WorldWideScience

Sample records for human identity testing

  1. Human Rights and Cultural Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Stewart Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Universal human rights and particular cultural identities, which are relativistic by nature, seem to stand in conflict with each other. It is commonly suggested that the relativistic natures of cultural identities undermine universal human rights and that human rights might compromise particular cultural identities in a globalised world. This article examines this supposed clash and suggests that it is possible to frame a human rights approach in such a way that it becomes the starting point and constraining framework for all non-deficient cultural identities. In other words, it is possible to depict human rights in a culturally sensitive way so that universal human rights can meet the demands of a moderate version of meta-ethical relativism which acknowledges a small universal core of objectively true or false moral statements and avers that, beyond that small core, all other moral statements are neither objectively true nor false.

  2. Human Rights and Cultural Identity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon John-Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ...-deficient cultural identities. In other words, it is possible to depict human rights in a culturally sensitive way so that universal human rights can meet the demands of a moderate version of meta-ethical relativism which acknowledges a small universal core of objectively true or false moral statements and avers that, beyond that small core, all other moral statements are neither objectively true nor false.

  3. Mitochondrial D-loop {open_quotes}signatures{close_quotes} produced by low-stringency single specific primer PCR constitute a simple comparative human identity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, G.; Vago, A.R.; Pena, S.D.J. [and others

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a technique called {open_quotes}LSSP-PCR{close_quotes} (low-stringency single specific primer PCR) that detects single or multiple mutations in DNA. A purified DNA fragment is submitted to PCR by using a single primer specific for one of the extremities of the fragment, under conditions of very low stringency. The primer hybridizes specifically to its complementary extremity and nonspecifically to multiple sites within the fragment, in a sequence-dependent manner. A complex set of reaction products is thus created that, when separated by electrophoresis, constitutes a unique {open_quotes}gene signature.{close_quotes} We here report the application of LSSP-PCR to the detection of sequence variation in the control (D-loop) region of human mtDNA, which is known to differ significantly between unrelated individuals. We prepared human DNA samples from blood and amplified a 1,024-bp portion of the mtDNA control region, using primers L15996 and H408. The amplified mtDNA fragments were then reamplified under LSSP-PCR conditions by using L15996 or H408 as drivers to produce complex signatures that always differed between unrelated individuals and yet were highly reproducible. In contrast, all mother-child pairs tested were identical, as expected from the matrilineal inheritance of mtDNA. Thus, the use of LSSP-PCR to produce D-loop signatures constitutes a powerful new technique for mtDNA-based comparative identity testing. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  4. The Identity of Language Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Two early publications are often cited as the genesis of the language testing field: (1) Lado's (1961) book on language testing; and (2) Carroll's (1961) fundamental considerations paper. The former is the first textbook on assessing foreign language ability. The latter is the first true statement of theory. The former is the first publication to…

  5. Ethnic identity, identity coherence, and psychological functioning: testing basic assumptions of the developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Moin; Juang, Linda P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test three fundamental theoretical propositions from Phinney's (1990) developmental model about the relations among ethnic identity, identity coherence, and psychological functioning: (a) ethnic identity is more strongly related to identity coherence for ethnic minorities than for Whites; (b) ethnic identity is more strongly related to psychological functioning for ethnic minorities than for Whites; and (c) identity coherence mediates the association between ethnic identity and psychological functioning for ethnic minorities, but not for Whites. These hypotheses were tested in three independent samples of ethnically diverse youth. In general, we found weak to moderate support for these three hypotheses, suggesting that the theoretically proposed differences in ethnic identity between ethnic minorities and Whites may not be supported by data. Implications for theory and measurement of ethnic identity are discussed.

  6. 1 THE HUMANITIES AND NATIONAL IDENTITY, SECURITY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    looked at clarification of concepts like the humanities, national ... challenges of Nigeria in terms of national identity and security. The ... among different ethnic groups in Nigeria and also pose a .... with political representation as well as access to and control of ... identity instead of national identity is articulated in all aspects.

  7. Pupil identity in the context of testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Rasmussen, Annette

    on theory of Basil Bernstein about different pedagogies (visible and invisible) (Bernstein 1997). Recently national mandatory standardized testing has been implemented in compulsory school in Denmark (2010). Getting insight into how and by which processes such kind of assessment affect pedagogic practise...

  8. Pupil identity in the context of testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Rasmussen, Annette

    on theory of Basil Bernstein about different pedagogies (visible and invisible) (Bernstein 1997). Recently national mandatory standardized testing has been implemented in compulsory school in Denmark (2010). Getting insight into how and by which processes such kind of assessment affect pedagogic practise...

  9. ID-Check: Online Concealed Information Test Reveals True Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuere, Bruno; Kleinberg, Bennett

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has already changed people's lives considerably and is likely to drastically change forensic research. We developed a web-based test to reveal concealed autobiographical information. Initial studies identified a number of conditions that affect diagnostic efficiency. By combining these moderators, this study investigated the full potential of the online ID-check. Participants (n = 101) tried to hide their identity and claimed a false identity in a reaction time-based Concealed Information Test. Half of the participants were presented with personal details (e.g., first name, last name, birthday), whereas the others only saw irrelevant details. Results showed that participants' true identity could be detected with high accuracy (AUC = 0.98; overall accuracy: 86-94%). Online memory detection can reliably and validly detect whether someone is hiding their true identity. This suggests that online memory detection might become a valuable tool for forensic applications.

  10. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  11. Genomics and identity: the bioinformatisation of human life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2009-06-01

    The genomics "revolution" is spreading. Originating in the molecular life sciences, it initially affected a number of biomedical research fields such as cancer genomics and clinical genetics. Now, however, a new "wave" of genomic bioinformation is transforming a widening array of disciplines, including those that address the social, historical and cultural dimensions of human life. Increasingly, bioinformation is affecting "human sciences" such as psychiatry, psychology, brain research, behavioural research ("behavioural genomics"), but also anthropology and archaeology ("bioarchaeology"). Thus, bioinformatics is having an impact on how we define and understand ourselves, how identities are formed and constituted, and, finally, on how we (on the basis of these redefined identities) assess and address some of the more concrete societal issues involved in genomics governance in various settings. This article explores how genomics and bioinformation, by influencing research agendas in the human sciences and the humanities, are affecting our self-image, our identity, the way we see ourselves. The impact of bioinformation on self-understanding will be assessed on three levels: (1) the collective level (the impact of comparative genomics on our understanding of human beings as a species), (2) the individual level (the impact of behavioural genomics on our understanding of ourselves as individuals), and (3) the genealogical level (the impact of population genomics on our understanding of human history, notably early human history). This threefold impact will be assessed from two seemingly incompatible philosophical perspectives, namely a "humanistic" perspective (represented in this article by Francis Fukuyama) and a "post-humanistic" one (represented by Peter Sloterdijk). On the basis of this analysis it will be concluded that, rather than focussing on human "enhancement" by adding or deleting genes, genome-oriented practices of the Self will focus on using genomics

  12. Genetics and human rights: Two histories: restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and identity suppression in Argentina and after compulsory isolation for leprosy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor B. Penchaszadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, there has been an accelerated development of genetic technology, leading to its use in human genetic identification for many purposes. Additionally, it has been made explicit that identity is a fundamental human right. A number of historical circumstances have connected these developments. Personal identity is increasingly associated with the preservation and defense of human rights and is a tool to repair the violation of these rights, particularly the right to identity. In this article, we report the use of genetics to support the right to identity in two historical circumstances. First, we report the search, localization, DNA testing and genetic identification of 110 individuals who were appropriated as babies by the Argentine military dictatorship of 1976-1983 in the context of savage repression and egregious violations of human rights, including forced disappearance and suppression of identity. Second, we report on the repair of right-to-identity violations of hundreds of individuals that occurred during the process of compulsory isolation of patients with leprosy in Brazil through the Program "Reencontro", which has led to the genetic identification of 158 pairs of individuals who previously did not have proof that they were siblings. The high value placed on genetic identification by victims of identity suppression did not counter the prevailing view that genetic factors were not more important than other factors (social, emotional, educational, cultural, spiritual in determining the complex phenomenon of personal identity. The use of genetic identification as a tool to redress and repair human rights violations is a novel application of human genetics for the benefit of mankind.

  13. Genetics and human rights. Two histories: Restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and identity suppression in Argentina and after compulsory isolation for leprosy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchaszadeh, Victor B; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2014-03-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been an accelerated development of genetic technology, leading to its use in human genetic identification for many purposes. Additionally, it has been made explicit that identity is a fundamental human right. A number of historical circumstances have connected these developments. Personal identity is increasingly associated with the preservation and defense of human rights and is a tool to repair the violation of these rights, particularly the right to identity. In this article, we report the use of genetics to support the right to identity in two historical circumstances. First, we report the search, localization, DNA testing and genetic identification of 110 individuals who were appropriated as babies by the Argentine military dictatorship of 1976-1983 in the context of savage repression and egregious violations of human rights, including forced disappearance and suppression of identity. Second, we report on the repair of right-to-identity violations of hundreds of individuals that occurred during the process of compulsory isolation of patients with leprosy in Brazil through the Program "Reencontro", which has led to the genetic identification of 158 pairs of individuals who previously did not have proof that they were siblings. The high value placed on genetic identification by victims of identity suppression did not counter the prevailing view that genetic factors were not more important than other factors (social, emotional, educational, cultural, spiritual) in determining the complex phenomenon of personal identity. The use of genetic identification as a tool to redress and repair human rights violations is a novel application of human genetics for the benefit of mankind.

  14. Deterministic Identity Testing of Read-Once Algebraic Branching Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Maurice; Sarma, Jayalal

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study polynomial identity testing of sums of $k$ read-once algebraic branching programs ($\\Sigma_k$-RO-ABPs), generalizing the work in (Shpilka and Volkovich 2008,2009), who considered sums of $k$ read-once formulas ($\\Sigma_k$-RO-formulas). We show that $\\Sigma_k$-RO-ABPs are strictly more powerful than $\\Sigma_k$-RO-formulas, for any $k \\leq \\lfloor n/2\\rfloor$, where $n$ is the number of variables. We obtain the following results: 1) Given free access to the RO-ABPs in the sum, we get a deterministic algorithm that runs in time $O(k^2n^7s) + n^{O(k)}$, where $s$ bounds the size of any largest RO-ABP given on the input. This implies we have a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for testing whether the sum of a constant number of RO-ABPs computes the zero polynomial. 2) Given black-box access to the RO-ABPs computing the individual polynomials in the sum, we get a deterministic algorithm that runs in time $k^2n^{O(\\log n)} + n^{O(k)}$. 3) Finally, given only black-box access to the polyn...

  15. An Empirical Test of Erikson's Theory of Ego Identity Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, James E.; Levine, Charles G.

    1989-01-01

    This study explores interrelationships among the following components of Erik Erikson's theory of ego identity formation: (1) the identity crisis; (2) the institutionalized moratoria; (3) the ego-superego struggle for dominance of the personality; and (4) the value orientation stages. Humanistically oriented adolescents are more likely to have a…

  16. Women and human rights: undoing images, (re constructing identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Stecanela

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Located in the context of studies on gender and violence, this paper interprets cases of violence against women, namely those in which the victim seeks for support services. It is part of a research being carried out in the southern region of Brazil, and debates the need to "deconstruct old images" in order to give place to "new identities" as a form of helping women to move from a victim's position towards playing the leading role of their own lives, in charge of their own choices and writing their own stories. This paper relates the urgency to revise socializing processes that will inculcate on everyday practices - of both men and women - another way of perceiving, conceiving and living their conditions as men and women in contemporaneity. It starts from the principle that it is not enough to assure rights and punish the aggressors. What has become evident in our first contacts with the research field points at the fight against gender violence being closely related to the representations that women have about domestic violence, since most of them only acknowledge physical violence, ignoring the other forms of violence. Generically, they consider gender differences as something natural and believe they occupy an inferior position in relation to men. Gender violence is a social construction that strengthens male domination and oppresses women. The challenge, thus, is to transform violence against women from a private into a public problem; that is, into an issue of human rights and gender equality. Key-words: Gender identities; Human rights; Violence against women.

  17. Mediating Teacher Professional Identity: The Emergence of Humanness and Ethical Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly Thi; Nguyen, Nhai Thi

    2013-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, international vocational education and training has been much debated at the nexus of the commercialisation of vocational education and social justice for international students. This nexus has significantly affected the professional identity and responsibilities of teachers who are directly involved in providing…

  18. Safety evaluation of the human-identical milk monosaccharide, l-fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sharon S H; Lynch, Barry S; Baldwin, Nigel; Dakoulas, Emily W; Roy, Shambhu; Moore, Carey; Thorsrud, Bjorn A; Röhrig, Christoph H

    2015-06-01

    l-Fucose is a natural monosaccharide present in mammals where it is found predominantly as an O-glycosidically linked component of glycoproteins, glycolipids, and oligosaccharides. It is also present in its free form in human breast milk (human milk monosaccharide). l-Fucose plays important roles in the development of the immune and nervous systems and is involved in cognitive function and memory formation. The human-identical milk monosaccharide l-fucose is therefore proposed for use in infant formulas to better simulate the free saccharides present in human breast milk. As part of the safety evaluation of l-fucose, a subchronic dietary toxicity study preceded by an in utero phase was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. l-Fucose was without maternal toxicity or compound-related adverse effects on female reproduction and general growth and development of offspring at a maternal dietary level up to 1%, equivalent to a dose of 1655 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day. During the subchronic phase, no compound-related adverse effects were observed in first generation rats at dietary levels of up to 1% (highest level tested), corresponding to doses of 516 and 665 mg/kg bw/day in males and females, respectively. l-Fucose was non-genotoxic in a series of in vitro genotoxicity/mutagenicity tests. These results support the safe use of l-fucose in infant formula and as a food ingredient at levels equivalent to those present in human breast milk.

  19. Only Human: Critical Reflections on Dance, Creation, and Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Margolin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the relationship between artistic creation and the negotiation of social identity in multicultural contexts.  Our discussion is largely grounded in the scholarship on critical multiculturalism, socio-cultural theories of artistic production, and on dance identity and education.  Through an arts-based, narrative analysis of our re-viewing of select performance DVDs from the amateur dance collective of which we were both members, we take the position that dance in multicultural contexts can create important opportunities for a critical reflection on how an artistic identity (i.e. “dancer” and a form of cultural production (i.e. “dance performance” - can both challenge and reinforce normative understandings about social identity (i.e. “gender”, “race”, “class”, etc..  We discuss the implications of this contradiction for dance creation, performance and education through the analytical themes of “Training, Technique and Choreography”; “Social Organization and Hierarchy”; and “Diversity and Inclusion”.

  20. Problems of Students Identity Development in the Educational Environment of the University for Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabdrakhmanova, Rashida G.; Khodyreva, Elena A.; Tornyova, Biyan?a L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the article is to determine the importance of students' identity development and self-development in the course of vocational training and identification of opportunities that the educational environment of a university for humanities may provide to develop the identity of subjects of vocational training. The leading methods of…

  1. ID-check: Online concealed information test reveals true identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuere, B.; Kleinberg, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has already changed people's lives considerably and is likely to drastically change forensic research. We developed a web-based test to reveal concealed autobiographical information. Initial studies identified a number of conditions that affect diagnostic efficiency. By combining these

  2. Dualism in Entanglement and Testing Quantum to Classical Transition of Identicity

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, S

    2005-01-01

    We show a hitherto unexplored consequence of the property of identicity in quantum mechanics. If two identical objects, distinguished by a dynamical variable A, are in certain entangled states of another dynamical variable B, then, for such states, they are also entangled in variable A when distinguished from each other by variable B. This dualism is independent of quantum statistics. Departures from identicity of the objects due to arbitrarily small differences in their innate attributes destroy this dualism. A system independent scheme to test the dualism is formulated which is readily realizable with photons. This scheme can be performed without requiring the entangled objects to be brought together. Thus whether two macro-systems behave as quantum identical objects can be probed without the complications of scattering. Such a study would complement the program of testing the validity of quantum superposition principle in the macro-domain which has stimulated considerable experimentation.

  3. An environment-dependent transcriptional network specifies human microglia identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselin, David; Skola, Dylan; Coufal, Nicole G.; Holtman, Inge R.; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.; Sajti, Eniko; Jaeger, Baptiste N.; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Pasillas, Martina P.; Pena, Monique; Adair, Amy; Gonda, David D.; Levy, Michael L.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Gage, Fred H.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2017-01-01

    Microglia play essential roles in central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis and influence diverse aspects of neuronal function. However, the transcriptional mechanisms that specify human microglia phenotypes are largely unknown. We examined the transcriptomes and epigenetic landscapes of human microg

  4. Psychological aspects of human cloning and genetic manipulation: the identity and uniqueness of human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, N M

    2009-01-01

    Human cloning has become one of the most controversial debates about reproduction in Western civilization. Human cloning represents asexual reproduction, but the critics of human cloning argue that the result of cloning is not a new individual who is genetically unique. There is also awareness in the scientific community, including the medical community, that human cloning and the creation of clones are inevitable. Psychology and other social sciences, together with the natural sciences, will need to find ways to help the healthcare system, to be prepared to face the new challenges introduced by the techniques of human cloning. One of those challenges is to help the healthcare system to find specific standards of behaviour that could be used to help potential parents to interact properly with cloned babies or children created through genetic manipulation. In this paper, the concepts of personality, identity and uniqueness are discussed in relationship to the contribution of twin studies in these areas. The author argues that an individual created by human cloning techniques or any other type of genetic manipulation will not show the donor's characteristics to the extent of compromising uniqueness. Therefore, claims to such an effect are needlessly alarmist.

  5. Genetics and human rights: Two histories: restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and identity suppression in Argentina and after compulsory isolation for leprosy in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Penchaszadeh,Victor B.; Lavinia Schuler-Faccini

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been an accelerated development of genetic technology, leading to its use in human genetic identification for many purposes. Additionally, it has been made explicit that identity is a fundamental human right. A number of historical circumstances have connected these developments. Personal identity is increasingly associated with the preservation and defense of human rights and is a tool to repair the violation of these rights, particularly the right to i...

  6. Identity's identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    in Academic English and more everyday-based English, identity as a lexeme is definitely worth having a look at. This paper presents a lexicological study of identity in which some of its senses are identified and their behaviors in actual discourse are observed. Drawing on data from the 2011 section...... of the Corpus of Contemporary American English, a behavioral profile of the distributional characteristics of identity is set up. Behavioral profiling is a lexicographical method developed by the corpus linguist Stefan Th. Gries which, by applying semantic ID tagging and statistical analysis, provides a fine......-grained insight into the semantic affinities of one or more lexemes. The main premise is that the semantic properties of a linguistic unit are reflected in its distributional characteristics, and, thus, by observing association patterns of a lexeme we can gain useful insights into its semantic affinities. Thus...

  7. Molecular identity of human outer radial glia during cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Chen, Jiadong; Retallack, Hanna; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Nicholas, Cory R; Shuga, Joe; Liu, Siyuan John; Oldham, Michael C; Diaz, Aaron; Lim, Daniel A; Leyrat, Anne A; West, Jay A; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-24

    Radial glia, the neural stem cells of the neocortex, are located in two niches: the ventricular zone and outer subventricular zone. Although outer subventricular zone radial glia may generate the majority of human cortical neurons, their molecular features remain elusive. By analyzing gene expression across single cells, we find that outer radial glia preferentially express genes related to extracellular matrix formation, migration, and stemness, including TNC, PTPRZ1, FAM107A, HOPX, and LIFR. Using dynamic imaging, immunostaining, and clonal analysis, we relate these molecular features to distinctive behaviors of outer radial glia, demonstrate the necessity of STAT3 signaling for their cell cycle progression, and establish their extensive proliferative potential. These results suggest that outer radial glia directly support the subventricular niche through local production of growth factors, potentiation of growth factor signals by extracellular matrix proteins, and activation of self-renewal pathways, thereby enabling the developmental and evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex.

  8. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The is...

  9. Identities of Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains.

  10. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains. PMID:18799696

  11. Diagnostic Tests in Human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Nouri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Brucellosis represents a zoonotic bacterial disease, caused by a gram negative bacterium called Brucella. Between the diverses pecies of this bacteria, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and B. canis consist the main causes of the disease in humans.More than half a million new cases of Brucellosis are reported annually. Consequently, brucellosis is a remarkable threat for the health of society. Because of the multiple nonspecific clinical signs of this infection, such as fever (60% of cases, night sweating, insomnia and anorexia, which are similar to other diseases, the detection of brucellosis is time-consuming and needs more scrutiny. Evidence Acquisition: Blood culture is considered the gold standard for the detection of brucellosis and the sensitivity of this test in the acute form is high. However, for the chronic type of disease, it is remarkably low, in addition, in some cases, it needs long reaction times. Nevertheless, today, some kinds of tests like automatic culturing system and serological methods, such as Rose Bengal (RB test, serum agglutination test (SAT, 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME and coombs, which are operated based on agglutination, are useful for the problems mentioned earlier. Conclusion: Although serological methods are common for the diagnosis of brucellosis, false results are observable for several methods, such as the SAT method. Tests like the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, for the screening of specific traits, although confirmed, have their advantages and defects. The lateral flow assay (LFA shows promising evidence to be effective in the diagnosis of brucellosis. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is more prevalent than other common tests, according to sensitivity and fast answering potency in case of molecular diagnosis. Also, PCR is proper for patients' follow-up during the period of treatment and crimination of relapse by this method is easier compared to others.

  12. Testing a model of minority identity achievement, identity affirmation, and psychological well-being among ethnic minority and sexual minority individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Negin; Fingerhut, Adam; Peplau, Letitia A; Grant, Sheila K; Wittig, Michele A

    2011-01-01

    How is social identity related to psychological well-being among minority individuals? Drawing on developmental models of identity formation (e.g., Erikson, 1968) and on Social Identity Theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), we tested a conceptual model examining links between two key aspects of social identity and psychological well-being. We proposed that the association between identity achievement (exploring and understanding the meaning of one's identity) and psychological well-being is mediated by identity affirmation (developing positive feelings and a sense of belonging to one's social group). Across three studies, including ethnic minority high school students (Study 1), ethnic minority college students (Study 2) and lesbian and gay male adults (Study 3), we found strong support for the model. Results suggest that the process of exploring and understanding one's minority identity can serve as an important basis for developing positive feelings toward and an enhanced sense of attachment to the group, which can in turn confer psychological benefits for minority individuals. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. A deterministic polynomial time algorithm for non-commutative rational identity testing with applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for testing if a symbolic matrix in non-commuting variables over $\\mathbb{Q}$ is invertible or not. The analogous question for commuting variables is the celebrated polynomial identity testing (PIT) for symbolic determinants. In contrast to the commutative case, which has an efficient probabilistic algorithm, the best previous algorithm for the non-commutative setting required exponential time (whether or not randomization is ...

  14. Mutations in the paralogous human α-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Moradkhani (Kamran); C. Prehu (Claude); J. Old (John); S. Henderson (Shirley); V. Balamitsa (Vera); H-Y. Luo; M-C. Poon (Man-Chiu); D.H. Chui (David); H. Wajcman (Henri); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe human α-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical α-globin chain. Over half of the α-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these varian

  15. Identity and dignity within the human rights discourse: An anthropological and praxis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Louw

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theological discourse mostly focuses on the moral and ethical framework for human rights and human dignity. In order to give theological justification to the value and dignity of human beings, most theologians point to the imago Dei as theological starting point for the design of an anthropology on human dignity. Within the paradigmatic framework of democracy, human dignity and human rights have become interchangeable concepts. This article aimed to focus not on ethics but on aesthetics: man as homo aestheticus, as well as the praxis question regarding the quality of human dignity within the network of human relationships. It was argued that human dignity is more fundamental than human rights. Dignity as an anthropological construct should not reside in the first place in the imago Dei and its relationship to Christology and incarnation theology. Human dignity, human rights and human identity are embedded in the basic human quest for meaning (teleology. As such, human dignity should, in a practical theological approach to anthropology, be dealt with from the aesthetic perspective of charisma, thus the option for inhabitational theology. As an anthropological category, human dignity should be viewed from the perspective of pneumatology within the networking framework of a �spiritual humanism�. In this regard, the theology of the Dutch theologian A.A. van Ruler, and especially his seminal 1968 work Ik geloof, should be revisited by a pneumatic anthropology within the parameters of practical theology.

  16. When a Talking-Face Computer Agent Is Half-Human and Half-Humanoid: Human Identity and Consistency Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Nass, Clifford

    2007-01-01

    Computer-generated anthropomorphic characters are a growing type of communicator that is deployed in digital communication environments. An essential theoretical question is how people identify humanlike but clearly artificial, hence humanoid, entities in comparison to natural human ones. This identity categorization inquiry was approached under…

  17. Distinct cerebral pathways for object identity and number in human infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Izard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available All humans, regardless of their culture and education, possess an intuitive understanding of number. Behavioural evidence suggests that numerical competence may be present early on in infancy. Here, we present brain-imaging evidence for distinct cerebral coding of number and object identity in 3-mo-old infants. We compared the visual event-related potentials evoked by unforeseen changes either in the identity of objects forming a set, or in the cardinal of this set. In adults and 4-y-old children, number sense relies on a dorsal system of bilateral intraparietal areas, different from the ventral occipitotemporal system sensitive to object identity. Scalp voltage topographies and cortical source modelling revealed a similar distinction in 3-mo-olds, with changes in object identity activating ventral temporal areas, whereas changes in number involved an additional right parietoprefrontal network. These results underscore the developmental continuity of number sense by pointing to early functional biases in brain organization that may channel subsequent learning to restricted brain areas.

  18. Teachers’ Professional Identities in an Era of Testing Accountability in Japan: The Case of Teachers in Low-Performing Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Katsuno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tentative findings and discussions arising from an ongoing study on whether and how Japanese teachers’ professional identities have shifted in the context of heightened testing accountability. After a brief description of policy development that led to the introduction of national testing in 2007, previous studies of teacher identity are reviewed. Having explored some ambiguity in the existent theories regarding the trajectories and consequences of identity work, the paper goes on to report and to analyse the cases of six teachers from three low-performing elementary schools in a northern Japanese administrative region. With the limited size and scope of the sample, the present research cannot claim generalisability, but it can still raise a number of theoretical issues for further investigation, such as the precariousness of teachers’ strategies for sustaining their professional identities and the need for locating teachers’ identity work in the micropolitics of schools.

  19. [Quality assurance in human genetic testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhrmann-Spangenberg, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Advances in technical developments of genetic diagnostics for more than 50 years, as well as the fact that human genetic testing is usually performed only once in a lifetime, with additional impact for blood relatives, are determining the extraordinary importance of quality assurance in human genetic testing. Abidance of laws, directives, and guidelines plays a major role. This article aims to present the major laws, directives, and guidelines with respect to quality assurance of human genetic testing, paying careful attention to internal and external quality assurance. The information on quality assurance of human genetic testing was obtained through a web-based search of the web pages that are referred to in this article. Further information was retrieved from publications in the German Society of Human Genetics and through a PubMed-search using term quality + assurance + genetic + diagnostics. The most important laws, directives, and guidelines for quality assurance of human genetic testing are the gene diagnostics law (GenDG), the directive of the Federal Medical Council for quality control of clinical laboratory analysis (RiliBÄK), and the S2K guideline for human genetic diagnostics and counselling. In addition, voluntary accreditation under DIN EN ISO 15189:2013 offers a most recommended contribution towards quality assurance of human genetic testing. Legal restraints on quality assurance of human genetic testing as mentioned in § 5 GenDG are fulfilled once RiliBÄK requirements are followed.

  20. A SNP panel for identity and kinship testing using massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandell, Ida; Samara, Raed; Tillmar, Andreas O

    2016-07-01

    Within forensic genetics, there is still a need for supplementary DNA marker typing in order to increase the power to solve cases for both identity testing and complex kinship issues. One major disadvantage with current capillary electrophoresis (CE) methods is the limitation in DNA marker multiplex capability. By utilizing massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technology, this capability can, however, be increased. We have designed a customized GeneRead DNASeq SNP panel (Qiagen) of 140 previously published autosomal forensically relevant identity SNPs for analysis using MPS. One single amplification step was followed by library preparation using the GeneRead Library Prep workflow (Qiagen). The sequencing was performed on a MiSeq System (Illumina), and the bioinformatic analyses were done using the software Biomedical Genomics Workbench (CLC Bio, Qiagen). Forty-nine individuals from a Swedish population were genotyped in order to establish genotype frequencies and to evaluate the performance of the assay. The analyses showed to have a balanced coverage among the included loci, and the heterozygous balance showed to have less than 0.5 % outliers. Analyses of dilution series of the 2800M Control DNA gave reproducible results down to 0.2 ng DNA input. In addition, typing of FTA samples and bone samples was performed with promising results. Further studies and optimizations are, however, required for a more detailed evaluation of the performance of degraded and PCR-inhibited forensic samples. In summary, the assay offers a straightforward sample-to-genotype workflow and could be useful to gain information in forensic casework, for both identity testing and in order to solve complex kinship issues.

  1. Natural selection and the distribution of identity-by-descent in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    There has recently been considerable interest in detecting natural selection in the human genome. Selection will usually tend to increase identity-by-descent (IBD) among individuals in a population, and many methods for detecting recent and ongoing positive selection indirectly take advantage......, we use a recently developed method for identifying IBD sharing among individuals from genome-wide data to scan populations from the new HapMap phase 3 project for regions with excess IBD sharing in order to identify regions in the human genome that have been under strong, very recent selection....... The HLA region is by far the region showing the most extreme signal, suggesting that much of the strong recent selection acting on the human genome has been immune related and acting on HLA loci. As equilibrium overdominance does not tend to increase IBD, we argue that this type of selection cannot...

  2. Masculinity and Femininity: Essential to the Identity of the Human Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Nancy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The title of this congress begins with the word “identity”. It also includes the word “reciprocity,” which indicates a form of relationship and finally, “gift of self”. This would lead us to conclude that the identity of the human person has something to do with reciprocity and that reciprocity involves giving of oneself to others. This talk will attempt to shed light on how the concept of gender might in some way be incorporated into these three concepts.

  3. Bacterial agglutinin activity in the saliva of human identical and fraternal twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, D; Christensen, C M; Navazesh, M; Davis, C

    1988-01-01

    The major factor in human saliva responsible for the specific aggregation of oral streptococci is a high molecular-weight glycoprotein (agglutinin). To determine if the level of this glycoprotein in whole and parotid saliva was genetically determined, agglutinin activity for Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans in saliva obtained from identical and fraternal twins was compared. Evidence for the heritability of agglutinin activity and also parotid flow rate and total protein was obtained. There was no evidence for a significant genetic contribution to salivary sodium concentration.

  4. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: II. Spin squeezing and other entanglement tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, B. J.; Goold, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Reid, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. The main focus is on two mode entanglement, but multi-mode entanglement is also considered. The bosons may be atoms or molecules as in cold quantum gases. The previous paper I dealt with the general features of quantum entanglement and its specific definition in the case of systems of identical bosons. Entanglement is a property shared between two (or more) quantum sub-systems. In defining entanglement for systems of identical massive particles, it was concluded that the single particle states or modes are the most appropriate choice for sub-systems that are distinguishable, that the general quantum states must comply both with the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules (SSR) that forbid quantum superpositions of states with differing total particle number (global SSR compliance). Further, it was concluded that (in the separable states) quantum superpositions of sub-system states with differing sub-system particle number (local SSR compliance) also do not occur. The present paper II determines possible tests for entanglement based on the treatment of entanglement set out in paper I. Several inequalities involving variances and mean values of operators have been previously proposed as tests for entanglement between two sub-systems. These inequalities generally involve mode annihilation and creation operators and include the inequalities that define spin squeezing. In this paper, spin squeezing criteria for two mode systems are examined, and spin squeezing is also considered for principle spin operator components where the covariance matrix is diagonal. The proof, which is based on our SSR compliant approach shows that the presence of spin squeezing in any one of the spin components requires entanglement of the relevant pair of modes. A simple Bloch vector test for

  5. A parametric approach to kinship hypothesis testing using identity-by-descent parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Magariños, Manuel; Egeland, Thore; López-de-Ullibarri, Ignacio; Hjort, Nils L; Salas, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    There is a large number of applications where family relationships need to be determined from DNA data. In forensic science, competing ideas are in general verbally formulated as the two hypotheses of a test. For the most common paternity case, the null hypothesis states that the alleged father is the true father against the alternative hypothesis that the father is an unrelated man. A likelihood ratio is calculated to summarize the evidence. We propose an alternative framework whereby a model and the hypotheses are formulated in terms of parameters representing identity-by-descent probabilities. There are several advantages to this approach. Firstly, the alternative hypothesis can be completely general. Specifically, the alternative does not need to specify an unrelated man. Secondly, the parametric formulation corresponds to the approach used in most other applications of statistical hypothesis testing and so there is a large theory of classical statistics that can be applied. Theoretical properties of the test statistic under the null hypothesis are studied. An extension to trios of individuals has been carried out. The methods are exemplified using simulations and a real dataset of 27 Spanish Romani individuals.

  6. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  7. Analysis of the human intestinal microbiota from 92 volunteers after ingestion of identical meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J S; Touyama, M; Kibe, R; Tanaka, Y; Benno, Y; Kobayashi, T; Shimakawa, M; Maruo, T; Toda, T; Matsuda, I; Tagami, H; Matsumoto, M; Seo, G; Chonan, O; Benno, Y

    2013-06-01

    The intestinal microbiota composition of 92 volunteers living in Japan was identified following the consumption of 'identical meals' (1,879 kcal/day) for 3 days. When faecal samples were analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism with several primer-restriction enzyme systems and then clustered, the patterns could be divided into 2 clusters. Contribution tests and partition modelling showed that OTU211 of the 35f-MspI system and OTU237 of the 35f-AluI system were key factors in the distribution of these groups. However, significant differences among these groups in terms of body mass index and age were not observed.

  8. Deterministic Black-Box Identity Testing $\\pi$-Ordered Algebraic Branching Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Maurice; Sarma, Jayalal

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study algebraic branching programs (ABPs) with restrictions on the order and the number of reads of variables in the program. Given a permutation $\\pi$ of $n$ variables, for a $\\pi$-ordered ABP ($\\pi$-OABP), for any directed path $p$ from source to sink, a variable can appear at most once on $p$, and the order in which variables appear on $p$ must respect $\\pi$. An ABP $A$ is said to be of read $r$, if any variable appears at most $r$ times in $A$. Our main result pertains to the identity testing problem. Over any field $F$ and in the black-box model, i.e. given only query access to the polynomial, we have the following result: read $r$ $\\pi$-OABP computable polynomials can be tested in $\\DTIME[2^{O(r\\log r \\cdot \\log^2 n \\log\\log n)}]$. Our next set of results investigates the computational limitations of OABPs. It is shown that any OABP computing the determinant or permanent requires size $\\Omega(2^n/n)$ and read $\\Omega(2^n/n^2)$. We give a multilinear polynomial $p$ in $2n+1$ variables ov...

  9. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  10. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  11. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional

  12. Testing the Factorial Invariance of the Black Racial Identity Scale across Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Joe L., II

    2011-01-01

    Given that over 50 studies have been published using the Black Racial Identity Scale (BRIAS), the study of its dimensions and structural components are important to understanding Black people and the evolution of Black racial identity theory. Unconstrained and constrained confirmatory factor analysis models were estimated across males and females…

  13. Testing the Factorial Invariance of the Black Racial Identity Scale across Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Joe L., II

    2011-01-01

    Given that over 50 studies have been published using the Black Racial Identity Scale (BRIAS), the study of its dimensions and structural components are important to understanding Black people and the evolution of Black racial identity theory. Unconstrained and constrained confirmatory factor analysis models were estimated across males and females…

  14. Human food preferences and cultural identity: the case of Aragón (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Luis; Espeitx, Elena; Gil Lacruz, Marta; Martín, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the relationship between sociocultural values and human food preferences. The latter, as shown in this paper, are greatly influenced by cultural identity. This work stems from a theoretical context that originated in Europe and the United States towards the mid-twentieth century, within the field of the anthropology of food. A qualitative and quantitative analysis has been performed in the Comunidad Autónoma de Aragón (Spain). Research methods include focus groups, in-depth interviews, participant observation, and a questionnaire that was handed out to a representative sample of the Aragonese population (816 people over 21 years of age; confidence level of 95.5% and error margin of ±3.5). Regarding the research outcome, a highly significant qualitative and quantitative connection has been found between food selection and cultural identity. In other words, people prefer to consume foods that are symbolically associated with their own culture, in order to reinforce their sense of belonging. Although this study has been carried out in Aragón, it is our belief that the results can be generalized to other areas. The originality and interest of our findings are notable considering that, to date, few works have analyzed the sociocultural factors motivating food behavior. Moreover, these results could be used by public and private organizations to meet objectives such as health promotion and product marketing.

  15. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the…

  16. The Franck Test for Gender Identity: Correlation with Occupation and Long-Term Stability of Score in Normal Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Roland

    1985-01-01

    A correlation was found between high (independent) occupational positions and masculine scores on the Franck Drawing Completion Test (FDCT). Acceptable individual long-term stability was also evident. The FDCT appears to be useful in assessing gender identity. (Author/ABB)

  17. An Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2013-01-01

    Item response models (IRMs) were used to analyze Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores. Rasch analysis scores were compared with classical test theory (CTT) scores. The partial credit model demonstrated a high goodness of fit and correlations between Rasch and CTT scores ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. CRIS scores are supported by both methods.…

  18. The right to know your genetic parents: from open-identity gamete donation to routine paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelingien, An; Pennings, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Over the years a number of countries have abolished anonymous gamete donation and shifted toward open-identity policies. Donor-conceived children are said to have a fundamental "right to know" the identity of their donor. In this article, we trace the arguments that underlie this claim and question its implications. We argue that, given the status attributed to the right to know one's gamete donor, it would be discriminatory not to extend this right to naturally conceived children with misattributed paternity. One way to facilitate this would be through routine paternity testing at birth. While this proposal is likely to raise concerns about the conflicting interests and rights of other people involved, we show that similar concerns apply to the context of open-identity gamete donation. Unless one can identify a rational basis for treating the two groups differently, one's stance toward both cases should be the same.

  19. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  20. National Development Generates National Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to test the relationship between national identities and modernisation. We test the hypotheses that not all forms of identity are equally compatible with modernisation as measured by Human Development Index. The less developed societies are characterised by strong ascribed national identities based on birth, territory and religion, but also by strong voluntarist identities based on civic features selected and/or achieved by an individual. While the former decreases with further modernisation, the latter may either decrease or remain at high levels and coexist with instrumental supranational identifications, typical for the most developed countries. The results, which are also confirmed by multilevel regression models, thus demonstrate that increasing modernisation in terms of development contributes to the shifts from classical, especially ascribed, identities towards instrumental identifications. These findings are particularly relevant in the turbulent times increasingly dominated by the hardly predictable effects of the recent mass migrations. PMID:26841050

  1. Visual Coding of Human Bodies: Perceptual Aftereffects Reveal Norm-Based, Opponent Coding of Body Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Gillian; Jeffery, Linda; Boeing, Alexandra; Calder, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the discovery of body-selective neural areas in occipitotemporal cortex, little is known about how bodies are visually coded. We used perceptual adaptation to determine how body identity is coded. Brief exposure to a body (e.g., anti-Rose) biased perception toward an identity with opposite properties (Rose). Moreover, the size of this…

  2. The activation of visual memory for facial identity is task-dependent: evidence from human electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Friederike G S; Eimer, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The question whether the recognition of individual faces is mandatory or task-dependent is still controversial. We employed the N250r component of the event-related potential as a marker of the activation of representations of facial identity in visual memory, in order to find out whether identity-related information from faces is encoded and maintained even when facial identity is task-irrelevant. Pairs of faces appeared in rapid succession, and the N250r was measured in response to repetitions of the same individual face, as compared to presentations of two different faces. In Experiment 1, an N250r was present in an identity matching task where identity information was relevant, but not when participants had to detect infrequent targets (inverted faces), and facial identity was task-irrelevant. This was the case not only for unfamiliar faces, but also for famous faces, suggesting that even famous face recognition is not as automatic as is often assumed. In Experiment 2, an N250r was triggered by repetitions of non-famous faces in a task where participants had to match the view of each face pair, and facial identity had to be ignored. This shows that when facial features have to be maintained in visual memory for a subsequent comparison, identity-related information is retained as well, even when it is irrelevant. Our results suggest that individual face recognition is neither fully mandatory nor completely task-dependent. Facial identity is encoded and maintained in tasks that involve visual memory for individual faces, regardless of the to-be-remembered feature. In tasks without this memory component, irrelevant visual identity information can be completely ignored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylund, D J; Ziegner, U H; Hooper, D G

    1992-06-01

    The performance of HIV testing requires meticulous attention to preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic variables, especially matters of patient confidentiality. Laboratory directors must pay strict attention to quality control and quality assurance practices. Careful attention to these considerations can produce a screening program in low-prevalence populations that has an extremely low false-positive rate, with a positive predictive value of greater than 99%. Issuing a clear and concise laboratory report to the clinician is important. The Fifth Consensus Conference on Testing for Human Retroviruses of the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors, March 1990, has recommended that ELISA be reported as reactive or nonreactive; IFA as reactive, nonreactive, or nonspecific, and WB as reactive, nonreactive, or indeterminate. It is recommended that the terms positive and negative be reserved for the summary interpretation given at the conclusion of the HIV-1 antibody testing algorithm. The testing algorithm used for HIV antibody screening at Scripps Clinic is shown in Figure 3. Other algorithms for complete testing on a single sample only or on two separate samples are reported. We agree with others that the patient should not be counseled for infection with HIV until a reactive confirmatory test(s) establishes a positive diagnosis. Certain special situations in diagnostic testing deserve comment. Establishing the diagnosis of HIV infection can be difficult in seronegative persons with acute infection. Polymerase chain reaction, viral culture or antigen detection may be useful tests in this situation. However, careful interpretation of test results and close correlation with patient risk factors are important to establish the proper diagnosis. Reports of seronegative persons, some remaining seronegative over a protracted time, have raised concerns over the transfusional risk of HIV infection. Blood donor screening programs are using

  4. Human Machine Interface Programming and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Thomas Garrison

    2013-01-01

    Human Machine Interface (HMI) Programming and Testing is about creating graphical displays to mimic mission critical ground control systems in order to provide NASA engineers with the ability to monitor the health management of these systems in real time. The Health Management System (HMS) is an online interactive human machine interface system that monitors all Kennedy Ground Control Subsystem (KGCS) hardware in the field. The Health Management System is essential to NASA engineers because it allows remote control and monitoring of the health management systems of all the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) and associated field devices. KGCS will have equipment installed at the launch pad, Vehicle Assembly Building, Mobile Launcher, as well as the Multi-Purpose Processing Facility. I am designing graphical displays to monitor and control new modules that will be integrated into the HMS. The design of the display screen will closely mimic the appearance and functionality of the actual modules. There are many different field devices used to monitor health management and each device has its own unique set of health management related data, therefore each display must also have its own unique way to display this data. Once the displays are created, the RSLogix5000 application is used to write software that maps all the required data read from the hardware to the graphical display. Once this data is mapped to its corresponding display item, the graphical display and hardware device will be connected through the same network in order to test all possible scenarios and types of data the graphical display was designed to receive. Test Procedures will be written to thoroughly test out the displays and ensure that they are working correctly before being deployed to the field. Additionally, the Kennedy Ground Controls Subsystem's user manual will be updated to explain to the NASA engineers how to use the new module displays.

  5. DNA鉴定技术在法科学中的应用%Studies and Applications of DNA-based Identity Test in Forensic Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李生斌; 阎春霞; 赖江华; 汪建; 杨焕明

    2001-01-01

    人类基因组遗传多态现象研究的深入,导致了法科学领域个体识别和亲权鉴定发生根本性变化。本文就新的遗传标记和各种DNA鉴定技术在法科学中的研究进展、应用前景与亟待解决的问题进行了探讨。%With the study advances on DNA polymorphism of human genome,radical changes have been taking place in forensic individual identification and paternity tests.In this paper,we introduced research progress of new genetic markers,their applications and problems should be solved urgently in the field of DNA-based identity test in forensic sciences.

  6. Psychometric testing and Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. van der Merwe

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a cumulative report on the findings of various exploratory research that were done with regard to the practice of psychometric testing in the Eastern Cape. Recent and ongoing developments in the South African labour legislation, and especially the implications of the Employment Equity Act, highlight once again the importance of the validation of all instruments to be used for human assessment and selection purposes. Information was gathered to establish which psychometric tests are used, and for what purposes, in industry today. Biographical information on each organisation is supplied, including the number of employees. The role of psychometric testing in the selection procedure is discussed. The different tests used, as well as the test users, are also indicated. The findings of other, related research, as well as comments, recommendations and shortcomings, are discussed. Opsomming Hierdie is ‘n kumulatiewe verslag wat die resultate verstrek van verskeie verkennende ondersoeke wat gedoen is na die aanwending van psigometriese toetsing in die Oos-Kaap. Onlangse en voortdurende ontwikkelinge in die Suid-Afrikaanse arbeidswetgewing, en veral die implikasies van die Wet op Gelyke Indiensneming, beklemtoon weer eens die belangrikheid van die validering van enige instrumente wat gebruik word vir evaluerings- en keuringsdoeleindes van individue. Inligting is ingewin om te bepaal watter psigometriese toetse, sowel as vir watter doel, vandag in die bedryf gebruik word. Biografiese inligting oor die onderskeie organisasies, insluitende hul aantal werknemers, word verstrek. Die rol van psigometriese toetsing in die keuringsproses word bespreek. Die verskillende toetse wat deur die organisasies gebruik word, sowel as die toetsge-bruikers, word ook aangedui. Die bevindinge van ander, relevante navorsing, sowel as opmerkings, aanbevelings en tekortkominge word bespreek.

  7. The Discourse of Language Testing as a Tool for Shaping National, Global, and Transnational Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohamy, Elana

    2013-01-01

    While much of the work in language testing is concerned with constructing quality tests in order to measure language knowledge in reliable and valid ways, there has been a significant movement in language testing research that examines tests in the context of their use in education and society. This line of research exits from the notion that…

  8. Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students: testing the moderating roles of ethnic and American identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Irene J K; Schwartz, Seth J; Lee, Richard M; Kim, May; Rodriguez, Liliana

    2013-04-01

    The present study tested the moderating roles of ethnic identity and American identity on the association between perceived racial/ethnic discrimination and antisocial behaviors among Asian American college students. Using data from the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) collaborative, the sample included 1,362 East Asian and South Asian American college students. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Ethnic identity was not a significant moderator of the discrimination-antisocial behavior link, but American identity exacerbated the association between perceived discrimination and antisocial behaviors for both East Asians and South Asians. Interestingly, the explanatory power of the regression model was greater for South Asians than for East Asians in predicting antisocial behaviors. The importance of attending to American identity as a potential source of risk for Asian American college students exposed to racial/ethnic discrimination is discussed.

  9. An Agreement to Disagree: The ASEAN Human Rights Declaration and the Absence of Regional Identity in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ASEAN’s engagement with human rights culminated in the creation of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration in 2012. The Declaration is fascinating in three ways: Its institutional origins are surprising, it was agreed upon by states with very different positions on the role of human rights domestically, and it both contains commitments far in advance of some members and is at the same time dangerously regressive. The three leading frameworks that currently interrogate the Declaration fail to provide convincing insights into all three of those dimensions. To correct these shortcomings, this article applies the notion of an “incompletely theorized agreement” to the study of the Declaration, arguing that member states understand the Declaration in very different ways and agreed to it for similarly diverse reasons. Further, I argue that the Declaration neither articulates a shared regional identity relating to respect for human rights, nor can it be understood as marking an early point towards the creation of this identity. Instead, the current diversity of regional opinions on human rights and democracy is perceived as legitimate and will endure. The article concludes by considering whether this denudes the Declaration of value, arguing that its importance will vary: The more progressive the member state, the more important the Declaration will be in the future.

  10. Blower door tests of a group of identical flats in a new student accommodation in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotol, Martin; Rode, Carsten; Vahala, Jan

    A new student accommodation for engineering students “Apisseq” was built in the town of Sisimiut, Greenland in 2010. Its purpose is not only to provide accommodation for students. Thanks to its complex monitoring system it enables researchers to evaluate the building’s energy performance and indoor...... air quality (IAQ) as well as performance of some single components. In summer 2012 a blower door test was performed on all 37 living units out of which 33 are identical single room flats and 4 are larger double room flats. The purpose was to evaluate the air tightness of the envelope and to find out...

  11. Employability during Unemployment: Adaptability, Career Identity and Human and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Sarah; Waters, Lea; Briscoe, Jon P.; Hall, Douglas T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Fugate et al. [Fugate, M., Kinicki, A. J., & Ashforth, B. E. (2004). Employability: A psycho-social construct, its dimensions, and applications. "Journal of Vocational Behavior, 65"(1), 14] defined employability as a psycho-social construct comprised of three dimensions: (i) adaptability; (ii) career identity; and (iii)…

  12. Sexual differentiation of the human brain in relation to gender identity and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka; Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Swaab, Dick F

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that during the intrauterine period the fetal brain develops in the male direction through a direct action of testosterone on the developing nerve cells, or in the female direction through the absence of this hormone surge. According to this concept, our gender identity (the conviction of belonging to the male or female gender) and sexual orientation should be programmed into our brain structures when we are still in the womb. However, since sexual differentiation of the genitals takes place in the first two months of pregnancy and sexual differentiation of the brain starts in the second half of pregnancy, these two processes can be influenced independently, which may result in transsexuality. This also means that in the event of ambiguous sex at birth, the degree of masculinization of the genitals may not reflect the degree of masculinization of the brain. There is no proof that social environment after birth has an effect on gender identity or sexual orientation. Data on genetic and hormone independent influence on gender identity are presently divergent and do not provide convincing information about the underlying etiology. To what extent fetal programming may determine sexual orientation is also a matter of discussion. A number of studies show patterns of sex atypical cerebral dimorphism in homosexual subjects. Although the crucial question, namely how such complex functions as sexual orientation and identity are processed in the brain remains unanswered, emerging data point at a key role of specific neuronal circuits involving the hypothalamus.

  13. Finding the needle in the haystack: differentiating "identical" twins in paternity testing and forensics by ultra-deep next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Lehmann, Jacqueline; Schilling, Elmar; Gradl, Georg; Richter, Daniel C; Wiehler, Jens; Rolf, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins are considered being genetically identical, therefore they cannot be differentiated using standard forensic DNA testing. Here we describe how identification of extremely rare mutations by ultra-deep next generation sequencing can solve such cases. We sequenced DNA from sperm samples of two twins and from a blood sample of the child of one twin. Bioinformatics analysis revealed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present in the twin father and the child, but not in the twin uncle. The SNPs were confirmed by classical Sanger sequencing. Our results give experimental evidence for the hypothesis that rare mutations will occur early after the human blastocyst has split into two, the origin of twins, and that such mutations will be carried on into somatic tissue and the germline. The method provides a solution to solve paternity and forensic cases involving monozygotic twins as alleged fathers or originators of DNA traces.

  14. 78 FR 2273 - Canned Tuna Deviating From Identity Standard; Temporary Permit for Market Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Loretta A. Carey, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-820), Food and Drug..., and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 341). ] The permit covers limited interstate marketing tests of products... panels on the labels of the test products must bear nutrition labeling in accordance with 21 CFR...

  15. Human Glioma–Initiating Cells Show a Distinct Immature Phenotype Resembling but Not Identical to NG2 Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Kim, Ella; Bielanska, Joanna; Giese, Alf; Mortensen, Lena Sünke; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Glioma-initiating cells (GICs) represent a potential important therapeutic target because they are likely to account for the frequent recurrence of malignant gliomas; however, their identity remains unsolved. Here, we characterized the cellular lineage fingerprint of GICs through a combination of electrophysiology, lineage marker expression, and differentiation assays of 5 human patient-derived primary GIC lines. Most GICs coexpressed nestin, NG2 proteoglycan, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Glioma-initiating cells could be partially differentiated into astrocytic but not oligodendroglial or neural lineages. We also demonstrate that GICs have a characteristic electrophysiologic profile distinct from that of well-characterized tumor bulk cells. Together, our results suggest that GICs represent a unique type of cells reminiscent of an immature phenotype that closely resembles but is not identical to NG2 glia with respect to marker expression and functional membrane properties. PMID:23481707

  16. Personal Identity in Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podroužková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of human enhancement, its methods and its relation to personal identity. Also several approaches to personal identity will be described. Transhumanism is a special think tank supporting human enhancement through modern technologies and some of its representatives claim, that even great changes to human organisms will not affect their personal identity. I will briefly describe the most important means of human enhancment and consider the problem of personal identity for each of them separately.

  17. Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Burri, A.V.; Zietsch, B.P.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection can cause evolution in traits that affect mating success, and it has thus been implicated in the evolution of human physical and behavioural traits that influence attractiveness. We use a large sample of identical and nonidentical female twins to test the prediction from mate choice

  18. Research on the Human Dynamics in Mobile Communities Based on Social Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through analyzing the data about the releases, comment, and forwarding of 120,000 microblog messages in a year, this paper finds out that the intervals between information releases and comment follow a power law; besides, the analysis of data in each 24 hours reveals obvious differences between microblogging and website visit, email, instant communication, and the use of mobile phone, reflecting how people use fragments of time via mobile internet technology. The paper points out the significant influence of the user's activity on the intervals of information releases and thus demonstrates a positive correlation between the activity and the power exponent. The paper also points out that user's activity is influenced by social identity in a positive way. The simulation results based on the social identity mechanism fit well with the actual data, which indicates that this mechanism is a reasonable way to explain people's behavior in the mobile Internet.

  19. 'But obviously not for me': robots, laboratories and the defiant identity of elder test users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Louis

    2010-02-01

    This article focuses on participants and researchers who actively tested a prototype - a robot intended to enhance the health of elders. Specifically, this article analyses interactions between robots, elder test users, and robot designers to examine how images of elder users, definitions of health, and ideas about ageing shape the development of technology. The designers imagined the prospective user as a person who would both need and want a health robot. In contrast, test users drew upon stereotypes of old people and imagined the prospective user as a lonely person in need of care and company. To resist this stereotype, they presented themselves as cognitively and physically healthy, independent, and helpful. This image of the helpful test user allowed participants to simultaneously enjoy the robot and position themselves as not old or in need of care. The participants' views, however, did not influence the designers' overall view of elder users, and were not incorporated into their design practices. Recognising and taking into account test users' views on elder technology users - specifically their understanding and rejection of negative stereotypes of old people - could help prevent resistance to (and thus the non-use of) health technologies by elders.

  20. The Social Roots of Human Identity and the Interplay of the Selves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Williams

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two main aspects of Cristina Meini’s From Cradle to Internet. The Social Nature of Personal Identity are taken into consideration. In the first place, Meini’s argument concerning the structuring role for self development of caregivers’ communicative mirroring is analysed in the light of current literature concerning the multi-layered architecture of identity. I propose to integrate Meini’s interesting socio-cultural perspective with a dialectical view of the interaction between fundamental self-monitoring mechanisms addressing bodily self-awareness and psychological as well as social components of self-knowledge. This integration widely relies on the most recent contributions from Peter Fonagy’s model of mentalization deficits studied in the clinical field of personality disorders. In the second section of the comment, I present some possible ways to tackle the problem of “extended mind” through internet devices raised by Meini. In particular, the notion of extended mind is confronted with the specificities of identity building in the use of social networks.

  1. 75 FR 67093 - Iceberg Water Deviating From Identity Standard; Temporary Permit for Market Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ...), Canada J3Z 1G4. This permit covers limited interstate marketing tests of products identified as ``GLACE... requirements of the standard with the exception of the source definition. The purpose of this temporary permit... problems, and assess commercial feasibility. This permit provides for the temporary marketing of...

  2. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Brock; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Oliver Wilder-Smith; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and modality, as well as using validated methods for assessing sensory response have contributed to the understanding of pain mechanisms. Mechanical stimulation based on impedance planimetry allows direct recordings of luminal cross-sectional areas, and combined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, the contribution of different gut layers can be estimated. Electrical stimulation depolarizes free nerve endings non-selectively. Consequently, the stimulation paradigm (single, train, tetanic) influences the involved sensory nerves. Visual controlled electrical stimulation combines the probes with an endoscopic approach, which allows the investigator to inspect and obtain small biopsies from the stimulation site. Thermal stimulation (cold or warm) activates selectively mucosal receptors, and chemical substances such as acid and capsaicin (either alone or in combination) are used to evoke pain and sensitization. The possibility of multimodal (e.g. mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical) stimulation in different gut segments has developed visceral pain research. The major advantage is involvement of distinctive receptors, various sensory nerves and different pain pathways mimicking clinical pain that favors investigation of central pain mechanisms involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. As impairment of descending control mechanisms partly underlies the pathogenesis in chronic pain, a cold pressor test that indirectly stimulates such control mechanisms can be added. Hence, the methods undoubtedly represent a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut, which provides knowledge to

  3. Visible humans, vanishing bodies, and virtual nursing: complications of life, presence, place, and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, Margarete

    2002-03-01

    The emergence of the posthuman body and the disappearance of the humanist body serve as background for the rediscovery of the body as resource and problem in nursing. At the precise moment when the fleshy body is deemed increasingly irrelevant and immaterial in cyberspace come divergent moves in nursing toward not only resurrecting this body, but also toward virtual environments of nursing care, where fleshy bodies never encounter each other. The posthuman conflation of bodies and information poses the greatest challenge yet to the secure place, presence, and identity of nursing in health care.

  4. Human Identity Verification based on Heart Sounds: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Beritelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Identity verification is an increasingly important process in our daily lives, and biometric recognition is a natural solution to the authentication problem. One of the most important research directions in the field of biometrics is the characterization of novel biometric traits that can be used in conjunction with other traits, to limit their shortcomings or to enhance their performance. The aim of this work is to introduce the reader to the usage of heart sounds for biometric recognition, describing the strengths and the weaknesses of this novel trait and analyzing in detail the methods developed so far by different research groups and their performance.

  5. Statistical tests for whether a given set of independent, identically distributed draws comes from a specified probability density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tygert, Mark

    2010-09-21

    We discuss several tests for determining whether a given set of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) draws does not come from a specified probability density function. The most commonly used are Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, particularly Kuiper's variant, which focus on discrepancies between the cumulative distribution function for the specified probability density and the empirical cumulative distribution function for the given set of i.i.d. draws. Unfortunately, variations in the probability density function often get smoothed over in the cumulative distribution function, making it difficult to detect discrepancies in regions where the probability density is small in comparison with its values in surrounding regions. We discuss tests without this deficiency, complementing the classical methods. The tests of the present paper are based on the plain fact that it is unlikely to draw a random number whose probability is small, provided that the draw is taken from the same distribution used in calculating the probability (thus, if we draw a random number whose probability is small, then we can be confident that we did not draw the number from the same distribution used in calculating the probability).

  6. Testing the social identity relative deprivation (SIRD) model of social change: the political rise of Scottish nationalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dominic; Grant, Peter R

    2012-12-01

    We tested a social-identity relative deprivation (SIRD) model predicting Scottish nationalist beliefs and intention to vote for the separatist Scottish Nationalist Party (SNP). Data were from a survey of a large and representative sample of Scottish teenagers administered in the late 1980s. The SIRD model distinguishes effects of group-based and personal relative deprivation, which should be independent of one another. Importantly, social change beliefs should mediate the effects of both collective relative deprivation and group identification on protest intentions (in this case intention to vote for the SNP). Egoistic relative deprivation should be the strongest predictor of feelings of depression. Using structural equation modelling, the results strongly support this model and replicate in two different cohorts.

  7. Gay identity, interpersonal violence, and HIV risk behaviors: an empirical test of theoretical relationships among a probability-based sample of urban men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relf, Michael V; Huang, Bu; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Catania, Joe

    2004-01-01

    The highest absolute number of new HIV infections and AIDS cases still occur among men who have sex with men (MSM). Numerous theoretical approaches have been used to understand HIV risk behaviors among MSM; however, no theoretical model examines sexual risk behaviors in the context of gay identity and interpersonal violence. Using a model testing predictive correlational design, the theoretical relationships between childhood sexual abuse, adverse early life experiences, gay identity, substance use, battering, aversive emotions, HIV alienation, cue-to-action triggers, and HIV risk behaviors were empirically tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The relationships between these constructs are complex, yet childhood sexual abuse and gay identity were found to be theoretically associated with HIV risk behaviors. Also of importance, battering victimization was identified as a key mediating variable between childhood sexual abuse, gay identity, and adverse early life experiences and HIV risk behaviors among urban MSM.

  8. Does total body irradiation conditioning improve outcomes of myeloablative human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling transplantations for chronic lymphocytic leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabloff, Mitchell; Sobecks, Ronald M; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; de Lima, Marcos; Brown, Jennifer R; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Holland, H Kent; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Laughlin, Mary J; Kamble, Rammurti T; Hsu, Jack W; Wirk, Baldeep M; Seftel, Matthew; Lewis, Ian D; Arora, Mukta; Alyea, Edwin P; Kalaycio, Matt E; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T; Gale, Robert Peter; Saber, Wael

    2014-03-01

    An allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from an HLA-identical donor after high-dose (myeloablative) pretransplantation conditioning is an effective therapy for some people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Because CLL is a highly radiosensitive cancer, we hypothesized that total body irradiation (TBI) conditioning regimens may be associated with better outcomes than those without TBI. To answer this, we analyzed data from 180 subjects with CLL receiving myeloablative doses of TBI (n = 126) or not (n = 54), who received transplants from an HLA-identical sibling donor between 1995 and 2007 and reported to the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research. At 5 years, treatment-related mortality was 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39% to 57%) versus 50% (95% CI, 36% to 64%); P = NS. Relapse rates were 17% (95% CI, 11% to 25%) versus 22% (95% CI, 11% to 35%); P = NS. Five-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 34% (95% CI, 26% to 43%) versus 28% (95% CI, 15% to 42%); P = NS and 42% (95% CI, 33% to 51%) versus 33% (95% CI, 19% to 48%); P = NS, respectively. The single most common cause of death in both cohorts was recurrent/progressive CLL. No variable tested in the multivariate analysis was found to significantly affect these outcomes, including having failed fludarabine. Within the limitations of this study, we found no difference in HLA-identical sibling transplantation outcomes between myeloablative TBI and chemotherapy pretransplantation conditioning in persons with CLL.

  9. East-West Epistemological Convergence of Humanism in Language, Identity, and Education: Confucius-Makiguchi-Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming Fang

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author explores an East-West epistemological convergence of humanism illuminated in three main themes in the works of Confucius (551-479 BC), Makiguchi Tsunesaburo (1871-1944), and John Dewey (1859-1952): "human-nature interconnection," "associated self-cultivation," and "value creation." She contends that these thinkers'…

  10. Human Capital and the Labor of Learning: A Case of Mistaken Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, Alexander Sidorkin offers a conceptual critique of the human capital theory that makes erroneous assumptions about the nature of student work and the private cost of schooling. Specifically, human capital theorists underestimate the private cost of schooling by taking low-level manual labor as the basis for estimating students'…

  11. East-West Epistemological Convergence of Humanism in Language, Identity, and Education: Confucius-Makiguchi-Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming Fang

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author explores an East-West epistemological convergence of humanism illuminated in three main themes in the works of Confucius (551-479 BC), Makiguchi Tsunesaburo (1871-1944), and John Dewey (1859-1952): "human-nature interconnection," "associated self-cultivation," and "value creation." She contends that these thinkers'…

  12. The fully-automated human: How is technology augmenting our identities?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    4 November 2016 - From 17:30 to 19:00 CET What if you could detect cancer years before the visible signs? What if you could analyze your genome to predict your longevity? What if your parents could edit your DNA long before you were born? What if your computer could think, feel and reason better than you? The tools of today are not only enhancing how we live—they are changing who we are. But they also introduce a new burden of responsibility. With so much information about ourselves now available, who should have access to it? If we have the ability to fundamentally alter our biologies or enhance our personalities, should we? This panel discussion features TEDxCERN 2016 speakers who are developing identity-changing technologies that are redefining how we perceive our health, our lifestyles and our roles in society. Speakers Dennis Lo Dennis Lo is a professor of chemical pathology...

  13. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, C.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and mo

  14. Implications of natural selection in shaping 99.4% nonsynonymous DNA identity between humans and chimpanzees: Enlarging genus Homo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Derek E.; Uddin, Monica; Liu, Guozhen; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Goodman, Morris

    2003-01-01

    What do functionally important DNA sites, those scrutinized and shaped by natural selection, tell us about the place of humans in evolution? Here we compare ≈90 kb of coding DNA nucleotide sequence from 97 human genes to their sequenced chimpanzee counterparts and to available sequenced gorilla, orangutan, and Old World monkey counterparts, and, on a more limited basis, to mouse. The nonsynonymous changes (functionally important), like synonymous changes (functionally much less important), show chimpanzees and humans to be most closely related, sharing 99.4% identity at nonsynonymous sites and 98.4% at synonymous sites. On a time scale, the coding DNA divergencies separate the human–chimpanzee clade from the gorilla clade at between 6 and 7 million years ago and place the most recent common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees at between 5 and 6 million years ago. The evolutionary rate of coding DNA in the catarrhine clade (Old World monkey and ape, including human) is much slower than in the lineage to mouse. Among the genes examined, 30 show evidence of positive selection during descent of catarrhines. Nonsynonymous substitutions by themselves, in this subset of positively selected genes, group humans and chimpanzees closest to each other and have chimpanzees diverge about as much from the common human–chimpanzee ancestor as humans do. This functional DNA evidence supports two previously offered taxonomic proposals: family Hominidae should include all extant apes; and genus Homo should include three extant species and two subgenera, Homo (Homo) sapiens (humankind), Homo (Pan) troglodytes (common chimpanzee), and Homo (Pan) paniscus (bonobo chimpanzee). PMID:12766228

  15. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  16. Sexual orientation identity disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation and completion among young adult US women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Gordon, Allegra R; Charlton, Brittany M; Haneuse, Sebastien; Potter, Jennifer; Austin, S Bryn

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association between sexual orientation identity and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination initiation and completion among both women and men. Using data from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey, we estimated logistic regression models for the association between sexual orientation identity and HPV vaccination initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses) among US women and men in relation to sociodemographic and healthcare factors. Analyses were restricted to individuals for whom the HPV vaccine was recommended at some point in their lives, namely women aged 18-34 years (n = 9,734) and men aged 18-31 years (n = 6,812). Among all women, bisexual women had higher adjusted odds of HPV vaccination initiation [(odds ratio) 1.71; (95 % confidence interval) 1.20-2.45] and completion (1.59; 1.05-2.42) than heterosexual women. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between lesbian and heterosexual women. Among women who had initiated HPV vaccination, lesbians had lower adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual women (0.41; 0.19-0.90). Among all men, gay men had higher adjusted odds of initiating (2.07; 1.17-3.52) and completing (3.90; 1.68-9.06) HPV vaccination than heterosexual men. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between bisexual and heterosexual men. Among men who had initiated HPV vaccination, gay (4.36; 1.28-14.83) and bisexual (20.92; 2.34-186.73) men had higher adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual men, although these results are unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. Interventions are needed to promote HPV vaccination among all US women and men, regardless of sexual orientation identity.

  17. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version Score of Schizophrenic Patients in a Japanese Clinical Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koide

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP, which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS scores in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d′ score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d′ score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  18. Evaluation of factors affecting continuous performance test identical pairs version score of schizophrenic patients in a Japanese clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takayoshi; Aleksic, Branko; Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Banno, Masahiro; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Adachi, Yasunori; Kawano, Naoko; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP), which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit) and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) scores) in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d' score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d' score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score.

  19. Impact of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 testing on deaf identity and comprehension of genetic test results in a sample of deaf adults: a prospective, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christina G S; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2014-01-01

    Using a prospective, longitudinal study design, this paper addresses the impact of genetic counseling and testing for deafness on deaf adults and the Deaf community. This study specifically evaluated the effect of genetic counseling and Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results on participants' deaf identity and understanding of their genetic test results. Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic testing was offered to participants in the context of linguistically and culturally appropriate genetic counseling. Questionnaire data collected from 209 deaf adults at four time points (baseline, immediately following pre-test genetic counseling, 1-month following genetic test result disclosure, and 6-months after result disclosure) were analyzed. Four deaf identity orientations (hearing, marginal, immersion, bicultural) were evaluated using subscales of the Deaf Identity Development Scale-Revised. We found evidence that participants understood their specific genetic test results following genetic counseling, but found no evidence of change in deaf identity based on genetic counseling or their genetic test results. This study demonstrated that culturally and linguistically appropriate genetic counseling can improve deaf clients' understanding of genetic test results, and the formation of deaf identity was not directly related to genetic counseling or Connexin-26 and Connexin-30 genetic test results.

  20. Moving beyond sex: Assessing the impact of gender identity on human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations and uptake among a national sample of rural-residing LGBT young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A; Whitehead, Jennifer L; Stephenson, Rob

    2017-06-01

    While national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination estimates exist by sex, little is known about HPV vaccination rates by gender identity. We conducted a self-administered, anonymous online cross-sectional survey, with recruitment through Facebook ads, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals in rural areas of the US. We compared HPV vaccine recommendation and uptake by self-reported sex assigned at birth and current gender identity. Six hundred sixty respondents were age eligible for HPV vaccination: 84% reported gender identity aligned with their sex assigned at birth, while 10% reported gender identity the differed from their sex assigned at birth; an additional 6% reported non-binary gender identity. Only 14% of male sex assigned at birth and 44% of female sex assigned at birth received HPV vaccine, similar to estimates by current gender identity. Transgender respondents' HPV vaccination experience mirrored that of cisgender respondents with regard to sex assigned at birth. Providers may base HPV vaccine recommendations on individuals' sex assigned at birth, which may impact transgender individuals' vaccine coverage. Future HPV vaccine uptake studies should account for gender identity. With sex-specific catch-up HPV vaccination recommendations, the role of gender identity on provider recommendation and reimbursement needs to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  2. Possible identity of IL-8 converting enzyme in human fibroblasts as a cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kensaku; Sano, Emiko; Nakaki, Toshio; Naruto, Masanobu

    2003-04-01

    A converting activity was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts, which secrete 72IL-8 and 77IL-8 in treatment with IFN-beta and poly I: poly C. 77IL-8 was significantly converted to 72IL-8 by a partially purified fraction of the culture supernatant of human diploid fibroblasts. The converting activity, which was temperature-dependent and optimal at pH 6, was completely inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors, antipain dihydrochloride and E-64, but not by other types of protease inhibitors. These data clearly show that human diploid fibroblasts are capable of processing IL-8 to produce a mature IL-8 and that the putative converting enzyme appears to be a cysteine protease.

  3. Elephants and Human Color-Blind Deuteranopes Have Identical Sets of Visual Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Takenaka, Naomi; Agnew, Dalen W.; Shoshani, Jeheskel

    2005-01-01

    Being the largest land mammals, elephants have very few natural enemies and are active during both day and night. Compared with those of diurnal and nocturnal animals, the eyes of elephants and other arrhythmic species, such as many ungulates and large carnivores, must function in both the bright light of day and dim light of night. Despite their fundamental importance, the roles of photosensitive molecules, visual pigments, in arrhythmic vision are not well understood. Here we report that elephants (Loxodonta africana and Elephas maximus) use RH1, SWS1, and LWS pigments, which are maximally sensitive to 496, 419, and 552 nm, respectively. These light sensitivities are virtually identical to those of certain “color-blind” people who lack MWS pigments, which are maximally sensitive to 530 nm. During the day, therefore, elephants seem to have the dichromatic color vision of deuteranopes. During the night, however, they are likely to use RH1 and SWS1 pigments and detect light at 420–490 nm. PMID:15781694

  4. Human allogeneic AB0/Rh-identical umbilical cord blood cells in the treatment of juvenile patients with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Yury A; Tarakanov, Oleg P; Radaev, Sergey M; Dugina, Tamara N; Ryaskina, Svetlana S; Darevskaya, Anna N; Morozova, Yana V; Khachatryan, William A; Lebedev, Konstantin E; Zotova, Nelli S; Burkova, Anna S; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Smirnov, Vladimir N

    2015-07-01

    The term "cerebral palsy" (CP) encompasses many syndromes that emerge from brain damage at early stages of ontogenesis and manifest as the inability to retain a normal body position or perform controlled movements. Existing methods of CP treatment, including various rehabilitation strategies and surgical and pharmacological interventions, are mostly palliative, and there is no specific therapy focused on restoring injured brain function. During a post-registration clinical investigation, the safety and efficacy of intravenous infusion of allogeneic human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-unmatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells were studied in 80 pediatric patients with cerebral palsy and associated neurological complications. Patients received up to 6 intravenous infusions of AB0/Rh-identical, red blood cell-depleted UCB cells at an average dose of 250 × 10(6) viable cells per infusion. Patients were followed for 3-36 months, and multiple cell infusions did not cause any adverse effects. In contrast, in most patients who received four or more UCB cell infusions, positive dynamics related to significant improvements in neurological status and/or cognitive functions were observed. The results confirm that multiple intravenous infusions of allogeneic AB0/Rh-identical UCB cells may be a safe and effective procedure and could be included in treatment and rehabilitation programs for juvenile patients with cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Human Resource Capital of Black and Latino Middle Schoolers' Mathematics Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck-Staley, Tracey Lavette

    2010-01-01

    Student learning in the mathematics classroom is described as being both social and personal. Students' prior knowledge (human capital), attitudes (personal capital), and social skills and/or cultural values (sociocultural capital) are personal components they bring into the classroom. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore (a)…

  6. Sexual differentiation of the human brain: relevance for gender identity, transsexualism and sexual orientation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    Male sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior are thought, on the basis of experiments in rodents, to be caused by androgens, following conversion to estrogens. However, observations in human subjects with genetic and other disorders show that direct effects of testosterone on the developing

  7. The Role of Human Resource Capital of Black and Latino Middle Schoolers' Mathematics Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck-Staley, Tracey Lavette

    2010-01-01

    Student learning in the mathematics classroom is described as being both social and personal. Students' prior knowledge (human capital), attitudes (personal capital), and social skills and/or cultural values (sociocultural capital) are personal components they bring into the classroom. The purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore (a)…

  8. Diagnostic tests based on human basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Erdmann, Stephan; Knol, Edward F;

    2006-01-01

    -maximal responses, termed 'intrinsic sensitivity'. These variables give rise to shifts in the dose-response curves which, in a diagnostic setting where only a single antigen concentration is employed, may produce false-negative data. Thus, in order to meaningfully utilize the current basophil activation tests...

  9. Human salivary agglutinin binds to lung surfactant protein-D and is identical with scavenger receptor protein gp-340

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ligtenberg, T J; Bikker, F J; Groenink, J

    2001-01-01

    bound in a similar way to Streptococcus mutans and surfactant protein-D. Histochemically, the distribution of gp-340 in the submandibular salivary glands was identical with the agglutinin distribution, as shown in a previous paper [Takano, Bogert, Malamud, Lally and Hand (1991) Anat. Rec. 230, 307......Salivary agglutinin is a 300-400 kDa salivary glycoprotein that binds to antigen B polypeptides of oral streptococci, thereby playing a role in their colonization and the development of caries. A mass spectrum was recorded of a trypsin digest of agglutinin. A dominant peak of 1460 Da was sequenced...... of gp-340. gp-340 is a 340 kDa glycoprotein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that binds specifically to lung surfactant protein-D. DMBT1 is a candidate tumour suppressor gene. A search in the human genome revealed only one copy of this gene. The molecular mass, as judged from SDS...

  10. Identity Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    This research examines two mechanisms by which persons' identities change over time. First, on the basis of identity control theory (ICT), I hypothesize that while identities influence the way in which a role is played out, discrepancies between the meanings of the identity standard and the meanings of the role performance will result in change.…

  11. The pluripotency factor LIN28 in monkey and human testes: a marker for spermatogonial stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeckerle, N; Eildermann, K; Drummer, C; Ehmcke, J; Schweyer, S; Lerchl, A; Bergmann, M; Kliesch, S; Gromoll, J; Schlatt, S; Behr, R

    2012-10-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is maintained by spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, since evidentiary assays and unequivocal markers are still missing in non-human primates (NHPs) and man, the identity of primate SSCs is unknown. In contrast, in mice, germ cell transplantation studies have functionally demonstrated the presence of SSCs. LIN28 is an RNA-binding pluripotent stem cell factor, which is also strongly expressed in undifferentiated mouse spermatogonia. By contrast, two recent reports indicated that LIN28 is completely absent from adult human testes. Here, we analyzed LIN28 expression in marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) and human testes during development and adulthood and compared it with that in mice. In the marmoset, LIN28 was strongly expressed in migratory primordial germ cells and gonocytes. Strikingly, we found a rare LIN28-positive subpopulation of spermatogonia also in adult marmoset testis. This was corroborated by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Importantly, in contrast to previous publications, we found LIN28-positive spermatogonia also in normal adult human and additional adult NHP testes. Some seasonal breeders exhibit a degenerated (involuted) germinal epithelium consisting only of Sertoli cells and SSCs during their non-breeding season. The latter re-initiate spermatogenesis prior to the next breeding-season. Fully involuted testes from a seasonal hamster and NHP (Lemur catta) exhibited numerous LIN28-positive spermatogonia, indicating an SSC identity of the labeled cells. We conclude that LIN28 is differentially expressed in mouse and NHP spermatogonia and might be a marker for a rare SSC population in NHPs and man. Further characterization of the LIN28-positive population is required.

  12. A matter of identity — Phenotype and differentiation potential of human somatic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E.P. New

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human somatic stem cells with neural differentiation potential can be valuable for developing cell-based therapies, including treatment of birth-related defects, while avoiding issues associated with cell reprogramming. Precisely defining the “identity” and differentiation potential of somatic stem cells from different sources, has proven difficult, given differences in sets of specific markers, protocols used and lack of side-by-side characterization of these cells in different studies. Therefore, we set to compare expression of mesenchymal and neural markers in human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs, pediatric adipose-derived stem cells (p-ADSCs in parallel with human neural stem cells (NSCs. We show that UC-MSCs at a basal level express mesenchymal and so-called “neural” markers, similar to that we previously reported for the p-ADSCs. All somatic stem cell populations studied, independently from tissue and patient of origin, displayed a remarkably similar expression of surface markers, with the main difference being the restricted expression of CD133 and CD34 to NSCs. Expression of certain surface and neural markers was affected by the expansion medium used. As predicted, UC-MSCs and p-ADSCs demonstrated tri-mesenchymal lineage differentiation potential, though p-ADSCs display superior chondrogenic differentiation capability. UC-MSCs and p-ADSCs responded also to neurogenic induction by up-regulating neuronal markers, but crucially they appeared morphologically immature when compared with differentiated NSCs. This highlights the need for further investigation into the use of these cells for neural therapies. Crucially, this study demonstrates the lack of simple means to distinguish between different cell types and the effect of culture conditions on their phenotype, and indicates that a more extensive set of markers should be used for somatic stem cell characterization, especially when developing therapeutic

  13. Cell-type specific DNA methylation patterns define human breast cellular identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Novak

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a role in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and stem cell differentiation. Tissue specific differential methylation has also been well characterized. We sought to extend these studies to create a map of differential DNA methylation between different cell types derived from a single tissue. Using three pairs of isogenic human mammary epithelial and fibroblast cells, promoter region DNA methylation was characterized using MeDIP coupled to microarray analysis. Comparison of DNA methylation between these cell types revealed nearly three thousand cell-type specific differentially methylated regions (ctDMRs. MassARRAY was performed upon 87 ctDMRs to confirm and quantify differential DNA methylation. Each of the examined regions exhibited statistically significant differences ranging from 10-70%. Gene ontology analysis revealed the overrepresentation of many transcription factors involved in developmental processes. Additionally, we have shown that ctDMRs are associated with histone related epigenetic marks and are often aberrantly methylated in breast cancer. Overall, our data suggest that there are thousands of ctDMRs which consistently exhibit differential DNA methylation and may underlie cell type specificity in human breast tissue. In addition, we describe the pathways affected by these differences and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms and physiological overlap between normal cellular differentiation and breast carcinogenesis.

  14. Major Shifts in Glial Regional Identity Are a Transcriptional Hallmark of Human Brain Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Soreq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies suggest that aging of the human brain is determined by a complex interplay of molecular events, although both its region- and cell-type-specific consequences remain poorly understood. Here, we extensively characterized aging-altered gene expression changes across ten human brain regions from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 years. We show that astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte-specific genes, but not neuron-specific genes, shift their regional expression patterns upon aging, particularly in the hippocampus and substantia nigra, while the expression of microglia- and endothelial-specific genes increase in all brain regions. In line with these changes, high-resolution immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes and of neuronal subpopulations in the aging brain cortex. Finally, glial-specific genes predict age with greater precision than neuron-specific genes, thus highlighting the need for greater mechanistic understanding of neuron-glia interactions in aging and late-life diseases.

  15. Human sports drug testing by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Since the installation of anti-doping rules and regulations and their international enforcement in the mid-1960s, mass spectrometry has been an integral part of doping control procedures. Although its utility was limited in the first decade, instrumental improvements and method optimizations have made mass spectrometry, in all its facets, an indispensable tool in modern sports drug testing. In this review, milestones in doping control analysis accomplished in Germany and reaching from the early developments to the current use of hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques concerning low- and high molecular mass analytes are presented. The considered drug classes include anabolic agents, peptidic drugs, nucleotide-derived therapeutics, approved and non-approved organic as well as inorganic analytes, and particular focus is put on drug class- and instrument-driven strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:16-46, 2017.

  16. Using the theory of planned behaviour and self-identity to explain chlamydia testing intentions in young people living in deprived areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Amy R; Norman, Paul; Harris, Peter R; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    The study sought to (1) explain intentions to get tested for chlamydia regularly in a group of young people living in deprived areas using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB); and (2) test whether self-identity explained additional variance in testing intentions. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. Participants (N = 278, 53% male; M = 17.05 years) living in deprived areas of a UK city were recruited from a vocational education setting. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire, including measures of attitude, injunctive subjective norm, descriptive norm, perceived behavioural control, self-identity, intention and past behaviour in relation to getting tested for chlamydia regularly. The TPB explained 43% of the variance in chlamydia testing intentions with all variables emerging as significant predictors. However, self-identity explained additional variance in intentions (ΔR(2)  = .22) and emerged as the strongest predictor, even when controlling for past behaviour. The study identified the key determinants of intention to get tested for chlamydia regularly in a sample of young people living in areas of increased deprivation: a hard-to-reach, high-risk population. The findings indicate the key variables to target in interventions to promote motivation to get tested for chlamydia regularly in equivalent samples, amongst which self-identity is critical. What is already known on this subject? Young people living in deprived areas have been identified as an at-risk group for chlamydia. Qualitative research has identified several themes in relation to factors affecting the uptake of chlamydia testing, which fit well with the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Identity concerns have also been identified as playing an important part in young people's chlamydia testing decisions. What does this study add? TPB explained 43% of the variance in chlamydia testing intentions and all variables were significant predictors

  17. Hard Identity and Soft Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Rachik

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Often collective identities are classified depending on their contents and rarely depending on their forms. Differentiation between soft identity and hard identity is applied to diverse collective identities: religious, political, national, tribal ones, etc. This classification is made following the principal dimensions of collective identities: type of classification (univocal and exclusive or relative and contextual, the absence or presence of conflictsof loyalty, selective or totalitarian, objective or subjective conception, among others. The different characteristics analysed contribute to outlining an increasingly frequent type of identity: the authoritarian identity.

  18. Pain and Consciousness in Humans. Or Why Pain Subserves the Identity and Self-representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Venturella

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional definitions of pain assume that an individual learns about pain through verbal usages related to the experience of injury in early life. This emphasis on the verbal correlates of pain restricts our understanding of pain to the context of adult human consciousness. In this paper we instead support the idea that our understanding of pain originates in neonatal experience and is not merely a verbally determined phenomenon. We also challenge the definition of pain as a merely sensory message related to peripheral tissue trauma. We aim to move beyond this definition by considering the relationship between the centre (Central Nervous System and periphery, taking into account certain phenomena such as phantom limbs and interoception. We show that pain helps an individual to develop a sense of awareness of himself immersed in a social context, and is thus a complex and adaptive phenomenon, that supports bodily integrity and social behavior.

  19. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: What a Turing Test Reveals about Human Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hannagan; Maria Ktori; Myriam Chanceaux; Jonathan Grainger

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fastacting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked primi...

  20. Differential expression of genes involved in the epigenetic regulation of cell identity in normal human mammary cell commitment and differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danila Coradini; Patrizia Boracchi; Saro Oriana; Elia Biganzoli; Federico Ambrogi

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of mammary epithelial cell identity depends on the activity of a group of proteins, collectively called maintenance proteins, that act as epigenetic regulators of gene transcription through DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of these crucial proteins may disrupt epithelial cellintegrity and trigger breast tumor initiation. Therefore, we exploredin silico the expression pattern of a panel of 369 genes known to be involved in the establishment and maintenance of epithelial cellidentity and mammary gland remodeling in cell subpopulations isolated from normal human mammary tissue and selectively enriched in their content of bipotent progenitors, committed luminal progenitors, and differentiated myoepithelial or differentiated luminal cells. The results indicated that, compared to bipotent cells, differentiated myoepithelial and luminal subpopulations were both characterized by the differential expression of 4 genes involved in cell identity maintenance:CBX6 andPCGF2, encoding proteins belonging to the Polycomb group, andSMARCD3 andSMARCE1, encoding proteins belonging to the Trithorax group. In addition to these common genes, the myoepithelial phenotype was associated with the differential expression of HDAC1, which encodes histone deacetylase 1, whereas the luminal phenotype was associated with the differential expression ofSMARCA4 andHAT1, which encode a Trithorax protein and histone acetylase 1, respectively. The luminal compartment was further characterized by the overexpression ofALDH1A3 and GATA3, and the down-regulation ofNOTCH4and CCNB1, with the latter suggesting a block in cell cycle progression at the G2 phase. In contrast, myoepithelial differentiation was associated with the overexpression ofMYC and the down-regulation ofCCNE1, with the latter suggesting a block in cellcycle progression at the G1 phase.

  1. Culture as Conquest: Nature and Condition in the Definition of Human Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Viana, Luis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the old debate about nature and culture, a debate which is —ultimately— one on the definition of the ‘human’, has acquired the form of a controversy (both philosophical and everyday between “animalists” and “hyper-humanists”; between those who would claim a certain “animalisation of humankind” —humanising animals on issues such as rights— and those who, on the contrary, make attempts at widening the division between humans and animals to justify practices of mistreatment and sacrifice of the latter in the name of tradition and culture. This paper mantains that reductionist abuses of “vulgar sociobiology”, now at times presented as innovative, were adequately questioned by anthropologists in the past; and proposes, both against these views and as opposed to what has been called “mysticist hyperhumanism” by some authors, a reivindication of culture as a conquest of our species leading us to humanity, retrieving in this way the program of that anthropology which, coming from the acknowledgement of cultural diversity, promoted a positive “humanization” of the world.

    En los últimos tiempos, el viejo debate en torno a naturaleza y cultura, que es una discusión —finalmente— sobre la definición de lo humano, ha adquirido las formas extremas de una pugna (tanto filosófica como a pie de calle entre “animalistas” e “hiperhumanistas”; entre quienes pretenderían —humanizando a los animales en materias como las de sus derechos— propiciar, según sus opositores, una cierta “animalización del hombre” y quienes, desde las perspectivas contrarias, estarían agrandando la brecha entre los humanos y los animales para justificar —así— el maltrato y sacrificio de estos últimos en nombre de la tradición y la cultura. Este trabajo viene a recordar que los abusos reduccionistas del “sociobiologismo vulgar”, que ahora se presentan a veces como novedosos, ya fueron

  2. Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment: Optimizing the Human Interface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human-Robot Interaction Reconfigurable Test Environment (HRI-RTE) integrates a grid-based, reconfigurable test arena and an operator workstation with...

  3. Anabolic processes in human skeletal muscle: restoring the identities of growth hormone and testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel W D; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-10-01

    that we believe are more important for stimulating hypertrophy in human skeletal muscle. Clarifying both the role of hormones in regulating muscle mass as well as the underlying basis for adaptation of skeletal muscle to resistance exercise will hopefully enhance and support the prescription of resistance exercise as an integral component of a healthy lifestyle.

  4. Effects of aggressive behaviour and group size on collective escape in an emergency: a test between a social identity model and deindividuation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugihara, N

    2001-12-01

    This study models escape behaviour in emergency situations and compares the ability of deindividuation and social identity-based explanations in particular to account for responses. According to deindividuation theory, the larger the group, the higher the degree of anonymity and the stronger antisocial responses such as competitiveness will be. Moreover, the competition for escape should be more severe, and the escape rate lowered, in a large group, regardless of whether participants have an aggressive option. A social identity model predicts that when group members have an option of aggressive behaviour, the salience of the aggressive norm in a larger group will be stronger than that in a smaller group. In contrast, when participants only have concessive option, the salience of the non-aggressive norm in a large group is expected to be stronger than that in a small group. The results of Study 1 supported the social identity model. Study 2 tested how participants responded to their norm. The social identity model suggests a more conscious and socially regulated process whereas deindividuation theory implies an unconscious or unregulated process. The results showed that what directly affects norm formation is the density of stimulus, that is, the amount of aggression received from others and of others' escape activity divided by group size. The results suggest the conscious process of the norm formation and support the social identity model.

  5. Genetics and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Anders

    2008-01-01

    For the last 20 years the concepts of identity and identification have been subject to much interest in the humanities and social sciences. However, the implications of genetics for identity and identification have been largely neglected. In this paper, I distinguish various conceptions of identity (as continuity over time, as basic kind of being, as unique set of properties, and as social role) and identification (as subjective experience of identity in various senses and as social ascription of identity in various senses), and investigate systematically genetic perspectives on each of these conceptions. I stress the importance of taking the genetic perspectives seriously but also their limitations. In particular, I pinpoint conceptual problems that arise when a genetic approach to identity is adopted.

  6. Humane Society International's global campaign to end animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidle, Troy

    2013-12-01

    The Research & Toxicology Department of Humane Society International (HSI) operates a multifaceted and science-driven global programme aimed at ending the use of animals in toxicity testing and research. The key strategic objectives include: a) ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide, via the multinational Be Cruelty-Free campaign; b) achieving near-term reductions in animal testing requirements through revision of product sector regulations; and c) advancing humane science by exposing failing animal models of human disease and shifting science funding toward human biology-based research and testing tools fit for the 21st century. HSI was instrumental in ensuring the implementation of the March 2013 European sales ban for newly animal-tested cosmetics, in achieving the June 2013 cosmetics animal testing ban in India as well as major cosmetics regulatory policy shifts in China and South Korea, and in securing precedent-setting reductions in in vivo data requirements for pesticides in the EU through the revision of biocides and plant protection product regulations, among others. HSI is currently working to export these life-saving measures to more than a dozen industrial and emerging economies. 2013 FRAME.

  7. Does Identity Precede Intimacy? Testing Erikson's Theory on Romantic Development in Emerging Adults of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Wim; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2010-01-01

    Erikson stated that healthy identity development during adolescence is a precursor of intimacy in romantic relationships during emerging adulthood. However, from a developmental contextual perspective, there are reasons to question this strict developmental ordering. Using interview and questionnaire data from a longitudinal study on 93…

  8. Identity paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers paradoxical nature of identity that emerges from: 1 the very concept of identity whose abstract generality unites various and even opposite features; 2 the processual nature of reality that is easier to express in the poetical metaphors or abstract principles than in unambiguous conceptual networks; 3 the oppose relationship between being and knowledge, mind and matter, subject and object, self and personality. Entangled in the labyrinth which evade efforts to be conceptually defined, the modern thinking of identity moves towards abandoning the idea of “self” on behalf of the “ego” and towards the misapprehension of identity as being identical. This corresponds to the “time of the lost spirit” stretched between the simultaneous need to find an identity and to give it up.

  9. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  10. Identity Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Provides information for identity management services on the creation, modification and eventual deletion of accounts and entitlements based on user relationships on...

  11. Pilot study of a brief intervention based on the theory of planned behaviour and self-identity to increase chlamydia testing among young people living in deprived areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Amy R; Norman, Paul; Goyder, Elizabeth; Harris, Peter R; Campbell, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    This study sought to estimate the effects of a novel intervention, compared with usual chlamydia testing promotion, on chlamydia test uptake and intentions among young people living in deprived areas. The intervention was based on the theory of planned behaviour, augmented with self-identity, and targeted the significant predictors of chlamydia testing intentions identified in the previous research. Cluster randomization was used to allocate college tutor groups (intervention n = 10; control n = 11) to the intervention or control group. The sample comprised 253 participants (intervention n = 145, control n = 108). The primary outcome was test offer uptake at the end of the session. Other outcomes measured at immediate follow-up were intention, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and self-identity. Generalized estimating equations, controlling for cluster effects and sexual activity, found a small but non-significant effect of condition on test offer uptake, OR = 1.65 (95% CI 0.70, 3.88) p = .25, with 57.5% of intervention participants accepting the offer of a test compared with 40.2% of control participants. Using the same analysis procedure, small-to-medium intervention effects were found on other outcome variables, including a significant effect on attitudes towards chlamydia testing, OR = 1.37 (95% CI 1.00, 1.87), p = .05. The results provide encouraging initial evidence that this theory-based intervention, targeting the key determinants of chlamydia testing, may help to improve chlamydia testing uptake in a high-risk group. They support the conduct of a larger trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. What is already known on this subject? Young people living in areas of increased socio-economic deprivation have been identified as a high-risk group for chlamydia. Previous research within an extended model of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) found that attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and self-identity

  12. Testing the Neutral Theory of Biodiversity with Human Microbiome Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianwei; Ma, Zhanshan Sam

    2016-08-16

    The human microbiome project (HMP) has made it possible to test important ecological theories for arguably the most important ecosystem to human health-the human microbiome. Existing limited number of studies have reported conflicting evidence in the case of the neutral theory; the present study aims to comprehensively test the neutral theory with extensive HMP datasets covering all five major body sites inhabited by the human microbiome. Utilizing 7437 datasets of bacterial community samples, we discovered that only 49 communities (less than 1%) satisfied the neutral theory, and concluded that human microbial communities are not neutral in general. The 49 positive cases, although only a tiny minority, do demonstrate the existence of neutral processes. We realize that the traditional doctrine of microbial biogeography "Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects" first proposed by Baas-Becking resolves the apparent contradiction. The first part of Baas-Becking doctrine states that microbes are not dispersal-limited and therefore are neutral prone, and the second part reiterates that the freely dispersed microbes must endure selection by the environment. Therefore, in most cases, it is the host environment that ultimately shapes the community assembly and tip the human microbiome to niche regime.

  13. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated...

  14. Limitation of using synthetic human odours to test mosquito repellents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbeyela Edgar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold-standard tests of mosquito repellents involve exposing human volunteers to host-seeking mosquitoes, to assess the protective efficacy of the repellents. These techniques are not exposure-free and cannot be performed prior to toxicological evaluation. It is postulated that synthetic lures could provide a useful assay that mimics in-vivo conditions for use in high-throughput screening for mosquito repellents. Methods This paper reports on a semi-field evaluation of repellents using a synthetic blend of human derived attractants for the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Different concentrations of known repellents, N, N diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet and Para-methane-3, 8, diol (PMD were added into traps baited with the synthetic blend, and resulting changes in mosquito catches were measured. Results All test concentrations of deet (0.001% to 100% reduced the attractiveness of the synthetic blend. However, PMD was repellent only at 0.25%. Above this concentration, it significantly increased the attractiveness of the blend. There was no relationship between the repellent concentrations and the change in mosquito catches when either deet (r2 = 0.033, P = 0.302 or PMD (r2 = 0.020, P = 0.578 was used. Conclusion It is concluded that while some repellents may reduce the attractiveness of synthetic human odours, others may instead increase their attractiveness. Such inconsistencies indicate that even though the synthetic attractants may provide exposure-free and consistent test media for repellents, careful selection and multiple-repellent tests are necessary to ascertain their suitability for use in repellent screening. The synthetic odour blend tested here is not yet sufficiently refined to serve as replacement for humans in repellent testing, but may be developed further and evaluated in different formats for exposure free repellent testing purposes.

  15. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hannagan

    Full Text Available Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers.

  16. Deciphering CAPTCHAs: what a Turing test reveals about human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ktori, Maria; Chanceaux, Myriam; Grainger, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Turning Turing's logic on its head, we used widespread letter-based Turing Tests found on the internet (CAPTCHAs) to shed light on human cognition. We examined the basis of the human ability to solve CAPTCHAs, where machines fail. We asked whether this is due to our use of slow-acting inferential processes that would not be available to machines, or whether fast-acting automatic orthographic processing in humans has superior robustness to shape variations. A masked priming lexical decision experiment revealed efficient processing of CAPTCHA words in conditions that rule out the use of slow inferential processing. This shows that the human superiority in solving CAPTCHAs builds on a high degree of invariance to location and continuous transforms, which is achieved during the very early stages of visual word recognition in skilled readers.

  17. Bridging Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaux, Kay; Burke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sociology and psychology are no strangers in the theoretical world of self and identity. Early works by William James (1890), a psychologist, and George Herbert Mead (1934), a sociologist, are often taken as a starting point by investigators in both fields. In more recent years, with the development of a number of identity theories in both fields,…

  18. Brand Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, John

    1998-01-01

    Instead of differentiating themselves by building "brand identities," colleges and universities often focus on competing with price. As a result, fewer and fewer institutions base their identities on value, the combination of quality and price. Methods of building two concepts to influence customers' brand image and brand loyalty are…

  19. Brand Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, John

    1998-01-01

    Instead of differentiating themselves by building "brand identities," colleges and universities often focus on competing with price. As a result, fewer and fewer institutions base their identities on value, the combination of quality and price. Methods of building two concepts to influence customers' brand image and brand loyalty are…

  20. Organizational Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo; Schultz, Majken

    This text presents the classic works on organizational identity alongside more current thinking on the issues. Ranging from theoretical contributions to empirical studies, the readings in this volume address the key issues of organizational identity, and show how these issues have developed through...

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection.

  2. Identity Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Line Helverskov

    2017-01-01

    , and theoretical foundation of the dissertation. Philosophically, the research rests on the central ANT concepts of symmetry, associations, and enactment with an inherent value of multiplicity. The philosophical position implies that the study of identity must be understood as the study of practices. This, in turn......Research in identity in general and professional identity specifically has seen an immense increase in recent years (Bauman 2004, Lawler 2014). Due to societal and technological developments, notions of what constitutes ‘the professional’ are subject to change. Thus, this dissertation rests...... on an understanding of professional identity as a moving concept that must be understood through its spatial and temporal contexts (Scanlon 2011). Accepting this position necessitates a reconsideration of the role that formal education plays in the development of professional identity of students. Researchers within...

  3. Am I seeing myself, my friend or a stranger? The role of personal familiarity in visual distinction of body identities in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Barbara; Bogler, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone

    2016-10-01

    Several brain regions appear to play a role in representing different body identities. The specific contribution of each of these regions is still unclear, however. Here we investigated which brain areas enable the visual distinction between self and other bodies of different familiarity, and between familiar and unfamiliar other individuals, and moreover, where identity-specific information on the three individuals was encoded. Participants were confronted with standardized headless human body stimuli either showing the participant's own, a personally familiar or an unfamiliar other body, while performing a luminance discrimination task. Employing multivariate pattern analysis, we were able to identify areas that allowed for the distinction of self from personal familiar other bodies within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus. Successful distinction of self from unfamiliar others was possible in the left middle frontal gyrus, the right inferior frontal gyrus, the left pre-supplementary motor area and the right putamen. Personally familiar others could be distinguished from unfamiliar others in the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ). An analysis of identity-specific information revealed a spatial gradient ranging from inferior posterior to superior anterior portions of the mPFC that was associated with encoding identity-related information for self via familiar to unfamiliar other bodies, respectively. Furthermore, several midline and frontal regions encoded information on more than one identity. The TPJ's role in deviance detection was underlined, as only identity-specific information on unfamiliar others was encoded here. Together, our findings suggest substantial spatial overlap in neural correlates of self and other body representation and thus, support the hypothesis of a socially-related representation of the self. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  5. Optimizing human semen cryopreservation by reducing test vial volume and repetitive test vial sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian F S; Ohl, Dana A; Parker, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN: Prospec......OBJECTIVE: To investigate optimal test vial (TV) volume, utility and reliability of TVs, intermediate temperature exposure (-88°C to -93°C) before cryostorage, cryostorage in nitrogen vapor (VN2) and liquid nitrogen (LN2), and long-term stability of VN2 cryostorage of human semen. DESIGN...

  6. Human skin equivalent as an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, Heike; Weimer, Michaela; Kersen, Silke; Brunner, Herwig

    2008-03-11

    The 3-D skin equivalent can be viewed as physiologically comparable to the natural skin and therefore is a suitable alternative for animal testing. This highly differentiated in vitro human skin equivalent is used to assess the efficacy and mode of action of novel agents. This model is generated from primary human keratinocytes on a collagen substrate containing human dermal fibroblasts. It is grown at the air-liquid interface which allows full epidermal stratification and epidermal-dermal interactions to occur. Future emphasis is the establishment of different test systems to investigate wound healing, melanoma research and infection biology. Key features of this skin model are that it can be used as an alternative for in vivo studies, donor tissue can be tailored to the needs of the study and multiple analyses can be carried out at mRNA and protein level. Driven by both ethical and economical incentives, this has already resulted in a shift of the test strategies used by the Pharmaceutical Industry in the early drug development process as reflected by the increased demand for application of cell based assays. It is also a suitable model for testing a wide variety of endpoints including cell viability, the release of proinflammatory mediators, permeation rate, proliferation and biochemical changes.

  7. Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

  8. Bridging Identities through Identity Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Allison M.; Martiny, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    As indicated by Deaux and Burke (this volume), sociology and psychology have shared a tradition of discourse allowing social psychologists to build upon each other's ideas. A conversation between social identity theory and identity theory was initiated fifteen years ago and addressed the similarities and differences between these theories. This…

  9. 78 FR 66366 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests To Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products for Infection With... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests to Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and... ``Guidance for Industry: Eligibility Determination for Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and...

  10. Electronic identity

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Norberto Nuno Gomes; Argles, David

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing availability of electronic services, security and a reliable means by which identity is verified is essential.Written by Norberto Andrade the first chapter of this book provides an overview of the main legal and regulatory aspects regarding electronic identity in Europe and assesses the importance of electronic identity for administration (public), business (private) and, above all, citizens. It also highlights the role of eID as a key enabler of the economy.In the second chapter Lisha Chen-Wilson, David Argles, Michele Schiano di Zenise and Gary Wills discuss the user-cent

  11. Identity Development and Identity Formation: A Theoretical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Atak

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Basic function of adolescence -one of the human life periods when physical and mental changes are experienced most heavily- is suggested to be identity development. Recent developmental psychology studies hypothesized that identity development starts during adolescence but intensifies during transi-tion to adulthood. This study addresses identity concept, in detail, from a theoretical point of view and in the scope of empirical studies. Literature offers quite different explanations and models as well as a few basic theories in this framework. The number of studies on identity subject is higher than the number of studies on other psycho-social study subjects. This study presents the theories offering basic explanations about identity (such as the works of Erikson, Marcia, Berzonsky, Waterman and the theories referring to identity (such as the works of Blos, Arnett, Kegan. Theories related to identity are addressed under the titles of identity exploration, identity status and identity styles. Almost all of the identity studies conducted in Turkey focused on identity status. In this context, new theories and tendencies may be taken into consideration in the studies to be made in Turkey on identity development.

  12. Assessment of Rose Bengal test in diagnosing Egyptian human brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fekhfakh, Effat Abdel-Monaem; Hassanain, Nawal Abdel-Hafiz; El-Folly, Runia Fouad; El-Hariri, Hazem

    2011-08-01

    A total of 30 patients suffering from brucellosis were suspected based on history taking, clinical manifestations and positive serum tube agglutination test (at titer > or = 1/160). The followings were done for all cases; complete blood picture (differential leucocytic count) and liver function tests, serodiagnosis of Brucella (serum tube agglutination test (STAT) as well as Rose Bengal test (RBT) and PCR. The study aimed to analyze the diagnostic value of RBT as compared to STAT and PCR for human brucellosis, and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, the cost and the time consuming of RBT as compared to STAT and PCR. There was a significant difference between diagnosis by RBT and both STAT > or = 1/640, & STAT > or = 1/1280. Also, there was a significant difference between PCR and both STAT > or = 1/640, and STAT > or = 1/1280. No significant difference was detected between RBT in diagnosing acute and chronic infection. STAT > or = 1/320 proved to be better than STAT at other titers and RBT in diagnosis of brucellosis. RBT proved to be suitable as screening test regarding time (faster) and cost. But, STAT > or = 1/320 from a practical and economic point of views proved to be the best one in diagnosing human brucellosis.

  13. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the incidence of cervical cancer, but has a low sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and requires frequent testing. Several HPV tests have become available commercially. They appear to be more sensitive for high-grade CIN, and may further reduce the incidence of cervical cancer......Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system... Test Systems § 862.1155 Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. (a) Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system intended for the early detection of pregnancy—(1) Identification. A human...

  15. Identity, identity politics, and neoliberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrenn Mary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the intensification of neoliberalism, it is useful to examine how some individuals might cope with the irrationality of the system. Neoliberalism cloaks the execution of the corporate agenda behind rhetorical manipulation that advocates for limited government. The corollary absence of government involvement on behalf of the citizenry writ large disarms the means of social redress for the individual. Democracy funded and fueled by corporate power thereby disenfranchises the individual, provoking some to search for empowerment through identity politics. The argument set forth suggests that individuals construct, reinforce, or escalate allegiance to identities as a coping mechanism, some of which manifest in violent identity politics.

  16. A pseudoisochromatic test of color vision for human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Michele E; Drodge, Suzanne C; Courage, Mary L; Adams, Russell J

    2014-07-01

    Despite the development of experimental methods capable of measuring early human color vision, we still lack a procedure comparable to those used to diagnose the well-identified congenital and acquired color vision anomalies in older children, adults, and clinical patients. In this study, we modified a pseudoisochromatic test to make it more suitable for young infants. Using a forced choice preferential looking procedure, 216 3-to-23-mo-old babies were tested with pseudoisochromatic targets that fell on either a red/green or a blue/yellow dichromatic confusion axis. For comparison, 220 color-normal adults and 22 color-deficient adults were also tested. Results showed that all babies and adults passed the blue/yellow target but many of the younger infants failed the red/green target, likely due to the interaction of the lingering immaturities within the visual system and the small CIE vector distance within the red/green plate. However, older (17-23 mo) infants, color- normal adults and color-defective adults all performed according to expectation. Interestingly, performance on the red/green plate was better among female infants, well exceeding the expected rate of genetic dimorphism between genders. Overall, with some further modification, the test serves as a promising tool for the detection of early color vision anomalies in early human life.

  17. Tuberculin test in nursing and human-sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golchin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a leading cause of death worldwide due to any single infectious agent. It seems that health care workers including nursing students can be affected easier than the other people, because of probable contacts in hospital. The risk of TB infection in nursing students has not estimated in Iran, so we conducted this study to compare the results of tuberculin test in the beginning and the end of educational course for nursing and human-sciences student. Methods: In a Cohort study, 320 students (160 nursing and 160 human-sciences underwent PPD skin test (5 units RT 23 at the beginning and the end of educational course by expert technician. The data of remaining students (123 nursing and 111 human-sciences were analyzed by SPSS software using Wilcoxson and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The frequency distribution of skin reaction in nursing students was negative (0-4 mm: 93.7%, suspected (5-9 mm: 4.4% and significant (≥15mm: 1.9% at the beginning of study, while it was negative( 75.5 %, suspected (9.8%, positive (10-14 mm 3.3% and significant (11.4% at the end of study. The frequency of skin reaction in human-sciences student was negative (93.7%, suspected (0.6%, positive (1.3% and significant (4.4% at the beginning of study, while it was negative (79.3%, significant (10.8%, suspected (8.1% and positive (1.8% at the end of study. The difference in that proportion of nursing students and control group with positive and significant PPD test at the end of study was statistically significant. The difference for the above proportions between two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: All subjects had no significant difference regarding to age, indigenous area and PPD test. Both groups have the same chance for exposure to M. Tuberculosis. The rate of new TB infection in Iranian community has diminished in comparison with the last few decades. Although risk of new infection may be a little bit more after age

  18. Testing modern human out-of-Africa dispersal models and implications for modern human origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Hubbe, Mark; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Stringer, Chris; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-10-01

    The modern human expansion process out of Africa has important implications for understanding the genetic and phenotypic structure of extant populations. While intensely debated, the primary hypotheses focus on either a single dispersal or multiple dispersals out of the continent. Here, we use the human fossil record from Africa and the Levant, as well as an exceptionally large dataset of Holocene human crania sampled from Asia, to model ancestor-descendant relationships along hypothetical dispersal routes. We test the spatial and temporal predictions of competing out-of-Africa models by assessing the correlation of geographical distances between populations and measures of population differentiation derived from quantitative cranial phenotype data. Our results support a model in which extant Australo-Melanesians are descendants of an initial dispersal out of Africa by early anatomically modern humans, while all other populations are descendants of a later migration wave. Our results have implications for understanding the complexity of modern human origins and diversity.

  19. Thermal human phantom for testing of millimeter wave cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palka, Norbert; Ryniec, Radoslaw; Piszczek, Marek; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek; Kowalski, Marcin

    2012-06-01

    Screening cameras working in millimetre band gain more and more interest among security society mainly due to their capability of finding items hidden under clothes. Performance of commercially available passive cameras is still limited due to not sufficient resolution and contrast in comparison to other wavelengths (visible or infrared range). Testing of such cameras usually requires some persons carrying guns, bombs or knives. Such persons can have different clothes or body temperature, what makes the measurements even more ambiguous. To avoid such situations we built a moving phantom of human body. The phantom consists of a polystyrene manikin which is covered with a number of small pipes with water. Pipes were next coated with a silicone "skin". The veins (pipes) are filled with water heated up to 37 C degrees to obtain the same temperature as human body. The phantom is made of non-metallic materials and is placed on a moving wirelessly-controlled platform with four wheels. The phantom can be dressed with a set of ordinary clothes and can be equipped with some dangerous (guns, bombs) and non-dangerous items. For tests we used a passive commercially available camera TS4 from ThruVision Systems Ltd. operating at 250 GHz. We compared the images taken from phantom and a man and we obtained good similarity both for naked as well as dressed man/phantom case. We also tested the phantom with different sets of clothes and hidden items and we got good conformity with persons.

  20. Challenging Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Identity is a keyword in a number of academic fields as well as in public debate and in politics. During the last decades, references to identity have proliferated, yet there is no simple definition available that corresponds to the use of the notion in all contexts. The significance of the notio...... Christian Lammers, Saxo-Instituttet - Arkæologi, Etnologi, Historie og Græsk og Latin; Gert Sørensen, Institut for Engelsk, Germansk og Romansk ; Anne Ring Petersen, Institut for Kunst- og Kulturvidenskab...

  1. A 22-nucleotide spliced leader sequence in the human parasitic nematode Brugia malayi is identical to the trans-spliced leader exon in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    Takacs, A M; Denker, J A; Perrine, K G; Maroney, P A; Nilsen, T W

    1988-01-01

    The mRNAs encoding a 63-kDa antigen in the human parasitic nematode Brugia Malayi contain a spliced leader sequence of 22 nucleotides (nt) that is identical to the trans-spliced leader found on certain actin mRNAs in the distantly related nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The 22-nt sequence does not appear to be encoded near the 63-kDa genes but is present in multiple copies in several locations within the parasite genome, including the 5S rRNA gene repeat. The 5S-linked copies of the 22-nt se...

  2. Disorders related to sexuality and gender identity in the ICD-11: revising the ICD-10 classification based on current scientific evidence, best clinical practices, and human rights considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Geoffrey M; Drescher, Jack; Krueger, Richard B; Atalla, Elham; Cochran, Susan D; First, Michael B; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Arango-de Montis, Iván; Parish, Sharon J; Cottler, Sara; Briken, Peer; Saxena, Shekhar

    2016-10-01

    In the World Health Organization's forthcoming eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11), substantial changes have been proposed to the ICD-10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders related to sexuality and gender identity. These concern the following ICD-10 disorder groupings: F52 Sexual dysfunctions, not caused by organic disorder or disease; F64 Gender identity disorders; F65 Disorders of sexual preference; and F66 Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation. Changes have been proposed based on advances in research and clinical practice, and major shifts in social attitudes and in relevant policies, laws, and human rights standards. This paper describes the main recommended changes, the rationale and evidence considered, and important differences from the DSM-5. An integrated classification of sexual dysfunctions has been proposed for a new chapter on Conditions Related to Sexual Health, overcoming the mind/body separation that is inherent in ICD-10. Gender identity disorders in ICD-10 have been reconceptualized as Gender incongruence, and also proposed to be moved to the new chapter on sexual health. The proposed classification of Paraphilic disorders distinguishes between conditions that are relevant to public health and clinical psychopathology and those that merely reflect private behaviour. ICD-10 categories related to sexual orientation have been recommended for deletion from the ICD-11.

  3. Disorders related to sexuality and gender identity in the ICD‐11: revising the ICD‐10 classification based on current scientific evidence, best clinical practices, and human rights considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Geoffrey M.; Drescher, Jack; Krueger, Richard B.; Atalla, Elham; Cochran, Susan D.; First, Michael B.; Cohen‐Kettenis, Peggy T.; Arango‐de Montis, Iván; Parish, Sharon J.; Cottler, Sara; Briken, Peer; Saxena, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    In the World Health Organization's forthcoming eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD‐11), substantial changes have been proposed to the ICD‐10 classification of mental and behavioural disorders related to sexuality and gender identity. These concern the following ICD‐10 disorder groupings: F52 Sexual dysfunctions, not caused by organic disorder or disease; F64 Gender identity disorders; F65 Disorders of sexual preference; and F66 Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation. Changes have been proposed based on advances in research and clinical practice, and major shifts in social attitudes and in relevant policies, laws, and human rights standards. This paper describes the main recommended changes, the rationale and evidence considered, and important differences from the DSM‐5. An integrated classification of sexual dysfunctions has been proposed for a new chapter on Conditions Related to Sexual Health, overcoming the mind/body separation that is inherent in ICD‐10. Gender identity disorders in ICD‐10 have been reconceptualized as Gender incongruence, and also proposed to be moved to the new chapter on sexual health. The proposed classification of Paraphilic disorders distinguishes between conditions that are relevant to public health and clinical psychopathology and those that merely reflect private behaviour. ICD‐10 categories related to sexual orientation have been recommended for deletion from the ICD‐11. PMID:27717275

  4. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  5. Designer's Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunrath, Kamila; Cash, Philip; Li-Ying, Jason

    2016-01-01

    A designer’s professional identity (DPI) develops through both education and professional experience, building on core personality traits and innate skills. In this paper a systematic literature review and a secondary narrative review were developed in order to map personal attributes and design...

  6. [Identity theft

    CERN Multimedia

    Wolinksy, H

    2003-01-01

    "A new survey by the Federal Trade Commission indicates that over the last five years one in four American households has been hit by identity theft, which can result in thieves tapping their victims' credit cards or bank accounts" (1 page).

  7. Mediating Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette Leonhardt; Morsing, Mette; Ravasi, Davide

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a longitudinal field study on the effects of positive media coverage on the reconstruction of organizational identity. The study highlights how intense positive coverage – to the point of turning an organization into a ‘celebrity’– influences both the way members understand the...

  8. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  9. Inflammatory aetiology of human myometrial activation tested using directed graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available THERE ARE THREE MAIN HYPOTHESES FOR THE ACTIVATION OF THE HUMAN UTERUS AT LABOUR: functional progesterone withdrawal, inflammatory stimulation, and oxytocin receptor activation. To test these alternatives we have taken information and data from the literature to develop causal pathway models for the activation of human myometrium. The data provided quantitative RT-PCR results on key genes from samples taken before and during labour. Principal component analysis showed that pre-labour samples form a homogenous group compared to those during labour. We therefore modelled the alternative causal pathways in non-labouring samples using directed graphs and statistically compared the likelihood of the different models using structural equations and D-separation approaches. Using the computer program LISREL, inflammatory activation as a primary event was highly consistent with the data (p = 0.925, progesterone withdrawal, as a primary event, is plausible (p = 0.499, yet comparatively unlikely, oxytocin receptor mediated initiation is less compatible with the data (p = 0.091. DGraph, a software program that creates directed graphs, produced similar results (p= 0.684, p= 0.280, and p = 0.04, respectively. This outcome supports an inflammatory aetiology for human labour. Our results demonstrate the value of directed graphs in determining the likelihood of causal relationships in biology in situations where experiments are not possible.

  10. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-02-07

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for maturation and terminal differentiation of HSEs. The small scale of the design reduces the amount of culture medium and the number of cells required by 36 fold compared to conventional transwell cultures. Our HSE-on-a-chip platform has the capability to recirculate the medium at desired flow rates without the need for pump or external tube connections. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to maintain HSEs for three weeks with proliferating keratinocytes similar to conventional HSE cultures. Immunohistochemistry analyses show that the differentiation and localization of keratinocytes was successfully achieved, establishing all sub-layers of the epidermis after one week. Basal keratinocytes located at the epidermal-dermal interface remain in a proliferative state for three weeks. We use a transdermal transport model to show that the skin barrier function is maintained for three weeks. We also validate the capability of the HSE-on-a-chip platform to be used for drug testing purposes by examining the toxic effects of doxorubucin on skin cells and structure. Overall, the HSE-on-a-chip is a user-friendly and cost-effective in vitro platform for drug testing of candidate molecules for skin disorders.

  11. "Everyone has a right to, like, check their box:" findings on a measure of gender identity from a cognitive testing study with adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conron, Kerith Jane; Scout; Austin, S Bryn

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to monitor the health of transgender youth, a small but high-risk population, are hindered by a lack of knowledge about how to accurately measure gender identity. Adolescents (n = 30) participated in semistructured qualitative interviews after completing a close-ended transgender-inclusive measure of gender. Interviews explored item comprehension and respondent burden. Participants, who were diverse in age (range = 15-21), gender identity, sexual orientation, and race-ethnicity, were accurately classified as male, female, or transgender. All youth understood transgender as a difference between the physical body and a person's internal sense of self. Nontransgender youth frequently used an example (a woman in a man's body) in their explanations and were largely supportive of the transgender options. Most transgender youth found a response option that they felt was appropriate. Transgender response options were added to a gender measure without impacting the accuracy of nontransgender responses or burdening the nontransgender adolescents in our sample. A modified measure (Gender: male; female; transgender, male-to-female; transgender, female-to-male; transgender, do not identify as exclusively male or female) is recommended for testing in samples that vary by age, race-ethnicity, socioeconomic status, language, and geography. Additional suggestions for research in this area are provided.

  12. Civil Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Axel

    scanning, etc., to discussions of Shari'a law versus common civil law in India; from the study of religious cult in ancient city states to the processes of constitutional reconstruction in former Communist countries; and from attempts at conflict resolution and prevention between Jewish and Arab citizens......In this paper I will go through a catalogue of examples of contexts in which the term civil identity is currently used, ranging from the formal and technical process of linking a set of administrative and other events to an individual biological person by means of identity cards, fingerprints, iris...... of technology and of law. If such a field can be established, the answers to those questions might be relevant to such contemporary issues as inter-ethnic, religious, and -cultural conflict or reconciliation, migration and nationality, civil rights and surveillance, security and privacy, bureaucracy and inter...

  13. Civil Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Axel

    scanning, etc., to discussions of Shari'a law versus common civil law in India; from the study of religious cult in ancient city states to the processes of constitutional reconstruction in former Communist countries; and from attempts at conflict resolution and prevention between Jewish and Arab citizens...... of Israel to Luce Irigaray's Feminist agenda of elaborating gender specific civil identities. My intention is to investigate whether these different employments of 'civil identity' point towards a common, and fairly well defined object field asking questions of contemporary relevance to the philosophy...... of technology and of law. If such a field can be established, the answers to those questions might be relevant to such contemporary issues as inter-ethnic, religious, and -cultural conflict or reconciliation, migration and nationality, civil rights and surveillance, security and privacy, bureaucracy and inter...

  14. Consumer Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Melissa Marie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to prove that despite consumers' impression that they are alone in deciding their consumption decision they are wrong. Consumers are manipulated on various levels by marketers. It is the marketer who decides what consumer identities should be created. Consumers are persuaded by marketers on different levels beginning with consumers' needs. Marketers begin by appealing to consumer drives, motivations and emotions to persuade their consumers to purchase their brand...

  15. Trigonometric identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina Baica

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author obtains new trigonometric identities of the form 2(p−1(p−22∏k=1p−2(1−cos2πkpp−1−k=pp−2 which are derived as a result of relations in a cyclotomic field ℛ(ρ, where ℛ is the field of rationals and ρ is a root of unity.

  16. Visual adaptation provides objective electrophysiological evidence of facial identity discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retter, Talia L; Rossion, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Discrimination of facial identities is a fundamental function of the human brain that is challenging to examine with macroscopic measurements of neural activity, such as those obtained with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Although visual adaptation or repetition suppression (RS) stimulation paradigms have been successfully implemented to this end with such recording techniques, objective evidence of an identity-specific discrimination response due to adaptation at the level of the visual representation is lacking. Here, we addressed this issue with fast periodic visual stimulation (FPVS) and EEG recording combined with a symmetry/asymmetry adaptation paradigm. Adaptation to one facial identity is induced through repeated presentation of that identity at a rate of 6 images per second (6 Hz) over 10 sec. Subsequently, this identity is presented in alternation with another facial identity (i.e., its anti-face, both faces being equidistant from an average face), producing an identity repetition rate of 3 Hz over a 20 sec testing sequence. A clear EEG response at 3 Hz is observed over the right occipito-temporal (ROT) cortex, indexing discrimination between the two facial identities in the absence of an explicit behavioral discrimination measure. This face identity discrimination occurs immediately after adaptation and disappears rapidly within 20 sec. Importantly, this 3 Hz response is not observed in a control condition without the single-identity 10 sec adaptation period. These results indicate that visual adaptation to a given facial identity produces an objective (i.e., at a pre-defined stimulation frequency) electrophysiological index of visual discrimination between that identity and another, and provides a unique behavior-free quantification of the effect of visual adaptation.

  17. Identity transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Robinson, Sarah; Jones, Sally

    This paper develops the concept of ‘pedagogical nudging’ and examines four interventions in an entrepreneurship classroom and the potential it has for student identity transformation. Pedagogical nudging is positioned as a tool, which in the hands of a reflective, professional, with an understand......This paper develops the concept of ‘pedagogical nudging’ and examines four interventions in an entrepreneurship classroom and the potential it has for student identity transformation. Pedagogical nudging is positioned as a tool, which in the hands of a reflective, professional......, as well as the resources they have when they come to the classroom. It also incorporates perspectives from (ii) transformational learning and explores the concept of (iii) nudging from a pedagogical viewpoint, proposing it as an important tool in entrepreneurship education. The study incorporates......) assists students in straddling the divide between identities, the emotions and tensions this elicits, and (iv) transform student understanding. We extend nudging theory into a new territory. Pedagogical nudging techniques may be able to unlock doors and bring our students beyond the unacknowledged...

  18. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Notice of Intent to...

  19. Learning as Negotiating Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg; Keller, Hanne Dauer

    of time - caught in the notion of trajectories of learning - that integrate past, present and future. Working with the learners' notion of time is significant because it is here that new learning possibilities become visible and meaningful for individuals. Further, we argue that the concept of identity......The paper explores the contribution of Communities of Practice (COP) to Human Resource Development (HRD). Learning as negotiating identities captures the contribution of COP to HRD. In COP the development of practice happens through negotiation of meaning. The learning process also involves modes...... of belonging constitutive of our identities. We suggest that COP makes a significant contribution by linking learning and identification. This means that learning becomes much less instrumental and much more linked to fundamental questions of being. We argue that the COP-framework links learning with the issue...

  20. [Human basophil degranulation test. Results of a modified technic (I)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román Pérez, F; Berlanga Cortés, J A; Urquiă, M; Guerra Pasadas, F; Peña Martínez, J

    1986-01-01

    The degranulation of human basophils towards antigenic substances, to which they must be previously sensitized as a result of the antigen-antibody union at the membrane level, is a phenomenon that has an important application complementing diagnosis of diseases mediated by the Gell and Coombs classification of Type I Hypersensitivity, on which the principle of Human Basophils Degranulation Test (HBDT) was based. An essential requirement is to be able to collect an adequate quantity of basophils, as well as the visualization by means of a technique of convenient stain. In this work, we show a modified HBDT technique for basophil granulocytes staining. A total of 33 HBDT was carried out on patients sensitive to grass pollen and/or Olea europea pollen and/or D. pteronyssinus, and as controls, HBDT was done on healthy individuals with negative clinical history. Basophil enrichemnt from the circulating blood sample was done by means of centrifugation in Percoll density gradients of 1072, 1076, 1080 and 1082, and we obtained a higher number of basophils with a density of 1080 at 400 Xg for 30 minutes. The cellular bottom was resuspended in 600 microliters of PBS. We employed lyophilized antigenic extracts from grass pollen, Olea europea and D. pteronyssinus, employing weight/volume concentration of 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6) and 10(-7). The optimum dilutions were 10(-5) for grass pollen and D. pteronyssinus.

  1. Moral identity in psychopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Glenn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several scholars have recognized the limitations of theories of moral reasoning in explaining moral behavior. They have argued that moral behavior may also be influenced by moral identity, or how central morality is to one's sense of self. This idea has been supported by findings that people who exemplify moral behavior tend to place more importance on moral traits when defining their self-concepts (Colby and Damon, 1995. This paper takes the next step of examining individual variation in a construct highly associated with IMMORAL behavior --- psychopathy. In Study 1, we test the hypothesis that individuals with a greater degree of psychopathic traits have a weaker moral identity. Within a large online sample, we found that individuals who scored higher on a measure of psychopathic traits were less likely to base their self-concepts on moral traits. In Study 2, we test whether this reduced sense of moral identity can be attributed to differences in moral judgment, which is another factor that could influence immoral behavior. Our results indicated that the reduced sense of moral identity among more psychopathic individuals was independent of variation in moral judgment. These results suggest that individuals with psychopathic traits may display immoral behavior partially because they do not construe their personal identities in moral terms.

  2. Testing the equivalence of modern human cranial covariance structure: Implications for bioarchaeological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Schroeder, Lauren

    2016-10-01

    Estimation of the variance-covariance (V/CV) structure of fragmentary bioarchaeological populations requires the use of proxy extant V/CV parameters. However, it is currently unclear whether extant human populations exhibit equivalent V/CV structures. Random skewers (RS) and hierarchical analyses of common principal components (CPC) were applied to a modern human cranial dataset. Cranial V/CV similarity was assessed globally for samples of individual populations (jackknifed method) and for pairwise population sample contrasts. The results were examined in light of potential explanatory factors for covariance difference, such as geographic region, among-group distance, and sample size. RS analyses showed that population samples exhibited highly correlated multivariate responses to selection, and that differences in RS results were primarily a consequence of differences in sample size. The CPC method yielded mixed results, depending upon the statistical criterion used to evaluate the hierarchy. The hypothesis-testing (step-up) approach was deemed problematic due to sensitivity to low statistical power and elevated Type I errors. In contrast, the model-fitting (lowest AIC) approach suggested that V/CV matrices were proportional and/or shared a large number of CPCs. Pairwise population sample CPC results were correlated with cranial distance, suggesting that population history explains some of the variability in V/CV structure among groups. The results indicate that patterns of covariance in human craniometric samples are broadly similar but not identical. These findings have important implications for choosing extant covariance matrices to use as proxy V/CV parameters in evolutionary analyses of past populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  4. Electromagnetic respiratory effort harvester: human testing and metabolic cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhaidar, E; Padasdao, B; Romine, R; Stickley, C; Lubecke, O Boric

    2015-03-01

    Remote health monitoring is increasingly recognized as a valuable tool in chronic disease management. Continuous respiratory monitoring could be a powerful tool in managing chronic diseases, however it is infrequently performed because of obtrusiveness and inconvenience of the existing methods. The movements of the chest wall and abdominal area during normal breathing can be monitored and harvested to enable self-powered wearable biosensors for continuous remote monitoring. This paper presents human testing results of a light-weight (30 g), wearable respiratory effort energy harvesting sensor. The harvester output voltage, power, and its metabolic burden, are measured on twenty subjects in two resting and exercise conditions each lasting 5 min. The system includes two off-the-shelf miniature electromagnetic generators harvesting and sensing thoracic and abdominal movements. Modules can be placed in series to increase the output voltage for rectification purposes. Electromagnetic respiratory effort harvester/sensor system can produce up to 1.4 V, 6.44 mW, and harvests 30.4 mJ during a 5-min exercise stage. A statistical paired t-test analysis of the calculated EE confirmed there is no significant change ( P > 0.05 ) in the metabolic rate of subjects wearing the electromagnetic harvester and biosensor.

  5. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G) in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3) to >10(4) times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6)) the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model). This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp) carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation deleterious to an

  6. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  7. Identity Support, Identity Devaluation, and Well-Being among Lesbians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Kristin P.; Peplau, Letitia Anne

    2005-01-01

    This research tested predictions about the association of identity support and identity devaluation with psychological well-being (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and depression). Lesbian women completed baseline surveys (N=42), then provided daily experience reports during a 2-week period (n=38), and completed a 2-month follow-up survey (n=34).…

  8. Identity Support, Identity Devaluation, and Well-Being among Lesbians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Kristin P.; Peplau, Letitia Anne

    2005-01-01

    This research tested predictions about the association of identity support and identity devaluation with psychological well-being (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and depression). Lesbian women completed baseline surveys (N=42), then provided daily experience reports during a 2-week period (n=38), and completed a 2-month follow-up survey (n=34).…

  9. Impact of cyclophosphamide dose of conditioning on the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aplastic anemia from human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takehiko; Koh, Hideo; Onishi, Yasushi; Kako, Shinichi; Onizuka, Makoto; Kanamori, Heiwa; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Iida, Hiroatsu; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakao, Shinji; Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-04-01

    The standard conditioning regimen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for aplastic anemia from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling has been high-dose cyclophosphamide (CY 200 mg/kg). In the present study, results for 203 patients with aplastic anemia aged 16 years or older who underwent allogeneic HSCT from HLA-identical siblings were retrospectively analyzed using the registry database of Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Conditioning regimens were defined as a (1) high-dose CY (200 mg/kg or greater)-based (n = 117); (2) reduced-dose CY (100 mg/kg or greater, but less than 200 mg/kg)-based (n = 38); and (3) low-dose CY (less than 100 mg/kg)-based (n = 48) regimen. Patient age and the proportion of patients receiving fludarabine were significantly higher in the reduced- and low-dose CY groups than the high-dose CY group. Engraftment was comparable among the groups. Five-year overall survival (OS) tended to be higher in the low-dose CY group [93.0 % (95 % CI 85.1-100.0 %)] than the high-dose CY [84.2 % (95 % CI 77.1-91.3 %)] or reduced-dose CY groups [83.8 % (95 % CI 71.8-95.8 %); P = 0.214]. Age-adjusted OS was higher in the low-dose CY group than the high- and reduced-dose CY groups with borderline significance (P = 0.067). These results suggest that CY dose can safely be reduced without increasing graft rejection by adding fludarabine in allogeneic HSCT for aplastic anemia from an HLA-identical sibling.

  10. Toward human resource management in inter-professional health practice: linking organizational culture, group identity and individual autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataw, David

    2012-01-01

    The literature on team and inter-professional care practice describes numerous barriers to the institutionalization of inter-professional healthcare. Responses to slow institutionalization of inter-professional healthcare practice have failed to describe change variables and to identify change agents relevant to inter-professional healthcare practice. The purpose of this paper is to (1) describe individual and organizational level barriers to collaborative practice in healthcare; (2) identify change variables relevant to the institutionalization of inter-professional practice at individual and organizational levels of analysis; and (3) identify human resource professionals as change agents and describe how the strategic use of the human resource function could transform individual and organizational level change variables and therefore facilitate the healthcare system's shift toward inter-professional practice. A proposed program of institutionalization includes the following components: a strategic plan to align human resource functions with organizational level inter-professional healthcare strategies, activities to enhance professional competencies and the organizational position of human resource personnel, activities to integrate inter-professional healthcare practices into the daily routines of institutional and individual providers, activities to stand up health provider champions as permanent leaders of inter-professional teams with human resource professionals as consultants and activities to bring all key players to the table including health providers. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  12. Ethical, legal and social issues in restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and suppression of identity in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchaszadeh, Victor B

    2015-07-01

    Human genetic identification has been increasingly associated with the preservation, defence and reparation of human rights, in particular the right to genetic identity. The Argentinian military dictatorship of 1976-1983 engaged in a savage repression and egregious violations of human rights, including forced disappearance, torture, assassination and appropriation of children of the disappeared with suppression of their identity. The ethical, legal and social nuances in the use of forensic genetics to support the right to identity in Argentina included issues such as the best interest of children being raised by criminals, the right to learn the truth of one's origin and identity, rights of their biological families, the issue of voluntary versus compulsory testing of victims, as well as the duty of the state to investigate crimes against humanity, punish perpetrators and provide justice and reparation to the victims. In the 30 years following the return to democracy in 1984, the search, localization and DNA testing of disappeared children and young adults has led, so far, to the genetic identification of 116 persons who had been abducted as babies. The high value placed on DNA testing to identify victims of identity suppression did not conflict with the social consensus that personal identity is a complex and dynamic concept, attained by the interaction of genetics with historical, social, emotional, educational, cultural and other important environmental factors. The use of genetic identification as a tool to redress and repair human rights violations is a novel application of human genetics within a developing set of ethical and political circumstances.

  13. Oxytocin is hydrolyzed by an enzyme in human placenta that is identical to the oxytocinase of pregnancy serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruki, M; Mizutani, S; Goto, K; Tsujimoto, M; Nakazato, H; Itakura, A; Mizuno, K; Kurauchi, O; Kikkawa, F; Tomoda, Y

    1996-01-01

    The hydrolysis of oxytocin (OT) by human placental subcellular fractions and pregnant sera was studied in the presence of bestatin, a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidases, and the antibody against pregnant serum oxyotocinase (P-LAP)(EC 3.4 11.3) by measuring liberated amino acids by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Our immunotitration study and the effect of bastatin on the oxytocin-degrading protease showed that the initiating and responsible protease in oxyotocin degradation in human placenta and pregnant serum is P-LAP.

  14. Galanin neurons in the intermediate nucleus (InM) of the human hypothalamus in relation to sex, age, and gender identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Ligtenberg, Lisette; Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-10-15

    The intermediate nucleus (InM) in the preoptic area of the human brain, also known as the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the interstitial nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus-1 (INAH-1) is explored here. We investigated its population of galanin-immunoreactive (Gal-Ir) neurons in relation to sex, age, and gender identity in the postmortem brain of 77 subjects. First we compared the InM volume and number of Gal-Ir neurons of 22 males and 22 females in the course of aging. In a second experiment, we compared for the first time the InM volume and the total and Gal-Ir neuron number in 43 subjects with different gender identities: 14 control males (M), 11 control females (F), 10 male-to-female (MtF) transsexual people, and 5 men who were castrated because of prostate cancer (CAS). In the first experiment we found a sex difference in the younger age group ( 45 years. In the second experiment the MtF transsexual group presented an intermediate value for the total InM neuron number and volume that did not seem different in males and females. Because the CAS group did not have total neuron numbers that were different from the intact males, the change in adult circulating testosterone levels does not seem to explain the intermediate values in the MtF group. Organizational and activational hormone effects on the InM are discussed.

  15. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  16. Human factors issues in the design of stereo-rendered photorealistic objects: a stereoscopic Turing test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Collin D.; Clewlow, John C.; Kessel, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    We present visual acuity metrics, human factors issues, and technical considerations in the construction of a stereorendered reality test in the spirit of the Turing test, Alan Turing's famous artificial intelligence test designed to explore the boundaries between human and machine interaction. The overall aim of this work is to provide guiding principles in the design of a stereoscopic reality test.

  17. Identical assemblage of Giardia duodenalis in humans, animals and vegetables in an urban area in southern Brazil indicates a relationship among them.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Maria Colli

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infects humans and other mammals by ingestion of cysts in contaminated water or food, or directly in environments with poor hygiene. Eight assemblages, designated A-H, are described for this species.We investigated by microscopy or by direct immunofluorescence technique the occurrence of G. duodenalis in 380 humans, 34 animals, 44 samples of water and 11 of vegetables. G. duodenalis cysts present in samples were genotyped through PCR-RFLP of β giardin and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh genes and sequencing of gdh. The gdh gene was amplified in 76.5% (26/34 of the human faeces samples with positive microscopy and in 2.9% (1/34 of negative samples. In 70.4% (19/27 of the positive samples were found BIV assemblage. In two samples from dogs with positive microscopy and one negative sample, assemblages BIV, C, and D were found. Cysts of Giardia were not detected in water samples, but three samples used for vegetable irrigation showed total coliforms above the allowed limit, and Escherichia coli was observed in one sample. G. duodenalis BIV was detected in two samples of Lactuca sativa irrigated with this sample of water. BIV was a common genotype, with 100% similarity, between different sources or hosts (humans, animals and vegetables, and the one most often found in humans.This is the first study in Brazil that reports the connection among humans, dogs and vegetables in the transmission dynamics of G. duodenalis in the same geographic area finding identical assemblage. BIV assemblage was the most frequently observed among these different links in the epidemiological chain.

  18. Efficient human paternity testing with a panel of 40 short insertion-deletion polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, J R; Pena, S D J

    2010-03-30

    We developed a panel of 40 multiplexed short insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphic loci with widespread chromosomal locations and allele frequencies close to 0.50 in the European population. We genotyped these markers in 360 unrelated self-classified White Brazilians and 50 mother-child-probable father trios with proven paternity. The average heterozygosity (gene diversity) per locus was 0.48, and the combined probability of identity (matching probability) for the 40-locus set was 3.48 x 10(-17). The combined power of exclusion of the indel panel was 0.9997. The efficiency of the 40 indel set in the exclusion of falsely accused individuals in paternity casework was equivalent to the CODIS set of 13 microsatellites. The geometric mean of the paternity indices of the 50 mother-child-probable father trios was 17,607. This panel of 40 short indels was found to have excellent performance. Thus, especially because of its simplicity and low cost, and the fact that it is composed of genomic markers that have very low mutation rates, it represents a useful new tool for human paternity testing.

  19. From Identity to Facility--The New Buildings for the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Copenhagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Magnus; Saugstad, Tone

    2007-01-01

    This analysis seeks to unite both an architectural and an educational perspective on the transformation of the university into a postmodern institution. Our point of departure is an analysis of the new buildings for the Faculty of Humanities University of Copenhagen which are located on the island area of Amager, to the south of Copenhagen's…

  20. Drug-Related Identity Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ferydoon Seyed Rabiee

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Our study is concentrating on understanding drug-related identity process which may enter important sociological visions into drug abuse pathology. It is in the framework of symbolic proactivity، cultural studies and the existing model for analyzing drug-related identity (Anderson – 1994. In this study، we have used a qualitative survey and a model test in a statistical sample cosisting white/black males and females who are under drug abuse treatment in Middle Michigan. Our data shows that identity change occures during childihood or early adolescence and is accompanied with experiences of isolationism before drug abuse which facilitates the creation of an afflicted identity as well as the loss of the ability to control the personal identity. Assimilation and drug abuse subculture have represented altenative identities for resolving such an unsuitable situation.

  1. Is Identical Really Identical? An Investigation of Equivalency Theory and Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Moody

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the validity of equivalency theory among 63 students by comparing two introductory upper-division human resource management courses: one taught online, the other in a traditional classroom. Commonalities included same term, same professor, and identical assignments/tests in the same order, thus allowing a direct comparison of course outcomes. MANCOVA results supported equivalency theory, and further suggest that the online learning pedagogy may be superior in its overall effect on student performance.

  2. The Use of Isolated Human Lymphocytes in Mycotoxin Cytotoxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike F. Dutton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of selected mycotoxins against isolated human lymphocytes was investigated, as a means of detecting mycotoxins in extracts derived from cereal samples. The methodology was based on the ability of viable cells to reduce methyl tetrazolium bromide to a purple formazan dye that could be quantitated by spectrophometric means and hence give a measure of the cytotoxicity of added substances. The results showed that there was good correlation with the occurrence of identified mycotoxins with only a minimum of false positives. For example, of the 13 samples of barley or barley derivatives that were positive for the mycotoxins, fumonisin B1 (FB1 deoxynivalenol (DON and ochratoxin A (OTA, all gave positive cytotoxicity responses. Two samples negative for mycotoxins gave no cytotoxicity responses. There was little variation between the results for lymphocytes drawn from the same healthy volunteer on three different occasions. Furthermore, for two of the mycotoxins tested (FB1 and DON it was possible to correlate general levels of mycotoxins present to the cytotoxic response of the lymphocytes but not for OTA, where it was concluded that interfering substances prevented direct correlation. It was concluded that this method was suited for general application as it could handle relatively high number of samples in a short period of time.

  3. Towards restoration of human identity: Practical Theology exploring possibilities of re-imagining the discourse of reconciliation and social cohesion in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semape J. Manyaka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ‘Social cohesion’ is a concept that many researchers agree is not easily defined. However, all definitions do agree that it is about a combination of processes. In this article I have adopted the Jenson definition (1998:4, as ‘a process of developing a community of shared values, shared challenges and equal opportunities within South Africa, based on trust, hope, and reciprocity among all South Africans’.Through this process the restoration of human identity will emerge out of the fragmentation caused by the apartheid government before the new democratic order of 1994. It is the aim of the new government to engage in this process (Cloete & Kotze 2009:43, with the result that many of those with broken human identities are beginning to participate in the developing new order.I have also chosen to explore transversal discourses in this article. These discourses favour an interdisciplinary approach. They allow different disciplines to have conversations without assimilation, and, while rooted in their own belief systems, they are still capable of sharing with others. In South Africa, we come from different backgrounds, but our backgrounds should have no power to keep us apart or locked in our own prisons.The article follows the tenets of postfoundationalist practical theology, and is based in the interdisciplinary paradigm. It promotes reflection on the ‘presence of God’ without using force, or judging those who do not share my faith. In this approach all voices receive equal treatment: participants are free to say what they believe and to express themselves openly; it also means theologians can participate freely in the debate on social cohesion. This is a never-ending journey; each one of us must play our role and never give up.

  4. Two structurally identical mannose-specific jacalin-related lectins display different effects on human T lymphocyte activation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Hervé; Culerrier, Raphaël; Poiroux, Guillaume; Ségui, Bruno; Jauneau, Alain; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy J; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Plant lectins displaying similar single sugar-binding specificity and identical molecular structure might present various biological effects. To explore this possibility, the effects on human lymphocytes of two mannose-specific and structurally closely related lectins, Morniga M from Morus nigra and artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia were investigated. In silico analysis revealed that Morniga M presents a more largely open carbohydrate-binding cavity than artocarpin, probably allowing interactions with a broader spectrum of carbohydrate moieties. In vitro, Morniga M interacted strongly with the lymphocyte surface and was uptaken quickly by cells. Morniga M and artocarpin triggered the proliferation and activation of human T and NK lymphocytes. A minority of B lymphocytes was activated in artocarpin-treated culture, whereas Morniga M favored the emergence of CD4+ CD8+ T lymphocytes. Moreover, cell death occurred in activated PBMC, activated T lymphocytes, and Jurkat T leukemia cells incubated with Morniga M only. The biological effects of both lectins were dependent on carbohydrate recognition. The Morniga M-induced cell death resulted, at least in part, from caspase-dependent apoptosis and FADD-dependent receptor-mediated cell death. Finally, Morniga M, but not artocarpin, triggered AICD of T lymphocytes. In conclusion, both lectins trigger lymphocyte activation, but only Morniga M induces cell death. In spite of similar in vitro mannose-binding specificities and virtually identical structure, only Morniga M probably interacts with carbohydrate moieties bound to molecules able to induce cell death. The present data suggest that subtle alterations in N-glycans can distinguish activation and cell death molecules at the lymphocyte surface.

  5. Sympathy for the Clone: (PostHuman Identities Enhanced by the ‘Evil Science’ Construct and its Commodifying Practices in Contemporary Clone Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Escudero Pérez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of human DNA in the form of eugenic pursuit, cloning, genetic engineering etc., has become a well-established subject in science fiction for decades now. In our days, this thematic trend is probably the most prolific one when inspiring narratives in popular culture and also constitutes the source of much bioethical debate. A common pattern derived from these practices is that they generate dystopian scenarios where a community is oppressed and abused by scientific means thus portraying science and its agents as evil. In the case of clone fiction, the focus of this article, the inhumanity of the oppressive powers enhances the questioned humanity of the clones, a particularly complex and evolving type of character that is often commodified. This paper analyses the "evil science" construction and the semiotics of the human/clone identity it produces as displayed in the cases of Never Let Me Go (Kazuo Ishiguro, 2005, The Island (Dir. Michael Bay, USA, 2005, Moon (Dir. Duncan Jones, UK, 2009 and the TV series Orphan Black (created by Graeme Manson & John Fawcett, Canada, 2013–. The cited examples provide references for typified patterns as well as for the development of both the clone figure and the scientific evilness component.

  6. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry: Testing for Salmonella Species in Human Foods and Direct-Human-Contact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ..., Storage, and Transportation.'' The guidance addresses testing procedures for Salmonella species (spp.) in... results, when the presence of Salmonella spp. in the food may render the food injurious to human health... Salmonella spp. in human foods (except shell eggs) and direct-human-contact animal foods, and...

  7. Racial Identity Attitudes and Ego Identity Statuses in Dominican and Puerto Rican College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Delida

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses in 94 Dominican and Puerto Rican Latino college students in an urban public college setting. Simultaneous regression analyses were conducted to test the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses, and findings indicated that…

  8. Nestin-positive progenitor cells isolated from human fetal pancreas have phenotypic markers identical to mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Tian-Pei Hong; Jiang Hu; Yi-Nan Liu; Yong-Hua Wu; Ling-Song Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To isolate nestin-positive progenitor cells from human fetal pancreas and to detect their surface markers and their capability of proliferation and differentiation into pancreatic islet endocrine cells in vitro.METHODS: Islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) were isolated from human fetal pancreas by using collagenase digestion. The free-floating ICCs were handpicked and cultured in a new dish. After the ICCs developed into monolayer epithelium-like cells, they were passaged and induced for differentiation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence stain, fluorescenceactivated cell sorting (FACS) and radioimmunoassay (RIA)were used to detect the expression of cell markers. RESULTS: (1) The monolayer epithelium-like cells had highly proliferative potential and could be passaged more than 16 timesin vitro; (2) RT-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence stain showed that these cells expressed both nestin and ABCG2, two of stem cellmarkers; (3) FACS analysis revealed that CD44, CD90and CD147 were positive, whereas CD34, CD38, CD45, CD71, CD117, CD133 and HLA-DR were negative on the nestin-positive cells; (4) RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression of insulin, glucagon and pancreaticduodenal homeobox gene-1 was detected, whereas the expression of nestin and neurogenin 3 disappeared in these cells treated with serum-free media supplemented with the cocktail of growth factors. Furthermore, the intracellular insulin content was detected by RIA after the induction culture.CONCLUSION: Nestin-positive cells isolated from human fetal pancreas possess the characteristics of pancreatic progenitor cells since they have highly proliferative potential and the capability of differentiation into insulinproducing cells in vitro. Interestingly, the nestin-positive pancreatic progenitor cells share many phenotypic markers with mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow.

  9. Identity Style, Parental Authority, and Identity Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzonsky, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The role that parental authority patterns and social-cognitive identity styles may play in establishing identity commitments was investigated. The results indicated that family authority and identity style variables combined accounted for 50% of the variation in strength of identity commitment. As hypothesized, the relationship between parental…

  10. Identity Style, Parental Authority, and Identity Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzonsky, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The role that parental authority patterns and social-cognitive identity styles may play in establishing identity commitments was investigated. The results indicated that family authority and identity style variables combined accounted for 50% of the variation in strength of identity commitment. As hypothesized, the relationship between parental…

  11. Humans and viticulture in Sardinia: The history and social relations as signs of identity of the wine-growing area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetto Graziella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The premise of this paper is that viticulture is an expression of history and social relations. In this sense, we embrace a post-modern vision of development that characterized both economic and cultural geography and agricultural economics. Such an approach does consider culture as an element of mediation between humans and the nature, placing it at the heart of the wine-growing territory. So history and social relations have influenced the today spatial densification by types of grape and the persistence, the reduction and/or disappearance of vines’ cultivations due to the different level of integration between humans and wine territories in the Italian region of Sardinia. In this region, there are selected areas where winegrowers have been forced to grub vineyards up, depleting the regional viticultural heritage, others–within which the fabric of the system of social relationships were denser–and where we saw a real rush to purchase of replanting rights for the expansion of the production surface for the increasing of production. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of history and social relations in the determination of the structure of the regional viticulture through the identification and analysis of diverse case studies.

  12. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for...

  13. 76 FR 50221 - International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine Testing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine... ``International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Human and Veterinary Rabies Vaccine Testing: State of the... approaches that may reduce, refine, or replace animal use in human and veterinary rabies vaccine...

  14. [DNA synthesis inhibition test of INAH by cultured human fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, K; Yanagisawa, K

    1986-03-20

    The most commonly used screening test of carcinogens is the Ames test. But this system occasionally shows false positive and false negative. Painter's method is one which has been developed to minimize false results. Now we test by Painter's method isonicotinic acid hydrazide, which shows negative in the Ames test but positive in an animal test. INAH showed positive by Painter's method. More chemicals are now under study for their carcinogenicity by Painter's method.

  15. [Design and trial of computer test system for experiment courses of human parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua; Ling, Jin; Su, Shui-Lian; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Qiong-Jun

    2011-06-01

    Based on the traditional experimental test of human parasitology, a reform was conducted to avoid the shortage of specimens and a disclosure of test questions. An experimental test system of human parasitology based on client/server (C/S) structure was therefore developed. This practicable system can increase the efficiency and fairness of examination and reduce cost.

  16. Origin-Dependent Neural Cell Identities in Differentiated Human iPSCs In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Hargus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation capability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs toward certain cell types for disease modeling and drug screening assays might be influenced by their somatic cell of origin. Here, we have compared the neural induction of human iPSCs generated from fetal neural stem cells (fNSCs, dermal fibroblasts, or cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons could be generated at similar efficiencies from all iPSCs. Transcriptomics analysis of the whole genome and of neural genes revealed a separation of neuroectoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs from mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Furthermore, we found genes that were similarly expressed in fNSCs and neuroectoderm, but not in mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Notably, these neural signatures were retained after transplantation into the cortex of mice and paralleled with increased survival of neuroectoderm-derived cells in vivo. These results indicate distinct origin-dependent neural cell identities in differentiated human iPSCs both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. No Identical “Mesenchymal Stem Cells” at Different Times and Sites: Human Committed Progenitors of Distinct Origin and Differentiation Potential Are Incorporated as Adventitial Cells in Microvessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetto Sacchetti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A widely shared view reads that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (“MSCs” are ubiquitous in human connective tissues, can be defined by a common in vitro phenotype, share a skeletogenic potential as assessed by in vitro differentiation assays, and coincide with ubiquitous pericytes. Using stringent in vivo differentiation assays and transcriptome analysis, we show that human cell populations from different anatomical sources, regarded as “MSCs” based on these criteria and assumptions, actually differ widely in their transcriptomic signature and in vivo differentiation potential. In contrast, they share the capacity to guide the assembly of functional microvessels in vivo, regardless of their anatomical source, or in situ identity as perivascular or circulating cells. This analysis reveals that muscle pericytes, which are not spontaneously osteochondrogenic as previously claimed, may indeed coincide with an ectopic perivascular subset of committed myogenic cells similar to satellite cells. Cord blood-derived stromal cells, on the other hand, display the unique capacity to form cartilage in vivo spontaneously, in addition to an assayable osteogenic capacity. These data suggest the need to revise current misconceptions on the origin and function of so-called “MSCs,” with important applicative implications. The data also support the view that rather than a uniform class of “MSCs,” different mesoderm derivatives include distinct classes of tissue-specific committed progenitors, possibly of different developmental origin.

  18. Sexual Orientation Identity Disparities in Awareness and Initiation of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Among U.S. Women and Girls: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah; Gordon, Allegra R; Haneuse, Sebastien; Potter, Jennifer E; Austin, S Bryn

    2015-07-21

    Lesbians and bisexual women are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection from female and male sexual partners. To examine the association between sexual orientation identity and HPV vaccination among U.S. women and girls. Cross-sectional, using 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth data. U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population. The 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth used stratified cluster sampling to establish a national probability sample of 12,279 U.S. women and girls aged 15 to 44 years. Analyses were restricted to 3253 women and girls aged 15 to 25 years who were asked about HPV vaccination. Multivariable logistic regression was used to obtain prevalence estimates of HPV vaccine awareness and initiation adjusted for sociodemographic and health care factors for each sexual orientation identity group. Among U.S. women and girls aged 15 to 25 years, 84.4% reported having heard of the HPV vaccine; of these, 28.5% had initiated HPV vaccination. The adjusted prevalence of vaccine awareness was similar among heterosexual, bisexual, and lesbian respondents. After adjustment for covariates, 8.5% (P = 0.007) of lesbians and 33.2% (P = 0.33) of bisexual women and girls who had heard of the vaccine had initiated vaccination compared with 28.4% of their heterosexual counterparts. Self-reported, cross-sectional data, and findings may not be generalizable to periods after 2006 to 2010 or all U.S. lesbians aged 15 to 25 years (because of the small sample size for this group). Adolescent and young adult lesbians may be less likely to initiate HPV vaccination than their heterosexual counterparts. Programs should facilitate access to HPV vaccination services among young lesbians. National Cancer Institute.

  19. Language and Identity Explored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rozanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between language and identity is widely discussed in applied linguistics, sociology, communications and other related scholarly fields. Furthermore, many researchers have focused on the post-Soviet region, which given its unique historical context allows for testing of this relationship. The widespread bilingualism as a result of historical russification and the linguistic transformations that occurred after the collapse of the Soviet Union make the region a ‘sociolinguistic playground’. Recent events in Ukraine have given grounds to further explore this relationship, now in attempt to link language and identity as potential forces for geopolitical change in the region. This paper presents an overview of existing research, theories, and opposing perspectives related to the relationship between language and identity, and considers complications such as historical russification, religious influence, socioeconomic factors, and education with regards to the Ukrainian and post-Soviet context.  I aim to illustrate the significance of language and its effects on socio-political change in the case of Ukraine, by presenting arguments and complications in support of the relationship between language and identity.

  20. 21 CFR 610.14 - Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity. 610.14 Section 610.14 Food and Drugs... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.14 Identity. The contents of a final container of each filling of each lot shall be tested for identity after all labeling operations shall have been...

  1. The Rose Bengal Test in human brucellosis: a neglected test for the diagnosis of a neglected disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Ramón; Casanova, Aurora; Ariza, Javier; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2011-04-19

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis affecting livestock and human beings. The human disease lacks pathognomonic symptoms and laboratory tests are essential for its diagnosis. However, most tests are difficult to implement in the areas and countries were brucellosis is endemic. Here, we compared the simple and cheap Rose Bengal Test (RBT) with serum agglutination, Coombs, competitive ELISA, Brucellacapt, lateral flow immunochromatography for IgM and IgG detection and immunoprecipitation with Brucella proteins. We tested 208 sera from patients with brucellosis proved by bacteriological isolation, 20 contacts with no brucellosis, and 1559 sera of persons with no recent contact or brucellosis symptoms. RBT was highly sensitive in acute and long evolution brucellosis cases and this related to its ability to detect IgM, IgG and IgA, to the absence of prozones, and to the agglutinating activity of blocking IgA at the pH of the test. RBT was also highly specific in the sera of persons with no contact with Brucella. No test in this study outperformed RBT, and none was fully satisfactory in distinguishing contacts from infected patients. When modified to test serum dilutions, a diagnostic titer >4 in RBT resulted in 87.4% sensitivity (infected patients) and 100% specificity (contacts). We discuss the limitations of serological tests in the diagnosis of human brucellosis, particularly in the more chronic forms, and conclude that simplicity and affordability of RBT make it close to the ideal test for small and understaffed hospitals and laboratories.

  2. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity...... drug testing....

  3. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  4. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes...

  5. Evaluation of behaviour testing for human directed aggression in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, van der J.A.M.; Beerda, B.; Ooms, M.; Silveira de Souza, A.; Hagen, M.; Kemp, B.

    2010-01-01

    Behaviour test batteries are used to identify aggressive dogs. The Dutch Socially Acceptable Behaviour (SAB)-test has been used since 2001 to select against unwanted aggression and fear in specific dog breeds, though much is unknown yet regarding its reliability, validity and feasibility. In this pa

  6. Claiming identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mo Michelsen Stochholm

    2016-01-01

    ) The controlled ruin: March 2014 (figure 1) This strategy involves partially demolishing of the abandoned building and subse-quently allowing the remnants to decay naturally. A precisely defined partial demo-lition transformed the abandoned building into a controlled ruin and exposed the building's private...... prototypes were tested as present manifestations in rural villages as an alternative way to pre-serve and activate buildings as well as memories....

  7. FINDING MY IDENTITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith Farnish

    2010-01-01

    @@ I have found an identity. Is that really such a big deal? The thing is,I didn't realize I was missing one.There are so many things I could call myself: a human,male,a father,a husband,a writer,a thinker,a gardener,a campaigner...so many things that I feel pretty comfortable with,yet until a couple of weeks ago I didn't realize there was something missing; something that yawned inside me,empty and lacking substance.

  8. Standards guidelines for human comfort tested on timber footbridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gutemberg de Alcântara Segundinho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Activities such as walking, running and jumping can produce undesirable dynamic excitations, which are a phenomenon that occurs due to pedestrian-induced dynamic forces whenever a footbridge features a natural frequency within stepping frequency ranges. Dynamic evaluations of timber footbridges are necessary to verify the level of human comfort and the suitability of the bridges when subjected to human traffic. The objective of this paper is to present a bibliography review on the standards guidelines contained in international codes BS 5400, SIA 160, OHBDC, CEB, EUROCODE 5, AASHTO, BRO and ISO 10137 as well as in studies by various researchers, in order to verify the serviceability limit state for vibrations. In Brazil, codes ABNT NBR 7190 and ABNT NBR 7188 set the sizing criteria for timber footbridges considering the ultimate and serviceability limit states, with the latter ignoring human comfort with regard to vibrations. Thus, the information contained in this study can contribute to the refinement of Brazilian code ABNT NBR 7190, as it takes into account human comfort in pedestrian-induced vibrations on footbridges.

  9. Identity between rat htf and human xbp-1 genes: determination of gene structure, target sequence, and transcription promotion function for HTF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokura, K; Kishimoto, T; Tamura, T

    2000-01-11

    Hepatocarcinogenesis-related transcription factor (HTF) was originally isolated from rats in which the expression was enhanced in hepatocellular carcinomas. Rat HTF (rHTF) is structurally similar to human X-box-binding protein-1 (hXBP-1), and both factors are unique in respective genomes. A previous study showed that hXBP-1 mRNA is detectable ubiquitously but is enriched in the human liver as rHTF. In this study, we demonstrated the analogous exon-intron organization and significant sequence homology for rhtf and hxbp-1 genes. Alignment of amino acid sequences of rHTF and hXBP-1 revealed that all the characteristic motifs in rHTF were conserved in hXBP-1. Moreover, Southern blotting patterns provided with the rHTF and hXBP-1 probes were basically the same. These two genes were thus thought to belong to the same evolutional lineage. We determined the consensus binding sequence (CRCGTCA) for rHTF by CASTing, and it was found to be nearly the same as that for hXBP-1. Transactivation ability of rHTF was also demonstrated. The rhtf gene generates two types of mRNAs (2.0 kb and 2.5 kb), both of which encode identical rHTF protein. These transcripts had distinct transcription initiation sites. The 2.0 kb promoter, that was revealed by the transient luciferase assay, contained GC-box and CAAT-box. Sequences around the transcription initiation site for the 2.0 kb transcript were similar in rhtf and hxbp-1 genes. Our observations suggest that HTF is a rat homolog of hXBP-1.

  10. Digital Identity Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhar, Marko

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is a review of existing systems and technologies for managing digital identities. After the selection of the two most promising systems there will be a detailed comparison for a typical environment. In the first part of my thesis, the theory for understanding issues of identity management is introduced. Furthermore, the difference between identity and digital identity is explained and identity management itself is interpreted. An example of identity management solut...

  11. Why do I dread looking old?: A test of social identity theory, terror management theory, and the double standard of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M; Teater, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    Outward appearance is one of the means by which age is determined, and fear of looking old may stem from fears about social identity and death. This study explored how social identity theory and terror management theory may help to explain the dread of looking old. University students from the United States, England, and Australia (N = 1,042) completed a questionnaire regarding their attitudes about aging and older adults. Results indicated that sex, age, beliefs about personal aging, and death anxiety explained 30.4% of the variance for participants' dread of looking old. Theoretical hypotheses were supported by our findings.

  12. A Comparison of the Roche Cobas HPV Test With the Hybrid Capture 2 Test for the Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levi, Angelique W; Bernstein, Jane I; Hui, Pei; Duch, Kara; Schofield, Kevin; Chhieng, David C

    2016-01-01

    All Food and Drug Administration-approved methods in the United States for human papillomavirus testing including the Hybrid Capture 2 human papillomavirus assay and the Roche cobas human papilloma...

  13. In vitro chemosensitivity tests on xenografted human melanomas.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    An in vitro chemosensitivity test has been applied to malignant melanoma cells from 5 patients. The tumour cells were first grown as xenografts in immune-suppressed mice, so that the results of the in vitro test could be compared with precise measurements of the sensitivity of the melanoma cells when exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs in vivo in the mouse. The in vitro assay involved exposing the tumour cells to each of 8 drugs, after which cell survival was determined by colony assay in soft ...

  14. DNA replication, repair, and repair tests. [Rat; human leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B.

    1980-09-01

    The rate of inhibition and recovery of DNA synthesis can be used in a rapid assay system to detect genotoxic potentials of chemicals. Also, the observation that an agent stimulates DNA repair in a test system indicates its ability to cause damage in DNA. Different experimental approaches to the study of repair synthesis are discussed.

  15. Behind the Battle Lines of History as Politics: An International and Intergenerational Methodology for Testing the Social Identity Thesis of History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tony; Collins, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article critiques popular assumptions that underlie the ongoing politicisation of school history curriculum as an agent of social identity and behaviour. It raises some key research questions which need further investigation and suggests a potential methodology for establishing evidence-based understanding of the relationship between history…

  16. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method.

  17. An Alternative to the Human Hemoglobin Test in the Investigation of Bloodstains Treated with Active Oxygen: The Human Glycophorin A Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Castelló

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In criminal investigations, there are three stages involved when studying bloodstains: search and orientation, confirmation, and individualization. Confirmatory tests have two aims: to show that the stain contains a human biological fluid and to confirm the type of biological fluid. The need to determine the nature of the evidence is reflected in the latest bibliography, where the possibility of employing mRNA and miRNA markers for this purpose is proposed. While these new proposals are being investigated, the kits for determining human hemoglobin currently provide a simple solution for resolving this issue. With these kits, the possibility of obtaining false positives and false negatives is well known. However, recently, a new problem has been detected. This involves the interference caused by new cleaning products that contain sodium percarbonate (or active oxygen when determining human hemoglobin. With the aim to resolve this problem, this work studied the ability of the human glycophorin A test to determine human blood in samples that have been treated with active oxygen. Our results show that the human glycophorin A test has a greater resistance to the destructive effect of the new detergents containing active oxygen; consequently, it provides an alternative to be taken into consideration in the confirmatory diagnoses of bloodstains.

  18. Use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry for detection of formazan in in vitro Reconstructed human Tissue (RhT)-based test methods employing the MTT-reduction assay to expand their applicability to strongly coloured test chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alépée, N; Barroso, J; De Smedt, A; De Wever, B; Hibatallah, J; Klaric, M; Mewes, K R; Millet, M; Pfannenbecker, U; Tailhardat, M; Templier, M; McNamee, P

    2015-06-01

    A number of in vitro test methods using Reconstructed human Tissues (RhT) are regulatory accepted for evaluation of skin corrosion/irritation. In such methods, test chemical corrosion/irritation potential is determined by measuring tissue viability using the photometric MTT-reduction assay. A known limitation of this assay is possible interference of strongly coloured test chemicals with measurement of formazan by absorbance (OD). To address this, Cosmetics Europe evaluated use of HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry as an alternative formazan measurement system. Using the approach recommended by the FDA guidance for validation of bio-analytical methods, three independent laboratories established and qualified their HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry systems to reproducibly measure formazan from tissue extracts. Up to 26 chemicals were then tested in RhT test systems for eye/skin irritation and skin corrosion. Results support that: (1) HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry formazan measurement is highly reproducible; (2) formazan measurement by HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry and OD gave almost identical tissue viabilities for test chemicals not exhibiting colour interference nor direct MTT reduction; (3) independent of the test system used, HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry can measure formazan for strongly coloured test chemicals when this is not possible by absorbance only. It is therefore recommended that HPLC/UPLC-spectrophotometry to measure formazan be included in the procedures of in vitro RhT-based test methods, irrespective of the test system used and the toxicity endpoint evaluated to extend the applicability of these test methods to strongly coloured chemicals.

  19. Genetic determinism and discrimination: a call to re-orient prevailing human rights discourse to better comport with the public implications of individual genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltis, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Genetic testing can not only provide information about diseases but also their prevalence in ethnic, gender, or other vulnerable populations. While offering the promise of significant therapeutic benefits and serving to highlight our commonality, genetic information also raises a number of sensitive human rights issues touching on identity and the perception thereof, as well as the possibility of discrimination and social stigma. It stands to reason that the results of individual screenings could haplessly be used to make general assumptions about entire ethnic or gender groups. In this manner, genetic information can directly influence identity by impacting and perhaps even reframing conceptions of group rights and dimensions of self-identification, thus importing constitutional scrutiny on questions of dignity and discrimination in particular. Is there a risk of collective stigmatization deriving from discrete testing of self-identified individuals? Would such stigmatization impinge on individual dignity by the exogenous imposition of ethnic or gender/sexual identity? If so, what norms can most adequately respond if and when individual and group interests diverge? These questions are examined from a comparative perspective.

  20. Preleptotene chromosome condensation stage in human foetal and neonatal testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, J M; Devictor, M; Stahl, A

    1977-04-01

    A preleptotene stage of chromosome condensation analogous to that already described in various plants and in the oocytes of several animal species has been observed in the human foetal testis. Contrary to what has been previously described, this stage in the testis is not followed by decondensation leading to leptotene filaments. This observation underlines the problem of the precise significance of this stage and its relation to initiation of meiosis. It is suggested that meiosis may be initiated during this condensation phase and that the male germ cell, despite its XY chromosome constitution, tends to evolve towards meiosis. This proposal pleads in favour of both the role of somatic cells in the inhibition of meiosis in the male foetus and the role of environmental factors rather than genetic constitution of the germ cell in meiotic induction.

  1. Mu suppression and human movement responses to the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime A; Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Parolin, Laura; Viglione, Donald J

    2011-03-30

    Electroencephalographic μ wave suppression was investigated using all 10 static, ambiguous Rorschach stimuli. In an earlier study using four Rorschach stimuli, the two stimuli that elicited feelings of movement were associated with μ suppression. In this study, we replicated this relationship using all 10 Rorschach stimuli while overcoming a number of other earlier limitations. The results strongly support the hypothesis that internal representation of the feeling of movement is sufficient to suppress the μ rhythm even when minimal external cues are present. This outcome increases the generalizability and ecological validity of this approach and gives support to the traditional interpretation of the Rorschach human movement responses as being associated with cognitive functioning, empathy, and social cognition.

  2. Assuring safety without animal testing concept (ASAT). Integration of human disease data with in vitro data to improve toxicology testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stierum, Rob; Aarts, Jac; Boorsma, Andre; Bosgra, Sieto; Caiment, Florian; Ezendam, Janine; Greupink, Rick; Hendriksen, Peter; Soeteman-Hernandez, Lya G.; Jennen, Danyel; Kleinjans, Jos; Kroese, Dinant; Kuper, Frieke; van Loveren, Henk; Monshouwer, Mario; Russel, Frans; van Someren, Eugene; Tsamou, Maria; Groothuis, Geny

    2014-01-01

    According to the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become possible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., (2004). Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 617-623). The ASAT concept takes human disease mechanisms as starting point and tries to define if activa

  3. Assuring safety without animal testing concept (ASAT). Integration of human disease data with in vitro data to improve toxicology testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stierum, R.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Boorsma, J.; Bosgra, S.; Caiment, F.; Ezendam, J.; Greuping, R.; Hendriksen, P.; Soeteman-Hernandez, L.G.; Jennen, D.; Kleinjans, J.; Kroese, D.; Kuper, F.; Loveren, van H.; Monshouwer, M.; Russel, F.; Someren, van E.; Tsamou, M.; Groothuis, G.

    2014-01-01

    According to the Assuring Safety Without Animal Testing (ASAT) principle, risk assessment may ultimately become possible without the use of animals (Fentem et al., (2004). Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 617–623). The ASAT concept takes human disease mechanisms as starting point and tries to define if activa

  4. Personal Identity in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Rabaglietti, Emanuela; Sica, Luigia Simona

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses specifics of identity formation in Italian adolescents and emerging adults. We review consistent evidence illustrating that, in Italy, a progressive deferral of transition to adulthood strongly impacts youth identity development by stimulating identity exploration and postponement of identity commitments. We also consider…

  5. Personal Identity in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Rabaglietti, Emanuela; Sica, Luigia Simona

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses specifics of identity formation in Italian adolescents and emerging adults. We review consistent evidence illustrating that, in Italy, a progressive deferral of transition to adulthood strongly impacts youth identity development by stimulating identity exploration and postponement of identity commitments. We also consider…

  6. Validating an artificial intelligence human proximity operations system with test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Justin; Straub, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    An artificial intelligence-controlled robot (AICR) operating in close proximity to humans poses risk to these humans. Validating the performance of an AICR is an ill posed problem, due to the complexity introduced by the erratic (noncomputer) actors. In order to prove the AICR's usefulness, test cases must be generated to simulate the actions of these actors. This paper discusses AICR's performance validation in the context of a common human activity, moving through a crowded corridor, using test cases created by an AI use case producer. This test is a two-dimensional simplification relevant to autonomous UAV navigation in the national airspace.

  7. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  8. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus by cobas 4800 HPV test in urban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Iwasaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular tests allow the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical samples, playing an important role in the prevention of cervical cancer. Objectives: We performed a study to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, HPV 18 and other high-risk human papillomavirus (pool 12 genotypes in Peruvian females from diverse urban areas using the cobas 4800 HPV test. Methods: Routine cervical samples collected in our laboratory were analyzed by cobas 4800 HPV test. Results: A total of 2247 samples from female patients aged 17–79 years were tested. high-risk human papillomavirus was positive in 775 (34.49% samples. Of these, 641 (82.71% were single infections and 134 (17.29% were multiple infections. The positivity rates for HPV 16, HPV 18, and other high-risk human papillomavirus were 10.77%, 2.0%, and 28.08%, respectively. In multiple high-risk human papillomavirus infections, the concomitance of HPV 16 and other high-risk human papillomavirus was more prevalent (13.42%. Conclusion: Our study showed high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in urban Peru, mainly among young women. In both single and multiple infections other high-risk human papillomavirus were more prevalent than HPV 16 and HPV 18, which might influence vaccine impact in our country. Furthermore, the cobas 4800 HPV test may be considered a useful tool for HPV molecular diagnosis.

  9. Design and prototyping of a chip-based multi-micro-organoid culture system for substance testing, predictive to human (substance) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Frank; Schilling, Niels; Mader, Katja; Gruchow, Mathias; Klotzbach, Udo; Lindner, Gerd; Horland, Reyk; Wagner, Ilka; Lauster, Roland; Howitz, Steffen; Hoffmann, Silke; Marx, Uwe

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic miniaturized human multi-micro-organ bioreactor systems are envisaged as a possible solution for the embarrassing gap of predictive substance testing prior to human exposure. A rational approach was applied to simulate and design dynamic long-term cultures of the smallest possible functional human organ units, human "micro-organoids", on a chip the shape of a microscope slide. Each chip contains six identical dynamic micro-bioreactors with three different micro-organoid culture segments each, a feed supply and waste reservoirs. A liver, a brain cortex and a bone marrow micro-organoid segment were designed into each bioreactor. This design was translated into a multi-layer chip prototype and a routine manufacturing procedure was established. The first series of microscopable, chemically resistant and sterilizable chip prototypes was tested for matrix compatibility and primary cell culture suitability. Sterility and long-term human cell survival could be shown. Optimizing the applied design approach and prototyping tools resulted in a time period of only 3 months for a single design and prototyping cycle. This rapid prototyping scheme now allows for fast adjustment or redesign of inaccurate architectures. The designed chip platform is thus ready to be evaluated for the establishment and maintenance of the human liver, brain cortex and bone marrow micro-organoids in a systemic microenvironment.

  10. Testing biomechanical models of human lumbar lordosis variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eric R; Hsu, Connie; Mair, Ross W; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2017-05-01

    Lumbar lordosis (LL) is a key adaptation for bipedalism, but factors underlying curvature variations remain unclear. This study tests three biomechanical models to explain LL variability. Thirty adults (15 male, 15 female) were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standing posture analysis was conducted, and lumbar range of motion (ROM) was assessed. Three measures of LL were compared. The trunk's center of mass was estimated from external markers to calculate hip moments (Mhip ) and lumbar flexion moments. Cross-sectional areas of lumbar vertebral bodies and trunk muscles were measured from scans. Regression models tested associations between LL and the Mhip moment arm, a beam bending model, and an interaction between relative trunk strength (RTS) and ROM. Hip moments were not associated with LL. Beam bending was moderately predictive of standing but not supine LL (R(2)  = 0.25). Stronger backs and increased ROM were associated with greater LL, especially when standing (R(2)  = 0.65). The strength-flexibility model demonstrates the differential influence of RTS depending on ROM: individuals with high ROM exhibited the most LL variation with RTS, while those with low ROM showed reduced LL regardless of RTS. Hip moments appear constrained suggesting the possibility of selection, and the beam model explains some LL variability due to variations in trunk geometry. The strength-flexibility interaction best predicted LL, suggesting a tradeoff in which ROM limits the effects of back strength on LL. The strength-flexibility model may have clinical relevance for spinal alignment and pathology. This model may also suggest that straight-backed Neanderthals had reduced lumbar mobility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cellular evidence for selfish spermatogonial selection in aged human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, G J; Goriely, A; Wilkie, A O M

    2014-05-01

    Owing to a recent trend for delayed paternity, the genomic integrity of spermatozoa of older men has become a focus of increased interest. Older fathers are at higher risk for their children to be born with several monogenic conditions collectively termed paternal age effect (PAE) disorders, which include achondroplasia, Apert syndrome and Costello syndrome. These disorders are caused by specific mutations originating almost exclusively from the male germline, in genes encoding components of the tyrosine kinase receptor/RAS/MAPK signalling pathway. These particular mutations, occurring randomly during mitotic divisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), are predicted to confer a selective/growth advantage on the mutant SSC. This selective advantage leads to a clonal expansion of the mutant cells over time, which generates mutant spermatozoa at levels significantly above the background mutation rate. This phenomenon, termed selfish spermatogonial selection, is likely to occur in all men. In rare cases, probably because of additional mutational events, selfish spermatogonial selection may lead to spermatocytic seminoma. The studies that initially predicted the clonal nature of selfish spermatogonial selection were based on DNA analysis, rather than the visualization of mutant clones in intact testes. In a recent study that aimed to identify these clones directly, we stained serial sections of fixed testes for expression of melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4), a marker of spermatogonia. A subset of seminiferous tubules with an appearance and distribution compatible with the predicted mutant clones were identified. In these tubules, termed 'immunopositive tubules', there is an increased density of spermatogonia positive for markers related to selfish selection (FGFR3) and SSC self-renewal (phosphorylated AKT). Here we detail the properties of the immunopositive tubules and how they relate to the predicted mutant clones, as well as discussing the utility of

  12. Analysis of rear-end impact response using mathematical human modeling and volunteer tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Ono, K.; Kaneoka, K.

    2001-01-01

    At TNO multi-directional mathematical human body models have been developed. The objective of this study was to simulate the rigid seat and standard seat JARI rear-impact sled tests using the MADYMO 50th percentile male model. The head and neck response of this human model and the volunteers were co

  13. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara;

    2016-01-01

    in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated...... placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, “PlaNet”, will bridge academia, industry...... and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice....

  14. Evaluation of Human and Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Models under Spaceflight Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Jacob P.; Untaroiu, Costin; Somers. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop occupant protection standards for future multipurpose crew vehicles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has looked to evaluate the test device for human occupant restraint with the modification kit (THOR-K) anthropomorphic test device (ATD) in relevant impact test scenarios. With the allowance and support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, NASA has performed a series of sled impact tests on the latest developed THOR-K ATD. These tests were performed to match test conditions from human volunteer data previously collected by the U.S. Air Force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the THOR-K finite element (FE) model and the Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS) FE model with respect to the tests performed. These models were evaluated in spinal and frontal impacts against kinematic and kinetic data recorded in ATD and human testing. Methods: The FE simulations were developed based on recorded pretest ATD/human position and sled acceleration pulses measured during testing. Predicted responses by both human and ATD models were compared to test data recorded under the same impact conditions. The kinematic responses of the models were quantitatively evaluated using the ISO-metric curve rating system. In addition, ATD injury criteria and human stress/strain data were calculated to evaluate the risk of injury predicted by the ATD and human model, respectively. Results: Preliminary results show well-correlated response between both FE models and their physical counterparts. In addition, predicted ATD injury criteria and human model stress/strain values are shown to positively relate. Kinematic comparison between human and ATD models indicates promising biofidelic response, although a slightly stiffer response is observed within the ATD. Conclusion: As a compliment to ATD testing, numerical simulation provides efficient means to assess vehicle safety throughout the design process and further improve the

  15. Identity and identity conflict in the workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Horton (Kate); P.S. Bayerl (Saskia); G. Belschak-Jacobs (Gabriele)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAs individuals, we define ourselves according to various characteristics that include our values and beliefs. This gives us our identity. As organisations become increasingly complex, understanding the concept of identity conflict may mean the difference between success and failure.

  16. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  17. Identities as organizational practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae; Asmuß, Birte

    Identity has been widely acknowledged as playing a central role in various organizational processes, yet there is still a need to better understand the dynamics and functions of identity work in modern organizations. The present paper is centered within this concern, and examines identity as inte......) reveal the intersubjective, multimodal and embodied nature of identity work; 2) demonstrate identity work as organizational practices, used in order to accomplish specific actions; and 3) pose a question on the view on identity as a layered/leveled phenomenon.......Identity has been widely acknowledged as playing a central role in various organizational processes, yet there is still a need to better understand the dynamics and functions of identity work in modern organizations. The present paper is centered within this concern, and examines identity...

  18. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  19. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Innovative Test Operations to Support Orion and Future Human Rated Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, William J.; Garcia, Rafael; Harris, Richard F.; See, Michael J.; Van Lear, Benjamin S.; Dobson, Jill M.; Norris, Scott Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes how the Orion program is implementing new and innovative test approaches and strategies in an evolving development environment. The early flight test spacecraft are evolving in design maturity and complexity requiring significant changes in the ground test operations for each mission. The testing approach for EM-2 is planned to validate innovative Orion production acceptance testing methods to support human exploration missions in the future. Manufacturing and testing at Kennedy Space Center in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout facility will provide a seamless transition directly to the launch site avoiding transportation and checkout of the spacecraft from other locations.

  1. A right to cultural identity in UNESCO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Donders

    2008-01-01

    This chapter touches first on the idea of developing a right to cultural identity in international human rights law, in order to clarify the issues and difficulties surrounding this right. Afterwards, it will address the work of UNESCO in relation to a right to cultural identity, including the adopt

  2. Reconsidering Graduate Employability: The "Graduate Identity" Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Len

    2001-01-01

    Elaborates a cogent alternative to the skills agenda as an approach to graduate employability--the graduate identity approach. Using a conceptual and theoretical examination of the key notion of performance, presents the twin concepts of practices and identity as significant for understanding human behavior. Offers suggestions for curriculum…

  3. Law as a Tale of Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2010-01-01

    Understanding law as a tale of identity, indentity includes what we ought as much as what we are. Criticism of law and literature of seing literature as having precende over law which is a mere technicality. Different human rights consceptions in Denmark compared to Europe equal diffent identities....

  4. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The subjective brain, identity, and neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant R

    2009-09-01

    The human brain is subjective and reflects the life of a being-in-the-world-with-others whose identity reflects that complex engaged reality. Human subjectivity is shaped and in-formed (formed by inner processes) that are adapted to the human life-world and embody meaning and the relatedness of a human being. Questions of identity relate to this complex and dynamic reality to reflect the fact that biology, human ecology, culture, and one's historic-political situation are inscribed in one's neural network and have configured its architecture so that it is a unique and irreplaceable phenomenon. So much is a human individual a relational being whose own understanding and ownership of his or her life is both situated and distinctive that neurophilosophical conceptions of identity and human activity that neglect these features of our being are quite inadequate to ground a robust neuroethics.

  6. Science Identity in Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Jennifer A.

    constructs for students attending the MOSS residential program. Analysis of results from paired-samples t-test indicates that MOSS does contribute to a positive change in science identity and this change does persist one month following the visit to MOSS, although a slight decline is seen. The results from this research and creation of this instrument provide useful tools for educators interested in increasing their students' science identity.

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  8. Restriction of human papillomavirus DNA testing in primary cervical screening to women above age 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is less specific for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (=CIN3) than cytology. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether a restriction of HPV testing to women aged at least 30 years would eliminate the problem....

  9. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  10. Genetic Testing and Its Implications: Human Genetics Researchers Grapple with Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabino, Isaac

    2003-01-01

    Contributes systematic data on the attitudes of scientific experts who engage in human genetics research about the pros, cons, and ethical implications of genetic testing. Finds that they are highly supportive of voluntary testing and the right to know one's genetic heritage. Calls for greater genetic literacy. (Contains 87 references.) (Author/NB)

  11. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  12. Attitudes of medical students towards human genome research and genetic counselling and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäfer, Mike Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study aimed to describe students' attitudes towards human genome research and towards genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients. The background of this investigation provided the increasing relevance ob human genetics research for clinical practice.Methods: A total of 167 medical students (54% female, aged 24 +/- 2 years from the second phase of their studies were surveyed in obligatory courses at the University of Leipzig, using a standardized questionnaire. Topics of the survey were attitudes towards human genome research and genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients as well as general values and socio-demographic data of the students.Results: The students consider human genome research as relevant and evaluate it positively, mainly based on expectations of medical uses. Genetic counselling and testing at cancer patients as an application of human genetics is also evaluated as important. The students attribute high relevance to clinical procedures for identification of genetic backgrounds for cancer (family history, information about genetic diagnostic. Nevertheless, deficits in their medical education are highlighted und reflected upon: the increased integration of human genetic content into medical curricula is demanded.Discussion: In accordance with the newly formulated „Approbationsordnung für Ärzte", the results suggest that current human genetic development should be more emphasized in medical education. This could be realized by an enlarged ratio of human genetic courses within curricula and by the transformation of these courses from facultative into obligatory.

  13. Testing and Results of Human Metabolic Simulation Utilizing Ultrasonic Nebulizer Technology for Water Vapor Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbe, Matthew; Curley, Su

    2010-01-01

    Life support technology must be evaluated thoroughly before ever being implemented into a functioning design. A major concern during that evaluation is safety. The ability to mimic human metabolic loads allows test engineers to evaluate the effectiveness of new technologies without risking injury to any actual humans. The main function of most life support technologies is the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) vapor. As such any good human metabolic simulator (HMS) will mimic the human body s ability to produce these items. Introducing CO2 into a test chamber is a very straightforward process with few unknowns so the focus of this particular new HMS design was on the much more complicated process of introducing known quantities of H2O vapor on command. Past iterations of the HMS have utilized steam which is very hard to keep in vapor phase while transporting and injecting into a test chamber. Also steam adds large quantities of heat to any test chamber, well beyond what an actual human does. For the new HMS an alternative approach to water vapor generation was designed utilizing ultrasonic nebulizers as a method for creating water vapor. Ultrasonic technology allows water to be vibrated into extremely tiny pieces (2-5 microns) and evaporate without requiring additional heating. Doing this process inside the test chamber itself allows H2O vapor generation without the unwanted heat and the challenging process of transporting water vapor. This paper presents the design details as well as results of all initial and final acceptance system testing. Testing of the system was performed at a range of known human metabolic rates in both sea-level and reduced pressure environments. This multitude of test points fully defines the systems capabilities as they relate to actual environmental systems testing.

  14. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

  15. Negotiating work identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamsen Saayman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The study explored the dynamics of work identity negotiation and construction.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate identity tensions and demands that mobilise identity work in the work environment.Motivation for the study: The study hoped to improve the understanding of the dynamics of identity construction and negotiation.Research design, approach and method: Using grounded theory methodology in the context of qualitative field research, the researchers conducted two unstructured interviews with 28 employees of a South African manufacturing company.Main findings: The five primary dimensions the data yielded were personal identity, individual agency, social identity, social practice and job.Practical/managerial implications: This study has implications for organisations that want to improve productivity through understanding work identity.Contribution/value-add: The article presents a conceptual model of the demands and tensions that influence work identity.

  16. Researching Identity and Interculturality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Researching Identity and Interculturality / by F. Dervin and K. Risager (eds.). Routledge 2015, 245 pp.......Review of: Researching Identity and Interculturality / by F. Dervin and K. Risager (eds.). Routledge 2015, 245 pp....

  17. Diversity of deaf identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Y

    2000-12-01

    Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1981) posits that members of minority groups achieve positive social identity by (a) attempting to gain access to the mainstream through individual mobility or (b) working with other group members to bring about social change. Some people may use a combination of both strategies. Through the use of cluster analysis, the existence of three identities associated with these strategies was discerned in a sample of 267 deaf adults: culturally hearing identity, culturally deaf identity, and bicultural identity, each comprising about a third of the sample. A subset of 56 people were interviewed in depth; excerpts are presented to illustrate the identity types. Qualified support was found for the prediction that people with culturally deaf and bicultural identities would have higher self-esteem.

  18. Professional entrepreneurial identity construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard, Michael Breum

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the construction of a professional identity as an entrepreneur in a sample of people with educational background in nutrition and health. The study examines the connection between professional identity construction and entrepreneurial business emergence using...

  19. Detection of EPO-Fc fusion protein in human blood: screening and confirmation protocols for sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Thevis, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) has been under investigation for several years as a pharmaceutical drug target. Clinical studies have shown that fusion proteins consisting of human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) and the Fc-part of IgG can be transported after pulmonary administration via FcRn across the airway epithelium to the blood stream. So far, no clinically approved pharmaceutical formulation of EPO-Fc is available. Since various forms of recombinant erythropoietins have been frequently misused by athletes as performance-enhancing agents, EPO-Fc might play a similar role in sports in the future. In order to investigate the detectability of EPO-Fc in human blood, different strategies were tested and developed. Only two of them fulfilled the necessary requirements regarding sensitivity and specificity. A rapid protocol useful for screening purposes first enriches EPO-Fc from human serum via high capacity protein A beads and subsequently detects EPO-Fc in the eluate with a commercial EPO ELISA kit. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method is about 5 pg (45 amol) EPO-Fc and is independent of the serum volume used. For screening and/or confirmation purposes a second protocol was evaluated, which consists of a fast EPO immunopurification step followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate or sarcosyl polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, SAR-PAGE) and Western double-blotting with chemiluminescence detection - a method already established in routine EPO anti-doping control. The latter strategy allows the detection of EPO-Fc in serum together with all other recombinant erythropoietins and with an identical LOD (5 pg/45 amol) as for the rapid screening protocol.

  20. At the Intersection of Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidasi Judit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that part of today’s societal difficulties, uncertainties and crisis worldwide can be attributed to the competing of multiple identities, to their intersections and their overlapping nature – on the level of nations, on the level of communities and also on the level of the individual. We aim at presenting a typology of identities that come into play in the public and in the private domain of the individual. It is hypothesized that there is a strong interdependence of cultural heritage, human values and social traditions in the competition of identities. These questions, which are interrelated and interconnected with each other through a common denominator, namely “cultural-mental programming” and “reprogramming efforts,” are going to be pondered about in the presentation. In the context of globalization the relevance of this topic is reinforced by the need to adapt to changes within the ever-intensifying shift from intercultural to multicultural environment in communities, in business and in work places. Attempts will be made to articulate some projections with respect to future trends that are to be expected: the way to go from competing identities to establishing a competitive identity (Simon Anholt. The contribution does not offer ready solutions but rather serves as fuel for further discussions.

  1. Diagnostic Efficacy of Modified Coagglutination Test in the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohite S.T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory help is must for thediagnosis of human brucellosis due to proteanclinical manifestations. As culture is hazardous,time consuming and less sensitive, serologicaltests are preferred for the diagnosis. Aggluti-nation tests like Rose Bengal PlateTest (RBPT, Serum Agglutination tests (SAT,2-Mercaptoethanol test (2-ME that are com-monly employed for the diagnosis either lacksensitivity or specificity. Coombs test andBrucellacapt though are sensitive and specific,workout costly. Therefore, modifiedcoagglutination test was developed and its di-agnostic efficacy was evaluated. Aims and Ob-jectives: To develop modified coagglutinationtest for the diagnosis of human brucellosis andcompare it with Coombs test. Materials andMethods: Serum samples collected from 191brucellosis patients and 100 controls were sub-jected to 2-ME, Coombs test and modifiedcoagglutination test (MCOAG. Blood culturewas performed by Castaneda’s method in all thepatients. Results: Significant difference in thepositivity rate was seen between MCOAG and2-ME. The results of MCOAG were compa-rable with Coombs test. Conclusions: Modi-fied coagglutination test is a better option toCoombs test for the serodiagnosis of brucel-losis in resource constrained countries as it issensitive, specific and cost effective.

  2. Language, Power and Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodak, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    How are identities constructed in discourse? How are national and European identities tied to language and communication? And what role does power have--power in discourse, over discourse and of discourse? This paper seeks to identify and analyse processes of identity construction within Europe and at its boundaries, particularly the diversity of…

  3. Experiencing with Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Justine Grønbæk

    2012-01-01

    This article studies how a political organization begins to experiment with its identity. By use of an empirical case of the Danish Ministry of Education, I examine how a political organization supplements its identity of a legislating power with identities of a supervisor, beacon and facilitator...

  4. Identity Security Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Philipsen, Nayna C.

    2004-01-01

    Identity theft is an increasing concern when organizations, businesses, and even childbirth educators ask for a client's Social Security number for identification purposes. In this column, the author suggests ways to protect one's identity and, more importantly, decrease the opportunities for identity theft.

  5. Teachers' Interpersonal Role Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Want, Anna C.; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Claessens, Luce C. A.; Pennings, Helena J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the link between teachers' appraisal of specific interpersonal situations in classrooms and their more general interpersonal identity standard, which together form their interpersonal role identity. Using semi-structured and video-stimulated interviews, data on teachers' appraisals and interpersonal identity standards…

  6. Mobile Identity Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoepman, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Identity management consists of the processes and all underlying technologies for the creation, management, and usage of digital identities. Business rely on identity management systems to simplify the management of access rights to their systems and services for both their employees and their custo

  7. Monitoring migrants or making migrants ‘misfit’? : Data protection and human rights perspectives on Dutch identity management practices regarding migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fors, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Record numbers of migrants and refugees fleeing violence and poverty in parts of Africa and the Middle East present the European Union with unprecedented challenges, including in determining their identity as well as status. In recent years problems of identifying immigrants have been addressed in

  8. Monitoring migrants or making migrants ‘misfit’? : Data protection and human rights perspectives on Dutch identity management practices regarding migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fors, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Record numbers of migrants and refugees fleeing violence and poverty in parts of Africa and the Middle East present the European Union with unprecedented challenges, including in determining their identity as well as status. In recent years problems of identifying immigrants have been addressed in o

  9. Novel strategies to identify relevant molecular signatures for complex human diseases based on data of identical-by-decent profiles and genomic context%基于IBD谱和基因组结构的复杂疾病相关分子标记识别的新策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传星; 杜磊; 李霞; 宫滨生; 张杰; 饶绍奇

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop novel strategies to identify relevant molecular signatures for complex human diseases based on data of identical-by-decent profiles and genomic context.Methods: In the proposed strategies, we define four relevancy criteria for mapping SNP-phenotype relationships-point-wise IBD mean difference, averaged IBD difference for window, Z curve and averaged slope for window.Results: Application of these criteria and permutation test to 100 simulated replicates for two hypothetical American populations to extract the relevant SNPs for alcoholism based on sib-pair IBD profiles of pedigrees demonstrates that the proposed strategies have successfully identified most of the simulated true loci.Conclusion: The data mining practice implies that IBD statistic and genomic context could be used as the informatics for locating the underlying genes for complex human diseases. Compared with the classical Haseman-Elston sib-pair regression method, the proposed strategies are more efficient for large-scale genomic mining.

  10. Toward Perceiving Robots as Humans: Three Handshake Models Face the Turing-Like Handshake Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, G; Nisky, I; Fernandes, H L; Acuna, D E; Kording, K P; Loeb, G E; Karniel, A

    2012-01-01

    In the Turing test a computer model is deemed to "think intelligently" if it can generate answers that are indistinguishable from those of a human. We developed an analogous Turing-like handshake test to determine if a machine can produce similarly indistinguishable movements. The test is administered through a telerobotic system in which an interrogator holds a robotic stylus and interacts with another party - artificial or human with varying levels of noise. The interrogator is asked which party seems to be more human. Here, we compare the human-likeness levels of three different models for handshake: (1) Tit-for-Tat model, (2) λ model, and (3) Machine Learning model. The Tit-for-Tat and the Machine Learning models generated handshakes that were perceived as the most human-like among the three models that were tested. Combining the best aspects of each of the three models into a single robotic handshake algorithm might allow us to advance our understanding of the way the nervous system controls sensorimotor interactions and further improve the human-likeness of robotic handshakes.

  11. A new alternative method for testing skin irritation using a human skin model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A; Berthet, A; Hopf, N B; Gilliet, M; Raffoul, W; Vernez, D; Spring, P

    2014-03-01

    Studies assessing skin irritation to chemicals have traditionally used laboratory animals; however, such methods are questionable regarding their relevance for humans. New in vitro methods have been validated, such as the reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model (Episkin®, Epiderm®). The comparison (accuracy) with in vivo results such as the 4-h human patch test (HPT) is 76% at best (Epiderm®). There is a need to develop an in vitro method that better simulates the anatomo-pathological changes encountered in vivo. To develop an in vitro method to determine skin irritation using human viable skin through histopathology, and compare the results of 4 tested substances to the main in vitro methods and in vivo animal method (Draize test). Human skin removed during surgery was dermatomed and mounted on an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell system. Ten chemicals with known non-irritant (heptylbutyrate, hexylsalicylate, butylmethacrylate, isoproturon, bentazon, DEHP and methylisothiazolinone (MI)) and irritant properties (folpet, 1-bromohexane and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI/MI)), a negative control (sodiumchloride) and a positive control (sodiumlaurylsulphate) were applied. The skin was exposed at least for 4h. Histopathology was performed to investigate irritation signs (spongiosis, necrosis, vacuolization). We obtained 100% accuracy with the HPT model; 75% with the RHE models and 50% with the Draize test for 4 tested substances. The coefficients of variation (CV) between our three test batches were test method presented effective results for the tested chemicals. It should be further validated using a greater number of substances; and tested in different laboratories in order to suitably evaluate reproducibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High definition viral vaccine strain identity and stability testing using full-genome population data--The next generation of vaccine quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höper, Dirk; Freuling, Conrad M; Müller, Thomas; Hanke, Dennis; von Messling, Veronika; Duchow, Karin; Beer, Martin; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2015-10-26

    Vaccines are the most effective prophylactic public health tools. With the help of vaccines, prevention of infectious disease spread and, in concert with other measures, even eradication has become possible. Until now, licensing and quality control require the determination of consensus genome sequences of replication competent infectious agents contained in vaccines. Recent improvements in sequencing technologies now enable the sequencing of complete genomes and the genetic analysis of populations with high reliability and resolution. The latter is particularly important for RNA viruses, which consist of fluctuating heterogeneous populations rather than genetically stable entities. This information now has to be integrated into the existing regulatory framework, challenging both licensing authorities and vaccine producers to develop new quality control criteria. Commercially available modified-live oral rabies vaccines and their precursor strains were deep-sequenced to assess strain identity and relations between strains based on population diversity. Strain relations were inferred based on the Manhattan distances calculated between the compositions of the viral populations of the strains. We provide a novel approach to assess viral strain relations with high resolution and reliability by deep sequencing with subsequent analysis of the overall genetic diversity within the viral populations. A comparison of our novel approach of inferring strain relations based on population data with consensus sequence analysis clearly shows that consensus sequence analysis of diverse viral populations can be misleading. Therefore, for quality control of viral vaccines deep sequencing analysis is to be preferred over consensus sequence analysis. The presented methodology allows for routine integration of deep sequencing data in vaccine quality control and licensing for highly reliable assessment of strain identity and stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional test of PCDHB11, the most human-specific neuronal surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Guilherme Braga; Gonçalves, Rafaella Araújo; Gralle, Matthias

    2016-04-12

    Brain-expressed proteins that have undergone functional change during human evolution may contribute to human cognitive capacities, and may also leave us vulnerable to specifically human diseases, such as schizophrenia, autism or Alzheimer's disease. In order to search systematically for those proteins that have changed the most during human evolution and that might contribute to brain function and pathology, all proteins with orthologs in chimpanzee, orangutan and rhesus macaque and annotated as being expressed on the surface of cells in the human central nervous system were ordered by the number of human-specific amino acid differences that are fixed in modern populations. PCDHB11, a beta-protocadherin homologous to murine cell adhesion proteins, stood out with 12 substitutions and maintained its lead after normalizing for protein size and applying weights for amino acid exchange probabilities. Human PCDHB11 was found to cause homophilic cell adhesion, but at lower levels than shown for other clustered protocadherins. Homophilic adhesion caused by a PCDHB11 with reversion of human-specific changes was as low as for modern human PCDHB11; while neither human nor reverted PCDHB11 adhered to controls, they did adhere to each other. A loss of function in PCDHB11 is unlikely because intra-human variability did not increase relative to the other human beta-protocadherins. The brain-expressed protein with the highest number of human-specific substitutions is PCDHB11. In spite of its fast evolution and low intra-human variability, cell-based tests on the only proposed function for PCDHB11 did not indicate a functional change.

  14. Corporate identity: The concept, its measurement and management

    OpenAIRE

    Riel, Cees; Balmer, John

    1997-01-01

    textabstractArticulates the main trends in the literature on corporate identity; defines corporate identity; explains the rationale for corporate identity management and describes the main methods used to reveal the desired and the actual corporate identity. Particular reference will be made to two recently developed models used to reveal an organization's identity: Balmer's Affinity Audit (BAA) and The Rotterdam Organizational Identification Test (ROIT). Concludes that while empirical resear...

  15. Long-term human immune system reconstitution in non-obese diabetic (NOD)-Rag (-)-γ chain (-) (NRG) mice is similar but not identical to the original stem cell donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D T; Badowski, M; Balamurugan, A; Yang, O O

    2013-12-01

    The murine immune system is not necessarily identical to it human counterpart, which has led to the construction of humanized mice. The current study analysed whether or not a human immune system contained within the non-obese diabetic (NOD)-Rag1(null) -γ chain(null) (NRG) mouse model was an accurate representation of the original stem cell donor and if multiple mice constructed from the same donor were similar to one another. To that end, lightly irradiated NRG mice were injected intrahepatically on day 1 of life with purified cord blood-derived CD34(+) stem and progenitor cells. Multiple mice were constructed from each cord blood donor. Mice were analysed quarterly for changes in the immune system, and followed for periods up to 12 months post-transplant. Mice from the same donor were compared directly with each other as well as with the original donor. Analyses were performed for immune reconstitution, including flow cytometry, T cell receptor (TCR) and B cell receptor (BCR) spectratyping. It was observed that NRG mice could be 'humanized' long-term using cord blood stem cells, and that animals constructed from the same cord blood donor were nearly identical to one another, but quite different from the original stem cell donor immune system.

  16. Social Identity and Preferences*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Daniel J.; Choi, James J.; Strickland, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Social identities prescribe behaviors for people. We identify the marginal behavioral effect of these norms on discount rates and risk aversion by measuring how laboratory subjects’ choices change when an aspect of social identity is made salient. When we make ethnic identity salient to Asian-American subjects, they make more patient choices. When we make racial identity salient to black subjects, non-immigrant blacks (but not immigrant blacks) make more patient choices. Making gender identity salient has no effect on intertemporal or risk choices. PMID:20871741

  17. Surfactant-induced dermatitis: comparison of corneosurfametry with predictive testing on human and reconstructed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Goffin, V; Hermanns-Lê, T; Arrese, J E; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1995-09-01

    Surfactants elicit alterations in the stratum corneum. Predictive tests that avoid animal experimentation are needed. This study compares three methods of rating and predicting shampoo-induced irritation. Corneosurfametry entails collection of stratum corneum followed by brief contact with diluted surfactants and measurement of variations in staining of samples. Corneosurfametry appears to correlate well with in vivo testing in volunteers with sensitive skin. However, corneosurfametry presents less interindividual variability than in vivo testing and allows better discrimination among mild products. Morphologic information about surfactant-induced loosening of corneocytes may be increased by testing surfactants on human skin equivalent. Results are similar to those provided by specimens used for corneosurfametry. The corneosurfametric prediction of surfactant irritancy correlates with in vivo testing and with in vitro evaluation on human skin equivalent.

  18. Identity and Professional Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Medha; Fast, Nathanael J; Fisher, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Despite evidence that large professional networks afford a host of financial and professional benefits, people vary in how motivated they are to build such networks. To help explain this variance, the present article moves beyond a rational self-interest account to examine the possibility that identity shapes individuals' intentions to network. Study 1 established a positive association between viewing professional networking as identity-congruent and the tendency to prioritize strengthening and expanding one's professional network. Study 2 revealed that manipulating the salience of the self affects networking intentions, but only among those high in networking identity-congruence. Study 3 further established causality by experimentally manipulating identity-congruence to increase networking intentions. Study 4 examined whether identity or self-interest is a better predictor of networking intentions, providing support for the former. These findings indicate that identity influences the networks people develop. Implications for research on the self, identity-based motivation, and professional networking are discussed.

  19. The Supermalt identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2007-01-01

    -Caribbean informants. The food and beverage consumption of informants reflects their mixed cultural identity. The brand identity Supermalt appears to be malleable, with ample room for consumer co-construction. Perceptions of brand identity differ markedly among informants, who are all able to construct Supermalt...... on consumers' self-identities. The second part explored the role of food and beverage products in the construction of self-identities. The final part focused on the construction of brand identity for Supermalt. Findings - The article provides information on the self-identities constructed by Afro...... aiming to develop strong brands with a limited marketing budget. Based on the Supermalt case, suggestions are made regarding branding in relation to ethnic minorities. Originality/value - This article provides a study of a brand that has become strong within a narrowly defined group of consumers....

  20. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  1. Artificial Human Phantoms: Human proxy in testing microwave apparatus that have electromagnetic interaction with the human body

    CERN Document Server

    Mobashsher, A T

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, an effort is made in this review to address different state-of-the-art artificial tissue emulating (ATE) materials and phantom types for various operating frequencies, and fabrication procedures in order to have a better understanding of the pros and cons of various ATE phantoms which leads us to develop superior version of artificial human body substitute for various applications.

  2. Self-identity as a construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    that is consistent with that definition. Self-identity has been shown to influence the acceptance and use of technology. Prior research has shown that self-identity includes the factors of innovativeness, tech savviness, and opinion leadership. The aim of the research is to test the self-identity construct...... consisting of these three elements. The research sample consists of 356 Slovak and 246 U.S. university students. The main finding is that correlations between the three elements of self-identity are approximately by 0.2 lower in the Slovak sample, this is a statistically significant difference. This directly...

  3. Personality and support for universal human rights: a review and test of a structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Sam

    2010-12-01

    All individual differences that predict support for international human rights are first reviewed: support for human rights is linked most positively to "globalism" (other international and environmental concerns), "identification with all humanity," principled moral reasoning, benevolence, and dispositional empathy. It is related most negatively to ethnocentrism and its root dispositions, the social dominance orientation, and authoritarianism. Other correlates are also noted. Secondly, a structural model of the effects of authoritarianism, social dominance, ethnocentrism and identification with all humanity upon commitment to human rights is presented and tested. Across 2 studies (Study 1, N=218 nonstudent adults; Study 2, N=102 university students), ethnocentrism and identification with all humanity directly predicted human rights commitment. The effects of authoritarianism upon this commitment were fully mediated through enhanced ethnocentrism and reduced identification with all humanity. The effects of social dominance were similar, but its direct effect upon human rights commitment remained significant and was not, in the second study, mediated by reduced dispositional empathy. © 2010 The Author. Journal of Personality © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Examining Identity Styles and Religiosity among Chilean Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales, Tevni E.; Leon, Vicente; Al Nasser, Fatimah; Hooley, Esther; Sample, Melina; Sommers, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    This study tested Berzsonky's theory of identity styles and identity commitment in predicting religiosity. Participants were university students (N = 320) from Chile who were surveyed with the ISI-3 and BRS-6 instruments to measure identity styles and religiosity. Path analysis was used to test the model, which suggested that the three identity…

  5. Human figure drawing test: validity in assessing intelligence in children aged 3-10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plubrukarn, Ratanotai; Theeramanoparp, Somchit

    2003-08-01

    Human-figure-drawing abilities are related with cognitive development in children. As cognitive skills progress, drawing abilities also improve in details and sex differentiation. The Goodenough-Harris (G-H) drawing test was developed to score human figure drawing with separate norms for males and females. To evaluate whether the Goodenough-Harris human drawing test is valid to classify intelligence in children aged 3-10 years. Record files of 528 children aged between 3-10 years who had attended the Child and Adolescent Unit at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (Children's Hospital), Bangkok, Thailand from January 1999 to December 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria included: 1) performing the human figure drawing test and standard intelligence tests on the same day and 2) diagnoses were addressed. The ages of the children ranged from 3 10/12 years to 10 11/12 years with a mean age of 7 9/12 years, 49.5 per cent were males and 50.5 per cent were female. The study group was diagnosed as pervasive development disorder 17 per cent, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 13 per cent, and mental retardation 11.3 per cent. Overall correlation of full scale intellectual quotient (FSIQ) from the standard intelligence test and standard scores on the Goodenough-Harris system was 0.813 (p test in classified correct intellectual level was 60.8 per cent but in children with an intellectual quotient (IQ) less than 70, the correct classification was 69.2 per cent. After stratification by age, it was found that the human figure drawing test had validity in predicting IQ below 70 in 88.7 per cent and 68.8 per cent of children aged 6 years respectively. The human figure drawing test can be used as an additional measure of assessing intelligence in young children but it should not be substituted for standard tests. The test is not complicated, therefore, trained personnel can use it in combination with other screening tests for cognitive

  6. Design and implementation of a system for the acquisition and three-dimensional virtual representation of the human face (tri-ident)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrobo Pizo, Gerardo A.; Ramirez, Navia-Carlos A.; Bravo Orozco, Belisario; Leon-Tellez, Jaury

    2005-02-01

    In present article the foundations base of the prototype called TRI_IDENT are exposed, as well as the elements that at the moment compose it, so much to level hardware as software and it will be spoken of the applications that it offers with purpose biometrics, that are guided for identification and people recognition go, as a system of security and a tool for facial surgeons, which use it to improve the precision and easiness in the it diagnose prescribe. In this article it showed the advantages that the TRI_IDENT offers, regarding two-dimensional systems, which lose quality and detail when they have been captured with an inappropriate illumination, produce shades that hide features and characteristic essential for the description of an individual or when the images are compressed digitally, in format to diminish space and to be able to keep them in database. The system TRI_IDENT also offers the understanding of this technology that this arriving to the world society.

  7. Validation studies of an immunochromatographic 1-step test for the forensic identification of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Sparkes, R; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Thali, M; Schmidt, L; Cordier, A; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-05-01

    An immunochromatographic 1-step test for the detection of fecal occult blood was evaluated for applicability for the forensic identification of human blood in stained material. The following experiments were conducted: 1) determination of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay; 2) evaluation of different extraction media for bloodstains (sterile water, Tris buffer pH 7.5 provided in the test kit, 5% ammonia); 3) analysis of biological samples subjected to a variety of environmental insults; and 4) evaluation of casework samples. This immunochromatographic 1-step occult blood test is specific for human (primate) hemoglobin and is at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous methods for detecting human hemoglobin in bloodstains. The antigen is insensitive to a variety of environmental insults, except for exposure to certain detergents and household bleaches and prolonged exposure to certain preparations of luminol. The entire assay can be conducted in field testing conditions within minutes. When in the laboratory the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no consumption of DNA for determining the presence of human hemoglobin in a forensic sample. The data demonstrate that this test is robust and suitable for forensic analyses.

  8. Commons of Identity: Sherpa Identity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Rune Loland

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent history of Sherpas demonstrates how identities can be scarce goods. While ‘Sherpa’ refers to an ethnic identity, ‘Sherpa’ refers to a crucial occupation in the trekking industry.i Their privileged position in Nepal’s international tourist industry is related to their common reputation. Their collective use of identity seems to help them getting access to an economic niche, and work in tourism seems to be an aspect of being Sherpa. Thus, an individual that operates in the tourist market does not only manage material assets but also identity assets to maintain the Sherpa reputation. Consequently, one can expect it to be a collective concern to husband their image, ie to control each member’s behaviour which could affect the Sherpa image. This article on Sherpa identity in encounters with outsiders analyses Sherpaness as a manageable resource that constitutes a collectively sanctioned commons. My point of departure is Barth’s analysis of ethnic boundary dynamics (1969, 1994 combined with Bourdieu’s concept of ‘capital’ and Hardin’s perspective on commons.DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v1i0.288Dhaulagiri Vol.1 (2005 pp.176-192

  9. Seroprevalence of human brucellosis in and around Jammu, India, using different serological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Brucellosis is a disease of zoonotic importance as it affects both human as well as animal’s health, and therefore, directly affects animal productivity and human efficiency. Therefore, a study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of brucellosis in humans in Jammu and surrounding areas. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 sera samples from humans occupied with professional related to animals were collected and tested for anti-Brucella antibodies by Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT, modified RBPT (mRBPT, standard tube agglutination test (STAT, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA. Sampling was done keeping in view with the occupation, sex, and age. Results: The overall seroprevalence of brucellosis recorded was 4.96%. The test-wise seroprevalence was 9.91% by RBPT, 9.91% by mRBPT, 9.09% by STAT, and 16.52% by I-ELISA. The prevalence of brucellosis was higher in >35-50 years age group compared to >20-35 years and >50-65 years. Sex-wise seroprevalence was higher in males than females. Taking I-ELISA as standard, the relative sensitivities of mRBPT, RBPT, and I-ELISA were in the order of mRBPT=RBPT>STAT. All the tests revealed high specificity values; however, among different serological tests, I-ELISA detected a maximum number of positive sera samples. Conclusions: The prevalence of brucellosis was found to be approximately 5%. The adult (>35-50 years age male group was most vulnerable. The routine diagnosis of brucellosis involved the conventional serological tests, viz., RBPT and STAT, but each was associated with drawbacks which could give either false-positive or false-negative interpretation. Therefore, it is always recommended to use a battery of tests in the diagnosis of brucellosis.

  10. Seroprevalence of human brucellosis in and around Jammu, India, using different serological tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H. K.; Kotwal, S. K.; Singh, D. K.; Malik, M. A.; Kumar, Arvind; Rajagunalan; Singh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Brucellosis is a disease of zoonotic importance as it affects both human as well as animal’s health, and therefore, directly affects animal productivity and human efficiency. Therefore, a study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of brucellosis in humans in Jammu and surrounding areas. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 sera samples from humans occupied with professional related to animals were collected and tested for anti-Brucella antibodies by Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT), modified RBPT (mRBPT), standard tube agglutination test (STAT), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA). Sampling was done keeping in view with the occupation, sex, and age. Results: The overall seroprevalence of brucellosis recorded was 4.96%. The test-wise seroprevalence was 9.91% by RBPT, 9.91% by mRBPT, 9.09% by STAT, and 16.52% by I-ELISA. The prevalence of brucellosis was higher in >35-50 years age group compared to >20-35 years and >50-65 years. Sex-wise seroprevalence was higher in males than females. Taking I-ELISA as standard, the relative sensitivities of mRBPT, RBPT, and I-ELISA were in the order of mRBPT=RBPT>STAT. All the tests revealed high specificity values; however, among different serological tests, I-ELISA detected a maximum number of positive sera samples. Conclusions: The prevalence of brucellosis was found to be approximately 5%. The adult (>35-50 years) age male group was most vulnerable. The routine diagnosis of brucellosis involved the conventional serological tests, viz., RBPT and STAT, but each was associated with drawbacks which could give either false-positive or false-negative interpretation. Therefore, it is always recommended to use a battery of tests in the diagnosis of brucellosis. PMID:27536036

  11. Rapid Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in Human Serum by Use of an Immunochromatographic Dipstick Test

    OpenAIRE

    Reithinger, Richard; Mario J Grijalva; Chiriboga, Rosa F.; Alarcón de Noya, Belkisyolé; Jaime R. Torres; Pavia-Ruz, Norma; MANRIQUE-SAIDE, Pablo; Cardinal, Marta V.; Ricardo E. Gürtler

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated a commercially available immunochromatographic dipstick test to detect Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 366 human serum samples with known serological results from Argentina, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela. One hundred forty-nine of 366 (40.7%) and 171/366 (46.7%) samples tested positive by dipstick and serology, respectively. Dipstick sensitivity was calculated to be 84.8% (range between countries, 77.5 to 95%), and specificity was 97.9% (95.9 to 100%).

  12. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... memoranda entitled ``Revised Recommendations for the Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  13. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for the confirmatory serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Roldán

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis, a sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB-IgG test was developed and evaluated using Toxocara canislarvae excretory-secretory antigens for detecting anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. The EITB-IgG profile of toxocariasis was characterized by comparing 27 sera from patients with toxocariasis, 110 sera from healthy subjects and 186 sera from patients with other helminth diseases (ascariasis, ancylostomiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, hymenolepiasis, diphyllobothriasis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, hydatidosis and fascioliasis. Antigenic bands of 24, 28, 30, 35, 56, 117, 136 and 152 kDa were predominantly recognized in sera from all patients with toxocariasis. However, only bands of 24-35 kDa were highly specific for Toxocara infection (98.3%, whereas other antigenic bands observed displayed cross-reactivity. Additionally, when the results of the EITB-IgG test were compared to those of the ELISA-IgG test, a 100% concordance was observed for positive results in human toxocariasis cases. The concordance for negative results between the two tests for healthy subjects and patients with other helminth diseases were 96.3% and 53.7%, respectively, showing that the EITB-IgG test has a higher specificity than ELISA. In conclusion, the EITB-IgG test is a very useful tool to confirm the serological diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  14. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for the confirmatory serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, William H; Espinoza, Yrma A

    2009-05-01

    To improve the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis, a sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB-IgG) test was developed and evaluated using Toxocara canislarvae excretory-secretory antigens for detecting anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. The EITB-IgG profile of toxocariasis was characterized by comparing 27 sera from patients with toxocariasis, 110 sera from healthy subjects and 186 sera from patients with other helminth diseases (ascariasis, ancylostomiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, hymenolepiasis, diphyllobothriasis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, hydatidosis and fascioliasis). Antigenic bands of 24, 28, 30, 35, 56, 117, 136 and 152 kDa were predominantly recognized in sera from all patients with toxocariasis. However, only bands of 24-35 kDa were highly specific for Toxocara infection (98.3%), whereas other antigenic bands observed displayed cross-reactivity. Additionally, when the results of the EITB-IgG test were compared to those of the ELISA-IgG test, a 100% concordance was observed for positive results in human toxocariasis cases. The concordance for negative results between the two tests for healthy subjects and patients with other helminth diseases were 96.3% and 53.7%, respectively, showing that the EITB-IgG test has a higher specificity than ELISA. In conclusion, the EITB-IgG test is a very useful tool to confirm the serological diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  15. Reconstructed human epidermis for skin absorption testing: results of the German prevalidation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Bock, Udo; Gamer, Armin; Haberland, Annekathrin; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Kaca, Monika; Kamp, Hennicke; Kietzmann, Manfred; Korting, Hans Christian; Krächter, Hans-Udo; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Mehling, Annette; Netzlaff, Frank; Niedorf, Frank; Rübbelke, Maria K; Schäfer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Schreiber, Sylvia; Schröder, Klaus-Rudolf; Spielmann, Horst; Vuia, Alexander

    2006-06-01

    Exposure to chemicals absorbed by the skin can threaten human health. In order to standardise the predictive testing of percutaneous absorption for regulatory purposes, the OECD adopted guideline 428, which describes methods for assessing absorption by using human and animal skin. In this study, a protocol based on the OECD principles was developed and prevalidated by using reconstructed human epidermis (RHE). The permeation of the OECD standard compounds, caffeine and testosterone, through commercially available RHE models was compared to that of human epidermis and animal skin. In comparison to human epidermis, the permeation of the chemicals was overestimated when using RHE. The following ranking of the permeation coefficients for testosterone was obtained: SkinEthic > EpiDerm, EPISKIN > human epidermis, bovine udder skin, pig skin. The ranking for caffeine was: SkinEthic, EPISKIN > bovine udder skin, EpiDerm, pig skin, human epidermis. The inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory reproducibility was good. Long and variable lag times, which are a matter of concern when using human and pig skin, did not occur with RHE. Due to the successful transfer of the protocol, it is now in the validation process.

  16. Identity and total institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubičić Milana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a psychiatric institution resident’s identity (self- construction processes. Our quest was grounded on constructivist theoretical paradigm that sees identity as a manner a person defines oneself in accordance with offered social repertoire. In other words, the total institution milieu offers limited range of identities to its residents. On the other hand, the latter are not just passive subjects that identity is imposed upon. They are able to use a number of adjustment mechanisms to the knowledge about themselves - ranging from symbolic escape to open resistance against the imposed image about them; to obedience, and we were interested to understand the (supposed complex dynamic of identity (re-building in, so-called, special or forensic patients. In order to understand this process and attempting to discover, besides the manifest also the latent layer of the story about self, the local, or personal, identity understanding was examined.

  17. Exploring medical identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Desla; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2009-09-16

    The crime of medical identity theft is a growing concern in healthcare institutions. A mixed-method study design including a two-stage electronic survey, telephone survey follow-up, and on-site observations was used to evaluate current practices in admitting and registration departments to reduce the occurrence of medical identity theft. Survey participants were chief compliance officers in acute healthcare organizations and members of the Health Care Compliance Association. Study results indicate variance in whether or how patient identity is confirmed in healthcare settings. The findings of this study suggest that information systems need to be designed for more efficient identity management. Admitting and registration staff must be trained, and compliance with medical identity theft policies and procedures must be monitored. Finally, biometric identity management solutions should be considered for stronger patient identification verification.

  18. A Dual Identity Approach for Conceptualizing and Measuring Children's Gender Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Andrews, Naomi C Z; England, Dawn E; Zosuls, Kristina; Ruble, Diane N

    2017-01-01

    The goal was to test a new dual identity perspective on gender identity by asking children (n = 467) in three grades (Mage  = 5.7, 7.6, 9.5) to consider the relation of the self to both boys and girls. This change shifted the conceptualization of gender identity from one to two dimensions, provided insights into the meaning and measurement of gender identity, and allowed for revisiting ideas about the roles of gender identity in adjustment. Using a graphical measure to allow assessment of identity in young children and cluster analyses to determine types of identity, it was found that individual and developmental differences in how similar children feel to both genders, and these variations matter for many important personal and social outcomes. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Reduction of animal suffering in rabies vaccine potency testing by introduction of humane endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Horiya, Madoka; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Kurane, Ichiro; Saijo, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Potency controls of inactivated rabies vaccines for human use are confirmed by the National Institutes of Health challenge test in which lethal infection with severe neurological symptoms should be observed in approximately half of the mice inoculated with the rabies virus. Weight loss, decreased body temperature, and the presence of rabies-associated neurological signs have been proposed as humane endpoints. The potential for reduction of animal suffering by introducing humane endpoints in the potency test for inactivated rabies vaccine for human use was investigated. The clinical signs were scored and body weight was monitored. The average times to death following inoculation were 10.49 and 10.99 days post-inoculation (dpi) by the potency and challenge control tests, respectively, whereas the average times to showing Score-2 signs (paralysis, trembling, and coma) were 6.26 and 6.55 dpi, respectively. Body weight loss of more than 15% appeared at 5.82 and 6.42 dpi. The data provided here support the introduction of obvious neuronal signs combined with a body weight loss of ≥15% as a humane endpoint to reduce the time of animal suffering by approximately 4 days. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Athletic identity foreclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Britton W; Petitpas, Albert J

    2017-08-01

    Athletic identity foreclosure refers to commitment to the athlete role in the absence of exploration of occupational or ideological alternatives. This article traces the theoretical underpinnings of the construct, examines the role of sport participation in identity development, and provides an overview of the course, correlates, and consequences of athletic identity foreclosure. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cervical Precancer Risk in HIV-Infected Women Who Test Positive for Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Despite a Normal Pap Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marla J.; Burk, Robert D.; Massad, L. Stewart; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Hessol, Nancy A.; Castle, Philip E.; Anastos, Kathryn; Xie, Xianhong; Minkoff, Howard; Xue, Xiaonan; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Flowers, Lisa; Levine, Alexandra M.; Colie, Christine; Rahangdale, Lisa; Fischl, Margaret A.; Palefsky, Joel M.; Strickler, Howard D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Determining cervical precancer risk among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women who despite a normal Pap test are positive for oncogenic human papillomavirus (oncHPV) types is important for setting screening practices. Methods. A total of 2791 HIV-infected and 975 HIV-uninfected women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study were followed semiannually with Pap tests and colposcopy. Cumulative risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN-2+; threshold used for CIN treatment) and grade 3 or greater (CIN-3+; threshold to set screening practices) were measured in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women with normal Pap tests, stratified by baseline HPV results, and also in HIV-infected women with a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL; benchmark indication for colposcopy). Results. At baseline, 1021 HIV-infected and 518 HIV-uninfected women had normal Pap tests, of whom 154 (15%) and 27 (5%), respectively, tested oncHPV positive. The 5-year CIN-2+ cumulative risk in the HIV-infected oncHPV-positive women was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9%–34%), 12% (95% CI, 0%–22%), and 14% (95% CI, 2%–25%) among those with CD4 counts CIN-3+, the cumulative risk averaged 4% (95% CI, 1%–8%) in HIV-infected oncHPV-positive women, and 10% (95% CI, 0%–23%) among those positive for HPV type 16. In HIV-infected women with LSIL, CIN-3+ risk was 7% (95% CI, 3%–11%). In multivariate analysis, HIV-infected HPV16-positive women had 13-fold (P = .001) greater CIN-3+ risk than oncHPV-negative women (referent), and HIV-infected women with LSIL had 9-fold (P < .0001) greater risk. Conclusions. HIV-infected women with a normal Pap result who test HPV16 positive have high precancer risk (similar to those with LSIL), possibly warranting immediate colposcopy. Repeat screening in 1 year may be appropriate if non-16 oncHPV is detected. PMID:26187020

  2. Study duration and earnings: A test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Oosterbeek

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we propose a simple test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate. It is argued that these theories lead to different predictions with respect to the earnings effects of deviations between actual and nominal durations of a study. Earnings and study duration equations ar

  3. The placenta in toxicology. Part IV : Battery of toxicological test systems based on human placenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göhner, Claudia; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Pfarrer, Christiane; Häger, Jan-Dirk; Faas, Marijke; Ernerudh, Jan; Cline, J Mark; Dixon, Darlene; Buse, Eberhard; Markert, Udo R

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the potential and also some limitations of using human placentas, or placental cells and structures for toxicology testing. The placenta contains a wide spectrum of cell types and tissues, such as trophoblast cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, stem cells, endothelial cells, ves

  4. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSESB.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt11Department of Reproductiv...

  5. Testing key predictions of the associative account of mirror neurons in humans using multivariate pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhof, Nikolaas N; Wiggett, Alison J; Cross, Emily S

    2014-04-01

    Cook et al. overstate the evidence supporting their associative account of mirror neurons in humans: most studies do not address a key property, action-specificity that generalizes across the visual and motor domains. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of neuroimaging data can address this concern, and we illustrate how MVPA can be used to test key predictions of their account.

  6. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  7. Absolute Pitch in Boreal Chickadees and Humans: Exceptions that Test a Phylogenetic Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Ronald G.; Balkwill, Laura-Lee; Hoeschele, Marisa; Moscicki, Michele K.; Bloomfield, Laurie L.; Sturdy, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined generality of the phylogenetic rule that birds discriminate frequency ranges more accurately than mammals. Human absolute pitch chroma possessors accurately tracked transitions between frequency ranges. Independent tests showed that they used note naming (pitch chroma) to remap the tones into ranges; neither possessors nor…

  8. Human Plasmodium knowlesi infection detected by rapid diagnostic tests for malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); M. Rutten (Martine); R. Koelewijn (Rob); A.M. Zeeman (Anne Marie); J. Verweij (Jaap); P.J. Wismans (Pieter); C.H. Kocken (Clemens); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a PCR-confirmed case of Plasmodium knowlesi infection with a high parasitemia level and clinical signs of severe malaria in a migrant worker from Malaysian Borneo in the Netherlands. Investigations showed that commercially available rapid antigen tests for detection of human

  9. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing and Associated Risk Factors in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Olivia; Wu, Qishan; Ickes, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study documents the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in a sample of college students and examines associated demographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants: College students aged 18 or older were randomly selected to participate in a health behavior survey at a southeastern university in September…

  10. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  11. Reconsolidation in a human fear conditioning study: a test of extinction as updating mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindt, M.; Soeter, M.

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting reconsolidation seems to be a promising approach to dampen the expression of fear memory. Recently, we demonstrated that disrupting reconsolidation by a pharmacological manipulation specifically targeted the emotional expression of memory (i.e., startle response). Here we test in a human

  12. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSESB.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt11Department of Reproductiv...

  13. Preventing Identity Theft

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Identity theft is becoming more common and is a very serious crime. Victims of identity theft can spend months or years and a lot of hard earned money cleaning up the mess thieves have made of their good name and credit record. Identity thieves can use your personal information to take over your credit accounts and open new ones. They may even use your good credit to get a job, take out a car loan, or rent an apartment. Identity theft victims may lose job opportunities, be refused loans for e...

  14. Identity/Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Knauer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper engages the unspoken fourth dimension of intersectionality—time. Using the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT identities as an example, it establishes that identity, as it is lived and experienced, is not only multivalent, but also historically contingent. It then raises a number of points regarding the temporal locality of identity—the influence of time on issues of identity and understanding, its implications for legal interventions, social movement building, and paradigms of progressive change. As the title suggests, the paper asks us to consider the frame of identity over time.

  15. Insertion Testing of Polyethylene Glycol Microneedle Array into Cultured Human Skin with Biaxial Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroto; Miyano, Takaya; Nishiyabu, Kazuaki

    Aiming at the practical use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) microneedles for transdermal drug delivery system (DDS), a testing apparatus for their insertion into cultured human skin has been developed. To simulate the variety of conditions of human skin, biaxial tension can be applied to the cultured human skin. An adopted testing scheme to apply and control the biaxial tension is similar to the deep-draw forming technique. An attention was also paid to the short-time setup of small, thin and wet cultured skin. One dimensional array with four needles was inserted and influence of tension was discussed. It was found that tension, deflection of skin during insertion and original curvature of skin are the important parameters for microneedles array design.

  16. Genotoxicity test of self-renovated ceramics in primary human peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Nan; Zhu, Huifang; Zhuang, Jing; Chen, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics is widely used in dentistry. Different compositions of ceramics have different features. Our self-renovated ceramics become more machinable without scarifying its dental restoration properties after adjusting ratio of lanthanum phosphate (LaPO4)/yttrium oxide (Y2O3). In order to evaluate its safety, here, we tested its genotoxicity in primary human peripheral lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes cultured on three groups of different ratios of LaPO4/Y2O3 diphase ceramics for 6 days showed little effect of growth inhibition and similar effect of growth trend to the negative control. Furthermore, single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) indicated that there was no significant difference of the value of tail moment between the tested ceramics and negative control, the IPS Empress II (P > 0.05). Our findings implicate that our self-renovated ceramics do not induce DNA damages in human peripheral lymphocytes and support their future clinic application.

  17. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and the genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. ELIMINATION AND IDENTITIES WITH THE INTEGRAL SIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongmei LIU; Tianming WANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we aim at using the elimination in Weyl algebra to give an algorithm for proving the identities with integral sign. Then, we test several examples that have been proved by D Zeilberger.

  19. [Pap test used for detection of cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Carrillo-Pacheco, Adia; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus can infect any mucous of the body and can cause cancer of the uterine cervix. This suggests recommending the Papanicolaou smear combined with a test for detection of human papillomavirus with a frequency interval of 3 years, since it grants greater information and fidelity to the result. The detection studies should begin at the age of 21 years and should stop at 65 years age. Until recently specific treatments did not exist to treat human papilloma virus, but recently some drugs that have demonstrated good effectiveness in curing the infection of human papilloma virus. One example is glycirrhicinic acid, which has demonstrated fewer adverse effects, as well as the possibility that its systemic employment allows treatment of lesions that are difficult to approach. The medical recommendations should be in constant revision, since a clinical trial can modify the interpretation of what is necessary to individualize each patient's treatment.

  20. The use of reconstructed human epidermis for skin absorption testing: Results of the validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Bock, Udo; Diembeck, Walter; Düsing, Hans-Jürgen; Gamer, Armin; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Hoffmann, Christine; Kaca, Monika; Kamp, Hennicke; Kersen, Silke; Kietzmann, Manfred; Korting, Hans Christian; Krächter, Hans-Udo; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Liebsch, Manfred; Mehling, Annette; Müller-Goymann, Christel; Netzlaff, Frank; Niedorf, Frank; Rübbelke, Maria K; Schäfer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Elisabeth; Schreiber, Sylvia; Spielmann, Horst; Vuia, Alexander; Weimer, Michaela

    2008-05-01

    A formal validation study was performed, in order to investigate whether the commercially-available reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are suitable for in vitro skin absorption testing. The skin types currently recommended in the OECD Test Guideline 428, namely, ex vivo human epidermis and pig skin, were used as references. Based on the promising outcome of the prevalidation study, the panel of test substances was enlarged to nine substances, covering a wider spectrum of physicochemical properties. The substances were tested under both infinite-dose and finite-dose conditions, in ten laboratories, under strictly controlled conditions. The data were subjected to independent statistical analyses. Intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory variability contributed almost equally to the total variability, which was in the same range as that in preceding studies. In general, permeation of the RHE models exceeded that of human epidermis and pig skin (the SkinEthic RHE was found to be the most permeable), yet the ranking of substance permeation through the three tested RHE models and the pig skin reflected the permeation through human epidermis. In addition, both infinite-dose and finite-dose experiments are feasible with RHE models. The RHE models did not show the expected significantly better reproducibility, as compared to excised skin, despite a tendency toward lower variability of the data. Importantly, however, the permeation data showed a sufficient correlation between all the preparations examined. Thus, the RHE models, EPISKIN, EpiDerm and SkinEthic, are appropriate alternatives to human and pig skin, for the in vitro assessment of the permeation and penetration of substances when applied as aqueous solutions.

  1. Elective Identities, (Culture, Identization and Integration)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMost of contemporary individual and social identities (constructed with societal, cultural and technological resources) are radically autonomous, nomadic and virtual - i.e. they are de-traditionalized, open to negotiation and not based on a single interpretation of a tradition.

  2. Age-Infusion Approach to Derive Injury Risk Curves for Dummies from Human Cadaver Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Pintar, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves (IARCs)/dummy injury assessment risk values (IARVs). This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not directly account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations) are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data were based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus “infusing” age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests, and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs. PMID:26697422

  3. Future Implications of Human Embryonic Testing and Modification: Great Medicine or GATTACA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Paul R; Marinelli, Enrico; Bailey, Amelia P

    2016-01-01

    The past several decades have seen tremendous advances in the field of medical genetics. Currently, the application of genetic testing on human embryos determines if embryos harbor a lethal condition or a serious genetic disease. The purpose of this sort of testing is not to "improve" the offspring of a couple. Rather, current testing strategies focus on helping couples to have a healthy family in an efficient manner. Newly emerging technologies have opened the door to test embryos for an exponentially growing number of traits. Additionally, recent reports describe the actual modification of human embryonic DNA. The implications from the application of this technology are many and have the potential to fundamentally change the social paradigm of the human experience. Embryonic testing and modification does have the potential to accomplish good and is not inherently amoral. However, thoughtful consideration should be given by scientists, legislators, and the general population on how to apply this technology in a manner that is both appropriate and equitable and does not result in further social stratification and polarization, both within individual nations and the global community.

  4. Age-Infusion Approach to Derive Injury Risk Curves for Dummies from Human Cadaver Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Pintar, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves (IARCs)/dummy injury assessment risk values (IARVs). This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not directly account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations) are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data were based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus "infusing" age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests, and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs.

  5. Age infusion approach to derive injury assessment risk curves for dummies from human cadaver tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan eYoganandan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves/values (IARCs and IARVs. This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data was based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus infusing age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs.

  6. Virtual test: A student-centered software to measure student's critical thinking on human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyati, Lilit; Firman, Harry

    2016-02-01

    The study "Virtual Test: A Student-Centered Software to Measure Student's Critical Thinking on Human Disease" is descriptive research. The background is importance of computer-based test that use element and sub element of critical thinking. Aim of this study is development of multiple choices to measure critical thinking that made by student-centered software. Instruments to collect data are (1) construct validity sheet by expert judge (lecturer and medical doctor) and professional judge (science teacher); and (2) test legibility sheet by science teacher and junior high school student. Participants consisted of science teacher, lecturer, and medical doctor as validator; and the students as respondent. Result of this study are describe about characteristic of virtual test that use to measure student's critical thinking on human disease, analyze result of legibility test by students and science teachers, analyze result of expert judgment by science teachers and medical doctor, and analyze result of trial test of virtual test at junior high school. Generally, result analysis shown characteristic of multiple choices to measure critical thinking was made by eight elements and 26 sub elements that developed by Inch et al.; complete by relevant information; and have validity and reliability more than "enough". Furthermore, specific characteristic of multiple choices to measure critical thinking are information in form science comic, table, figure, article, and video; correct structure of language; add source of citation; and question can guide student to critical thinking logically.

  7. Phototoxicity of bergamot oil assessed by in vitro techniques in combination with human patch tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejlová, K; Jírová, D; Bendová, H; Kandárová, H; Weidenhoffer, Z; Kolárová, H; Liebsch, M

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the differences in the phototoxicity of bergamot oil obtained from four different suppliers. Spectral and chemical analyses were performed to identify presence of photoactive compounds in the test samples. The phototoxicity was assessed in vitro by the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test (PT) and subsequently in a phototoxicity test on reconstructed human skin model (H3D PT). Confirmatory photopatch tests in a group of volunteers were performed using the first non-phototoxic concentration determined in the H3D PT. The spectral and chemical analyses revealed, that two samples of bergamot oil exhibited a potential for photoactivation. These oils were subsequently classified as phototoxic in the 3T3 NRU PT, however, only on the basis of borderline results and depending on the solvent used. H3D PT revealed clear classifications, correlating well with the findings of spectral and chemical analysis. The test was, however, not yet capable of precise prediction of safe, non-phototoxic concentrations. Additional endpoints, e.g. interleukin determination might be employed to increase the sensitivity of the test. Although the study showed the usefulness of the tiered testing strategy, currently, the extrapolation of in vitro results to human situation may be performed only to a limited extent.

  8. In Vitro Experimental Testing of the Human Knee: A Concise Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletsky, Lorin; Shalhoub, Sami; Fitzwater, Fallon; Eboch, William; Dickinson, Matthew; Akhbari, Bardiya; Louie, Ednah

    2016-02-01

    In vitro testing of the human knee provides valuable insight that contributes to further understanding knee biomechanics. Cadaveric testing correlates well with clinical trials because the tissue has similar properties to that of live subjects. In addition, in vitro testing allows studies to be performed that would otherwise be unethical to evaluate in vivo. Due to their many advantages, cadaveric testing has been utilized to evaluate many of medical devices and surgical techniques that have been developed in recent decades. This article aims to review the current technologies and methodologies utilized in experimental in vitro testing of the human knee. The article provides a summary of the different rigs and machines that are currently used to examine the biomechanics of the knee. It also highlights the variable experimental techniques and measurement systems that are used to collect the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint. As technologies advance so do the measurement systems and equipment in the experimental biomechanics field. The influence of improvements to these testing equipment and measurement devices on in vitro testing of the knee will also be discussed in this review. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Human perceptual deficits as factors in computer interface test and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, S.E.

    1992-06-01

    Issues related to testing and evaluating human computer interfaces are usually based on the machine rather than on the human portion of the computer interface. Perceptual characteristics of the expected user are rarely investigated, and interface designers ignore known population perceptual limitations. For these reasons, environmental impacts on the equipment will more likely be defined than will user perceptual characteristics. The investigation of user population characteristics is most often directed toward intellectual abilities and anthropometry. This problem is compounded by the fact that some deficits capabilities tend to be found in higher-than-overall population distribution in some user groups. The test and evaluation community can address the issue from two primary aspects. First, assessing user characteristics should be extended to include tests of perceptual capability. Secondly, interface designs should use multimode information coding.

  10. Evaluation of protective ensemble thermal characteristics through sweating hot plate, sweating thermal manikin, and human tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Powell, Jeffery B; Roberge, Raymond J; Shepherd, Angie; Coca, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predictive capability of fabric Total Heat Loss (THL) values on thermal stress that Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ensemble wearers may encounter while performing work. A series of three tests, consisting of the Sweating Hot Plate (SHP) test on two sample fabrics and the Sweating Thermal Manikin (STM) and human performance tests on two single-layer encapsulating ensembles (fabric/ensemble A = low THL and B = high THL), was conducted to compare THL values between SHP and STM methods along with human thermophysiological responses to wearing the ensembles. In human testing, ten male subjects performed a treadmill exercise at 4.8 km and 3% incline for 60 min in two environmental conditions (mild = 22°C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and hot/humid = 35°C, 65% RH). The thermal and evaporative resistances were significantly higher on a fabric level as measured in the SHP test than on the ensemble level as measured in the STM test. Consequently the THL values were also significantly different for both fabric types (SHP vs. STM: 191.3 vs. 81.5 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble A, and 909.3 vs. 149.9 W/m(2) in fabric/ensemble B (p values are significantly different from the actual THL potential of the PPE ensemble tested on STM, (2) physiological benefits from wearing a more breathable PPE ensemble may not be feasible with incremental THL values (SHP test) less than approximately 150-200 W·m(2), and (3) the effects of thermal environments on a level of heat stress in PPE ensemble wearers are greater than ensemble thermal characteristics.

  11. Identity of psychology, identity and psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Nastran Ule

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with epistemic issues of modern psychology with the starting hypothesis being that scientific psychology must satisfy three main interests: scientific, practical and emancipatory interest. Particularly important is the emancipatory interest, which is based on the social reflection of scientific work and conclusions. Psychological knowledge involves not only neutral descriptions of facts, but also implicit rules, expectations regarding values or norms, and criticism of undesirable behavior. The traditional psychological model attempts to satisfy the scientific interest and partly practical interest, while avoiding emancipatory interest. But I believe modern socio-historical models of psychology to be significant precisely owing to the inclusion of emancipatory interest. The difference between these two models of psychology is most obvious in their perception of identity i.e. individuality. Conventional perceptions follow the logic of "possessive individualism" in which the individual is seen as an autonomous bearer and owner of his/her psychological states and processes. The conventional model of identity supports the modernist concept of the individual as being focused on his/her self or personal identity. Socio-historical models, on the other hand, see the individual as a being embedded in social relations and social interactions, and one who builds and expresses his/her individuality through the reflection on social interactions, discursive practices, and response to the hierarchy of power and social mechanisms of control. According to this model, identity evolves through a series of social constructions which are embodied in the individual and represent him/her in society. Identity thus becomes a notion that combines individuality and social context, subjectivation and objectivation of the individual, and historical and biographical time.

  12. Annual banned-substance review: analytical approaches in human sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kuuranne, Tiia; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    There has been an immense amount of visibility of doping issues on the international stage over the past 12 months with the complexity of doping controls reiterated on various occasions. Hence, analytical test methods continuously being updated, expanded, and improved to provide specific, sensitive, and comprehensive test results in line with the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) 2016 Prohibited List represent one of several critical cornerstones of doping controls. This enterprise necessitates expediting the (combined) exploitation of newly generated information on novel and/or superior target analytes for sports drug testing assays, drug elimination profiles, alternative test matrices, and recent advances in instrumental developments. This paper is a continuation of the series of annual banned-substance reviews appraising the literature published between October 2015 and September 2016 concerning human sports drug testing in the context of WADA's 2016 Prohibited List. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Identity without Membership?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobusch, Leonhard; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    the formation of organizational identity in more fluid organizational settings. Drawing on an empirical study of the hacker collective Anonymous, we show that organizational identity is formed through public communicative events that are subject to meaning negotiation whether or not actions can be attributed...

  14. Corporate identity. Brand designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Steve

    2004-02-19

    The past two years have seen a steadily more consistent brand identity for the NHS. Branding will become more important as foundation status and PCT commissioning makes acute hospitals more competitive. This has put pressure on some trusts that have their own strong identities.

  15. Capturing Chemical Identity Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Courtney; Sevian, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Chemical identity, the idea that every substance has at least one property that makes it unique and able to be differentiated from other substances, is core to the practice of chemistry. Such practice requires using properties to classify as well as to differentiate. Learning which substance properties are productive in chemical identity thinking…

  16. Personal Identity in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazumi; Mizokami, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    This chapter explores characteristics of identity formation among Japanese adolescents and young adults living in a cultural context where individualism has been increasingly emphasized even while maintaining collectivism. We argue that, to develop a sense of identity in Japanese culture, adolescents and young adults carefully consider others'…

  17. Identities-in-action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Diana; Valero, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The notion of identity is often used in mathematics education research in an attempt to link individual and social understandings of mathematical learning. In this paper we review existing research making use of the notion of identity, and we point to some of the strengths and weaknesses in the w...

  18. Teachers' interpersonal role identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Want, Anna C.; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Claessens, Luce C A; Pennings, Helena J M

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the link between teachers' appraisal of specific interpersonal situations in classrooms and their more general interpersonal identity standard, which together form their interpersonal role identity. Using semi-structured and video-stimulated interviews, data on teachers' ap

  19. Teachers' Interpersonal Role Identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Want, Anna C.; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Brekelmans, Mieke; Claessens, Luce C A; Pennings, Helena J M

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the link between teachers' appraisal of specific interpersonal situations in classrooms and their more general interpersonal identity standard, which together form their interpersonal role identity. Using semi-structured and video-stimulated interviews, data on teachers' ap

  20. Cultural Identity Through CLIL

    OpenAIRE

    Oprescu Monica

    2015-01-01

    The CLIL approach is a modern manner of teaching English, which has been adapted in Romanian schools and universities. An interesting aspect of learning a foreign language is the contact with its culture/s and the changes it produces in terms of identity. Therefore, a challenging question to be answered is whether a CLIL approach focusing on culture influences students' cultural identity.

  1. Value Conditionality of Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Yusupov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers theoretical approaches to the study of values and identity, and reveals the role of values in the formation of the ethnic, regional and Russian identity on the example of Chechnya and the North Caucasus, with the sociological indicators characterizing value orientations and self-identification.

  2. Biomechanical Characterization of Human Soft Tissues Using Indentation and Tensile Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michelle; Premakumar, Yaami; Seifalian, Alexander; Butler, Peter Edward; Szarko, Matthew

    2016-12-13

    Regenerative medicine aims to engineer materials to replace or restore damaged or diseased organs. The mechanical properties of such materials should mimic the human tissues they are aiming to replace; to provide the required anatomical shape, the materials must be able to sustain the mechanical forces they will experience when implanted at the defect site. Although the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered scaffolds are of great importance, many human tissues that undergo restoration with engineered materials have not been fully biomechanically characterized. Several compressive and tensile protocols are reported for evaluating materials, but with large variability it is difficult to compare results between studies. Further complicating the studies is the often destructive nature of mechanical testing. Whilst an understanding of tissue failure is important, it is also important to have knowledge of the elastic and viscoelastic properties under more physiological loading conditions. This report aims to provide a minimally destructive protocol to evaluate the compressive and tensile properties of human soft tissues. As examples of this technique, the tensile testing of skin and the compressive testing of cartilage are described. These protocols can also be directly applied to synthetic materials to ensure that the mechanical properties are similar to the native tissue. Protocols to assess the mechanical properties of human native tissue will allow a benchmark by which to create suitable tissue-engineered substitutes.

  3. A new model for preclinical testing of dermal substitutes for human skin reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann-Fritsch, Fabienne; Biedermann, Thomas; Braziulis, Erik; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2013-05-01

    Currently, acellular dermal substitutes used for skin reconstruction are usually covered with split-thickness skin grafts. The goal of this study was to develop an animal model in which such dermal substitutes can be tested under standardized conditions using a bioengineered dermo-epidermal skin graft for coverage. Bioengineered grafts consisting of collagen type I hydrogels with incorporated human fibroblasts and human keratinocytes seeded on these gels were produced. Two different dermal substitutes, namely Matriderm(®), and an acellular collagen type I hydrogel, were applied onto full-thickness skin wounds created on the back of immuno-incompetent rats. As control, no dermal substitute was used. As coverage for the dermal substitutes either the bioengineered grafts were used, or, as controls, human split-thickness skin or neonatal rat epidermis were used. Grafts were excised 21 days post-transplantation. Histology and immunofluorescence was performed to investigate survival, epidermis formation, and vascularization of the grafts. The bioengineered grafts survived on all tested dermal substitutes. Epidermis formation and vascularization were comparable to the controls. We could successfully use human bioengineered grafts to test different dermal substitutes. This novel model can be used to investigate newly designed dermal substitutes in detail and in a standardized way.

  4. Identity And Privacy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Katzan, Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Personal identity and privacy are important topics in information systems in general and data analytics in particular.  Normally associated with digital security, the scope of identity and privacy is much greater and affects most aspects of everyday life.  Related subjects are behavioral tracking, personal-identifiable information (PII, privacy data relevance, data repurposing, identity theft, and homeland security.  Identity and Privacy Services is an admixture of the major issues in the area of personal identity and privacy and the security of individual rights in a complex societal environment.  This is a general paper on this important subject, intended to give exposure to the constituent topics.

  5. Identity as wrapping up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an understanding of cross-professional collaboration and to develop a notion of professional identity based in practice. The background of the paper is science and technology studies and more precisely actor network theory. The method used: The empirical analysis...... in close relation to the making of a report concerning the cross-professional collaboration. Findings are that “Identity as wrapping up” points to the way in which certain actors, by other actors, are maneuvered into certain pockets in a network. Identity as wrapping up is emphasized as a way...... of participating, which is closely connected to the intention to control the relation towards the other. Thus identity as wrapping up is argued to be a strategy to optimize the situation of one’s own profession. Conclusion: This articulation of identity contributes to the actor network literature as well...

  6. Visual identity and rebranding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wrona

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to highlight the essence of visual identification and rebranding, as well as to discuss elements of corporate identity, which are subject to revitalization in the process of refreshing the image of a brand. In the first part the article the analysis of the term visual identification is conducted. In the analysis special attention is drawn to the role of visual identification in creating a coherent identity of an organization. In the subsequent chapters further components of corporate identity are presented in detail – starting with logotype, through business forms, advertisements, accompanying materials and Internet websites to signs on buildings. Moreover, corporate identity book as a collection of standards and guidelines for application of corporate identity rules is discussed. The deliberations are based on the study of literature. The last chapter presented the transformation of the brand of Institute of Aviation.

  7. Sleep deprivation impairs performance in the 5-choice continuous performance test: similarities between humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Acheson, Dean; Risbrough, Victoria; Drummond, Sean; Geyer, Mark A; Young, Jared W

    2014-03-15

    Several groups undergo extended periods without sleep due to working conditions or mental illness. Such sleep deprivation (SD) can deleteriously affect attentional processes and disrupt work and family functioning. Understanding the biological underpinnings of SD effects may assist in developing sleep therapies and cognitive enhancers. Utilizing cross-species tests of attentional processing in humans and rodents would aid in mechanistic studies examining SD-induced inattention. We assessed the effects of 36h of: (1) Total SD (TSD) in healthy male and female humans (n=50); and (2) REM SD (RSD) in male C57BL/6 mice (n=26) on performance in the cross-species 5-choice continuous performance test (5C-CPT). The 5C-CPT includes target trials on which subjects were required to respond and non-target trials on which subjects were required to inhibit from responding. TSD-induced effects on human psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) were also examined. Effects of SD were also examined on mice split into good and poor performance groups based on pre-deprivation scores. In the human 5C-CPT, TSD decreased hit rate and vigilance with trend-level effects on accuracy. In the PVT, TSD slowed response times and increased lapses. In the mouse 5C-CPT, RSD reduced accuracy and hit rate with trend-level effects on vigilance, primarily in good performers. In conclusion, SD induced impaired 5C-CPT performance in both humans and mice and validates the 5C-CPT as a cross-species translational task. The 5C-CPT can be used to examine mechanisms underlying SD-induced deficits in vigilance and assist in testing putative cognitive enhancers.

  8. The biomechanics of human ribs: material and structural properties from dynamic tension and bending tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Pullins, Clayton A; Freeman, Laura J; Duma, Stefan M; Rouhana, Stephen M

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify both the tensile material properties and structural response of human ribs in order to determine which variables contribute to regional variation in the strength of human ribs. This was done by performing 94 matched tests on human rib specimens; 46 tension coupon tests, 48 three-point bending tests. Contralateral matched specimens were dissected from anterior and lateral regions of ribs 4 through 7 of six male fresh frozen post mortem human subjects ranging from 42 to 81 years of age. Tension coupons were taken from one side of the thorax, while three-point bending specimens were taken from the opposite side as the tension coupons at corresponding anatomical locations. The results of the tension coupon testing showed that there were no significant differences with respect to region or rib level: ultimate stress (p=0.90; p=0.53), ultimate strain (p=0.49; p=0.86), or modulus (p=0.72; p=0.81). In contrast, lateral three-point bending specimens were found to have a significantly higher peak bending moment (pbending specimens also had a significantly larger area moment of inertia (pradius of gyration (pradius of gyration (p=0.04) were found to be significantly different with respect to rib level. For lateral specimens, the area moment of inertia (pradius of gyration (p=0.03) were found to be significantly different with respect to rib level. These results clearly illustrate that there is variation in the structural response of human ribs with respect to anatomical region and rib level and this variation is due to changes in local geometry of each rib while the material properties remain constant.

  9. Research on Religious Identity of Orthodoxy Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khukhlaev O.E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the results of socio-psychological research of Orthodox youth religious identity. The research was carried out in the city of Smolensk, Russian Federation, on 261 respondents, high school pupils (9—10th grades. According to the models of G. Allport and R. Gorsuch & S. E. McPherson, the religious identity as a complex socio-psychological concept contains 4-factor structure basing on personal- social and inner-outer scales but doesn’t seem to be a simple Orthodox affiliation. Different components of the religious identity are studied through their connection with value orientations (according to S. Schwartz. To study the religious identity and value orientations we used the adapted version of 32 items questionnaire based on Individual / Social Religious Identity Measure by D. Van Camp and S. Schwartz’s Portrait Value Questionnaire (PVQ-R2. Almost all values connected with religious identity components seem to be socially motivated. It can be said that contemporary Orthodox youth religious identity is figured out to possess a pronounced social character. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Humanities (project № 15-06-10843 «Religious identity risks and resources in present-day Russia: cross-cultural analysis».

  10. Evaluation of a human on-site urine multidrug test for emergency use with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitler, Joan B

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, human on-site urine multidrug test was used to screen canine urine samples for the presence of five illegal drugs and drugs from three commonly abused drug classes. Each sample was sent to a toxicology laboratory for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) validation. On-site test results and GC/MS assays confirmed that the human on-site test kit did identify barbiturates, opiates, benzodiazepines, and amphetamines/methamphetamines in urine from dogs that had received these common illicit drugs/drug classes either intravenously and/or orally. However, neither the on-site test kit nor the GC/MS individual assays for marijuana or methadone, a synthetic opiate, were effective in identifying marijuana and methadone in urine from dogs with suspected or known exposure. No index of suspicion was seen for exposure to phencyclidines or cocaine during the study period, and no exposures were indicated by the on-site test results. Overall, the test is a rapid, readily available, affordable, and useful complement to the veterinarian's clinical consideration and professional judgment.

  11. The Bender Gestalt Test with the Human Figure Drawing Test for Young School Children. A Manual for Use with the Koppitz Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppitz, Elizabeth Munsterberg

    Presented is a manual for scoring the Bender Gestalt Test and the Human Figure Drawing Test for screening and diagnostic uses with emotionally disturbed, brain damaged, or perceptually handicapped 5- to 11-year-old children. Given are suggestions for administering and scoring the Bender test which examines distortion of shape, rotation,…

  12. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test for non-identically distributed random variables: with application to empirical Bayes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, W.J. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Cox, D.D. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Martz, H.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    When using parametric empirical Bayes estimation methods for estimating the binomial or Poisson parameter, the validity of the assumed beta or gamma conjugate prior distribution is an important diagnostic consideration. Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests of the beta or gamma prior hypothesis are developed for use when the binomial sample sizes or Poisson exposure times vary. Nine examples illustrate the application of the methods, using real data from such diverse applications as the loss of feedwater flow rates in nuclear power plants, the probability of failure to run on demand and the failure rates of the high pressure coolant injection systems at US commercial boiling water reactors, the probability of failure to run on demand of emergency diesel generators in US commercial nuclear power plants, the rate of failure of aircraft air conditioners, baseball batting averages, the probability of testing positive for toxoplasmosis, and the probability of tumors in rats. The tests are easily applied in practice by means of corresponding Mathematica{reg_sign} computer programs which are provided.

  13. Testing for Gender Related Size and Shape Differences of the Human Ear canal using Statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the shape of the human ear canal. It is described how a dense surface point distribution model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The dense...... surface models are built by using the anatomical landmarks to warp a template mesh onto all shapes in the training set. Testing the gender related differences is done by initially reducing the dimensionality using principal component analysis of the vertices of the warped meshes. The number of components...

  14. Performance of humans vs. exploration algorithms on the Tower of London Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fimbel

    Full Text Available The Tower of London Test (TOL used to assess executive functions was inspired in Artificial Intelligence tasks used to test problem-solving algorithms. In this study, we compare the performance of humans and of exploration algorithms. Instead of absolute execution times, we focus on how the execution time varies with the tasks and/or the number of moves. This approach used in Algorithmic Complexity provides a fair comparison between humans and computers, although humans are several orders of magnitude slower. On easy tasks (1 to 5 moves, healthy elderly persons performed like exploration algorithms using bounded memory resources, i.e., the execution time grew exponentially with the number of moves. This result was replicated with a group of healthy young participants. However, for difficult tasks (5 to 8 moves the execution time of young participants did not increase significantly, whereas for exploration algorithms, the execution time keeps on increasing exponentially. A pre-and post-test control task showed a 25% improvement of visuo-motor skills but this was insufficient to explain this result. The findings suggest that naive participants used systematic exploration to solve the problem but under the effect of practice, they developed markedly more efficient strategies using the information acquired during the test.

  15. Phylogenetic discordance of human and canine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM) families, but striking identity of the CEA receptors will impact comparative oncology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichselbaumer, Marlene; Willmann, Michael; Reifinger, Martin; Singer, Josef; Bajna, Erika; Sobanov, Yuriy; Mechtcherikova, Diana; Selzer, Edgar; Thalhammer, Johann G.; Kammerer, Robert; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2011-01-01

    Comparative oncology aims at speeding up developments for both, human and companion animal cancer patients. Following this line, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) could be a therapeutic target not only for human but also for canine (Canis lupus familiaris; dog) patients. CEACAM5 interacts with CEA-receptor (CEAR) in the cytoplasm of human cancer cells. Our aim was, therefore, to phylogenetically verify the antigenic relationship of CEACAM molecules and CEAR in human and canine cancer. Anti-human CEACAM5 antibody Col-1, previously being applied for cancer diagnosis in dogs, immunohistochemically reacted to 23 out of 30 canine mammary cancer samples. In immunoblot analyses Col-1 specifically detected human CEACAM5 at 180 kDa in human colon cancer cells HT29, and the canine antigen at 60, 120, or 180 kDa in CF33 and CF41 mammary carcinoma cells as well as in spontaneous mammary tumors. While according to phylogenicity canine CEACAM1 molecules should be most closely related to human CEACAM5, Col-1 did not react with canine CEACAM1, -23, -24, -25, -28 or -30 transfected to canine TLM-1 cells. By flow cytometry the Col-1 target molecule was localized intracellularly in canine CF33 and CF41 cells, in contrast to membranous and cytoplasmic expression of human CEACAM5 in HT29. Col-1 incubation had neither effect on canine nor human cancer cell proliferation. Yet, Col-1 treatment decreased AKT-phosphorylation in canine CF33 cells possibly suggestive of anti-apoptotic function, whereas Col-1 increased AKT-phosphorylation in human HT29 cells. We report further a 99% amino acid similarity of human and canine CEA receptor (CEAR) within the phylogenetic tree. CEAR could be detected in four canine cancer cell lines by immunoblot and intracellularly in 10 out of 10 mammary cancer specimens from dog by immunohistochemistry. Whether the specific canine Col-1 target molecule may as functional analogue to human CEACAM5 act as ligand to canine CEAR, remains to be defined. This

  16. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis (TH-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis (TVS-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test.

  17. Human papillomavirus testing by self-sampling: assessment of accuracy in an unsupervised clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarewski, Anne; Cadman, Louise; Mallett, Susan; Austin, Janet; Londesborough, Philip; Waller, Jo; Wardle, Jane; Altman, Douglas G; Cuzick, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance and acceptability of unsupervised self-sampling with clinician sampling for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types for the first time in a UK screening setting. Setting: Nine hundred and twenty women, from two demographically different centres, attending for routine cervical smear testing Methods: Women performed an unsupervised HPV self-test. Immediately afterwards, a doctor or nurse took an HPV test and cervical smear. Women with an abnormality on any test were offered colposcopy. Results: Twenty-one high-grade and 39 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) were detected. The sensitivity for high-grade disease (CIN2+) for the self HPV test was 81% (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–92), clinician HPV test 100% (95% CI 85–100), cytology 81% (95% CI 60–92). The sensitivity of both HPV tests to detect high- and low-grade cervical neoplasia was much higher than that of cytology (self-test 77% [95%CI 65–86], clinician test 80% [95% CI 68–88], cytology 48% [95% CI 36–61]). For both high-grade alone, and high and low grades together, the specificity was significantly higher for cytology (greater than 95%) than either HPV test (between 82% and 87%). The self-test proved highly acceptable to women and they reported that the instructions were easy to understand irrespective of educational level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that it would be reasonable to offer HPV self-testing to women who are reluctant to attend for cervical smears. This approach should now be directly evaluated among women who have been non-attenders in a cervical screening programme. PMID:17362570

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soo-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective.

  19. A novel ELISA test for laboratory diagnosis of Blastocystis spp. in human stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogruman-Al, Funda; Turk, Songul; Adiyaman-Korkmaz, Gulcan; Hananel, Amit; Levi, Lital; Kopelowitz, June; Babai, Oded; Gross, Shimon; Greenberg, Zvi; Herschkovitz, Yoav; Mumcuoglu, Ipek

    2015-02-01

    Detection of Blastocystis is routinely performed by microscopy, culture, and formyl-ether (ethyl acetate) concentration technique (FECT). Yet, these methods require special skilled personnel, are time consuming, and often involve processing that may cause misdiagnosis. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the usefulness of a newly introduced ELISA test for the detection of Blastocystis antigens in stool samples (CoproELISA(TM) Blastocystis, Savyon Diagnostics) as a proper alternative to currently used methods, especially microscopy. A cohort of 179 fresh/frozen clinical stool samples was tested by the ELISA test, and results were compared to consensus methods comprised of microscopic examination of Lugol's iodine staining, culture, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The new ELISA test was able to detect fewer than 10(3) cells, recognized subtypes 1, 2, 3, and 5 (comprising >95 % of human Blastocystis infections), and exhibited similar reactivity when comparing formalin-preserved samples to fresh/frozen samples. The test demonstrated 92 % sensitivity, 87 % specificity, and 89 % accuracy when culture, and IFA or microscopy consensus results were taken as reference. When the consensus was comprised of culture and IFA, the test demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 82, 86, and 84 %, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity of Lugol staining microscopy was only 18 %. This work presents a unique ELISA test that provides an alternative to the use of microscopy, currently most widely used method. The test enables high-throughput screening and diagnosis of Blastocystis, adaptation to automatic procedures.

  20. Small Sample Kernel Association Tests for Human Genetic and Microbiome Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Wenan; Zhao, Ni; Wu, Michael C; Schaid, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Kernel machine based association tests (KAT) have been increasingly used in testing the association between an outcome and a set of biological measurements due to its power to combine multiple weak signals of complex relationship with the outcome through the specification of a relevant kernel. Human genetic and microbiome association studies are two important applications of KAT. However, the classic KAT framework relies on large sample theory, and conservativeness has been observed for small sample studies, especially for microbiome association studies. The common approach for addressing the small sample problem relies on computationally intensive resampling methods. Here, we derive an exact test for KAT with continuous traits, which resolve the small sample conservatism of KAT without the need for resampling. The exact test has significantly improved power to detect association for microbiome studies. For binary traits, we propose a similar approximate test, and we show that the approximate test is very powerful for a wide range of kernels including common variant- and microbiome-based kernels, and the approximate test controls the type I error well for these kernels. In contrast, the sequence kernel association tests have slightly inflated genomic inflation factors after small sample adjustment. Extensive simulations and application to a real microbiome association study are used to demonstrate the utility of our method. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Role of human papillomavirus testing and cytology in follow-up after conization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Camilla F; Huusom, Lene D; Deltour, Isabelle;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adequate follow-up of women who have undergone conization for high-grade cervical lesions is crucial in cervical cancer screening programs. We evaluated the performance of testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, cytology alone, and combined testing in predicting cervical...... after conization is more sensitive than ASCUS+ cytology for identifying women at risk for relapse of CIN2+ within 2 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether HPV testing could be a stand-alone test in follow up after conization....... detection of high-risk HPV. The women were passively followed until 2 years after first follow-up visit by linkage to the nationwide Pathology Data Bank. RESULTS: At first visit after conization (median time, 3.4 months), 20.4% were HPV-positive and 17.2% had atypical squamous intraepithelial lesions...

  2. On random field Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouritzin, Michael A; Newton, Fraser; Wu, Biao

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we propose generating CAPTCHAs through random field simulation and give a novel, effective and efficient algorithm to do so. Indeed, we demonstrate that sufficient information about word tests for easy human recognition is contained in the site marginal probabilities and the site-to-nearby-site covariances and that these quantities can be embedded directly into certain conditional probabilities, designed for effective simulation. The CAPTCHAs are then partial random realizations of the random CAPTCHA word. We start with an initial random field (e.g., randomly scattered letter pieces) and use Gibbs resampling to re-simulate portions of the field repeatedly using these conditional probabilities until the word becomes human-readable. The residual randomness from the initial random field together with the random implementation of the CAPTCHA word provide significant resistance to attack. This results in a CAPTCHA, which is unrecognizable to modern optical character recognition but is recognized about 95% of the time in a human readability study.

  3. Oblique Loading in Post Mortem Human Surrogates from Vehicle Lateral Impact Tests using Chestbands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John R; Pintar, Frank A; Arun, Mike W J; Rhule, Heather; Rudd, Rodney; Craig, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    While numerous studies have been conducted to determine side impact responses of Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) using sled and other equipment, experiments using the biological surrogate in modern full-scale vehicles are not available. The present study investigated the presence of oblique loading in moving deformable barrier and pole tests. Threepoint belt restrained PMHS were positioned in the left front and left rear seats in the former and left front seat in the latter condition and tested according to consumer testing protocols. Three chestbands were used in each specimen (upper, middle and lower thorax). Accelerometers were secured to the skull, shoulder, upper, middle and lower thoracic vertebrae, sternum, and sacrum. Chestband signals were processed to determine magnitudes and angulations of peak deflections. The magnitude and timing of various signal peaks are given. Vehicle accelerations, door velocities, and seat belt loads are also given. Analysis of deformation contours, peak deflections, and angulations indicated that the left rear seated specimen were exposed to anterior oblique loading while left front specimens in both tests sustained essentially pure lateral loading to the torso. These data can be used to validate human body computational models. The occurrence of oblique loading in full-scale testing, hitherto unrecognized, may serve to stimulate the exploration of its role in injuries to the thorax and lower extremities in modern vehicles. It may be important to continue research in this area because injury metrics have a lower threshold for angled loading.

  4. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52)

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  5. Concordant testing results between various Human Papillomavirus assays in primary cervical cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Thurah, Lena; Bonde, Jesper; Hoa Lam, Janni Uyen

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays are increasingly used for primary cervical screening and HPV vaccination effect monitoring. We undertook a systematic literature review to determine the concordance in positive test results (i.e., detection of HPV infections) between Hybrid Capture 2...... (HC2) and other assays. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Embase and Scopus for studies of primary screening with HC2 and ≥one more assay, with cross-tabulated testing results for the assays. Two authors applied inclusion criteria and three authors extracted data from included studies. For each inter...

  6. Development of standard test methods for unmanned and manned industrial vehicles used near humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelman, Roger; Norcross, Richard; Falco, Joe; Marvel, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been researching human-robot-vehicle collaborative environments for automated guided vehicles (AGVs) and manned forklifts. Safety of AGVs and manned vehicles with automated functions (e.g., forklifts that slow/stop automatically in hazardous situations) are the focus of the American National Standards Institute/Industrial Truck Safety Development Foundation (ANSI/ITSDF) B56.5 safety standard. Recently, the NIST Mobile Autonomous Vehicle Obstacle Detection/Avoidance (MAVODA) Project began researching test methods to detect humans or other obstacles entering the vehicle's path. This causes potential safety hazards in manufacturing facilities where both line-of-sight and non-line-of-sight conditions are prevalent. The test methods described in this paper address both of these conditions. These methods will provide the B56.5 committee with the measurement science basis for sensing systems - both non-contact and contact - that may be used in manufacturing facilities.

  7. Fingerprint recognition with identical twin fingerprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunqiang Tao

    Full Text Available Fingerprint recognition with identical twins is a challenging task due to the closest genetics-based relationship existing in the identical twins. Several pioneers have analyzed the similarity between twins' fingerprints. In this work we continue to investigate the topic of the similarity of identical twin fingerprints. Our study was tested based on a large identical twin fingerprint database that contains 83 twin pairs, 4 fingers per individual and six impressions per finger: 3984 (83*2*4*6 images. Compared to the previous work, our contributions are summarized as follows: (1 Two state-of-the-art fingerprint identification methods: P071 and VeriFinger 6.1 were used, rather than one fingerprint identification method in previous studies. (2 Six impressions per finger were captured, rather than just one impression, which makes the genuine distribution of matching scores more realistic. (3 A larger sample (83 pairs was collected. (4 A novel statistical analysis, which aims at showing the probability distribution of the fingerprint types for the corresponding fingers of identical twins which have same fingerprint type, has been conducted. (5 A novel analysis, which aims at showing which finger from identical twins has higher probability of having same fingerprint type, has been conducted. Our results showed that: (a A state-of-the-art automatic fingerprint verification system can distinguish identical twins without drastic degradation in performance. (b The chance that the fingerprints have the same type from identical twins is 0.7440, comparing to 0.3215 from non-identical twins. (c For the corresponding fingers of identical twins which have same fingerprint type, the probability distribution of five major fingerprint types is similar to the probability distribution for all the fingers' fingerprint type. (d For each of four fingers of identical twins, the probability of having same fingerprint type is similar.

  8. [Diagnosing gender identity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Mattila, Aino; Kärnä, Teemu; Joutsenneimi, Kaisla

    2015-01-01

    Transsexualism and other variations of gender identity are based on a stable sense of identity. The aetiology of this phenomenon is not fully known. Suffering caused by gender dysphoria is alleviated with sex reassignment. The psychiatric assessment of both adolescents and adults has been centralized in Finland to two university hospitals, the Helsinki University Hospital and Tampere University Hospital. In both hospitals, multidisciplinary teams aim at differential diagnosis by using well-known psychiatric and psychological instruments. Wishes for sex reassignment that are caused by a mental health disorder are excluded. Assessment in adolescence is challenging because the identity in youth is still forming.

  9. Linguistic identity matching

    CERN Document Server

    Lisbach, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Regulation, risk awareness and technological advances are increasingly drawing identity search functionality into business, security and data management processes, as well as fraud investigations and counter-terrorist measures.Over the years, a number of techniques have been developed for searching identity data, traditionally focusing on logical algorithms. These techniques often failed to take into account the complexities of language and culture that provide the rich variations  seen in names used around the world. A new paradigm has now emerged for understanding the way that identity data

  10. Credit and identity theft

    OpenAIRE

    Charles M. Kahn; Roberds, William

    2005-01-01

    The quintessential crime of the information age is identity theft, the malicious use of personal identifying data. In this paper we model “identity” and its use in credit transactions. Various types of identity theft occur in equilibrium, including “new account fraud,” “existing account fraud,” and “friendly fraud.” The equilibrium incidence of identity theft represents a tradeoff between a desire to avoid costly or invasive monitoring of individuals on the one hand and the need to control tr...

  11. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  12. Evaluation of the rat embryo culture system as a predictive test for human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, I; Buttar, H S; Smith, S; Varma, D R

    1994-01-01

    Ingestion of the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid and of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril during pregnancy has been associated with abnormal fetal outcome in humans. In contrast, the use of the antiinflammatory drug ibuprofen and the antihistamine diphenhydramine has not been documented to be embryotoxic in humans. We evaluated the rat embryo culture system as a predictive model of teratogenesis, using these four drugs as test agents. Valproic acid, ibuprofen, and diphenhydramine were embryotoxic, inducing concentration-dependent decreases in growth and a significant increase in anomalies. Valproic acid caused an increase in neural tube defects, ibuprofen increased the incidence of abnormal maxillary processes, and diphenhydramine increased the number of embryos with distorted body morphology. These abnormalities were induced at concentrations of valproic acid and diphenhydramine that are used clinically, but ibuprofen only induced toxicity at concentrations greatly exceeding the therapeutic range. Captopril was not embryotoxic up to 5 mM, the highest concentration tested. These results suggest that the rat embryo culture system produces both false positive and false negative data on the teratogenic potential of drugs. Although such an in vitro assay may be suitable to determine the mechanism of teratogenesis, it is not a sensitive indicator of potential human teratogens on its own. These data support the view that in vitro systems can only supplement clinical and epidemiological observations in humans, possibly as a method to determine mechanisms of actions of teratogens.

  13. Adolescence: Search for an Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinath, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    James Marcia (1991, 1994, 1999, 2002) expanded on Erikson's theory of identity formation. Specifically, he focused on two essential processes in achieving a mature identity: exploration and commitment. Erikson's observations about identity were extended by Marcia, who described four identity statuses: identity diffusion, foreclosure, moratorium…

  14. Identification of the estrogen receptor GPER in neoplastic and non-neoplastic human testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggiolini Marcello

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen signaling is mediated by estrogen receptor beta isoforms in normal and neoplastic human testes. Recently, a G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPER has been suggested as being involved in rapid responses to estrogens in different normal and tumor cells. Methods This study investigated the GPER expression in paraffin-embedded samples from non neoplastic and neoplastic human testes (sex-cord stromal and germ cell tumors by immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses. Results In control testes, a positive GPER immunoreactivity was detected in Leydig and in Sertoli cells while all germ cells were immunonegative. Furthermore, neoplastic cells of the Sertoli cell tumor, Leydig cell tumor, seminoma and embryonal carcinoma samples were all immunopositive. The immunoblots of testis extracts confirmed the results. Conclusions These findings suggest that GPER could mediate estrogen signaling in both normal and transformed somatic cells of human testis, but they reveal a differential expression of the novel estrogen receptor in non neoplastic and neoplastic germ cells.

  15. Vocational Identity and Ego Identity Status in Korean Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Young Koo, PhD, RN

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: These findings show that nursing students in identity achievement status have secure and clear vocational identities. Further longitudinal and qualitative studies are needed to find out if identity formation among nursing students changes with age.

  16. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  17. Human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) in England and Wales, 2004 to 2013: testing and diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Georgina; Croxford, Sara; Tosswill, Jennifer; Raghu, Rajani; Davison, Katy; Hewitt, Patricia; Simmons, Ruth; Taylor, Graham

    2017-05-18

    Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection has been under enhanced surveillance in England and Wales since 2002, however, little is known about testing patterns. Using data from two surveillance systems held at Public Health England, we described HTLV antibody testing patterns between 2008 and 2013 and the demographic and clinical characteristics of persons diagnosed with HTLV in England and Wales between 2004 and 2013. An increase in HTLV testing was observed in England between 2008 and 2013 (3,581 to 7,130). Most tests (82%; 7,597/9,302) occurred within secondary care, 0.5% (48/9,302) of persons were reactive for HTLV antibodies and 0.3% (27/9,302) were confirmed positive. Increasing age and female sex were predictors of a reactive HTLV screen and confirmed diagnosis. Testing in primary care including sexual health and antenatal services was infrequent. Between 2004 and 2013, 858 people were diagnosed with HTLV, most of whom were female (65%; 549/851), of black Caribbean ethnicity (60%), not born in the United Kingdom (72%; 369/514) and asymptomatic at diagnosis (45%; 267/595). Despite increased testing, the epidemiology and clinical features of those diagnosed with HTLV have remained consistent. Apart from donor screening, testing for HTLV infection remains uncommon, except to diagnose associated disease. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  18. Determination of peak deflections from human surrogates using chestbands in side impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John R; Pintar, Frank A; Maiman, Dennis J

    2013-08-01

    To understand the biomechanics of the human body in motor vehicle environments, physical models including anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) and biological models (postmortem human surrogates) are used, and sled tests are conducted. Deflection is often used as a biomechanical variable to characterize the effects of impact loading and derive injury criteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate different techniques and recommend a methodology to determine the peak thorax and abdominal deflections from temporal contours using chestbands in oblique lateral impacts. The side impact ATD WorldSID representing human surrogates was positioned on a seat. The seat was rigidly fixed to the platform of an acceleration sled. The oblique load-wall fixed to the sled consisted of separate and adjustable plates to contact the shoulder, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Two 59-gage chestbands were wrapped on the thorax and abdomen. Tests were conducted at low, medium, and high velocities (3.4, 6.7, and 7.5m/s) and three methods, termed the spine-sternum, bilateral, and spine-box, were used to determine the global peak deflection and its angulation. Results indicated that all three methods produced very similar angulations, for all velocity tests, and at both thorax and abdominal regions. However, maximum deflections were the lowest in the spine-sternum, followed by bilateral and spine-box methods, with one exception. Based on the development of deflection contours, locations used in the definitions of the origin, and accuracy in identifying critical locations/points in time-varying contours, results of the present study indicate that the bilateral method is the optimum procedure to determine the oblique peak deflection vector in biomechanical tests.

  19. The Identity Mapping Project: Demographic differences in patterns of distributed identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Richard L; Dionisio, John David N; Forney, Andrew; Dorin, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The advent of cloud computing and a multi-platform digital environment is giving rise to a new phase of human identity called "The Distributed Self." In this conception, aspects of the self are distributed into a variety of 2D and 3D digital personas with the capacity to reflect any number of combinations of now malleable personality traits. In this way, the source of human identity remains internal and embodied, but the expression or enactment of the self becomes increasingly external, disembodied, and distributed on demand. The Identity Mapping Project (IMP) is an interdisciplinary collaboration between psychology and computer Science designed to empirically investigate the development of distributed forms of identity. Methodologically, it collects a large database of "identity maps" - computerized graphical representations of how active someone is online and how their identity is expressed and distributed across 7 core digital domains: email, blogs/personal websites, social networks, online forums, online dating sites, character based digital games, and virtual worlds. The current paper reports on gender and age differences in online identity based on an initial database of distributed identity profiles.

  20. A functional test of Neandertal and modern human mitochondrial targeting sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gralle, Matthias, E-mail: gralle@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter [Department of Molecular Cell Therapy, Leipzig University, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Paeaebo, Svante [Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Two mutations in mitochondrial targeting peptides occurred during human evolution, possibly after Neandertals split off from modern human lineage. {yields} The ancestral and modern human versions of these two targeting peptides were tested functionally for their effects on localization and cleavage rate. {yields} In spite of recent evolution, and to the contrary of other mutations in targeting peptides, these mutations had no visible effects. -- Abstract: Targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins to different organelles, such as mitochondria, is a process that can result in the redeployment of proteins to new intracellular destinations during evolution. With the sequencing of the Neandertal genome, it has become possible to identify amino acid substitutions that occurred on the modern human lineage since its separation from the Neandertal lineage. Here we analyze the function of two substitutions in mitochondrial targeting sequences that occurred and rose to high frequency recently during recent human evolution. The ancestral and modern versions of the two targeting sequences do not differ in the efficiency with which they direct a protein to the mitochondria, an observation compatible with the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

  1. An Exploratory Analysis of Stream Teratogenicity and Human Health Using Zebrafish Whole-Sediment Toxicity Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dellinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates a novel application of effect-based toxicity testing for streams that may provide indications of co-perturbation to ecological and human health. For this study, a sediment contact assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos was adapted to serve as an indicator of teratogenic stress within river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from Lake Michigan tributary watersheds. Sediment contact assay responses were then compared to prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD and vital statistic birth indicators aggregated from civil divisions associated with the watersheds. Significant risk relationships were detected between variation in early life-stage (ELS endpoints of zebrafish embryos 72 h post-fertilization and the birth prevalence of human congenital heart disease, low birthweight and infant mortality. Examination of principal components of ELS endpoints suggests that variance related to embryo heart and circulatory malformations is most closely associated with human CHD prevalence. Though toxicity assays are sometimes used prospectively, this form of investigation can only be conducted retrospectively. These results support the hypothesis that bioassays normally used for ecological screening can be useful as indicators of environmental stress to humans and expand our understanding of environmental–human health linkages.

  2. Clinician and Patient Acceptability of Self-Collected Human Papillomavirus Testing for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Constance; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Whitham, Hilary K; Hawes, Stephen E; Lin, John; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate clinician and patient attitudes toward home self-collected human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for cervical cancer screening. Women aged 21-65 years were recruited for a randomized trial comparing home self-collected HPV testing to standard clinician-collected Pap screening. Participants were surveyed about their attitudes toward self-collected HPV testing. Clinicians performing cervical cancer screening in University of Washington medical clinics were also surveyed to determine their acceptability of self-collected HPV testing. Over half (59.1%) of the 1,769 women surveyed preferred self-collected HPV testing to clinician-collected tests. Reasons most often cited were convenience or time saving (82.7%), and avoiding embarrassment or discomfort associated with pelvic exam (38.1%). Women who did not prefer self-collected HPV testing reported greater faith in clinician-collected samples (56.7%) or a desire for a clinic visit to address other issues (42.4%). One hundred eighteen (49.6%) of 238 physicians and midlevel providers surveyed completed the survey. The majority (78.0%) reported that they would recommend a self-collected HPV test if the test had qualities such as high sensitivity and cost effectiveness. Provider concerns mirrored those of patients, namely ensuring adequate sample collection and the opportunity to address other health concerns. Patients and clinicians are supportive of self-collected HPV testing. However, concerns regarding adequacy of samples that are self collected and the desire to see a provider in a clinic setting for other health needs highlight areas that need to be addressed if self collection proves to be a viable option for cervical cancer screening.

  3. Gender Identity: Intersex Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhame Khabar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available According to past beliefs and social norms, society has been taught that their has only been two types of biological structures regarding the ideal male and female. The majority of society has also believed that gender identity was specific only to those structures, as most have had a very fixed perspective of men and women and the sexual organs that are associated. In today's society, there has been an observed increase of many variations in sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, and sex anatomy. Awareness has been subtle, yet growing on gender identity and intersex individuals; however, some studies and popular media stories have also shown that many of these individuals have experienced trauma and hardship due to their ambiguous genitalia and how it has affected their gender identity.

  4. Identity after Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstrøm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    of the financial industry. Findings: The paper finds that members of a dead organization construct a bankruptcy narrative that is also a legacy organizational identity narrative including a legacy organizational identity transformation and several identities that have positive and negative aspects...... evidence on ways that legacy organizational identity from a dead organization play a substantial role in a living organization. Research limitations/implications: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Practical implications: The paper holds insight...... that can help practitioners understand members of a dying organization -- including the ways they come to form and perform in a new organizational context; an understanding that is a prerequisite for helping and supporting these members in coming to perform satisfyingly in the new organization. Originality/value...

  5. Researcher Identities in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelló, Montserrat; Wisker, Gina; Kobayashi, Sofie

    as other emergent ‘signals’, the latent or clear indications from institutions and academic communities regarding career directions and necessary professional skills and attitudes should be identified and interpreted for researchers to adequately develop their new identities. The aim of this paper...... is twofold: a) to present a comprehensive framework of the notion of researcher identity by means of analysing those spheres of activity related to researcher and career development; and b) to relate researcher identities to the experiences of early career researchers with issues concerning signals......Researchers are now embarked upon what we define as a ‘risk career’, rather than, as previously, a relatively more predictable academic career. In this changing context, traditional milestones that enabled early career researchers to build their identities are disappearing. Instead, what we define...

  6. Autoethnography: Inquiry into Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppes, Steve

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides guidelines and suggestions for assessing student development using autoethnography, a qualitative research method. Autoethnography guides students in examining the nexus between personal and professional identities, including skills, challenges, values, histories, and hopes for the future.

  7. Personal Identity Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers concerned with the question of personal identity have typically been asking the so-called re-identification question: what are the conditions under which a person at one point in time is properly re-identified at another point in time? This is a rather technical question. In our...... everyday interactions, however, we do raise a number of personal identity questions that are quite distinct from it. In order to explore the variety of ways in which the Internet may affect personal identity, I propose in this study to broaden the typical philosophical horizon to other more mundane senses...... of the question. In Section 2, I describe a number of possible meanings of personal identity observed in everyday contexts and more philosophical ones. With some caveats, I argue that it is the specific context in which the question arises that disambiguates the meaning of the question. Online contexts are novel...

  8. The Supermalt identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2007-01-01

    aiming to develop strong brands with a limited marketing budget. Based on the Supermalt case, suggestions are made regarding branding in relation to ethnic minorities. Originality/value - This article provides a study of a brand that has become strong within a narrowly defined group of consumers.......Purpose - The objective of this article is to conduct a case study of the Supermalt brand of malt beer, which has become the preferred beverage of Afro-Caribbean consumers in Brixton on a very limited marketing budget. Design/methodology/approach - The article uses the concepts of personal identity...... and brand identity in a qualitative study to explore how Brixtonbased Afro-Caribbean consumers construct their self-identities and the brand identity of Supermalt. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 Afro-Caribbean consumers. Each interview was divided into three parts. The first part focused...

  9. Personal Identity Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers concerned with the question of personal identity have typically been asking the so-called re-identification question: what are the conditions under which a person at one point in time is properly re-identified at another point in time? This is a rather technical question. In our...... everyday interactions, however, we do raise a number of personal identity questions that are quite distinct from it. In order to explore the variety of ways in which the Internet may affect personal identity, I propose in this study to broaden the typical philosophical horizon to other more mundane senses...... of the question. In Section 2, I describe a number of possible meanings of personal identity observed in everyday contexts and more philosophical ones. With some caveats, I argue that it is the specific context in which the question arises that disambiguates the meaning of the question. Online contexts are novel...

  10. Embracing humanity in the face of death: why do existential concerns moderate ingroup humanization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaes, Jeroen; Bain, Paul G; Bastian, Brock

    2014-01-01

    People humanize their ingroup to address existential concerns about their mortality, but the reasons why they do so remain ambiguous. One explanation is that people humanize their ingroup to bolster their social identity in the face of their mortality. Alternatively, people might be motivated to see their ingroup as more uniquely human (UH) to distance themselves from their corporeal "animal" nature. These explanations were tested in Australia, where social identity is tied less to UH and more to human nature (HN) which does not distinguish humans from animals. Australians attributed more HN traits to the ingroup when mortality was salient, while the attribution of UH traits remained unchanged. This indicates that the mortality-buffering function of ingroup humanization lies in reinforcing the humanness of our social identity, rather than just distancing ourselves from our animal nature. Implications for (de)humanization in intergroup relations are discussed.

  11. Esperanto & cultural identity

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrmann, Ask; Christensen, Julie Hellesøe; Dzieza, Malgorzata; Hansen, Nathalie Gylling

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this project is the relationship between culture, cultural identity and language, and their relationship to the ambiguous concept of neutrality. Taking a case study of Esperanto, an artificial language designed with the specific intention of being a completely neutral and nationless language, we will explore how languages relate to the world. By comparing the thoughts on culture and group identity of various authors, we will then try to explore the concept of neutrality – for can...

  12. Visual identity and rebranding

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Wrona

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to highlight the essence of visual identification and rebranding, as well as to discuss elements of corporate identity, which are subject to revitalization in the process of refreshing the image of a brand. In the first part the article the analysis of the term visual identification is conducted. In the analysis special attention is drawn to the role of visual identification in creating a coherent identity of an organization. In the subsequent chapters further comp...

  13. Cultural Identity Through CLIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprescu Monica

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The CLIL approach is a modern manner of teaching English, which has been adapted in Romanian schools and universities. An interesting aspect of learning a foreign language is the contact with its culture/s and the changes it produces in terms of identity. Therefore, a challenging question to be answered is whether a CLIL approach focusing on culture influences students' cultural identity.

  14. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens.

  15. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Marton

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53 is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113 of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens.

  16. Human Figure Test in the research of psychopathological state of refugees and somatically traumatized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opalić Petar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Machover Human Figure Test was used to investigate eight clinical features in five diagnostic categories (neurosis, depression, schizophrenia, paranoid feature and aggressiveness and one symptom (motor deficiency through graphical features of human figure drawing. The test involved 201 subjects, out of whom 109 were refugees from refugee camp in Krnjača, 31 somatically traumatized patients from the Orthopedic Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, and 61 subjects from Belgrade denying any traumatic experience whatsoever. The following was determined in three tested subgroups: - Out of general psychopathological features, "thickened line of the drawing", "unclear medium line of the drawing" and "absence of an arm or a leg" were significantly most frequent in the group of somatically traumatized subjects, thus supporting the hypothesis that Machover Test examined projective aspects of disorder of the body scheme experience. - Out of eight diagnostic categories, only "motor deficiency" was significantly different - of course, in the group of somatically traumatized subjects, while "aggressiveness" was different in the group of refugees.

  17. NATIONAL IDENTITY IN THE VENEZUELAN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nércida Romer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The research had as main purpose to analyze the national identity in the Venezuelan University education. It was descriptive with descriptive transactional design. The population was 250 students of the IX and X semester of education at the UNERMB, Ciudad Ojeda. The results showed: in the objective test, they don’t know details of the national identity; It was detected in the interview that there is a sense of belonging. The recommendation is: in subjects related innovate strategies to give the student knowledge of national identity elements; promote educational and publicity campaigns about the care and conservation of geographical, biological and cultural heritage.

  18. IMMIGRATION, IDENTITY AND LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semran CENGİZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The leading problems incidental to the globalization are the immigration, the poverty, the adaptation problems of the immigrants, the identity and the cultural conflicts. The globalization actors that are transforming the whole world to a huge market, consider to commercialize the product even to the people at the other end of the world. Therefore they lay emphasis on its local identity and remark its variety as its richness. In this way the limits are easily exceeded and the consumption culture becomes available to be instilled upon even the people at the back of the beyond. However one party always wins; the more some people consume, the more some people make profit. The people who does not have any power to consume anymore, becomes the guest of the ones who get them adopt this habit and desires to receive a share from this profit.The modern world people who are not pleased with this situation, have made every effort to alienate the immigrants from the center but they could not succeed. The situation that gave rise to a conflict between parties, have also led the identity problems to occur. In the present situation, the immigrants are trying to take place in the modern world as people with hybrid identities. The music produced by the children of the immigrants with double identities, attracts attention of the world where the immigrant identity, changing its shell, promises hope as the conciliation area of the new century.

  19. Names and Collective Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Krogseth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The preceding two decades have displayed a remarkable awareness for a connection between the concepts "identity" and "cultural memory". David Lowenthal speaks of a "current craze for heritage"! Cultural heritage has become extremely popular, especially in combination with tourism, and has accordingly been converted into a modern system of meaning a type of "secular religion". With reference to collective identity and cultural memory, it is important to ask the cul- tural analytical questions: "Why identity now? Why heritage now?" My reply is that we experience a critical identity crisis. Three central aspects signify individual and collective identity: Continuity, coherence and individuality. The three aspects, constituting the concept of identity, are exposed to serious threats in the post-modern era: The danger of changeability, fragmentation and standardisation. This ten- dency has, however, met various compensating counter reactions like for instance "re-traditionalisation". In my presentation, I will examine the phenomenon cultural memory through examples from the German tradition -- principally from the works of Aleida and Jan Assmann.

  20. On a New Trigonometric Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei

    2002-01-01

    A new trigonometric identity derived from factorizations and partial fractions is given. This identity is used to evaluate the Poisson integral via Riemann sum and to establish some trigonometric summation identities.

  1. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  2. Incorporating human papillomavirus testing into cytological screening in the era of prophylactic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Maribel; Sasieni, Peter; Cuzick, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Screening for, and treatment of, pre-cancerous cervical lesions has lead to dramatic reductions in cervical cancer in many countries. In all cases, cervical screening has been based on cytology, but that is beginning to change. Research studies, including randomised trials, clearly show that human papillomavirus (HPV) testing could be used to prevent a greater proportion of cervical cancer within a practical screening programme. Meanwhile, young adolescents are being vaccinated against HPV in developed countries, but cervical screening should continue for many years because it will take decades before most of those targeted by screening have been vaccinated. In the HPV vaccination era, the rate of cervical disease will decrease, and so will the positive predictive value of cytology. The screening characteristics of HPV testing make it the preferred choice for primary screening. However, questions regarding how to use HPV testing to screen vaccinated and unvaccinated women in the future remain unanswered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Micronucleus test of human oral buccal epithelium: problems, progress and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaev, V N; Artiukhov, V G; Nechaeva, M S

    2014-01-01

    The articles by russian and foreign authors for the period from 2000 to 2012, devoted to the problems of application, analysis and interpretation of the results of micronucleus test in human buccal epithelium has been analyzed in the review. Nuclear abnormality founding in the cells of the oral mucosa has been described. The paper summarizes works devoted to the analysis of the influence of the micronucleus test methods (painting, taking scrapings) to its results. Modern opinions about the factors of different etiology (sex, age, genotype, psycho-physiological characteristics, immune status, diseases of different etiology, man-made pollution, climatic and geographical conditions, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, chemical compounds (drugs, dietary supplements, androgenic steroids, etc.), dental fillings, occupational exposures, alcohol, using tobacco blends) inducing the estimation of nuclear aberration has been summarized as a scheme. The problems and unresolved issues related to the peculiarities of micronucleus test has been noted.

  4. Countering Gattaca: Efficient and Secure Testing of Fully-Sequenced Human Genomes

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Pierre; De Cristofaro, Emiliano; Gasti, Paolo; Tsudik, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have put ubiquitous availability of fully sequenced human genomes within reach. It is no longer hard to imagine the day when everyone will have the means to obtain and store one's own DNA sequence. Widespread and affordable availability of fully sequenced genomes immediately opens up important opportunities in a number of health-related fields. In particular, common genomic applications and tests performed in vitro today will soon be conducted computationally, using digitized genomes. New applications will be developed as genome-enabled medicine becomes increasingly preventive and personalized. However, this progress also prompts significant privacy challenges associated with potential loss, theft, or misuse of genomic data. In this paper, we begin to address genomic privacy by focusing on three important applications: Paternity Tests, Personalized Medicine, and Genetic Compatibility Tests. After carefully analyzing these applications and their privacy requiremen...

  5. Evaluation of an Immunocapture-Agglutination Test (Brucellacapt) for Serodiagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduña, Antonio; Almaraz, Ana; Prado, Ana; Gutierrez, M. Purificación; Garcia-Pascual, Agustina; Dueñas, Ana; Cuervo, Milagros; Abad, Ramon; Hernández, Beatriz; Lorenzo, Belen; Bratos, Miguel A.; Torres, Antonio Rodriguez

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the validity and the usefulness of a new test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis based on an immunocapture-agglutination technique. A total of 315 sera from 82 patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis, 157 sera from patients in whom brucellosis was suspected but not confirmed, and 412 sera from people living in rural areas with endemic brucellosis were studied. The seroagglutination test (SAT), Coombs anti-Brucella test, and Brucellacapt test were evaluated. All the initial sera from the 82 patients proved to be positive in Brucellacapt and Coombs tests, while only 75 (91.4%) were positive in the SAT. If a ≥1/160 diagnostic threshold titer was defined for the Brucellacapt test, Coombs test, and SAT, the sensitivities were 95.1, 91.5, and 65.8%, respectively. Taking the same diagnostic threshold titer for the 157 sera from the unconfirmed but suspected patients, the specificities of the Brucellacapt, Coombs, and SAT were 81.5, 96.2, and 100%, respectively; for the 412 control sera, the specificities were 99.0, 99.8, and 100%. The diagnostic efficiency (area below the receiver operating characteristic curve) of Brucellacapt was 0.987852 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95109 to 0.99286), very similar to the diagnostic efficiency of the Coombs test (0.97611; 95% CI, 0.94781 to 0.99146) and higher than that of SAT (0.91013; 95% CI, 0.86649 to 0.94317). The results of the Brucellacapt test were compared with those of the Coombs test (correlation coefficient, 0.956; P = 0.000) and SAT (correlation coefficient, 0.866; P = 0.000). The study shows very good correlation between the Brucellacapt and Coombs tests, with a high concordance between titers obtained in the two tests. Nevertheless, lower correlation and concordance were found between the Brucellacapt and Coombs tests when the results for titers of ≥1/160 were compared (0.692; P = 0.000). In acute brucellosis, the Brucellacapt and Coombs tests render positive titers of ≥1/160. When the titers

  6. Understanding family dynasty: Nurturing the corporate identity across generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemilentsev, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyse the Ahlstrom annual reports. The content analysis contributes to family business corporate identity. According to the results family business corporate identity is based both on history and on the future. Human resource management, customer relationships, high quality, and also family ownership reflect corporate identity in large family corporations. Modern family business corporate identity is based on continuously developing the business concept and its core competency. Meeting the needs of customers and technical quality standards combined with upgrading and developing the business idea characterises family business corporate identity.

  7. Lateral neck injury assessments in side impact using post mortem human subject tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John; Pintar, Frank A; Wolfla, Christopher E; Maiman, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Current neck injury criteria are based on matching upper cervical spine injuries from piglet tests to airbag deployment loads and pairing kinematics from child dummies. These "child-based" scaled data together with adult human cadaver tolerances in axial loading are used to specify neck injury thresholds in axial compression and tension, and flexion and extension moment about the occipital condyles; no thresholds are specified for any other force or moment including lateral bending. The objective of this study was to develop a testing methodology and to determine the lateral bending moment injury threshold under coronal loading. Post mortem human subjects (PMHS) were used. Specimens consisted of whole body and isolated head-neck complexes with intact musculature. Intact specimen positioning included: sitting PMHS upright on a rigid seat, supporting the torso by a plate, maintaining Frankfurt plane horizontal. Isolated head-neck complexes were fixed at T1 with the occiput connected via a custom apparatus to a testing device to induce lateral bending motion. Head angular and linear accelerations and angular velocities were computed using a pyramid nine accelerometer package on the head; specimen-specific physical properties including center of gravity and moments of inertia in the three-dimensions; and equations of equilibrium. These data were used to determine neck loads at the occipital condyles. No specimens sustained injuries, identified by palpation, x-rays, CT, and autopsy. Results from 24 tests indicated that PMHS head-neck complexes can tolerate 75 Nm of coronal moment at low axial load without failure, and this level may be used as an initial estimate of the injury reference value under lateral loading to the human head-neck complex.

  8. Establishment of a novel in vitro test setup for electric and magnetic stimulation of human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, P C; Jonitz-Heincke, A; Su, Y; Souffrant, R; Hansmann, D; Ewald, H; Krüger, A; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2014-11-01

    When large defects occur, bone regeneration can be supported by bone grafting and biophysical stimuli like electric and magnetic stimulation (EMS). Clinically established EMS modes are external coils and surgical implants like an electroinductive screw system, which combines a magnetic and electric field, e.g., for the treatment of avascular bone necrosis or pseudarthrosis. For optimization of this implant system, an in vitro test setup was designed to investigate effects of EMS on human osteoblasts on different 3D scaffolds (based on calcium phosphate and collagen). Prior to the cell experiments, numerical simulations of the setup, as well as experimental validation, via measurements of the electric parameters induced by EMS were conducted. Human osteoblasts (3 × 10(5) cells) were seeded onto the scaffolds and cultivated. After 24 h, screw implants (Stryker ASNIS III s-series) were centered in the scaffolds, and EMS was applied (3 × 45 min per day at 20 Hz) for 3 days. Cell viability and collagen type 1 (Col1) synthesis were determined subsequently. Numerical simulation and validation showed an adequate distribution of the electric field within the scaffolds. Experimental measurements of the electric potential revealed only minimal deviation from the simulation. Cell response to stimulation varied with scaffold material and mode of stimulation. EMS-stimulated cells exhibited a significant decrease of metabolic activity in particular on collagen scaffolds. In contrast, the Col1/metabolic activity ratio was significantly increased on collagen and non-sintered calcium phosphate scaffolds after 3 days. Exclusive magnetic stimulation showed similar but nonsignificant tendencies in metabolic activity and Col1 synthesis. The cell tests demonstrate that the new test setup is a valuable tool for in vitro testing and parameter optimization of the clinically used electroinductive screw system. It combines magnetic and electric stimulation, allowing in vitro investigations

  9. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettuzzi, M., E-mail: matteo.bettuzzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M.P. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Gallo, A. [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Strolin, S.; Casali, F. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Lamanna, Ernesto [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Ariu, Marilu [CEFLA Dental Group, Imola (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local 'S. Orsola' Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120x120 mm{sup 2}, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a

  10. The challenges in diagnosis and gender assignment in disorders of sex development presenting to a pediatric surgical unit in a developing country: the role of laparoscopy and simple tests for gender identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tanvir K; Kabir, Mahfuzul; Chowdhury, Md Zonaid; Hutson, John M; Banu, Tahmina

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to assess how the diagnosis and determination of gender identity of disorders of sex development (DSD) is different in a developing country from Western medicine, and whether a pediatric surgery department can determine the underlying diagnosis and use simple tools to determine the likely gender identity (GI). We reviewed the records of DSD patients admitted to the Department of Pediatric Surgery, Chittagong Medical College & Hospital (CMCH), Chittagong, Bangladesh, from January 2006 to December 2012 and performed a cross-sectional study on GI and gender-related behavior in these patients during the year 2012. DSD boys and girls answered a GI interview and had their gender role behavior assessed by observations of structural toy play and analyzed for differences in scores. This cohort of DSD patients presented in mid-childhood (6 months-16 years, mean 6.9 years) rather than infancy, and 30% came from consanguineous unions. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) constituted only 11 of 50 (22%) of the DSD cohort, and not all families had access to steroid hormone replacement. A simple assessment of GI and gender-related behavior allowed effective gender assignment, as there was significant difference between DSD boys and girls in GI and gender-related behavior score. DSD management in Bangladesh provides some unique challenges because of limited resources. A national reference laboratory for biochemical and genetic testing and development of a quaternary referral center for DSD patients will be helpful. Continued use of the GI interview and gender-related behavior study will enable effective interim decisions about diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tools for Understanding Identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creese, Sadie; Gibson-Robinson, Thomas; Goldsmith, Michael; Hodges, Duncan; Kim, Dee DH; Love, Oriana J.; Nurse, Jason R.; Pike, William A.; Scholtz, Jean

    2013-12-28

    Identity attribution and enrichment is critical to many aspects of law-enforcement and intelligence gathering; this identity typically spans a number of domains in the natural-world such as biographic information (factual information – e.g. names, addresses), biometric information (e.g. fingerprints) and psychological information. In addition to these natural-world projections of identity, identity elements are projected in the cyber-world. Conversely, undesirable elements may use similar techniques to target individuals for spear-phishing attacks (or worse), and potential targets or their organizations may want to determine how to minimize the attack surface exposed. Our research has been exploring the construction of a mathematical model for identity that supports such holistic identities. The model captures the ways in which an identity is constructed through a combination of data elements (e.g. a username on a forum, an address, a telephone number). Some of these elements may allow new characteristics to be inferred, hence enriching the holistic view of the identity. An example use-case would be the inference of real names from usernames, the ‘path’ created by inferring new elements of identity is highlighted in the ‘critical information’ panel. Individual attribution exercises can be understood as paths through a number of elements. Intuitively the entire realizable ‘capability’ can be modeled as a directed graph, where the elements are nodes and the inferences are represented by links connecting one or more antecedents with a conclusion. The model can be operationalized with two levels of tool support described in this paper, the first is a working prototype, the second is expected to reach prototype by July 2013: Understanding the Model The tool allows a user to easily determine, given a particular set of inferences and attributes, which elements or inferences are of most value to an investigator (or an attacker). The tool is also able to take

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Chlamydia/Gonorrhea Testing among Heterosexual College Students: Who Is Getting Tested and Why Do Some Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erin W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study explored college students' reported history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chlamydia/gonorrhea and characteristics of students reporting testing. Additionally, it assessed their motivation regarding future testing and reasons for lack of motivation. Participants: The sample consisted of 292 sexually experienced…

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Chlamydia/Gonorrhea Testing among Heterosexual College Students: Who Is Getting Tested and Why Do Some Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erin W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study explored college students' reported history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chlamydia/gonorrhea and characteristics of students reporting testing. Additionally, it assessed their motivation regarding future testing and reasons for lack of motivation. Participants: The sample consisted of 292 sexually experienced…

  14. Agreement between Computerized and Human Assessment of Performance on the Ruff Figural Fluency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderson, Martin F.; Pham, Sander; van Eersel, Marlise E. A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Kok, Johan; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Tucha, Oliver; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Slaets, Joris P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFFT) is a sensitive test for nonverbal fluency suitable for all age groups. However, assessment of performance on the RFFT is time-consuming and may be affected by interrater differences. Therefore, we developed computer software specifically designed to analyze performance on the RFFT by automated pattern recognition. The aim of this study was to compare assessment by the new software with conventional assessment by human raters. The software was developed using data from the Lifelines Cohort Study and validated in an independent cohort of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End Stage Disease (PREVEND) study. The total study population included 1,761 persons: 54% men; mean age (SD), 58 (10) years. All RFFT protocols were assessed by the new software and two independent human raters (criterion standard). The mean number of unique designs (SD) was 81 (29) and the median number of perseverative errors (interquartile range) was 9 (4 to 16). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between the computerized and human assessment was 0.994 (95%CI, 0.988 to 0.996; p<0.001) and 0.991 (95%CI, 0.990 to 0.991; p<0.001) for the number of unique designs and perseverative errors, respectively. The mean difference (SD) between the computerized and human assessment was -1.42 (2.78) and +0.02 (1.94) points for the number of unique designs and perseverative errors, respectively. This was comparable to the agreement between two independent human assessments: ICC, 0.995 (0.994 to 0.995; p<0.001) and 0.985 (0.982 to 0.988; p<0.001), and mean difference (SD), -0.44 (2.98) and +0.56 (2.36) points for the number of unique designs and perseverative errors, respectively. We conclude that the agreement between the computerized and human assessment was very high and comparable to the agreement between two independent human assessments. Therefore, the software is an accurate tool for the assessment of performance on the RFFT. PMID:27661083

  15. Human Visual System as a Double-Slit Single Photon Interference Sensor: A Comparison between Modellistic and Biophysical Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Pizzi

    Full Text Available This paper describes a computational approach to the theoretical problems involved in the Young's single-photon double-slit experiment, focusing on a simulation of this experiment in the absence of measuring devices. Specifically, the human visual system is used in place of a photomultiplier or similar apparatus. Beginning with the assumption that the human eye perceives light in the presence of very few photons, we measure human eye performance as a sensor in a double-slit one-photon-at-a-time experimental setup. To interpret the results, we implement a simulation algorithm and compare its results with those of human subjects under identical experimental conditions. In order to evaluate the perceptive parameters exactly, which vary depending on the light conditions and on the subject's sensitivity, we first review the existing literature on the biophysics of the human eye in the presence of a dim light source, and then use the known values of the experimental variables to set the parameters of the computational simulation. The results of the simulation and their comparison with the experiment involving human subjects are reported and discussed. It is found that, while the computer simulation indicates that the human eye has the capacity to detect the corpuscular nature of photons under these conditions, this was not observed in practice. The possible reasons for the difference between theoretical prediction and experimental results are discussed.

  16. Testing the relationship between human occupancy in the landscape and tadpole developmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C Eterovick

    Full Text Available Amphibian population declines are widespread; the main causal factors are human related and include habitat fragmentation due to agriculture, mining, fires, and urban development. Brazil is the richest country in species of amphibians, and the Brazilian regions with the greatest amphibian diversity are experiencing relatively high rates of habitat destruction, but there are presently relatively few reports of amphibian declines. It is thus important to develop research methods that will detect deterioration in population health before severe declines occur. We tested the use of measurements of fluctuating asymmetry (FA taken on amphibian larvae to detect anthropogenic stress. We hypothesized that greater human occupancy in the landscape might result in more stressful conditions for amphibians. We conducted this study at the Espinhaço mountain range in southeastern Brazil, using as a model an endemic species (Bokermannohyla saxicola, Hylidae. We chose two tadpole denticle rows and eye-nostril distance as traits for FA measurement. We measured percent cover of human-altered habitats in the landscape around tadpole sampling points and measured FA levels in sampled tadpoles. We found FA levels to differ among localities but found no relationship between human modification of the landscape and tadpole FA levels. Levels of FA in the traits we examined may not be strongly affected by environmental conditions, or may be affected by local variables that were not captured by our landscape-scale measures. Alternatively, populations may be genetically differentiated, affecting how FA levels respond to stress and obscuring the effects of anthropogenic disturbance.

  17. Testing the Relationship between Human Occupancy in the Landscape and Tadpole Developmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eterovick, Paula C.; Bar, Luís F. F.; Souza, Jorge B.; Castro, José F. M.; Leite, Felipe S. F.; Alford, Ross A.

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian population declines are widespread; the main causal factors are human related and include habitat fragmentation due to agriculture, mining, fires, and urban development. Brazil is the richest country in species of amphibians, and the Brazilian regions with the greatest amphibian diversity are experiencing relatively high rates of habitat destruction, but there are presently relatively few reports of amphibian declines. It is thus important to develop research methods that will detect deterioration in population health before severe declines occur. We tested the use of measurements of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) taken on amphibian larvae to detect anthropogenic stress. We hypothesized that greater human occupancy in the landscape might result in more stressful conditions for amphibians. We conducted this study at the Espinhaço mountain range in southeastern Brazil, using as a model an endemic species (Bokermannohyla saxicola, Hylidae). We chose two tadpole denticle rows and eye-nostril distance as traits for FA measurement. We measured percent cover of human-altered habitats in the landscape around tadpole sampling points and measured FA levels in sampled tadpoles. We found FA levels to differ among localities but found no relationship between human modification of the landscape and tadpole FA levels. Levels of FA in the traits we examined may not be strongly affected by environmental conditions, or may be affected by local variables that were not captured by our landscape-scale measures. Alternatively, populations may be genetically differentiated, affecting how FA levels respond to stress and obscuring the effects of anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:25793699

  18. Numerical compliance testing of human exposure to electromagnetic radiation from smart-watches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seon-Eui; Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Pack, Jeong-Ki

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the electromagnetic dosimetry for smart-watches. At present, the standard for compliance testing of body-mounted and handheld devices specifies the use of a flat phantom to provide conservative estimates of the peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR). This means that the estimated SAR using a flat phantom should be higher than the SAR in the exposure part of an anatomical human-body model. To verify this, we numerically calculated the SAR for a flat phantom and compared it with the numerical calculation of the SAR for four anatomical human-body models of different ages. The numerical analysis was performed using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). The smart-watch models were used in the three antennas: the shorted planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA), loop antenna, and monopole antenna. Numerical smart-watch models were implemented for cellular commutation and wireless local-area network operation at 835, 1850, and 2450 MHz. The peak spatial-averaged SARs of the smart-watch models are calculated for the flat phantom and anatomical human-body model for the wrist-worn and next to mouth positions. The results show that the flat phantom does not provide a consistent conservative SAR estimate. We concluded that the difference in the SAR results between an anatomical human-body model and a flat phantom can be attributed to the different phantom shapes and tissue structures.

  19. Assuring safety without animal testing: the case for the human testis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Robert E; Boekelheide, Kim; Cortvrindt, Rita; van Duursen, Majorie B M; Gant, Tim; Jegou, Bernard; Marczylo, Emma; van Pelt, Ans M M; Post, Janine N; Roelofs, Maarke J E; Schlatt, Stefan; Teerds, Katja J; Toppari, Jorma; Piersma, Aldert H

    2013-08-01

    From 15 to 17 June 2011, a dedicated workshop was held on the subject of in vitro models for mammalian spermatogenesis and their applications in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. The workshop was sponsored by the Dutch ASAT initiative (Assuring Safety without Animal Testing), which aims at promoting innovative approaches toward toxicological hazard and risk assessment on the basis of human and in vitro data, and replacement of animal studies. Participants addressed the state of the art regarding human and animal evidence for compound mediated testicular toxicity, reviewed existing alternative assay models, and brainstormed about future approaches, specifically considering tissue engineering. The workshop recognized the specific complexity of testicular function exemplified by dedicated cell types with distinct functionalities, as well as different cell compartments in terms of microenvironment and extracellular matrix components. This complexity hampers quick results in the realm of alternative models. Nevertheless, progress has been achieved in recent years, and innovative approaches in tissue engineering may open new avenues for mimicking testicular function in vitro. Although feasible, significant investment is deemed essential to be able to bring new ideas into practice in the laboratory. For the advancement of in vitro testicular toxicity testing, one of the most sensitive end points in regulatory reproductive toxicity testing, such an investment is highly desirable. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Field evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test to detect antibodies in human toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, P K C; Yamasaki, H; Mak, J W; Wong, S F; Chong, C W; Yap, I K S; Ambu, S; Kumarasamy, V

    2015-08-01

    Human toxocariasis which is caused mainly by the larvae of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, is a worldwide zoonotic disease that can be a potentially serious human infection. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens harvested from T. canis larvae is currently the serological test for confirming toxocariasis. An alternative to producing large amounts of Toxocara TES and improved diagnosis for toxocariasis is through the development of highly specific recombinant antigens such as the T. canis second stage larva excretory-secretory 30 kDa protein (recTES-30). The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid diagnostic kit (RDT, named as iToxocara kit) in comparison to recTES-30 ELISA in Serendah Orang Asli village in Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 133 subjects were included in the study. The overall prevalence rates by ELISA and RDT were 29.3% and 33.1%, respectively, with more positive cases detected in males than females. However, no association was found between toxocariasis and gender or age. The percentage sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of RDT were 85.7%, 90.1%, 80% and 93.2%, respectively. The prevalence for toxocariasis in this population using both ELISA and RDT was 27.1% (36/133) and the K-concordance test suggested good agreement of the two tests with a Cohen's kappa of 0.722, Ptoxocariasis.

  1. Genotoxic evaluation of Halfenprox using the human peripheral lymphocyte micronucleus assay and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Dere, Hatice; Serteser, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Halfenprox, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide and acaricide, was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 were treated with or without S9 fraction. The doses of Halfenprox were 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/plate and test materials were dissolved in DMSO. The concentrations of Halfenprox did not show mutagenic activity on both strains with and without S9 fraction. The MN assay was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of Halfenprox in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg/ml concentrations of Halfenprox for 24 and 48 h, and at 1000 μg/ml the concentration was significantly increased and the MN formation was compared with the negative control for both treatment periods. In addition, a significant decrease of the nuclear devision index (NDI) values at the higher concentrations of Halfenprox and at both treatment periods was observed.

  2. Human Factors for Nursing: From In-Situ Testing to Mobile Usability Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Solvoll, Terje; Hullin, Carola

    2016-01-01

    The tutorial goal is to familiarize participants with human aspects of health informatics and human-centered approaches to the design, evaluation and deployment of both usable and safe healthcare information systems. The focus will be on demonstrating and teaching practical and low-cost methods for evaluating mobile applications in nursing. Basic background to testing methods will be provided, followed by live demonstration of the methods. Then the audience will break into small groups to explore the application of the methods to applications of interest (there will be a number of possible applications that will be available for applications in areas such as electronic health records and decision support, however, if the groups have applications of specific interest to them that will be possible). The challenges of conducting usability testing, and in particular mobile usability testing will be discussed along with practical solutions. The target audience includes practicing nurses and nurse researchers, nursing informatics specialists, nursing students, nursing managers and health informatics professionals interested in improving the usability and safety of healthcare applications.

  3. Detection of thalidomide embryotoxicity by in vitro embryotoxicity testing based on human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Nobuo; Kunisato, Atsushi; Nagao, Kenji; Kusaka, Hideaki; Takaba, Katsumi; Ohgami, Kinya

    2014-01-01

    The mouse embryonic stem cell test (mEST) is used to assess the embryotoxicity of drug candidates by evaluating the effects on the cardiac differentiation of stem cells. However, thalidomide embryotoxicity has not yet been reported using the mEST. To detect the effects of thalidomide, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) instead of mouse embryonic stem cells, and assessed three endpoints: the inhibition of cardiac differentiation, the cytotoxicity to hiPSCs, and the cytotoxicity to human dermal fibroblasts, according to the mEST. From these data (IC50 values), the embryotoxicity was classified into one of three different classes based on the mEST and our criteria. Valproate was used as a positive control and ascorbic acid was used as a negative control, and their effects were assessed. Similar to valproate, thalidomide was classified as a Class 2 agent, with weak embryotoxicity, by the mEST criteria, and was classified as Category 3 embryotoxic based on our criteria. Ascorbic acid was classified as a Class 1 / Category 1, non-embryotoxic agent, based on both criteria. Thalidomide embryotoxicity was detected in the embryonic stem cell test based on hiPSCs. This test system is thus considered to have a much greater predictive ability than the mEST.

  4. Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus and its Vaccination: Adaptation and Psychometric Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Gulten; Seven, Memnun; Akyuz, Aygul

    2016-06-01

    To adapt and psychometrically test the Health Belief Model Scale for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and Its Vaccination (HBMS-HPVV) for use in a Turkish population and to assess the Human Papilloma Virus Knowledge score (HPV-KS) among female college students. Instrument adaptation and psychometric testing study. The sample consisted of 302 nursing students at a nursing school in Turkey between April and May 2013. Questionnaire-based data were collected from the participants. Information regarding HBMS-HPVV and HPV knowledge and descriptive characteristic of participants was collected using translated HBMS-HPVV and HPV-KS. Test-retest reliability was evaluated and Cronbach α was used to assess internal consistency reliability, and exploratory factor analysis was used to assess construct validity of the HBMS-HPVV. The scale consists of 4 subscales that measure 4 constructs of the Health Belief Model covering the perceived susceptibility and severity of HPV and the benefits and barriers. The final 14-item scale had satisfactory validity and internal consistency. Cronbach α values for the 4 subscales ranged from 0.71 to 0.78. Total HPV-KS ranged from 0 to 8 (scale range, 0-10; 3.80 ± 2.12). The HBMS-HPVV is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring young Turkish women's beliefs and attitudes about HPV and its vaccination. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Scale-Up of an Human Papillomavirus Testing Implementation Program in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Miriam; Maza, Mauricio; Alfaro, Karla; Morales Velado, Mario; Felix, Juan; Castle, Philip E; Kim, Jane; Gage, Julia C

    2017-01-01

    The Cervical Cancer Prevention in El Salvador is a demonstration project to introduce a lower-cost human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA test into a public sector project. Started in October 2012, The Cervical Cancer Prevention in El Salvador consists of 3 phases and will ultimately screen 30,000 women. Results of phase 2 of the project are presented. The objective of this project was to compare colposcopy and noncolposcopy-based management for HPV-positive women. In phase 2, a total of 8,050 women, aged 30 to 49 years, were screened; 6,761 provided both self- and provider-collected specimens and 1,289 provided only provider-testing specimens. HPV results from self-collected specimens were not used in clinical management decisions. Women with provider-collected HPV-positive results were treated based on the strategy assigned to their community; the strategy was colposcopy management (CM) or screen-and-treat (ST) management if they were cryotherapy eligible or colposcopy if not eligible. Outcomes were assessed 6 months after screening. Overall, 489 (12.3%) of 3,963 women receiving CM and 465 (11.4%) of 4,087 women receiving ST tested HPV positive. In the CM cohort, 216 (44.2%) of 489 completed their intervention (203 treated, 11 diagnosed negative, 2 pregnant). In the ST cohort, 411 (88.4%) of 465 completed their intervention (407 treated, 2 diagnosed negative, 1 pregnant). Overall agreement between HPV test results from self-collected and provider-collected specimens was 93.7%, with a κ value of 0.70 (95% CI = 0.68-0.73). Human papillomavirus testing with ST management resulted in an approximately twice completion rate compared with CM management. Agreement between self- and provider-based sampling was good and might be used to extend screening to women in areas that are more difficult to reach.

  6. In vitro human digestion test to monitor the dissolution of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, P.; Malvindi, M. A.; Sabella, S.

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology is a scientific revolution that the food industry has experienced over the last years. Widely employed as food additives and/or food contact materials in consumer products, silver nanoparticles are an example of this innovation. However, their increasing use makes also likely the human ingestion, thus requiring a proper risk analysis. In this framework, a comprehensive characterization of biotransformation of silver nanoparticles in biological fluids is fundamental for the regulatory needs. Herein, we aimed at studying the dissolution behaviour of silver nanoparticles using an in vitro test, which simulates the human oral ingestion of NPs during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The nanoparticle suspensions were characterized in the different digestion phases using several techniques to follow the changes of key physical properties (e.g., size, surface charge and plasmon peak) and to quantify the biotransformed products arisen by the process, as for example free silver ions.

  7. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of copper oxychloride in cultured human lymphocytes using cytogenetic and molecular tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Suleyman; Genc, Ahmet; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup

    2016-10-01

    The genotoxicity of copper oxychloride was investigated in human lymphocytes using chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests and the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction technique. The lymphocytes were treated with 3, 6, and 12 µg/mL of copper oxychloride for 24 and 48 h. Copper oxychloride increased CA and abnormal cells in a dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN and micronucleated binuclear cells also increased at all concentrations and treatment periods. However, copper oxychloride cytotoxicity, observed through lower mitotic and nuclear division index, was significantly lower only at the higher concentrations (6 and 12 µg/mL). Copper oxychloride increased the polymorphic bands and decreased genomic template stability. In conclusion, in this study it was confirmed that copper oxychloride has genotoxic potential for human lymphocytes in vitro. Additionally, caution is advised for its use as a fungicide, because it may increase the risk of exposure through the food chain.

  8. Sympathy for the Clone: (Post)Human Identities Enhanced by the ‘Evil Science’ Construct and its Commodifying Practices in Contemporary Clone Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Jimena Escudero Pérez

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of human DNA in the form of eugenic pursuit, cloning, genetic engineering etc., has become a well-established subject in science fiction for decades now. In our days, this thematic trend is probably the most prolific one when inspiring narratives in popular culture and also constitutes the source of much bioethical debate. A common pattern derived from these practices is that they generate dystopian scenarios where a community is oppressed and abused by scientific means thus ...

  9. Family correlates of female adolescents' ego-identity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G R

    1985-03-01

    Past research has suggested that parents may contribute to the positive development of their daughter's identity formation. Theoretical notions from both social learning and symbolic interaction indicate that parents can either facilitate or hinder positive growth. Therefore, to test the predictions that (a) more mature (moratorium and achieved) identity status parents would have daughters with more mature identities, and (b) that both positive and negative parenting styles can be detected to differentiate between less (diffused and foreclosed) and more mature identity status youths, 45 families (145 subjects) were assessed on parent-child relations and identity status formation. In contrast to much past research, parent-child relations were assessed from both the adolescents' and the parents' perspectives. The findings indicate that parental identity status formation may have an effect on the adolescent's identity formation and that parent-child relations differentiate between less and more mature female adolescent identities.

  10. Narrating Career, Positioning Identity: Career Identity as a Narrative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Kirsi

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to traditional definitions of career identity as an individual construct, this article argues for a discursive approach to career identity as a narrative practice. Career identity is conceptualized as a practice of articulating, performing and negotiating identity positions in narrating career experiences. By using the concept of…

  11. Perception, experience and body identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ibor, Juan J; Ortiz, Tomás; López-Ibor, María I

    2011-12-01

    Physician has to know the patient in the disease and not only the disease in the patient, from the dual perspective of the body as object and the body as subject. This also affects the patient who has to cope with the reality of having a body that bursts into the subject's consciousness as a vital threat, as source of discomfort and inability and being a body (Marcel). The human body in its dual aspect has been and is a great unknown, if not a great outrage in spite of the fact that we are our body and our body is each of us. We sometimes do not feel as we are and thus a confrontation arises, sometimes more normal, others more morbid. This forces the physician to face complex ethics considerations and the scientist to accept a personal identity disorder. Dualism considers that there are two substances in us, one that distinguishes us from other beings and from the rest of the individuals of the human species, the soul, the psychic life, mind or consciousness, and another more insubstancial one, the body. The aim of the first substance is to dominate the body, to survive it after death when it is, already a corpse is meant to become putrefied, is buried, incinerated or thrown to the depth of the sea. This dualism aims to explain the origin of the evil and the attitude to defeat it and it does so efficiently. This anthropology has very ancient roots (the Upvanishads, in the orphic texts, in Plato), it is the core of Gnostic thought and the foundation of the modern science since Descartes. Some monist perspectives are a masked dualism or a mereologic fallacy, according to which, the brain is conscious, when that what is conscious is the subject, although the subject, with the brain could not be conscious. Therefore, a new perspective is proposed, chiasmatic or janicular monism, that considers the adaptive value of focusing on the reality from two perspectives, as physical universe and the world of interpersonal relationships. In the agnosias and in the phantom limb

  12. Identity gaps and level of depression among Korean immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eura; Hecht, Michael L

    2008-07-01

    Identity gaps are a new theoretical construct that provide a framework for integrating communication into the study of identity and understanding the relationship between identity and health outcomes, such as depression. Derived from the communication theory of identity, identity gaps emerge when elements of identity are inconsistent with each other. This article focuses on 2 types of identity gaps, personal-enacted and personal-relational, examining their relationships with situational variables and depression. A questionnaire was administered to a community sample of 377 Korean immigrants to test a hypothesized path model predicting that 3 situational variables (intercultural communication competence, middleperson status, and perception of racial hierarchy) would influence the identity gaps that, in turn, influence Korean immigrants' levels of depression. Results showed that all 3 situational variables predicted Korean immigrants' personal-relational identity gaps, whereas only intercultural communication competence predicted their personal-enacted identity gaps. Both types of identity gaps predicted the level of depression. The personal-relational identity gap significantly mediated the effects of all 3 situational variables on levels of depression. However, the personal-enacted identity gap mediated only the effects of intercultural communication competence on the levels of depression.

  13. Automatic analysis of the micronucleus test in primary human lymphocytes using image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieauff, W; Martus, H J; Suter, W; Elhajouji, A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test (MNT) is a well-established test for early screening of new chemical entities in industrial toxicology. For assessing the clastogenic or aneugenic potential of a test compound, micronucleus induction in cells has been shown repeatedly to be a sensitive and a specific parameter. Various automated systems to replace the tedious and time-consuming visual slide analysis procedure as well as flow cytometric approaches have been discussed. The ROBIAS (Robotic Image Analysis System) for both automatic cytotoxicity assessment and micronucleus detection in human lymphocytes was developed at Novartis where the assay has been used to validate positive results obtained in the MNT in TK6 cells, which serves as the primary screening system for genotoxicity profiling in early drug development. In addition, the in vitro MNT has become an accepted alternative to support clinical studies and will be used for regulatory purposes as well. The comparison of visual with automatic analysis results showed a high degree of concordance for 25 independent experiments conducted for the profiling of 12 compounds. For concentration series of cyclophosphamide and carbendazim, a very good correlation between automatic and visual analysis by two examiners could be established, both for the relative division index used as cytotoxicity parameter, as well as for micronuclei scoring in mono- and binucleated cells. Generally, false-positive micronucleus decisions could be controlled by fast and simple relocation of the automatically detected patterns. The possibility to analyse 24 slides within 65h by automatic analysis over the weekend and the high reproducibility of the results make automatic image processing a powerful tool for the micronucleus analysis in primary human lymphocytes. The automated slide analysis for the MNT in human lymphocytes complements the portfolio of image analysis applications on ROBIAS which is supporting various assays at Novartis.

  14. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  15. Viscoelastic behaviour of human blood and polyacrylamide model fluids for heart valve testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Dietmar; Vlastos, Georgios; Koch, Brigitte; Pohl, Manfred; Affeld, Klaus

    1993-06-01

    New heart valves and other cardiovascular assist systems have to be tested for hydrodynamic performance. In place of human blood simple model fluids like glycerol solutions are employed often due to ethical and practical reasons. But blood exhibits complex non-Newtonian and viscoelastic behaviour. Rheological blood properties are reviewed based on literature and own experimental results. Furthermore we studied polymer solutions with respect to blood-like flow behaviour. Rheology was assessed by means of the low shear rotational viscometer (LS 40, Mettler-Toledo, Switzerland) under stationary and dynamic shear conditions (variation of frequency and angular displacement).

  16. Testing of the radiosensitivity of human malignant tumor cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, M.; Neumeister, K.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Chirurgische Klinik; Bezirkskrankenhaus Karl-Marx-Stadt (German Democratic Republic); Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik)

    1984-01-01

    Primary cell cultures of human malignant tumors were irradiated with X-ray doses of 1-30 Gy. Their radiosensitivity has been examined for 3 weeks postirradiation concerning morphological aspects. The investigations were carried out on 43 tumors of different histology. In 26 cases the results of the radiosensitivity test in the tumor cell culture were compared with the results of the radiotherapy of the adequate patients, 6-8 years postirradiation. In 17 patients the in vitro results correlated with the conventional clinical experience as to the radiosensitivity of the corresponding tumor.

  17. Proteolytic processing of anti-Müllerian hormone differs between human fetal testes and adult ovaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamsen, Linn; Petersen, TS; Jeppesen, JV

    2015-01-01

    and specificity of a panel of five novel high-affinity AMH monoclonal antibodies. Two recognize the mature C-terminal form of AMH, whereas three recognize the active pro-mature form of AMH in human tissue. The antibodies were tested on fetal male testicular and mesonephric tissue aged 8-19 weeks post conception...... of AMH was hardly detected in Sertoli cells, but was readily detected in GCs. This particular form was also located to the nucleus in GCs, whereas the other investigated AMH forms remained in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, the distribution of the AMH forms in the fetal serum of boys showed...

  18. A combination of in vitro comet assay and micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Aoi; Miyata, Atsuro; Honma, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    The comet assay has been widely used as a genotoxicity test for detecting primary DNA damage in individual cells. The micronucleus (MN) test is also a well-established assay for detecting clastogenicity and aneugenicity. A combination of the comet assay (COM) and MN test is capable of detecting a variety of genotoxic potentials as an in vitro screening system. Although the in vitro MN test has a robust protocol and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline, the in vitro COM does not. To establish a robust protocol for the COM and to compare its sensitivity with that of the MN, we conducted COM and MN concurrently for five genotoxic agents (ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, hydrogen peroxide, gamma-rays and mitomycin C) and one non-genotoxic agent (triton X-100), using human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Relative cell count (RCC), relative population doubling (RPD), relative increase in cell count (RICC) and relative cell viability determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay (TBDE) were employed as cytotoxic measurements. However, the relative cell viability determined by TBDE just after the treatment was not an appropriate parameter of cytotoxicity for the genotoxic agents because it remained constant even at the highest doses, which showed severe cytotoxicity by RCC, RPD and RICC. The results of the COM showed qualitative agreement (positive or negative) with those of the MN except for mitomycin C, which is an interstrand cross-linker. The COM always required higher doses than the MN to detect the genotoxic potential of the genotoxic agents under the test conditions applied here. The doses that induced a comet tail always yielded test guideline for MN because of their high cytotoxicity. These results are helpful for interpreting the results of the COM and MN in in vitro genotoxic hazard assessments. Further investigation is required to standardise the COM.

  19. Properties of a specific interleukin 1 (IL 1) receptor on human Epstein Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes. Identity of receptor for IL 1-. cap alpha. and IL 1-. beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, K.; Akahoshi, T.; Yamada, M.; Furutani, Y.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The properties of specific human interleukin 1 (IL 1) receptors on human Epstein Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B) were studied. Purified human IL 1-..beta.. from a myelomonocytic cell line (THP-1) was labeled with /sup 125/I. Among four EBV-B cell lines tested, a pre-B cell type (VDS-O) specifically bound the highest amount of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta... The binding of /sup 125/I-IL 1-..beta.. to VDS-O cells was inhibited by F(ab)'/sub 2/ fragments of anti-human IL 1 and recombinant human IL 1-..cap alpha.., as well as by unlabeled human IL 1-..beta.. but not by recombinant lymphotoxin, recombinant tumor necrosis factor, or phorbol myristic acid, suggesting that IL 1-..cap alpha.. and IL 1-..beta.. bind specifically to the same receptor. The m.w. of IL 1 receptor on human EBV-B cells was estimated to be 60,000 by both the chemical cross-linking method and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isoelectric point of solubilized human IL 1 receptor was 7.3 on HPLC chromatofocusing. The evidence of existence of IL 1 receptor on human EBV-B cells additionally supports the hypothesis that IL 1 may be an autocrine signal for these cells.

  20. The use of ex vivo human skin tissue for genotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reus, Astrid A.; Usta, Mustafa [TNO Triskelion BV, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, Zeist (Netherlands); Krul, Cyrille A.M., E-mail: cyrille.krul@tno.nl [TNO, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE Zeist (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the chemical legislation concerning the registration, evaluation, authorization and restriction of chemicals (REACH), and the Seventh Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive, which prohibits animal testing in Europe for cosmetics, alternative methods for safety evaluation of chemicals are urgently needed. Current in vitro genotoxicity assays are not sufficiently predictive for the in vivo situation, resulting in an unacceptably high number of misleading positives. For many chemicals and ingredients of personal care products the skin is the first site of contact, but there are no in vitro genotoxicity assays available in the skin for additional evaluation of positive or equivocal responses observed in regulatory in vitro genotoxicity assays. In the present study ex vivo human skin tissue obtained from surgery was used for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals by using the comet assay. Fresh ex vivo human skin tissue was cultured in an air–liquid interface and topically exposed to 20 chemicals, including true positive, misleading positive and true negative genotoxins. Based on the results obtained in the present study, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ex vivo skin comet assay to predict in vivo genotoxicity were 89%, 90% and 89%, respectively. Donor and experimental variability were mainly reflected in the magnitude of the response and not the difference between the presence and absence of a genotoxic response. The present study indicates that human skin obtained from surgery is a promising and robust model for safety evaluation of chemicals that are in direct contact with the skin. -- Highlights: ► We use human skin obtained from surgery for genotoxicity evaluation of chemicals. ► We use the comet assay as parameter for genotoxicity in ex vivo human skin. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to predict in vivo genotoxins are determined. ► Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy are 89%, 90% and 90%, respectively. ► The method

  1. Researcher Identity in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelló, Montserrat; Kobayashi, Sofie; McGinn, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the current higher education context, early career researchers (ECRs) face a ‘risk-career’ in which predictable, stable academic careers have become increasingly rare. Traditional milestones to signal progress toward a sustainable research career are disappearing or subject...... to reinterpretation, and ECRs need to attend to new or reimagined signals in their efforts to develop a researcher identity in this current context. In this article, we present a comprehensive framework for researcher identity in relation to the ways ECRs recognise and respond to divergent signals across spheres...... comprehensive framework allows for the analysis of researcher identity development through the complex and intertwined activities in which ECRs are involved. We advance this approach as a foundation for a sustained research agenda to understand how ECRs identify and respond to relevant signals, and...

  2. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  3. Identity work and identity regulation in managers' personal development training

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the role of personal development training in managers’ identity processes. Personal development training constitutes a local management discourse, which can influence both identity work and identity regulation processes. The study emphasizes the importance of personal life stories in understanding how managers are influenced by personal development training. The training provokes different processes of identity work and identity regulation, and managers actively work wi...

  4. A (fascinating) litmus test for human retino- vs. non-retinotopic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Marco; Oğmen, Haluk; Krummenacher, Joseph; Otto, Thomas U; Herzog, Michael H

    2009-12-05

    In human vision, the optics of the eye map neighboring points of the environment onto neighboring photoreceptors in the retina. This retinotopic encoding principle is preserved in the early visual areas. Under normal viewing conditions, due to the motion of objects and to eye movements, the retinotopic representation of the environment undergoes fast and drastic shifts. Yet, perceptually our environment appears stable suggesting the existence of non-retinotopic representations in addition to the well-known retinotopic ones. Here, we present a simple psychophysical test to determine whether a given visual process is accomplished in retino- or non-retinotopic coordinates. As examples, we show that visual search and motion perception can occur within a non-retinotopic frame of reference. These findings suggest that more mechanisms than previously thought operate non-retinotopically. Whether this is true for a given visual process can easily be found out with our "litmus test."

  5. [Research of joint-robotics-based design of biomechanics testing device on human spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guoyong; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-12-01

    This paper introduces the hardware and software of a biomechanical robot-based testing device. The bottom control orders, posture and torque data transmission, and the control algorithms are integrated in a unified visual control platform by Visual C+ +, with easy control and management. By using hybrid force-displacement control method to load the human spine, we can test the organizational structure and the force state of the FSU (Functional spinal unit) well, which overcomes the shortcomings due to the separation of the force and displacement measurement, thus greatly improves the measurement accuracy. Also it is esay to identify the spinal degeneration and the load-bearing impact on the organizational structure of the FSU after various types of surgery.

  6. Professions and their Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John

    2005-01-01

    PROFESSIONS AND THEIR IDENTITIES: HOW TO EXPLORE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AMONG (SEMI-)PROFESSIONS This article explores conditions for discussing what it means to be professional among teachers, pre-school teachers, nurses and social workers. From an epistemological point of view it explores how...... analytical strategies can frame in sufficiently complex ways what it means to be a professional today. It is assumed that at least four main issues must be dealt with in order to conduct a satisfactory analysis of professions and their identities. Firstly, it is of fundamental strategic importance that one...

  7. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  8. National and Transnational Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    is that the opportunity and incentive structures clearly affect collective identities and the organising processes of the Turkish minority groups within in the three countries. The analysis shows that the immigrant organisations adapt to the structural limitations and claims and identities are negotiated within...... in terms of career paths. In Germany the integration activities are increasingly being pushed over to the immigrant organisations which now share the role of being service providers together with the welfare organisations, which also stipulates increased competition. The analysis also shows...

  9. Identity-based encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sanjit

    2011-01-01

    Identity Based Encryption (IBE) is a type of public key encryption and has been intensely researched in the past decade. Identity-Based Encryption summarizes the available research for IBE and the main ideas that would enable users to pursue further work in this area. This book will also cover a brief background on Elliptic Curves and Pairings, security against chosen Cipher text Attacks, standards and more. Advanced-level students in computer science and mathematics who specialize in cryptology, and the general community of researchers in the area of cryptology and data security will find Ide

  10. On the fundamentals of identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Various new perspectives on identity have been introduced or have increased in popularity over the past two decades. These include identity as dynamic system (Kunnen & Bosma, 2001), a narrative approach to identity (McAdams, 2001), multi-dimensional models of identity formation (Luyckx et al., 2006;

  11. On the fundamentals of identity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    Various new perspectives on identity have been introduced or have increased in popularity over the past two decades. These include identity as dynamic system (Kunnen & Bosma, 2001), a narrative approach to identity (McAdams, 2001), multi-dimensional models of identity formation (Luyckx et al., 2006;

  12. Switch from cytology-based to human papillomavirus test-based cervical screening: implications for colposcopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Carolina; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Rodríguez, Ana C; Morales, Jorge; Burk, Robert D; Alfaro, Mario; Hutchinson, Martha; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Sherman, Mark E; Wacholder, Sholom; Solomon, Diane; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-04-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more sensitive than cytology; some cervical cancer prevention programs will switch from cytology to carcinogenic HPV test-based screening. The objective of our study is to evaluate the clinical implications of a switch to HPV test-based screening on performance and workload of colposcopy. Women in the population-based, 7-year Guanacaste cohort study were screened at enrollment using cytology. We also took another specimen for HPV DNA testing and collected magnified cervical photographic images (cervigrams). A final case diagnosis (≥cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 3, CIN2, lesions at referral to colposcopy and the sensitivity versus specificity trade-off of the colposcopic impressions would be similar to programs using cytology (≥ atypical squamous cells of unknown significance [ASCUS]) for referral. The major concern with switching from cytology to more sensitive HPV screening is management of the many HPV-positive women, including those with still nonvisible ≥CIN2 lesions. Our data support the need for a nonvisual diagnostic method to guide management and treatment of HPV-positive women. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  13. Expression of a novel alternative transcript of the novel retinal pigment epithelial cell gene NORPEG in human testes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wa Yuan; Ying Zheng; Ran Huo; Li Lu; Xiao-Yan Huang; Lan-Lan Yin; Jian-Min Li; Zuo-Min Zhou; Jia-Hao Sha

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To identify a novel alternative transcript of the novel retinal pigment epithelial cell gene (NORPEG) expressed in the human testis. Methods: A human testis cDNA microarray was established and hybridized with cDNA probes from human fetal testes, adult testes and human spermatozoa. Differentially expressed clones were sequenced and analyzed. One of these clones was a short transcript of NORPEG which we proceeded to analyze by RT-PCR.Results: The novel short alternative transcript of NORPEG was isolated and named sNORPEG. It was 3486 bp in length and contained a 2952-bp open reading frame, encoding a 110.4-kDa protein of 983 amino acids. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the sNORPEG protein contains six ankyrin repeats and two coiled-coil domains. It shares a high homology with the NORPEG and ankycorbin proteins in both its sequence and motifs. Blasting the human genome database localized sNORPEG to human chromosome 5p13.2-13.3. Expression profiles showed that sNORPEG was expressed in human fetal testes, adult testes and spermatozoa. Moreover, sNORPEG was found to be ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Conclusion: sNORPEG is expressed in different developmental stages of the testis and encodes a protein that may have roles in human testis development and spermatogenesis.

  14. Personal identities and disordered eating behaviors in Mexican American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Karen Farchaus; Corte, Colleen; Ronis, David L

    2010-08-01

    Eating disorder behaviors are prevalent in Latina populations. This study tested Schwartz's (2006) theoretical view that a broad array of personal identities serves as an internal resource during acculturation and prevents internalization of dysfunctional weight related beliefs. Sixty-six Mexican American women completed measures of personal identities, fat self-definition, eating disorder symptoms and acculturation. Results show that few positive and many negative personal identities predict higher eating disorder scores and effects are mediated through the fat self-definition. Characteristics of personal identities may influence internalization of cultural values related to weight. Interventions focused on overall identity may prevent eating disorders in Latinas.

  15. High risk human papillomavirus genotyping in clinical samples: evaluation of different commercial tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, F; Rollo, F; Brandi, R; Benevolo, M; Mariani, L; Cercato, M C; Vocaturo, A; Venuti, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the performance of several commercial human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in a cohort of 281 women. The hybrid capture II, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer, the linear array, and DR.HPVTMIVD were utilized to detect and type HPV in parallel with in-house PCR tests followed by direct automated sequencing or by sub-cloning and sequencing. The concordance levels along with other tests were evaluated with a Cohen's K value varying between 0.60 to 0.88, indicating good correlation with nearly perfect agreement between hybrid capture II, (HCII) and the linear array test. High sensitivity was recorded by the linear array and HCII with 100% (95% CI, 0.8021 to 1.0000) detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) III by both methods. Conversely, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer showed high specificity with 12% (95% CI, 0.7966 to 0.9163) positivity on normal samples. The genotyping analysis showed that agreement among tests was only low to moderate with great differences between different HPV types. Multiple infections were detected with poor concordance and sub-cloning assays revealed the presence of a lower number of HPV in comparison to the other methods. In summary, the use of different HPV tests applied to the same group of cervical smears may possibly lead to incongruent results, suggesting the need to standardize type-specific sensitivity of genotyping methods and the need to evaluate their accuracy in detecting multiple HPV infections. This would be a prerequisite for the use of genotyping assays in cervical cancer screening programs.

  16. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Maldonado, Leith; Wentzell, Emily; Brown, Brandon; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Salmerón, Jorge; Billings, Deborah L; Thrasher, James F; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP). Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender. Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission. These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health education and

  17. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith León-Maldonado

    Full Text Available HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP. Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender.Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission.These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health

  18. Corporate Brand Identity in SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäläskä, Minna; Jones, Richard Ian

    studies. The research is important since it suggests an iterative and co-creative approach to brand identity. A typology of brand identity formation for SMEs is presented: entrepreneur driven, market driven, stakeholder driven. Practical implications: The three paths to creating a strong brand identity......Purpose: To study the emergence of corporate brand identity in SMEs and to develop a typology of brand identity drivers that reflects a co-creative approach to the emergence of brand identity. Design / Methodology / Approach : Existing approaches to brand identity are summarised. A narrative...... approach to understanding the emergence of brand identity is employed in case studies of 10 case companies reflecting both B-to-B and B-to-C companies. Findings: In all cases we see that brand identity is not a clear, enduring identity as suggested in the literature but is formed in a co-creative process...

  19. Human engineered heart tissue as a model system for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Alexandra; Vollert, Ingra; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Drug development is time- and cost-intensive and, despite extensive efforts, still hampered by the limited value of current preclinical test systems to predict side effects, including proarrhythmic and cardiotoxic effects in clinical practice. Part of the problem may be related to species-dependent differences in cardiomyocyte biology. Therefore, the event of readily available human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) has raised hopes that this human test bed could improve preclinical safety pharmacology as well as drug discovery approaches. However, hiPSC-CM are immature and exhibit peculiarities in terms of ion channel function, gene expression, structural organization and functional responses to drugs that limit their present usefulness. Current efforts are thus directed towards improving hiPSC-CM maturity and high-content readouts. Culturing hiPSC-CM as 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) improves CM maturity and anisotropy and, in a 24-well format using silicone racks, enables automated, multiplexed high content readout of contractile function. This review summarizes the principal technology and focuses on advantages and disadvantages of this technology and its potential for preclinical drug screening.

  20. Annual banned-substance review: the Prohibited List 2008-analytical approaches in human sports drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Kuuranne, Tiia; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-01-01

    The list of prohibited substances and methods of doping issued by the World Anti-Doping Agency is updated and modified annually based on most recent developments and scientific data. Compounds and methods are maintained, added, or removed from the list, or they are placed in so-called monitoring programmes that have been established to obtain reliable data on the prevalence of particular substances and methods in- and/or out-of-competition. Consequently, doping control laboratories continuously update, modify and optimize existing screening and confirmation assays to ensure utmost comprehensiveness in detecting the prohibited and monitored substances as well as chemically and pharmacologically related analogs. The annual banned-substance review for human sports drug testing critically summarizes recent innovations in analytical approaches supporting the detection of established and newly outlawed substances and methods of doping. Literature from January 2007 through September 2008 as indexed in Medline and Web of Science was screened and articles on detection methods for substances and methods of doping in humans were compiled according to the 2008 Prohibited List of the World Anti-Doping Agency. Few new approaches were presented for individual doping agents and the majority of reports demonstrated new options for increasing the comprehensiveness of existing doping control assays. In addition, new techniques in separation and/or ionization of analytes complementary to commonly used procedures were described, which, so far, did not meet all requirements of sports drug testing. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. ARTISTIC: a randomised trial of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in primary cervical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, H C; Almonte, M; Gilham, C; Dowie, R; Stoykova, B; Sargent, A; Roberts, C; Desai, M; Peto, J

    2009-11-01

    Primary cervical screening uses cytology to detect cancer precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stage 3 or beyond (CIN3+)]. Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing could add sensitivity as an adjunct to cytology or as a first test, reserving cytology for HPV-positive women. This study addresses the questions: Does the combination of cytology and HPV testing achieve a reduction in incident CIN3+?; Is HPV testing cost-effective in primary cervical screening?; Is its use associated with adverse psychosocial or psychosexual effects?; and How would it perform as an initial screening test followed by cytology for HPV positivity? ARTISTIC was a randomised trial of cervical cytology versus cervical cytology plus HPV testing, evaluated over two screening rounds, 3 years apart. Round 1 would detect prevalent disease and round 2 a combination of incident and undetected disease from round 1. Women undergoing routine cervical screening in the NHS programme in Greater Manchester. In total 24,510 women aged 20-64 years were enrolled between July 2001 and September 2003. HPV testing was performed on the liquid-based cytology (LBC) sample obtained at screening. Women were randomised in a ratio of 3:1 to have the HPV test result revealed and acted upon if persistently positive in cytology-negative cases or concealed. A detailed health economic evaluation and a psychosocial and psychosexual assessment were also performed. The primary outcome was CIN3+ in round 2. Secondary outcomes included an economic assessment and psychosocial effects. A large HPV genotyping study was also conducted. In round 1 there were 313 CIN3+ lesions, representing a prevalence in the revealed and concealed arms of 1.27% and 1.31% respectively (p = 0.81). Round 2 (30-48 months) involved 14,230 (58.1%) of the women screened in round 1 and only 31 CIN3+ were detected; the CIN3 rate was not significantly different between the revealed and concealed arms. A less restrictive definition of round 2 (26

  2. Optical coherence tomography applied to tests of skin care products in humans--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Pinto, L M C; Maldonado, E P; Raele, M P; Amaral, M M; de Freitas, A Z

    2015-02-01

    When evaluating skin care products for human skin, quantitative test methods need to be simple, precise and reliable. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), provides high-resolution sectional images of translucent materials to a depth of a few millimeters, a technique usually applied to medical measurements in ophthalmology and dermatology. This study aimed to demonstrate the application of OCT as the main technique for monitoring changes in skin topography during tests of a wrinkle-reduction product in humans. We used a commercial OCT apparatus to perform clinical examinations of skin roughness in treated and non-treated sites in the periorbital region of thirty human voluntaries who were using an anti-aging product commercially available: Natura Chronos® Flavonóides de Passiflora 45+ FPS15, from Natura Cosméticos, Brazil. Measurements were performed days 0, 7, 14 and 28 of treatment. Equipment and software allowed real-time recording of skin roughness parameters and wrinkle depths. The OCT measurements have allowed the monitoring of changes in skin roughness, which have shown reduction in treated sites around 10%. The obtained depth distributions also indicate reduction in the occurrence of wrinkles deeper than 170 μm. The verified results are consistent with those typically obtained after successful treatment with modern anti-aging products. By using the OCT technique, it was possible to quantify changes in skin roughness and in the distribution of depths of skin wrinkles, with adequate sensitivity. OCT imaging allows the direct visualization of the skin topography with resolution of micrometers, a reliable and interactive tool for clinical use. Therefore, for the first time, we demonstrated the use of OCT technique to verify the efficacy of cosmetic products in real time. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. IDENTITY THEFT COMMITTED THROUGH INTERNET

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cristian MOISE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, starting with the presentation of some aspects regarding management of identity in cyberspace, it is carried out the analysis of the offence of identity theft committed through Internet. The term “identity theft” describes the criminal acts through which the offender obtains and uses in a fraudulent manner the identity of other person. These criminal acts may be carried out through the use of information and communication technology, too. The cases of identity theft committed t...

  4. Identity-based consumer behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Americus; Forehand, Mark; Puntoni, Stefano; Warlop, Luk

    2012-01-01

    Although the influence of identity on consumer behavior has been documented in many streams of literature, the absence of a consistent definition of identity and of generally accepted principles regarding the drivers of identity-based behavior complicates comparisons across these literatures. To resolve that problem, we propose a simple but inclusive definition of identity. Identity can be defined as any category label with which a consumer self-associates that is amenable to a clear picture ...

  5. Fluidity, Identity, and Organizationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobusch, Leonhard; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    that the organizationality of a social collective is accomplished through “identity claims”—i.e., speech acts that concern what the social collective is or does—and negotiations on whether or not these claims have been made on the collective's behalf. We empirically examine the case of the hacker collective Anonymous...

  6. Gendered Avatar Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolums, Viola

    2011-01-01

    Gendered appearance in "World of Warcraft" is of particular interest because it seems to infiltrate interactions between individuals without serving a functional purpose within the game itself. It provides an opportunity to look at avatar choice in environments that have a primary purpose aside from existing as an arena for creating identity, and…

  7. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Few psychological disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual have generated as much controversy as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). For the past 35 years diagnoses of DID, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), have increased exponentially, causing various psychological researchers and clinicians to question the…

  8. The Visual Identity Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant-Gadd, Laurie; Sansone, Kristina Lamour

    2008-01-01

    Identity is the focus of the middle-school visual arts program at Cambridge Friends School (CFS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Sixth graders enter the middle school and design a personal logo as their first major project in the art studio. The logo becomes a way for students to introduce themselves to their teachers and to represent who they are…

  9. Bilingualism versus identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Jesper

    1988-01-01

    During the last hundred years psychologists, philosophers and theologians have developed two different conceptions of personal identity. One of them insists that each person is a unique and transcendental being, whereas the other finds the personality deriving from interaction with other persons........ (This is the prevailing view today.) These theories are placed in relation to the difficulties an immigrant encounters....

  10. Gender, Identity and CMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Simeon J.

    1997-01-01

    Some research and popularized accounts have claimed computer-mediated communication (CMC) based interactions are free of gender inequality though a growing body of research has documented gender differences in access and practice. This article examines both positions and cultural aspects of gender identities to make clear the centrality of gender…

  11. What about Linguistic Identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Micah

    2010-01-01

    The recent influx of Latino immigrants in the Mid-West U.S. has also increased the number of Mexican students in schools. As recent immigrants, one of the challenges Mexican students face besides learning a different language is the construction of new identities in unfamiliar environments. Learning a language involves acquiring another identity…

  12. Teaching European Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raento, Pauliina

    2008-01-01

    The political, cultural and social make-up of Europe is changing fast. A new European identity is under construction, but old contradictions and diversity challenge its contents, forms and boundaries. Migration, the changing role of the nation-state and Europe's regions, the reshaping of politico-administrative and perceptional boundaries, the…

  13. Spatial Identity in Gagauzia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Salavatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically the gagauz developed a self-perception based on their difference from Moldova as well as the ‘Turkish world’. The article argues that this fact has determined their pro-Russian political orientation as the only possible way of maintaining their identity

  14. Graduate Identity and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey William; Jolly, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of graduate identity as a way of deepening the understanding of graduate employability. It does this through presenting research in which over 100 employers in East Anglia were asked to record their perceptions of graduates in respect of their employability. The findings suggest a composite and complex graduate…

  15. Language and Social Identity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A person' s language and social identity are in fact an inseparable entity. When I was in Australia, as I can recall, my neighbour practised his speaking every morning, making it both pleasant and a privilege to hear, for the purpose of getting into parliament.

  16. Migration, Narration, Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leese, Peter

    three consecutive summers from 2010 to 2012. The articles focus on various aspects of the migrant experience and try to answer questions about migrant identity and its representations in literature and the media. The book closes with an original play by Carlos Morton, the Chicano playwright working...

  17. Discourses of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Theo

    2009-01-01

    This lecture discusses the concept of lifestyle, which emerged in the field of marketing in the 1970s, as a new, and increasingly pervasive, discourse of identity cutting through older "demographic" discourses. Distributed by mediated experts and role models, and realized through the semiotics of "composites of connotation", it redraws the…

  18. WORK AND LEARNER IDENTITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to suggest a theoretical framework than can assess to how people’s engagement in specific historical and social work practices are significant to their development, maintenance or transformation of a learner identity. Such a framework is crucial in order to grasp how...

  19. Story Telling: Crafting Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Career guidance clients are seeking to craft new identities that better position them in their careers. The focus of the present article is on narrative career counselling's potential contribution in providing a meaningful and useful experience for career guidance clients. To illustrate the potential of narrative career counselling, the story…

  20. Optimized lower leg injury probability curves from postmortem human subject tests under axial impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A; Szabo, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Derive optimum injury probability curves to describe human tolerance of the lower leg using parametric survival analysis. The study reexamined lower leg postmortem human subjects (PMHS) data from a large group of specimens. Briefly, axial loading experiments were conducted by impacting the plantar surface of the foot. Both injury and noninjury tests were included in the testing process. They were identified by pre- and posttest radiographic images and detailed dissection following the impact test. Fractures included injuries to the calcaneus and distal tibia-fibula complex (including pylon), representing severities at the Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) level 2+. For the statistical analysis, peak force was chosen as the main explanatory variable and the age was chosen as the covariable. Censoring statuses depended on experimental outcomes. Parameters from the parametric survival analysis were estimated using the maximum likelihood approach and the dfbetas statistic was used to identify overly influential samples. The best fit from the Weibull, log-normal, and log-logistic distributions was based on the Akaike information criterion. Plus and minus 95% confidence intervals were obtained for the optimum injury probability distribution. The relative sizes of the interval were determined at predetermined risk levels. Quality indices were described at each of the selected probability levels. The mean age, stature, and weight were 58.2±15.1 years, 1.74±0.08 m, and 74.9±13.8 kg, respectively. Excluding all overly influential tests resulted in the tightest confidence intervals. The Weibull distribution was the most optimum function compared to the other 2 distributions. A majority of quality indices were in the good category for this optimum distribution when results were extracted for 25-, 45- and 65-year-olds at 5, 25, and 50% risk levels age groups for lower leg fracture. For 25, 45, and 65 years, peak forces were 8.1, 6.5, and 5.1 kN at 5% risk; 9.6, 7.7, and 6.1 k