female sex workers (N =397) were tested for HIV-1, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy quarterly for 12 months, and

  8. West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilalas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of West Nile virus lineage 2 in central Macedonia, Greece, in 2010 resulted in large outbreaks for 5 consecutive years. We report a case of viral meningitis in an individual infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which preceded the recognition of the outbreak and was confirmed retrospectively as West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

  9. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Continuum of Care in European Union Countries in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourlay, Annabelle; Noori, Teymur; Pharris, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Background.: The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a "90-90-90" target to curb the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic by 2020, but methods used to assess whether countries have reached this target are not standardized, hindering comparisons. Methods.: Through...

  10. Relationship between cytomegalovirus infection and procoagulant changes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, R.; Tichelaar, Y. I. G. V.; Sprenger, H. G.; Mulder, A. B.; Lijfering, W. M.

    P>Cytomegalovirus is associated with hypercoagulability, and is reported to increase the risk of venous thrombosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Progression to AIDS, however, is also associated with hypercoagulability and venous thrombosis, and may result in more

  11. DNA binding properties of the integrase proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); Y. Elgersma (Ype); M.W. Bolk; C. Vink (Cornelis); R.H. Plassterk

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIntegration of retroviral DNA into the host chromosome requires the integrase protein (IN). We overexpressed the IN proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) in E. coli and purified them. Both proteins were found to specifically cut two

  12. Mutational analysis of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); A.A. Groeneger; A.A. Plassterk

    1992-01-01

    textabstractPurified integrase protein (IN) can nick linear viral DNA at a specific site near the ends and integrate nicked viral DNA into target DNA. We have made a series of 43 site-directed point mutants of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 IN and assayed purified mutant

  13. The Connections between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Implications for Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Fox, Ashley; Ferro, Carol; Khawaja, Shazia; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2005-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted with 28 women who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and have experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in order to examine (1) the challenges generated by the experience of sexual abuse and related coping strategies, (2) the impact of the HIV diagnosis on their coping strategies, and (3) the links…

  14. Mobility and the spread of human immunodeficiency virus into rural areas of West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagarde, E.; Schim van der Loeff, M.; Enel, C.; Holmgren, B.; Dray-Spira, R.; Pison, G.; Piau, J. P.; Delaunay, V.; M'Boup, S.; Ndoye, I.; Coeuret-Pellicer, M.; Whittle, H.; Aaby, P.

    2003-01-01

    In eastern and southern Africa, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic appeared first in urban centres and then spread to rural areas. Its overall prevalence is lower in West Africa, with the highest levels still found in cities. Rural areas are also threatened, however, because of the

  15. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on cd4 t ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on cd4 t-lymphocyte depletion among people living with HIV and AIDS in Enugu, Nigeria. ... group A. Though there was down regulation of viral burden during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there was no corresponding increase in T-cell proliferation.

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and...

  17. Indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus Western blot profiles in ethiopians with discordant screening-assay results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meles, Hailu; Wolday, Dawit; Fontanet, Arnaud; Tsegaye, Aster; Tilahun, Tesfaye; Aklilu, Mathias; Sanders, Eduard; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2002-01-01

    The Western blot (WB) assay is the most widely accepted confirmatory assay for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, indeterminate WB reactivity to HIV-1 proteins may occur in individuals who do not appear to be infected with HIV. The profiles of WB

  18. Schistosomiasis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that treatment for schistosomiasis in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) attenuated HIV replication as measured by plasma HIV RNA. We investigated systemic inflammation as measured by plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor II...

  19. Viral gene expression, antibody production and immune complex formation in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Paul, D. A.; de Wolf, F.; Coutinho, R. A.; Goudsmit, J.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen (HIV-Ag) in polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitates and supernatants and HIV antibodies (HIV-Ab) to core and envelope antigens were studied in serial serum samples of three HIV-Ab seroconverters and 11 HIV-Ab seropositive men with a mean follow-up time of

  20. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N...

  1. Pathogenesis of primary R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clones in SCID-hu mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scoggins, R. M.; Taylor, J. R.; Patrie, J.; van't Wout, A. B.; Schuitemaker, H.; Camerini, D.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the replication and cytopathicity in SCID-hu mice of R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) biological clones from early and late stages of infection of three patients who never developed MT-2 cell syncytium-inducing (SI; R5X4 or X4) viruses. Several of the late-stage non-MT-2

  2. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  3. Specific Western Blot Bands Are Associated with Initial CD4+ Lymphocyte Counts in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconverters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-30

    development of AIDS in subjects with hemophilia . N Engl J Med 1989;321:1141-8. 8. Margolick JB, Fauci AS. Immunopathogenesis of the acquired ...S, Taylor J. et al. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-free time after Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) seroconversion in homosexual

  4. Family and other social factors contributing to differences in human immunodeficiency virus infection between South Africa and Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginneken, J.K.S.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to draw attention to the importance of social, cultural, economic and political factors as causes of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic in South Africa by comparing the current situation in this country with

  5. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Nandy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles, Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi′s sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis.

  6. [The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from Yunnan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Li, Chengwen; Pei, Junhaoxiang; Bai, Jinsong; Yang, Xianghong; Duan, Kaiwen

    2014-08-01

    To assess the incidence of oral candidiasis and its influencing factors in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). An oral examination was conducted in the 1 566 HIV/AIDS patients in the Third Hospital of Kunming from March 2008 to September 2012 (M/F: 1 062/504, age range: 0.2 to 84.0 years old). The HIV viral load (HIV- RNA) and peripheral blood CD4 count were respectively analyzed by Bayer Q340 fluorescence signal surveying instrument (bDNA method) and flow cytometry analysis. The information on usage of highly active anti-retroviral (HAART) drugs and transmission of HIV were obtained through questionnaires. The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with different HIV-RNA levels and CD4 count and the use of HAART was analyzed and compared. The total incidence of oral candidosis was 31.0% (486/1 566) and there was no difference in sex. The oral lesions were presented by three types, psudomembranous candidosis (PC), erythematous candidosis (EC) and angular cheilitis (AC), and the morbidity was 13.9% (217/1 566), 17.0% (267/1 566) and 4.9% (77/1 566), respectively. The average level of CD4 count in psudomembranous candidosis, erythematous candidosis and angular cheilitis [81.0 (146.0), 74.0 (152.0) and 69.0 (121.5) cell/µl] showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). The incidence of oral candidiasis in non-HAART and HAART subjects were 36.3% (402/1 107) and 18.3% (84/459), respectively (P = 0.000). The CD4 count and absolute counts of HIV viral load in oral candidiasis patients and non-oral candidiasis patients had significant difference (Z = -10.261, P = 0.000 and Z = -4.762, P = 0.000). The morbidity of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients in Yunnan Province was high, including PC, EC and AC and hyperplastic candidosis was not detected. The incidence was related to the degree of immune suppression and HIV viral load.

  7. A literature review on cardiovascular risk in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansueto Gomes Neto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In recent years, there has been growing concern about an increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, which could be associated with side effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy. It is likely that the metabolic disorders related to anti-human immunodeficiency virus treatment will eventually translate into a increased cardiovascular risk in patients submitted to such regimens. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than human immunodeficiency virus infected patients not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, or the general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a computer-based search in representative databases, and also performed manual tracking of citations in selected articles. RESULT: The available evidence suggests an excess risk of cardiovascular events in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons compared to non-human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and morphological signs of cardiovascular diseases. Some evidence suggested that human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are at increased risk of dyslipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction, particularly if the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen contains a protease inhibitor. CONCLUSION: Physicians must weigh the cardiovascular risk against potential benefits when prescribing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Careful cardiac screening is warranted for patients who are being evaluated for, or who are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens, particularly for those with known underlying cardiovascular risk

  8. Off-the-Shelf Virus-Specific T Cells to Treat BK Virus, Human Herpesvirus 6, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Naik, Swati; Leung, Kathryn; Martinez, Caridad A; Ramos, Carlos A; Carrum, George; Sasa, Ghadir; Lulla, Premal; Watanabe, Ayumi; Kuvalekar, Manik; Gee, Adrian P; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Grilley, Bambi J; Krance, Robert A; Gottschalk, Stephen; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Leen, Ann M; Omer, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Improvement of cure rates for patients treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) will require efforts to decrease treatment-related mortality from severe viral infections. Adoptively transferred virus-specific T cells (VSTs) generated from eligible, third-party donors could provide broad antiviral protection to recipients of HSCT as an immediately available off-the-shelf product. Patient and Methods We generated a bank of VSTs that recognized five common viral pathogens: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus (BKV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). The VSTs were administered to 38 patients with 45 infections in a phase II clinical trial. Results A single infusion produced a cumulative complete or partial response rate of 92% (95% CI, 78.1% to 98.3%) overall and the following rates by virus: 100% for BKV (n = 16), 94% for CMV (n = 17), 71% for AdV (n = 7), 100% for EBV (n = 2), and 67% for HHV-6 (n = 3). Clinical benefit was achieved in 31 patients treated for one infection and in seven patients treated for multiple coincident infections. Thirteen of 14 patients treated for BKV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis experienced complete resolution of gross hematuria by week 6. Infusions were safe, and only two occurrences of de novo graft-versus host disease (grade 1) were observed. VST tracking by epitope profiling revealed persistence of functional VSTs of third-party origin for up to 12 weeks. Conclusion The use of banked VSTs is a feasible, safe, and effective approach to treat severe and drug-refractory infections after HSCT, including infections from two viruses (BKV and HHV-6) that had never been targeted previously with an off-the-shelf product. Furthermore, the multispecificity of the VSTs ensures extensive antiviral coverage, which facilitates the treatment of patients with multiple infections.

  9. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, Eirikur; de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; Nabatov, Alexey A.; Kalay, Hakan; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Derek J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a 30-year-old man testing positive for Immunodeficiency Virus, probably during acute seroconversion. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and nerve conduction studies. Rapid clinical deterioration prompted intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and early commencement of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. All symptoms resolved within nine weeks. Conclusion Unusual neurological presentations in previously fit patients are an appropriate indication for Immunodeficiency-Virus testing. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy with adequate penetration of the central nervous system should be considered as an early intervention, alongside conventional therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin.

  11. History matching of a complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus transmission by using variance emulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianakis, I; Vernon, I; McCreesh, N; McKinley, T J; Oakley, J E; Nsubuga, R N; Goldstein, M; White, R G

    2017-08-01

    Complex stochastic models are commonplace in epidemiology, but their utility depends on their calibration to empirical data. History matching is a (pre)calibration method that has been applied successfully to complex deterministic models. In this work, we adapt history matching to stochastic models, by emulating the variance in the model outputs, and therefore accounting for its dependence on the model's input values. The method proposed is applied to a real complex epidemiological model of human immunodeficiency virus in Uganda with 22 inputs and 18 outputs, and is found to increase the efficiency of history matching, requiring 70% of the time and 43% fewer simulator evaluations compared with a previous variant of the method. The insight gained into the structure of the human immunodeficiency virus model, and the constraints placed on it, are then discussed.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus neurological complications: an overview of the Ugandan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasujja, N; Musisi, S; Robertson, K; Wong, M; Sacktor, N; Ronald, A

    2005-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa, which has about 12% of the global population, is home to almost 70% of individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). A recent survey by the Ugandan Ministry of Health has found the HIV prevalence rate to be approximately 7% in sexually active adults. The predominant HIV subtypes present in Uganda are A and D. Health care resources are well planned but often lack human and fiscal resources. Uganda has adopted the World Health Organization (WHO) "3 by 5" global strategy for the introduction of antiretroviral therapy and has surpassed the target. Neurological complications of the HIV virus are common and often have devastating consequences. A recent study in Kampala found the rate of HIV dementia and peripheral neuropathy at 31% and 47%, respectively. Further studies are urgently required to determine the natural history and treatment outcomes of both these common HIV complications.

  13. Improvement of lymphocyte proliferation in human immunodeficiency virus infection after recombinant interleukin-2 treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, S D; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the effect of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) on the function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients was examined. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), an impaired ability of PBMC from 8 patients to respond upon...... mitogen stimulation with expression of IL-2 and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was found compared with healthy donors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively). Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of p55 interleukin-2 alpha-receptor (CD25) after phytohaemagglutinin......, the induced gene expressions for IL-2 and IL-2R were positively correlated (p IL-2 and IL-2R genes in humans may share a common activation pathway, as has been found in monkeys infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These results indicate...

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and female lower genital tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, L; Sun, X W; Wright, T C

    1999-02-01

    The risk of lower genital tract neoplasia is increased in women infected with HIV. This has been best demonstrated in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions, but has also been observed in vulvar and perianal intraepithelial lesions in some studies. Alterations in the prevalence and natural history of human papillomavirus infections of the lower genital tract appear to account for much of the increase. HIV-infected women are approximately four times more likely to be infected with human papillomavirus (including infection with high oncogenic risk human papillomavirus types) than are HIV-uninfected women, and these infections are more likely to be persistent. Human papilomavirus-associated lesions may be more difficult to treat in HIV-infected women. These data highlight the need to develop effective cervical cancer prevention programs for HIV-infected women.

  15. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Perkins, Simon [Los Alamos, NM; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [Los Alamos, NM; Fischer, William M [Los Alamos, NM; Theiler, James [Los Alamos, NM; Letvin, Norman [Boston, MA; Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos, NM; Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  16. Reduction of Diagnostic Window by New Fourth-Generation Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening Assays†

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Bernard; Mbargane Fall, El Hadji; Berger, Annemarie; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce the diagnostic window between the time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and laboratory diagnosis, new screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) which permit the simultaneous detection of HIV antigen and antibody have been developed. Two fourth-generation assays, HIV DUO (Biomérieux) and HIV Combi (Boehringer Mannheim), for the combined detection of HIV antigen and antibody, were compared with a third-generation assay (HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Generation Pl...

  17. Diagnostic Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibodies in Urine: a Brazilian Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oelemann, Walter M. R.; Lowndes, Catherine M; Veríssimo Da Costa, Giovani C.; Morgado, Mariza G; Castello-Branco,Luiz Roberto R; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Alary, Michel; Bastos, Francisco I

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated, for the first time in Latin America, the performance of a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Calypte Biomedical Corporation, Berkeley, Calif.) that detects human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific antibodies in urine in comparison to standard serological assays (two commercial EIAs and a commercial Western blot [WB] assay). Paired serum and urine specimens were collected from two different groups of Brazilian patients: 225 drug users with unknown HIV status who att...

  18. Acanthamoeba keratitis in a non-contact lens wearer with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Kronborg, Gitte

    2003-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is potentially blinding and often associated with contact lens wearing. A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient, a non-contact lens wearer, presented with keratitis. She experienced a protracted course of disease, characterized by exacerbations and remissions...... keratitis the diagnosis is delayed, pathognomonic features are often not seen and visual outcome is usually poor. There is no known relation between HIV infection and Acanthamoeba keratitis....

  19. Impact of human immunodeficiency virus on neurocognition and risky behaviors in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Laurie M.; Paul, Robert H.; Heaps, Jodi; Westerhaus, Elizabeth; Chang, Jee Yoon; Williams, Samuel; Brier, Matthew R.; Plax, Katie; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have identified cognitive impairments due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in adults. However, few studies have examined the impact of HIV on cognition in young adults (18-24 years old). Yet, this group is one of the largest populations of individuals with new HIV infection. Young adulthood is also an important developmental window as the brain has not fully matured and individuals are prone to engage in risky behavior. The purpose of the present study was to examine the...

  20. Recombinant Glycoprotein Vaccines for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children and Their Effects on Viral Quasispecies

    OpenAIRE

    Essajee, Shaffiq M; Yogev, Ram; Pollack, Henry; Greenhouse, Bryan; Krasinski, Keith; Borkowsky, William

    2002-01-01

    In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), specific immunity is associated with a more diverse viral repertoire and slower disease progression. Attempts to enhance antiviral immunity with therapeutic vaccination have shown that recombinant glycoprotein (RGP) vaccines are safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic, but the effect of RGP vaccines on the viral repertoire is unknown. We evaluated diversification of the viral envelope in 12 HIV-infected children who recei...

  1. Selection of peptides interfering with a ribosomal frameshift in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Dulude, Dominic; THÉBERGE-JULIEN, GABRIEL; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Heveker, Nikolaus

    2008-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus of type 1 (HIV-1) uses a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift to produce the precursor of its enzymes, and changes in frameshift efficiency reduce replicative fitness of the virus. We used a fluorescent two-reporter system to screen for peptides that reduce HIV-1 frameshift in bacteria, knowing that the frameshift can be reproduced in Escherichia coli. Expression of one reporter, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), requires the HIV-1 frameshift, whereas the sec...

  2. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein by aptamer-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Uda; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to detect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Tat protein using interdigitated electrodes. The measurements and images of the IDEs' finger gaps and the images of chitosan-carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the interdigitated electrodes were taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope. The detection of HIV-1 Tat protein was done using split aptamers and aptamer tail. Biosensors were chosen as diagnostic equipment due to their rapid diagnostic capabilities.

  3. A Simple Saliva-Based Test for Detecting Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus*

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, Willfried; Angulo, Gustavo Barriga; Torres, Patricia Castillo; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the feasibility of using saliva as a diagnostic medium for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 under nonlaboratory conditions and to evaluate the performance characteristics of such a test. We developed for this purpose a self-contained kit (Saliva · Strip [ST]), which combines the collection and processing, as well as the analysis, of the specimen. The kit’s performance was eval...

  4. The Roles of Genetic Polymorphisms and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Regina Delicato Almeida; Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche; Ana Paula Kallaur; Tamires Flauzino; Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has been frequently observed among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and factors related to HIV-1, the host, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are involved in this phenomenon. This study reviews the roles of genetic polymorphisms, HIV-1 infection, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in lipid metabolism. Lipid abnormalities can vary according to the HAART regimen, such as those with protease inhibitors (PIs). However, genetic factor...

  5. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  6. Primary infection by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus: diagnosis and prognosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhems, P.; Beaulieu, R.

    1997-01-01

    Primary infection by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is symptomatic in about 70% of cases. The acute illness is a mononucleosis-like syndrome with characteristics such as mucosal ulcerations. The duration and severity of the symptoms appear to be related to the prognosis. After reviewing the most frequent signs and symptoms of primary HIV infection, we report different prognostic studies which examined the association between the acute illness and the progression of HIV disease.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Oral Levofloxacin in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects Receiving Concomitant Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Villani, P.; Viale, P.; Signorini, L.; Cadeo, B.; Marchetti, F.; Villani, A.; Fiocchi, C; Regazzi, M B; Carosi, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) profile of oral levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in steady-state treatment with nelfinavir (NFV) or with efavirenz (EFV) and to determine the effects of levofloxacin on the PK parameters of these two antiretroviral agents. For levofloxacin, plasma samples were obtained at steady state during a 24-h dosing interval. Plasma NFV and EFV concentrations were evaluated before and after 4 days of levofl...

  8. Investigating the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type One-Infected Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Secretome

    OpenAIRE

    Ciborowski, Pawel; Kadiu, Irena; Rozek, Wojciech; Smith, Lynette; Bernhardt, Kristen; Fladseth, Melissa; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2007-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophages, alveolar macrophages, perivascular macrophages, and microglia) are reservoirs and vehicles of dissemination for the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). How virus alters mononuclear phagocyte immunoregulatory activities to complete its life cycle and influence disease is incompletely understood. In attempts to better understanding the influence of virus on macrophage functions, we used one-dimensional electrophoresis, a...

  9. New Surge of Syphilis among Patients Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Martinique in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putot, Alain; Rozé, Benoît; Pierre-François, Sandrine; Pircher, Mathilde; Vilain, Rosalie; Miossec, Charline; Desbois, Nicole; Hochedez, Patrick; Guitteaud, Karine; Laudarin, Ingrid; Abel, Sylvie; Cabié, André

    2017-09-01

    A syphilis outbreak began in Martinique, French Antilles, in 2004, initially among men who had sex with men (MSM) and who were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The outbreak subsequently affected all groups at risk, leading to a first epidemic peak in 2008. After an initial decrease, the outbreak started growing again in 2014 among patients living with HIV with unprecedented incidence among MSM. Herein, we describe the change in medical and social parameters of the outbreak since 2005.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Hodgkin's Lymphoma in South Africa: An Emerging Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Moosa; Philip, Vinitha; Fazel, Fatima

    2011-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) occurs with increasing frequency in human-immunodeficiency-virus-(HIV-) infected individuals. The natural history and behaviour of HIV-HL is different, being more atypical and aggressive. The association between HIV and HL appears to be primarily EBV driven. HAART use does not significantly impact on the incidence of HL. Indeed, the risk of HL has increased in the post-HAART era. However, the advent of HAART has brought renewed hope, allowing standard therapeutic opti...

  11. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez, Jorge N.; Bibiana A Ledesma; Nigro, Monica G; Natalia Vittar; Nestor Rueda; Luis De Carolis; Olga Figueiras; Silvana Carnevale; Marcelo Corti

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 c...

  12. Survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), HIV-infected lymphocytes, and poliovirus in water.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, B E

    1993-01-01

    The potential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to enter domestic sewers via contaminated body fluids such as blood has spurred interest in the survival of this virus in water and wastewater. This study focused on establishing the inactivation of HIV and productively infected lymphocytes in dechlorinated tap water. In addition, HIV survival was compared with that of poliovirus. Results indicated that either free HIV or cell-associated HIV was rapidly inactivated, with a 90% loss of infec...

  13. Low uptake of antiretroviral therapy after admission with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, R A; Sunpath, H; Taha, B; Kappagoda, S; Maphasa, K T M; Kuritzkes, D R; Smeaton, L

    2010-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected in-patients with tuberculosis (TB) or other opportunistic infections (OIs) in South Africa to estimate subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and survival.

  14. Detection of Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Inactivation of both Autologous and Heterologous Virus in Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasa-Chapman, Marlén M. I.; Holuigue, Sophie; Aubin, Keith; Wong, MaiLee; Jones, Nicola A.; Cornforth, David; Pellegrino, Pierre; Newton, Philippa; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; McKnight, Áine

    2005-01-01

    Specific CD8 T-cell responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are induced in primary infection and make an important contribution to the control of early viral replication. The importance of neutralizing antibodies in containing primary viremia is questioned because they usually arise much later. Nevertheless antienvelope antibodies develop simultaneously with, or even before, peak viremia. We determined whether such antibodies might control viremia by complement-mediated inactivation (CMI). In each of seven patients studied, antibodies capable of CMI appeared at or shortly after the peak in viremia, concomitantly with detection of virus-specific T-cell responses. The CMI was effective on both autologous and heterologous HIV-1 isolates. Activation of the classical pathway and direct viral lysis were at least partly responsible. Since immunoglobulin G (IgG)-antibodies triggered the CMI, specific memory B cells could also be induced by vaccination. Thus, consideration should be given to vaccination strategies that induce IgG antibodies capable of CMI. PMID:15709001

  15. Gonococcal cervicitis is associated with reduced systemic CD8+ T cell responses in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected and exposed, uninfected sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Rupert; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L; Gillespie, Geraldine; Kimani, Joshua; Dong, Tao; Kiama, Peter; Simonsen, J Neil; Bwayo, Job J; McMichael, Andrew J; Plummer, Francis A

    2002-05-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cervicitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 frequently coinfect core transmitter populations, such as female sex workers. Gonococcal cervicitis is associated with increased viral shedding and plasma viremia in HIV-1-infected women and increased HIV-1 susceptibility in uninfected women. We studied the influence of gonococcal cervicitis on CD8(+) interferon (IFN)-gamma responses to HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) epitopes in HIV-1-infected and in highly-exposed, persistently seronegative (HEPS) female sex workers. In HIV-1-infected women, gonococcal cervicitis was associated with reduced IFN-gamma responses in bulk CD8(+) lymphocyte populations, and intracellular cytokine staining, combined with class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide tetramer studies, demonstrated reduced IFN-gamma production by HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes. In HEPS sex workers, cervicitis was associated with the transient loss of systemic HIV-1-specific CD8(+) responses and with reduced function of CMV-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes. Impaired function of virus-specific CD8(+) lymphocytes may partly explain the deleterious effects of gonococcal cervicitis on HIV-1 immune control and susceptibility.

  16. Human Discs Large is a new negative regulator of human immunodeficiency virus-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Fabien; Muriaux, Delphine; Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Chabani, Sabah; Decroly, Etienne; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Blot, Vincent; Pique, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication is positively or negatively regulated through multiple interactions with host cell proteins. We report here that human Discs Large (Dlg1), a scaffold protein recruited beneath the plasma membrane and involved in the assembly of multiprotein complexes, restricts HIV-1 infectivity. The endogenous Dlg1 and HIV-1 Gag polyprotein spontaneously interact in HIV-1-chronically infected T cells. Depleting endogenous Dlg1 in either adherent cells or T cells does not affect Gag maturation, production, or release, but it enhances the infectivity of progeny viruses five- to sixfold. Conversely, overexpression of Dlg1 reduces virus infectivity by approximately 80%. Higher virus infectivity upon Dlg1 depletion correlates with increased Env content in cells and virions, whereas the amount of virus-associated Gag or genomic RNA remains identical. Dlg1 knockdown is also associated with the redistribution and colocalization of Gag and Env toward CD63 and CD82 positive vesicle-like structures, including structures that seem to still be connected to the plasma membrane. This study identifies both a new negative regulator that targets the very late steps of the HIV-1 life cycle, and an assembly pathway that optimizes HIV-1 infectivity.

  17. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eléonore Pérès

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1, is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed.

  18. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-12-07

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed.

  19. Alpha interferon inhibits early stages of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Y; Pitha, P M

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) on a single replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the lymphocytic cell line CEM-174, which is highly sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN. Pretreatment of cells with 50 to 500 U of recombinant human IFN-alpha per ml resulted in a marked reduction in viral RNA and protein synthesis. The effect of IFN-alpha was dose dependent and was amplified in multiple infection cycle...

  20. Use of Condoms among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a global crisis, a challenge to human life and dignity with ability to erode social and economic development. .... [10,11]. This may lead to infection of uninfected partners with its multiplier effect, usher in a vicious cycle of poverty, poor health and impaired economic growth.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infertility treatment: a committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a serious but manageable chronic disease that affects persons of reproductive age, many of whom express a desire for biologic parenthood. This document is a revision of the original document of the same name, last published in 2010 (Fertil Steril 2010;94:11-5). Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaccination Reduces Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Sequence Reversion through Enhanced Viral Control▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Clarke, Ryon H.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that vaccination prior to infection may direct the mutational evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to a less fit virus, resulting in an attenuated course of disease. The present study was initiated to explore whether prior immunization might prevent the reversion of the virus to the wild-type form. Mamu-A*01 monkeys were vaccinated to generate a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to the immunodominant Gag p11C epitope and were then challenged with a cloned pathogenic CXCR4-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) expressing a mutant Gag p11C sequence (Δp11C SHIV). The epitopic and extraepitopic compensatory mutations introduced into gag of Δp11C SHIV resulted in attenuated replicative capacity and eventual reversions to the wild-type Gag p11C sequence in naïve rhesus monkeys. However, in vaccinated rhesus monkeys, no reversions of the challenge virus were observed, an effect that may have been a consequence of significantly decreased viral replication rather than a redirection of the mutational evolution of the virus. These findings highlight the multifactorial pressures that affect the evolution of primate immunodeficiency viruses. PMID:20881040

  3. Vaccination reduces simian-human immunodeficiency virus sequence reversion through enhanced viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R; Yeh, Wendy W; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Clarke, Ryon H; Lifton, Michelle A; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-12-01

    It has been suggested that vaccination prior to infection may direct the mutational evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to a less fit virus, resulting in an attenuated course of disease. The present study was initiated to explore whether prior immunization might prevent the reversion of the virus to the wild-type form. Mamu-A*01 monkeys were vaccinated to generate a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to the immunodominant Gag p11C epitope and were then challenged with a cloned pathogenic CXCR4-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) expressing a mutant Gag p11C sequence (Δp11C SHIV). The epitopic and extraepitopic compensatory mutations introduced into gag of Δp11C SHIV resulted in attenuated replicative capacity and eventual reversions to the wild-type Gag p11C sequence in naïve rhesus monkeys. However, in vaccinated rhesus monkeys, no reversions of the challenge virus were observed, an effect that may have been a consequence of significantly decreased viral replication rather than a redirection of the mutational evolution of the virus. These findings highlight the multifactorial pressures that affect the evolution of primate immunodeficiency viruses.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type-2-A milder, kinder virus: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kannangai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-2 (HIV-2 belongs to the family retroviridae which is phylogenetically clusters with SIV SM from sooty mangabeys. This virus is morphologically similar to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 but has got only a 40% homology at the nucleotide level. There is a distinct geographical distribution of HIV-2 unlike HIV-1. There are currently eight subtypes/groups identified with subtype/group A responsible for the majority of infections. HIV-2 shows a considerable difference in the course of the disease. Clinical, haematological and immunological evaluation of individuals infected with HIV-2 has shown the virus to be less pathogenic than HIV-1 although the exact mechanism underlying this difference is not well defined. Similar to HIV-1, the HIV-2 isolates also showed distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics. The transmission rate for HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 is very low both by heterosexual route and mother to child transmission. The clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency associated with HIV-2 are similar to the ones seen among the HIV-1-infected individuals and they can also progress to AIDS. It is naturally resistant to NNRTI and hence the diagnosis become important as it affects the treatment strategy. Similar to HIV-1, HIV-2 strains of infected individuals also show mutations that can cause drug resistance. The current evidence suggests that there is no protective effective for HIV-2 against HIV-1.

  5. Cerebral aneurysms associated with human immunodeficiency virus in adults: literature review and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Campostrini Pagiola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection has been decreasing patient morbidity and mortality by opportunistic infections and, thus, survival has increased. This new reality has been changing the spectrum of diseases affecting such patients. Objective: to discuss the association between HIV and the emergence of aneurysmal brain injuries. Method: it was performed a literature review using medical database. The following descriptors were searched: "Intracranial Aneurysms and HIV", "Intracranial Aneurysms and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome," "aneurysm and brain and HIV". Results: after performed a literature review, it was observed that the relationship between HIV infection and the formation of aneurysms appears to be real, however, it still lacks data to confirm the pathophysiology of this condition and its best treatment. Conclusion: there are new signs and symptoms that should be studied and researched relating HIV with other changes not previously known.

  6. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Klein, Melanie; Proske, Judith; Werno, Christian; Schneider, Katharina; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Rack, Brigitte; Buchholz, Stefan; Ganzer, Roman; Blana, Andreas; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Nitsche, Ulrich; Männel, Daniela N; Klein, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD) comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  7. Neovascular niche for human myeloma cells in immunodeficient mouse bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirono Iriuchishima

    Full Text Available The interaction with bone marrow (BM plays a crucial role in pathophysiological features of multiple myeloma (MM, including cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and bone lesion progression. To characterize the MM-BM interactions, we utilized an in vivo experimental model for human MM in which a GFP-expressing human MM cell line is transplanted into NOG mice (the NOG-hMM model. Transplanted MM cells preferentially engrafted at the metaphyseal region of the BM endosteum and formed a complex with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. A subpopulation of MM cells expressed VE-cadherin after transplantation and formed endothelial-like structures in the BM. CD138(+ myeloma cells in the BM were reduced by p53-dependent apoptosis following administration of the nitrogen mustard derivative bendamustine to mice in the NOG-hMM model. Bendamustine maintained the osteoblast lining on the bone surface and protected extracellular matrix structures. Furthermore, bendamustine suppressed the growth of osteoclasts and mesenchymal cells in the NOG-hMM model. Since VE-cadherin(+ MM cells were chemoresistant, hypoxic, and HIF-2α-positive compared to the VE-cadherin(- population, VE-cadherin induction might depend on the oxygenation status. The NOG-hMM model described here is a useful system to analyze the dynamics of MM pathophysiology, interactions of MM cells with other cellular compartments, and the utility of novel anti-MM therapies.

  8. Human Ubc9 contributes to production of fully infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L; Wood, Charles; West, John T; Weldon, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold less infectious than those produced in the presence of Ubc9. The nature of this defect was assayed for dependence on Ubc9 during viral assembly, trafficking, and Env incorporation. The Gag-mediated assembly of virus particles and protease-mediated processing of Gag and Gag-Pol were unchanged in the absence of Ubc9. However, the stability of the cell-associated Env glycoprotein was decreased and Env incorporation into released virions was altered. Interestingly, overexpression of the Ubc9 trans-dominant-negative mutant C93A, which is a defective E2-SUMO-1 conjugase, suggests that this activity may not be required for interaction with Gag, virion assembly, or infectivity. This finding demonstrates that Ubc9 plays an important role in the production of infectious HIV-1 virions.

  9. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  10. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising......Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  12. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  13. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  14. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Munoz

    Full Text Available Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204 were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R. HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58 and two low-risk (LR-HPV (HPV-6/11 types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine followed by HPV-31(47.2% in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7% in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  15. The Human Polycomb Group EED Protein Interacts with the Integrase of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violot, Sébastien; Hong, Saw See; Rakotobe, Dina; Petit, Caroline; Gay, Bernard; Moreau, Karen; Billaud, Geneviève; Priet, Stéphane; Sire, Joséphine; Schwartz, Olivier; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Boulanger, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Human EED, a member of the superfamily of WD-40 repeat proteins and of the Polycomb group proteins, has been identified as a cellular partner of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix (MA) protein (R. Peytavi et al., J. Biol. Chem. 274:1635-1645, 1999). In the present study, EED was found to interact with HIV-1 integrase (IN) both in vitro and in vivo in yeast. In vitro, data from mutagenesis studies, pull-down assays, and phage biopanning suggested that EED-binding site(s) are located in the C-terminal domain of IN, between residues 212 and 264. In EED, two putative discrete IN-binding sites were mapped to its N-terminal moiety, at a distance from the MA-binding site, but EED-IN interaction also required the integrity of the EED last two WD repeats. EED showed an apparent positive effect on IN-mediated DNA integration reaction in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. In situ analysis by immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) of cellular distribution of IN and EED in HIV-1-infected cells (HeLa CD4+ cells or MT4 lymphoid cells) showed that IN and EED colocalized in the nucleus and near nuclear pores, with maximum colocalization events occurring at 6 h postinfection (p.i.). Triple colocalizations of IN, EED, and MA were also observed in the nucleoplasm of infected cells at 6 h p.i., suggesting the ocurrence of multiprotein complexes involving these three proteins at early steps of the HIV-1 virus life cycle. Such IEM patterns were not observed with a noninfectious, envelope deletion mutant of HIV-1. PMID:14610174

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus impairs reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Mujawar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Several steps of HIV-1 replication critically depend on cholesterol. HIV infection is associated with profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Whereas numerous studies have investigated the role of anti-HIV drugs in lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, the effects of HIV infection on cellular cholesterol metabolism remain uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that HIV-1 impairs ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux from human macrophages, a condition previously shown to be highly atherogenic. In HIV-1-infected cells, this effect was mediated by Nef. Transfection of murine macrophages with Nef impaired cholesterol efflux from these cells. At least two mechanisms were found to be responsible for this phenomenon: first, HIV infection and transfection with Nef induced post-transcriptional down-regulation of ABCA1; and second, Nef caused redistribution of ABCA1 to the plasma membrane and inhibited internalization of apolipoprotein A-I. Binding of Nef to ABCA1 was required for down-regulation and redistribution of ABCA1. HIV-infected and Nef-transfected macrophages accumulated substantial amounts of lipids, thus resembling foam cells. The contribution of HIV-infected macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis was supported by the presence of HIV-positive foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques of HIV-infected patients. Stimulation of cholesterol efflux from macrophages significantly reduced infectivity of the virions produced by these cells, and this effect correlated with a decreased amount of virion-associated cholesterol, suggesting that impairment of cholesterol efflux is essential to ensure proper cholesterol content in nascent HIV particles. These results reveal a previously unrecognized dysregulation of intracellular lipid metabolism in HIV-infected macrophages and identify Nef and ABCA1 as the key players responsible for this effect. Our findings

  17. Direct Phenotypical and Functional Dysregulation of Primary Human B Cells by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios; María Ángeles Muñoz-Fernandez; Marjorie Pion

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and pheno...

  18. Circulating Metabolites of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitor Nelfinavir in Humans: Structural Identification, Levels in Plasma, and Antiviral Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kanyin E.; Wu, Ellen; Amy K Patick; Kerr,Bradley; Zorbas, Mark; Lankford, Angela; Kobayashi, Takuo; Maeda, Yuki; Shetty, Bhasker; Webber, Stephanie

    2001-01-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept, formally AG1343) is a potent and orally bioavailable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (Ki = 2 nM) and is being widely prescribed in combination with HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection. The current studies evaluated the presence of metabolites circulating in plasma following the oral administration of nelfinavir to healthy volunteers and HIV-infected patients, as well as the levels in plasma...

  19. Use of human papillomavirus genotyping and biomarkers for targeted screening of anal dysplasia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dupin, Clarisse; Siproudhis, Laurent; Hénno, Sébastien; Minjolle, Sophie; Arvieux, Cédric; Tattevin, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Screening for anal dysplasia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients is not standardized. High-resolution imaging is not adequate for mass screening, and anal cytology requires expertise. New biomarkers, selected because of their use in cervical cancer mass screening, have been originally tested for targeted and easy-to-perform screening. METHODS: 120 HIV-infected individuals (males 96.4%, mean age 47±11 years) were referred for clinical exa...

  20. Management of a rare presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Priya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH, a multisystem autoimmune bilateral panuveitis with systemic manifestations, is uncommon in immunocompromised patients such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS. We report a rare presentation of VKH in a 45-year-old HIV-positive female on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART who presented with a history of recurrent panuveitis. A diagnosis of probable VKH was made based on ocular and systemic signs and symptoms. She was treated with topical and systemic steroids with close monitoring of CD4 counts and viral loads. After inflammation control, complicated cataract was managed surgically under perioperative steroid cover. VKH in HIV/AIDS has not been reported earlier. This case shows that significant inflammation can be seen even in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART with VKH in spite of moderate CD4 counts. Management is a challenge considering the systemic risks with long-term use of steroids.

  1. Management of a rare presentation of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, D; Sudharshan, S; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2017-05-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH), a multisystem autoimmune bilateral panuveitis with systemic manifestations, is uncommon in immunocompromised patients such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS). We report a rare presentation of VKH in a 45-year-old HIV-positive female on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) who presented with a history of recurrent panuveitis. A diagnosis of probable VKH was made based on ocular and systemic signs and symptoms. She was treated with topical and systemic steroids with close monitoring of CD4 counts and viral loads. After inflammation control, complicated cataract was managed surgically under perioperative steroid cover. VKH in HIV/AIDS has not been reported earlier. This case shows that significant inflammation can be seen even in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART with VKH in spite of moderate CD4 counts. Management is a challenge considering the systemic risks with long-term use of steroids.

  2. A Mutation in the HLA-B*2705-Restricted NP383-391 Epitope Affects the Human Influenza A Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Response In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhoff, E. G. M.; Boon, A. C. M.; Nieuwkoop, N. J.; Fouchier, R. A. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.

    2004-01-01

    Viruses can exploit a variety of strategies to evade immune surveillance by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), including the acquisition of mutations in or adjacent to CTL epitopes. Recently, an amino acid substitution (R384G) in an HLA-B*2705-restricted CTL epitope in the influenza A virus nucleoprotein (nucleoprotein containing residues 383 to 391 [NP383-391]; SRYWAIRTR, where R is the residue that was mutated) was associated with escape from CTL-mediated immunity. The effect of this mutation on the in vitro influenza A virus-specific CTL response was studied. To this end, two influenza A viruses, one with and one without the NP383-391 epitope, were constructed by reverse genetics and designated influenza viruses A/NL/94-384R and A/NL/94-384G, respectively. The absence of the HLA-B*2705-restricted CTL epitope in influenza virus A/NL/94-384G was confirmed by using 51Cr release assays with a T-cell clone specific for the NP383-391 epitope. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza virus A/NL/94-384G failed to recognize HLA-B*2705-positive target cells pulsed with the original NP383-391 peptide. The proportion of virus-specific CD8+ gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive T cells in in vitro-stimulated PBMC was determined by intracellular IFN-γ staining after restimulation with virus-infected autologous B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and C1R cell lines expressing only HLA-B*2705. The proportion of virus-specific CD8+ T cells was lower in PBMC stimulated in vitro with influenza virus A/NL/94-384G obtained from several HLA-B*2705-positive donors than in PBMC stimulated with influenza virus A/NL/94-384R. This finding indicated that amino acid variations in CTL epitopes can affect the virus-specific CTL response and that the NP383-391 epitope is the most important HLA-B*2705-restricted epitope in the nucleoprotein of influenza A viruses. PMID:15113903

  3. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS: We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment......, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION: DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV...

  4. A New Face of Cardiac Emergencies: Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic is a major health challenge of the twenty-first century as the transition from infectious complications to noncommunicable disease becomes more evident. These patients may present to the emergency department with a variety of cardiovascular diseases, such as acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, pericardial disease, infective endocarditis, venothromboembolism, and other conditions. Increased awareness is needed among health care professionals to enhance adequate identification and promote prompt management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nef protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: evidence against its role as a transcriptional inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammes, S. R.; Dixon, E P; Malim, M H; Cullen, B R; Greene, W C

    1989-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) encodes a 27-kDa protein termed Nef (negative factor). Nef has been reported to down-regulate viral gene transcription directed by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. To assess the possible role of Nef in the initiation or maintenance of viral latency, we prepared two different nef expression vectors (pNEF from the HXB-3 proviral clone; pNEF-2/3 from HXB-2 and HXB-3) and a control vector containing a frameshift mutation in the HXB-3 nef coding seque...

  6. Indicator cell lines for detection of primary strains of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodicka, M A; Goh, W C; Wu, L I; Rogel, M E; Bartz, S R; Schweickart, V L; Raport, C J; Emerman, M

    1997-06-23

    CCR5 and CXCR4 are the two major coreceptors that have been identified for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry. We have modified several beta-galactosidase-based HIV indicator cell lines to express CCR5 and/or CXCR4. Using these new reagents, we have been able to detect all primary isolates tested using one or both of these cell lines. However, there is large variation in the absolute viral infectivity among primary strains. Furthermore, all HIV strains are capable of causing syncytia in the indicator cells when the coreceptor is present regardless of whether they had previously been characterized as "syncytia-inducing" or "non-syncytium-inducing."

  7. Aspects of gastrointestinal immunology and nutrition in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castello-Branco Luiz RR

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal surfaces have a fundamental participation in many aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection pathogenesis. In Brazilian HIV-1 infected subjects, loss of weight and appetite are among the most debilitating symptoms. In this review we describe a defined mucosal immunogen that has profound but transient effects on HIV viral load, and we suggest that gut associated lymphoid tissue under constant immunostimulation is likely to provide a major contribution to the total levels of HIV. We also show that hypermetabolism appears to play a role in the wasting process in Brazilian patients coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis.

  8. Overcoming stigmatization: social and personal implications of the human immunodeficiency virus diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B A

    1992-06-01

    All diseases have attached metaphors. Social and personal reactions to people with human immunodeficiency virus are influenced by the metaphor, "fear of polluting people," and have in common with sexually transmitted diseases, the irrational fear of easy contagion. These issues negatively affect clients' response to their diagnosis and their treatment and care. Many clients have suffered as a result of receiving care from professionals who are condemning of the person with the disease. Others, though have found supportive care givers and have experienced positive reactions to the diagnosis through achieving emotional and spiritual development. The response of nursing to this stigmatized disease is explicated.

  9. Acanthamoeba keratitis in a non-contact lens wearer with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Kronborg, Gitte

    2003-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is potentially blinding and often associated with contact lens wearing. A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient, a non-contact lens wearer, presented with keratitis. She experienced a protracted course of disease, characterized by exacerbations and remissions......, and was treated with various topical antibiotics and steroids. 13 months after symptom onset the eye was removed owing to serious scarring of cornea and unbearable pain. Microbiological and histopathological examination of the cornea showed Acanthamoeba. In non-contact lens wearers suffering from Acanthamoeba...

  10. Gonococcal arthritis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena Corrales, Gabriel; Mora Navas, Laura; Palacios Muñoz, Rosario; García López, Victoria; Márquez Solero, Manuel; Santos González, Jesús

    We report a case of gonococcal arthritis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and review 17 previously published cases; only one patient presented urethritis, and blood cultures were positive in one case. Gonococcal arthritis is rare in HIV-infected patients and is not usually associated with other symptoms. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute arthritis in patients with HIV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells....... This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus...

  12. Lambda Interferon Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei; Wang,Xu; Ye, Li; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Riedel, Eric; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    The newly identified type III interferon (IFN-λ) has antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. We thus examined whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages that expressed IFN-λ receptors. Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-1 activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-ad...

  13. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication prior to Reverse Transcription by Influenza Virus Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Blazevic, Vesna; Patterson, Bruce K.; Mac Trubey, C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Gene M Shearer

    2000-01-01

    It is now recognized that, in addition to drug-mediated therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the immune system can exert antiviral effects via CD8+ T-cell-generated anti-HIV factors. This study demonstrates that (i) supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza A virus inhibit replication of CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates prior to reverse transcription; (ii) the HIV-suppressive supernatants can be generated by CD4- or CD...

  14. Meningitis caused by Rhodotorula rubra in an human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodotorula spp . are common saprophytes but may be responsible for systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Meningitis caused by Rhodotorula spp. in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients has been reported only rarely. We present a case of meningitis caused by Rhodotorula rubra in HIV infected patient. The presumptive diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was made on the basis of India ink preparation, Gram staining and latex agglutination test (LAT for cryptococcal antigen. The final diagnosis was confirmed by isolation of Rhodotorula rubra from cerebrospinal fluid on culture. LAT was considered false positive. Amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine were administered but the patient succumbed to his illness.

  15. Conflicting selective forces affect T cell receptor contacts in an immunodominant human immunodeficiency virus epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Learn, Gerald H

    2006-01-01

    variant(s) prevailed in the virus population. The pathways notably influenced the amount of plasma virus, as patients with efficient CTL selection had lower plasma viral loads than did patients without efficient selection. Thus, viral escape from CTL responses does not necessarily correlate with disease......Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are critical for the control of human immunodeficiency virus, but containment of virus replication can be undermined by mutations in CTL epitopes that lead to virus escape. We analyzed the evolution in vivo of an immunodominant, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope and found...

  16. Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related Castleman's disease: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberopoulos, Evagelos; Tolis, Christos; Bai, Mary; Efremidis, Stavros; Pavlidis, Nikolaos; Elisaf, Moses

    2003-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is increasingly recognized as an aggressive illness with a rapidly fatal outcome in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. In the absence of optimal therapy, various therapeutic interventions have been tested with disappointing results; only five reports with a successful outcome have been described. Presented herein is a 66-year-old HIV-infected man with multicentric Castleman's disease. Early administration of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone resulted in prolonged clinical recovery. The relevant literature is also reviewed. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Recent Recommendations for Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2017-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic condition. HIV is not a valid reason to deny, delay, or withhold dental treatment. There are no absolute contraindications and few complications associated with comprehensive oral health care treatment delivered in an outpatient setting for asymptomatic HIV-infected patients and clinically stable patients with AIDS. Consultation with the patient's medical provider and modifications in the delivery of dental treatment may be necessary when treating patients with advanced HIV disease or other comorbid conditions. Oral health care is an integral and important part of comprehensive health care for all patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection presenting as acute periodontal infection in a patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, C L; Winkler, J R; Heinic, G S; Daniels, T E; Yee, K; Greenspan, D

    1993-04-01

    During childhood, many people acquire primary infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), one of the herpes viruses. If they later become immunosuppressed, such as occurs with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, CMV is likely to become reactivated. Severe disease caused by CMV is life-threatening in the HIV-infected population. CMV retinitis, gastritis, colitis, pneumonia, encephalitis and hepatitis have all been reported, but oral lesions due to infection with CMV are rarely reported. We report a case of oral CMV infection which at first was clinically indistinguishable from HIV-associated periodontal disease.

  19. Cardiovascular disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infection as a cause of hospitalization: a case-series in a General Hospital in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Valenzuela-Rodríguez

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of hospitalization in Peruvian human immunodeficiency virus patients, with differences between immunosuppression stages. Further studies analyzing associated factors are warranted.

  20. Modeling Human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Correction by CRISPR/Cas9-Enhanced Gene Targeting

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    Chia-Wei Chang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the Janus family kinase JAK3 gene cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. JAK3 deficiency in humans is characterized by the absence of circulating T cells and natural killer (NK cells with normal numbers of poorly functioning B cells (T–B+NK–. Using SCID patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and a T cell in vitro differentiation system, we demonstrate a complete block in early T cell development of JAK3-deficient cells. Correction of the JAK3 mutation by CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting restores normal T cell development, including the production of mature T cell populations with a broad T cell receptor (TCR repertoire. Whole-genome sequencing of corrected cells demonstrates no CRISPR/Cas9 off-target modifications. These studies describe an approach for the study of human lymphopoiesis and provide a foundation for gene correction therapy in humans with immunodeficiencies.

  1. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  2. HIV-1 evades virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses by targeting systemic and intestinal B cells via long-range intercellular conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A; Sullivan, John S; He, Bing; Shan, Meimei; Ball, Susan C; Dyer, Wayne B; Ketas, Thomas J; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Knowles, Daniel M; Chiu, April; Sanders, Rogier W; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Contact-dependent communication between immune cells generates protection but also facilitates viral spread. Here we found that macrophages formed long-range actin-propelled conduits in response to negative factor (Nef), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protein with immunosuppressive functions. Conduits attenuated immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) and IgA class switching in systemic and intestinal lymphoid follicles by shuttling Nef from infected macrophages to B cells through a guanine-exchange factor-dependent pathway involving the amino-terminal anchor, central core and carboxy-terminal flexible loop of Nef. By showing stronger virus-specific IgG2 and IgA responses in patients with Nef-deficient virions, our data suggest that HIV-1 exploits intercellular 'highways' as a 'Trojan horse' to deliver Nef to B cells and evade humoral immunity systemically and at mucosal sites of entry.

  3. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Álvarez-Fernández, Emilio

    2013-12-10

    We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http

  4. The Burden of Smoking in the Health-Disease Process in People with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoenny Peña García

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foundation: smoking affects individual, familial and social health of people living with the human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS. The effects of the habit on these patients influence morbidity and mortality and increase the risk of various diseases and affect the immune response to antiretroviral treatment. Objective: to determine the burden of smoking on the disease health process in patients living with human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS. Methods: an analytical cohort study was performed. It was analyzed as a dependent variable for smoking in people living with the human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS, and as independent variables: age, years of exposure (as a smoker, diseases that have suffered in the last 5 years, immunological condition, and response to antiretroviral therapy. The relative risk and the etiologic risk fraction were calculated, as well as the Chi2 test to estimate the strength of association between the independent and dependent variables. Results: smoking in patients living with human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS had a significant statistical association with different related effects, which in order of strength of association increases the risk of deterioration of the immune system and the incidence of malignant tumours and pneumonia Pneumocystis jirovecii. Conclusion: there was a causal relationship between smoking and the immunodeficiency virus in addition to the incidence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. It was show that smoking impairs the immune condition of these patients and affects the adequate response to antiretroviral treatment.

  5. AA-amyloidosis caused by visceral leishmaniasis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vallière, Serge; Mary, Charles; Joneberg, Jeanna E; Rotman, Samuel; Bullani, Roberto; Greub, Gilbert; Gillmore, Julian D; Buffet, Pierre A; Tarr, Philip E

    2009-08-01

    AA-amyloidosis in the setting of chronic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has been reported in animal models but documentation in humans is unavailable. Here, we report on a Portuguese man who in 1996 was diagnosed with both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infection and VL. Antiretroviral treatment led to sustained suppression of HIV viremia but CD4+ lymphocytes rose from 8 to only 160 cells/mL. Several courses of antimony treatment did not prevent VL relapses. Renal failure developed in 2006 and renal biopsy revealed AA-amyloidosis. The patient had cryoglobulinemia and serum immune complexes containing antibodies directed against seven leishmanial antigens. Antimony plus amphotericin B, followed by oral miltefosine resulted in a sustained VL treatment response with elimination of circulating Leishmania infantum DNA and CD4+ recovery. The concomitant reduction of serum AA levels and disappearance of circulating leishmanial immune complexes suggests that prolonged VL may lead to AA-amyloidosis in immunocompromised humans.

  6. Impact of human immunodeficiency virus infection on abdominal tuberculosis in western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, P M; Amarapurakar, D N; Parikh, S S; Joshi, J; Koppikar, G V; Amarapurkar, A D; Kalro, R H

    1997-01-01

    We studied the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and abdominal tuberculosis. We also assessed the clinical characteristics, risk factors, tuberculin status, site, and response to therapy of abdominal tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-seronegative patients. Volunteer blood donors (n = 8,395), patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 387), and patients with abdominal tuberculosis (n = 108) were screened for HIV 1 and/or HIV 2 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Torrent, India) and positivity reconfirmed by a repeat ELISA and Western blot test. The HIV seroprevalence in the abdominal tuberculosis patients (16.6%) was significantly higher compared with those with pulmonary tuberculosis (6.9%, p < 0.05) and volunteer blood donors (1.4%, p < 0.01). Absolute lymphocyte counts did not differ between the HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative patients (2,044.94 +/- 830 vs 2,261.34 +/- 805/mm3, p = NS). The Mantoux reaction was larger in the HIV-seronegative group as compared with the HIV-seropositive group (14.8 mm vs. 9.5 mm, p < 0.05). Tuberculosis patients responded well to conventional antituberculosis drugs in standard doses regardless of their HIV status.

  7. Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Sefa; Yayla, Çağrı; Açar, Burak; Ertem, Ahmet G; Akboğa, Mehmet K; Gökaslan, Serkan; Erdöl, Mehmet A; Sönmezer, Meliha Ç; Kaya Kiliç, Esra; Ataman Hatipoğlu, Çiğdem; Tulek, Necla; Erdinç, Fatma S; Aydoğdu, Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS are known to cause cardiovascular diseases such as premature coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. Recently, Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio has been shown as a novel marker of ventricular repolarization. We aimed to evaluate the ventricular repolarization using Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Totally 48 patients with HIV and 60 control subjects were enrolled to the study. Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT ratio and Tp-e/QTc ratio were significantly higher in patients with HIV than control subjects (all pe interval and disease duration (r=0.298, p=0.048). and inverse correlation between Tp-e interval and CD4 count(r=-0.303, p=0.036). Our study showed that Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were increased in patients with HIV than control subjects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Characterization to species level of Mycobacterium avium complex strains from human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakopoulos, A M; Tassios, P. T.; Matsiota-Bernard, P; Marinis, E; Tsaousidou, S; Legakis, N J

    1997-01-01

    Forty human clinical Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex strains isolated in Greece were characterized to the species level by PCR with three sets of primers specific for one or both species. M. avium predominated in both human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients, but the frequency of M. intracellulare isolation appeared to be higher in the latter.

  9. Intra-Blood-Brain Barrier Synthesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigen and Antibody in Humans and Chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Epstein, Leon G.; Paul, Deborah A.; van der Helm, Hayo J.; Dawson, George J.; Asher, David M.; Yanagihara, Richard; Wolff, Axel V.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was associated with progressive encephalopathy in adult and pediatric patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV antigen was detected in CSF from 6 of 7 AIDS patients with progressive encephalopathy. By contrast, HIV antigen, whether free or complexed, was detected in CSF from only 1 of 18 HIV antibody seropositive patients without progressive encephalopathy and from 0 of 8 experimentally infected chimpanzees without clinical signs. Intra-blood-brain barrier synthesis of HIV-specific antibody was demonstrated in the majority of patients with AIDS (9/12) or at risk for AIDS (8/13) as well as in the experimentally infected chimpanzees, indicating HIV-specific B-cell reactivity in the brain without apparent neurological signs. In 6 of 11 patients with HIV infection, antibodies synthesized in the central nervous system were directed against HIV envelope proteins. Active viral expression appears to be necessary for both the immunodeficiency and progressive encephalopathy associated with HIV infection.

  10. Protection of rabbits and immunodeficient mice against lethal poxvirus infections by human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Crickard

    Full Text Available Smallpox (variola virus is a bioweapon concern. Monkeypox is a growing zoonotic poxvirus threat. These problems have resulted in extensive efforts to develop potential therapeutics that can prevent or treat potentially lethal poxvirus infections in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against smallpox are a conservative approach to this problem, as the licensed human smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus, VACV primarily works on the basis of protective antibody responses against smallpox. Fully human mAbs (hmAbs against vaccinia H3 (H3L and B5 (B5R, targeting both the mature virion (MV and extracellular enveloped virion (EV forms, have been developed as potential therapeutics for use in humans. Post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed in both murine and rabbit animal models. Therapeutic efficacy of the mAbs was assessed in three good laboratory practices (GLP studies examining severe combined immunodeficiency mice (SCID given a lethal VACV infection. Pre-exposure combination hmAb therapy provided significantly better protection against disease and death than either single hmAb or vaccinia immune globulin (VIG. Post-exposure combination mAb therapy provided significant protection against disease and death, and appeared to fully cure the VACV infection in ≥50% of SCID mice. Therapeutic efficacy was then assessed in two rabbit studies examining post-exposure hmAb prophylaxis against rabbitpox (RPXV. In the first study, rabbits were infected with RPVX and then provided hmAbs at 48 hrs post-infection, or 1 hr and 72 hrs post-infection. Rabbits in both groups receiving hmAbs were 100% protected from death. In the second rabbitpox study, 100% of animal treated with combination hmAb therapy and 100% of animals treated with anti-B5 hmAb were protected. These findings suggest that combination hmAb treatment may be effective at controlling smallpox disease in immunocompetent or immunodeficient humans.

  11. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...

  12. In vivo experimental model of human gingival mucosa using immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukinoki, K; Miyoshi, Y; Aoki, T; Karakida, K; Ohta, Y; Kaneko, A; Ueyama, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2007-08-01

    To establish an in vivo experimental model for examining human periodontal tissue, the present study examined several transplant techniques that maintain the structure and characteristics of human gingival mucosa. Human oral mucosal tissue samples were collected from the gingiva (n = 11), palate (n = 1), and tongue (n = 3). These mucosal grafts were transplanted onto BALB/c nu/scid mice with double-mutant immunodeficiency. Murine skin, twice the size of the graft, was cut open in an ' square superset'-shape. Next, the connective tissue side of the graft was placed onto the murine connective tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed, using polyclonal rabbit antibody to involucrin, monoclonal antibody to vimentin, monoclonal antibody to CD34, and monoclonal antibody to Ki-67, to determine whether the characteristics of human oral mucosa were maintained. When the connective tissue side of the graft was placed on the murine fascial membrane, the histological structure of the graft was maintained for 60 d. These grafts were examined for human characteristics using human-specific antibodies. Immunohistochemically, the expression patterns of involucrin, vimentin, and Ki-67 indicated that transplanted mucosa revealed normal human characteristics, including differentiation and proliferation up to 80 d. CD34 was not detected in the graft endothelial cells. The present study revealed that the novel technique of transplantation of human gingival mucosa in nu/scid mice may serve as an in vivo experimental model of periodontal disease.

  13. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than...... the normal upper range and is accompanied by adverse effects such as joint pain and glucose intolerance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a 16-week open-labelled prospective pilot study in six male HALS patients using a s.c. low-dose hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), aiming to examine the impact on total and free IGF...

  14. II Brazilian Consensus on the use of human immunoglobulin in patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudouris, Ekaterini Simões; Rego Silva, Almerinda Maria do; Ouricuri, Aluce Loureiro; Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Prando, Carolina Cardoso; Kokron, Cristina Maria; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Tavares, Fabíola Scancetti; Silva Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues; Barreto, Irma Cecília; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Barros, Myrthes Anna; Forte, Wilma Carvalho Neves

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years, new primary immunodeficiencies and genetic defects have been described. Recently, immunoglobulin products with improved compositions and for subcutaneous use have become available in Brazil. In order to guide physicians on the use of human immunoglobulin to treat primary immunodeficiencies, based on a narrative literature review and their professional experience, the members of the Primary Immunodeficiency Group of the Brazilian Society of Allergy and Immunology prepared an updated document of the 1st Brazilian Consensus, published in 2010. The document presents new knowledge about the indications and efficacy of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiencies, relevant production-related aspects, mode of use (routes of administration, pharmacokinetics, doses and intervals), adverse events (major, prevention, treatment and reporting), patient monitoring, presentations available and how to have access to this therapeutic resource in Brazil. RESUMO Nos últimos anos, novas imunodeficiências primárias e defeitos genéticos têm sido descritos. Recentemente, produtos de imunoglobulina, com aprimoramento em sua composição e para uso por via subcutânea, tornaram-se disponíveis em nosso meio. Com o objetivo de orientar o médico no uso da imunoglobulina humana para o tratamento das imunodeficiências primárias, os membros do Grupo de Assessoria em Imunodeficiências da Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunologia produziram um documento que teve por base uma revisão narrativa da literatura e sua experiência profissional, atualizando o I Consenso Brasileiro publicado em 2010. Apresentam-se novos conhecimentos sobre indicações e eficácia do tratamento com imunoglobulina nas imunodeficiências primárias, aspectos relevantes sobre a produção, forma de utilização (vias de administração, farmacocinética, doses e intervalos), efeitos adversos (principais efeitos, prevenção, tratamento e notificação), monitorização do

  15. Lipodystrophic syndrome in children and adolescents infected with the human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has resulted in greater survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. However, the use of these drugs has been associated with lipodystrophic syndrome (LS, which is characterized by metabolic alterations (dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and lactic acidosis and abnormal corporal fat distribution. Clinically, LS may manifest as three different forms: lipohipertrophy (accumulation of fat in the central part of the body, lipoatrophy (loss of fat in the extremities, face and buttocks and mixed (lipohipertrophy + lipoatrophy. Although its physiopathology has not been elucidated, some mechanisms have been described, including leptin and adiponectin deficiency, mitochondrial dysfunction and use of antiretroviral drugs. The type, dose and duration of the antiretroviral treatment, as well as age and puberty are the main risk factors. LS is also associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular illnesses, atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Treatment includes physical activity, cautious restriction of caloric intake, changes in antiretroviral therapy, and use of insulin-sensitizing and lipid-lowering agents. Follow up must be periodic, consisting of measurement of body fat distribution, evaluation of the lipid profile and insulin resistance.

  16. Lipodystrophic syndrome in children and adolescents infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Crésio; Oliveira, Ana Cláudia; Brites, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has resulted in greater survival of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the use of these drugs has been associated with lipodystrophic syndrome (LS), which is characterized by metabolic alterations (dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, and lactic acidosis) and abnormal corporal fat distribution. Clinically, LS may manifest as three different forms: lipohipertrophy (accumulation of fat in the central part of the body), lipoatrophy (loss of fat in the extremities, face and buttocks) and mixed (lipohipertrophy + lipoatrophy). Although its physiopathology has not been elucidated, some mechanisms have been described, including leptin and adiponectin deficiency, mitochondrial dysfunction and use of antiretroviral drugs. The type, dose and duration of the antiretroviral treatment, as well as age and puberty are the main risk factors. LS is also associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular illnesses, atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Treatment includes physical activity, cautious restriction of caloric intake, changes in antiretroviral therapy, and use of insulin-sensitizing and lipid-lowering agents. Follow up must be periodic, consisting of measurement of body fat distribution, evaluation of the lipid profile and insulin resistance.

  17. Hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 in human results in a late onset immunodeficiency and no autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Capucine; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Chemin, Karine; Maciorowski, Zofia; Lim, Annick; Mazerolles, Fabienne; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Debre, Marianne; Magny, Jean-Paul; Le Deist, Françoise; Fischer, Alain; Hivroz, Claire

    2009-07-01

    Complete lack of function of the tyrosine kinase ZAP70 in humans results in a severe immunodeficiency, characterized by a lack of mature CD8(+) T cells and non-functional CD4(+) T cells. We report herein an immunodeficiency with an inherited hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 due to a single G-to-A substitution in a non-coding intron. This mutation introduces a new acceptor splice site and allows low levels of normal alternative splicing and of WT ZAP70 expression. This partial deficiency results in a compromised TCR signaling that was totally restored by increased expression of ZAP70, demonstrating that defective activation of the patient T cells was indeed caused by the low level of ZAP70 expression. This partial ZAP70 deficiency was associated with an attenuated clinical and immunological phenotype as compared with complete ZAP70 deficiency. CD4(+) helper T-cell populations including, follicular helper T cells, Th1, Th17 and Treg were detected in the blood. Finally, the patient had no manifestation of autoimmunity suggesting that the T-cell tolerogenic functions were not compromised, in contrast to what has been observed in mice carrying hypomorphic mutations of Zap70. This report extends the phenotype spectrum of ZAP70 deficiency with a residual function of ZAP70.

  18. A digenic human immunodeficiency characterized by IFNAR1 and IFNGR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Chou, Janet; Sodroski, Catherine N; Beano, Abdallah; Bainter, Wayne; Angelova, Magdalena; Al Idrissi, Eman; Habazi, Murad K; Alghamdi, Hamza Ali; Almanjomi, Fahd; Al Shehri, Mohamed; Elsidig, Nagi; Alaa Eldin, Morsi; Knipe, David M; AlZahrani, Mofareh; Geha, Raif S

    2017-11-06

    Primary immunodeficiencies are often monogenic disorders characterized by vulnerability to specific infectious pathogens. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a patient with disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus viridians bacteremia, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia and identified mutations in 2 genes that regulate distinct IFN pathways. The patient had a homozygous frameshift deletion in IFNGR2, which encodes the signal transducing chain of the IFN-γ receptor, that resulted in minimal protein expression and abolished downstream signaling. The patient also harbored a homozygous deletion in IFNAR1 (IFNAR1*557Gluext*46), which encodes the IFN-α receptor signaling subunit. The IFNAR1*557Gluext*46 resulted in replacement of the stop codon with 46 additional codons at the C-terminus. The level of IFNAR1*557Gluext*46 mutant protein expressed in patient fibroblasts was comparable to levels of WT IFNAR1 in control fibroblasts. IFN-α-induced signaling was impaired in the patient fibroblasts, as evidenced by decreased STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of STAT1, and expression of IFN-α-stimulated genes critical for CMV immunity. Pretreatment with IFN-α failed to suppress CMV protein expression in patient fibroblasts, whereas expression of WT IFNAR1 restored IFN-α-mediated suppression of CMV. This study identifies a human IFNAR1 mutation and describes a digenic immunodeficiency specific to type I and type II IFNs.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of young, college student blood donors about Human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Young people, who tend to be healthy, idealistic, and motivated, are an excellent pool of potential voluntary unpaid blood donors. Recruiting and retaining young blood donors improves the long term safety and sufficiency of a country′s blood supply. Knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV should play an important role in prevention of disease transmission. Materials and Methods: This study was a questionnaire based survey, conducted to explore the levels of knowledge, attitude, and beliefs about HIV in young college student blood donors. Results: The results showed that the proportion of participants with comprehensive knowledge of HIV prevention and transmission was lesser than expected. Increase in education level and male gender was found to be significantly associated with high HIV-related knowledge. The responses on the different aspects of HIV-related attitude were also varied and there is still stigma associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS even in the educated groups. Discussion: There was a spectrum of myths and misperceptions emphasizing the need of education that recognizes the social context of attitude towards HIV. Results from this study may contribute to the development of appropriate educational and training material for this group of donors which in turn, may assist in achieving the elusive goal of safe blood supply in future.

  20. Mycoplasma penetrans and Other Mycoplasmas in Urine of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Althaf I.; Robson, William Lane M.; Kelley, Robin; Reid, Tanya; Gangemi, J. David

    1999-01-01

    Urine samples from children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and healthy controls were examined for mycoplasmas by culture. Standard biochemical assays, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and PCR (16S and 16S-23S spacer rRNA region) were used for identification of isolates. Mycoplasmas were identified from 13 (87%) of 15 HIV-positive patients and 3 (20%) of 15 HIV-negative control patients. The frequency and type of mycoplasma varied with the severity of HIV infection. Mycoplasma penetrans, Mycoplasma pirum, Mycoplasma fermentans, and Mycoplasma genitalium were isolated from patients with severe immunodeficiency. Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were isolated more frequently from children in the early stages of HIV infection and from HIV-negative patients. Mycoplasma penetrans was isolated from one (50%) of two patients in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) group B and from five (55.5%) of nine pediatric patients with AIDS (CDC group C). This is the first report that indicates that “AIDS-associated” mycoplasmas are more common in HIV-infected children than in HIV-negative controls. PMID:10203515

  1. [Diseases of the peripheral and visual nervous system during infection with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Sotolongo, P; Casanova-Carrillo, P; Casanova-Carrillo, C

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often accompanied by neurological complications. One of these includes disorders affecting the peripheral and visual nervous system, especially during the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) stage. The peripheral neuropathies associated with infection by HIV are an assorted group of disorders, which include acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multiple mononeuropathy and neuropathies related to the herpes zoster virus or cytomegalovirus. The most common and clinically important of the neuropathies is painful distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP). The most severely affected cranial nerves are V and VII. The isolation of HIV from the affected nerves suggests a direct role, but an immune mechanism is also possible. Although cytomegalovirus may be associated with a variety of peripheral nerve syndromes, its clinical presentation as a primary demyelinating polyneuropathy is unusual. DSP and antiretroviral toxic neuropathy are the most common HIV-associated neuropathies. Both HIV infection, by itself, and the neurotoxicity of certain drugs in tritherapy contribute to the development of painful peripheral sensory neuropathy. In researching into the cause of HIV-associated neuropathy further studies are needed to determine the relative roles played by the viral infection and the activation of the immunological factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of the damage done in axons, the dorsal root ganglion and in the sensory pathways in the spinal cord.

  2. Localized or systemic in vivo heat inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): a mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennypacker, C; Perelson, A S; Nys, N; Nelson, G; Sessler, D I

    1995-04-01

    Temperatures > or = 42 degrees C, maintained for > or = 25 min, inactivate approximately 25% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV-infected T cells are more sensitive to heat than healthy lymphocytes, and susceptibility increases when the cells are presensitized by exposure to tumor necrosis factor. Thus, induction of a whole-body hyperthermia or hyperthermia specifically limited to tissues having a high viral load is a potential antiviral therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Accordingly, we incorporated therapeutic hyperthermia into an existing mathematical model that evaluates the interaction between HIV and CD4+ T cells. Given the assumptions and limitations of this model, the results indicate that a daily therapy lowering the population of actively infected cells by 40% or infectious virus by 40% would effectively reverse the depletion of T cells. In contrast, a daily decline of 20% of either actively infected cells or infectious virus would have a marginal effect. However, daily reduction by 20% of both actively infected cells and infectious virus could restore T-cell numbers, assuming that permanent damage had not been inflicted on the thymus. Since daily treatments would probably be excessively stressful, whole-body hyperthermia seems unlikely to be clinically useful. In contrast, heating directed specifically to areas of viral concentration may be effective and have a suitable risk/benefit ratio.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) inactivation of banked bone by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salai, M; Vonsover, A; Pritch, M; von Versen, R; Horoszowski, H

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus(HIV)-positive carriers, poses difficulties when musculo-skeletal tissues are considered for banking in readiness for future clinical application. This study was conducted to test the actual yield of gamma irradiation on HIV infectivity, within HIV-infected bones. The effect of gamma irradiation on bones containing T-cells chronically infected with HIV type I (HIV-I) was studied, in respect to inactivation of the virus. After exposure of the cell-free virus or infected T-cells to 2.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, the authors were able to demonstrate complete inactivation of the virus. It would appear from this study that gamma irradiation at this dose is sufficient to achieve clinical sterilisation of bones and facilitate their use for reconstructive procedures by eliminating the risk of HIV transmission to the recipient. Furthermore, when preparing bones for banking, this would also seem to be the method of choice in preventing the transmission of various strains of bacteria, fungi and other viruses.

  4. Conserved immunogenic region of a major core protein (p24) of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koito, A; Hattori, T; Matsushita, S; Maeda, Y; Nozaki, C; Sagawa, K; Takatsuki, K

    1988-12-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb), VAK 4, has been known to specifically react with a major core protein (p24) as well as with its precursor (p55-57) and intermediate precursor (p40) of human immunodeficiency virus strain IIIB (HTLV-IIIB). Radioimmunoprecipitation assays revealed that VAK 4 MoAb precipitated a major core protein and its precursors from a variety of strains of HIV and also from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), although the molecular weights of the precursor proteins in each viral strain were slightly different. A protein synthesized by transfected Escherichia coli containing amino acid sequences corresponding to residues 121-436 of the HTLV-IIIB gag gene was reactive with VAK 4 MoAb, but the protein carrying only residues 121-309 was not reactive, suggesting that the epitope recognized by VAK 4 MoAb resides at the carboxyl terminus of p24 protein. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that patient sera containing anticore protein antibody inhibited the binding of VAK 4 to HTLV-IIIB. These findings suggested that VAK 4 MoAb recognized an immunogenic and conserved epitope belonging to a major core protein of HIV-related viruses.

  5. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  6. Visceral Leishmaniasis Treated with Antimonials/Paromomycin followed by Itraconazole/Miltefosine after Standard Therapy Failures in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán, Patricia; López-Velez, Rogelio; Olmo, Montserrat; Podzamczer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an opportunistic infection that affects human immunodeficiency virus–infected persons in leishmaniasis-endemic areas. The standard treatment may not be effective and relapses are common. We report the case of a human immunodeficiency virus-1–infected patient who had several relapses of visceral leishmaniasis after treatment with standard therapies and responded to a combined therapy.

  7. Hepatitis B virus exposure in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive Cuban patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licel Rodríguez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the prevalence of serological markers of exposure to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV, 295 subjects were selected at random from the National Registry of human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects. Evidence of exposure to HBV was defined as: testing Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc positive or anti-HBc positive only. Overall, 133 (45.5% were positive for anti-HBc and 15 (5.1% resulted positive to HBsAg. Significant statistical association was found between male sex and exposure to HBV (p<0.01. Homosexual or bisexual behavior was found to be strongly associated to HBV exposure (p<0.001. In conclusion, the prevalence of HBV serological markers is higher in Cuban HIV positive subjects compared to the Cuban general population.

  8. [Practical considerations for high resolution anoscopy in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren-Díaz, Mauricio; Ocampo Hermida, Antonio; González-Carreró Fojón, Joaquín; Alonso-Parada, María; Rodríguez-Girondo, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Anal cancer is uncommon in the general population, however its incidence is increasing significantly in certain risk groups, mainly in men who have sex with men, and particularly those infected with human immunodeficiency virus. High resolution anoscopy technique is currently considered the standard in the diagnosis of anal intraepithelial neoplasia, but at present there is no agreed standard method between health areas. High resolution anoscopy is an affordable technique that can be critical in the screening of anal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, but is not without difficulties. We are currently studying the most effective strategy for managing premalignant anal lesions, and with this article we attempt to encourage other groups interested in reducing the incidence of an increasing neoplasia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Marchesini, Emanuela; Iorio, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: Trials were identified through manual and electronic searches. Randomized trials comparing peginterferon plus ribavirin...... with other antiviral treatments for patients with chronic hepatitis C and HIV were included. The primary outcome measure was virological response at the end of treatment and after > or =6 months (sustained). Intention-to-treat meta-analyses including data on all patients who were randomized were carried out....... RESULTS: Seven randomized trials were eligible for inclusion. The patients included had chronic hepatitis C and stable HIV and were not previously treated with interferon or ribavirin (treatment naive). The mean dosages were 180 or 1.5 microg/kg once weekly for peginterferon and 800 mg daily for ribavirin...

  10. False-positive and indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus test results in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, T I; Parra, E

    2000-01-01

    Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga, recommend that all pregnant women be offered human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing to ensure that they have the opportunity to use currently available therapeutic interventions to reduce the risk infecting their offspring with HIV. These recommendations have resulted in an increased number of low-risk women being tested and a significant rise in the percentage of false-positive results from HIV antibody screening tests and ambiguous (indeterminate) findings from confirmatory tests. Women receiving such results are generally in emotional turmoil yet must make treatment choices if they prove to be infected. This article provides guidelines to help general medical practitioners to understand the nature of HIV testing, to assess a woman's infection status when initial tests are ambiguous, and to determine when treatment is appropriate.

  11. Schistosomiasis and infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, Christian; Kallestrup, Per; Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that treatment for schistosomiasis in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) attenuated HIV replication as measured by plasma HIV RNA. We investigated systemic inflammation as measured by plasma levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor II...... (sTNF-rII), interleukin-8, (IL-8), and IL-10 during schistosomiasis and HIV co-infection and after schistosomiasis treatment. The cohort was composed of 378 persons who were or were not infected with HIV-1, Schistosoma haematobium, or S. mansoni. Schistosomiasis-infected persons were randomized...... to receive praziquantel (40 mg/kg) at baseline or at the three-month follow-up. sTNF-rII and IL-8 were positively associated with schistosomiasis intensity as measured by circulating anodic antigen (CAA), regardless of HIV status. Interleukin-10 was positively associated with CAA in HIV-negative participants...

  12. Current Status of Point-of-Care Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Horacio A; Panpradist, Nuttada; Beck, Ingrid A; Lutz, Barry; Lai, James; Kanthula, Ruth M; Kantor, Rami; Tripathi, Anubhav; Saravanan, Shanmugam; MacLeod, Iain J; Chung, Michael H; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Chunfu; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2017-12-01

    Healthcare delivery has advanced due to the implementation of point-of-care testing, which is often performed within minutes to hours in minimally equipped laboratories or at home. Technologic advances are leading to point-of-care kits that incorporate nucleic acid-based assays, including polymerase chain reaction, isothermal amplification, ligation, and hybridization reactions. As a limited number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with clinically significant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance, assays to detect these mutations have been developed. Early versions of these assays have been used in research. This review summarizes the principles underlying each assay and discusses strategic needs for their incorporation into the management of HIV infection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Hypertrophic lichen planus as a presenting feature of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Rashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus (LP is a chronic papulosquamous dermatosis in which both skin and mucous membranes may be involved. To date, there have been only five reports of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients with hypertrophic LP. In the present report, we describe a 37-year-old female who presented with widely distributed, hyperpigmented, pruritic scaly lesions involving the face, trunk, and upper and lower extremities for one month. She also had swelling of both lower legs with low grade fever for past one week. She was diagnosed to be a HIV-positive patient who had severe, widespread hypertrophic LP lesions along with acute eruptive lesions of LP. These LP lesions were a presenting feature of HIV infection in our case.

  14. Animal-associated opportunistic infections among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, C A; Angulo, F J; Rooney, J A

    1994-01-01

    A number of animal-associated infections occur in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including those due to Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium, Microsporida, Salmonella, Campylo-bacter, Giardia, Rhodococcus equi, Rochalimaea, and Listeria monocytogenes. Most of these infections, with the exception of those due to Rochalimaea, appear to be acquired by the immunosuppressed individual from sources other than exposure to animals. Drs. Glaser and colleagues review our current understanding of the role of exposure to animals, especially pets, in the natural history of these opportunistic infections. They suggest that the risk of zoonotic transmission is small and offer practical suggestions designed to reduce this low risk. They conclude that the benefits of animal companionship outweigh the risks to patients and that prohibition of pet ownership by individuals infected with HIV is not warranted.

  15. A rare case report of Brucellosis in human immunodeficiency virus infected patient from rural Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shewtank Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of brucellosis in a patient infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, who came to seek medical care at a tertiary care center in rural Uttar Pradesh. A 26-year-old male patient, milk salesperson by occupation who also used to rear his cattle as a routine, presented with complaints of longstanding fever accompanied with vomiting, giddiness, myalgia, and headache. No significant abnormality was detected on routine physical and laboratory investigations except reactive HIV antibodies. It was decided to conduct the serological tests for the evidence of brucellosis as clinical symptoms continued to persist. He had high titers of Brucella agglutinin, and responded to treatment with tetracycline and streptomycin. The isolates were confirmed at Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar.

  16. Smoking and renal function in people living with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Legarth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    the association between smoking status and 1) overall renal function and risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), 2) risk of any renal replacement therapy (aRRT), and 3) mortality following aRRT. We calculated estimated creatinine clearance using the Cockcroft-Gault equation (CG-CrCl), and evaluated renal function......INTRODUCTION: Smoking is a main risk factor for morbidity and mortality in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV), but its potential association with renal impairment remains to be established. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based cohort study in Danish PLHIV to evaluate...... Cohort Study, we identified 1,475 never smokers, 768 previous smokers, and 2,272 current smokers. During study period, we observed no association of smoking status with overall renal function. Previous and current smoking was not associated with increased risk of CKD (adjusted IRR: 1.1, 95% confidence...

  17. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna Helene Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) is responsible for cleaving ten different sites in the viral Gag and Gag-pol polyproteins, thereby releasing the structural proteins and enzymes necessary for the maturation and infectivity of the HIV-1 virus. The vital role of HIV-1 PR...... in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted...... in multi-drug-resistant PRs. Computational analysis of a vast number of inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 PR variants can broaden the knowledge of how and why the mutations arise, which would be a great advantage in the design on resistance-evading inhibitors. Here we present a diverse system to select...

  19. Novel use of levodopa in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy-mediated parkinsonism in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M F Devine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 36-year-old man with a medical history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection who presented with hypomimia, hypophonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and freezing of gait. His clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with HIV encephalopathy with involvement of the bilateral basal ganglia and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. We initiated a trial of carbidopa-levodopa. The dose was escalated to 1050 mg levodopa daily. Amantadine was also started. The patient was closely monitored for behavioral, neurological, or systemic side effects. He tolerated therapy well without adverse effects. The patient's neurological status significantly improved with levodopa, including hypomimia, hypophonia, bradykinesia, and fluidity of gait. This case demonstrates that carbidopa-levodopa can be safely utilized to manage parkinsonism in an adult patient with HIV encephalopathy.

  20. Compulsory premarital screening for the human immunodeficiency virus. Technical and public health considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, P D; Barry, M J; Mayer, K H; Brandt, A M; Gostin, L; Fineberg, H V

    1987-10-02

    The effectiveness of a mandatory premarital screening program was examined as a means of curtailing the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States. The epidemiology of the HIV, the technical characteristics of tests for antibodies to HIV, and the logistic, economic, and legal implications of such a program were considered. In one year, universal premarital screening in the United States currently would detect fewer than one tenth of 1% of HIV-infected individuals at a cost of substantially more than +100 million. More than 100 infected individuals would be told that they were probably not infected, and there would likely be more than 350 false-positive results. Public education, counseling of individuals, and discretionary testing can be important tools in reducing the spread of HIV infection, but mandatory premarital screening in a population with a low prevalence of infection is a relatively ineffective and inefficient use of resources.

  1. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  2. Global challenges in human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis coinfection among men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Chelsea P; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-11-01

    Syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM), and the rate of coinfection has been increasing over the last decade. HIV and syphilis coinfection is particularly challenging because the infections interact synergistically thereby increasing the risk of acquisition and transmission as well as accelerating disease progression. Areas covered: This paper reviews and summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical management and prevention of HIV and syphilis coinfection among MSM. Expert commentary: Research does not support a different syphilis treatment for coinfected individuals; however, coinfection may warrant a recommendation for antiretroviral therapy. In order to reverse the epidemic of syphilis and HIV coinfection, there needs to be greater awareness, improved cultural sensitivity among health care providers, improved access to preventative services and increased screening for syphilis and HIV.

  3. Associations among depression, suicidal behavior, and quality of life in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca; Montebovi, Franco; Lamis, Dorian A; Erbuto, Denise; Girardi, Paolo; Amore, Mario; Pompili, Maurizio

    2015-08-12

    To investigate the potential associations among major depression, quality of life, and suicidal behavior in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. A detailed MEDLINE search was carried out to identify all articles and book chapters in English published from January 1995 to January 2015. Based on the main findings, the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) ranged from 14.0% to 27.2%. Furthermore, the prevalence of suicidal ideation varied from 13.6% to 31.0% whereas, attempted suicides were reported to range from 3.9% to 32.7%. Interestingly, various associated risk factors for both depression and suicide were identified in HIV patients. Finally, consistent associations were reported among MDD, suicidal ideation, and poor quality of life in individuals living with HIV. Although additional studies are needed to elucidate this complex association, our results suggest the importance of early detection of both MDD and suicidality in patients living with HIV.

  4. Correlation of in vivo neuroimaging abnormalities with postmortem human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis and dendritic loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Sarah L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Fennema-Notestine, Christine

    2004-01-01

    previous studies have linked brain viral levels to these alterations, other neuropathological mechanisms might also contribute to them. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between findings on premortem magnetic resonance images and postmortem neuropathologic evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV......) encephalitis and neurodegeneration. DESIGN: Morphometric analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in seropositive cases with matched seronegative controls, and the correlation of these volumes to neuropathological measures in autopsied seropositive cases. SETTING: University of California, San Diego, HIV...... Neurobehavioral Research Center. SUBJECTS: Twenty-one seropositive subjects studied at autopsy and 19 seronegative cases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In vivo structural magnetic resonance imaging data analyzed by quantitative methods, with comparison of volumes from magnetic resonance imaging and neuropathological...

  5. Nursing consultation tool for people with human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandra Rodrigues Feijão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to verify the opinion of judges about a nursing consultation tool for people with co-infection by the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis. Methods: methodological study, involving the construction of a tool based on Orem’s self-care theory and its submission for evaluation by judges experts in the area, which gave opinions about organization, clarity and relevance. Results: the instrument gained a positive evaluation for all assessment criteria, with agreement greater than 75% and Content Validity Index greater than 0.80 in most items. Following judges opinion, three items were excluded and two modified. Conclusion: the adequacy of the nursing consultation tool for people with HIV/tuberculosis co-infection was confirmed regarding organization into subdivisions and items. Minimal disagreement among judges in the analysis of the issues was noted. Although most items were evaluated positively, further validation studies will be needed.

  6. Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Cure: HIV Persistence in Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritz, Eli A; Douek, Daniel C

    2017-03-15

    The uneven anatomic distribution of cell subsets that harbor human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during antiretroviral therapy (ART) complicates investigation of the barriers to HIV cure. Here we propose that while previous studies done largely in blood cells have led to important investigations into HIV latency, other important mechanisms of HIV persistence during ART may not be readily apparent in the bloodstream. We specifically consider as an example the question of ongoing HIV replication during ART. We discuss how growing understanding of key anatomic sanctuaries for the virus can inform future experiments aimed at further clarifying this issue. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Next-Generation Human Immunodeficiency Virus Sequencing for Patient Management and Drug Resistance Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera-Julian, Marc; Edgil, Dianna; Harrigan, P Richard; Sandstrom, Paul; Godfrey, Catherine; Paredes, Roger

    2017-12-01

    High-quality, simplified, and low-cost human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance tests that are able to provide timely actionable HIV resistance data at individual, population, and programmatic levels are needed to confront the emerging drug-resistant HIV epidemic. Next-generation sequencing technologies embedded in automated cloud-computing analysis environments are ideally suited for such endeavor. Whereas NGS can reduce costs over Sanger sequencing, automated analysis pipelines make NGS accessible to molecular laboratories regardless of the available bioinformatic skills. They can also produce highly structured, high-quality data that could be examined by healthcare officials and program managers on a real-time basis to allow timely public health action. Here we discuss the opportunities and challenges of such an approach. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Dengue Virus Coinfection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Patients on the West Coast of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Valle-Reyes, Salvador; Ochoa-Jiménez, Rodolfo; Arechiga-Ramírez, Conrado; Gámez-Arroyo, José L; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Vásquez, Clemente; López-Lemus, Uriel A

    2017-09-01

    Dengue virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is not well studied. Previous reports suggest a transitory inhibition of the HIV-1 viral load, as well as a benign clinical progression of dengue. The follow-up of six HIV-1-infected patients, diagnosed and hospitalized with dengue virus infection in the State of Colima, Mexico, was carried out to analyze the progression of this viral coinfection. The presence of dengue virus serotype 1 was confirmed through molecular tests. No severe complications were observed in any of the patients during dengue virus infection. Significant alteration of the HIV-1 viral loads was not observed during dengue virus infection and 6 months after coinfection. Further studies are required to understand the pathology, as well as the clinical course, of these viral coinfections.

  9. Probiotics in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: A Systematic Review and Evidence Synthesis of Benefits and Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, George M; Esmaeili, Aryan; Shah, Hardikkumar; Indyk, Debbie; Johnson, Matthew; Andreae, Michael; Sacks, Henry S

    2016-10-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus frequently use dietary supplements, including probiotics, but concern exists about ingesting live organisms. We performed a systematic review of the benefits of probiotics and a meta-analysis of sepsis risk. We undertook a protocol-driven, comprehensive review to identify all relevant studies, assess their quality, and summarize the evidence. Of 2068 references, 27 were analyzed. The data suggest possible benefits for CD4 count, recurrence or management of bacterial vaginosis, and diarrhea management. We examined randomized, controlled studies explicitly assessing sepsis in any patient population, and we found zero cases of supplement-associated bacteremia or fungemia in 39 randomized controlled trials comprising 9402 subjects. The estimated number needed to harm is 7369 in Bayesian approach (95% credible interval: 1689, ∞), which should reassure clinicians. No or mild adverse effects were reported. Longer duration studies investigating different individual and mixed strains for plausible indications are needed to establish best practices.

  10. Caregiver experience in preventive treatment for children exposed to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ramos da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the experience of caregivers of children vertically exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. It used Symbolic Interactionism as a theoretical framework. It is a qualitative research with data collection carried out in a reference clinic in a municipality in the state of São Paulo, from November 2012 to August 2013 through semi-structured interviews with 12 mothers and a grandmother. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis method. The caregivers administered antiretroviral to child to prevent virus infection and perceived good acceptance of medication. The child was considered healthy and waiting for the test results generated suffering. Family support and public health services were highlighted as an aid to go through this route pervaded by prejudice, lack of direction, fear and inability to breastfeed. It was noted that the public health service in the city studied tried to follow the protocol requirements established, however, improvements in the quality of counselling is needed.

  11. Current Issues and Considerations Regarding Trichomoniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus in African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Shira C.; Sorvillo, Frank J.; Smith, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis has long been recognized as one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections. However, it is only in recent years that it has been appreciated that Trichomonas may play a critical role in amplifying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Given the evidence that T. vaginalis likely promotes HIV infection, the apparent high level of Trichomonas infection in the African-American community is cause for concern. Even if T. vaginalis increases the risk of HIV transmission by a small or modest amount, it translates into a sizable population effect since Trichomonas is so common in this community. Therefore, control of trichomoniasis may represent an important avenue of control for the prevention of HIV transmission, particularly among African-Americans. PMID:19136432

  12. Dendritic cells preferentially transfer CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants to CD4(+) T lymphocytes in trans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfort, Thijs; Thomas, Adri A. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preferentially utilizes the CCR5 coreceptor for target cell entry in the acute phase of infection, while later in disease progression the virus switches to the CXCR4 coreceptor in approximately 50% of patients. In response to IHV-I the adaptive immune

  13. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  14. Virus load in chimpanzees infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: effect of pre-exposure vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haaft, P.; Cornelissen, M.; Goudsmit, J.; Koornstra, W.; Dubbes, R.; Niphuis, H.; Peeters, M.; Thiriart, C.; Bruck, C.; Heeney, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Many reports indicate that a long-term asymptomatic state following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with a low amount of circulating virus. To evaluate the possible effect of stabilizing a low virus load by non-sterilizing pre-exposure vaccination, a quantitative

  15. Rapid disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals with adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Veugelers, P. J.; Keet, I. P.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Miedema, F.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relation between the occurrence of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) prophylaxis and the subsequent course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a cohort of homosexual men. Adverse reactions to TMP-SMZ were associated with a more rapid

  16. Apelin, the natural ligand of the orphan seven-transmembrane receptor APJ, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayabyab, M.; Hinuma, S.; Farzan, M.; Choe, H.; Fukusumi, S.; Kitada, C.; Nishizawa, N.; Hosoya, M.; Nishimura, O.; Messele, T.; Pollakis, G.; Goudsmit, J.; Fujino, M.; Sodroski, J.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to the CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, a subset of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates can also use the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor APJ as a coreceptor. A previously identified ligand of APJ, apelin, specifically inhibited the entry of primary

  17. Antiretroviral Drugs and Risk of Chronic Alanine Aminotransferase Elevation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Monoinfected Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovari, Helen; Sabin, Caroline A; Ledergerber, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) frequently have chronic liver enzyme elevation (cLEE), the underlying cause is often unclear. Methods.  Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) Study participants without...

  18. Semen parameters of a semen donor before and after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Cornelissen, M.; de Vries, J. W.; Lowe, S. H.; Jurriaans, S.; Repping, S.; van der Veen, F.

    2004-01-01

    Semen samples from a donor who seroconverted for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) during the period that he was donating at our clinic were stored before and after infection. Semen analysis was done on all of these samples before cryopreservation. Retrospectively, both qualitative and

  19. Coinfection with Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta, Giardia intestinalis, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Case Report with Complex Immunologic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Pocaterra, Leonor A; Rojas, Elsy; Hernán, Aurora; Jiménez, Juan Carlos; Núñez, Luz

    2017-05-01

    AbstractWe describe the case of a 43-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-infected man receiving combined antiretroviral therapy and coinfected with Hymenolepis nana, Hymenolepis diminuta, and Giardia intestinalis, presenting as chronic diarrhea and critical weight loss. Immunological aspects of these interactions are reviewed.

  20. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Ngouleun

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that human immunodeficiency virus status and alcohol consumption constitutes aggravating factors for the occurrence of hepatic toxicity. In addition, the consumption of antioxidant foods simultaneously with TB drugs help in reducing the hepatotoxic effects of these drugs.

  1. Dimerization and template switching in the 5 ' untranslated region between various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Berkhout, Ben; Kjems, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) particle contains two identical RNA strands, each corresponding to the entire genome. The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of each RNA strand contains extensive secondary and tertiary structures that are instrumental in different steps of the viral

  2. Cellular gene expression upon human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of CD4(+)-T-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lehrman, Ginger K.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; O'Keeffe, Gemma C.; Katze, Michael G.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Geiss, Gary K.; Mullins, James I.

    2003-01-01

    The expression levels of approximately 4,600 cellular RNA transcripts were assessed in CD4(+)-T-cell lines at different times after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain BRU (HIV-1(BRU)) using DNA microarrays. We found that several classes of genes were inhibited by HIV-1(BRU)

  3. Human syndromes of immunodeficiency and dysregulation are characterized by distinct defects in T-cell receptor repertoire development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yu (Xiaomin); J.R. Almeida (Jorge); S. Darko (Sam); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); S.S. Deravin (Suk See); H. Malech (Harry); A.R. Gennery (Andrew); I. Chinn (Ivan); M.L. Markert (Mary Louise); D.C. Douek (Daniel ); J.D. Milner (Joshua)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Human immunodeficiencies characterized by hypomorphic mutations in critical developmental and signaling pathway genes allow for the dissection of the role of these genes in the development of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and the correlation of alterations of the TCR

  4. Adherence and acceptability of once daily Lamivudine and abacavir in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LePrevost, M.; Green, H.; Flynn, J.; Head, S.; Clapson, M.; Lyall, H.; Novelli, V.; Farrelly, L.; Walker, A.S.; Burger, D.M.; Gibb, D.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on adherence to and acceptability of once daily lamivudine and abacavir are few. METHODS: Twenty-four U.K. human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children 2-13 years of age participated in the Pediatric European Network for the Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) 13 single arm, open

  5. Distinctiveness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypes from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Seropositive and -Seronegative Patients in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Niyaz; Caviedes, Luz; Alam, Mahfooz; Rao, K. Rajender; Sangal, Vartul; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates obtained from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive (n = 80) and -seronegative (n = 25) patients from Lima, Peru, revealed two distinct genotypes correlating with the host immune status. While the level of intrastrain diversity of DNA fingerprints of HIV-seropositive isolates was less pronounced, these isolates showed many clonal groupings. PMID:12682166

  6. Preterm premature rupture of membranes in pregnancies complicated by human immunodeficiency virus infection: a single center's five-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jesus R; Bardeguez, Arlene; Iffy, Leslie; Apuzzio, Joseph J

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe one center's five-year experience of the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive gravidas with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) not in labor at review of all HIV positive gravidas with PPROM at rupture of membranes prior to delivery.

  7. Epidemiology of infections with intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among sugar-estate residents in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanet, A. L.; Sahlu, T.; Rinke de Wit, T.; Messele, T.; Masho, W.; Woldemichael, T.; Yeneneh, H.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections could play an important role in the progression of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), by further disturbing the immune system whilst it is already engaged in the fight against HIV. HIV and intestinal parasitic infections were investigated in 1239,

  8. Angiographic Features and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With First-Time Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Mathiasen, Anders B; Worck, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A matched cohort study was conducted comparing patients with first-time acute coronary syndromes infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to non-HIV-infected patients with and without diabetes matched for smoking, gender, and type of acute coronary syndrome who underwent first-time corona...

  9. A reliable phenotype predictor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C based on envelope V3 sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Mark A.; Coetzer, Mia; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Morris, Lynn; Mullins, James I.

    2006-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B infections, the emergence of viruses able to use CXCR4 as a coreceptor is well documented and associated with accelerated CD4 decline and disease progression. However, in HIV-1 subtype C infections, responsible for more than 50% of global

  10. SEROPREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO THE HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS IN DIALYSIS WORKERS - RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERLYNE, G; KACZMAREK, RG; HAMBURGER, S; HAMILTON, P; MOORE, RM; CHARNEY, AN; KAHN, T; GRUBER, M; KAUFMAN, CE; GOFFINET, J; BERNARD, MA

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Devices and Radiological Health, in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Brooklyn, N.Y., conducted a multi-center, multi-institutional study of the seroprevalence of antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among dialysis workers. Seven

  11. Practices, Beliefs, and Perceived Barriers to Adolescent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Avani S; Goyal, Monika K; Dowshen, Nadia; Mistry, Rakesh D

    2015-09-01

    Limited data exist regarding knowledge of and compliance to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's universal adolescent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening recommendations. Our objective was to assess current guideline knowledge, practice, and perceived barriers to emergency department (ED)-based adolescent HIV screening. We administered an anonymous Web-based cross-sectional survey from May 1, 2012, to June 30, 2012, to 1073 physicians from the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Emergency Medicine LISTSERV. Survey participants were included if they (1) practiced as attending-level physicians, (2) practiced primarily in pediatric emergency medicine or general emergency medicine, and (3) provided clinical care for patients younger than the age of 21 years. The survey examined respondent demographics, knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, practices, and barriers to ED-based HIV screening. Standard descriptive statistics and comparative analyses were performed. A total of 220 responses were obtained; 29 responses were excluded and 191 responses were included in the study. Most of the participants were from urban, free-standing children's hospitals and had an annual ED volume of more than 61,000 patient visits. Respondent knowledge of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines was low; less than 40% of the respondents identified correct consent requirements. Only 15.4% of the respondents reported screening for HIV more than 10 times for the prior 6 months. Most frequently cited barriers included concerns for privacy (67.4%), follow-up (67%), and cost-effectiveness (65.4%). Human immunodeficiency virus screening facilitators included availability of health educators (83%), established follow-up (74.7%), and rapid HIV tests (65.2%). Emergency department clinicians exhibit poor knowledge of adolescent HIV screening recommendations. Current universal screening practices remain low; barriers to screening are numerous. Future efforts should

  12. Critical appraisal and update on tenofovir in management of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Elena Alvarez1, Judit Morello1, Vincent Soriano2, Pablo Labarga2, Sonia Rodriguez-Nóvoa11Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacogenetic Unit, Service of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Carlos III, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Tenofovir is currently one of the most widely used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV due to its good efficacy, tolerability, and convenience as a once-daily dosage. It is a drug of choice both for first-line therapy in naïve and pretreated patients, along with two other active drugs as part of a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Moreover, tenofovir can be used to treat hepatitis B virus-infected patients as well as coinfected patients who meet criteria to be treated for HIV or hepatitis B virus infection, and more recently some studies have supported its use as part of pre-exposure prophylaxis. Although large clinical trials and postmarketing studies have shown a gentle renal profile for tenofovir, some prospective cohort studies and case reports have raised concern about renal damage and bone disorders associated with use of tenofovir in a small proportion of patients, and apprehension lingers over its long-term usage. Renal toxicity from tenofovir seems to be linked to tubular damage, so classical markers for monitoring renal function that mainly assess glomerular function would not be advisable to detect early renal impairment. Management of toxicity associated with tenofovir should be based on assessment of optimal biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of renal disease.Keywords: tenofovir, antiretroviral treatment, kidney, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B

  13. Rifampin pharmacokinetics in children, with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection, hospitalized for the management of severe forms of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIlleron Helen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rifampin is a key drug in antituberculosis chemotherapy because it rapidly kills the majority of bacilli in tuberculosis lesions, prevents relapse and thus enables 6-month short-course chemotherapy. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of rifampin in children. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of rifampin in children with tuberculosis, both human immunodeficiency virus type-1-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected. Methods Fifty-four children, 21 human immunodeficiency virus-infected and 33 human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected, mean ages 3.73 and 4.05 years (P = 0.68, respectively, admitted to a tuberculosis hospital in Cape Town, South Africa with severe forms of tuberculosis were studied approximately 1 month and 4 months after commencing antituberculosis treatment. Blood specimens for analysis were drawn in the morning, 45 minutes, 1.5, 3.0, 4.0 and 6.0 hours after dosing. Rifampin concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. For two sample comparisons of means, the Welch version of the t-test was used; associations between variables were examined by Pearson correlation and by multiple linear regression. Results The children received a mean rifampin dosage of 9.61 mg/kg (6.47 to 15.58 body weight at 1 month and 9.63 mg/kg (4.63 to 17.8 at 4 months after commencing treatment administered as part of a fixed-dose formulation designed for paediatric use. The mean rifampin area under the curve 0 to 6 hours after dosing was 14.9 and 18.1 μg/hour/ml (P = 0.25 1 month after starting treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected children, respectively, and 16.52 and 17.94 μg/hour/ml (P = 0.59 after 4 months of treatment. The mean calculated 2-hour rifampin concentrations in these human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected children were 3.9 and 4.8

  14. Histoplasmosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS): multicenter study of outcomes and factors associated with relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Anderson, Albert M; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N; Bamberger, David M; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N; Wheat, L Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p 150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis.

  15. Is human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome decreasing among Brazilian injection drug users? Recent findings and how to interpret them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco I Bastos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review findings from Brazilian settings where the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS epidemic among injection drug users (IDUs seems to be decreasing, highlighting recent findings from Rio de Janeiro and discussing methodological alternatives. Former analyses using serologic testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion have shown that HIV incidence has been low in IDUs recruited by two different surveys carried out in Rio, where low injection frequencies and infection rates have been found among new injectors. The proportion of AIDS cases among IDUs in Rio has been fairly modest, compared to São Paulo and especially to the southernmost states. Notwithstanding, the interpretation of findings from serial surveys constitutes a challenge, magnified in the assessment of HIV spread among IDUs due to the dynamic nature of the drug scenes and limitations of sampling strategies targeting hard-to-reach populations. Assessment of epidemic trends may profit from the triangulation of data, but cannot avert biases associated with sampling errors. Efforts should be made to triangulate data from different sources, besides exploring specific studies from different perspectives. In an attempt to further assess the observed trends, we carried out original analyses using data from Brazilian AIDS databank.

  16. Behaviors Influencing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission in the Context of Positive Prevention among People Living with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ramin Radfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying factors, which influence health behaviors is critical to designing appropriate and effective preventive programs. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission is highly related to people behaviors and understanding factors influencing healthy behaviors among Iranian people living with HIVs (PLHIVs/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is very important to tailor an effective response to HIV/AIDS epidemic. Methods: This study was conducted as a qualitative study by methods of focus group discussion and in-depth interview in six provinces of Iran with 64 PLHIVs to determine factors influence engagement in positive prevention. Results: Knowledge and education, feelings of responsibility and positive prevention practices were identified as the primary domains of engagement. These domains were found to be influenced by feelings of ostracism and frustration, poverty, barriers to disclosure of HIV status, access to and utilization of drug abuse treatment services and antiretroviral therapy, adherence to treatment, age, religiousness, sex work, singleness, and incarceration. Conclusions: Designing new interventions and updating current interventions directed toward the aforementioned factors should be addressed by responsible Iranian authorities in order to have a national effective response on the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

  17. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E

    2013-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including in-depth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions.

  18. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  19. Hepatitis B and C Viruses Infections and Their Association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study among Blood Donors in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yami, Alemeshet; Alemseged, Fissehaye; Hassen, Alima

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of the study was to determine the Sero-prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the association of the virus with Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus infection. As Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus infections are highly prevalent and they are among the major public health concern in developing countries including Ethiopia investigating this problem is of paramount benefit. Although studies on co-infection of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus have clearly identified adverse effects of co-infection, the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus infection and the association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in developing countries including Ethiopia has not been know for sure. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 1 to 31, 2010, in Jimma University specialized hospital Blood Bank. The inclusion criteria of the study was adult who donated blood to Jimma University specialized hospital blood bank any time from establishment of the unit until January 2010 and whose record was retrieved. Accordingly 9,204 adults were included of which 6,063 were selected by lottery method. Data on socio-demographic variables (age and sex), laboratory test result for Hepatitis B surface Antigen, anti-Hepatitis C Virus antibody, anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibody, and Rapid Plasma Reagin tests were collected using structured questionnaire. After the data were collected, they were entered into a computer and analyzed using SPSS -16 for windows. P-Value of Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis infection were 2.1%, 0.2%, 2.1% and 0.7%, respectively. Sex and age had

  20. Clinicopathologic study of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to human immunodeficiency virus infection status and species types: analysis of 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Yoko; Takahashi, Masae; Horiguchi, Shin-ichiro; Funata, Nobuaki; Koizumi, Koichi; Okudela, Koji; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2015-01-13

    Previous studies reported that the incidence of intestinal spirochetosis was high in homosexual men, especially those with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological features of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection status and species types. A pathology database search for intestinal spirochetosis was performed at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center Komagome Hospital between January 2008 and October 2011, and included 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies from 4254 patients. After patient identification, a retrospective review of endoscopic records and clinical information was performed. All pathology slides were reviewed by two pathologists. The length of the spirochetes was measured using a digital microscope. Causative species were identified by polymerase chain reaction. Intestinal spirochetosis was diagnosed in 3 out of 55 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients (5.5%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 8.5 μm (range 7-11). Brachyspira pilosicoli was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all 3 patients. Intestinal spirochetosis was also diagnosed in 73 out of 4199 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients (1.7%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 3.5 μm (range 2-8). The species of intestinal spirochetosis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in 31 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients. Brachyspira aalborgi was detected in 24 cases (78%) and Brachyspira pilosicoli in 6 cases (19%). Both Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli were detected in only one Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patient (3%). The mean length of Brachyspira aalborgi was 3.8 μm, while that of Brachyspira pilosicoli was 5.5 μm. The length of Brachyspira pilosicoli was significantly longer than that of Brachyspira aalborgi (p < 0.01). The lengths of intestinal spirochetes were

  1. Abnormal CD40 Ligand (CD154) Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Maurice R. G.; DuChateau, Brian; Paniagua, Mary; Hunt, Janelle; Bensen, Nicolas; Yogev, Ram

    2001-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD154), expressed primarily on activated CD4-positive T cells, is a costimulatory molecule involved in B-cell proliferation, germinal center formation, and immunoglobulin class switching. Since B-cell abnormalities including hypergammaglobulinemia and abnormal antibody-specific immune responses are prominent and occur early during the course of pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we measured the baseline levels and the induced levels of expression of CD154 on CD3+ CD8− (T helper cells) in HIV-infected children and uninfected children born to HIV-positive mothers. The percentage of CD154+ T helper cells activated in vitro and the level of CD154 expressed per T helper cell (mean fluorescent channel [MFC]) were significantly lower in the HIV-infected children than in the uninfected control group (77% ± 3% versus 89% ± 1%, respectively [P CD154 expressed on resting T helper cells in the HIV-infected group were not significantly different from the levels observed in the control group. In the HIV-infected children, the level of CD154 on activated T helper cells correlated with the level of immunodeficiency, as assessed by the CD4 T-cell levels (correlation coefficient [r] = 0.707, P = 0.003), but did not correlate with the viral load or with any of the serum immunoglobulin concentrations measured in this group of HIV-infected children. The baseline level of CD154 expressed on T helper cells did, however, correlate with the concentration of immunoglobulin A in serum. We conclude that HIV-infected children have impaired regulation of CD154 expression which may contribute to the immune dysregulation commonly observed. PMID:11687447

  2. Alcohol and associated characteristics among older persons living with human immunodeficiency virus on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily C; Bradley, Katharine A; Balderson, Benjamin H; McClure, Jennifer B; Grothaus, Lou; McCoy, Katryna; Rittmueller, Stacey E; Catz, Sheryl L

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use, and particularly unhealthy alcohol use, is associated with poor human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related outcomes among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Despite a rapidly growing proportion of PLWH ≥50 years, alcohol use and its associated characteristics are underdescribed in this population. The authors describe alcohol use, severity, and associated characteristics using data from a sample of PLWH ≥50 years who participated in a trial of a telephone-based intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participants were recruited from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) service organizations in 9 states and included PLWH ≥50 years who were prescribed ART, reported suboptimal adherence at screening (missing >1.5 days of medication or taking medications 2 hours early or late on >3 days in the 30 days prior to screening), and consented to participate. The AUDIT-C (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption) alcohol screen, sociodemographic characteristics, substance use, and mental health comorbidity were assessed at baseline. AUDIT-C scores were categorized into nondrinking, low-level drinking, and mild-moderate unhealthy, and severe unhealthy drinking (0, 1-3, 4-6, and 7-12, respectively). Analyses described and compared characteristics across drinking status (any/none) and across AUDIT-C categories among drinkers. Among 447 participants, 57% reported drinking in the past year (35%, 15%, and 7% reported low-level drinking, mild-moderate unhealthy drinking, and severe unhealthy drinking, respectively). Any drinking was most common among men and those who were lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), married/partnered, had received past-year alcohol treatment, and never used injection drugs (P values all older PLWH with suboptimal ART adherence, a majority reported past-year alcohol use and 22% screened positive for unhealthy alcohol use. Any and unhealthy alcohol use were associated with demographics

  3. Direct comparisons of inhibitor sensitivities of reverse transcriptases from feline and human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, T W; Cronn, R C; Remington, K M; Tandberg, R T

    1990-08-01

    The sensitivities of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were directly compared. The two enzymes had similar sensitivities to three analogs of dTTP, namely, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine 5'-triphosphate. Each of these analogs demonstrated competitive inhibition of both enzymes. Ki values for inhibition of FIV RT by these three inhibitors were 3.3, 6.7, and 1.8 nM, respectively; Ki values for inhibition of the HIV enzyme were 6.5, 5.9, and 8.3 nM, respectively. Ratios of the Ki for the inhibitor to the Km for the substrate were also determined for each inhibitor, and no differences between the two enzymes greater than threefold were observed. Inhibition constants for 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate and 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate were determined for FIV RT, and these were similar to published values for HIV RT. The activities of three dideoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates against FIV RT were determined; ddGTP was slightly more potent than ddTTP, whereas both were much more effective than ddCTP. The activity of a noncompetitive inhibitor, phosphonoformate, was also examined with the FIV enzyme; it was much more active with poly(rA)-oligo(dT) as the template-primer than with poly(rC)-oligo(dG) or poly(rI)-oligo(dC).

  4. Oral lesions and conditions associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection in 300 south Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, K; Reddy, B V; Kumarasamy, N; Solomon, S; Viswanathan, R; Johnson, N W

    2000-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a major health problem in India. The National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) of India reports a seropositivity of 25.03 per thousand for the whole country, as of October 1999. In spite of this high prevalence there are very few reports of oral lesions and conditions in Indian HIV/AIDS patients, which are important in early diagnosis and management of these patients. The present report describes the oral lesions in 300 HIV positive symptomatic patients presenting to us at RAGAS-YRG CARE, a non-governmental organisation in Chennai, South India, over a period of 9 months in 1998. Lesions were diagnosed on clinical appearance using international criteria. Of the 300 patients 89% had acquired the infection through heterosexual contact. There were 205 males and 95 females, aged from 7 months to 72 years. Forty-seven percent of the patients were in the age group 21-30 years. CD4 counts were ascertained for 105 patients, 64 (62%) had CD4 counts oral lesion when examined. Gingivitis (47%) and pseudomembranous candidiasis (33%) were the most common oral lesions. The other oral lesions seen were oral mucosal pigmentation (23%), erythematous candidiasis (14%), periodontitis (9%), angular cheilitis (8%), oral ulcers (3%), oral hairy leukoplakia (3%), hyperplastic candidiasis (1%), oral submucous fibrosis (2%) and one case of leukoplakia. Oral lesions occur commonly in HIV infection. A comprehensive oral examination may not only suggest HIV disease but may also be useful in monitoring the disease progression. This is a cost-effective procedure, which may be useful in screening large populations in developing countries like India.

  5. Epidemiology and outcome of infections in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus-coinfected liver transplant recipients: a FIPSE/GESIDA prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, A.; Cervera, C.; Fortun, J.; Blanes, M.; Montejo, E.; Abradelo, M.; Len, O.; Rafecas, A.; Martin-Davila, P.; Torre-Cisneros, J.; Salcedo, M.; Cordero, E.; Lozano, R.; Perez, I.; Rimola, A.; Miro, J.M.; Barrera, P.

    2012-01-01

    Information about infections unrelated to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected liver recipients is scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence, clinical characteristics, time of onset, and outcomes of bacterial, viral, and fungal

  6. Production of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus in human and nonhuman cells transfected with an infectious molecular clone.

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, A; Gendelman, H E; Koenig, S.; Folks, T; Willey, R; Rabson, A; Martin, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    We constructed an infectious molecular clone of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus. Upon transfection, this clone directed the production of infectious virus particles in a wide variety of cells in addition to human T4 cells. The progeny, infectious virions, were synthesized in mouse, mink, monkey, and several human non-T cell lines, indicating the absence of any intracellular obstacle to viral RNA or protein production or assembly. During the course of these studies, a ...

  7. Proviral Progeny of Heterodimeric Virions Reveal a High Crossover Rate for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Lee, Hui-Ling Rose; Ron, Yacov; Dougherty, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS in humans, exhibits a very high rate of recombination. Bearing in mind the significant epidemiological and clinical contrast between HIV-2 and HIV-1 as well as the critical role that recombination plays in viral evolution, we examined the nature of HIV-2 recombination. Towards this end, a strategy was devised to measure the rate of crossover of HIV-2 by evaluating recombinant progeny produced exclusively by heterodimeric...

  8. Detection of early antibodies in human immunodeficiency virus infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and radioimmunoprecipitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Saah, A J; Farzadegan, H; Fox, R; Nishanian, P; Rinaldo, C R; Phair, J P; Fahey, J L; Lee, T H; Polk, B F

    1987-01-01

    A current concept of the serological response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans is that antibodies to core antigens (p55, p24, and p15) are detectable earlier during initial stages of antibody production than antibodies against envelope antigens (gp160, gp120, and gp41). Comparative studies of Western blot (immunoblot), radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) during initial antibody production are limited to case reports and...

  9. Effects of G-CSF on telomere lengths in PBMCs from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Schjerling, P

    2000-01-01

    Telomeres are unique terminal chromosomal structures, the length of which has been shown to decrease with cell division in vitro and with increased age in vivo for human somatic cells. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, decrease of telomere length is primarily found in CD8+ T cell...... that during G-CSF treatment lymphocytes are recruited by a combination of central and peripheral proliferation....

  10. The physical activity levels among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome receiving high active antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, J M; Murenzi, A

    2013-01-01

    The accessibility of high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for local human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients is improving in Rwanda. It is well known that this therapy is associated with serious adverse effects, such as metabolic and morphologic changes. One of the recommended preventive modalities for these complications is participation in physical activity. The current study aims to determine the anthropometric profile and physical activity levels among people living with HIV and receiving HAART in Kigali, Rwanda. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive quantitative survey. The participant's levels of physical activity participation and their association with anthropometric profiles were measured, using a structured self-administered questionnaire for 407 clients passing through the clinics. Of the participants, approximately 70% were inactive and in addition, 40% were obese and 43% overweight. Obesity was found to be strongly associated with inactivity. Lack of motivation, and time as well as fear of worsening the disease were found to be barriers to participation in physical activity.

  11. Influence of human leukocyte antigen-B22 alleles on the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in 3 cohorts of white men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorak, M. Tevfik; Tang, Jianming; Tang, Shenghui; Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Coutinho, Roel A.; Goedert, James J.; Detels, Roger; Kaslow, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B22 serogroup--which consists of the alleles B*54, B*55, and B*56--has been associated with rapidly progressive disease in white patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Subjects from 3 cohorts of men who have sex with men (N=671), all of whom

  12. env Sequences of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses from Chimpanzees in Cameroon Are Strongly Related to Those of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Group N from the Same Geographic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Sylvie; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela C.; Versmisse, Pierre; Delarue, Severine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Lewis, John; Brunak, Soren; Martin, Paul; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise; Simon, François; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise; Mauclere, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group N from Cameroon is phylogenetically close, in env, to the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) cpz-gab from Gabon and SIVcpz-US of unknown geographic origin. We screened 29 wild-born Cameroonian chimpanzees and found that three (Cam3, Cam4, and Cam5) were positive for HIV-1 by Western blotting. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that Cam3 and Cam5 belonged to Pan troglodytes troglodytes and that Cam4 belonged to P. t. vellerosus. Genetic analyses of the viruses together with serological data demonstrated that at least one of the two P. t. troglodytes chimpanzees (Cam5) was infected in the wild, and revealed a horizontal transmission between Cam3 and Cam4. These data confirm that P. t. troglodytes is a natural host for HIV-1-related viruses. Furthermore, they show that SIVcpz can be transmitted in captivity, from one chimpanzee subspecies to another. All three SIVcpz-cam viruses clustered with HIV-1 N in env. The full Cam3 SIVcpz genome sequence showed a very close phylogenetic relationship with SIVcpz-US, a virus identified in a P. t. troglodytes chimpanzee captured nearly 40 years earlier. Like SIVcpz-US, SIVcpz-cam3 was closely related to HIV-1 N in env, but not in pol, supporting the hypothesis that HIV-1 N results from a recombination event. SIVcpz from chimpanzees born in the wild in Cameroon are thus strongly related in env to HIV-1 N from Cameroon, demonstrating the geographic coincidence of these human and simian viruses and providing a further strong argument in favor of the origin of HIV-1 being in chimpanzees. PMID:10590144

  13. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoxia; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Weihong; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cui, Jingtao; Yan, Wenjuan; Ni, Anping

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health. Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010-2011). Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting. Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively) than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively). The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%), Emergency (1.71%), and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12%) departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60-70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. During 2010-2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection increased (with higher

  14. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxia Xu

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health.Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010-2011. Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting.Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively. The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%, Emergency (1.71%, and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12% departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60-70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.During 2010-2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection increased (with

  15. Characterization of the Outer Domain of the gp120 Glycoprotein from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzhen; Tomov, Vesko; Kurteva, Svetla; Wang, Liping; Ren, Xinping; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Sodroski, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The core of the gp120 glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is comprised of three major structural domains: the outer domain, the inner domain, and the bridging sheet. The outer domain is exposed on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer and contains binding surfaces for neutralizing antibodies such as 2G12, immunoglobulin G1b12, and anti-V3 antibodies. We expressed the outer domain of HIV-1YU2 gp120 as an independent protein, termed OD1. OD1 efficiently bound 2G12 and a large number of anti-V3 antibodies, indicating its structural integrity. Immunochemical studies with OD1 indicated that antibody responses against the outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein are rare in HIV-1-infected human sera that potently neutralize the virus. Surprisingly, such outer-domain-directed antibody responses are commonly elicited by immunization with recombinant monomeric gp120. Immunization with soluble, stabilized HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers elicited antibody responses that more closely resembled those in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. These results underscore the qualitatively different humoral immune responses elicited during natural infection and after gp120 vaccination and help to explain the failure of gp120 as an effective vaccine. PMID:15542649

  16. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  17. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than.......01). Patients reported improvements of lipodystrophy, which was supported by a decreased waist-to-thigh ratio (P = 0.01), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.06). Ratio of peripheral to trunk soft tissue mass increased (P = 0.01, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans) and a trend towards reduction......' treatment of lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients with hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), increased total and free IGF-I twofold and appeared safe and tolerable. The potential of low-dose hGH in the treatment of HIV-lipodystrophy awaits examination by placebo-controlled, randomized trials....

  18. Maternal biochemical serum screening for Down syndrome in pregnancy with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meaux, Jean-Patrick; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Schmitz, Thomas; Fulla, Yvonne; Launay, Odile; Goffinet, François; Azria, Elie

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the influence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy on maternal serum markers levels and the false-positive rate with biochemical maternal serum screening for Down syndrome. We performed a 1:1 matched case-control study comparing 132 HIV-infected women with single pregnancy to controls selected among non-HIV-infected women matched on geographical origin and fetal sex. Of HIV-infected women, 47.7% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Groups did not differ in multiples of the median (MoM) levels of total human chorionic gonadotrophin. The MoM alpha fetoprotein level did not differ between total HIV-infected women and control women but was significantly lower for untreated HIV-positive women compared with control women (0.91 compared with 1.03 MoM, PHIV-positive women (0.91 compared with 1.18 MoM, Pfalse-positive rate of biochemical screening did not differ between groups. Untreated HIV infection is associated with lower maternal serum alpha fetoprotein levels. Nevertheless, the false-positive rate of double-marker second-trimester Down syndrome serum screening did not appear to be affected in our sample of HIV-infected women, whether women were receiving antiretroviral therapy at the time of the test or not.

  19. Identification of cellular proteins required for replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Natallia; Ferguson, Monique R; O'Brien, William A; Sanchez, Anthony; Prussia, Andrew J; McDonald, Natalie J; Friedrich, Brian M; Li, Guangyu; Shaw, Michael W; Sheng, Jinsong; Hodge, Thomas W; Rubin, Donald H; Murray, James L

    2012-10-01

    Cellular proteins are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and may serve as viable new targets for treating infection. Using gene trap insertional mutagenesis, a high-throughput approach based on random inactivation of cellular genes, candidate genes were found that limit virus replication when mutated. Disrupted genes (N=87) conferring resistance to lytic infection with several viruses were queried for an affect on HIV-1 replication by utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens in TZM-bl cells. Several genes regulating diverse pathways were found to be required for HIV-1 replication, including DHX8, DNAJA1, GTF2E1, GTF2E2, HAP1, KALRN, UBA3, UBE2E3, and VMP1. Candidate genes were independently tested in primary human macrophages, toxicity assays, and/or Tat-dependent β-galactosidase reporter assays. Bioinformatics analyses indicated that several host factors present in this study participate in canonical pathways and functional processes implicated in prior genome-wide studies. However, the genes presented in this study did not share identity with those found previously. Novel antiviral targets identified in this study should open new avenues for mechanistic investigation.

  20. Natural killer cell biology illuminated by primary immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Matthias; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cytotoxic effector cells well known for their role in antiviral immunity and tumor immunosurveillance. In parts, this knowledge stems from rare inherited immunodeficiency disorders in humans that abrogate NK cell function leading to immune impairments, most notably associated with a high susceptibility to viral infections. Phenotypically, these disorders range from deficiencies selectively affecting NK cells to complex general immune defects that affect NK cells but also other immune cell subsets. Moreover, deficiencies may be associated with reduced NK cell numbers or rather impair specific NK cell effector functions. In recent years, genetic defects underlying the various NK cell deficiencies have been uncovered and have triggered investigative efforts to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders. Here we review the associations between inherited human diseases and NK cell development as well as function, with a particular focus on defects in NK cell exocytosis and cytotoxicity. Furthermore we outline how reports of diverse genetic defects have shaped our understanding of NK cell biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Functional restoration of human immunodeficiency virus and Epstein-Barr virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with an increase in CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostense, Stefan; Otto, Sigrid A.; Knol, Gerlinde J.; Manting, Erik H.; Nanlohy, Nening M.; Jansen, Christine; Lange, Joep M. A.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Miedema, Frank; van Baarle, Debbie

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on HIV- and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific CD8(+) T cells, total number and function of these cells was determined in 16 HIV-infected individuals using tetrameric HLA-peptide complexes and IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays after

  2. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence in an unbooked obstetric population in the Niger Delta

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    Chris I Akani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chris I Akani1, Erhabor Osaro2, Dennis O Allagoa11Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Hematology, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, NigeriaAbstract: Despite recent advances in the prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection from mother to child during pregnancy, infants continue to be born and infected with HIV, particularly in Africa. This study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of HIV infection among unbooked pregnant women in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. One hundred and eighteen consecutively recruited unbooked subjects presenting to the isolation ward at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were screened for HIV. Among the 118 subjects studied, 30 (25.4% were positive for HIV. HIV-1 was the predominant viral strain. Gestational age of subjects at presentation was 28–40 weeks and mean age was 35.04 ± 8.06 years. The majority of subjects were primigravidas 66 (55.9%, while 52 (44.1% were multigravidas. The prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among unbooked pregnant women with less formal education: 14 (11.9% compared with 9 (7.6%, 5 (4.2%, and 2 (1.7% for those with primary, secondary, and tertiary education, respectively (P = 0.01. Among the occupational groups, the prevalence of HIV was significantly higher among traders 14 (11.9% than in career women 5 (4.2%, P = 0.04. Multigravid women were more susceptible to HIV infection 17 (14.4% than primigravid women. Perinatal mortality and emergency cesarean section was high among unbooked pregnant women. The prevalence of HIV observed amongst unbooked antenatal subjects in this study is significantly higher than those of booked patients in previous studies. These findings are very pertinent to health care delivery, because this pool of unbooked patients may not be benefiting from the Prevention of Maternal to Child Transmission program, thus increasing the pediatric HIV burden in our environment

  4. Acceptance of referral for partners by clients testing positive for human immunodeficiency virus

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    Netsanet F

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetene Netsanet,1 Ayalew Dessie21IMA World Health SuddHealth Multi Donor Trust Fund-Basic Package of Health Services Project, Juba, South Sudan; 2United States Agency for International Development, Private Health Sector Program, Abt Associates Inc, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaBackground: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive individuals who do not disclose their HIV status to their partners are more likely to present late for HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS care than those who have disclosed their HIV status to their partners. A major area of challenge with regards to HIV counseling for clients is disclosure of their HIV status to their partners. The main methods of partner notification are patient referral, provider referral, contract referral, and outreach assistance. The emphasis on a plausible and comprehensive partner referral strategy for widespread positive case detection in resource-limited countries needs to be thought out and developed.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted among newly HIV-positive clients to identify partners for notification and acceptance of referral by their partners. Health service providers working in HIV testing and counseling clinics were also provided with semistructured questionnaires in order to assess their view towards partner notification strategies for clients testing positive for HIV.Results: Fifteen newly diagnosed HIV-positive clients were counseled to provide referral slips to their partners. All clients agreed and took the referral card. However, only eight were willing and actually provided the card to their partners. Five of the eight partners of clients who tested HIV-positive and who were provided with referral cards responded to the referral and were tested for HIV. Three were positive and two were negative. Nine of 11 counselors did not agree to requesting partner locator information from HIV-positive clients for contractual referral and/or outreach assistance. The findings

  5. Estimation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Manipur

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    Singh H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To estimate and stratify CD4 + and CD8 + T-lymphocyte levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected (asymptomatic and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients (symptomatic and correlate the clinical features of the patients with CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte level. Methods : Between April 2002 and September 2003, a total of 415 HIV seropositive adult patients (297 males and 118 females attending Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS hospitals were tested for CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS counter (Becton Dickinson. Symptomatic patients were diagnosed as per NACO clinical case definition. Results : Ranges of 0-50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-300, 301-400, 401-500 and above 500 CD4+ T-lymphocyte per microlitre were seen in 68, 52, 101, 73, 47, 31 and 43 patients respectively whereas CD8+ T-lymphocyte ranges of 0-300, 301-600, 601-900, 901-1500, 1501-2000, 2001-3500 per microlitre were seen in 29, 84, 92, 145, 40 and 25 patients respectively. One hundred and fifty patients were asymptomatic and 265 were symptomatic. CD4/CD8 ratio in asymptomatics and symptomatics were 0.13-1.69 and 0.01-0.93 respectively. Tuberculosis and candidiasis occurred in CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories between 0-400 cells per mL in symptomatics. However, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, herpes zoster, cryptococcal meningitis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, penicilliosis and cytomegalovirus retinitis were seen in patients having CD4+ T-lymphocyte less than 200 per mL. Conclusions : CD4+ T-lymphocyte was decreased in both asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV patients, The decrease was greater in symptomatics while CD8+ T-lymphocyte was increased in both except advanced stage symptomatics. CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in both groups. Opportunistic infections correlated with different CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories.

  6. Food Security in Households of People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study in a Subdivision of Darjeeling District, West Bengal.

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    Dasgupta, Pallabi; Bhattacherjee, Sharmistha; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) adversely impacts food security in households of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Little research has focused on food insecurity among PLWHA in India. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of and factors relating to food security in households of PLWHA in the Siliguri subdivision of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out among 173 PLWHA residing in Siliguri and registered at the Anti-retroviral Therapy Centre of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Data was collected at the household level with interviews of PLWHA using a food security survey instrument. We analyzed the associations using logistic regression. The prevalence of household food security among the participants was 50.9% (88/173). Five years or more of schooling, higher socioeconomic class and males were found to be significantly associated with a higher likelihood of food security. A later stage of the disease and the presence of other family members with HIV/AIDS were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of food security. The major coping strategies to deal with food insecurity in the acute phase HIV infection included borrowing money (56.1%), followed by spousal support, loans from microfinance institutions, banks, or money lenders, borrowing food, or selling agricultural products. The present study revealed that only about half of households with PLWHA were food secure. Prior interventions relating to periods of food and economic crisis as well as strategies for sustaining food security and economic status are needed in this area.

  7. Intracranial Aneurysms Involving Circle of Willis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Vasculitis- A Rare Case Report.

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    Lahoti, Amol Madanlal; Taori, Abhijit Kishor; Dhok, Avinash Parashuram; Rawat, Jitesh Subhash; Chandak, Nihar Umakant

    2017-07-01

    Intracranial Arterial Aneurysms (IAAs) are relatively rare in paediatric population and they account for at least 10%-15% of haemorrhagic strokes which occur during the first two decades of life. Here we present a unique and unusual case of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected child who presented with intracranial aneurysms with formation of collaterals and vasculopathy, demonstrating low viral count despite receiving adequate antiretroviral treatment. Intracranial vascular involvement, their complications and its incidence in these patients may become increasingly common as the management of human immunodeficiency virus infection continues to improve and afflicted patients survive for longer periods because of advancement in the antiretroviral treatment. Diagnosing aneurysm of cerebral circulation needs high degree of suspicion and correlation between clinical and radiological findings.

  8. Quality of life, socioeconomic profile, knowledge and attitude toward sexuality from the perspectives of individuals living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

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    Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Gosuen, Gisele Cristina; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Fram, Dayana Souza; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Belasco, Angélica Gonçalves Silva

    2015-01-01

    to analyze the quality of life of "patients" with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and relate it to their socioeconomic profile, knowledge and attitudes toward sexuality. crosssectional and analytical study with 201 individuals who are 50 years old or older. The Targeted Quality of Life and Aging Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Scales were applied during interviews. Multiple Linear Regression was used in data analysis. dimensions of quality of life more strongly compromised were disclosure worries (39.0), sexual function (45.9), and financial worries (55.6). Scores concerning knowledge and attitudes toward sexuality were 31.7 and 14.8, respectively. There was significant correlation between attitudes and the domains of overall function, health worries, medication worries, and HIV mastery. guidance concerning how the disease is transmitted, treated and how it progresses, in addition to providing social and psychological support, could minimize the negative effects of the disease on the quality of life of patients living with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

  9. Induction of Murine Mucosal CCR5-Reactive Antibodies as an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barassi, C.; Soprana, E.; Pastori, C.; Longhi, R.; Buratti, E.; Lillo, F.; Marenzi, C.; Lazzarin, A.; Siccardi, A. G.; Lopalco, L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mucosa is the main site of initial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contact with its host. In spite of repeated sexual exposure, some individuals remain seronegative, and a small fraction of them produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA autoantibodies directed against CCR5, which is probably the cause of the CCR5-minus phenotype observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects. These antibodies recognize the 89-to-102 extracellular loop of CCR5 in its native conformation. The aim of this study was to induce infection-preventing mucosal anti-CCR5 autoantibodies in individuals at high risk of HIV infection. Thus, we generated chimeric immunogens containing the relevant CCR5 peptide in the context of the capsid protein of Flock House virus, a presentation system in which it is possible to engineer conformationally constrained peptide in a highly immunogenic form. Administered in mice via the systemic or mucosal route, the immunogens elicited anti-CCR5 IgG and IgA (in sera and vaginal fluids). Analogous to exposed seronegative individuals, mice producing anti-CCR5 autoantibodies express significantly reduced levels of CCR5 on the surfaces of CD4+ cells from peripheral blood and vaginal washes. In vitro studies have shown that murine IgG and IgA (i) specifically bind human and mouse CD4+ lymphocytes and the CCR5-transfected U87 cell line, (ii) down-regulate CCR5 expression of CD4+ cells from both humans and untreated mice, (iii) inhibit Mip-1β chemotaxis of CD4+ CCR5+ lymphocytes, and (iv) neutralize HIV R5 strains. These data suggest that immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV-protective immunity. PMID:15890924

  10. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

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    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  11. Malignancies and infection due to the human immunodeficiency virus. Are these emerging diseases?

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    Valencia Ortega, M E

    2017-09-02

    Since the start of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, tumour disease among patients has been significant. The collection of malignancies can be divided primarily into 2 groups: those associated with HIV (all of which are related to viral diseases) and those not associated with HIV (only some of which are associated with viral diseases). The origin of these malignancies is multifactorial, and the main causes that have led to an increase in tumour disease are immunosuppression, coinfection with oncogenic viruses and life prolongation secondary to the use of antiretroviral therapy. Establishing the general characteristics of the undiagnosed AIDS tumours is difficult, mainly because they are a highly heterogeneous group formed by malignancies of a diverse nature. The treatments do not differ from those used in the general population, although the management can be more difficult due to the late diagnosis, drug interactions and associated comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Alopecia areata and vitiligo as primary presentations in a young male with human immunodeficiency virus

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    Li Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old Chinese male consulted with the team regarding his alopecia areata and vitiligo for which previous treatment was ineffective. The patient, a homosexual man, denied having a history of drug abuse and of blood transfusion. No member of his family had vitiligo or alopecia. Laboratory studies revealed that the serum for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibody was positive. The patient′s CD4 lymphocyte count and CD4/CD8 ratio were both strikingly low (20 cells/mL and 0.04, but no other complaints or opportunistic infections were reported. One month after antiretroviral therapy, the patient′s alopecia areata dramatically improved, but no evident improvement in his vitiligo was found. This case is a very rare case of alopecia areata and vitiligo associated with HIV infection that might be attributed to the generation and maintenance of self-reactive CD8+ T-cells due to chronic immune activation with progressive immune exhaustion in HIV infection.

  13. Performances of four fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus-1 screening assays.

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    Song, Eun Young; Hur, Mina; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo Min

    2012-12-01

    Fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) screening assays have improved sensitivity, but vary in performance characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different fourth-generation HIV-1 assays. These assays included the AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab Combo (Abbott diagnostics, Delkenheim, Germany), ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo (Abbott), Elecsys 2010 HIV Combi (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany), and Elecsys HIV Combi PT (Roche). A total of 1,306 samples that included 1,225 clinical samples and 81 samples consisting of seroconversion panels, an HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity panel, and dilution series of HIV-1 lysates and HIV-1 antibodies were tested. All of the assays had sensitivities of 100% on clinical samples. The specificities of the AxSYM, ARCHITECT, Elecsys 2010 HIV Combi, and Elecsys HIV Combi PT were 99.6, 99.6, 99.0, and 99.5%, respectively. Of the 81 samples with different levels of HIV antigen or antibody and/or subtypes, Elecsys HIV Combi PT and ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo showed better analytical sensitivities than the other two assays. In summary, the performance characteristics of AxSYM, ARCHITECT, and Elecsys HIV Combi PT were comparable and satisfactory for clinical samples. ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo and Elecsys HIV Combi PT have the higher analytical sensitivities, and would be preferable for reducing the window period. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of performance of human immunodeficiency virus antigen/antibody combination assays in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kai; Kao, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Pi-Han; Huang, Hui-Lin; Ho, Shu-Yuan; Wong, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Bo-Chang; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Lee, Chia-Yeh; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Chun-Nan; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yang, Jyh-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) combination assay, which can simultaneously detect the presence of anti-HIV antibody and HIV antigen, has been shown to shorten the window period in HIV diagnosis compared with the third-generation HIV antibody immunoassay. This study was aimed to determine the performance of HIV combination assays in Taiwan, where the HIV-1 seroprevalence is 0.007% and HIV-2 infection has never been reported. Performance of three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays (Dia.Pro, Wantai, and Bio-Rad) and one third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay (AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO) was assessed. A total of 152 specimens, including 86 confirmed HIV-seropositive and 66 HIV-seronegative samples, were used in the study. The sensitivity of four assays varied from 98.8% to 100%, and specificity varied from 98.5% to 100%. Performance of the 75 equivocal samples, the HIV status of which was confirmed later, in terms of negative prediction varied from 81.8% to 87.5%. The Bio-Rad and Dia.Pro assays exhibited higher sensitivity for the detection of p24 antigen among the three fourth-generation HIV combination assays. The three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays exhibited better sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction than the third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) related lymphomas, pathology view point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke-Serinsöz, Ebru; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2017-07-01

    The contribution of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) to the development of specific types of malignant lymphomas occurring in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) setting has been extensively studied since the beginning of the HIV epidemic 35 years ago. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) in 1996 has changed dramatically the incidence of HIV-related malignancies. Nevertheless, malignant lymphomas continue to be the major group of malignances observed in HIV infected individuals, and the most common cause of cancer related-deaths. Common features of the predominant B-cell lymphomas in the HIV + setting are the frequent plasmacytoid morphology of the neoplastic cells, advanced stage, aggressive disease and frequent extranodal involvement. In this article, we review the evolving concepts and definitions of the various EBV-associated lymphomas in HIV + patients, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, classical Hodgkin lymphoma, plasmablastic lymphoma and primary effusion lymphoma. The current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of these malignancies, the interplay between HIV and EBV co-infection in the development of certain HIV related lymphomas, and the emerging paradigm that suggests that HIV may play a direct role in lymphomagenesis are explored as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The lived experiences of rural women diagnosed with the human immunodeficiency virus in the antenatal period.

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    Fords, Genevieve Marion; Crowley, Talitha; van der Merwe, Anita S

    2017-12-01

    In South Africa, pregnant women are diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at antenatal clinics and simultaneously initiated on antiretroviral treatment (ART). An HIV diagnosis together with the initiation of ART has an emotional impact that may influence how pregnant women cope with pregnancy and their adherence to a treatment plan. The aim of the study was to explore the lived experiences of women diagnosed with HIV in the antenatal period in a rural area in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. A qualitative approach with a descriptive phenomenological design was utilised. The study applied purposive sampling to select participants from a local community clinic in the Eastern Cape. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework. Four themes formed the essential structure of the phenomenon being investigated: a reality that hits raw, a loneliness that hurts, hope for a fractured tomorrow and support of a few. Although the participants had to accept the harsh reality of being diagnosed with HIV and experienced loneliness and the support of only a few people, they had hope to live and see the future of their children. Women diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy are ultimately concerned with the well-being of their unborn children, and this concern motivates their adherence to ART. Women's lived experiences are situated in their unique sociocultural context, and although some known challenges remain, counselling and support strategies need to be informed by exploring context-specific issues and involving the local community.

  17. Multimodal imaging of a humanized orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Heuillard, Emilie; Lindner, Véronique; Bou About, Ghina; Ignat, Mihaela; Dillenseger, Jean-Philippe; Anton, Nicolas; Dalimier, Eugénie; Gossé, Francine; Fouré, Gael; Blindauer, Franck; Giraudeau, Céline; El-Saghire, Hussein; Bouhadjar, Mourad; Calligaro, Cynthia; Sorg, Tania; Choquet, Philippe; Vandamme, Thierry; Ferrand, Christophe; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F; Diana, Michele; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2016-10-14

    The development of multimodal strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma requires tractable animal models allowing for advanced in vivo imaging. Here, we characterize an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model based on the injection of luciferase-expressing human hepatoma Huh-7 (Huh-7-Luc) cells in immunodeficient mice. Luciferase allows for an easy repeated monitoring of tumor growth by in vivo bioluminescence. The intrahepatic injection was more efficient than intrasplenic or intraportal injection in terms of survival, rate of orthotopic engraftment, and easiness. A positive correlation between luciferase activity and tumor size, evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, allowed to define the endpoint value for animal experimentation with this model. Response to standard of care, sorafenib or doxorubicin, were similar to those previously reported in the literature, with however a strong toxicity of doxorubicin. Tumor vascularization was visible by histology seven days after Huh-7-Luc transplantation and robustly developed at day 14 and day 21. The model was used to explore different imaging modalities, including microtomography, probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy, full-field optical coherence tomography, and ultrasound imaging. Tumor engraftment was similar after echo-guided intrahepatic injection as after laparotomy. Collectively, this orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model enables the in vivo evaluation of chemotherapeutic and surgical approaches using multimodal imaging.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus in oral mucosa from human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

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    Larissa Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the detection rate of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is higher in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In an attempt to contribute to our epidemiological understanding of this coinfection and to investigate the activity of EBV in normal oral mucosa, we performed a cross-sectional study with HIV-positive patients. Methods: oral smears from 145 HIV-positive patients were collected between March 2010 and March 2011. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR were used to genotype EBV and to detect EBNA-2 expression, respectively. Results: EBV DNA was detected in 48.3% of the study participants, of whom 32.85% were EBV-1 and 45.71% were EBV-2 carriers. Additionally, 14.28% were coinfected with both types. EBNA-2 mRNA was expressed in 45.7% of the EBV -positive samples, including 20.0% with EBV-1 only, 20.0% with EBV-2 only and 1.4% with both genotypes. Immune status affected the overall EBV infection, and EBV-2 positivity was significantly correlated with sexual lifestyle of the participants. EBV co-infection with both viral types was dependent upon HIV viral load and the activity of the EBNA-2 gene. Conclusion: we report a high prevalence of active EBV in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic HIV-seropositive individuals. This study addresses the need for monitoring and treatment of HIV-infected patients with EBV reactivation.

  19. [Challenges of lopinavir/ritonavir in the chronicity of human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirrebengoa, Koldo

    2014-11-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased patient survival, which is currently similar to that of the general population in western countries. However, ART is unable to completely restore normal health, given the persistence of chronic immune activation. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become a chronic disease and 50% of patients will soon be older than 50 years. Currently, there is a debate on the possibility of accelerated aging in the HIV-infected population. An overlap has been observed between chronic inflammation, age-related comorbidities, lifestyle, and the long-term toxicity of ART. ART-related toxicity can encourage the development of comorbidities, especially cardiovascular and renal complications, while toxicity-especially that of thymidine analogs-can also contribute to inflammation and aging. Evidence is available on simplification strategies with boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy aiming to avoid or reduce potential or demonstrated toxicity. Currently, studies are underway of dual therapy strategies with lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) with distinct antiretroviral agents. The studies with the largest samples are those with raltegravir and lamivudine. The GARDEL trial has demonstrated that dual therapy with LPV/r plus a generic drug such as lamivudine is non-inferior to triple therapy in treatment- naïve patients. All of the above indicates the response to the challenge posed to LPV/r by the chronic phase of the disease and by the need to reduce costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. [Polymorphism of CXCR4 coding region of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Chinese Han people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-xu; Wang, Fu-sheng; Hong, Wei-guo; Wang, Bo; Jin, Lei; Lei, Zhou-yun; Hou, Jing

    2003-06-01

    To study the polymorphism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor CXCR4 in Chinese Han ethnic group for AIDS prevention and treatment. Totally 48 individuals were enrolled into the study. CXCR4 (cDNA No-AF147204) was cloned by PCR amplification using 2 pairs of primers, then sequenced using sequencing primers. The results of the same sequencing primers were analyzed by DNAstar software to find and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. Totally 7 SNPs were found in the coding region of CXCR4, among them 3 were synonymous mutation (C-->T at loci 129, 426 and 968), 3 were missense mutation (C-->T at locus 38, A-->T at locus 90, and A-->C at locus 712) and 1 was stop mutation (C-->T at 106, which converted the codon for glutamic acid into stop codon). The polymorphism of CXCR4 coding region in Chinese Han is probably different from that of the other ethnic groups. Six of the 7 SNPs were discovered for the first time. Their influences on AIDS progression are worthy of studying.

  1. Practical Review of Recognition and Management of Obesity and Lipohypertrophy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jordan E; Stanley, Takara L; Apovian, Caroline M; Bhasin, Shalendar; Brown, Todd T; Capeau, Jaqueline; Currier, Judith S; Dube, Michael P; Falutz, Julian; Grinspoon, Steven K; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Martinez, Esteban; McComsey, Grace A; Sattler, Fred R; Erlandson, Kristine M

    2017-05-15

    Obesity and lipohypertrophy are common in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and contribute to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We present a consensus opinion on the diagnosis, clinical consequences, and treatment of excess adiposity in adults with treated HIV infection. Obesity and lipohypertrophy commonly occur among HIV-infected adults on ART and may have overlapping pathophysiologies and/or synergistic metabolic consequences. Traditional, HIV-specific, and ART-specific risk factors all contribute. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of excess adiposity are critical drivers of non-AIDS events in this population. Although promising treatment strategies exist, further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiology and optimal treatment of obesity and lipohypertrophy in the modern ART era. Both generalized obesity and lipohypertrophy are prevalent among HIV-infected persons on ART. Aggressive diagnosis and management are key to the prevention and treatment of end-organ disease in this population and critical to the present and future health of HIV-infected persons.

  2. Oligomerization within Virions and Subcellular Localization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Caroline; Schwartz, Olivier; Mammano, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Previous biochemical and genetic evidence indicated that the functional form of retroviral integrase protein (IN) is a multimer. A direct demonstration of IN oligomerization during the infectious cycle was, however, missing, due to the absence of a sensitive detection method. We describe here the generation of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral clones carrying IN protein tagged with highly antigenic epitopes. In this setting, we could readily visualize IN both in producer cells and in viral particles. More interestingly, we detected IN oligomers, the formation of which was dependent on disulfide bridges and took place inside virions. Additionally, expression of a tagged HIV-1 IN in the absence of other viral components resulted in almost exclusive nuclear accumulation of the protein. Mutation of a conserved cysteine in the proposed dimer interface determined the loss of viral infectivity, associated with a reduction of IN oligomer formation and the redistribution of the mutated protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Epitope tagging of HIV-1 IN expressed alone or in the context of a replication-competent viral clone provides powerful tools to validate debated issues on the implication of this enzyme in different steps of the viral cycle. PMID:10233971

  3. Leprosy and infection with the human immunodeficiency virus in Uganda; a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawuma, H J; Bwire, R; Adatu-Engwau, F

    1994-12-01

    Both leprosy and infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are endemic in Uganda. Various speculations about a possible interaction between the two infections have been put forward but not confirmed. A case-control study involving 189 new leprosy patients and 481 matched controls, resident in eight Ugandan districts, was carried out to investigate if any relationship exists between leprosy and infection with HIV-1 in Uganda. Serum samples from 23 (12.2%) of the 189 leprosy patients tested positive for HIV-1 antibodies as compared to 88 (18.3%) of the 481 control sera. The two proportions of HIV seropositivity are not different statistically. A stratified analysis of the data by districts was done and showed a negative relationship between leprosy and HIV infection in the case of Rakai District (0.04 studies seeking to observe the clinical progress of dually infected patients might help to reveal new knowledge about a possible relationship between HIV and leprosy and about the immunology of leprosy in general.

  4. The Great Impostor: Transaminitis Masking the Coinfection of Syphilis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    Sunit Tolia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of syphilis continues to rise in the United States over the past 15 years. This disease process is classified into stages and may present with a coinfection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. Case Report. We present a case of a 32-year-old African American male who presented with cutaneous manifestations of secondary syphilis and transaminitis. A workup revealed that the transaminitis was secondary to underlying syphilitic hepatitis in the presence of HIV coinfection. The patient had a reactive rapid plasma reagin (RPR of 1 : 64 TU and reactive Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA. Lab findings showed alkaline phosphate (ALP of 648 unit/L, aspartate aminotransferase (AST of 251 unit/L, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT of 409 unit/L. Conclusion. Syphilitic hepatitis is a recognized entity in the medical literature. It is a manifestation of secondary syphilis and it is more commonly seen in coinfected patients with both syphilis and HIV. Therefore, primary care physicians should keep infectious etiologies (e.g., syphilis and HIV in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with unexplained liver dysfunction in a cholestatic pattern.

  5. Neuropathological sequelae of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and apathy: A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies.

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    McIntosh, Roger C; Rosselli, Monica; Uddin, Lucina Q; Antoni, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Apathy remains a common neuropsychiatric disturbance in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) despite advances in anti-retroviral treatment (ART). The goal of the current review is to recapitulate findings relating apathy to the deleterious biobehavioral effects of HIV-1 in the post-ART era. Available literatures demonstrate that the emergence of apathy with other neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms may be attributed to neurotoxic effects of viral proliferation, e.g., aggregative effect of Tat and gp120 on apoptosis, transport and other enzymatic reactions amongst dopaminergic neurons and neuroglia. An assortment of neuroimaging modalities converge on the severity of apathy symptoms associated with the propensity of the virus to replicate within frontal-striatal brain circuits that facilitate emotional processing. Burgeoning research into functional brain connectivity also supports the effects of microvascular and neuro-inflammatory injury linked to aging with HIV-1 on the presentation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Summarizing these findings, we review domains of HIV-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric impairment linked to apathy in HIV. Taken together, these lines of research suggest that loss of affective, cognitive and behavioral inertia is commensurate with the neuropathology of HIV-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Longitudinal evolution of bone mineral density and bone markers in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

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    Mondy, Kristin; Yarasheski, Kevin; Powderly, William G; Whyte, Michael; Claxton, Sherry; DeMarco, Debra; Hoffmann, Mary; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-02-15

    The underlying mechanisms of several bone disorders in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and any relation to antiretroviral therapy have yet to be defined. A longitudinal study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in HIV-infected persons; to assess bone mineralization, metabolism, and histomorphometry over time; and to evaluate predisposing factors. A total of 128 patients enrolled the study, and 93 were observed for 72 weeks. "Classic" risk factors (low body mass index, history of weight loss, steroid use, and smoking) for low bone mineral density (BMD) and duration of HIV infection were strongly associated with osteopenia. There was a weak association between low BMD and receipt of treatment with protease inhibitors; this association disappeared after controlling for the above factors. Markers of bone turnover tended to be elevated in the whole cohort but were not associated with low BMD. BMD increased slightly during follow-up. Traditional risk factors and advanced HIV infection play a more significant pathogenic role in the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis associated with HIV infection than do treatment-associated factors.

  7. Association between amebic liver abscess and Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection in Taiwanese subjects

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    Chen Mao-Yuan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Invasive amebiasis is an emerging parasitic disorder in Taiwan, especially in patients diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Thirty-three Taiwanese subjects with amebic liver abscess (ALA were examined and a possible correlation between ALA and HIV infection was investigated. Results Among ALA patients, the proportion of HIV-positive individuals increased during the study period. ALA was the first major clinical presentation in 54% of HIV patients with ALA. Overall, 58% (14/24 of HIV-infected patients had a CD4+ count > 200 cells/μL and 82.1% (23/28 had no concurrent opportunistic infection or other evidence of HIV infection. There was no marked difference in clinical characteristics between HIV-positive and HIV-negative ALA patients except the level of leukocytosis. Conclusion While the clinical characteristics described herein cannot be used to determine whether ALA patients have HIV infection, routine HIV testing is recommended in patients with ALA, even in the absence of HIV symptoms.

  8. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Care Continuum in China: 1985-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ye; Dou, Zhihui; Guo, Wei; Mao, Yurong; Zhang, Fujie; McGoogan, Jennifer M; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Decai; Wu, Yasong; Liu, Zhongfu; Wu, Zunyou

    2017-12-05

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care continuum attrition is a major global public health challenge. Few studies have examined this problem in resource-limited settings. We aimed to assess cumulative, current, and historical achievement along China's HIV continuum of care. A nationwide, serial cross-sectional study of all individuals with HIV infection diagnosed in China between 1 January 1985 and 31 December 2015 was conducted using data from China's HIV/AIDS information systems. Biennial estimates of the number of persons living with HIV were also used. We defined 7 steps in HIV care continuum as infected (estimated), diagnosed, linked, retained, enrolled, receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), and virally suppressed. Cumulative, 30-year performance, and biennial performance during the most recent 10 years were examined. A total of 573529 persons diagnosed with HIV infection were included. Cumulatively, 94% were linked, 88% were retained, 73% were enrolled, 67% were receiving ART, and 44% were suppressed. Greatest attrition was observed for adolescents, minorities, and those who reported injecting drug use as their route of infection. Improvement was observed from 2005 to 2015. As of the end of 2015, 68% among those infected were diagnosed, 67% among diagnosed were receiving ART, and 65% among those receiving ART were virally suppressed. After adjusting for those without viral load testing, the proportion suppressed increased to 89%. Despite dramatic improvements, China faces serious challenges in achieving the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 90-90-90 targets, because of substantial attrition along its continuum of HIV care.

  9. External ophthalmoplegia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineles, Stacy L; Demer, Joseph L; Holland, Gary N; Ransome, Susan S; Bonelli, Laura; Velez, Federico G

    2012-12-01

    On rare occasions, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can develop a disorder similar to chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) while undergoing long-term treatment with antiretroviral therapy. Orbital imaging may help explain the pathogenesis of this abnormality. In this case series, 5 adult patients who presented with a CPEO-like disorder after more than 10 years of antiretroviral therapy and who underwent T1-weighted high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbits and brain were retrospectively identified. Patients also were screened for acetylcholine receptor antibody levels. All patients had bilateral external ophthalmoplegia and blepharoptosis. Acetylcholine receptor antibody titers were not increased. Brain MRI was unremarkable. Orbital MRI showed patchy bright signal inside the extraocular muscles that had conserved volume. Patients with HIV under long-term antiretroviral therapy may develop functional abnormalities of extraocular muscles that are structurally normal in size, that is, changes are similar to those observed in the orbital MRIs of patients with CPEO. This constellation of signs and symptoms suggests a possible role of HIV disease or antiretroviral therapy in the CPEO-like syndrome observed in some HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency

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    Zhuo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the “cytokine storm” is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called “cytokine storm.” In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  11. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Shang, Hong; Jiang, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the "cytokine storm" is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called "cytokine storm." In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  12. Role of cranial computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with generalised seizures

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    Chris van Zyl

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency neuroimaging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients with generalised new onset seizures (NOS and a normal post-ictal neurological examination remains controversial, with the general impression being that emergency imaging is necessary because immunosuppression may blur clinical indicators of acute intracranial pathology. The objectives of our study were to establish whether cranial computed tomography (CT affects the emergency management of HIV-positive patients with generalised NOS and a normal post-ictal neurological examination.Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive observational study. Consecutive HIVpositive patients of 18 years and older, who presented to the Kimberley Hospital Complex’s Emergency Department within 24 hours of their first generalised seizures and who had undergone normal post-ictal neurological examinations, were included. Emergency CT results as well as CD4-count levels were evaluated.Results: A total of 25 HIV-positive patients were included in the study. The results of cranial CT brought about a change in emergency care management in 12% of patients, all of them with CD4 counts below 200 cells/mm3 .Conclusion: We suggest that emergency cranial CT be performed on all HIV-positive patients presenting with generalised NOS and a normal post-ictal neurological examination, particularly if the CD4 count is below 200 cells/mm3.Keywords: HIV; Seizures; CT Brain

  13. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus among young prisoners

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    Mehdi Ataie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Juveniles in custody are affected by sexually transmitted infections due to risky behaviors. Therefore, they have a disproportionate burden of hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In this study, the prevalence and associated characteristics of hepatitis B and HIV infections were assessed in young prisoners. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, prevalence of HBV and HIV infections was assessed among young prisoners during 2008-2009. A checklist consisting of demographic, social, and risk factors was filled out and blood was drawn for their tests. Sera were analyzed for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag, hepatitis B surface antibody (HBs Ab, hepatitis B core antibody (HBc Ab and HIV Ab, and Western blot test was performed on antibody-positive HIV. Results: A total number of 160 young prisoners (147 boys and 13 girls were evaluated. The mean age of the subjects was 16.59 ± 1.24 year. HBs Ag, HBc Ab, HBs Ab, and HIV Ab were detected in 1 (0.63%, 1 (0.63%, 52 (32.5%, and 1 (0.63%, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to national vaccination program against HBV infection, the juvenile prisoners had low prevalence of HBs Ab.

  14. The roles of genetic polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus infection in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Elaine Regina Delicato; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Kallaur, Ana Paula; Flauzino, Tamires; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia has been frequently observed among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and factors related to HIV-1, the host, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are involved in this phenomenon. This study reviews the roles of genetic polymorphisms, HIV-1 infection, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in lipid metabolism. Lipid abnormalities can vary according to the HAART regimen, such as those with protease inhibitors (PIs). However, genetic factors may also be involved in dyslipidemia because not all patients receiving the same HAART regimen and with comparable demographic, virological, and immunological characteristics develop variations in the lipid profile. Polymorphisms in a large number of genes are involved in the synthesis of structural proteins, and enzymes related to lipid metabolism account for variations in the lipid profile of each individual. As some genetic polymorphisms may cause dyslipidemia, these allele variants should be investigated in HIV-1-infected patients to identify individuals with an increased risk of developing dyslipidemia during treatment with HAART, particularly during therapy with PIs. This knowledge may guide individualized treatment decisions and lead to the development of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia in these patients.

  15. The Roles of Genetic Polymorphisms and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Lipid Metabolism

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    Elaine Regina Delicato de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia has been frequently observed among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, and factors related to HIV-1, the host, and antiretroviral therapy (ART are involved in this phenomenon. This study reviews the roles of genetic polymorphisms, HIV-1 infection, and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in lipid metabolism. Lipid abnormalities can vary according to the HAART regimen, such as those with protease inhibitors (PIs. However, genetic factors may also be involved in dyslipidemia because not all patients receiving the same HAART regimen and with comparable demographic, virological, and immunological characteristics develop variations in the lipid profile. Polymorphisms in a large number of genes are involved in the synthesis of structural proteins, and enzymes related to lipid metabolism account for variations in the lipid profile of each individual. As some genetic polymorphisms may cause dyslipidemia, these allele variants should be investigated in HIV-1-infected patients to identify individuals with an increased risk of developing dyslipidemia during treatment with HAART, particularly during therapy with PIs. This knowledge may guide individualized treatment decisions and lead to the development of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia in these patients.

  16. [Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS in terms of reverse transcriptase and molecular evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, H

    1998-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolves rapidly in the host. The computer analysis of the HIV-1 genome has shown that the mutation manner is dependent on oligonucleotide sequences (in particular, six bases long); thus HIV-1 adaptively evolves. The six-base-long interaction between template-primer oligonucleotide and the reverse transcriptase (RT) has been revealed by the crystal structure of RT, in vitro termination assay of plymerization, and hydroxyl radical footprint analysis. It has been thought that AIDS is caused by the large numbers of HIV-1 quasispecies yielded by the adaptive and rapid evolution in the host. However, the slow evolution and the high levels of viral RNA in the progressive HIV-1 infected individuals (progressives) were recently reported; in contrast, the adaptive and rapid evolution and the low viral-RNA levels were reported in the non-progressives. This suggests that the physiological environment, e.g. pH and dNTP balance, in which RT works in the progressives is different from that in the non-progressives.

  17. Refinement of linkage of human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDXI) to polymorphic markers in Xq13

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    Puck, J.M (Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States) Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Conely, M.E. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital and Univ. of Tennessee School of Medicine, Memphis (United States)); Bailey, L.C. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The most common form of human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is inherited as an X-linked recessive genetic defect, MIM 300400. The disease locus, SCIDX1, has previously been placed in Xq13.1-q21.1 by demonstration of linkage to polymorphic markers between DXS159 and DXS3 and by exclusion from interstitial deletions of Xq21.1-q21.3. The authors report an extension of previous linkage studies, with new markers and a total of 25 SCIDX1 families including female carriers identified by nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in their T lymphocytes. SCIDX1 was nonrecombinant with DXS441, with a lod score of 17.96. Linkage relationships of new markers in the SCIDX1 families were consistent with the linkage map generated in the families of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisms Humain (CEPH) and with available physical map data. The most likely locus order was DXS1-(DXS159,DXS153)-DXS106-DXS132-DXS453-(SCIDX1,PGK1, DXS325,DXS347,DXS441)-DXS447-DXS72-DXYS1X-DXS3. The SCIDX1 region now spans approximately 10 Mb of DNA in Xq13; this narrowed genetic localization will assist efforts to identify gene candidates and will improve genetic management for families with SCID. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women in Cuba

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    Kouri Vivian

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence rates and serovar distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infections in Cuban women, two different groups were selected. Group I consisted of 60 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 seropositive women from different regions of Cuba and group II of 60 randomly selected women HIV seronegative and apparently healthy. C. trachomatis was detected in cervical scrapes by mean of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR specific for major out membrane protein. The overall prevalence rate of C. trachomatis in cervical scrapes determined by nested PCR was 10% in group I and the estimated prevalence was 6.6% for group II; 83.3% of HIV seropositive women with C. trachomatis infection reported history of pelvic inflammatory disease followed by cervicitis (50%. The control group C. trachomatis-infected women referred a history of cervicitis in 75% of cases. Other reports in the latter group included infertility and pelvic inflamatory disease in 50%. The present study is the first report of C. trachomatis prevalence in Cuba. It showed that there was not significantly difference in the prevalence rate of C. trachomatis between both groups.

  19. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) rev by (time-resolved) fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kungl, A J; Seidel, C; Schilk, A; Daly, T J; Kauffmann, H F; Auer, M

    1994-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been applied to the single tryptophan-containing regulatory protein Rev of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The fluorescence emission was found to have a maximum at 336 nm which refers to a surrounding of the chromophore of intermediate polarity. Fluorescence transients recorded at the maximum of fluorescence were found to decay nonexponentially. A bimodal lifetime distribution is obtained from exponential series analysis (ESM) with centers at 1.7 and 4.5 ns. Two microenvironments for tryptophan are suggested to be responsible for the two lifetime distributions. No innerfilter effect occurred in a Rev solution up to a concentration of 40 μM. A data quality study of ESM analysis as function of collected counts in the peak channel maximum (CIM) showed that, for reliable reconvolution, at least 15,000 CIM are necessary. The widths of the two distributions are shown to be temperature dependent. The broadening of the lifetime distributions when the temperature is raised to 50°C is interpreted as extension of the number of conformational substates which do not interconvert on the fluorescence time scale. The thermal deactivation (temperature quenching) is reflected in a constant decrease in the center of the short-lived lifetime distribution.

  20. Screening for tuberculosis and testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Zambian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggard, Katie R; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Harris, Jennifer B; Phiri, Winifreda; Krüüner, Annika; Kaunda, Kaunda; Topp, Stephanie M; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Henostroza, German; Reid, Stewart E

    2015-02-01

    To improve the Zambia Prisons Service's implementation of tuberculosis screening and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing. For both tuberculosis and HIV, we implemented mass screening of inmates and community-based screening of those residing in encampments adjacent to prisons. We also established routine systems – with inmates as peer educators – for the screening of newly entered or symptomatic inmates. We improved infection control measures, increased diagnostic capacity and promoted awareness of tuberculosis in Zambia's prisons. In a period of 9 months, we screened 7638 individuals and diagnosed 409 new patients with tuberculosis. We tested 4879 individuals for HIV and diagnosed 564 cases of infection. An additional 625 individuals had previously been found to be HIV-positive. Including those already on tuberculosis treatment at the time of screening, the prevalence of tuberculosis recorded in the prisons and adjacent encampments – 6.4% (6428/100,000) – is 18 times the national prevalence estimate of 0.35%. Overall, 22.9% of the inmates and 13.8% of the encampment residents were HIV-positive. Both tuberculosis and HIV infection are common within Zambian prisons. We enhanced tuberculosis screening and improved the detection of tuberculosis and HIV in this setting. Our observations should be useful in the development of prison-based programmes for tuberculosis and HIV elsewhere.

  1. Localization of human immunodeficiency virus antigens in infected cells by scanning/transmission-immunogold techniques

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    Herrera, M.I.; Santa Maria, I.; de Andres, R.; Najera, R.

    1988-01-01

    An application of high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and gold-labelling techniques for the rapid detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in infected cells has been developed. Experimental in vitro studies for detecting two HIV structural proteins, gp41 and p17, were performed following an indirect labeling procedure that uses monoclonal anti-p17 and anti-gp41 antibodies as primary antibodies and 40 nm gold-linked goat antimouse IgG as secondary antibodies. The cells were then studied by STEM in the scanning mode. Unambiguous localization of the viral antigens was possible by combining the three-dimensional image provided by the secondary electron image and the atomic number-dependent backscattered electron image for the identification of the gold marker. This technique combines both the morphological information and the rapid procedures of scanning electron microscopy with the precise and sensitive antigen detection provided by the use of STEM and immunological methods. The preliminary results of its application to the study of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from four anti-HIV-seropositive patients showing the presence of specific labeling in all of them suggest that it might prove useful for early detection of HIV infection before seroconversion, as well as for quantitative studies.

  2. The breakdown of the cytokine network subsequent to human immunodeficiency virus infection

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    M. Clerici

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquired immunodeflciency syndrome (AIDS is a clinically multifaceted disease induced by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. HIV infection results in a complex pattern of immunologic alterations that leads to the development of AIDS in the majority of HIV seropositive (HIV+ individuals. The reduction in CD4 T lymphocyte counts is the hallmark of HIV infection; nevertheless, long before the reduction in CD4 counts reaches critical levels, a series of profound and complex defects that impair the function of CD4 T lymphocytes can be detected. Thus, HIV infection is characterized by quantitative and qualitative defects affecting CD4 T lymphocytes. It was suggested recently that programmed cell death (PCD is an important mechanism leading to CD4 depletion in HIV infection, and that susceptibility of peripheral lymphocytes to PCD is differentially regulated by diverse cytokines. Thus, type 1 cytokines would protect CD4 lymphocytes against PCD, whereas type 2 cytokines would not protect against, and could augment, PCD. We suggest that the qualitative alterations of the immune response provoke the CD4 depletion characteristic of HIV disease via type 2 cytokinemediated augmentation of PCD, and are therefore ultimately responsible for the progression of HIV infection. Finally, we summarize recent data showing that three correlates of disease progression: emergence of HIV strains with syncitium-inducing ability (SI, type 1-to-type 2 cytokine shift, and CD4 depletion, are significantly associated, suggesting a complex interconnected virologic-immunologic pathogenesis of HIV infection.

  3. Anterior segment manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome

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    Biswas Jyotirmay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular complications are known to occur as a result of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease. They can be severe leading to ocular morbidity and visual handicap. Cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis is the commonest ocular opportunistic infection seen in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. Though posterior segment lesions can be more vision-threatening, there are varied anterior segment manifestations which can also lead to ocular morbidity and more so can affect the quality of life of a HIV-positive person. Effective antiretroviral therapy and improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections have led to an increase in the survival of an individual afflicted with AIDS. This in turn has led to an increase in the prevalence of anterior segment and adnexal disorders. Common lesions include relatively benign conditions such as blepharitis and dry eye, to infections such as herpes zoster ophthalmicus and molluscum contagiosum and malignancies such as squamous cell carcinoma and Kaposi′s sarcoma. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a new phenomenon known as immune recovery uveitis which presents with increased inflammation, has been noted to be on the rise. Several drugs used in the management of AIDS such as nevirapine or indinavir can themselves lead to severe inflammation in the anterior segment and adnexa of the eye. This article is a comprehensive update of the important anterior segment and adnexal manifestations in HIV-positive patients with special reference to their prevalence in the Indian population.

  4. Health services research: drug use and human immunodeficiency virus in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanzer, Jerry

    2003-12-15

    Major research findings show gaps in health services research on the prevalence and outcomes of patient- and organization-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse prevention and treatment services. The latest thrust of health services research on translational research issues includes informing and training practitioners about new, proven drug abuse treatment interventions; changing treatment organizations (creating a climate for change and building a culture to sustain change); and financing new treatments. Findings defining the direct relationship between the quality of drug abuse treatment and the patients' program completion, the perception of the staff by the patient, feelings of self-empowerment and mitigation of patient and organizational readiness, the superiority of integrated care, and the primary reasons for delays in HIV-infected substance-using patients seeking care are included. More needs to be done to increase the participation of substance abuse programs in teaching about and implementing HIV prevention and developing means to modulate or eliminate barriers to the integration of HIV and substance abuse care.

  5. Poverty and human immunodeficiency virus in children: a view from the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Barend Jacobus; Esser, Monika; Godwin, Sarah; Rabie, Helena; Cotton, Mark Fredric

    2008-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the region affected worst by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), with the most southern countries, including Botswana, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, and South Africa, carrying the highest disease burden. This geographic distribution represents a complex interaction among virological, political, social, cultural, and economic forces. In South Africa the HIV epidemic is seemingly unchecked, with 18% of the adult population infected. Although South Africa is a mid-developed country, there is a large chasm between the wealthy and the poor, with many living in moderate to extreme poverty. Poverty creates conditions that fuel the HIV epidemic while HIV exacerbates the multiple interlinking causes of poverty. Children are the most vulnerable members of society, severely affected by all components of the poverty cycle. Although improved health education and access to care will alleviate many problems, sustainable poverty alleviation should form an essential component of the response to AIDS. The formulation of the United Nations Millennium Developmental Goals is an important step in the right direction, but global and local political commitment is essential for success.

  6. Exosomes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I Pathogenesis: Threat or Opportunity?

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    Sin-Yeang Teow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometre-sized vesicles, also known as exosomes, are derived from endosomes of diverse cell types and present in multiple biological fluids. Depending on their cellular origins, the membrane-bound exosomes packed a variety of functional proteins and RNA species. These microvesicles are secreted into the extracellular space to facilitate intercellular communication. Collective findings demonstrated that exosomes from HIV-infected subjects share many commonalities with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1 particles in terms of proteomics and lipid profiles. These observations postulated that HIV-resembled exosomes may contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Interestingly, recent reports illustrated that exosomes from body fluids could inhibit HIV infection, which then bring up a new paradigm for HIV/AIDS therapy. Accumulative findings suggested that the cellular origin of exosomes may define their effects towards HIV-1. This review summarizes the two distinctive roles of exosomes in regulating HIV pathogenesis. We also highlighted several additional factors that govern the exosomal functions. Deeper understanding on how exosomes promote or abate HIV infection can significantly contribute to the development of new and potent antiviral therapeutic strategy and vaccine designs.

  7. A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Interventions for Parental Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disclosure

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    Donaldson F. Conserve

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDisclosure of parental human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection to their children remains a difficult process for parents living with HIV (PLWH. In order to identify the best strategies to facilitate parental HIV disclosure, it is necessary to examine the efficacy of existing interventions designed to help PLWH parents with the disclosure process to their children.ObjectivesTo systematically review the efficacy of interventions designed to assist PLWH disclose their HIV status to their children.MethodsWe conducted a systematic review and narrative synthesis of interventions designed to assist PLWH disclose their HIV status to their children. MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Global Health, and Web of Science were searched.ResultsStudies were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated an intervention for parental HIV disclosure. Five studies published between 2001 and 2015 met the inclusion criteria. The interventions were conducted in South Africa, China, and the United States. Three of the studies used two-arm randomized controlled trials, in which the intervention group was given enhanced care while the control group received standard care. Four of the five studies included a theoretically informed intervention and three were limited to mothers. Results showed that four of the interventions increased parental HIV disclosure.ConclusionThe findings suggest that parental HIV disclosure interventions are successful in assisting parents with the disclosure process and can be adapted in different cultural context. Future parental HIV disclosure interventions should include fathers in order to assist men with parental HIV disclosure.

  8. Equity issues were not fully addressed in Cochrane human immunodeficiency virus systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aves, Theresa; Kredo, Tamara; Welch, Vivian; Mursleen, Sara; Ross, Stephanie; Zani, Babalwa; Motaze, Nkengafac Villyen; Quinlan, Leah; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    To describe and summarize equity reporting in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) systematic reviews and explore the extent to which equity issues are addressed and reported in HIV reviews using the PROGRESS Plus framework. Application of the PROGRESS Plus framework to a bibliometric analysis of HIV reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The analysis included 103 reviews published as of March 2014, with a median of five studies per review (first quartile; Q1 = 2; third quartile; Q3 = 11). Reporting of PROGRESS Plus factors was as follows: Place of residence (low, middle, and high income; 55.3%), place of residence (urban or rural; 24.3%), race or ethnicity (20.4%), occupation (10.7%), gender (65.0%), religion (1.9%), education (7.8%), socioeconomic position (10.7%), social networks and capital (1.0%), age (1.9%), and sexual orientation (3.8%). Gaps in the reporting of relevant equity indicators were identified within Cochrane HIV systematic review indicating that research is not consistently conducted through an equity lens. There is a need to incorporate PROGRESS Plus factors into both primary and secondary studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Resistant to the Protease Inhibitor Darunavir

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    Sasková, Klára Grantz; Koíek, Milan; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí; Yashina, Tatyana; Kagan, Ron M.; Konvalinka, Jan; (Quest); (Charles U)

    2010-03-04

    Darunavir is the most recently approved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) and is active against many HIV type 1 PR variants resistant to earlier-generation PIs. Darunavir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance development, and virus strains with lower sensitivity to darunavir have a higher number of PI resistance-associated mutations than viruses resistant to other PIs. In this work, we have enzymologically and structurally characterized a number of highly mutated clinically derived PRs with high levels of phenotypic resistance to darunavir. With 18 to 21 amino acid residue changes, the PR variants studied in this work are the most highly mutated HIV PR species ever studied by means of enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The recombinant proteins showed major defects in substrate binding, while the substrate turnover was less affected. Remarkably, the overall catalytic efficiency of the recombinant PRs (5% that of the wild-type enzyme) is still sufficient to support polyprotein processing and particle maturation in the corresponding viruses. The X-ray structures of drug-resistant PRs complexed with darunavir suggest that the impaired inhibitor binding could be explained by change in the PR-inhibitor hydrogen bond pattern in the P2 binding pocket due to a substantial shift of the aminophenyl moiety of the inhibitor. Recombinant virus phenotypic characterization, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray structural analysis thus help to explain darunavir resistance development in HIV-positive patients.

  10. Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–infected Adults and Adolescents: Current Concepts and Future Directions

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    Sadatomo Tasaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP is one of the most common opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults. Colonization of Pneumocystis is highly prevalent among the general population and could be associated with the transmission and development of PCP in immunocompromised individuals. Although the microscopic demonstration of the organisms in respiratory specimens is still the golden standard of its diagnosis, polymerase chain reaction has been shown to have a high sensitivity, detecting Pneumocystis DNA in induced sputum or oropharyngeal wash. Serum β-D-glucan is useful as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of PCP. High-resolution computed tomography, which typically shows diffuse ground-glass opacities, is informative for the evaluation of immunocompromised patients with suspected PCP and normal chest radiography. Trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX is the first-line agent for the treatment of mild to severe PCP, although it is often complicated with various side effects. Since TMP-SMX is widely used for the prophylaxis, the putative drug resistance is an emerging concern.

  11. Weighted brain networks in disease: centrality and entropy in human immunodeficiency virus and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Ortega, Mario; Benzinger, Tammie L; Ances, Beau M

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory models can produce simple, biologically informative metrics of the topology of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) networks. However, typical graph theory approaches model FC relationships between regions (nodes) as unweighted edges, complicating their interpretability in studies of disease or aging. We extended existing techniques and constructed fully connected weighted graphs for groups of age-matched human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive (n = 67) and HIV negative (n = 77) individuals. We compared test-retest reliability of weighted versus unweighted metrics in an independent study of healthy individuals (n = 22) and found weighted measures to be more stable. We quantified 2 measures of node centrality (closeness centrality and eigenvector centrality) to capture the relative importance of individual nodes. We also quantified 1 measure of graph entropy (diversity) to measure the variability in connection strength (edge weights) at each node. HIV was primarily associated with differences in measures of centrality, and age was primarily associated with differences in diversity. HIV and age were associated with divergent measures when evaluated at the whole graph level, within individual functional networks, and at the level of individual nodes. Graph models may allow us to distinguish previously indistinguishable effects related to HIV and age on FC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired plant growth and development caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Previous attempts to express the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat (trans-activator of transcription) protein in plants resulted in a number of physiological abnormalities, such as stunted growth and absence of seed formation, that could not be explained. In the study reported here, we expressed Tat in tomato and observed phenotypic abnormalities, including stunted growth, absence of root formation, chlorosis, and plant death, as a result of reduced cytokinin levels. These reduced levels were ascribed to a differentially expressed CKO35 in Tat-bombarded tomato. Of the two CKO isoforms that are naturally expressed in tomato, CKO43 and CKO37, only the expression of CKO37 was affected by Tat. Our analysis of the Tat confirmed that the Arg-rich and RGD motifs of Tat have functional relevance in tomato and that independent mutations at these motifs caused inhibition of the differentially expressed CKO isoform and the extracellular secretion of the Tat protein, respectively, in our Tat-bombarded tomato samples.

  13. False-positive human immunodeficiency virus antibody test in a dialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Douglas M; Aviles, Diego H; Vehaskari, V Matti

    2004-05-01

    A patient developed end-stage renal disease secondary to p-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA) positive rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. He subsequently had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 antibody screening performed as part of a pre-transplant evaluation. The HIV-1 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) antibody test was repeatedly reactive. The HIV-1 western blot was indeterminate. The western blot pattern revealed "non-specific staining obscuring bands in that region." Another sample of serum was sent and the results were identical to the first result. An HIV-1 proviral qualitative polymerase chain reaction test was then performed several months later and no HIV-1 DNA was detected. One year later, an HIV-1 RNA test was negative. Thus, the positive antibody EIA test and the indeterminate western blot represent a false-positive result, most likely due to cross-reacting antigens in the patient's serum with various HIV antibodies. Throughout this period and thereafter, the patient has exhibited no symptoms of HIV infection.

  14. Outcome of cytomegalovirus retinitis in immunocompromised patients without Human Immunodeficiency Virus treated with intravitreal ganciclovir injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Kumari, Neha; Trehan, Amita; Khadwal, Alka; Dogra, Mangat R; Gupta, Vishali; Sharma, Aman; Gupta, Amod; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    To study the outcomes of treatment with intravitreal ganciclovir injection for cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients without Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. In this retrospective cohort study, demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with CMV retinitis without HIV were noted. Patients received intravitreal ganciclovir injection (2 mg/0.1 ml) alone until quiescence. The outcome measures were time taken for the lesions to heal, number of injections, change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), recurrence of retinitis, occurrence of immune recovery uveitis (IRU) or injection-related complications and retinal detachment (RD). 18 eyes of ten patients (six males) with mean age of 33.7 years from June 2004 to March 2013 were included. Thirteen eyes with active lesions (mean BCVA of 0.51 ± 0.41) received 5.54 ± 3.36 intravitreal ganciclovir injections with complete healing within 1.81 ± 1.25 months. The final BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.52. IRU was observed in six eyes (33.33%) and RD developed in one eye. One eye had recurrence 1 month after stopping ganciclovir injections. The rest of the patients had recurrence-free follow-up at 9.46 ± 12.42 months. Non-HIV patients with CMV retinitis can be successfully treated with intravitreal ganciclovir injection alone, avoiding the systemic side effects of systemic anti-CMV therapy.

  15. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among Mexican human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Gutierrez-Escolano, Fernanda; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Gomez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier; Lira, Rosalia

    2014-10-07

    To determine the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OHBI) in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1+/ hepatitis B surface antigen negative (HBsAg)- patients from Mexico. We investigated the presence of OHBI in 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was analyzed using nested PCR to amplify the Core (C) region and by real-time PCR to amplify a region of the S and X genes. The possible associations between the variables and OHBI were investigated using Pearson's χ(2) and/or Fisher's exact test. We found that the frequency of OHBI was 49% among the group of 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients studied. The presence of OHBI was significantly associated with the HIV-1 RNA viral load [odds ratio (OR) = 8.75; P = 0.001; 95%CI: 2.26-33.79] and with HIV-antiretroviral treatment with drugs that interfere with HBV replication (lamivudine, tenofovir or emtricitabine) (OR = 0.25; P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.08-1.05). The OHBI frequency is high among 49 Mexican HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients and it was more frequent in patients with detectable HIV RNA, and less frequent in patients who are undergoing HIV-ARV treatment with drugs active against HBV.

  16. Lymphocyte subsets in human immunodeficiency virus-unexposed Brazilian individuals from birth to adulthood

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    Maria Isabel de Moraes-Pinto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic origin, genetics, gender and environmental factors have been shown to influence some immunologic indices, so that development of reference values for populations of different backgrounds may be necessary. We have determined the distribution of lymphocyte subsets in healthy Brazilian individuals from birth to adulthood. Lymphocyte subsets were determined using four-colour cytometry in a cross-sectional study of 463 human immunodeficiency virus-unexposed children and adults from birth through 49 years of age. Lymphocyte subsets varied according to age, as previously observed in other studies. However, total CD4+ T cell numbers were lower than what was described in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group P1009 (PACTG P1009, which assessed an American population of predominantly African and Hispanic backgrounds until the 12-18 year age range, when values were comparable. Naïve percentages and absolute values of CD8+ T cells, as assessed by CD45RA expression, were also lower than the PACTG P1009 data for all analysed age ranges. CD38 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was lower than the PACTG P1009 values, with a widening gap between the two studies at older age ranges. Different patterns of cell differentiation seem to occur in different settings and may have characteristic expression within each population.

  17. Charges of human immunodeficiency virus discrimination in the workplace: the Americans with Disabilities Act in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, David M

    2002-08-01

    Congress enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide persons living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other vulnerable populations with legal means of redress against discrimination, yet virtually nothing is known about how the intended beneficiaries have used these protections. This study aimed to describe the epidemiology of ADA charges alleging employment-related discrimination due to HIV and to investigate the charge-filing behavior of workers with HIV. Using a national database of all HIV discrimination charges filed since the inception of the ADA in 1991, the author described respondent employers, issues in dispute, and outcomes of charges. Next, he used multivariate regression analyses to compare the sociodemographic characteristics of charge filers with those of a nationally representative baseline sample of workers with HIV. Of the 3,520 HIV discrimination charges filed through 1999, 18.0% had merit and 14.1% received monetary compensation. Workers who were female (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, p aged less than 25 years (OR = 0.36, p aged 25-34 years (OR = 0.77, p discrimination in the baseline population magnified this "underclaiming" among young workers. The findings should help to target dissemination and support activities, designed to help workers take advantage of antidiscrimination protections, at the subgroups of workers who need them most.

  18. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Cardiometabolic Syndrome in the Developing World: An African Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutimura, Eugene; Crowther, Nigel J.; Stewart, Aimee; Cade, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS into a manageable chronic disorder. Clinical care, however, needs to address the metabolic, anthropometric, and cardiovascular changes associated with HIV infection and HAART. Studies in developing countries suggest an increasing incidence of HIV-associated cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS), especially in urban settings. Predictions indicate that the greatest increase in the prevalence of diabetes will occur in Africa over the next 2 decades due to lifestyle changes. This, coupled with increased access to HAART, may exponentially increase the prevalence of CMS in developing countries, where HIV infection is prevalent. Appropriate evaluation and intervention programs need to be implemented in the developing world, especially sub-Saharan Africa, to curtail HIV-related CMS. This should include routine cardiovascular risk assessments, management of HIV infection with more “metabolically friendly” HAART, and encouragment of lifestyle modifications, particularly smoking cessation, weight management, regular exercise, and adherence to a healthy diet. PMID:18453811

  19. Screening for tuberculosis and testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Zambian prisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggard, Katie R; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Harris, Jennifer B; Phiri, Winifreda; Krüüner, Annika; Kaunda, Kaunda; Topp, Stephanie M; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Henostroza, German

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To improve the Zambia Prisons Service’s implementation of tuberculosis screening and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing. Methods For both tuberculosis and HIV, we implemented mass screening of inmates and community-based screening of those residing in encampments adjacent to prisons. We also established routine systems – with inmates as peer educators – for the screening of newly entered or symptomatic inmates. We improved infection control measures, increased diagnostic capacity and promoted awareness of tuberculosis in Zambia’s prisons. Findings In a period of 9 months, we screened 7638 individuals and diagnosed 409 new patients with tuberculosis. We tested 4879 individuals for HIV and diagnosed 564 cases of infection. An additional 625 individuals had previously been found to be HIV-positive. Including those already on tuberculosis treatment at the time of screening, the prevalence of tuberculosis recorded in the prisons and adjacent encampments – 6.4% (6428/100 000) – is 18 times the national prevalence estimate of 0.35%. Overall, 22.9% of the inmates and 13.8% of the encampment residents were HIV-positive. Conclusion Both tuberculosis and HIV infection are common within Zambian prisons. We enhanced tuberculosis screening and improved the detection of tuberculosis and HIV in this setting. Our observations should be useful in the development of prison-based programmes for tuberculosis and HIV elsewhere. PMID:25883402

  20. [Consensus statement: recommendations for the management of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Esteban; Jódar Gimeno, Esteban; Reyes García, Rebeca; Carpintero, Pedro; Casado, José Luis; Del Pino Montes, Javier; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Maalouf, Jorge; Negredo, Eugenia; Ocampo, Antonio; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To provide practical recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of metabolic bone disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. Members of scientific societies related to bone metabolism and HIV: Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GeSIDA), Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición (SEEN), Sociedad Española de Investigación Ósea y del Metabolismo Mineral (SEIOMM), and Sociedad Española de Fractura Osteoporótica (SEFRAOS). A systematic search was carried out in PubMed, and papers in English and Spanish with a publication date before 28 May 2013 were included. Recommendations were formulated according to GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) setting both their strength and the quality of supporting evidence. Working groups were established for each major part, and the final resulting document was later discussed in a face-to-face meeting. All the authors reviewed the final written document and agreed with its content. The document provides evidence-based practical recommendations on the detection and treatment of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Corneal Ring Infiltrates Caused by Serratia marcescens in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

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    Winai Chaidaroon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe corneal ring infiltrates caused by Serratia marcescens in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 who wore contact lenses. Methods: A case study of a patient with keratitis due to an infection caused by S. marcescens and exhibiting corneal ring infiltrates was reviewed for history, clinical manifestation, microscopic study, and management. Results: A 29-year-old man who had a history of contact lens wear and HIV-1 infection was admitted to hospital because of blurred vision, redness, and corneal infiltrates in the shape of a ring in the left eye. The visual acuity (VA in both eyes was hand movement (uncorrected. Corneal scrapings were performed. The culture results of the corneal specimens revealed S. marcescens. The culture results of the contact lens disclosed the same organism. The corneal ulcer responded well to treatment with topical gentamycin sulfate 14 mg/ml. The final VA remained hand movement. Conclusions: S. marcescens can cause ring infiltrates in a HIV-1 patient who wears contact lenses. The treatment result for S. marcescens keratitis in a HIV-1 patient who wore contact lenses was favorable after intensive use of fortified topical antibiotics.

  2. Influence of immune activation and inflammatory response on cardiovascular risk associated with the human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán LM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luis M Beltrán,1 Alfonso Rubio-Navarro,2 Juan Manuel Amaro-Villalobos,2 Jesús Egido,2–4 Juan García-Puig,1 Juan Antonio Moreno21Metabolic-Vascular Unit, Fundación IdiPAZ-Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain; 2Vascular, Renal, and Diabetes Research Lab, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain; 3Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM, Madrid, Spain; 4Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo-Instituto Reina Sofía de Investigaciones Nefrológicas (FRIAT-IRSIN, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased cardiovascular risk. Although initially this increased risk was attributed to metabolic alterations associated with antiretroviral treatment, in recent years, the attention has been focused on the HIV disease itself. Inflammation, immune system activation, and endothelial dysfunction facilitated by HIV infection have been identified as key factors in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this review, we describe the epidemiology and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV infection and summarize the latest knowledge on the relationship between traditional and novel inflammatory, immune activation, and endothelial dysfunction biomarkers on the cardiovascular risk associated with HIV infection.Keywords: HIV, cardiovascular disease, immune activation, inflammation, antiretroviral therapy

  3. Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Kidney Transplantation: The Mount Sinai Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vinay; Khaim, Rafael; El-Salem, Fadi; Kent, Rebecca; Lerner, Susan; Berger, Amnon; Miko, Leandra; Rollins, Brett; Ebcioglu, Zeynep; Delaney, Veronica; Sehgal, Vinita; Menon, Madhav; Ames, Scott; Benvenisty, Alan; Wadhera, Vikram; Arvelakas, Antonious; Schiano, Thomas; Rana, Meena; Huprikar, Shirish; Florman, Sander; Shapiro, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Mount Sinai Hospital in New York has a long history in the field of organ transplantation. The first kidney transplant at Mount Sinai was performed in 1967 by the late Dr. Lewis Burrows and the first laparoscopic donor nephrectomy in New York was performed at Mount Sinai in 1996. Over 3000 kidney transplantations have been performed at Mount Sinai. In the early 1990s, the first hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive patient at Mount Sinai underwent a kidney transplant and the first kidney transplant in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in New York was performed at Mount Sinai in 2001. In general, these patients have done well after renal transplantation, with outcomes similar to those seen in non-infected patients. This chapter will describe the evolution of immunosuppressive regimens in HCV positive and HIV positive patients, and will describe the outcomes of kidney transplantation in these patients. Given the favorable outcomes, it is reasonable to continue to offer renal transplantation as a treatment for end stage renal disease patients with HCV and/or HIV. Copyright© 2016 by the Terasaki Foundation Laboratory.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Hodgkin's Lymphoma in South Africa: An Emerging Problem

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    Moosa Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL occurs with increasing frequency in human-immunodeficiency-virus-(HIV- infected individuals. The natural history and behaviour of HIV-HL is different, being more atypical and aggressive. The association between HIV and HL appears to be primarily EBV driven. HAART use does not significantly impact on the incidence of HL. Indeed, the risk of HL has increased in the post-HAART era. However, the advent of HAART has brought renewed hope, allowing standard therapeutic options to be used more optimally, with better treatment outcomes. Despite the renewed optimism, the overall survival of HIV-HL patients remains less favourable than that in HIV-seronegative patients. This is particularly true in sub-Saharan Africa, where there is a significant burden of HIV/AIDS and where more than half the patients are HAART naive at diagnosis of HL. The similarities and differences of a South African cohort of HIV-HL are presented in this paper.

  5. Seroprevalence of Brucellosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patients in Hamadan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, Fariba; Majzobi, Mohammad Mehdi; Poorolajal, Jalal; Ghane, Zohreh Zarei; Adabi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Brucellosis is a systemic disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in Hamadan Province in the west of Iran. Methods A total of 157 HIV-infected patients were screened through standard serological tests, including Wright’s test, Coombs’ Wright test, and 2-mercaptoethanol Brucella agglutination test (2ME test), blood cultures in Castaneda media, and CD4 counting. Data were analyzed using Stata version 11. Results Wright and Coombs’ Wright tests were carried out, and only 5 (3.2%) patients had positive serological results. However, all patients had negative 2ME results, and blood cultures were negative for Brucella spp. Moreover, patients with positive serology and a mean CD4 count of 355.8 ± 203.11 cells/μL had no clinical manifestations of brucellosis, and, and the other patients had a mean CD4 count of 335.55 ± 261.71 cells/μL. Conclusion Results of this study showed that HIV infection is not a predisposing factor of acquiring brucellosis. PMID:28904852

  6. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era. PMID:25949944

  7. Alveolar bone in human immunodeficiency virus infection: is it changed by long-term antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Kanjanaprapas, Aree; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Pangsomboon, Kanokporn; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) can lead to osteoporosis in HIV-infected individuals. However, their effects on alveolar bone are not well established. The objective of this study was to measure the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) of HIV-infected patients, with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART), in comparison with that of HIV-free individuals, and to determine factors associated with the BMD of alveolar bone. A cross-sectional study was performed in non-HIV-infected individuals and HIV-infected individuals, with and without ART. Medical status and clinical data were recorded. Periapical radiographs of maxillary and mandibular right premolars were analysed for changes of alveolar BMD based on HIV/ART status. Other factors associated with the changes of alveolar BMD were explored using a parametric multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). One-hundred and one HIV-infected individuals receiving ART (age range: 23-57 years; median age 39 years), 58 receiving no ART (age range: 20-59 years; median age 34 years) and 50 HIV-negative individuals (age range: 19-59 years; median age 36 years) were enrolled. Neither HIV status nor use of ART was significantly associated with the changes of alveolar BMD. Although osteoporosis has been reported in HIV-infected individuals treated with ART, alveolar BMD does not appear to be changed as a result of the infection, or use of ART. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. Cerebral glial tumors and human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. More than a coincidental association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulignier, A; Mikol, J; Pialoux, G; Eliaszewicz, M; Thurel, C; Thiebaut, J B

    1994-07-15

    The authors describe the clinical and morphologic patterns in four patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed intracranial glial tumors. This retrospective study reports 70 patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy for an intracerebral space-occupying lesion. Of these patients, four had glial tumors: one astroblastoma, two astrocytomas, and one glioblastoma. Glial tumors probably arise from a complex interplay of factors; possibilities include the activation of a dominant oncogene or viral inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene by a viral promoter (like the tat protein), impairment of immune defenses (which facilitates the growth of astrocytomas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia), production of cellular growth factors, cytokines, possible infection of glial cells by HIV, and the potentiation of a coinfectious agent. These cases illustrate that glial tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain masses in HIV-1 infection, especially because specific treatment for these tumors is available. Moreover, the occurrence of glial tumors in AIDS patients is not only an important event from a clinical point of view, but may also have implications for the pathogenesis of tumors in AIDS.

  9. Photoinactivation of cell-free human immunodeficiency virus by hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huijuan; Li, Yingxin; Zheng, Yongtang; Ye, Xuying; Zheng, Liqing; Li, Chunyan; Xue, Zhixiao

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles that remain in the blood of patients are frequently ignored as targets for AIDS treatment. We therefore investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) as a means of inactivating cell-free HIV in vitro. Virus particles including HIV-1(IIIB), resistant HIV-1 variants, HIV-1 clinical variants, and HIV-2 variants were incubated with HMME for 40 min, followed by irradiation with a 630-nm semiconductor laser at an energy density of 0.3 J/cm(2). The antiviral effects were evaluated by counting syncytium formation or measuring p24 antigen expression levels in supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationships between photoinactivation and HMME concentrations, energy density, power density and antioxidants (NaN(3) and D: -mannitol) were also assessed using the above methods. All the tested virus particles were completely responsive to HMME-PDT. HMME concentration and energy density were positively correlated with photoinactivation of HIV, while power density was negatively correlated. Both sodium azide and D: -mannitol weakened the inhibitory effect of PDT on virus-induced membrane fusion, with D: -mannitol having a stronger effect. HMME-PDT can inactivate HIV particles, and may therefore represent a promising treatment for AIDS patients.

  10. Community-based rapid oral human immunodeficiency virus testing for tuberculosis patients in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Adrianne K; Caldas, Adolfo; Sebastian, Jose Luis; Muñoz, Maribel; Bonilla, Cesear; Yamanija, Jose; Jave, Oswaldo; Magan, Christina; Saldivar, Judith; Espiritu, Betty; Rosell, Gustavo; Bayona, Jaime; Shin, Sonya

    2012-09-01

    Among tuberculosis patients, timely diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection and early antiretroviral treatment are crucial, but are hampered by a myriad of individual and structural barriers. Community-based models to provide counseling and rapid HIV testing are few but offer promise. During November 2009-April 2010, community health workers offered and performed HIV counseling and testing by using the OraQuick Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test to new tuberculosis cases in 22 Ministry of Health establishments and their household contacts (n = 130) in Lima, Peru. Refusal of HIV testing or study participation was low (4.7%). Intervention strengths included community-based approach with participant preference for testing site, use of a rapid, non-invasive test, and accompaniment to facilitate HIV care and family disclosure. We will expand the intervention under programmatic auspices for rapid community-based testing for new tuberculosis cases in high incidence establishments. Other potential target populations include contacts of HIV-positive persons and pregnant women.

  11. Pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Sachin D; Kanwar, Amrinder J; Vinay, Keshavamurthy; Wanchu, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    Mucocutaneous diseases are among the first-recognized clinical manifestations of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. They function as visual markers in assessing the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Given the relative ease of examination of skin, its evaluation remains an important tool in the diagnosis of HIV infection. To determine the pattern of mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV-positive patients and to correlate their presence with CD4 counts. This cross-sectional study included 352 HIV-infected patients seen at PGIMER, Chandigarh, India, over a period of 1 year. The patients were screened for mucocutaneous disorders by an experienced dermatologist. The patients were classified into different stages according to the World Health Organization clinical and immunological staging system. The most prevalent infection was candidiasis, seen in 57 patients (16.2%). Prevalence of candidiasis, dermatophytosis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, molluscum contagiosum (MC), seborrheic dermatitis, adverse drug reaction, nail pigmentation, xerosis and diffuse hair loss differed statistically according to the clinical stages of HIV infection. There was a statistically significant association between immunological stages of HIV infection and dermatophytosis. Results of our study suggest that mucocutaneous findings occur throughout the course of HIV infection. Dermatoses like MC and dermatophytosis show an inverse relation with CD4 cell count, and these dermatoses can be used as a proxy indicator of advanced immunosuppression to start highly active anti-retroviral therapy in the absence of facilities to carry out CD4 cell count.

  12. Surgical crown lengthening in a population with human immunodeficiency virus: a retrospective analysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Shilpa; Mason, Suzanne A; Janic, Ana; Bhola, Monish; Haque, Shaziya; Winkler, James R

    2012-03-01

    Individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased risk of developing health problems, including some that are life threatening. Today, dental treatment for the population with a positive HIV diagnosis (HIV+) is comprehensive. There are limited reports on the outcomes of intraoral surgical therapy in patients with HIV, such as crown lengthening surgery (CLS) with osseous recontouring. This report investigates the outcome of CLS procedures performed at an urban dental school in a population of individuals with HIV. Specifically, this retrospective clinical analysis evaluates the healing response after CLS. Paper and electronic records were examined from the year 2000 to the present. Twenty-one individuals with HIV and immunosuppression, ranging from insignificant to severe, underwent CLS. Pertinent details, including laboratory values, medications, smoking history/status, and postoperative outcomes, were recorded. One such surgery is described in detail with radiographs, photographs, and a videoclip. Of the 21 patients with HIV examined after CLS, none had postoperative complications, such as delayed healing, infection, or prolonged bleeding. Variations in viral load (healing. In addition, variations in medication regimens (highly active anti-retroviral therapy [18]; on protease inhibitors [1]; no medications [2]) did not have an impact. The results of this retrospective analysis show the absence of postoperative complications after CLS in this population with HIV. Additional investigation into this area will help health care practitioners increase the range of surgical services provided to this group of patients.

  13. [Healing status of surgical incisions in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Changsong; Sun, Sheng; Cai, Juan

    2014-09-09

    To observe the healing status of surgical incisions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with fractures and explore the factors related with poor wound healing, treatment and preventive measures. Retrospective analyses were performed for the clinical data of 61 HIV-positive patients with fractures. And the influencing factors, treatment and outcomes of poor wound healing were analyzed. Among them, the healing status was good (n = 50) and poor (n = 11). And the outcomes included redness (n = 10), oozing (n = 8), split (n = 3), infection (n = 2), hematoma (n = 1), fat liquefaction (n = 2) and delayed healing (n = 2). All healed well after treatment. There was no infection or death during the follow-up period. Compared with HIV-negative patients, it was not statistically significant in wound infection. However, poor healing rates were significantly different (P HIV infection clinical stage, long operative duration, emergency surgery and incision contamination. In HIV-positive patients with fractures, the healing of surgical incision is generally good. However few have poor wound healing due to multiple factors. If poor healing is identified early and handled timely and correctly, good healing ensues.

  14. Oral mucosal lesions: association with the presence of antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, S L; Engel, D; Truelove, E; DeRouen, T; Morton, T; Schubert, M; Dunphy, C; Wood, R W

    1989-07-01

    To assess the relationship between oral lesions and antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus, oral examinations of 803 homosexual males were conducted at the time of serologic testing. Nineteen percent were HIV seropositive. Thirty percent of antibody-positive subjects had one or more oral lesion(s), as compared with 7% of antibody-negative subjects (p less than 0.001). The presence of oral lesions was significantly associated with HIV seropositivity: a subject was 5.7 times as likely to have serum antibodies if he had one or more oral lesions (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 9.1; p less than 0.001). This significant association with HIV seropositivity was only partially explained by cigarette smoking (adjusted odds ratio 3.1; 1.4-6.8; less than 0.006). Specific conditions that were significantly associated with seropositivity included candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, periodontal disease, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Other diseases identified included acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, mucocutaneous ulcerations, and oral warts. Oral findings may occur earlier in the natural history of infection than previously reported.

  15. Measuring media use in college students with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Toussi, Sima S; Cohn, Elizabeth; Neu, Natalie; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-01-01

    Media applications have shown promise for health education. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a media survey measure and compare media use among college students with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, a convenience sample of college students (N = 53) were recruited. Psychometric testing of the media instrument was performed, and the tool was then used to compare media use among HIV-infected undergraduates (n = 15), other undergraduates (n = 23), and nursing students (n = 15). Psychometric testing of the media instrument demonstrated a high degree of reliability (intraclass correlation = .998; 95% confidence intervals = .997, .999). All respondents had computers with Internet access and cellular phones. Among HIV-infected undergraduate students, 86.7% reported spending 5 minutes or more viewing television during the previous 24 hours outside of school and or work, in comparison with 34.8% of the other undergraduate students with no known chronic illness and 46.7% of the nursing students (p = .002 and .05, respectively). Preferred modes to access health information and communicate with health care providers for all respondents were the Internet (86.8%) and telephone (62.3%), respectively. Assessment of media use among adolescents and young adults will aid in planning for their health education needs. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Do Sex Differences in Respiratory Burst Enzyme Activities Exist in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emokpae, Mathias Abiodun; Mrakpor, Beatrice Aghogho

    2016-11-15

    Studies have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disproportionally affects more females than males. Affected individuals are susceptible to infections due to depressed immunity, qualitative defects in phagocytic function and altered phagocytosis as well as lowered oxidative burst capacity. This study seeks to determine whether sex differences exist in serum activities of respiratory burst enzymes in HIV-1-infected female and male subjects. Serum myeloperoxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were assayed in 170 confirmed HIV-1 positive and 50 HIV-1 negative subjects using ELISA. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and p values of less than 0.05 were considered significant. The measured enzyme activities were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in females than males in HIV-1 negative subjects while no sex differences were observed in HIV-1 positive subjects. The absence of sex differences in the activities of respiratory burst enzymes in HIV-1 infection may be due to immune activation as a result of active phagocytic leukocytes, immune reactivity and inflammation.

  17. Evaluation of oral fluid enzyme immunoassay for confirmation of a positive rapid human immunodeficiency virus test result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, L G; Sanchez, T; MacKellar, D A; Branson, B M; Ethridge, S F; Constantine, N; Ketema, F; Sullivan, P S

    2009-07-01

    The CDC recommends that a reactive rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test be confirmed with an approved supplemental test; the performance of an intermediate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is optional. In support of this recommendation, it was found that of 1,431 reactive rapid HIV test results, 2 (0.1%) had false-negative oral fluid Western blot results and both had false-negative EIA results.

  18. Enhanced Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening for Mycoplasma genitalium in Human Immunodeficiency Virus -Infected US Air Force Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakre, Shilpa; Casimier, Rosemary O; Danboise, Brooke A; Peel, Sheila A; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T; Okulicz, Jason F

    2017-10-16

    Three-site genital and extragenital screening for Mycoplasma genitalium in 102 asymptomatic Air Force members with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection revealed 19 (18.6%) cases of M. genitalium, commonly (58%) in rectal samples. Because M. genitalium is associated with both HIV acquisition and transmission, these findings suggest that it should be included in routine screening of HIV-infected individuals for sexually transmitted infections. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  19. 1592U89, a novel carbocyclic nucleoside analog with potent, selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Daluge, S M; Good, S S; Faletto, M B; Miller, W. H.; St Clair, M H; Boone, L R; Tisdale, M; Parry, N R; Reardon, J E; Dornsife, R E; Averett, D R; Krenitsky, T A

    1997-01-01

    1592U89, (-)-(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2-cyclo pentene-1-methanol, is a carbocyclic nucleoside with a unique biological profile giving potent, selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. 1592U89 was selected after evaluation of a wide variety of analogs containing a cyclopentene substitution for the 2'-deoxyriboside of natural deoxynucleosides, optimizing in vitro anti-HIV potency, oral bioavailability, and central nervous system (CNS) penetration....

  20. Comparison of depression, anxiety, stress, and related factors among women and men with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Saadat; Zahra M Behboodi; Ebrahim Saadat

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare depression, anxiety, stress, and related factors among women and men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Settings And Design: In this cross-sectional survey conducted between November and September 2013, 200 participants with HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) attending Consultation Centers. Materials And Methods: Participants with HIV/AIDS were interviewed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales questionnaire (DASS 21 ). Results: There were...

  1. Comparison of the Genetic Recombination Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Macrophages and T Cells†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jianbo; Rhodes, Terence D.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exhibits a high level of genetic variation generated by frequent mutation and genetic recombination during reverse transcription. We have measured HIV-1 recombination rates in T cells in one round of virus replication. It was recently proposed that HIV-1 recombines far more frequently in macrophages than in T cells. In an attempt to delineate the mechanisms that elevate recombination, we measured HIV-1 recombination rates in macrophages at three dif...

  2. Cytoplasmic Utilization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic RNA Is Not Dependent on a Nuclear Interaction with Gag

    OpenAIRE

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Überla, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been...

  3. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine profiles in children exposed to or infected with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, B. N.; Lu, J. G.; Kline, M.W.; Paul, M.; Doyle, M; Kozinetz, C; Shearer, W T; Reuben, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, cytokine production profiles switch from predominantly type 1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) to type 2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines with disease progression. To test this hypothesis in vertically HIV-infected children, we measured cytokine transcription and production in rapid progressors (RPs), seroreverters (SRs), and those children exposed to HIV in utero (P0s). Production of type 1 and type 2 cytokines was measu...

  4. Esophago-pleural fistula with multiple esophageal ulcers in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Choi, Jae Phil; Son, Jin Sung [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Esophagitis is a common complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is caused by candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or idiopathic esophagitis with no detectable etiology. Esophagitis in HIV infected patient is occasionally combined with esophageal ulcers. We report chest CT findings and clinical manifestation of esophago-pleural fistula with pneumothorax in a HIV infected patient, who was treated for aspiration pneumonia and esophageal ulcers.

  5. A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Guidelines: Nutrition Support of Children With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sabery, Nasim; Duggan, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in children differ substantially from those in adults, and these differences are important to consider in providing both medical and nutrition care. Growth failure, wasting, and loss of active lean tissue are all associated with increased mortality and accelerated disease progression. The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the prognosis and life span of c...

  6. Evaluation of Oral Fluid Enzyme Immunoassay for Confirmation of a Positive Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Test Result▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wesolowski, L. G.; Sanchez, T.; MacKellar, D. A.; Branson, B. M.; Ethridge, S. F.; Constantine, N.; Ketema, F.; Sullivan, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    The CDC recommends that a reactive rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test be confirmed with an approved supplemental test; the performance of an intermediate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is optional. In support of this recommendation, it was found that of 1,431 reactive rapid HIV test results, 2 (0.1%) had false-negative oral fluid Western blot results and both had false-negative EIA results.

  7. Infection of primary CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus enhances human immunodeficiency virus expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, M; Zhang, R D; Wu, B; Henderson, E E

    1996-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes purified from normal adult donors by flow cytometry could be infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as measured by the accumulation of components of the EBV replicative cycle, viral DNA and viral transcripts encoding EBER1 and BRLF1. EBV infection resulted in enhanced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB in CD4+ lymphocytes as measured by accumulation of reverse transcriptase and formation of syncytia. Furthermore, a small percentage of C...

  8. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B, Cytomegalovirus, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses in Multitransfused Thalassemic Children in Upper Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Ramadan A.; El-Mazary, Abdel-Azeem M.; Khodeary, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background. Frequent blood transfusions in thalassemia major children expose them to the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) in thalassemic children attending the Pediatrics Departments of both Sohag and Minia Universities of Upper Egypt, during the period from May 2014 to May 2015. Methods. Serum samples were sc...

  9. A Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease, N88S, That Causes In Vitro Hypersensitivity to Amprenavir

    OpenAIRE

    Ziermann, Rainer; Limoli, Kay; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Edward; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Parkin, Neil T.

    2000-01-01

    Amprenavir (Agenerase, 141-W94, VX-478) is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (PRI) recently approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in the United States. A major cause of treatment failure is the development of resistance to PRIs. One potential use for amprenavir is as salvage therapy for patients for whom treatment that includes one (or more) of the other four currently approved PRIs-saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, and nelfinavir-has failed. We evaluate...

  10. Thalidomide suppresses Up-regulation of human immunodeficiency virus coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juffermans, N. P.; Verbon, A.; Olszyna, D. P.; van Deventer, S. J.; Speelman, P.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    Concurrent infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection increases the expression of HIV coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. Thalidomide has beneficial effects in a number of HIV-associated diseases. The effect of thalidomide on CXCR4 and CCR5 expression on CD4+ T cells was

  11. Production of Interferon α by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on Induction of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dejiang; Kang, Kyung Hee; Spector, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The mechanisms responsible for interferon α (IFN-α) production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are unknown. This research examined the roles of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and autophagy in IFN-α production by pDCs during HIV-1 infection.

  12. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  13. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer: Results of a Clinical Trial in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Subjects with Facial Lipoatrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tagle, Jorge M.; Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in t...

  14. Adaptation of Subtype A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope to Pig-Tailed Macaque Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Daryl; Overbaugh, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of macaques to HIV-1 infection in humans depends on how closely SHIVs mimic HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and diversity. Circulating HIV-1 strains are predominantly subtypes C and A and overwhelmingly require CCR5 for entry, yet most SHIVs incorporate CXCR4-using subtype B envelopes (Envs). While pathogenic subtype C-based SHIVs have been constructed, the subtype A-based SHIVs (SHIV-As) constructed to date have been unable to replicate in macaque cells. To understand the barriers to SHIV-A replication in macaque cells, HIVAQ23/SIVvif was constructed by engineering a CCR5-tropic subtype A provirus to express SIV vif, which counters the macaque APOBEC3G restriction. HIVAQ23/SIVvif replicated poorly in pig-tailed macaque (Ptm) lymphocytes, but viruses were adapted to Ptm lymphocytes. Two independent mutations in gp120, G312V (V3 loop) and A204E (C2 region), were identified that increased peak virus levels by >100-fold. Introduction of G312V and A204E to multiple subtype A Envs and substitution of G312 and A204 with other residues increased entry into Ptm cells by 10- to 100-fold. G312V and A204E Env variants continued to require CCR5 for entry but were up to 50- and 200-fold more sensitive to neutralization by IgG1b12 and soluble CD4 and had a 5- to 50-fold increase in their ability to utilize Ptm CD4 compared to their wild-type counterparts. These findings identify the inefficient use of Ptm CD4 as an unappreciated restriction to subtype A HIV-1 replication in Ptm cells and reveal amino acid changes to gp120 that can overcome this barrier. PMID:21325401

  15. Longitudinal study of surrogate aging measures during human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janice M; Fishbane, Nick; Jones, Meaghan; Morin, Alexander; Xu, Stella; Liu, Joseph Cy; MacIsaac, Julie; Milloy, M-J; Hayashi, Kanna; Montaner, Julio; Horvath, Steve; Kobor, Michael; Sin, Don D; Harrigan, P Richard; Man, S F Paul

    2017-02-23

    Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) harbor an increased risk of age-related conditions. We measured changes in telomere length and DNA methylation in the peripheral blood of 31 intravenous drug users, who were followed longitudinally with blood samples pre-HIV (T1), immediately post-HIV (T2; 1.9±1 year from T1), and at a later follow-up time (T3; 2.2±1 year from T2). Absolute telomere length measurements were performed using polymerase chain reaction methods. Methylation profiles were obtained using the Illumina Human Methylation450 platform. Methylation aging was assessed using the Horvath method. Telomere length significantly decreased between T1 and T2 (227±46 at T1 vs. 201±48 kbp/genome at T2, p=0.045), while no differences were observed between T2 and T3 (201±48 at T2 vs. 186±27 kbp/genome at T3, p=0.244). Methylation aging as measured by the age acceleration residual increased over the time course of HIV infection (p=0.035). CpG sites corresponding to PCBP2 and CSRNP1 were differentially methylated between T1 and T2 at a q-value <0.05. Telomere shortening and methylation changes can therefore be observed in the short-term period immediately following HIV seroconversion. Further studies to confirm these results in larger sample sizes and to compare these results to non-HIV and non-injection drug users are warranted.

  16. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  17. Subtypes and phylogenetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Jayapura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Widiyanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, a retrovirus that infects the human immune system, is genetically differentiated into HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV1 is classified into 3 groups: M,N and O. Group M is subdivided into 9 subtypes, namely: A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J and K. HIV subtype mapping would constitute a good reference base to study the epidemiology of HIV-1. HIV phylogenetic analysis is required to understand virus origin, geographical distribution and tracking parameters of the HIV transmission process in a sample area. The objective of this study was to determine HIV-1 subtype distribution and the relationship between HIV-1 subtypes with genBank HIV isolates based on envelope gene fragments. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 36 subjects in Jayapura Regency between January and March 2013. Blood samples were taken and analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and nested PCR, and confirmed with sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was performed along 400 bp of envelope gene fragment. The data were analyzed with Bioedit ver.7 and MEGA 5.1. software. RESULTS Two HIV-1 subtypes were found in Jayapura Regency. Subtype CRF01_AE was confirmed in 31 patients (86.1% and subtype B in 5 patients (13.9%. Phylogenetic analysis showed phylogenetic relationships between CRF01_AE from Jayapura and subtypes from Singapore and Thailand, while subtype B from Jayapura was closely related to subtypes from United States and United Kingdom CONCLUSION The results of this study reflect the independent introduction of multiple HIV-1 strains into Papua, with the rapid spread of a single strain of HIV-1 (CRF01_AE in the majority of infected patients tested.

  18. Subtypes and phylogenetic analysis of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in Jayapura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Widiyanti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a retrovirus that infects human immune system. HIV is genetically differentiated into HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV- 1 is classified into 3 groups : M,N and O. M Group is divided into 9 subtypes, namely : A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J and K. HIV subtype mapping would become a good reference to study the epidemiology of HIV-1. HIV phylogenetic analysis required to understand virus origin, geographical distribution and tracking parameter of HIV transmission process in sample area. The objective of this study was to determine HIV-1 subtype distribution and the relationship between HIV-1 subtypes from with genBank HIV isolate based on envelope gene fragment. METHODS A cross setional design was conducted involving 36 subjects in Jayapura between January to March 2013. Blood samples were taken and analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, nested PCR and confirmed with sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis performed along 400 bp of envelope gene fragment. The data were analyzed with Bioedit ver.7 and MEGA 5.1. software. RESULT Two types of HIV-1 subtype were found in Jayapura Regency. CRF01_AE was confirmed in 31 patients (86.1% and subtype B in 5 patients (13.9%. Phylogenetic analysis showed phylogenetic relationship between CRF01_AE from jayapura with subtype from Singapore and Thailand, while subtype B from Jayapura were closely related with subtype from United States and United Kingdom CONCLUSION This study reflect the independent introduction of multiple HIV-1 strains into Papua, with the rapid spread in the majority of infected patients tested of single strain of HIV-1 (CRF01_AE.

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men treated at a referral hospital for sexually transmitted diseases in the Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkh, Alex Panizza; Miranda, Angelica Espinosa; Hurtado-Guerreiro, Jose Camilo; Ramos, Lorena Angelica Castano; Figliuolo, Guiseppe; Maia, Jussimara; Costa, Cintia Mara; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence and to identify the demographic, behavioural and clinical factors associated with C. trachomatis in human immunodeficiency virus infected men. This was a cross-sectional study of C. trachomatis prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus-infected men enrolled at the Outpatient clinic of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome of the Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. C. trachomatis deoxyribonucleic acid from urethral samples was purified and submitted to real time polymerase chain reaction to identify the presence of C. trachomatis. A total of 276 human immunodeficiency virus-infected men were included in the study. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection was 12% (95% confidence interval 8.1%-15.7%). The mean age of the participants was 34.63 (standard deviation 10.80) years. Of the 276 human immunodeficiency virus-infected men, 93 (56.2%) had more than one sexual partner in the past year and 105 (38.0%) reported having their first sexual intercourse under the age of 15 years. Men having sex with men and bisexuals amounted to 61.2% of the studied population. A total of 71.7% had received human immunodeficiency virus diagnosis in the last three years and 55.1% were using antiretroviral therapy. Factors associated with C. trachomatis infection in the logistic model were being single (p<0.034), men having sex with men (p<0.021), and having previous sexually transmitted diseases (p<0.001). The high prevalence of C. trachomatis infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected men highlights that screening human immunodeficiency virus-infected men for C. trachomatis, especially among men having sex with men, is paramount to control the spread of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and genotyping of Enterocytozoon bieneusi among human immunodeficiency virus infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanduja, Sonali; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Agarwal, Vikas; Pant, Priyannk; Ghoshal, Uday C

    Microsporidia cause diarrhea among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients worldwide. Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis are the most common species infecting HIV patients. Various genotypes of E. bieneusi are transmitted from human to human (anthroponotic route) or from animal to human (zoonotic route). However, there is no study from India on genotypes of E. bieneusi among infected hosts. Therefore, we aimed to (a) study the prevalence, clinical symptoms, and species identification of microsporidia among HIV infected patients and (b) perform a genotypic analysis of E. bieneusi and a phylogenetic interpretation of the transmission of different genotypes among infected hosts. Two hundred and twenty-two HIV-infected patients and 220 healthy controls (HC) were tested for the presence of microsporidia using modified trichrome (MT) staining and PCR. Demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters were studied. Species identification was performed using PCR-RFLP. All E. bieneusi isolates were subjected to genotypic and phylogenetic analysis. Patients with HIV [n=222, age 37.4±10.4y, 169 (76%) male] were more commonly infected with microsporidia than the HC [n=220, age 34.5±6.5y, 156 (71%) male], using MT stain and PCR [4/222, 1.8% vs. 0/220, p=0.04]. Patients infected with microsporidia more commonly presented with diarrhea than those not infected with microsporidia [4, 100% vs. 98/218, 45%; p=0.04]. E. bieneusi was detected in all patients with microsporidia. Four novel genotypes (Ind1 to Ind4) were identified. Ind1 showed 95% similarity with genotype L (AF267142.1) reported in cats (Germany). Genotypes Ind2 to Ind4 showed 94-96% similarity to host-specific genotype A (AF101197.1) reported in humans. Phylogenetic analysis mainly showed an anthroponotic route of transmission (3/4), while the zoonotic route (1/4) was also observed. The prevalence of microsporidia among HIV-infected patients was 1.8%. Patients with microsporidia