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Sample records for human hereditary disease

  1. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP).

  2. Human keratin diseases: hereditary fragility of specific epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, L D; McLean, W H

    1996-12-01

    Keratins are heteropolymeric proteins which form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Since 1991, mutations in several keratin genes have been found to cause a variety of human diseases affecting the epidermis and other epithelial structures. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first mechanobullous disease for which the underlying genetic lesion was found, with mutations in both the K5 and K14 genes rendering basal epidermal keratinocytes less resilient to trauma, resulting in skin fragility. The site of mutation in the keratin protein correlates with phenotypic severity in this disorder. Since mutations were identified in the basal cell keratins, the total number of keratin genes associated with diseases has risen to eleven. The rod domains of suprabasal keratins K1 and K10 are mutated in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE; also called epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, EH) and mosaicism for K1/K10 mutations results in a nevoid distribution of EH. An unusual mutation in the VI domain of K1 has also been found to cause diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (DNEPPK). Mutations in palmoplantar specific keratin K9 cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) and mutations in the late differentiation suprabasal keratin K2e cause ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). In the last year or so, mutations were discovered in differentiation specific keratins K6a and K16 causing pachyonychia congenita type 1 and K17 mutations occur in pachyonychia congenita type 2. K16 and K17 mutations have also been reported to produce phenotypes with little or no nail changes: K16 mutations can present as focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) and K17 mutations can result in a phenotype resembling steatocystoma multiplex. Recently, mutation of mucosal keratin pair K4 and K13 has been shown to underlie white sponge nevus (WSN). This year, the first mutations in a keratin-associated protein, plectin, were shown to

  3. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  4. Dog as a model in studies on human hereditary diseases and their gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switonski, Marek

    2014-03-01

    During the last 15 years spectacular progress has been achieved in knowledge on the dog genome organization and the molecular background of hereditary diseases in this species. A majority of canine genetic diseases have their counterparts in humans and thus dogs are considered as a very important large animal model in human biomedicine. Among canine monogenic diseases with known causative gene mutations there are two large groups classified as retinal dystrophies and lysosomal storage diseases. Specific types of these diseases are usually diagnosed in a single or several breeds. A well known disorder, restricted to a single breed, is congenital stationary night blindness described in Briards. This disease is a counterpart of Leber amaurosis in children. On the other hand, one of the most common monogenic human diseases (Duchenne muscular dystrophy), has its canine counterparts in several breeds (e.g., the Golden retriever, Beagle and German short-haired pointer). For some of the canine diseases gene therapy strategy was successfully applied, e.g., for congenital stationary night blindness, rod-cone dystrophy and muccopolysaccharydoses type I, IIIB and VII. Since phenotypic variability between the breeds is exceptionally high, the dog is an interesting model to study the molecular background of congenital malformations (e.g., dwarfism and osteoporosis imperfecta). Also disorders of sexual development (DSD), especially testicular or ovotesticular DSD (78,XX; SRY-negative), which is widely distributed across dozens of breeds, are of particular interest. Studies on the genetic background of canine cancers, a major health problem in this species, are also quite advanced. On the other hand, genetic studies on canine counterparts of major human complex diseases (e.g., obesity, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus) are still in their infancy.

  5. Hereditary skin diseases of hemidesmosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF

    1999-01-01

    Studies of hereditary blistering skin diseases (epidermolysis bullosa) and targeted gene mutation experiments in knockout mice have greatly improved our understanding of hemidesmosomes and their associated structures in the cytoskeleton and basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. At leas

  6. [Hereditary peroxisomal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo, Leonardo; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Touati, Guy; Levade, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisomes are small intracellular organelles that catalyse key metabolic reactions such as the beta-oxidation of some straight-chain or branched-chain fatty acids and the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. These enzyme reactions produce hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently neutralized by the peroxisomal catalase. Peroxisomes also metabolize glyoxylate to glycine, and catalyze the first steps of plasmalogen biosynthesis. There are more than a dozen inherited peroxisomal disorders in humans. These metabolic diseases are due to monogenic defects that affect either a single function (such as enzyme or a transporter) or more than two distinct functions because of the impairment of several aspects of peroxisome biogenesis. With the notable exception of X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy, these inborn disorders are transmitted as autosomal recessive traits. Their clinical presentation can be very heterogeneous, and include neonatal, infantile or adult forms. The present review describes the symptomatology of these genetic diseases, the underlying genetic and biochemical alterations, and summarizes their diagnostic approach. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary...... cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait......Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose...

  8. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...

  9. Hereditary chin tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary chin tremor (HCT) is characterized by rhythmical, involuntary movements of the chin muscles usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We describe a 74-year old man with familial, childhood-onset chin tremor, and a 3-year history of progressive hand tremor, gait difficulty, and other parkinsonian features. Since chin tremor often occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD), a coexistent HCT may not be recognized unless past and family history of tremor is carefully explored.

  10. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  11. [Hereditary haemochromatosis: novel genes, novel diseases and hepcidin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, J.P.; Kemna, E.H.J.M.; Janssen, M.C.; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Marx, J.J.M.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Since the discovery of the HFE gene of hereditary haemochromatosis in 1996 several new genetic defects have been identified, enabling explanation of the cause and variety of this disease. To date, at least 5 major types of hereditary haemochromatosis have been recognised. All these genes encode for

  12. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  13. 儿童遗传性肾脏疾病%Hereditary kidney diseases in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琰琴; 丁洁; 王芳; 张宏文

    2013-01-01

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  14. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    models that recapitulate the human disease . Therefore, we introduced mutations in the endogenous mouse T7 cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several...ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Our original proposal had three specific aims. Aim 1. Identify and biochemically characterize...pancreatitis in mutant mice which do not develop spontaneous disease (strains T7-D23del-Cre, T7-D23del-Neo, T7-K24R-Cre and T7- K24R-Neo), will be

  15. Enhance the diagnosis of hereditary renal diseases in pediatric field in China%加强我国儿科领域中对遗传性肾脏病的诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁洁

    2006-01-01

    @@ More and more hereditary diseases, including hereditary renal diseases in particular, have been diagnosed with the achievement of the Human Genome Project in the last decade and the development of biotechnology. The increased diagnosis of hereditary diseases as well as hereditary renal diseases appeared not only in case numbers but also in disease categories. Some hereditary renal diseases that are considered to be rare previously now become relatively common, because there have been much more approaches for diagnosis, such as renal pathology, biochemistry, imaging, and genetic diagnoses.

  16. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  17. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are common monogenically inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system. In the most common variant, i.e., the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, both motor and sensory nerves are affected. In contrast, sensory abnormalities predominate or are exclusively present in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN). HSAN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to mode of inheritance, age of onset and clinical evolution. In recent years, 6 disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive HSAN. However, vesicular transport and axonal trafficking seem important common pathways leading to degeneration of sensory and autonomic neurons. This review discusses the HSAN-related genes and their biological role in the disease mechanisms leading to HSAN.

  18. [Organization of therapeutic aid to patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, V A; Temin, P A; Arkhipov, B A; Zavadenko, N N

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes experience gained for many years by the All-Union Research Methodological Center for Study of Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases. The specialists of the Center render counselling and therapeutic assistance to patients afflicted with neuromuscular diseases. The counselling and diagnostic services are characterized by the fact that it is based on the activity of a large hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases. The problems which are being solved by the out- and inpatient services of the Center are considered in detail. The advantages of the setting up of the common in- and outpatient complex on the basis of the hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases are described.

  19. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia K Muranova

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1, which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1.

  20. One novel transcript of human hereditary multipleexostoses 2 (EXT2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The encoding sequence of human hereditary multiple exostoses gene EXT2.1 is 30 bp longer than EXT2, and they differ in a sequence of 90 base pairs. In order to clarify EXT2.1 structure, this 90 bp sequence was analyzed with the Human Sequence Draft, a database provided by Celera Genomics. The result shows that EXT2.1 is a novel transcript of EXT2 gene, suggesting a rare event of alternative splicing.

  1. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  2. Molecular and genetic characteristics of hereditary autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Mehmet; Ozdogan, Huri

    2005-02-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are defined as recurrent "unprovoked" inflammatory events which do not produce high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells. There are currently eight hereditary forms of these diseases: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous articular (CINCA) syndrome or neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) and Blau syndrome. Apart from FMF (which has a prevalence of about 0.1 percent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Turks and Arabs), they are very rare disorders. FMF and HIDS are autosomal recessive diseases, all the other members of the family are autosomal and dominantly transmitted. Their common clinical features are recurrent and usually short attacks of synovitis and various skin eruptions; abdominal pain and fever are also frequently observed. The genes of all of these diseases have been discovered and, with the exception of HIDS, it was found that the proteins they encode share certain domains taking part in innate immunity and apoptosis. Thus it was evident that hereditary autoinflammatory diseases may help us understand better a number of important and prevalent pathologic events. We have reviewed the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on the molecular aspects of these disorders.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  4. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel.

  5. Moyamoya disease in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, A.; Woldenberg, R.; Miller, D.; Kalina, P.; Black, K.; Lane, E. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, New York University School of Medicine, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebral vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and proximal portions of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Patients develop an extensive collateral network of parenchymal, transdural and leptomeningeal vessels to supply the compromised brain. These collateral channels, also known as ``moyamoya vessels,`` may be seen in a number of disorders which lead to intracranial vascular occlusion. We report a case of MMD in a child with hereditary spherocytosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  6. Hereditary spherocytosis

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    Weed, R.I.

    1975-10-01

    Studies of the clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis since 1871 and laboratory investigation of the cellular abnormalities since 1940 have led to the characterization of hereditary spherocytosis as a prime example of a Mendelian dominant, genetically determined disorder of the erythrocyte membrane. This review of hereditary spherocytosis emphasizes the contributions of Dr. Lawrence Young and many others to our present understanding of the disease and discusses current studies of the protein abnormality in the membrane of hereditary spherocytes.

  7. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  8. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...... risk of IHD or MI in prospective studies, overall or stratified by gender. We had 90% power to detect a hazard ratio for IHD of 3.4 for C282Y/C282Y, 1.9 for C282Y/H63D, and 1.3 for C282Y/wild-type versus wild-type/wild-type. Furthermore, these genotypes were not associated with increased risk of IHD...... or MI in case-control studies, overall or stratified by gender. We had 90% power to detect an odds ratio for IHD of 3.6 for C282Y/C282Y, 1.8 for C282Y/H63D, and 1.3 for C282Y/wild-type versus wild-type/wild-type. CONCLUSIONS: In these studies, hereditary hemochromatosis C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, and C282...

  9. Catalytic deficiency of human aldolase B in hereditary fructose intolerance caused by a common missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, N C; Tolan, D R; Cox, T M

    1988-06-17

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a human autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of aldolase B that results in an inability to metabolize fructose and related sugars. We report here the first identification of a molecular lesion in the aldolase B gene of an affected individual whose defective protein has previously been characterized. The mutation is a G----C transversion in exon 5 that creates a new recognition site for the restriction enzyme Ahall and results in an amino acid substitution (Ala----Pro) at position 149 of the protein within a region critical for substrate binding. Utilizing this novel restriction site and the polymerase chain reaction, the patient was shown to be homozygous for the mutation. Three other HFI patients from pedigrees unrelated to this individual were found to have the same mutation: two were homozygous and one was heterozygous. We suggest that this genetic lesion is a prevailing cause of hereditary fructose intolerance.

  10. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  11. Lack of Benefit of Early Intervention with Dietary Flax and Fish Oil and Soy Protein in Orthologous Rodent Models of Human Hereditary Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamio Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Rationale for dietary advice in polycystic kidney disease (PKD is based in part on animal studies that have examined non-orthologous models with progressive development of cystic disease. Since no model completely mimics human PKD, the purpose of the current studies was to examine the effects of dietary soy protein (compared to casein or oils enriched in omega-3 fatty acids (fish or flax oil compared to soy oil on early disease progression in two orthologous models of PKD. The models studied were Pkd2WS25/- mice as a model of autosomal dominant PKD, and PCK rats as a model of autosomal recessive PKD. After 13 weeks of feeding, dietary fish (but not flax oil resulted in larger kidneys and greater kidney water content in female Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. After 12 weeks of feeding male PCK compared to control rats, both fish and flax compared to soy oil resulted in enlarged kidneys and livers, greater kidney water content and higher kidney cyst area in diseased rats. Dietary soy protein compared to casein had no effects in Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. In PCK rats, kidney and liver histology were not improved, but lower proteinuria and higher urine pH suggest that soy protein could be beneficial in the long term. Therefore, in contrast to studies in non-orthologous models during the progressive development phase, these studies in orthologous PKD models do not support dietary advice to increase soy protein or oils enriched in omega-3 oils in early PKD.

  12. Cloning and characterization of CLCN5, the human kidney chloride channel gene implicated in Dent disease (an X-linked hereditary nephrolithiasis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S.E.; Van Bakel, I.; Craig, I.W. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    Dent disease, an X-linked familial renal tubular disorder, is a form of Fanconi syndrome associated with proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, and eventual renal failure. We have previously used positional cloning to identify the 3{prime} part of a novel kidney-specific gene (initially termed hClC-K2, but now referred to as CLCN5), which is deleted in patients from one pedigree segregating Dent disease. Mutations that disrupt this gene have been identified in other patients with this disorder. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the human CLCN5 gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 746 amino acids, with significant homology to all known members of the ClC family of voltage-gated chloride channels. CLCN5 belongs to a distinct branch of this family, which also includes the recently identified genes CLCN3 and CLCN4. We have shown that the coding region of CLCN5 is organized into 12 exons, spanning 25-30 kb of genomic DNA, and have determined the sequence of each exon-intron boundary. The elucidation of the coding sequence and exon-intron organization of CLCN5 will both expedite the evaluation of structure/function relationships of these ion channels and facilitate the screening of other patients with renal tubular dysfunction for mutations at this locus. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Mechanisms of disease in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; Timmerman, Vincent; Janssens, Katrien

    2012-01-24

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of the PNS. Progressive degeneration, predominantly of sensory and autonomic neurons, is the main pathological feature in patients with HSAN, and causes prominent sensory loss and ulcerative mutilations in combination with variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Advances in molecular genetics have enabled identification of disease-causing mutations in 12 genes, and studies on the functional effects of these mutations are underway. Although some of the affected proteins--such as nerve growth factor and its receptor--have obvious nerve-specific roles, others are ubiquitously expressed proteins that are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, transcription regulation and structural integrity. An important challenge in the future will be to understand the common molecular pathways that result in HSANs. Unraveling the mechanisms that underlie sensory and autonomic neurodegeneration could assist in identifying targets for future therapeutic strategies in patients with HSAN. This Review highlights key advances in the understanding of HSANs, including insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease, derived from genetic studies of patients with these disorders.

  14. HEREDITARY DISEASES AND SYNDROMES ACCOMPANIED BY FEBRILE CONVULSIONS: CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERISTICS AND DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. L. Dadali; A. A. Sharkov; I. V. Sharkova; I. V. Kanivets; F. A. Konovalov; I. A. Akimova

    2016-01-01

    The authors provide a review of the clinical and genetic characteristics of hereditary diseases and syndromes accompanied by febrile convulsions, which is illustrated by examples of their own observations...

  15. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years.

  16. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus (HPV B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  17. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Samin; Arabi, Nahid; Yazdi, Mohammad Kaji; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Zohrehbandian, Farahnaz

    2015-09-01

    Human parvovirus (HPV) B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  18. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans DGR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available D Gareth R Evans,1 Sarah Louise Ingham21Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2Centre for Health Informatics, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel–Lindau syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, and familial adenomatous polyposis; and conditions which are usually not possible to diagnose clinically in a single individual, such as Lynch syndrome and BRCA1/2. Understanding of the mortality in hereditary cancer predisposing diseases is important for developing effective disease treatment programs. A number of studies have been undertaken to investigate the genetic predictors, prevalence and incidence, and treatment outcomes of these diseases; however, the majority examine only the most common of these diseases (eg, neurofibromatosis or BRCA, or look into postoperative survival. The mortality of individuals who are diagnosed with one of these hereditary diseases remains an area for investigation. This review is the first to attempt identification of studies investigating life expectancy in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors.Keywords: mortality, survival, life expectancy, early-onset, tumors

  19. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  20. Hereditary hearing loss: from human mutation to mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Danielle R; Avraham, Karen B

    2011-11-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hearing loss is thus far represented by hundreds of genes encoding a large variety of proteins. Mutations in these genes have been discovered for patients with different modes of inheritance and types of hearing loss, ranging from syndromic to non-syndromic and mild to profound. In many cases, the mechanisms whereby the mutations lead to hearing loss have been partly elucidated using cell culture systems and mouse and other animal models. The discovery of the genes has completely changed the practice of genetic counseling in this area, providing potential diagnosis in many cases that can be coupled with clinical phenotypes and offer predictive information for families. In this review we provide three examples of gene discovery in families with hereditary hearing loss, all associated with elucidation of some of the mechanisms leading to hair cell degeneration and pathology of deafness.

  1. Validation of the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) for hereditary recurrent fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piram, M.; Kone-Paut, I.; Lachmann, H.J.; Frenkel, J.; Ozen, S.; Kuemmerle-Deschner, J.; Stojanov, S.; Simon, A.; Finetti, M.; Sormani, M.P.; Martini, A.; Gattorno, M.; Ruperto, N.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To validate the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) in the four major hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRFs): familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and cryopyrin-asso

  2. Distinctions in sensitivity and repair of cells of children with some hereditary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.D.; Barashnev, Yu.I.; Vasil' eva, I.M.; Sdirkova, N.I.; Semyachkina, A.N. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej Genetiki)

    A study was made of blood cell sensitivity of children with some hereditary diseases, to ..gamma..-radiation and 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide. Using the host cell reactivation and chromatographic methods we revealed the increase in the sensitivity to the above mentioned agents and inhibition of the repair function in cells of patients with the following diseases: Marfan's disease, histidinemia, osteogenesis imperfecta, Sylvere-Russelle, Laurence, Franchescetti, and Losch-Nychane syndromes.

  3. Mouse model of SCN5A-linked hereditary Lenegre's disease - Age-related conduction slowing and myocardial fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royer, A; van Veen, TAB; Le Bouter, S; Marionneau, C; Griol-Charhbili, [No Value; Leoni, AL; Steenman, M; van Rijen, HVM; Demolombe, S; Goddard, CA; Richer, C; Escoubet, B; Jarry-Guichard, T; Colledge, WH; Gros, D; de Bakker, JMT; Grace, AA; Escande, D; Charpentier, F

    2005-01-01

    Background-We have previously linked hereditary progressive cardiac conduction defect (hereditary Lenegre's disease) to a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the main cardiac Na+ channel, SCN5A. In the present study, we investigated heterozygous Scn5a-knockout mice (Scn5a(+/-) mice) as a

  4. Hereditary spherocytosis associated with deletion of human erythrocyte ankyrin gene on chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, S E; Tse, W T; Menninger, J C; John, K M; Harris, P; Shalev, O; Chilcote, R R; Marchesi, S L; Watkins, P C; Bennett, V

    1990-06-21

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common hereditary haemolytic anaemias. HS red cells from both autosound dominant and recessive variants are spectrin-deficient, which correlates with the severity of the disease. Some patients with recessive HS have a mutation in the spectrin alpha-2 domain (S.L.M. et al., unpublished observations), and a few dominant HS patients have an unstable beta-spectrin that is easily oxidized, which damages the protein 4.1 binding site and weakens spectrin-actin interactions. In most patients, however, the cause of spectrin deficiency is unknown. The alpha- and beta-spectrin loci are on chromosomes 1 and 14 respectively. The only other genetic locus for HS is SPH2, on the short arm of chromosome 8 (8p11). This does not correspond to any of the known loci of genes for red cell membrane proteins including protein 4.1 (1p36.2-p34), the anion exchange protein (AE1, band 3; 17q21-qter), glycophorin C (2q14-q21), and beta-actin (7pter-q22). Human erythrocyte ankyrin, which links beta-spectrin to the anion exchange protein, has recently been cloned. We now show that the ankyrin gene maps to chromosome 8p11.2, and that one copy is missing from DNA of two unrelated children with severe HS and heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8 (del(8)(p11-p21.1)). Affected red cells are also ankyrin-deficient. The data suggest that defects or deficiency or ankyrin are responsible for HS at the SPH2 locus.

  5. Aldolase-B knockout in mice phenocopies hereditary fructose intolerance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Sarah A; Sennott, Erin M; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-03-01

    The rise in fructose consumption, and its correlation with symptoms of metabolic syndrome (MBS), has highlighted the need for a better understanding of fructose metabolism. To that end, valid rodent models reflecting the same metabolism as in humans, both biochemically and physiologically, are critical. A key to understanding any type of metabolism comes from study of disease states that affect such metabolism. A serious defect of fructose metabolism is the autosomal recessive condition called hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), caused by mutations in the human aldolase B gene (Aldob). Those afflicted with HFI experience liver and kidney dysfunction after fructose consumption, which can lead to death, particularly during infancy. With very low levels of fructose exposure, HFI patients develop non-alcoholic fatty acid liver disease and fibrosis, sharing liver pathologies also seen in MBS. A major step toward establishing that fructose metabolism in mice mimics that of humans is reported by investigating the consequences of targeting the mouse aldolase-B gene (Aldo2) for deletion in mice (Aldo2(-/-)). The Aldo2(-/-) homozygous mice show similar pathology following exposure to fructose as humans with HFI such as failure to thrive, liver dysfunction, and potential morbidity. Establishing that this mouse reflects the symptoms of HFI in humans is critical for comparison of rodent studies to the human condition, where this food source is increasing, and increasingly controversial. This animal should provide a valuable resource for answering remaining questions about fructose metabolism in HFI, as well as help investigate the biochemical mechanisms leading to liver pathologies seen in MBS from high fructose diets.

  6. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  7. Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Karim, Omar; Dizdarevic, Adis; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an inherited disease that causes periodic swelling attacks, which can be life threatening and have a major effect on a patient's life. Studies have shown that home therapy for angioedema reduces disease severity, leads to faster relief of symptoms, and improves quality...

  8. Stage-specific action of matrix metalloproteinases influences progressive hereditary kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zeisberg

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Glomerular basement membrane (GBM, a key component of the blood-filtration apparatus in the in the kidney, is formed through assembly of type IV collagen with laminins, nidogen, and sulfated proteoglycans. Mutations or deletions involving alpha3(IV, alpha4(IV, or alpha5(IV chains of type IV collagen in the GBM have been identified as the cause for Alport syndrome in humans, a progressive hereditary kidney disease associated with deafness. The pathological mechanisms by which such mutations lead to eventual kidney failure are not completely understood.We showed that increased susceptibility of defective human Alport GBM to proteolytic degradation is mediated by three different matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs--MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9--which influence the progression of renal dysfunction in alpha3(IV-/- mice, a model for human Alport syndrome. Genetic ablation of either MMP-2 or MMP-9, or both MMP-2 and MMP-9, led to compensatory up-regulation of other MMPs in the kidney glomerulus. Pharmacological ablation of enzymatic activity associated with multiple GBM-degrading MMPs, before the onset of proteinuria or GBM structural defects in the alpha3(IV-/- mice, led to significant attenuation in disease progression associated with delayed proteinuria and marked extension in survival. In contrast, inhibition of MMPs after induction of proteinuria led to acceleration of disease associated with extensive interstitial fibrosis and early death of alpha3(IV-/- mice.These results suggest that preserving GBM/extracellular matrix integrity before the onset of proteinuria leads to significant disease protection, but if this window of opportunity is lost, MMP-inhibition at the later stages of Alport disease leads to accelerated glomerular and interstitial fibrosis. Our findings identify a crucial dual role for MMPs in the progression of Alport disease in alpha3(IV-/- mice, with an early pathogenic function and a later protective action. Hence, we propose possible

  9. Subcutaneous administration of human C1 inhibitor with recombinant human hyaluronidase in patients with hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Marc A; Lumry, William R; Li, H Henry; Banerji, Aleena; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Ba, Murat; Bjrkander, Janne; Magerl, Markus; Maurer, Marcus; Rockich, Kevin; Chen, Hongzi; Schranz, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    The currently approved method of C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) administration for patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 INH deficiency (HAE) is by intravenous injection. A C1 INH subcutaneous formulation may provide an attractive mode of administration for some patients. To evaluate efficacy and safety of two doses of subcutaneous, plasma-derived C1 INH with the dispersing agent, recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) to prevent angioedema attacks in patients with HAE. A randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging, crossover study, patients 12 years of age (n = 47) with a confirmed diagnosis of HAE were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous injections of 1000 U C1 INH with 24,000 U rHuPH20 or 2000 U C1 INH with 48,000 U rHuPH20 every 3 or 4 days for 8 weeks and then crossed-over for another 8-week period. The primary efficacy end point was the number of angioedema attacks during each treatment period. The study was terminated early as a precaution related to non-neutralizing antibodies to rHuPH20 in 45% of patients. The mean standard deviation number of angioedema attacks during the 8-week treatment periods were 1.58 1.59 with 1000 U C1 INH and 0.97 1.26 with 2000 U. The mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) within-patient difference (2000 U-1000 U, respectively) was 0.61 (95% CI, 1.23 to 0.01) attacks per month (p = 0.0523), and 0.56 (95% CI, 1.06 to 0.05) attacks that required acute treatment, (p = 0.0315). No deaths or other serious adverse events were reported. Injection-site reaction was the most common adverse event. Despite early termination, this study demonstrated a clinically and statistically significant difference in burden of disease, which favored 2000 U C1 INH, without associated serious adverse events.

  10. [The role of the immune system in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäurer, M; Toyka, K V; Martini, R

    2005-06-01

    Hereditary neuropathies, e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system causing chronic progressive motor and sensory dysfunction. Most neuropathies are due to mutations in myelin genes such as PMP22, P0, and the gap junction protein Cx32. Myelin mutant mice are regarded as suitable animal models for several forms of hereditary neuropathies and are important neurobiological tools for the evaluation of pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts in hereditary neuropathies. Using these animal models we could recently show that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies. Due to the phenotypic similarities we also consider the immune system important for human inherited neuropathies, in particular since several case reports demonstrate a beneficial effect of immune therapies in patients with hereditary neuropathies. In this review we compare findings from animal models and human disease to elucidate the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies.

  11. Spontaneous hepatic copper accumulation in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with hereditary hepatitis. A model of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Togashi, Y; Sato, S; Emoto, T; Kang, J H; Takeichi, N; Kobayashi, H; Kojima, Y; Une, Y; Uchino, J

    1991-05-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an inbred strain of a mutant rat isolated from Long-Evans rats, develop hereditary hepatitis. To elucidate the role of copper metabolism in the development of the hepatitis in LEC rats, we examined the copper concentration in the tissues and serum levels of copper and ceruloplasmin. Copper concentration in the liver of LEC rats was over 40 times that of normal Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats, while the serum ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in LEC rats decreased significantly. The hepatocytes of LEC rats show steatosis in cytoplasm and pleomorphism of mitochondria, resembling the histologic features of the liver in Wilson's disease. These findings suggest that the hereditary hepatitis in LEC rats is closely associated with copper toxicity, and may be dealing with a rat form of Wilson's disease. Thus the LEC rats will provide a unique and useful animal model for clarifying the mechanism and for developing treatment strategies for Wilson's disease and other abnormal copper metabolism in humans.

  12. Molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance: mutations and polymorphisms in the human aldolase B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, D R

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human aldolase B gene that result in hereditary fructose intolerance have been characterized extensively. Although the majority of subjects have been from northern Europe, subjects from other geographical regions and ethnic groups have been identified. At present 21 mutations have been reported; 15 of these are single base substitutions, resulting in nine amino acid replacements, four nonsense codons, and two putative splicing defects. Two large deletions, two four-base deletions, a single-base deletion, and a seven-base deletion/one-base insertion have been found. This last mutation leads to a defect in splicing and it is likely that one of the small deletions does as well. Regions of the enzyme where mutations have been observed recurrently are encoded by exons 5 and 9. Indeed, the three most common mutations are found in these exons. Two of these prevalent HFI mutations arose from a common ancestor and spread throughout the population by genetic drift. This finding was based on linkage to two sequence polymorphisms, which are among very few informative polymorphic markers that have been identified within the aldolase B gene. Because of the prevalence of a few HFI alleles, and the recent advances in molecular methods for identifying and screening for mutation, the diagnosis of HFI by molecular screening methods should become routine. These molecular diagnostic methods will be extremely beneficial for this often difficult to diagnose and sometimes fatal disease.

  13. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement.

  14. Hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, A; Avvisati, R A; Piscopo, C

    2010-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a common hemolytic disorder characterized by a defect or deficiency in one or more of the proteins composing red blood cell membrane. As a result, red blood cells have an abnormal shape, higher metabolic requirements, and are prematurely trapped and destroyed in the spleen. Hereditary spherocytosis, including the very mild or subclinical forms, is the most common cause of non-immune hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European ancestry, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 2000. However very mild forms of the disease may be much more common. Hereditary spherocytosis is inherited in a dominant fashion in 75% of cases, whereas the remaining are truly recessive cases and de novo mutations. This review reports current concepts on red cell membrane structure and it will attempt to clarify molecular defects leading to spherocyte and their consequences.

  15. Abnormal polyamine metabolism in hereditary muscular dystrophies: effect of human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, D; Kutner, M H; Chawla, R K; Goldsmith, M A

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies showed hyperre-sponsiveness to human growth hormone (hGH) in men with myotonic or limb girdle dystrophies (MMD or LGD). Because polyamines may mediate some actions of hGH, we have now investigated polyamine metabolism in these and other dystrophies. Under metabolic balance study conditions, serum and urine levels of putrescine (Pu), spermidine (Sd), spermine (Sm), and cadaverine (Cd) were measured in six normal men (36-44 yr), four men with MMD (38-44 yr), and three men with LGD (30-36 yr), before and during treatment with 0.532 U/kg body wt ((3/4)/d) of hGH. Daily balances of N, P, and K were also monitored. In the normal subjects, hGH did not influence elemental balances or serum and urine polyamines. In MMD, hGH caused significant retention of N, P, and K (P muscular dystrophy, age 8-13, did not differ from those in five age-matched normal boys. Skeletal muscle polyamines were measured in five men (31-40 yr) without muscle disease and in three men with LGD (30-38 yr). Average concentrations of Pu, Sd, Sm, and Cd were 46, 306, 548, and 61 nmol/g wet wt in LGD and 1, 121, 245, and 14 in the normal subjects, respectively (P muscular dystrophy and in age- and sex-matched normal controls. Pu, Sd, Sm, and Cd levels were two to three times higher than normal in muscle, but did not differ in liver, kidney, and brain. Similar findings were made in male hamsters with hereditary dystrophy and in their controls. The abnormality in hamster muscle polyamines appeared between 1 and 6 wk of age and persisted or intensified until 30 wk. These data reveal abnormalities of polyamine metabolism in men with MMD, in men with LGD, and in mice or hamsters with hereditary muscular dystrophy. The polyamine disorder could be related to dystrophic patients' hyperresponsiveness to hGH.

  16. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  17. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Related Hereditary Neuropathies: From Gene Function to Associated Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareyson, D; Saveri, P; Piscosquito, G

    2014-10-10

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies are a genetically highly heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. CMT affects both the sensory and motor nerves, distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies (dHMN) are phenotypically similar disorders involving only motor nerves, while Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSAN) are rare distinct disorders affecting sensory and sometimes autonomic nerves. Almost 70 genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. It is astonishing to learn how diverse are the cellular sublocalisation and the functional roles of the encoded proteins of CMT-associated genes which all lead to similar disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Myelin formation and maintenance, mitochondrial dynamics, cytoskeleton organization, axonal transport, and vesicular trafficking are the most frequently involved pathways. However, dysfunction of several activities from the nucleus to the neuromuscular junction forms the basis for these hereditary neuropathies, making it challenging predicting the functions of newly identified mutated genes. In this review we will discuss the function and related phenotypes of all the genes thus far associated with CMT, dHMN, and HSAN.

  18. Advantages of a miniature pig model in research on human hereditary hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Guo; Shi-ming Yang

    2015-01-01

    In medical laboratory animals, the pig is the closest species to human in evolution, except for primates. As an animal model, the pig is highly concerned by many scientists, including comparative biology, developmental biology, medical genetics. Rodents as animal model for human hearing defects has are poor producibility and reliability, due to differences in anatomical structure, evolutionary rate and metabolic rate, but these happens to be the advantages of the pig model. In this paper, we will summarize the application of miniature pig in the study of human hereditary deafness.

  19. Spleen histology in children with sickle cell disease and hereditary spherocytosis: hints on the disease pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Marco; Fuligni, Fabio; Santoro, Luisa; Sabattini, Elena; Ichino, Martina; De Vito, Rita; Zucchetta, Pietro; Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Alaggio, Rita

    2017-02-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and sickle cell disease (SCD) are associated with splenomegaly and spleen dysfunction in pediatric patients. Scant data exist on possible correlations between spleen morphology and function in HS and SCD. This study aimed to assess the histologic and morphometric features of HS and SCD spleens, to get possible correlations with disease pathophysiology. In a large series of spleens from SCD, HS, and control patients, the following parameters were considered: (i) macroscopic features, (ii) lymphoid follicle (LF) density, (iii) presence of perifollicular marginal zones, (iv) presence of Gamna-Gandy bodies, (v) density of CD8-positive sinusoids, (vi) density of CD34-positive microvessels, (vii) presence/distribution of fibrosis and smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive myoid cells, and (viii) density of CD68-positive macrophages. SCD and HS spleens had similar macroscopic features. SCD spleens had lower LF density and fewer marginal zones than did HS spleens and controls. SCD also showed lower CD8-positive sinusoid density, increased CD34-positive microvessel density and SMA-positive myoid cells, and higher prevalence of fibrosis and Gamna-Gandy bodies. HS had lower LF and CD8-positive sinusoid density than did controls. No significant differences were noted in red pulp macrophages. By multivariate analysis, most HS spleens clustered with controls, whereas SCD grouped separately. A multiparametric score could predict the degree of spleen changes irrespective of the underlying disease. In conclusion, SCD spleens display greater histologic effacement than HS, and SCD-related changes suggest impaired function due to vascular damage. These observations may contribute to guide the clinical management of patients.

  20. Bovine cystic ovarian disease: hereditary relationships and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J H; Huffman, E M; Lane, M

    1982-09-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) was studied in a closed 300-cow dairy herd, using Dairy Herd Improvement Association and individual health records for a 7-year period (1974-1980). There were 2,112 calvings by 649 cows during the period. Cysts were found in 130 cows. Of the 649 cows that calved, 110 (16.9%) produced at least 1 daughter in which COD developed. Two bulls sired 17.6% of the daughters with COD, which was more than anticipated inasmuch as they sired only 11.6% of all daughters (P less than 0.05). These bulls were removed from the breeding program in an attempt to reduce code in the herd.

  1. A humanized mouse model of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets without alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Min; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-11-01

    The syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a genetic disease of altered mineral homeostasis due to mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. It is frequently, but not always, accompanied by the presence of alopecia. Mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome have been prepared through genetic deletion of the Vdr gene and are characterized by the presence of rickets and alopecia. Subsequent studies have revealed that VDR expression in hair follicle keratinocytes protects against alopecia and that this activity is independent of the protein's ability to bind 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3]. In the present study, we introduced into VDR-null mice a human VDR (hVDR) bacterial artificial chromosome minigene containing a mutation that converts leucine to serine at amino acid 233 in the hVDR protein, which prevents 1,25(OH)2D3 binding. We then assessed whether this transgene recreated features of the HVDRR syndrome without alopecia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in one strain showed an appropriate level of mutant hVDR expression in all tissues examined including skin. The hVDR-L233S mutant failed to rescue the aberrant systemic and skeletal phenotype characteristic of the VDR null mouse due to the inability of the mutant receptor to activate transcription after treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Importantly, however, neither alopecia nor the dermal cysts characteristic of VDR-null mice were observed in the skin of these hVDR-L233S mutant mice. This study confirms that we have created a humanized mouse model of HVDRR without alopecia that will be useful in defining additional features of this syndrome and in identifying potential novel functions of the unoccupied VDR.

  2. A network medicine approach to quantify distance between hereditary disease modules on the interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniza, Horacio; Romero, Alfonso E.; Paccanaro, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a MeSH-based method that accurately quantifies similarity between heritable diseases at molecular level. This method effectively brings together the existing information about diseases that is scattered across the vast corpus of biomedical literature. We prove that sets of MeSH terms provide a highly descriptive representation of heritable disease and that the structure of MeSH provides a natural way of combining individual MeSH vocabularies. We show that our measure can be used effectively in the prediction of candidate disease genes. We developed a web application to query more than 28.5 million relationships between 7,574 hereditary diseases (96% of OMIM) based on our similarity measure.

  3. Recent advance in the molecular genetics of Wilson disease and hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Tingxia; Li, Xiaojin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xinyan; Ou, Xiaojuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic liver diseases such as Wilson disease (WD) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) possess complicated pathogenesis and typical hereditary characteristics with the hallmarks of a deficiency in metal metabolism. Mutations in genes encoding ATPase, Cu + transporting, beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and hemochromatosis (HFE) or several non-HFE genes are considered to be causative for WD and HH, respectively. Although the identification of novel mutations in ATP7B for WD and HFE or the non-HFE genes for HH has increased, especially with the application of whole genome sequencing technology in recent years, the biological function of the identified mutations, as well as genotype-phenotype correlations remain to be explored. Further analysis of the causative gene mutation would be critical to clarify the mechanisms underlying specific disease phenotypes. In this review, we therefore summarize the recent advances in the molecular genetics of WD and HH including the updated mutation spectrums and the correlation between genotype and phenotype, with an emphasis on biological functional studies of the individual mutations identified in WD and HH. The weakness of the current functional studies and analysis for the clinical association of the individual mutation was also discussed. These works are essential for the understanding of the association between genotypes and phenotypes of these inherited metabolic liver diseases.

  4. [Diagnosis of hereditary angioedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillet, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease, potentially life-threatening. It requires a specific treatment. Angioedema without wheals associated with abdominal attacks are very specific of this disease. Antigenemy and functional C1Inhibitor assays are necessary for the diagnosis. The hereditary angioedema with normal C1Inh (type III) is a diagnostic challenge. Bradykinin, secondary to kallikrein-kinin system activation is the key mediator of hereditary angioedema. Female are more symptomatic. Attacks can be induced by menstruations, pregnancies or contraceptive pills.

  5. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A systematic review of hereditary spherocytosis reported in Chinese biomedical journals from 1978 to 2013 and estimation of the prevalence of the disease using a disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cui, Yazhou; Li, Yan; Liu, Xiao; Han, Jinxiang

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological information of hereditary spherocytosis in China is slight. This systematic review summarizes the number of cases of hereditary spherocytosis reported in China Biology Medicine disc from 1978 to 2013. In total, 2,043 cases were reported in the past 36 years. We describe its distribution from time and space. We also estimate the literature reported prevalence of hereditary spherocytosis by DisMod-II software, overall prevalence in China was estimated to be: 1.27 cases per 100,000 people in males and 1.49 cases per 100,000 people in females. All results suggest a stronger network of diagnosis and treatment including all levels of hospitals should be created to improve healthcare for hereditary spherocytosis and even other rare diseases in the future, meanwhile we can obtain more useful information for orphan drug designation purposes and make public health decisions regarding such diseases through the use of the burden of disease models.

  7. HEREDITARY DISEASES AND SYNDROMES ACCOMPANIED BY FEBRILE CONVULSIONS: CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERISTICS AND DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dadali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors provide a review of the clinical and genetic characteristics of hereditary diseases and syndromes accompanied by febrile convulsions, which is illustrated by examples of their own observations. The paper sets forth the possibilities and limitations of using current methods for the molecular genetic diagnosis of idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies. The most effective and less expensive technique of molecular genetic analysis is shown to be an exome sequencing test using the panels of genes responsible for the occurrence of diseases with simi1ar clinical symptoms. The paper also presents the structure of the panel of genes responsible for the occurrence of monogenic epilepsies, which has been designed at the Genomed Clinic and includes 448 genetic variants. It also determines the significance of using a chromosomal microarray analysis to diagnose both chromosomal and monogenic diseases accompanied by convulsions. 

  8. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hereditary retinal degenerations: Layer-by-layer analyses in normal and diseased retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijun

    OCT is a new technique for non-invasive, non-contact, cross-sectional imaging of biological tissues with micrometer longitudinal resolution. As it applies to the field of ophthalmology, OCT can delineate retinal sublayers based on their backscattering characteristics, and permit quantitative measurement of the structure of retina in vivo. This dissertation intended to clarify the basis of the OCT signals and whether this procedure has potential for diagnosis and monitoring of human retinal degenerative diseases. Key to this goal are quantitation of OCT signal features and accurate, layer-by-layer correlation of these features with underlying retinal microanatomy. In normal and degenerate avian and swine retinas, OCT signal features were quantified using custom computer programs, and were correlated with cryosections of unfixed retinas obtained at the same retinal location. The results suggested a definable and quantifiable relationship between OCT signal components and retinal microanatomy. The correlation in the outer retina indicated that the OCT posterior highly reflective band, or the outer- retina-choroid complex (ORCC), is attributable to the photoreceptor layer, RPE, and anterior choroid. Further evidence of OCT signal origin was provided by the rd chicken and the rhodopsin P347L mutant transgenic swine. In these animals where photoreceptors had degenerated, OCT abnormalities were observed at the level of and vitreal to the ORCC, consistent with the hypothesis that photoreceptors contribute to the ORCC. Studies of quantitative OCT analysis in man were also performed. In selected hereditary retinal degenerative diseases in which there was regional difference in retinal function, frequently observed OCT abnormalities that were associated with visual dysfunction were reduced OCT thickness, reduced ORCC thickness, increased reflectivity posterior to ORCC, and abnormal OCT signal lamination. These preliminary results suggested that OCT abnormalities at the level

  9. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized.

  10. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Hereditary Connective-Tissue Diseases Accompanied by Frequent Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent bone fractures in infancy require the elimination of a large number (> 100 of genetic disorders. The modern diagnostic method of hereditary diseases characterized by debilitating course is a new generation sequencing. The article presents the results of molecular-genetic study conducted in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of connective tissue disorders. 10 (56% patients had mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen chains, leading to the development of osteogenesis imperfecta, 5 (28% — mutations in IV and V type collagen genes that are responsible for the development of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 3 (17% patients had mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 protein, deficiency of which is manifested by Marfan syndrome. However, the correlation between patient's phenotype and discovered mutations in the investigated gene is established not in all cases.

  11. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte, Jennifer [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sega, Gary A [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Withrow, Catherine [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  12. Validation of the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) for hereditary recurrent fever syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piram, Maryam; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lachmann, Helen J; Frenkel, Joost; Ozen, Seza; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Stojanov, Silvia; Simon, Anna; Finetti, Martina; Sormani, Maria Pia; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To validate the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) in the four major hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRFs): familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Methods In 2010, an international collaboration established the content of a disease activity tool for HRFs. Patients completed a 1-month prospective diary with 12 yes/no items before a clinical appointment during which their physician assessed their disease activity by a questionnaire. Eight international experts in auto-inflammatory diseases evaluated the patient's disease activity by a blinded web evaluation and a nominal group technique consensus conference, with their consensus judgement considered the gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity/accuracy measures and the ability of the score to discriminate active from inactive patients via the best cut-off score were calculated by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Consensus was achieved for 98/106 (92%) cases (39 FMF, 35 CAPS, 14 TRAPS and 10 MKD), with 26 patients declared as having inactive disease and 72 as having active disease. The median total AIDAI score was 14 (range=0–175). An AIDAI cut-off score ≥9 discriminated active from inactive patients, with sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of 89%/92%/90%, respectively, and an area under the curve of 98% (95% CI 96% to 100%). Conclusions The AIDAI score is a valid and simple tool for assessing disease activity in FMF/MKD/TRAPS/CAPS. This tool is easy to use in clinical practice and has the potential to be used as the standard efficacy measure in future clinical trials. PMID:24026675

  13. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Part II: cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, pediatric systemic granulomatosis and PAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, Juan I; Yagüe, Jordi

    2008-03-29

    Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases result from a genetically-based dysregulated inflammatory process, and are clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent systemic inflammatory episodes, which typically occur in the absence of infectious, neoplastic or autoimmune etiology. Elucidation of their molecular basis has enabled the use of genetic analyses to achieve an accurate and definitive diagnosis, and to establish a tailored treatment. The present review is the second and last part of an updated and comprehensive overview of hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and will introduce persistent, non-periodic autoinflammatory diseases, such as: a) the group of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), which includes familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome, and CINCA-NOMID syndrome; b) the group of pediatric systemic granulomatosis, which includes both Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis, and c) the pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

  14. Molecular biology methods in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, A. [University of Helsinki, Department of Biosciences, Division of Genetics, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-12-01

    Effort to predict the genetic consequences for humans of exposure to ionising radiation has been one of the most important issues of human genetics over the past 60 years. To date, there has been little experimental knowledge on the genetic risks of human exposure to ionising radiation. Radiation-induced deleterious hereditary effects have not been detected in human populations - not even among the offspring of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This does not mean deleterious hereditary effects do not exist in humans, but rather that they are small and/or difficult to detect because the normal incidence of inherited abnormalities is quite high in the human population. Thus, assessment of radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans has been based on the common knowledge of human heredity and on animal experiments. However, recent data have suggested that hyper-variable tandem repeat minisatellite loci provide a useful and sensitive experimental approach for monitoring radiation-induced germline mutations in humans. In order to investigate the feasibility of the minisatellite mutation screening system in assessing radiation-induced hereditary risks in humans, we examined the amount of hereditary minisatellite mutations among the offspring of Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers. The men studied received a median radiation dose of 109 mSv while working on the cleanup activities after the Chernobyl accident. We compared the minisatellite mutation rates of 155 children born to 147 Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers after the accident to those of their 148 siblings born prior to it. In addition, 44 Estonian families, where the father had not been exposed to radiation, composed an additional control group. In all of these families, the paternity of the children was ascertained by using 5 minisatellite loci (APOB, HRAS, MCOB19, MCT118, and YNZ-22) in PCR-based analyses. Other 8 minisatellite loci (B6.7, CEB1, CEB15, CEB25, CEB36, MS1, MS31, and MS32) were used

  15. [Developments in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary sensorimotor neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprise a group of diseases with heterogeneous clinical, electrophysiological and genetic expression. They are classified by the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant, X-linked dominant, autosomal recessive) and their electrophysiological characteristics taking into account the speed of motor conduction of the median nerve (demyelinating, intermediary and axonal forms). Certain purely motor forms are called spinal CMT or hereditary distal motor neuropathy, or distal spinal amyotrophy. CMT involving an important sensorial component, trophic disorders, or signs of dysautonomia are included in the classification of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

  16. Hereditary chorea - what else to consider when the Huntington's disease genetics test is negative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, N; Newman, E J

    2017-01-01

    Chorea, cognitive, behavioural and psychiatric disturbance occur in varying combinations in Huntington's disease (HD). This is often easy to recognise particularly in the presence of an autosomal dominant history. Whilst HD may be the most common aetiology of such a presentation, several HD phenocopies should be considered if genetic testing for HD is negative. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database from January 1, 1946 up to January 1, 2016, combining the search terms: 'chorea', 'Huntington's disease', 'HDL' and 'phenocopies'. HD phenocopies frequently display additional movement disorders such as myoclonus, dystonia, parkinsonism and tics. Here, we discuss the phenotypes, and investigations of HD-like disorders where the combination of progressive chorea and cognitive impairment is obvious, but HD gene test result is negative. Conditions presenting with sudden onset chorea such as vascular, infectious and autoimmune causes are not the primary focus of our discussion, but we will make a passing reference to these as some of these conditions are potentially treatable. Hereditary forms of chorea are a heterogeneous group of conditions and this number is increasing. While most of these conditions are not curable, molecular genetic testing has enabled many of these disorders to be distinguished from HD. Getting a precise diagnosis may enable patients and their families to better understand the nature of their condition.

  17. Modeling non-hereditary mechanisms of Alzheimer disease during apoptosis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Braun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired protein degradation and mitochondrial dysfunction are believed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD. In patients suffering from non-hereditary AD, UBB+1, the frameshift variant of ubiquitin B, accumulated in neurons affected by neurofibrillary tangles, which is a pathological hallmark. We established a yeast model expressing high levels of UBB+1, and could demonstrate that UBB+1 interfered with both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and mitochondrial function. More precisely, UBB+1 promoted the mitochondrion-localized production of the basic amino acids arginine, ornithine, and lysine, which we identified as the decisive toxic event culminating in apoptosis. Inducing the UPS activity at mitochondria prevented the lethal basic amino acid accumulation and avoided UBB+1-triggered cell loss. The arginine/ornithine metabolism is altered in brains of AD patients, and VMS1, the mitochondrion-specific UPS component, co-existed with UBB+1 in neurofibrillary tangles. Therefore, our data suggest that aberrant basic amino acid synthesis is a crucial link between UPS dysfunction and mitochondrial damage during AD progression.

  18. Molecular genetics and mechanisms of disease in distal hereditary motor neuropathies: insights directing future genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, A P; Blair, I P; Nicholson, G A

    2011-11-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMNs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that primarily affect motor neurons, without significant sensory involvement. New dHMN genes continue to be identified. There are now 11 causative genes described for dHMN, and an additional five genetic loci with unidentified genes. This genetic heterogeneity has further delineated the classification of dHMN, which was previously classified according to mode of inheritance, age at onset, and additional complicating features. Some overlap between phenotypically distinct forms of dHMN is also apparent. The mutated genes identified to-date in dHMN include HSPB1, HSPB8, HSPB3, DCTN1, GARS, PLEKHG5, BSCL2, SETX, IGHMBP2, ATP7A and TRPV4. The pathogenesis of mutations remains to be fully elucidated, however common pathogenic mechanisms are emerging. These include disruption of axonal transport, RNA processing defects, protein aggregation and inclusion body formation, disrupted calcium channel activity, and loss of neuroprotective signalling. Some of these dHMN genes are also mutated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). This review examines the growing number of identified dHMN genes, discusses recent insights into the functions of these genes and possible pathogenic mechanisms, and looks at the increasing overlap between dHMN and the other neuropathies CMT2 and SMA.

  19. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazir, Meriem; Hamadouche, Tarik; Nouioua, Sonia; Mathis, Stephane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. However, the frequency of the different subtypes varies within distinct populations. Although more than seventy clinical and genetic forms are known to date, more than 80% of CMT patients in Western countries have genetic abnormalities associated with PMP22, MPZ, MFN2 and GJB1. Given the considerable genetic heterogeneity of CMT, we emphasize the interest of both clinical and pathological specific features such that focused genetic testing could be performed. In this regard, peripheral nerve lesions in GDAP1 mutations (AR CMT1A), such as mitochondrial abnormalities, have been newly demonstrated. Otherwise, while demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT used to be classified as CMT4 (A, B, C …), we propose a simplified classification such as AR CMT1 (A, B, C …), and AR CMT2 for axonal forms. Also, we stress that next generation sequencing techniques, now considered to be the most efficient methods of genetic testing in CMT, will be helpful in molecular diagnosis and research of new genes involved. Finally, while no effective therapy is known to date, ongoing new therapeutic trials such as PXT3003 (a low dose combination of the three already approved drugs baclofen, naltrexone, and D-sorbitol) give hopes for potential curative treatment.

  20. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized.

  1. [Current status of the predictive genetic testing for hereditary neurological diseases in Shinshu University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Mizuuchi, Asako; Yamashita, Hiromi; Tamai, Mariko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    The current status of predictive genetic testing for late-onset hereditary neurological diseases in Japan is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed data from 73 clients who visited the Division of Clinical and Molecular Genetics, Shinshu University Hospital, for the purpose of predictive genetic testing. The clients consisted of individuals with family histories of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP; n=30), Huntington's disease (HD; n=16), spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD; n=14), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1; n=9), familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1 (ALS1; n=3), and Alzheimer's disease (AD; n=1). Forty-nine of the 73 (67.1%) clients were in their twenties or thirties. Twenty-seven of the 73 (37.0%) clients visited a medical institution within 3 months after becoming aware of predictive genetic testing. The most common reason for requesting predictive genetic testing was a need for certainty or to reduce uncertainty and anxiety. The decision-making about marriage and having a child was also a main reason in clients in the twenties and thirties. The numbers of clients who actually underwent predictive genetic testing was 22 of 30 (73.3%) in FAP, 3 of 16 (18.8%) in HD, 6 of 10 (60.0%) in SCD, 7 of 9 (77.8%) in DM1, and 0 of 3 (0%) in ALS1 (responsible gene of the disease was unknown in 4 SCD patients and an AD patient). The percentage of test usage was lower in untreatable diseases such as HD and SCD than that in FAP, suggesting that many clients changed their way of thinking on the significance of testing through multiple genetic counseling sessions. In addition, it was obvious that existence of disease-modifying therapy promoted usage of predictive genetic testing in FAP. Improvement of genetic counseling system to manage predictive genetic testing is necessary, as consultation concerning predictive genetic testing is the main motivation to visit genetic counseling clinic in many at-risk clients.

  2. [From gene to disease; E-cadherin and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, J.H.F.M. de; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome associated with an early-onset, histologically diffuse, signet ring cell type gastric cancer and the occurrence of cancer at other anatomical sites, i.e. breast, colon, prostate and ovary. Inactivating germline mutations

  3. R2*-relaxometry of the pancreas in patients with human hemochromatosis protein associated hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, B; Rauch, S; Zoller, H; Plaikner, M; Jaschke, W; Kremser, C

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate pancreatic iron in patients with human hemochromatosis protein associated hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) using R2* relaxometry. 81 patients (58 male, 23 female; median age 49.5, range 10-81 years) with HHC were retrospectively studied. All underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen. A fat-saturated multi-gradient echo sequence with 12 echoes (TR=200ms; TE-initial 0.99ms; Delta-TE 1.41ms; 12 echoes; flip-angle: 20°) was used for the R2* quantification of the liver and the pancreas. Parameter maps were analyzed using regions of interest (3 in the liver and 2 in the pancreas) and R2* values were correlated. 59/81 patients had a liver R2*≥70 1/s of which 10/59 patients had a pancreas R2*≥50 1/s. No patient presented with a liver R2*pancreas R2*≥50 1/s. All patients with pancreas R2* values≥50 1/s had liver R2* values≥70 1/s. ROC analysis resulted in a threshold of 209.4 1/s for liver R2* values to identify HFE positive patients with pancreas R2* values≥50 1/s with a median specificity of 78.87% and a median sensitivity of 90%. In patients with HHC R2* relaxometry of the pancreas should be performed when liver iron overload is present and can be omitted in cases with no sign of hepatic iron. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  5. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport causing hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Levi B.; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L. P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa; Law, Christopher S.; Stray-Petersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H.; Mace, Emily M.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K.; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D.; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Waterfield, Michael R.; Papa, Feroz R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N. Tony; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Shum, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomics have allowed unbiased genetic studies of human disease with unexpected insights into the molecular mechanisms of cellular immunity and autoimmunity1. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted sequencing in patients with an apparent Mendelian syndrome of autoimmune disease characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). In five families, we identified four unique deleterious variants in the Coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) gene all located within the same functional domain. We hypothesized that mutant COPA leads to a defect in intracellular transport mediated by coat protein complex I (COPI)2–4. We show that COPA variants impair binding of proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi to ER transport and demonstrate that expression of mutant COPA leads to ER stress and the upregulation of Th17 priming cytokines. Consistent with this pattern of cytokine expression, patients demonstrated a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells toward a T helper 17 (Th17) phenotype, an effector T cell population implicated in autoimmunity5,6. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand how alterations in cellular homeostasis caused by a defect in the intracellular trafficking pathway leads to the generation of human autoimmune disease. PMID:25894502

  6. [Human prion diseases in the Czech Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Z; Rusina, R; Marešová, M; Matěj, R

    2015-09-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of very rare diseases with a unique pathogenesis and, due to an inauspicious prognosis and unavailability of therapy, with fatal consequences. The etiopathogenetic background is the presence of pathologically misfolded prion protein, highly resistant to denaturation, the aggregation and presence of which in the brain tissue causes irreversible neuronal damage. The most frequent prion disease in humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which occurs in sporadic, hereditary/familial, or acquired/infectious/iatrogenic forms. A new form of CJD, variant CJD, is considered to be linked to dietary exposure to beef products from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and to infection via blood transfusion. The clinical picture of these diseases is characterized by a rapidly progressing dementia, cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms, and rather specific MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Clinically, the diagnosis is described as possible or probable prion disease and needs to be confirmed by neuropathological or immunological investigation of the brain tissue. Epidemiological data from the Czech Republic spanning the last decade are presented.

  7. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  8. Recombinant Human C1 Esterase Inhibitor in the Management of Hereditary Angioedema

    OpenAIRE

    Riedl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, is caused by a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This potentially life-threatening condition manifests as recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal swelling of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and larynx. The management of HAE includes treatment of acute episodes, short-term prophylaxis in preparation for exposure to known triggers and long-term prophylaxis to decrease the incidence and seve...

  9. Hereditary retinal eye diseases in childhood and youth affecting the central retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Nentwich

    2013-01-01

    Classic examinations for patients suffering from hereditary retinal dystrophies of the central retina are funduscopy - also using red-free light - visual-field tests, electrophysiologic tests as electro-retinogram [ERG] and multifocal ERG and tests evaluating color vision. Recently, new imaging modalities have been introduced into the clinical practice. The significance of these new methods such as high-resolution spectral-domain optic coherence tomography [SD-OCT] and fundus autofluorescence will be discussed as well as "next generation sequencing" as a new method for the analysis of genetic mutations in a larger number of patients.

  10. [The role of hereditary and environmental factors in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba

    2012-07-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases are the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorders affecting 5% to 10% of the population in Western countries. The clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, the interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. The identified autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex, and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor, thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. The majority of the anti-TSH-receptor antibodies have a stimulating capacity and are responsible for hyperthyroidism. The anti-thyroglobulin- and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies belonging to the catalytic type of antibodies destroy the thyrocytes resulting in hypothyroidism. The appearance of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies precedes the induction of thyroiditis and the manifestation of hypothyroidism. The molecular analysis of thyroglobulin gene polymorphism is important in the mechanism of autoimmune thyroiditis. The autoantigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex molecules is a key point of the autoimmune mechanism. It has been shown that a HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain confers a strong genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, while glutamine at position DRβ1-74 is protective. Human thyroglobulin 2098 peptide represents a strong and specific DRβ1-Arg74 binder, while a non-binding control peptide, thyroglobulin 2766 fails to induce this response. Moreover, thyroglobulin 2098 stimulated T-cells from individuals who were positive for thyroglobulin antibodies, demonstrating that thyroglobulin 2098 is an immunogenic peptide capable of being

  11. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history...

  12. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Kun Xia; Beisha Tang; Ruxu Zhang; Xiaohong Zi; Lin Li; Yajing Zhan; Shunxiang Huang; Jin Li; Xuning Li; Xigui Li; Zhengmao Hu

    2012-01-01

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced.

  13. Hereditary retinal disease : clinical and genetic studies on the role of the peripherin/RDS gene , the BEST1 gene, and the CFH gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene, the BEST1 gene, and the CFH gene appear to be relatively frequent causes of hereditary retinal diseases that principally affect the macula. Intriguingly, a single mutation may be associated with a broad range of retinal phenotypes. Even in a single family, one m

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dystroglycan gene do not correlate with disease severity in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Emily; Ciccone, Carla; Darvish, Daniel; Naiem-Cohen, Shahrouz; Dalakas, Marinos C; Savelkoul, Paul J; Krasnewich, Donna M; Gahl, William A; Huizing, Marjan

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of dystroglycan occurs in certain muscular dystrophies, including hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM). HIBM harbors a widely varying clinical severity and age of onset, which raised the suspicion of the presence of disease modifier genes. We considered the highly polymorphic dystroglycan gene (DAG1) as a feasible candidate modifier gene. DAG1 genomic DNA was sequenced for 32 HIBM patients, mainly of Persian-Jewish descent. Five novel DAG1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, bringing the total number of SNPs to 19. However, no direct correlation between DAG1 SNPs and clinical severity of HIBM could be detected. Several identified SNPs substitute an amino acid and might modulate dystroglycan function or glycosylation status, and deserve further research. These data are valuable for future studies on the role of DAG1 in HIBM and other muscular dystrophies, especially those dystrophies that involve abnormal glycosylation of dystroglycan.

  15. Retroviruses and human disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 25 years animal retroviruses have been favoured subjects of research by virologists, oncologists, and molecular biologists. Retroviruses have given us reverse transcriptase, oncogenes, and cloning vectors that may one day be exploited for human gene therapy. They have also given us leukaemia and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Kawasaki disease and tropical spastic paraparesis are thought to be associated with retrovirus infection, and other diseases such as de Qu...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary Fructose Intolerance Health Topic: Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  17. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims...

  18. 86 The Efficacy and Safety of Human Plasma-derived C1-Inhibitor Concentrate Administered for the Treatment of Attacks in Pediatric Patients with Hereditary Angioedema Due to C1-Inhibitor Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Erika; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Lilian; Fejes, János; Harmat, George

    2012-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) is a life-threatening, rare disease characterized by recurrent edematous attacks. In 50% of cases, the initial onset of symptoms occurs between 5 and 11 years of age. There are limited data on the emergency treatment of acute episodes in pediatric patients. Our aim was to analyze the efficacy and safety of human plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate in our pediatric patient population with HAE-C1-INH. Methods 50 pediatri...

  19. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nishino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors.

  20. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  1. Effect of Systemic Iron Overload and a Chelation Therapy in a Mouse Model of the Neurodegenerative Disease Hereditary Ferritinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene cause the neurodegenerative disease neuroferritinopathy or hereditary ferritinopathy (HF). HF is characterized by a severe movement disorder and by the presence of nuclear and cytoplasmic iron-containing ferritin inclusion bodies (IBs) in glia and neurons throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and in tissues of multiple organ systems. Herein, using primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts from a mouse model of HF, we show significant intracellular accumulation of ferritin and an increase in susceptibility to oxidative damage when cells are exposed to iron. Treatment of the cells with the iron chelator deferiprone (DFP) led to a significant improvement in cell viability and a decrease in iron content. In vivo, iron overload and DFP treatment of the mouse model had remarkable effects on systemic iron homeostasis and ferritin deposition, without significantly affecting CNS pathology. Our study highlights the role of iron in modulating ferritin aggregation in vivo in the disease HF. It also puts emphasis on the potential usefulness of a therapy based on chelators that can target the CNS to remove and redistribute iron and to resolubilize or prevent ferritin aggregation while maintaining normal systemic iron stores. PMID:27574973

  2. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  3. Assessment of Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing as a Tool for the Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Hereditary Motor Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; García-García, Francisco; Sancho, Paula; Tello, Cristina; García-Romero, Mar; Villarreal, Liliana; Alberti, Antonia; Sivera, Rafael; Dopazo, Joaquín; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Márquez-Infante, Celedonio; Casasnovas, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is characterized by broad genetic heterogeneity with >50 known disease-associated genes. Mutations in some of these genes can cause a pure motor form of hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetics of which are poorly characterized. We designed a panel comprising 56 genes associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. We validated this diagnostic tool by first testing 11 patients with pathological mutations. A cohort of 33 affected subjects was selected for this study. The DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation was detected in two cases; novel changes and/or variants with low frequency (A mutation was also detected in three additional families. On haplotype analysis, all of the patients from these five families shared the same haplotype; therefore, the DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation may be a founder event. Our gene panel allowed us to perform a very rapid and cost-effective screening of genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. Our diagnostic strategy was robust in terms of both coverage and read depth for all of the genes and patient samples. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in achieving a definitive molecular diagnosis because of the complexity of interpreting new variants and the genetic heterogeneity that is associated with these neuropathies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Tortora, Rosangela P; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Pires, Gisele Viana; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to participate in this study. Prevalence of AAB was 40%. Our data indicate high prevalence of AAB in patients with Hereditary Angioedema. Large-scale studies should be considered to determine the significance of these AAB in the follow-up care of patients with Hereditary Angioedema.

  5. HECT E3s and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staub Olivier

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a simplified view, members of the HECT E3 family have a modular structure consisting of the C-terminal HECT domain, which is catalytically involved in the attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins, and N-terminal extensions of variable length and sequence that mediate the substrate specificity of the respective HECT E3. Although the physiologically relevant substrates of most HECT E3s have remained elusive, it is becoming increasingly clear that HECT E3s play an important role in sporadic and hereditary human diseases including cancer, cardiovascular (Liddle's syndrome and neurological (Angelman syndrome disorders, and/or in disease-relevant processes including bone homeostasis, immune response and retroviral budding. Thus, molecular approaches to target the activity of distinct HECT E3s, regulators thereof, and/or of HECT E3 substrates could prove valuable in the treatment of the respective diseases. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  6. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells: implications for human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    interest on these cells, mainly focused on animal models. Only recently, a few studies have started to address the relevance of the mRGC system in humans and related diseases. We recently discovered that mRGCs resist neurodegeneration in two inherited mitochondrial disorders that cause blindness, i.......e. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy. The mechanism leading to mRGCs sparing in these blinding disorders, characterized by extensive and selective loss of RGCs, is currently unknown and under investigation. Other studies reported on mRGCs in glaucoma, on genetic variation...

  7. [The significance of Goodpasture antigen in hereditary nephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta-Jovanović, Gordana; Radojević-Skodrić, Sanja; Jovanović, Milena; Bogdanović, Ljiljana; Bogdanović, Radovan; Lezaić, Visnja; Nesić, Vidosava; Dikman, Steven

    2008-12-01

    Two types of hereditary nephritis, nonprogressive and progressive, clinically present as asymptomatic haematuria, sometimes combined with proteinuria. At the onset, in both types, light microscopic changes are minimal, immunofluorescence findings are negative, and diagnosis can be made only upon electron microscopic findings that are considered to be specific. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of Goodpasture antigen detection in diagnosis of progressive and nonprogressive hereditary nephritis in its early phase. Analysis of renal biopsy specimens was done in patients with hereditary nephritis that were followed from 1990 to 2005. Progression of renal disease was examined in 14 patients with Alport's syndrome, 10 patients with thin basement membrane disease, and 6 patients with unclassified hereditary nephritis diagnosed. For all these cases, indirect immunofluorescence study with serum from a patient with high titer of Goodpasture autoantibodies that recognize the antigenic determinants in human glomerular and tubular basement membrane was performed. In 11 out of 14 cases diagnosed as Alport's syndrome, there was negative staining with Goodpasture serum, and in 3 additional cases with Alport's syndrome, expression of Goodpasture antigen in glomerular basement membrane and thin basement membrane was highly reduced. In all 10 patients with thin basement membrane disease, immunofluorescence showed intensive, bright linear staining with Goodpasture serum along glomerular and tubular basement membrane. In 2 out of 6 patients with unclassified hereditary nephritis, Goodpasture antigen expression was very strong, in one patient it was very reduced, and in 3 patients it was negative. The results of our study show that Goodpasture antigen detection plays a very important role in differential diagnosis of progressive and nonpregressive hereditary nephritis, particularly in early phases of the disease.

  8. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome: Genetic Testing Identifies a Potentially Deadly Hereditary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sequencing can identify variants in a person’s genes—places where their genetic sequence differs from an expected sequence,” says Katie Lewis, a research coordinator at NIH’s National Human Genome ...

  11. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  12. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Paassen, Barbara W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-03-19

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal.

  13. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  14. Mutation analysis of PMP22 in Slovak patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resko, Peter; Radvansky, Jan; Odnogova, Zuzana; Baldovic, Marian; Minarik, Gabriel; Polakova, Helena; Palffy, Roland; Kadasi, Ludevit

    2011-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related peripheral neuropathies are the most commonly inherited neurological disorders in humans, characterized by clinical and genetic heterogeneity. The most prevalent clinical entities belonging to this group of disorders are CMT type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). CMT1A and HNPP are predominantly caused by a 1.5 Mb duplication and deletion in the chromosomal region 17p11.2, respectively, and less frequently by other mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Despite being relatively common diseases, they haven't been previously studied in the Slovak population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population by screening 119 families with CMT and 2 families with HNPP for causative mutations in this gene. The copy number determination of PMP22 resulted in the detection of CMT1A duplication in 40 families and the detection of HNPP deletion in 7 families, 6 of which were originally diagnosed as CMT. Consequent mutation screening of families without duplication or deletion using dHPLC and sequencing identified 6 single base changes (3 unpublished to date), from which only c.327C>A (Cys109X) present in one family was provably causative. These results confirm the leading role of PMP22 mutation analysis in the differential diagnosis of CMT and show that the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population is comparable to that seen in the global population.

  15. [The molecular diagnosis of hereditary diseases. In memoriam Dr. Eduardo Aguirre Pequeño].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera Saldaña, H A; Rojas Martínez, A; Rivera Pérez, J A; Vázquez Alemán, R M; González Garay, M L

    1992-01-01

    Accordingly, we have established in our unit a DNA diagnosis laboratory and have started molecular genetics and epidemiological studies of several inherited diseases. We have started with cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia A. We practice the molecular diagnosis with both, Southern transfer and the polymerase chain reaction, using either direct (detection of mutations) or indirect (restriction fragment length polymorphisms) approaches. With the studies we have so far carried out, we have been able to provide genetic counseling and gained valuable information on the type and frequency of mutation associated to these diseases in our region.

  16. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J; Lander, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead.

  17. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight into the t......Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  19. [Hereditary peripheral neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Mériem; Calvo, Judith; Funalot, Benoît

    2009-09-01

    Currently more than 30 genes are known to be responsible for genetically determined neuropathies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most frequent of these hereditary neuropathies, with a prevalence of 4.7 to 36 per 100 000. In its demyelinating forms (CMT1), approximately 70% of cases are associated with a duplication of the PMP22gene. In its axonal forms (CMT2), 10-20% of the cases may be associated with a mutation of the MFN2gene. For North African patients with recessive transmission, a mutation of the LMNA gene must be sought. It is essential to stress the great variability of the phenotype--clinical, electrophysiological, and histologic--between and within families. A detailed analysis of these criteria, together with consideration of ethnic origin, may guide the search for the causal mutation. Whether the case involves certainly hereditary transmission or a sporadic form, it is desirable to be able to examine the maximum number of the patient's kin, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The forms with recessive transmission usually have a very early onset and are more serious than the dominant forms. The early- and very early-onset forms of CMT are increasingly better distinguished: congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (mutations of PMP22, MPZ or EGR2), or more axonal forms, including SMARD1 (Spinal muscle atrophy with respiratory distress; mutations of IGHMBP2) and EOHMSN (Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy; mutations of MFN2). The prevention of cutaneous (ulcerations), bone, and amputation complications is very important in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, because of the severity of the sensory disorders.

  20. Pedigree and BRCA gene analysis in breast cancer patients to identify hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality of disease in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooei, Mina; Poornima, Subhadra; Salma, Bibi Umae; Iyer, Gayatri R; Pujar, Akhilesh N; Annapurna, Srirambhatla; Shah, Ashwin; Maddali, Srinivas; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2017-02-01

    Global burden of breast cancer is expected to increase to >2 million new cases every year by 2030 and 10% of these are likely to have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Identifying these individuals by pedigree and BRCA1/2 mutation analyses will enable us to offer targeted mutation testing and appropriate counseling. This study from a tertiary care hospital showed that of the 127 breast cancer patients on treatment during 2014-2015, 24 of them fulfilled the criteria of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome after detailed verbal autopsy and pedigree analysis, and BRCA1 and 2 next-generation sequencing done after pre-test counseling revealed mutations in 13 cases (54%), these included 9 BRCA1 mutations (69%) and 4 BRCA2 mutation (31%). Subsequent post-test counseling recommended targeted mutation analysis for 64 high-risk members in these 13 families with pathogenic mutations, which will help in surveillance for early detection, appropriate management, and prevention of the disease by decreasing the burden to both family and nation. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of genetic counseling, pedigree analysis, and genetic testing. It can be recommended that all oncology units should have a genetic counseling service for providing appropriate support to oncologists, patients, and families to prevent unnecessary testing; however, breast cancer screening program is incomplete without evaluating for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.

  1. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  2. Hereditary breast cancer associated with Cowden syndrome-related PTEN mutation with Lhermitte-Duclos disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Fuyo; Ueda, Ai; Sato, Eiichi; Akimoto, Jiro; Kaise, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kimito; Hosonaga, Mari; Kawai, Yuko; Teraoka, Saeko; Okazaki, Miki; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Cowden syndrome is characterized by multiple hamartomas in various tissues, including the skin, brain, breast, thyroid, mucous membrane, and gastrointestinal tract, and is reported to increase the risk of malignant disease. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman in whom a tumor was diagnosed in the left cerebellar hemisphere and treated by surgical resection. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mutation in exon 8 insertion was found in the brain tumor tissue and leukocytes. This finding supported the diagnosis of Cowden syndrome. She consequently developed endometrial cancer and underwent abdominal total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Four years later, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer was found in the right breast, and breast-conserving surgery with radiation therapy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed. Herein, we describe a patient who was diagnosed as having familial breast cancer associated with PTEN mutation-related Cowden syndrome. We also reviewed reports of this syndrome in the literature for disease appraisal.

  3. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchi, Mariko; Mizuno, Haruo; Tsuboi, Takashi [Nagoya City Univ. Medical School (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a {lambda}EMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning {approximately}15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5{prime} flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A- to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A ({nu} = .26) and 440 Gpoly ({nu} = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. 76 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian canc...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  5. Fatty liver disease and hypertransaminasemia hiding the association of clinically silent Duchenne muscular dystrophy and hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolella, Giulia; Pisano, Pasquale; Albano, Raffaele; Cannaviello, Lucio; Mauro, Carolina; Esposito, Gabriella; Vajro, Pietro

    2012-10-31

    We report a case with the association of well self-compensated hereditary fructose intolerance and still poorly symptomatic Duchenne type muscular dystrophy. This case illustrates the problems of a correct diagnosis in sub-clinical patients presenting with "cryptogenic" hypertransaminasemia.

  6. Fatty liver disease and hypertransaminasemia hiding the association of clinically silent Duchenne muscular dystrophy and hereditary fructose intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolella Giulia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case with the association of well self-compensated hereditary fructose intolerance and still poorly symptomatic Duchenne type muscular dystrophy. This case illustrates the problems of a correct diagnosis in sub-clinical patients presenting with “cryptogenic” hypertransaminasemia.

  7. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  8. [Hereditary fructose intolerance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanner, F

    1977-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is the most important disturbance in human fructose metabolism. This paper deals with the present knowledge of biochemistry and pathophysiology of this inborn error of metabolism, which is often wrongly diagnosed and gives a detailed description of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  9. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  10. Integrated map of the chromosome 8p12-p21 region, a region involved in human cancers and Werner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, A.; Chaffanet, M.; Birnbaum, D.; Pebusque, M.J. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the genetic mapping of the specific region on human chromosome 8, 8p12-p21, and its implications to human hereditary cancers and diseases. The localization of disease genes such as NEFL and FGFR1 are given, accomplished using contigs which span the region of deletion involved in these hereditary diseases. 59 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A monograph proposing the use of canine mammary tumours as a model for the study of hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Katie; Merner, Nancy D

    2017-05-01

    Canines are excellent models for cancer studies due to their similar physiology and genomic sequence to humans, companion status and limited intra-breed heterogeneity. Due to their affliction to mammary cancers, canines can serve as powerful genetic models of hereditary breast cancers. Variants within known human breast cancer susceptibility genes only explain a fraction of familial cases. Thus, further discovery is necessary but such efforts have been thwarted by genetic heterogeneity. Reducing heterogeneity is key, and studying isolated human populations have helped in the endeavour. An alternative is to study dog pedigrees, since artificial selection has resulted in extreme homogeneity. Identifying the genetic predisposition to canine mammary tumours can translate to human discoveries - a strategy currently underutilized. To explore this potential, we reviewed published canine mammary tumour genetic studies and proposed benefits of next generation sequencing canine cohorts to facilitate moving beyond incremental advances.

  12. Marked reduction of spectrin in hereditary spherocytosis in the common house mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenquist, A.C.; Shohet, S.B.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1978-06-01

    In contrast to the disease in humans, hereditary spherocytosis in the common house mouse produces an extreme spherocytosis. The cells show a broad distribution in size ranging from microcytic to macrocytic. Of particular interest is the finding of a substantial reduction in the major membrane polypeptide called spectrin, supporting a critical role for this protein in the control of erythrocyte shape and membrane stability.

  13. Laminopathies: involvement of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of an increasing number of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraldi, Nadir M; Squarzoni, Stefano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Capanni, Cristina; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Ognibene, Andrea; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2005-05-01

    Just at the beginning of the millennium the neologism laminopathies has been introduced in the scientific vocabulary. An exponential increase of interest on the subject started concomitantly, so that a formerly quite neglected group of rare human diseases is now widely investigated. This review will cover the history of the identification of the molecular basis for fourteen (since now) hereditary diseases arising from defects in genes that encode nuclear envelope and nuclear lamina-associated proteins and will also consider the hypotheses that can account for the role of structural nuclear proteins in the pathogenesis of diseases affecting a wide spectrum of tissues.

  14. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  15. Spontaneous hepatic copper accumulation in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with hereditary hepatitis. A model of Wilson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y; Togashi, Y; S. Sato; Emoto, T; J. H. Kang; TAKEICHI N.; Kobayashi, H; Y. Kojima; Une, Y.; Uchino, J

    1991-01-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an inbred strain of a mutant rat isolated from Long-Evans rats, develop hereditary hepatitis. To elucidate the role of copper metabolism in the development of the hepatitis in LEC rats, we examined the copper concentration in the tissues and serum levels of copper and ceruloplasmin. Copper concentration in the liver of LEC rats was over 40 times that of normal Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats, while the serum ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in LEC rats decr...

  16. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  17. The hereditary spastic paraplegia-related enzyme DDHD2 is a principal brain triglyceride lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Inloes, Jordon M.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Dix, Melissa M.; Viader, Andreu; Masuda, Kim; Takei, Thais; Wood, Malcolm R.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Many rare human genetic disorders are caused by mutations in genes that code for proteins of poorly characterized function. Determining the functions of these proteins is critical for understanding and devising potential treatments for human diseases. In this article, we discover using a combination of mouse genetic models, selective inhibitors, and lipid profiling that the DDHD2 enzyme, mutations of which cause a neurological disease termed complex hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), acts a...

  18. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi; Alfeu T. França; GRUMACH, Anete S.; Abílio A Motta; Fátima R Fernandes; Regis A. Campos; Solange O Valle; Rosário, Nelson A.; Dirceu Sole

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom t...

  19. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  20. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  1. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  2. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, F

    2015-01-01

    diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies......The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2...... may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction....

  3. Chromatin remodeling and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Sloan, Emily A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2003-06-01

    In the past few years, there has been a nascent convergence of scientific understanding of inherited human diseases with epigenetics. Identified epigenetic processes involved in human disease include covalent DNA modifications, covalent histone modifications, and histone relocation. Each of these processes influences chromatin structure and thereby regulates gene expression and DNA methylation, replication, recombination, and repair. The importance of these processes for nearly all aspects of normal growth and development is illustrated by the array of multi-system disorders and neoplasias caused by their dysregulation.

  4. Imaging findings of arteriovenous malformations involving lung and liver in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(Osler-weber-rendu disease): two cases report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Seong, Su Ok [Cheongju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of bleeding. Multiple telangiectases consisting of thin-walled, dilated vascular channels with arteriovenous communication may involve, for example, mucocutaneous tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the liver, lung, and brain. We report the imaging findings of two cases of HHT involving arteriovenous malformation of both the lungs and liver, a rare condition. Chest radiography revealed a round mass, while helical CT showed a feeding artery and draining vein with arteriovenous malformation in the lung. Color Doppler sonography revealed an enlarged and tortuous hepatic artery with high systolic velocity. CT demonstrated an enlarged hepatic artery, arteriovenous shunt, and early draining hepatic vein in the liver. Celiac angiography showed arteriovenous malformation.

  5. [Hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: recent advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the recent genetic advances in hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The different new genes discovered in 2010 and their underlying phenotypes will be presented.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary spherocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary spherocytosis hereditary spherocytosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. ...

  7. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  8. Functions of NOD-like receptors (NLRs in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei eZhong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptors (NLRs are highly conserved cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that perform critical functions in surveying the intracellular environment for the presence of infection, noxious substances, and metabolic perturbations. Sensing of these danger signals by NLRs leads to their oligomerization into large macromolecular scaffolds and the rapid deployment of effector signaling cascades to restore homeostasis. While some NLRs operate by recruiting and activating inflammatory caspases into inflammasomes, others trigger inflammation via alternative routes including the NF-κB, MAPK and IRF pathways. The critical role of NLRs in development and physiology is demonstrated by their clear implications in human diseases. Mutations in the genes encoding NLRP3 or NLRP12 lead to hereditary periodic fever syndromes, while mutations in CARD15 that encodes NOD2 are linked to Crohn’s disease or Blau’s syndrome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified a number of risk alleles encompassing NLR genes in a host of diseases including allergic rhinitis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multi-bacillary leprosy, vitiligo, early-onset menopause, and bone density loss in elderly women. Animal models have allowed the characterization of underlying effector mechanisms in a number of cases. In this review, we highlight the functions of NLRs in health and disease and discuss how the characterization of their molecular mechanisms provides new insights into therapeutic strategies for the management of inflammatory pathologies.

  9. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H;

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  10. Functional and molecular modelling studies of two hereditary fructose intolerance-causing mutations at arginine 303 in human liver aldolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, R; Esposito, G; Vitagliano, L; Race, V; Paglionico, I; Zancan, L; Zagari, A; Salvatore, F

    2000-09-15

    We have identified a novel hereditary fructose intolerance mutation in the aldolase B gene (i.e. liver aldolase) that causes an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at residue 303 (Arg(303)-->Gln). We previously described another mutation (Arg(303)-->Trp) at the same residue. We have expressed the wild-type protein and the two mutated proteins and characterized their kinetic properties. The catalytic efficiency of protein Gln(303) is approx. 1/100 that of the wild-type for substrates fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and fructose 1-phosphate. The Trp(303) enzyme has a catalytic efficiency approx. 1/4800 that of the wild-type for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate; no activity was detected with fructose 1-phosphate. The mutation Arg(303)-->Trp thus substitution impairs enzyme activity more than Arg(303)-->Gln. Three-dimensional models of wild-type, Trp(303) and Gln(303) aldolase B generated by homology-modelling techniques suggest that, because of its larger size, tryptophan exerts a greater deranging effect than glutamine on the enzyme's three-dimensional structure. Our results show that the Arg(303)-->Gln substitution is a novel mutation causing hereditary fructose intolerance and provide a functional demonstration that Arg(303), a conserved residue in all vertebrate aldolases, has a dominant role in substrate binding during enzyme catalysis.

  11. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  12. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Fog Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting.

  13. Murine iPSC-Derived Macrophages as a Tool for Disease Modeling of Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis due to Csf2rb Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Mucci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent an innovative source for the standardized in vitro generation of macrophages (Mφ. We here describe a robust and efficient protocol to obtain mature and functional Mφ from healthy as well as disease-specific murine iPSCs. With regard to morphology, surface phenotype, and function, our iPSC-derived Mφ (iPSC-Mφ closely resemble their counterparts generated in vitro from bone marrow cells. Moreover, when we investigated the feasibility of our differentiation system to serve as a model for rare congenital diseases associated with Mφ malfunction, we were able to faithfully recapitulate the pathognomonic defects in GM-CSF signaling and Mφ function present in hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP. Thus, our studies may help to overcome the limitations placed on research into certain rare disease entities by the lack of an adequate supply of disease-specific primary cells, and may aid the development of novel therapeutic approaches for herPAP patients.

  14. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  15. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport and cause hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Levi B; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy J; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L P; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa R; Law, Christopher S; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H; Mace, Emily M; Anderson, Mark S; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra L; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Rosenblum, Michael D; Dell, Sharon D; Waterfield, Michael R; Papa, Feroz R; Muzny, Donna M; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N Tony; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S; Shum, Anthony K

    2015-06-01

    Unbiased genetic studies have uncovered surprising molecular mechanisms in human cellular immunity and autoimmunity. We performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing in five families with an apparent mendelian syndrome of autoimmunity characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease. We identified four unique deleterious variants in the COPA gene (encoding coatomer subunit α) affecting the same functional domain. Hypothesizing that mutant COPA leads to defective intracellular transport via coat protein complex I (COPI), we show that COPA variants impair binding to proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Additionally, expression of mutant COPA results in ER stress and the upregulation of cytokines priming for a T helper type 17 (TH17) response. Patient-derived CD4(+) T cells also demonstrate significant skewing toward a TH17 phenotype that is implicated in autoimmunity. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease.

  16. [Advances in hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Graciela; Cadiz, Claudia; Lachman, J; Cornelio, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with a recessive autosomic pattern, in which inadequate iron (Fe) absorption is made by the intestinal cell. As consequence of that process, takes place a progressive accumulation of metal in different organs, predominantly in the liver. This leads to an alteration of liver structure and function: cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma (1). The gene implied in this pathology was identified (HFE) in 1996. This codes a similar molecule to the mayor histocompatibility complex type 1(MHC-T1 like) that can modulate the transport of PE binding the transferrin receptor. This progress allows a deep understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the homeostasis of the Fe and its alterations in the NH. The diagnosis of disease by means of a genetic test let to carry out a familiar screening and to detect asymptomatic carriers. This makes possible to begin the appropriate treatment at early stages of the disease in order to avoid its consequences and offering a better quality of life to these patients.

  17. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Chagas disease and human migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Human Chagas disease is a purely accidental occurrence. As humans came into contact with the natural foci of infection might then have become infected as a single addition to the already extensive host range of Trypanosoma cruzi that includes other primates. Thus began a process of adaptation and domiciliation to human habitations through which the vectors had direct access to abundant food as well as protection from climatic changes and predators. Our work deals with the extraction and specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction of T. cruzi DNA obtained from mummified human tissues and the positive diagnosis of Chagas disease in a series of 4,000-year-old Pre-Hispanic human mummies from the northern coast of Chile. The area has been inhabited at least for 7,000 years, first by hunters, fishers and gatherers, and then gradually by more permanent settlements. The studied specimens belonged to the Chinchorro culture, a people inhabiting the area now occupied by the modern city of Arica. These were essentially fishers with a complex religious ideology, which accounts for the preservation of their dead in the way of mummified bodies, further enhanced by the extremely dry conditions of the desert. Chinchorro mummies are, perhaps, the oldest preserved bodies known to date.

  19. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN.

  20. Misclassification and linkage of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, J.M.; Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Recently Kwon et al. published in the Journal their work describing linkage of a single large family with an inherited axonal neuropathy to chromosome 3, which they suggest is a second locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 2 and subsequently named {open_quotes}CMT2B.{close_quotes} We think that the diagnostic classification of this family as CMT2 is incorrect, since the subjects have a severe sensory neuropathy that fits within the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type 1 classification of Dyck (1993). Abnormal sensory findings in CMT2 separate it from distal spinal muscular atrophy but are a minor component of clinical symptoms in most CMT patients, as CMT is primarily a motor neuropathy. When Kwon et al. state that {open_quotes}all [patients] had characteristic findings in their physical examinations, including... evidence of foot sores that were slow to heal, or amputated limbs related to the poorly healing foot ulcers,{close_quotes} it suggests that a different diagnosis is more appropriate. In our experience collecting data on >950 individuals in >60 CMT1, CMT2, CMTX and CMT4 families, we have not seen foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, or amputations. Ulcerations leading to osteomyelitis and amputations are usually associated with severe sensory neuropathies. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Under the lash: Demodex mites in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Noreen; Kavanagh, Kevin; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2009-08-01

    Demodex mites, class Arachnida and subclass Acarina, are elongated mites with clear cephalothorax and abdomens, the former with four pairs of legs. There are more than 100 species of Demodex mite, many of which are obligatory commensals of the pilosebaceous unit of mammals including cats, dogs, sheep, cattle, pigs, goats, deer, bats, hamsters, rats and mice. Among them, Demodex canis, which is found ubiquitously in dogs, is the most documented and investigated. In excessive numbers D. canis causes the inflammatory disease termed demodicosis (demodectic mange, follicular mange or red mange), which is more common in purebred dogs and has a hereditary predisposition in breeding kennels1. Two distinct Demodex species have been confirmed as the most common ectoparasite in man. The larger Demodex folliculorum, about 0.3-0.4 mm long, is primarily found as a cluster in the hair follicle (Figure 1a), while the smaller Demodex brevis, about 0.2-0.3 mm long with a spindle shape and stubby legs, resides solitarily in the sebaceous gland (Figure 1b). These two species are also ubiquitously found in all human races without gender preference. The pathogenic role of Demodex mites in veterinary medicine is not as greatly disputed as in human diseases. In this article, we review the key literature and our joint research experience regarding the pathogenic potential of these two mites in causing inflammatory diseases of human skin and eye. We hope that the evidence summarized herein will invite readers to take a different look at the life of Demodex mites in several common human diseases.

  2. [Alzheimer's disease and human memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustache, F; Giffard, B; Rauchs, G; Chételat, G; Piolino, P; Desgranges, B

    2006-10-01

    Memory disorders observed in Alzheimer's disease gave rise, from the eighties, to a detailed analysis into the framework of cognitive neuropsychology which aimed at describing the deficits of very specific processes. Beyond their clinical interest, these studies contributed to the modelisation of human memory thanks to the characterization of different memory systems and their relationships. The first part of this paper gives an overview of the memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease and insists on particular cognitive phenomena. Hence, several examples are developed in the domains of semantic memory (such as hyperpriming and hypopriming effects) and autobiographical memory. Recent results highlight the existence of severe autobiographical amnesia observed in all neurodegenerative diseases, though with contrasting profiles: Ribot's gradient in Alzheimer's disease (showing that remote memories are better preserved than recent ones), reverse gradient in semantic dementia and no clear gradient in the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia. The second part of this article presents advances in cognitive neuroscience searching to disclose the cerebral substrates of these cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease. The studies using functional imaging techniques are the most informative regarding this problematic. While showing the dysfunctions of an extended network, they emphasize the selectivity of cerebral damages that are at the root of very specific cognitive dysfunctions, coming close in that way to the conceptions of cognitive neuropsychology. These neuroimaging studies unravel the existence of compensatory mechanisms, which until recently were clearly missing in the literature on neurodegenerative diseases. These different researches lead to a wide conception of human memory, not just limited to simple instrumental processes (encoding, storage, retrieval), but necessarily covering models of identity and continuity of the subject, which interact in a dynamic way

  3. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  4. Pyoderma Gangrenosum in a Patient with Hereditary Spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyoung Il; Paek, Jun Oh; Kim, Jeoung Eun; Ro, Young Suck; Ko, Joo Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare, relapsing cutaneous disease with 4 distinctive clinical manifestations: ulcerative, bullous, pustular, and vegetative lesions. It mainly occurs in adults and is frequently associated with systemic diseases, most commonly inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatologic disease, or hematological dyscrasias. However, there have been no previous reports of PG in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis, a common inherited hemolytic anemia. We report here a unique case of PG in a 15-year-old boy with underlying hereditary spherocytosis.

  5. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene testing for hereditary pancreatitis is now available. Ataxia telangiectasia The team at Johns Hopkins discovered that inherited ... are known to cause the clinical syndrome of "ataxia telangiectasia," and 2-3% of people with familial pancreatic ...

  6. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  7. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Its Implications Meeting A 1997 ELSI Report Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Iron Overload ...

  8. Human Microbiota and Ophthalmic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise J; Liu, Ji

    2016-09-01

    The human ocular surface, consisting of the cornea and conjunctiva, is colonized by an expansive, diverse microbial community. Molecular-based methods, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, has allowed for more comprehensive and precise identification of the species composition of the ocular surface microbiota compared to traditional culture-based methods. Evidence suggests that the normal microbiota plays a protective immunological role in preventing the proliferation of pathogenic species and thus, alterations in the homeostatic microbiome may be linked to ophthalmic pathologies. Further investigation of the ocular surface microbiome, as well as the microbiome of other areas of the body such as the oral mucosa and gut, and their role in the pathophysiology of diseases is a significant, emerging field of research, and may someday enable the development of novel probiotic approaches for the treatment and prevention of ophthalmic diseases.

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  10. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  11. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  12. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A R; Ryman, B E

    1971-11-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance.

  13. Development of a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (HAE-QoL: Spanish multi-centre research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prior Nieves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for a disease-specific instrument for assessing health-related quality of life in adults with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency, a rare, disabling and life-threatening disease. In this paper we report the protocol for the development and validation of a specific questionnaire, with details on the results of the process of item generation, domain selection, and the expert and patient rating phase. Methods/Design Semi-structured interviews were completed by 45 patients with hereditary angioedema and 8 experts from 8 regions in Spain. A qualitative content analysis of the responses was carried out. Issues raised by respondents were grouped into categories. Content analysis identified 240 different responses, which were grouped into 10 conceptual domains. Sixty- four items were generated. A total of 8 experts and 16 patients assessed the items for clarity, relevance to the disease, and correct dimension assignment. The preliminary version of the specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for hereditary angioedema (HAE-QoL v 1.1 contained 44 items grouped into 9 domains. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multi-centre research project that aims to develop a specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for adult patients with hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency. A preliminary version of the specific HAE-QoL questionnaire was obtained. The qualitative analysis of interviews together with the expert and patient rating phase helped to ensure content validity. A pilot study will be performed to assess the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and to decide on the final version.

  14. Human Plasma-Derived, Nanofiltered, C1-Inhibitor Concentrate (Cinryze®), a Novel Therapeutic Alternative for the Management of Hereditary Angioedema Resulting from C1-Inhibitor Deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farkas, Henriette; Varga, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (HAE-C1-INH) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal edema...

  15. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yang Wang; Ya-Li Zhao; Qiong Liu; Hu Yuan; Yun Gao; Lan Lan; Lan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI), including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI).Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause.This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI.Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686) with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing.These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years.Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c.2081G>A (p.G694E), in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL).The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members.In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136* and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient.Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686.The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL.It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  16. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  17. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected.

  18. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  19. Hereditary periodic fever and reactive amyloidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, J.C.H. van der; Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF) are a group of diseases characterised by recurrences of fever and inflammation separated by symptom-free intervals. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent entity within this group of disorders which further consists of

  20. Fast capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence analysis of ligase chain reaction products: human mitochondrial DNA point mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, J; Williams, P M; Williams, S J; Brown, M D; Wallace, D C; Karger, B L

    1996-12-01

    High speed capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) has been used to separate and detect point mutations using the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method utilizes short capillary columns (7.5 cm effective length) and fields of 400 V/cm to analyze DNA-ethidium bromide complexes using an He/Ne laser. The method was first demonstrated with a commercially available kit for LCR based on a lacI gene fragment inserted in a Bluescript II phagemid. LCR-CE-LIF was then applied to detect point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA, resulting in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Three severe mutations were analyzed in which the original base is substituted by a thymidine base at positions 3460, 11778 and 14459. Appropriate primers were designed with polyT tails for length discrimination of pooled samples. Successful detection of mutated samples was achieved, with appropriate correction for small amounts of nonspecific ligated product. The method is rapid, easy to implement, and automatable.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... InfoSearch: Hereditary angioedema MalaCards: c1 inhibitor deficiency Merck Manual Professional Version Orphanet: Hereditary angioedema Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) International Patient Organization for C1 Inhibitor Deficiencies National Organization for Rare ...

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  4. 84 Immuno-Safety of Recombinant Human C1 Inhibitor in Patients With Hereditary Angioedema: An Integrated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erik; Relan, Anurag; Kaufman, Leonard; Pijpstra, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Background Recombinant C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) is a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of acute angioedema attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). The amino acid sequence of rhC1INH is identical to that of endogenous C1INH. However, any recombinant protein may elicit antibodies against the protein and/or host related impurities (HRI). Clinical consequences of these antibodies can theoretically range from no clinical symptoms to allergic reactions and reduced C1INH activity due to neutralizing antibodies. Objective To analyze the immuno-safety of rhC1INH in symptomatic patients with HAE. Methods Plasma samples were collected pre-treatment and 22 and 90 days post-treatment of an acute angioedema attack. Plasma samples were tested for the presence of antibodies against plasma-derived C1INH and rhC1INH using 6 different, validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), to detect IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies against plasma-derived C1INH or rhC1INH. Antibodies against HRI in plasma samples were measured in an ELISA testing for all antibody classes. Plasma samples from normal healthy controls and HAE patients, never exposed to rhC1INH, were used to estimate cut off levels of the assays. Plasma samples with antibody levels above the cut-off level in the screening assays were tested in confirmatory displacement assay in case of anti-HRI antibodies and in an assay for neutralizing antibodies in case of antibodies against C1INH. Results Data from 155 symptomatic HAE patients having received a total of 424 administrations of rhC1INH were analyzed. The frequency of anti-C1INH antibody levels above the assay cut-off was low and similar in pre- and post-exposure samples (1.7 and 1.8%, respectively). Results above the assay cut-off were sporadic and transient. Occurrence of anti-C1INH antibodies did not correlate with repeated treatment or time since last treatment. No neutralizing antibodies were detected. A total of 5/155 (3%) rhC1INH-treated patients

  5. Autofluorescence manifestation in children with hereditary retinal diseases%儿童遗传性视网膜疾病的眼底自身荧光表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹绪胜; 马凯; 纪海霞; 彭晓燕

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the autofluorescence (AF) manifestation in children with hereditary retinal diseases. Methods The clinical data of 22 children (aged from 5 to 14 years) with hereditary retinal diseases were retrospectively analyzed. There were 8 children (16 eyes) with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, 3 children (6 eyes) with Stargardt macular dystrophy, 3 children (6 eyes) with macular cone dystrophy, 5 children (10 eyes) with primary retinitis pigmentosa, and 3 children (6 eyes) with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. The routine clinical examinations included present history, family history, visual acuity, silt-lamp microscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, color fundus photography and fundus autofluorescence angiography (FAF). Some patients received fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA),electroretinogram (ERG), electrooculogram (EOG), and ocular coherence tomography (OCT). The characteristics of AF in all the children were analyzed, and were compared with the images of color fundus and/or FFA. Results Symmetry round macular fluorescent weak or absent area was found in all Stargardt disease and cone dystrophy. Weak AF area with surrounded circular increased AF was found in 2 children (4 eyes) with cone dystrophy and 1 child (2 eyes) with Stargardt macular dystrophy. A central round area with regular or irregular intense AF was observed in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. RP children showed increased AF out of the macular region. Cellular or granular strong AF was found in the fovea of 3 children (5 eyes) with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. Conclusion The children with hereditary retinal diseases had special AF changes.%目的 观察儿童遗传性视网膜疾病的眼底自身荧光(FAF)特征.方法 回顾性分析22例临床资料完整、年龄5~14岁之问的遗传性视网膜疾病患儿的FAF检查结果.其中,Best卵黄样病变8例16只眼,Stargardt病3例6只眼,视锥细胞营养不良3例6只眼,原发性视网膜色素变性(RP)5例10只

  6. Follow-up nationwide survey on predictive genetic testing for late-onset hereditary neurological diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mariko; Kosho, Tomoki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Wakui, Keiko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2013-08-01

    A follow-up nationwide survey on predictive genetic testing for late-onset neurological diseases in Japan was conducted. A questionnaire was sent to 89 institutional members of the Japan's National Liaison Council for Clinical Sections of Medical Genetics, and was returned by 60 (67.4%). A total of 301 clients with an interest in predictive testing were accumulated from April 2006 to March 2011. The greatest interest was shown for spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD, n=110), followed by myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n=69), Huntington's disease (HD, n=52) and familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP, n=35). The ratios of clients who actually underwent predictive testing were: SCD, 21.8%; DM1, 39.1%; HD, 26.9%; and FAP, 74.3%, indicating that predictive testing was conducted very cautiously for untreatable neurological diseases in Japan. Clinical geneticists were predominantly involved in genetic counseling, whereas the participation of non-medical doctor (non-MD) staff, including nurses, clinical psychologists and genetic counselors, was not common. Lack of non-MD counseling staff was one of the most serious issues in conducting predictive testing, which has not been improved since the previous survey performed in 2006. Institutional arrangements, such as revision of medical insurance system regarding genetic testing and counseling, might be necessary to resolve this issue.

  7. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; França, Alfeu T; Grumach, Anete S; Motta, Abílio A; Fernandes, Fátima R; Campos, Regis A; Valle, Solange O; Rosário, Nelson A; Sole, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  8. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  9. [Hereditary spherocytosis: Review. Part I. History, demographics, pathogenesis, and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is the most frequent hereditary anemia excluding beta thalassemia in Argentina. Historical, demographic, genetic and pathogenic aspects of the disease are reviewed, and confirmatory laboratory tests are described. Special characteristics on the outcome of the disease in our population and prevalent protein deficiencies in our country are described. Emphasis is given on new available laboratory tests, which allow an earlier diagnosis using volume of blood samples significantly smaller than required for conventional tests.

  10. Genetically Modified Pig Models for Human Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nana Fan; Liangxue Lai

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies.Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases,some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology.Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy,physiology,and genome.Thus,pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases.This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological,cardiovascular,and diabetic disorders.We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  11. A preliminary score for the assessment of disease activity in hereditary recurrent fevers : results from the AIDAI (Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index) Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piram, Maryam; Frenkel, Joost; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Lachmann, Helen J.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Hentgen, Veronique; Neven, Benedicte; Stojanovic, Katia Stankovic; Simon, Anna; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Hoffman, Hal; Stojanov, Silvia; Duquesne, Agnes; Pillet, Pascal; Martini, Alberto; Pouchot, Jacques; Kone-Paut, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Background The systemic autoinflammatory disorders (SAID) share many clinical manifestations, albeit with variable patterns, intensity and frequency. A common definition of disease activity would be rational and useful in the management of these lifelong diseases. Moreover, standardised disease acti

  12. A preliminary score for the assessment of disease activity in hereditary recurrent fevers: results from the AIDAI (Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index) Consensus Conference.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piram, M.; Frenkel, J.; Gattorno, M.; Ozen, S.; Lachmann, H.J.; Goldbach-Mansky, R.; Hentgen, V.; Neven, B.; Stojanovic, K.S.; Simon, A.; Kuemmerle-Deschner, J.; Hoffman, H.; Stojanov, S.; Duquesne, A.; Pillet, P.; Martini, A.; Pouchot, J.; Kone-Paut, I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The systemic autoinflammatory disorders (SAID) share many clinical manifestations, albeit with variable patterns, intensity and frequency. A common definition of disease activity would be rational and useful in the management of these lifelong diseases. Moreover, standardised disease act

  13. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  14. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting early-s

  15. Understanding Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... INH) in their blood or this C1-INH protein does not function appropriately. These forms of hereditary angioedema are different ... In addition to a physical examination and medical history, HAE is diagnosed by measuring the level and function of C1-INH in the blood. Living with ...

  16. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  17. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  18. Uncovering disease-disease relationships through the incomplete human interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menche, Jörg; Sharma, Amitabh; Kitsak, Maksim; Ghiassian, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    According to the disease module hypothesis the cellular components associated with a disease segregate in the same neighborhood of the human interactome, the map of biologically relevant molecular interactions. Yet, given the incompleteness of the interactome and the limited knowledge of disease-associated genes, it is not obvious if the available data has sufficient coverage to map out modules associated with each disease. Here we derive mathematical conditions for the identifiability of disease modules and show that the network-based location of each disease module determines its pathobiological relationship to other diseases. For example, diseases with overlapping network modules show significant co-expression patterns, symptom similarity, and comorbidity, while diseases residing in separated network neighborhoods are clinically distinct. These tools represent an interactome-based platform to predict molecular commonalities between clinically related diseases, even if they do not share disease genes. PMID:25700523

  19. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  20. Physico-chemical properties of R140G and K141Q mutants of human small heat shock protein HspB1 associated with hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, Victoria V; Datskevich, Petr N; Sudnitsyna, Maria V; Strelkov, Sergei V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2013-08-01

    Some physico-chemical properties of R140G and K141Q mutants of human small heat shock protein HspB1 associated with hereditary peripheral neuropathy were analyzed. Mutation K141Q did not affect intrinsic Trp fluorescence and interaction with hydrophobic probe bis-ANS, whereas mutation R140G decreased both intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence of bis-ANS bound to HspB1. Both mutations decreased thermal stability of HspB1. Mutation R140G increased, whereas mutation K141Q decreased the rate of trypsinolysis of the central part (residues 5-188) of HspB1. Both the wild type HspB1 and its K141Q mutant formed large oligomers with apparent molecular weight ∼560 kDa. The R140G mutant formed two types of oligomers, i.e. large oligomers tending to aggregate and small oligomers with apparent molecular weight ∼70 kDa. The wild type HspB1 formed mixed homooligomers with R140G mutant with apparent molecular weight ∼610 kDa. The R140G mutant was unable to form high molecular weight heterooligomers with HspB6, whereas the K141Q mutant formed two types of heterooligomers with HspB6. In vitro measured chaperone-like activity of the wild type HspB1 was comparable with that of K141Q mutant and was much higher than that of R140G mutant. Mutations of homologous hot-spot Arg (R140G of HspB1 and R120G of αB-crystallin) induced similar changes in the properties of two small heat shock proteins, whereas mutations of two neighboring residues (R140 and K141) induced different changes in the properties of HspB1.

  1. Parasitic diseases in humans transmitted by vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewiński, Marcin; Derda, Monika; Hadaś, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress of medicine, parasitic diseases still pose a great threat to human health and life. Among parasitic diseases, those transmitted by vectors, mainly arthropods, play a particular role. These diseases occur most frequently in the poorest countries and affect a vast part of the human population. They include malaria, babesiosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and filariasis. This study presents those vector-transmitted diseases that are responsible for the greatest incidence and mortality of people on a global scale. Attention is focused primarily on diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, flies, Hemiptera and ticks.

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy in hereditary spherocytosis: Possible pathogenetic relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, A.I. (Univ. of Chicago); Miller, J.B.; Lester, E.P.; Bowers, T.K.; Jacob, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with hereditary spherocytosis led us to consider the possible pathogenetic relation between these two disorders. Twelve adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis had significant hypergammaglobulinemia in comparison to normal subjects. Retrospective analysis of previous illness in 140 patients with multiple myeloma showed a significant association between IgA myeloma and previous gallbladder disease. We propose that the chronic reticuloendothelial stimulation due to extravascular hemolysis, possibly potentiated by the inflammation associated with cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, may foster neoplastic transformation of immunocytes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, ultimately leading to the development of monoclonal gammopathy.

  3. Hereditary optic neuropathies share a common mitochondrial coupling defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrollier, Arnaud; Guillet, Virginie; Loiseau, Dominique; Gueguen, Naïg; de Crescenzo, Marie-Anne Pou; Verny, Christophe; Ferre, Marc; Dollfus, Hélène; Odent, Sylvie; Milea, Dan; Goizet, Cyril; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are heterogeneous diseases characterized by the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells leading to optic nerve atrophy and impairment of central vision. We found a common coupling defect of oxidative phosphorylation in fibroblasts of patients affected by autosomal dominant optic atrophy (mutations of OPA1), autosomal dominant optic atrophy associated with cataract (mutations of OPA3), and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, a disorder associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA complex I genes. Interestingly, the energetic defect was significantly more pronounced in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy patients with a more complex phenotype, the so-called plus phenotype.

  4. Hereditary angioedema type I: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Peralta, Francisca; Buller Vigueira, Eva; Cabello Pulido, Juana

    2016-01-28

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease with great heterogeneity of symptoms such as edema of the skin, gastro-intestinal mucosa and larynx or pharynx. Even though there are three types, the most frequent is type I, which is a result from a deficiency of the complement C1 inhibitor. The severity of its symptoms along with the low prevalence of the disease and the need for appropriate specific treatment make the diagnosis and treatment of the pathology an outstanding subject for the family physician. The present is the case of a male teenager with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency since he was six months old, angioedema on arms and legs since 11 years old and diagnosed with hereditary angioedema type I one year after. The definitive diagnosis of the disease enabled an appropriate treatment which consists in preventing outbreaks that may compromise the patient's life and, if they occur, administration of complement C1 inhibitor.

  5. The distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Alexander M; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Reilly, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the common feature of a length-dependent predominantly motor neuropathy. Many forms of dHMN have minor sensory abnormalities and/or a significant upper-motor-neuron component, and there is often an overlap with the axonal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) and with juvenile forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Eleven causative genes and four loci have been identified with autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked patterns of inheritance. Despite advances in the identification of novel gene mutations, 80% of patients with dHMN have a mutation in an as-yet undiscovered gene. The causative genes have implicated proteins with diverse functions such as protein misfolding (HSPB1, HSPB8, BSCL2), RNA metabolism (IGHMBP2, SETX, GARS), axonal transport (HSPB1, DYNC1H1, DCTN1) and cation-channel dysfunction (ATP7A and TRPV4) in motor-nerve disease. This review will summarise the clinical features of the different subtypes of dHMN to help focus genetic testing for the practising clinician. It will also review the neuroscience that underpins our current understanding of how these mutations lead to a motor-specific neuropathy and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. An understanding of the functional consequences of gene mutations will become increasingly important with the advent of next-generation sequencing and the need to determine the pathogenicity of large amounts of individual genetic data.

  6. Acute edema blisters in a hereditary angioedema cutaneous attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Romero, D; Di Marco, P; Malbrán, A

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of acute edema affecting the skin and the respiratory and digestive tracts. Acute edema blisters or hydro-static bullae develop after rapid accumulation of interstitial fluid usually associated to cardiac insufficiency. Lesions contain sterile fluid and break up easily resolving without scars. Blisters disappear when fluid accumulation resolves. We describe a patient developing recurrent acute edema blisters as a consequence of cutaneous hereditary angioedema attacks.

  7. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  8. Hereditary erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis and neutrophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wan-Jen; Gotlib, Jason

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis, and neutrophilia are rare inherited syndromes which exhibit Mendelian inheritance. Some patients with primary hereditary erythrocytosis exhibit a mutation in the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) which is associated with low serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels. Secondary congenital erythrocytosis may be characterized by normal or high serum EPO levels, and is related to high oxygen affinity haemoglobin variants, mutation of the enzyme biphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM), or defects in components of the oxygen-sensing pathway. Hereditary thrombocytosis was first linked to mutations in genes encoding thrombopoietin (THPO) or the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL. More recently, germline mutations in JAK2, distinct from JAK2 V617F, and mutation of the gelsolin gene, were uncovered in several pedigrees of hereditary thrombocytosis. Hereditary neutrophilia has been described in one family with an activating germline mutation in CSF3R. The mutational basis for most hereditary myeloproliferative disorders has yet to be identified. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  10. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  12. Reduced penetrance in human inherited disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... tant role in cellular senescence, tumorigenesis and in several diseases ... A correlation between epigenetic DNA modifications and human life span ... Most studies demonstrated that aging is associated with a relaxation in ...

  13. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  14. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...... in accumulation of misfolded proteins. Dependent on the properties of the protein and the efficiency of the PQC systems, the accumulated protein may be degraded or assembled into toxic oligomers and aggregates. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a number of very different protein misfolding diseases including...

  15. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliger Harold I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  16. Human Echinococcosis: A Neglected Disease

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    António Menezes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is among the most neglected parasitic diseases. Development of new drugs and other treatment modalities receives very little attention, if any. In most developed countries, Cystic Echinococcosis (CE is an imported disease of very low incidence and prevalence and is found almost exclusively in migrants from endemic regions. In endemic regions, predominantly settings with limited resources, patient numbers are high. Whole communities do not have access to appropriate treatment. The choice of treatment modalities is limited because of poor infrastructure and shortage of equipment and drugs. In this context, CE meets the criteria for a neglected disease. Furthermore, the terminology related to the designations around the parasite, its evolution and some therapeutic procedures is not uniform and sometimes inappropriate terms and wrong designations are used based on incorrect concepts. Although all of us know the different aspects of the disease it is pertinent to remember some important points and, above all, to clarify some aspects concerning the hydatid cyst's nomenclature in order to understand better the therapeutic options in the liver locations, particularly the different surgical approaches.

  17. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  18. [Primary human demodicosis. A disease sui generis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C-K; Zink, A; Wei, K-J; Dzika, E; Plewig, G; Chen, W

    2015-03-01

    Human Demodex mites (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis) are unique in that they are an obligate human ectoparasite that can inhabit the pilosebaceous unit lifelong without causing obvious host immune response in most cases. The mode of symbiosis between humans and human Demodex mites is unclear, while the pathogenicity of human Demodex mites in many inflammatory skin diseases is now better understood. Primary human demodicosis is a skin disease sui generis not associated with local or systemic immunosuppression. Diagnosis is often underestimated and differentiation from folliculitis, papulopustular rosacea and perioral dermatitis is not always straightforward. Dependent on the morphology and degree of inflammation, the clinical manifestations can be classified into spinulate, papulopustular, nodulocystic, crustic and fulminant demodicosis. Therapy success can be achieved only with acaricides/arachidicides. The effective doses, optimal regimen and antimicrobial resistance remain to be determined.

  19. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  20. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  1. Profiles of microbial fatty acids in the human metabolome are disease-specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna A Ktsoyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by a diverse and dense symbiotic microbiota, the composition of which is the result of host-microbe co-evolution and co-adaptation. This tight integration creates intense crosstalk and signalling between the host and microbiota at the cellular and metabolic levels. In many genetic or infectious diseases the balance between host and microbiota may be compromised resulting in erroneous communication. Consequently, the composition of the human metabolome, which includes the gut metabolome, may be different in health and disease states in terms of microbial products and metabolites entering systemic circulation. To test this hypothesis, we measured the level of hydroxy, branched, cyclopropyl and unsaturated fatty acids, aldehydes, and phenyl derivatives in blood of patients with a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, and in patients with peptic ulceration (PU resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection. Discriminant function analysis of a data matrix consisting of 94 cases as statistical units (37 FMF patients, 14 PU patients, and 43 healthy controls and the concentration of 35 microbial products in the blood as statistical variables revealed a high accuracy of the proposed model (all cases were correctly classified. This suggests that the profile of microbial products and metabolites in the human metabolome is specific for a given disease and may potentially serve as a biomarker for disease.

  2. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  3. Human Plasma-Derived, Nanofiltered, C1-Inhibitor Concentrate (Cinryze®), a Novel Therapeutic Alternative for the Management of Hereditary Angioedema Resulting from C1-Inhibitor Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Henriette; Varga, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (HAE-C1-INH) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal edema. Early diagnosis is essential. Management is aimed at the prompt elimination of full-fledged attacks, as well as at the prevention of edematous episodes. The most straightforward means for therapy is supplementation with the deficient C1-INH protein. Placebo-controlled and open clinica...

  4. A preliminary score for the assessment of disease activity in hereditary recurrent fevers: results from the AIDAI (Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index) Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piram, Maryam; Frenkel, Joost; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza; Lachmann, Helen J; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Hentgen, Véronique; Neven, Bénédicte; Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Simon, Anna; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Hoffman, Hal; Stojanov, Silvia; Duquesne, Agnès; Pillet, Pascal; Martini, Alberto; Pouchot, Jacques; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Background The systemic autoinflammatory disorders (SAID) share many clinical manifestations, albeit with variable patterns, intensity and frequency. A common definition of disease activity would be rational and useful in the management of these lifelong diseases. Moreover, standardised disease activity scores are required for the assessment of new therapies in constant development. The aim of this study was to develop preliminary activity scores for familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency, tumour necrosis factor receptor-1-associated periodic syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Methods The study was conducted using two well-recognised consensus formation methods: the Delphi technique and the nominal group technique. The results from a two-step survey and data from parent/patient interviews were used as preliminary data to develop the agenda for a consensus conference to build a provisional scoring system. Results 24 of 65 experts in SAID from 20 countries answered the web questionnaire and 16 attended the consensus conference. There was consensus agreement to develop separate activity scores for each disease but with a common format based on patient diaries. Fever and disease-specific clinical variables were scored according to their severity. A final score was generated by summing the score of all the variables divided by the number of days over which the diary was completed. Scores varied from 0 to 16 (0–13 in CAPS). These scores were developed for the purpose of clinical studies but could be used in clinical practice. Conclusion Using widely recognised consensus formation techniques, preliminary scores were obtained to measure disease activity in four main SAID. Further prospective validation study of this instrument will follow. PMID:21081528

  5. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  6. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  7. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  8. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
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  9. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  10. Pharmacokinetics of plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor after subcutaneous versus intravenous administration in subjects with mild or moderate hereditary angioedema: the PASSION study

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Cicardi, Marco; Suffritti, Chiara; Rusicke, Eva; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Stoll, Hildegard; Rossmanith, Tanja; Feussner, Annette; Kalina, Uwe; Kreuz, Wolfhart

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease caused by C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency, characterized by periodic attacks of acute edema affecting subcutaneous (SC) tissues and mucous membranes. Human C1-INH concentrate given intravenously (IV) is effective and safe, but venous access may be difficult. We compared SC and IV administration of human pasteurized C1-INH concentrate with respect to pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety. Study Design and Methods This ...

  11. Fibromatosis gingival hereditaria una inusual enfermedad genética: reporte de caso Hereditary gingival fibromatosis a rare genetic disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Harris Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Asociada a factores genéticos, que se caracterizada por aumento en el tamaño del tejido gingival, el cual genera dificultades emocionales, estéticas y funcionales. En el presente artículo se reporta un caso de una paciente femenina de 13 años con aumento generalizado en el volumen de la encía, que cubre casi todos los dientes, la historia familiar fue muy importante para el diagnóstico de fibromatosis gingival hereditaria, ya que la madre y un hermano presentaron la misma manifestación.Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare disorder, associated with genetic factors, characterized by various degrees of attached gingival overgrowth, which generates emotional, aesthetic and functional disorders. This article reports the case of a 13-year-old female who presented a generalized severe gingival overgrowth, involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost the whole dentition. The family history was very important for the diagnosis of hereditary gingival fibromatosis, as the mother and a brother had the same disorder.

  12. Hereditary opalescent dentin: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Siddharth; Bhowate, Rahul R; Bhati, Ashok

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic findings of hereditary opalescent dentin to facilitate an early diagnosis. Hereditary opalescent dentin (or dentinogenesis imperfecta) may manifest itself in three variations: i.e., Shields type I, Shields type II, and Shields type III. Dentinogenesis imperfecta occurs as an autosomal dominant trait with variable expressivity, either in presence with osteogenesis imperfecta or as a separate clinical entity in persons who have none of the features of osteogenesis imperfecta. A seven-year old boy and his mother were both diagnosed with hereditary opalescent dentin. A review of the family dental history revealed that this condition affected not only the child's mother but his maternal grandfather and great grandfather. Both the son and the mother exhibited the same clinical and radiologic features as those reported previously with no evidence of osteogenesis imperfecta. Being an autosomal disease, hereditary opalescent dentin runs in the family and can affect both the deciduous and permanent dentitions as a dominant trait. Once a patient is diagnosed with hereditary opalescent dentin, other family members should be evaluated given the condition is hereditary.

  13. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies.

  14. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  15. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  16. [Genetics of hereditary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Fergelot, Patricia; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The classification of hereditary abnormalities of iron metabolism was recently expanded and diversified. Genetic hemochromatosis now corresponds to six diseases, namely classical hemochromatosis HFE 1; juvenile hemochromatosis HFE 2 due to mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 1; hemochromatosis HFE 3 due to mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2); hemochromatosis HFE 4 caused by a mutation in the H subunit of ferritin; and hemochromatosis HFE 6 whose gene is hepcidine (HAMP). Systemic iron overload is also associated with aceruloplasminemia, atransferrinemia and the "Gracile" syndrome caused by mutations in BCS1L. The genes responsible for neonatal and African forms of iron overload are unknown. Other genetic diseases are due to localized iron overload: Friedreich's ataxia results from the expansion of triple nucleotide repeats within the frataxin (FRDA) gene; two forms of X-linked sideroblastic anemia are due to mutations within the delta aminolevulinate synthetase (ALAS 2) or ABC-7 genes; Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is caused by a pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK-2) defect; neuroferritinopathies; and hyperferritinemia--cataract syndrome due to a mutation within the L-ferritin gene. In addition to this wide range of genetic abnormalities, two other features characterize these iron disorders: 1) most are transmitted by an autosomal recessive mechanism, but some, including hemochromatosis type 4, have dominant transmission; and 2) most correspond to cytosolic iron accumulation while some, like Friedreich's ataxia, are disorders of mitochondrial metabolism.

  17. Hereditary angioedema: Not an allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Bhivgade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder due to a deficiency or malfunction of C1 esterase inhibitor. We herein describe a case of 25-year-old male who presented with swelling over face since one day. There was history of similar episodes since two years with gradual subsidence of swelling without any treatment. Investigations revealed grossly reduced complement C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor level. Patient was diagnosed to have hereditary angioedema type 1 and started on stanozolol 2 mg three times a day with no recurrence in one year of follow-up. Hereditary angioedema resembles angioedema of an allergic reaction. However, the cause is different.

  18. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a population-based study of prevalence and mortality in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early d...

  19. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  20. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  1. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated.

  2. Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Pyropoikilocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Bayhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 17-day-old boy was admitted because of jaundice and anemia. He was born weighing 2900 g subsequent to a term gestation as the fourth child of first-degree cousin parents. The previous history revealed the administration of phototherapy for 4 days starting from the first day of life. Complete blood count revealed hemoglobin (Hb of 6.9 g/dL, hematocrit of 19.8%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV of 87.5 fL, red cell distribution width (RDW of 37%, white blood cell count of 11.4x109/L, and platelet count of 263x109/L. Corrected reticulocyte count was 5.3%. Peripheral blood smear revealed polychromasia and pyropoikilocytosis. Direct antibody test was negative. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and pyrimidine 5’ nucleotidase levels were normal. An erythrocyte transfusion was administered with a diagnosis of non-immune hemolytic anemia and the patient was discharged at the 26th day of life with initiation of folic acid. During his outpatient followup, he required erythrocyte transfusions 2 more times and the last transfusion was performed when he was 3 months old. At a visit 3 months after the last transfusion, his blood count was as follows: Hb of 9.5 g/dL, hematocrit of 28.2%, MCV of 68.2 fL, and RDW of 30.5%. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility was found to be normal and Hb electrophoresis revealed Hb F of 6.6% and Hb A2 of 1.7%. Upon physical examination he had mild jaundice and no splenomegaly. The parents’ blood counts were within normal ranges. Peripheral blood smear revealed prominent elliptocytes and occasional microcytic and fragmented erythrocytes with poikilocytosis (Figure 1. The clinical findings and laboratory results were diagnostic for the hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP type of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, but in vitro fragmentation testing was not performed

  3. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presente...

  4. Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Steffen, Leta S; Howell, Melanie H.; Pusack, Timothy J; Lawrence, Chris; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish correspondence: Corresponding author. Children's Hospital Boston, Enders Bldg, Rm 570, 300 Longwood Ave Boston, MA 02115. Tel.: +1 617 355 7576. (Kunkel, Louis M.) (Kunkel, Louis M.) Program in Genomics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children's Hospital Boston - Boston--> , MA 02115--> - UNITED STATES (Guyon, Jeffrey R.) Program in Genomics a...

  5. Family Line Investigation on Two Cases of Leber's Hereditary Optic Nerve Disease%Leber遗传性视神经病2例家系报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林柳燕; 郝小波

    2005-01-01

    Leber遗传性视神经病(Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy,LHON)1858年由Von Grade等首先报告,Leber于1871年确定该病的遗传性。1988年,Wallace等首次发现LHON存在线粒体DNA(mitochon—drial DNA,mtDNA)的病理性突变,他们发现在许多LHON家族成员均有mtDNMl778位点的点突变。此后,许多研究证实LHON为母系遗传性疾病,其主要病因是线粒体基因组某些位点发生突变,是一种最为常见的线粒体遗传病。

  6. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  7. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  8. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  9. A Case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Jae; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Kang, Seung Hwa; Mun, Se Kwon; Kim, Heyjin; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Jin; Kang, Hye Jin

    2013-03-25

    We recently encountered a case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome. Patient was initially diagnosed with Gilbert's syndrome and observed, but other findings suggestive of concurrent hemolysis, such as splenomegaly and gallstones were noted during the follow-up period. Therefore, further evaluations, including a peripheral blood smear, osmotic fragility test, autohemolysis test, and red blood cell membrane protein test were performed, and coexisting hereditary spherocytosis was diagnosed. Genotyping of the conjugation enzyme uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase was used to confirm Gilbert's syndrome. Because of the high prevalence rates and similar symptoms of these 2 diseases, hereditary spherocytosis can be masked in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. In review of a case and other article, the possibility of the coexistence of these 2 diseases should be considered, especially in patients with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia who also have splenomegaly and gallstones.

  10. Dispersion of compound muscle action potential in hereditary neuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael; Pannoni, Valerie; Lewis, Richard A; Logigian, Eric L; Naguib, Demian; Shy, Michael E; Cleland, James; Herrmann, David N

    2006-10-01

    Distal compound muscle action potential (DCMAP) dispersion, defined as a DCMAP duration > or = 9 ms, and proximal-distal (P-D) CMAP dispersion are considered useful in the electrodiagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Distal and P-D CMAP dispersion have not been fully studied in hereditary neuropathies, and it is not known whether these measures distinguish hereditary from acquired demyelination. We compared DCMAP duration and P-D CMAP dispersion in 91 genetically characterized hereditary neuropathies and 33 subjects with CIDP. DCMAP dispersion was more frequent in nerves affected by CIDP (41.5%) than in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT)1A (24.4%), CMT1B (7.4%), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) (10.5%), or CMTX (9.8%). P-D CMAP dispersion was more frequent in CIDP (27.7% of nerves) than in hereditary neuropathies (16.3%) when applying American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria; however, its frequency was similar in CIDP and the hereditary neuropathies using the more restrictive criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM). Although dispersion is more common in CIDP than in the hereditary neuropathies, DCMAP and P-D dispersion occur in at least one motor nerve in a significant proportion of hereditary neuropathies, and cannot be used in isolation to distinguish acquired from hereditary demyelination.

  11. Human lagochilascariasis-A rare helminthic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulcinea Maria Barbosa Campos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a helminth of the order Ascaroidea, genus Lagochilascaris that comprises 6 species, among which only Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909, is implicated in the human form of the disease. It is remarkable that the majority of cases of human lagochilascariasis in the Americas have been reported in Brazil. The natural definitive hosts of this parasite seem to be wild felines and canines. Lagochilascariasis is mostly a chronic human disease that can persist for several years, in which the parasite burrows into the subcutaneous tissues of the neck, paranasal sinuses, and mastoid. L. minor exhibits remarkable ability to migrate through the tissues of its hosts, destroying even bone tissue. Fatal cases have been described in which the parasite was found in the lungs or central nervous system. Treatment is often palliative, with recurrence of lesions. This paper summarizes the main features of the disease and its etiologic agent, including prevalence, life cycle, clinical course, and treatment.

  12. Heartworm disease in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John W; Genchi, Claudio; Kramer, Laura H; Guerrero, Jorge; Venco, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Heartworm disease due to Dirofilaria immitis continues to cause severe disease and even death in dogs and other animals in many parts of the world, even though safe, highly effective and convenient preventatives have been available for the past two decades. Moreover, the parasite and vector mosquitoes continue to spread into areas where they have not been reported previously. Heartworm societies have been established in the USA and Japan and the First European Dirofilaria Days (FEDD) Conference was held in Zagreb, Croatia, in February of 2007. These organizations promote awareness, encourage research and provide updated guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of heartworm disease. The chapter begins with a review of the biology and life cycle of the parasite. It continues with the prevalence and distribution of the disease in domestic and wild animals, with emphasis on more recent data on the spreading of the disease and the use of molecular biology techniques in vector studies. The section on pathogenesis and immunology also includes a discussion of the current knowledge of the potential role of the Wolbachia endosymbiont in inflammatory and immune responses to D. immitis infection, diagnostic use of specific immune responses to the bacteria, immunomodulatory activity and antibiotic treatment of infected animals. Canine, feline and ferret heartworm disease are updated with regard to the clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, therapy and management of the disease, with special emphasis on the recently described Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD) Syndrome in cats. The section devoted to heartworm infection in humans also includes notes on other epizootic filariae, particularly D. repens in humans in Europe. The chapter concludes with a discussion on emerging strategies in heartworm treatment and control, highlighting the potential role of tetracycline antibiotics in adulticidal therapy.

  13. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  14. Unsolved issues related to human mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombès, Anne; Auré, Karine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Gilleron, Mylène; Jardel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Human mitochondrial diseases, defined as the diseases due to a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect, represent a large group of very diverse diseases with respect to phenotype and genetic causes. They present with many unsolved issues, the comprehensive analysis of which is beyond the scope of this review. We here essentially focus on the mechanisms underlying the diversity of targeted tissues, which is an important component of the large panel of these diseases phenotypic expression. The reproducibility of genotype/phenotype expression, the presence of modifying factors, and the potential causes for the restricted pattern of tissular expression are reviewed. Special emphasis is made on heteroplasmy, a specific feature of mitochondrial diseases, defined as the coexistence within the cell of mutant and wild type mitochondrial DNA molecules. Its existence permits unequal segregation during mitoses of the mitochondrial DNA populations and consequently heterogeneous tissue distribution of the mutation load. The observed tissue distributions of recurrent human mitochondrial DNA deleterious mutations are diverse but reproducible for a given mutation demonstrating that the segregation is not a random process. Its extent and mechanisms remain essentially unknown despite recent advances obtained in animal models.

  15. The role of formins in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWard, Aaron D; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Matheson, Stephen F; Alberts, Arthur S

    2010-02-01

    Formins are a conserved family of proteins that play key roles in cytoskeletal remodeling. They nucleate and processively elongate non-branched actin filaments and also modulate microtubule dynamics. Despite their significant contributions to cell biology and development, few studies have directly implicated formins in disease pathogenesis. This review highlights the roles of formins in cell division, migration, immunity, and microvesicle formation in the context of human disease. In addition, we discuss the importance of controlling formin activity and protein expression to maintain cell homeostasis.

  16. Human papillomavirus-associated diseases and cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Yang; Jianbo Zhu Co-first author; Xiaoyue Song; Yan Qi; Xiaobin Cui; Feng Li 

    2015-01-01

    Human papilomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in cervical cancer cels and skin papiloma cels, which have a variety of types, including low-risk and high-risk types. HPV genome replication requires the host cel’s DNA synthesis machinery, and HPVs encode proteins that maintain diferentiated epithelial cels in a replication-competent state. HPV types are tissue-specific and generaly produce diferent types of le-sions, either benign or malignant. This review examines diferent HPV types and their associated diseases and presents therapeutic options for the treatment of HPV-positive diseases.

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  18. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-10-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future.

  19. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  20. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  1. The humanistic burden of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero, Teresa; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    and impact of HAE types I and II from the patient perspective. The HAE Burden of Illness Study in Europe was conducted in Spain, Germany, and Denmark to assess the real-world experience of HAE from the patient perspective via a one-time survey, which included items on clinical characteristics and physical......Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease marked by spontaneous, recurrent attacks of swelling. The broad range of consequences of HAE on patients? lives is not well understood. The study objective was to comprehensively characterize the burden of illness...

  2. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  3. [Hereditary phaeochromocytoma in twins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Patócs, Attila; Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Phaeochromocytoma is a tumor of the catecholamine-producing cells of the adrenal gland. Extraadrenal phaeochromocytomas are frequently called paragangliomas. The majority of phaeochromocytomas are sporadic, however, about 25-30% are caused by genetic mutation. These tumor are frequently referred as hereditary phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Their incidence increases continuously which can be attributed to availability of genetic examination and to the discovery of novel genes. The 47-year-old female patient underwent abdominal computed tomography which revealed bilateral adrenal gland enlargement. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, the 131-I- metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, urinary catecholamines and serum chomogranin A measurements confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral phaeochromocytomas. The genetically identical twin sister of the patient was also diagnosed with hormonally active bilateral phaechromocytoma, suggesting the genetic origin of phaeochromocytoma. Mutation screening confirmed a germline mutation of the transmembrane protein 127 tumorsupressor gene in both patients. Both patients underwent cortical-sparing adrenalectomy. The adrenal gland with the larger tumor was totally resected, while in the opposite side only the tumor was resected and a small part of the cortex was saved. After the operation urinary catecholamines and serum chromogranin A returned to normal in both patients. Adrenocortical deficiency was absent in the first patient, but her sister developed adrenal insufficiency requiring glucocorticoid replacement. To the best of the authors' knowledge phaeochromocytoma affecting twins has never been described earlier. Genetic examination performed in siblings confirmed the presence of the mutant gene through four generations. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1326-1330.

  4. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ismail Yasawy; Ulrich Richard Folsch; Wolfgang Eckhard Schmidt; Michael Schwend

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an underrecognized,preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting,abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to Ⅳ fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  5. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawy, Mohamed Ismail; Folsch, Ulrich Richard; Schmidt, Wolfgang Eckhard; Schwend, Michael

    2009-05-21

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an under-recognized, preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting, abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to IV fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  6. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  7. The role of chemerin in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stojek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue is not merely a storage depot of triacylglycerols but also a major endocrine organ. Its cells, including adipocytes, synthesize and secrete a range of biologically active molecules termed adipokines. Adipokines that display the properties of cytokines are often called adipocytokines. In recent years there has been increasing interest in a new adipokine called chemerin. Chemerin is a protein synthesized mostly by the adipose tissue and the liver as inactive pre-pro-chemerin. After the intracellular hydrolytic cutting off of the 20-amino-acid N-terminal polypeptide, it is secreted into the bloodstream as inactive pro-chemerin. Biologically active chemerin is then derived from pro-chemerin after cleavage of the C-terminal fragment by serum proteases involved in inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis. Proteolytic cleavage leads to formation of several chemerin-derived peptides, both biologically active (often with opposing functions and inactive.Within the last decade, there has been a growing number of publications regarding the role of chemerin in human disease. It seems to be implicated in the inflammatory response, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and alimentary tract disorders. The article presents the most recent information on the role of chemerin in human disease, and specifically alimentary tract disorders. The available evidence suggests that chemerin is an important link between adipose tissue mass, metabolic processes, the immune system and inflammation, and therefore plays a major role in human pathophysiology.

  8. Genes of periodontopathogens expressed during human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yo-Han; Kozarov, Emil V; Walters, Sheila M; Cao, Sam Linsen; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2002-12-01

    Since many bacterial genes are environmentally regulated, the screening for virulence-associated factors using classical genetic and molecular biology approaches can be biased under laboratory growth conditions of a given pathogen, because the required conditions for expression of many virulence factors may not occur during in vitro growth. Thus, technologies have been developed during the past several years to identify genes that are expressed during disease using animal models of human disease. However, animal models are not always truly representative of human disease, and with many pathogens, there is no appropriate animal model. A new technology, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) was thus engineered and tested in our laboratory to screen for genes of pathogenic organisms induced specifically in humans, without the use of animal or artificial models of infection. This technology uses pooled sera from patients to probe for genes expressed exclusively in vivo (or ivi, in vivo-induced genes). IVIAT was originally designed for the study of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis, but we have now extended it to other oral pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis. One hundred seventy-one thousand (171,000) clones from P. gingivalis strain W83 were screened and 144 were confirmed positive. Over 300,000 A. actinomycetemcomitans clones were probed, and 116 were confirmed positive using a quantitative blot assay. MAT has proven useful in identifying previously unknown in vivo-induced genes that are likely involved in virulence and are thus excellent candidates for use in diagnostic : and therapeutic strategies, including vaccine design.

  9. Mitochondria: impaired mitochondrial translation in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Horvath, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial protein synthesis cause a subgroup of mitochondrial diseases, which are usually associated with decreased activities of multiple respiratory chain (RC) enzymes. The clinical presentations of these disorders are often disabling, progressive or fatal, affecting the brain, liver, skeletal muscle, heart and other organs. Currently there are no effective cures for these disorders and treatment is at best symptomatic. The diagnosis in patients with multiple respiratory chain complex defects is particularly difficult because of the massive number of nuclear genes potentially involved in intra-mitochondrial protein synthesis. Many of these genes are not yet linked to human disease. Whole exome sequencing rapidly changed the diagnosis of these patients by identifying the primary defect in DNA, and preventing the need for invasive and complex biochemical testing. Better understanding of the mitochondrial protein synthesis apparatus will help us to explore disease mechanisms and will provide clues for developing novel therapies.

  10. Molecular genetics of distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irobi, Joy; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies comprise a wide variety of diseases primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system. The best-known peripheral neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) described in 1886 by J.-M. Charcot, P. Marie and H.H. Tooth. In 1980, A.E. Harding and P.K. Thomas showed that in a large group of individuals with CMT, several only had motor abnormalities on clinical and electrophysiological examination, whereas sensory abnormalities were absent. This exclusively motor variant of CMT was designated as spinal CMT or hereditary distal spinal muscular atrophy, and included in the distal hereditary motor neuropathies (distal HMN). The distal HMN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to the mode of inheritance, age at onset and clinical evolution. Since the introduction of positional cloning, 12 chromosomal loci and seven disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive distal HMN. Most of the genes involved have housekeeping functions, as in RNA processing, translation synthesis, glycosylation, stress response, apoptosis, but also axonal trafficking and editing. Functional characterization of the mutations will help to unravel the cellular processes that underlie the specificity of motor neuropathies leading to neurogenic muscular atrophy of distal limb muscles. Here we review the recent progress of the molecular genetics of distal HMN and discuss the genes implicated.

  11. Prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and occurrence of neurological symptoms in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E;

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms....

  12. Diagnostic evaluation of hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE and non-HFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The management and understanding of hereditary hemochromatosis have evolved with recent advances in iron biology and the associated discovery of numerous genes involved in iron metabolism. HFE-related (type 1) hemochromatosis remains the most frequent form, characterized by C282Y mutation homozygosity. Rare forms of hereditary hemochromatosis include type 2 (A and B, juvenile hemochromatosis caused by HJV and HAMP mutation), type 3 (related to TFR2 mutation), and type 4 (A and B, ferroportin disease). The diagnostic evaluation relies on comprehension of the involved pathophysiologic defect, and careful characterization of the phenotype, which gives clues to guide appropriate genetic testing.

  13. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lin; SUN Qing-miao; ZANG Dong-jie; ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2011-01-01

    A case of hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was reported. A 39-year-old woman presented with small and tiny telangiectases on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms at birth. The numbers and sizes of the lesions increased gradually and she had no hemorrhagic diathesis and systemic diseases. No similar patients were found in her family. Upon physical examination, telangiectases were found on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms; and a telangiectatic erythema was found on the right forearm 25 mm ×40 mm in size. Histopathology examination showed a normal epidermis and dilation of the capillaries at upper dermis. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was diagnosed.

  14. The molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance in Italian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, R; Scarano, M I; Esposito, G; Chiandetti, L; Izzo, P; Salvatore, F

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the molecular defects of the aldolase B gene in five unrelated patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance. The techniques used were DNA amplification, direct sequencing and allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization. The most frequent substitutions found in the hereditary fructose intolerance alleles analysed were the A174D and the A149P mutations, which account for 50% and 30% of the alleles, respectively. In two unrelated families, we found a rare mutation, the MD delta 4 previously described only in one British family, which may be an important cause of the disease in Italy.

  15. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This duplicat

  16. Allelic imbalance in hereditary and sporadic prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, B.; Houwelingen, K.P. van; Ruijter, T.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we evaluate the pattern of allelic imbalance (AI) in both sporadic prostate cancer (SPC) and hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) at loci that frequently show allelic imbalance in sporadic prostate cancer, or are believed to have a putative role in the disease. METHODS: DNA ob

  17. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  18. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  20. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening.

  1. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  2. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  3. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  4. Eeyore: a novel mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Miller

    Full Text Available Animal models that recapitulate human disease are proving to be an invaluable tool in the identification of novel disease-associated genes. These models can improve our understanding of the complex genetic mechanisms involved in disease and provide a basis to guide therapeutic strategies to combat these conditions. We have identified a novel mouse model of non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss with linkage to a region on chromosome 18. Eeyore mutant mice have early onset progressive hearing impairment and show abnormal structure of the sensory epithelium from as early as 4 weeks of age. Ultrastructural and histological analyses show irregular hair cell structure and degeneration of the sensory hair bundles in the cochlea. The identification of new genes involved in hearing is central to understanding the complex genetic pathways involved in the hearing process and the loci at which these pathways are interrupted in people with a genetic hearing loss. We therefore discuss possible candidate genes within the linkage region identified in eeyore that may underlie the deafness phenotype in these mice. Eeyore provides a new model of hereditary sensorineural deafness and will be an important tool in the search for novel deafness genes.

  5. Late onset hereditary episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damak, M; Riant, F; Boukobza, M; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Bousser, M-G; Vahedi, K

    2009-05-01

    Episodic ataxias (EA) are hereditary paroxysmal neurological diseases with considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. So far seven loci have been reported and four different genes have been identified. Analysis of additional sporadic or familial cases is needed to better delineate the clinical and genetic spectrum of EA. A two generation French family with late onset episodic ataxia was examined. All consenting family members had a brain MRI with volumetric analysis of the cerebellum. Haplotype analysis was performed for the EA2 locus (19p13), the EA5 locus (2q22), the EA6 locus (5p13) and the EA7 locus (19q13). Mutation screening was performed for all exons of CACNA1A (EA2), EAAT1 (EA6) and the coding sequence of KCNA1 (EA1). Four family members had episodic ataxia with onset between 48 and 56 years of age but with heterogeneity in the severity and duration of symptoms. The two most severely affected had daily attacks of EA with a slowly progressive and disabling permanent cerebellar ataxia and a poor response to acetazolamide. Brain MRI showed in three affected members a decrease in the ratio of cerebellar volume:total intracranial volume, indicating cerebellar atrophy. No deleterious mutation was found in CACNA1A, SCA6, EAAT1 or KCNA1. In addition, the EA5 locus was excluded. A new phenotype of episodic ataxia has been described, characterised clinically by a late onset and progressive permanent cerebellar signs, and genetically by exclusion of the genes so far identified in EA.

  6. Uniparental disomy and human disease: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazawa, Kazuki; Ogata, Tsutomu; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2010-08-15

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) refers to the situation in which both homologues of a chromosomal region/segment have originated from only one parent. This can involve the entire chromosome or only a small segment. As a consequence of UPD, or uniparental duplication/deficiency of part of a chromosome, there are two types of developmental risk: aberrant dosage of genes regulated by genomic imprinting and homozygosity of a recessive mutation. UPD models generated by reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation heterozygote intercrosses have been a powerful tool to investigate genomic imprinting in mice, whereas novel UPD patients such as those with cystic fibrosis and Prader-Willi syndrome, triggered the clarification of recessive diseases and genomic imprinting disorders in human. Newly developed genomic technologies as well as conventional microsatellite marker methods have been contributing to the functional and mechanistic investigation of UPD, leading to not only the acquisition of clinically valuable information, but also the further clarification of diverse genetic processes and disease pathogenesis.

  7. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: screening procedures and pulmonary angiography in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease with a high prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The first symptom of HHT may be stroke or fatal hemoptysis associated with the presence of PAVM....

  8. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies : a genotype-phenotype correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven g

  9. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  10. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  11. The Microbiota, Chemical Symbiosis, and Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of mammalian-microbial mutualism has expanded by combing microbial sequencing with evolving molecular and cellular methods, and unique model systems. Here, the recent literature linking the microbiota to diseases of three of the key mammalian mucosal epithelial compartments – nasal, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) tract – is reviewed with a focus on new knowledge about the taxa, species, proteins and chemistry that promote health and impact progression toward disease. The information presented is further organized by specific diseases now associated with the microbiota:, Staphylococcus aureus infection and rhinosinusitis in the nasal-sinus mucosa; cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and asthma in the pulmonary tissues. For the vast and microbially dynamic GI compartment, several disorders are considered, including obesity, atherosclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, drug toxicity, and even autism. Our appreciation of the chemical symbiosis ongoing between human systems and the microbiota continues to grow, and suggest new opportunities for modulating this symbiosis using designed interventions. PMID:25305474

  12. An update on hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Marylee; Shaker, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema affects approximately 1 in 50,000 individuals without gender or ethnic preference. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a decreased level (type I) or function (type II) of C1 inhibitor. Patients experience repeated episodes of angioedema involving sites that include the face, extremities, gastrointestinal tract, and larynx. Treatment involves measures to increase functioning levels of active C1 inhibitor through stimulation of endogenous pathways or exogenous supplementation. Additional therapies targeted at inhibition of bradykinin can also be used to treat episodes of angioedema. Treatment may be indicated for both acute episodes of angioedema and prevention of future episodes.

  13. Human prion diseases in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Holman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prion diseases are a family of rare, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals. The most common form of human prion disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, occurs worldwide. Variant CJD (vCJD, a recently emerged human prion disease, is a zoonotic foodborne disorder that occurs almost exclusively in countries with outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This study describes the occurrence and epidemiology of CJD and vCJD in the United States. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of CJD and vCJD deaths using death certificates of US residents for 1979-2006, and those identified through other surveillance mechanisms during 1996-2008. Since CJD is invariably fatal and illness duration is usually less than one year, the CJD incidence is estimated as the death rate. During 1979 through 2006, an estimated 6,917 deaths with CJD as a cause of death were reported in the United States, an annual average of approximately 247 deaths (range 172-304 deaths. The average annual age-adjusted incidence for CJD was 0.97 per 1,000,000 persons. Most (61.8% of the CJD deaths occurred among persons >or=65 years of age for an average annual incidence of 4.8 per 1,000,000 persons in this population. Most deaths were among whites (94.6%; the age-adjusted incidence for whites was 2.7 times higher than that for blacks (1.04 and 0.40, respectively. Three patients who died since 2004 were reported with vCJD; epidemiologic evidence indicated that their infection was acquired outside of the United States. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Surveillance continues to show an annual CJD incidence rate of about 1 case per 1,000,000 persons and marked differences in CJD rates by age and race in the United States. Ongoing surveillance remains important for monitoring the stability of the CJD incidence rates, and detecting occurrences of vCJD and possibly other novel prion diseases in the United States.

  14. Hereditary nephritis (with unusual renal histology): report of a first case from the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Jankey, N

    1976-11-01

    A 21-year-old Grenadian girl undergoing investigation in Trinidad for anaemia was diagnosed as a case of hereditary nephritis. She had the clinical features of a nephropathy, nerve deafness and an ocular defect. Renal histology was exceptional in that in addition to the typical findings of a hereditary nephritis, cystic areas generally associated with medullary cystic disease were noted. Several members of the patient's maternal family were afflicted with either deafness visual distrubances or renal disease.

  15. Long-term evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-like symptoms in rotenone administered rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Laura; Philip, Ann L; Martinez, Juan C; Guttierez, Juan C; Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao; Thomas, Biju B

    2015-01-12

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons that lead to the loss of central vision. This study is aimed at evaluating the LHON symptoms in rats administered with rotenone microspheres into the superior colliculus (SC). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) analysis showed substantial loss of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in rotenone injected rats. Optokinetic testing in rotenone treated rats showed decrease in head-tracking response. Electrophysiological mapping of the SC surface demonstrated attenuation of visually evoked responses; however, no changes were observed in the ERG data. The progressive pattern of disease manifestation in rotenone administered rats demonstrated several similarities with human disease symptoms. These rats with LHON-like symptoms can serve as a model for future investigators to design and implement reliable tests to assess the beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions for LHON disease.

  16. HIV and the spectrum of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Sebastian; Nelson, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes systemic T cell destruction and reduced cell-mediated immunity that leads to a wide range of opportunistic infections and cancers. Second, it directly damages many tissues - gut, brain, lung - through mononuclear cell infection and activation. Third, through immune activation and effects on endothelia, it can cause more subtle systemic organ damage, such as chronic cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary and central nervous system disease. Antiretroviral treatment has enabled HIV-infected persons to live with chronic infection, although with some side-effects and mortality, including reactions due to the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). As cohorts of infected people get older, age-related diseases will combine with chronic HIV infection to produce disabilities whose scale is not yet understood. HIV is detectable in tissues by immunohistochemistry when infection loads are high, such as at first presentation. Pathologists should proactively consider HIV disease in routine diagnostic work, so as to identify more HIV-infected patients and enable their optimal management.

  17. Blood type biochemistry and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, D Rose; Sumner, Susan C J

    2016-11-01

    Associations between blood type and disease have been studied since the early 1900s when researchers determined that antibodies and antigens are inherited. In the 1950s, the chemical identification of the carbohydrate structure of surface antigens led to the understanding of biosynthetic pathways. The blood type is defined by oligosaccharide structures, which are specific to the antigens, thus, blood group antigens are secondary gene products, while the primary gene products are various glycosyltransferase enzymes that attach the sugar molecules to the oligosaccharide chain. Blood group antigens are found on red blood cells, platelets, leukocytes, plasma proteins, certain tissues, and various cell surface enzymes, and also exist in soluble form in body secretions such as breast milk, seminal fluid, saliva, sweat, gastric secretions, urine, and amniotic fluid. Recent advances in technology, biochemistry, and genetics have clarified the functional classifications of human blood group antigens, the structure of the A, B, H, and Lewis determinants and the enzymes that produce them, and the association of blood group antigens with disease risks. Further research to identify differences in the biochemical composition of blood group antigens, and the relationship to risks for disease, can be important for the identification of targets for the development of nutritional intervention strategies, or the identification of druggable targets. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:517-535. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. Histology of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfen, N. van; Gabreëls-Festen, A.A.W.M.; Laak, H.J. ter; Arts, W.F.M.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2005-01-01

    We report the findings in five muscle and three sural nerve biopsies, and in one postmortem plexus specimen, from six patients with hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA). We found that the sensory nerves are definitely involved in HNA despite the mainly motor symptoms, and that lesions in nerves and

  19. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  20. Diet, disease and pigment variation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, R; Khan, B S Razib

    2010-10-01

    There are several hypotheses which explain the de-pigmentation of humans. The most prominent environmental explanation is that reduced endogenous vitamin D production due to diminished radiation at higher latitudes had a deleterious impact on fitness. This drove de-pigmentation as an adaptive response. A model of natural selection explains the high correlations found between low vitamin D levels and ill health, as vitamin D's role in immune response has clear evolutionary implications. But recent genomic techniques have highlighted the likelihood that extreme de-pigmentation in Eurasia is a feature of the last 10,000years, not the Upper Pleistocene, when modern humans first settled northern Eurasia. Additionally the data imply two independent selection events in eastern and western Eurasia. Therefore new parameters must be added to the model of natural selection so as to explain the relatively recent and parallel adaptive responses. I propose a model of gene-culture co-evolution whereby the spread of agriculture both reduced dietary vitamin D sources and led to more powerful selection on immune response because of the rise of infectious diseases with greater population densities. This model explains the persistence of relatively dark-skinned peoples at relatively high latitudes and the existence of relatively light-skinned populations at low latitudes. It also reinforces the importance of vitamin D as a micronutrient because of the evidence of extremely powerful fitness implications in the recent human past of pigmentation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of a cell-free system to determine UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase and N-acetylmannosamine kinase activities in human hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Susan E; Ciccone, Carla; Lalor, Molly; Orvisky, Eduard; Klootwijk, Riko; Savelkoul, Paul J; Dalakas, Marinos C; Krasnewich, Donna M; Gahl, William A; Huizing, Marjan

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder associated with mutations in uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) 2-epimerase (GNE)/N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) kinase (MNK), the bifunctional and rate-limiting enzyme of sialic acid biosynthesis. We developed individual GNE and MNK enzymatic assays and determined reduced activities in cultured fibroblasts of patients, with HIBM harboring missense mutations in either or both the GNE and MNK enzymatic domains. To assess the effects of individual mutations on enzyme activity, normal and mutated GNE/MNK enzymatic domains were synthesized in a cell-free in vitro transcription-translation system and subjected to the GNE and MNK enzymatic assays. This cell-free system was validated for both GNE and MNK activities, and it revealed that mutations in one enzymatic domain (in GNE, G135V, V216A, and R246W; in MNK, A631V, M712T) affected not only that domain's enzyme activity, but also the activity of the other domain. Moreover, studies of the residual enzyme activity associated with specific mutations revealed a discrepancy between the fibroblasts and the cell-free systems. Fibroblasts exhibited higher residual activities of both GNE and MNK than the cell-free system. These findings add complexity to the tightly regulated system of sialic acid biosynthesis. This cell-free approach can be applied to other glycosylation pathway enzymes that are difficult to evaluate in whole cells because their substrate specificities overlap with those of ancillary enzymes.

  2. [Research progress of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A-Mei; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; MIM 535000) is one of the most common mitochondrial diseases, with a clinical manifestation of painless, acute or sub-acute bilateral visual loss in young adults leading to blindness and central scotoma. Over 95% of LHON patients were caused by one of three primary mtDNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A and m.14484T>C). Incomplete penetrance and gender bias are two riddles of this disease. Here we summarized recent research progress of LHON, with a focus on the molecular pathogenic mechanisms, clinical features, in vitro experiments and animal models, and prevention and treatment of LHON. In particular, we presented the main findings and challenges in our recent efforts to decipher genetic susceptibility and mechanism of LHON in Chinese patients.

  3. Sleeping Beauty transposon system is a reliable gene delivery tool for hereditary tyrosinaemia type 1 disease gene therapy: size of the foreign gene decides the timing of stable integration into the host chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X-J; Ma, Z-Z; Zhang, Q-J; Fan, L; Li, Q-H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated compensation for loss of the fumaryl-acetoacetate hydrolase gene (Fah) by gene therapy using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system (SBTS), in a hereditary tyrosinaemia type 1 (HT-1) mouse model (Fah-/-). Twenty Fah-/- study mice, five wild-type positive controls and five Fah-/- negative controls were included. All Fah-/- mice received 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclo hexaedione (NTBC). Fah-/- study mice were randomly injected with one of two SBTS constructs: Fah-SBTS (containing mouse Fah gene), or forkhead box M1b (FOXM1B)-Fah-SBTS (containing mouse Fah and human FOXM1B genes). Firefly luciferase-SBTS was injected as a trace marker. NTBC treatment stopped after construct injection; Fah-/- negative controls were kept healthy with continued NTBC. Mice were weighed daily; the luciferase signal was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence, and Fah and FOXM1B gene expression were evaluated. The Fah gene integrated into the mouse chromosomes within 1 week of Fah-SBTS injection (mice survived without NTBC thereafter) and within 1 month of FOXM1B-Fah-SBTS injection (mice lost weight dramatically and needed additional NTBC). The shorter Fah gene had an advantage over the longer FOXM1B-Fah gene for stable integration into the host mouse chromosomes.

  4. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  5. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  6. Canine hereditary ataxia in old english sheepdogs and gordon setters is associated with a defect in the autophagy gene encoding RAB24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryline Agler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters suffer from a juvenile onset, autosomal recessive form of canine hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex. The clinical and histological characteristics are analogous to hereditary ataxias in humans. Linkage and genome-wide association studies on a cohort of related Old English Sheepdogs identified a region on CFA4 strongly associated with the disease phenotype. Targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing of the region identified an A to C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located at position 113 in exon 1 of an autophagy gene, RAB24, that segregated with the phenotype. Genotyping of six additional breeds of dogs affected with hereditary ataxia identified the same polymorphism in affected Gordon Setters that segregated perfectly with phenotype. The other breeds tested did not have the polymorphism. Genome-wide SNP genotyping of Gordon Setters identified a 1.9 MB region with an identical haplotype to affected Old English Sheepdogs. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural evaluation of the brains of affected dogs from both breeds identified dramatic Purkinje neuron loss with axonal spheroids, accumulation of autophagosomes, ubiquitin positive inclusions and a diffuse increase in cytoplasmic neuronal ubiquitin staining. These findings recapitulate the changes reported in mice with induced neuron-specific autophagy defects. Taken together, our results suggest that a defect in RAB24, a gene associated with autophagy, is highly associated with and may contribute to canine hereditary ataxia in Old English Sheepdogs and Gordon Setters. This finding suggests that detailed investigation of autophagy pathways should be undertaken in human hereditary ataxia.

  7. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  8. Laparoscopic Splenectomy in a Child with Moyamoya Syndrome, Hereditary Spherocytosis, and Interstitial Lung Disease: A Mere Coincidence or Partnership Based on Genetic Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Karvandian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of moyamoya syndrome and spherocytosis with concurrent interstitial lung disease who underwent laparoscopic splenectomy is being reported. A theory regarding their coexistence is being forwarded together with their anesthetic management. According to our search, this is the fourth case of moyamoya syndrome and the first case with an associated interstitial lung disease in a 10-year-old child.

  9. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  10. Role of alpha-1 antitrypsin in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Serres, F; Blanco, I

    2014-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an under-recognized hereditary disorder associated with the premature onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, liver cirrhosis in children and adults, and less frequently, relapsing panniculitis, systemic vasculitis and other inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. Severe AAT deficiency mainly affects Caucasian individuals and has its highest prevalence (1 : 2000-1 : 5000 individuals) in Northern, Western and Central Europe. In the USA and Canada, the prevalence is 1: 5000-10 000. Prevalence is five times lower in Latin American countries and is rare or nonexistent in African and Asian individuals. The key to successful diagnosis is by measuring serum AAT, followed by the determination of the phenotype or genotype if low concentrations are found. Case detection allows implementation of genetic counselling and, in selected cases, the application of augmentation therapy. Over the past decade, it has been demonstrated that AAT is a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-infective and tissue-repair molecule. These new capacities are promoting an increasing number of clinical studies, new pharmacological formulations, new patent applications and the search for alternative sources of AAT (including transgenic and recombinant AAT) to meet the expected demand for treating a large number of diseases, inside and outside the context of AAT deficiency.

  11. Human KATP channelopathies: diseases of metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of an inward rectifier K+ channel pore (Kir6.1/Kir6.2) and an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding regulatory subunit (SUR1/SUR2A/SUR2B) forms ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel heteromultimers, widely distributed in metabolically active tissues throughout the body. KATP channels are metabolism-gated biosensors functioning as molecular rheostats that adjust membrane potential-dependent functions to match cellular energetic demands. Vital in the adaptive response to (patho)physiological stress, KATP channels serve a homeostatic role ranging from glucose regulation to cardioprotection. Accordingly, genetic variation in KATP channel subunits has been linked to the etiology of life-threatening human diseases. In particular, pathogenic mutations in KATP channels have been identified in insulin secretion disorders, namely, congenital hyperinsulinism and neonatal diabetes. Moreover, KATP channel defects underlie the triad of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes (DEND syndrome). KATP channelopathies implicated in patients with mechanical and/or electrical heart disease include dilated cardiomyopathy (with ventricular arrhythmia; CMD1O) and adrenergic atrial fibrillation. A common Kir6.2 E23K polymorphism has been associated with late-onset diabetes and as a risk factor for maladaptive cardiac remodeling in the community-at-large and abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise stress performance in patients with heart failure. The overall mutation frequency within KATP channel genes and the spectrum of genotype–phenotype relationships remain to be established, while predicting consequences of a deficit in channel function is becoming increasingly feasible through systems biology approaches. Thus, advances in molecular medicine in the emerging field of human KATP channelopathies offer new opportunities for targeted individualized screening, early diagnosis, and tailored therapy. PMID:20033705

  12. Major trends in human parasitic diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; He, Shenyi; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Guanghui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2010-05-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the control and prevention of human parasitic diseases in mainland China in the past 30 years because of China's Reform and Opening to the Outside Policies initiated in 1978. However, parasitic diseases remain a major human health problem, with significant morbidity and mortality as well as adverse socioeconomic consequences. Although soil-transmitted parasitic diseases are in the process of being gradually controlled, food-borne parasitic diseases and emerging parasitic diseases are becoming the focus of new campaigns for control and prevention. This article reviews major trends in human parasitic diseases in mainland China, with perspectives for control.

  13. Renal AA amyloidosis in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary complete C4 deficiency has until now been reported in 30 cases only. A disturbed clearance of immune- complexes probably predisposes these individuals to systemic lupus erythematosus, other immune- complex diseases and recurrent microbial infections. We present here a 20- year- old female with hereditary complete C4 deficiency. Renal biopsy demonstrated renal AA amyloidosis. This unique case further substantiates that deficiency of classical pathway components predisposes to the development of recurrent microbial infections and that the patients may develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, in clinical practice, the nephrotic syndrome occurring in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency should lead to the suspicion of renal AA amyloidosis.

  14. Wolbachia endosymbionts and human disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatko, Barton E; Luck, Ashley N; Dobson, Stephen L; Foster, Jeremy M

    2014-07-01

    Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filaria, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility and survival, whereas in arthropods, they are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as Dengue, Chikungunya, Yellow Fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Furthermore, Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases.

  15. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  16. Glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Carlo; Martucci, Alessio; Mancino, Raffaele; Cerulli, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of open-angle glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Single case analysis method is used. A 53-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of glaucoma presented with progressive visual field loss. Complete ophthalmological examination and blood tests were negative for other concomitant diseases. Genetic counseling revealed mitochondrial DNA mutation compatible with the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In conclusion, the case describes the concomitant occurrence of open-angle glaucoma and Leber's optic neuropathy. We hypothesize that the two diseases may have a cumulative effect on oxidative stress and retinal ganglion cell death with the consequent rapid progression of visual impairment. Screening for mitochondrial DNA mutations may be requested in patients with glaucoma who, despite pharmacologically controlled intraocular pressure, show rapid progression of the disease.

  17. [Hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N; Chrestian, N; Thiffault, I; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J-P

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated, for many inherited diseases, that historical events have shaped the various regional gene pools of Eastern Canada. In so doing, it has given rise to the increased prevalence of some rare diseases due, to founder effects. The following neurogenetic disorders were first identified in patients from Eastern Canada: AOA-2, Arsacs, HSN-2, Arca-1, HMSN/ACC and Arsal. The population of Eastern Canada, we are convinced, will still allow the identification of new rare forms of hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies as well as contribute to the uncovering of their mutated genes. We have summarized our current knowledge of the various hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada. The study of the more common and homogenous features of these diseases has been largely completed.

  18. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies of childhood: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This review focuses on the "pure" hereditary peripheral neuropathies where peripheral nerve disease is the main manifestation and does not address neurodegenerative disorders associated with but not dominated by peripheral neuropathy. Aetiologies of childhood-onset peripheral neuropathies differ from those of adult-onset, with more inherited conditions, especially autosomal recessive. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the commonest neuromuscular disorder. The genetic labels of CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) disease types 1-4 are the preferred sub-type terms. Clinical presentations and molecular genetic heterogeneity of hereditary peripheral neuropathies are diverse. For most patients worldwide, diagnostic studies are limited to clinical assessment. Such markers which could be used to identify specific sub-types include presentation in early childhood, scoliosis, marked sensory involvement, respiratory compromise, upper limb involvement, visual or hearing impairment, pyramidal signs and mental retardation. These key markers may assist targeted genetic testing and aid in diagnosing children where DNA testing is not possible.

  19. Successful outcome in a twin pregnancy with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type –II complicated with heart disease and preclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasmita Mondal

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Heridetary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN TYPE-2 reflects reduction in the number of primary motor and sensory neurons. The occurrence of this disease is rare in pregnancy but may be exaggerated in pregnancy leading to preeclampsia / eclampsia. Here is a 28 years old 2nd gravidae with twin pregnancy at 31 weeks hospitalized with HMSN TYPE-2 disease and was managed successfully with good feto maternal outcome

  20. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  1. Gilbert Syndrome with Concomitant Hereditary Spherocytosis Presenting with Moderate Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiso, Mitsuhiko; Yagi, Minami; Tanaka, Atsushi; Miura, Kotaro; Miura, Ryo; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Nakahara, Sayuri; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We experienced a case of a 19-year-old man with Gilbert syndrome with concomitant hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented with moderate unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and inherited etiology was strongly suspected. The diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome was confirmed by the genetic analysis of the UGT1A1 gene, demonstrating UGT1A1*28 and compound heterozygote UGT1A1*6. In addition, since the laboratory findings and imaging studies revealed lysemia as well as gallstone and splenomegaly, a diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was made as a comorbidity. Both Gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis are hereditary diseases with a high frequency, and the hyperbilirubinemia may be exacerbated when these two diseases are concomitant.

  2. Treatment for dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) in hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Keage, Megan J; Johansson, Kerstin; Schalling, Ellika

    2015-11-13

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in progressive inco-ordination. Swallowing impairment, also known as dysphagia, is a common and potentially life threatening sequel of disease progression. The incidence and nature of dysphagia in these conditions is largely unknown. The loss of an effective and safe swallow can dramatically affect the health and well-being of an individual. Remediation of difficulties of eating and drinking is an important goal in the clinical care of people with hereditary ataxia. To assess the effects of interventions for swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in people with hereditary ataxias. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) on 14 September 2015. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts, and Trials Registries on 24 September 2015. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxia with placebo or no treatment. We only included studies measuring dysphagia. Three review authors (ES, KJ, MK) independently screened all titles and abstracts. In the event of any disagreement or uncertainty over the inclusion of a particular paper, the review authors planned to meet and reach consensus. We identified no RCTs from the 519 titles and abstracts screened. We excluded papers primarily for not including participants with a hereditary ataxia (that is, being focused on other neurological conditions), being theoretical reviews rather than intervention studies, or being neither randomised nor quasi-randomised trials.We identified five papers of various design that described treatment for dysphagia, or improvement to swallow as a by-product of treatment, in people with hereditary ataxia. None of these studies were RCTs or

  3. Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166826.html Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility? Study finds ... 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, ...

  4. Avaliação da autofluorescência do fundo de olho nas distrofias de retina com o aparelho Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2 Evaluation of fundus autofluorescence in hereditary retinal diseases using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Côco

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Definir características do exame de autofluorescência, verificando sua utilidade no diagnóstico e acompanhamento de distrofias retinianas. MÉTODOS: Participaram do estudo, 28 pacientes, adultos, divididos igualmente em quatro grupos com diagnósticos de doença de Stargardt, distrofia de Cones, retinose pigmentar e voluntários saudáveis para estabelecimento do padrão de normalidade. Em média foram obtidas nove imagens com o filtro para angiofluoresceinografia para a formação da imagem autofluorescente no Heidelberg Retina Angiograph2. As imagens de cada grupo de pacientes foram analisadas para verificar características comuns. RESULTADOS: As imagens fundoscópicas autofluorescentes dos voluntários do grupo controle mostraram área foveal hipoautofluorescente em relação à retina do pólo posterior. As imagens dos portadores de doença de Stargardt, em geral, apresentaram lesão hipoautofluorescente, correspondendo à área macular. As principais alterações da autofluorescência em pacientes com distrofia de cones foram hipoautofluorescência macular com halo hiperautofluorescente. Nos portadores de retinose pigmentar, foram encontrados pigmentos periféricos causando hipoautofluorescência. Na região macular, hipoautofluorescência ou apenas desorganização do pigmento. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo mostrou a existência de padrões de autofluorescência de fundo nas distrofias de retina que permitem o diagnóstico e melhor interpretação da fisiopatogenia destas doenças.PURPOSE: To define characteristics of the fundus autofluorescence examination, verifying usefulness in the diagnosis and care of hereditary retinal diseases. METHODS: 28 patients, adults, divided equally into four groups with diagnoses of Stargardt macular dystrophy, cone dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa and healthy volunteers for the establishment of the normality pattern. An average of nine images with the filter for fluorescein angiography was obtained

  5. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  6. CSF1R mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids are loss of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridans, Clare; Sauter, Kristin A.; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Hume, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) in humans is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by giant neuroaxonal swellings (spheroids) within the CNS white matter. Symptoms are variable and can include personality and behavioural changes. Patients with this disease have mutations in the protein kinase domain of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) which is a tyrosine kinase receptor essential for microglia development. We investigated the effects of these mutations on Csf1r signalling using a factor dependent cell line. Corresponding mutant forms of murine Csf1r were expressed on the cell surface at normal levels, and bound CSF1, but were not able to sustain cell proliferation. Since Csf1r signaling requires receptor dimerization initiated by CSF1 binding, the data suggest a mechanism for phenotypic dominance of the mutant allele in HDLS.

  7. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with oral manifestations. Report of periodontal treatment in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G B; Quart, A M; Novak, B

    1981-03-01

    The periodontal conditions of two patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia were successfully treated by a two-phase plan. The first phase of treatment eliminated inflammation from local etiologic factors by removing plaque and plaque-retaining factors. The second phase eliminated the residual anatomic defects of periodontal disease. Gingival bleeding has been indicated as a symptomatic factor of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, but such bleeding is more likely the result of periodontal inflammation.

  8. Mutations in the hereditary haemochromatosis gene HFE in professional endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    López Chicharro, José; Hoyos, J; Gómez Gallego, Félix; Villa Vicente, José Gerardo; Bandrés Moya, Fernando; Celaya, P; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hereditary haemochromatosis, a disease that affects iron metabolism, progresses with a greater or lesser tendency to induce iron overload, possibly leading to severe organ dysfunction. Most elite endurance athletes take iron supplements during their active sporting life, which could aggravate this condition. Objective: To determine the prevalence and discuss potential clinical implications of mutations of HFE (the gene responsible for hereditary haemochromatosis) in endurance athl...

  9. Disease: H00858 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00858 Marie-Unna hereditary hypotrichosis (MUHH) Marie Unna hereditary hypotrichos...is (MUHH) is an autosomal dominant form of hereditary hair loss. It is characterized by sparse or absent sca...IM: 146550 PMID:21504454 (description, gene) Podjasek JO, Hand JL Marie-Unna hereditary hypotrichosis: case ...X Loss-of-function mutations of an inhibitory upstream ORF in the human hairless transcript cause Marie Unna hereditary...igelshoven S, Hanneken S, Refke M, Wen Y, Zhang X, Cichon S, Betz RC, Nothen MM Marie Unna hereditary

  10. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  11. Reg gene family and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Zhang; Liu-Song Ding; Mao-De Lai

    2003-01-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg or REG) family, within the superfamily of C-type lectin, is mainly involved in the liver,pancreatic, gastric and intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation. Considerable attention has focused on Reg family and its structurally related molecules. Over the last 15 years, 17 members of the Reg family have been cloned and sequenced. They have been considered as members of a conserved protein family sharing structural and some functional properties being involved in injury, inflammation,diabetes and carcinogenesis. We previously identified Reg Ⅳ as a strong candidate for a gene that was highly expressed in colorectal adenoma when compared to normal mucosa based on suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH),reverse Northern blot, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)and Northern blot. In situ hybridization results further support that overexpression of Reg Ⅳ may be an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis. We suggest that detection of Reg Ⅳ overexpression might be useful in the early diagnosis of carcinomatous transformation of adenoma.This review summarizes the roles of Reg family in diseases in the literature as well as our recent results of Reg Ⅳ in colorectal cancer. The biological properties of Reg family and its possible roles in human diseases are discussed. We particularly focus on the roles of Reg family as sensitive reactants of tissue injury, prognostic indicators of tumor survival and early biomarkers of carcinogenesis. In addition to our current understanding of Reg gene functions, we postulate that there might be relationships between Reg family and microsatellite instability, apoptosis and cancer with a poor prognosis. Investigation of the correlation between tumor Reg expression and survival rate, and analysis of the Reg gene status in human maliganancies, are required to elucidate the biologic consequences of Reg gene expression, the implications for Reg gene regulation of cell growth, tumorigenesis

  12. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Shelley E; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Buchanan, George R

    2011-12-01

    Vascular complications, including pulmonary hypertension (PH), have been reported to occur following splenectomy for various disorders,including hereditary spherocytosis (HS). We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of 36 adults with HS (78% with prior splenectomy)utilizing echocardiography to estimate tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) as well as measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to screen for PH. No participant with HS hada significantly elevated TRV or NT-proBNP level, despite a median 25-year interval since splenectomy (95% confidence interval for point prevalence 0, 0.097). Although our study was limited by a small sample size, it appears that persons with HS, following splenectomy, appear unlikely to be at significantly increased risk of developing PH to the degree reported for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

  13. Hereditary palmoplantar keratodermas in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Thappa, D M; Garg, B R

    1997-12-01

    Thirty-one patients with inherited palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKs) were screened from 59,490 cases who visiting the OPD of JIPMER, Pondicherry. The prevalence rate was 5.2 per 10,000 population (1:2000 approx.). PPKs were more common in males (25 patients) than females (6 patients); the overall male to female ratio was 4.2:1. The incidence was highest in the group from 0-10 years of life (67.7% of cases). Unna-Thost syndrome topped the list with 38.7% of cases and its prevalence 1:6000 (approx.), followed by Greither's disease (22.9%) and others-Vohwinkel (3 cases), idiopathic punctate (2 cases), ichthyosis vulgaris associated PPK (2 cases) etc. This study has for the first time reported the prevalence and patterns of hereditary PPKs in South India.

  14. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data.

  15. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker....... Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use...

  16. Effect of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Gene H63D and C282Y Mutations on Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Kasım Terzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease that is one of the most important reasons for iron overload. Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that occurs as a result of a homozygous mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Erythrocyte transfusion is frequently used in the treatment of this disease. Iron overload as a result of transfusion is important in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell anemia patients as well as in other hemoglobinopathies. In this study, the effect of hemochromatosis gene (HFE p.H63D and p.C282Y mutations on transfusion-related cardiac and liver iron overload in sickle cell disease patients who carry homozygous hemoglobin S mutation has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single-center crosssectional study in patients with homozygous hemoglobin S mutation between the years 2008 and 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (group A, n=31 was receiving chelation therapy and the second group (group B, n=13 was not. Direct and indirect iron loads were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging and biochemically, respectively. HFE gene mutations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analyses were performed by independent samples t-test. Results: p.H63D mutation was detected in 10 (32.3% patients in group A and in only 1 patient (7.7% in group B. When the 2 groups were compared for iron overload, iron deposition in the liver was significantly higher in group B (p=0.046. In addition, in group A, iron deposition was significantly higher in HFE mutation carriers compared to patients without the mutation (p=0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that HFE gene mutations are important in iron deposition in the liver in patients with sickle cell disease.

  17. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgur Kartal; Sevket Arslan; Mustafa Gulec; Ahmet Zafer Caliskaner; Abdullah Baysan; Nail Ersoz; Ugur Musabak; Osman Sener

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;ab...

  18. Intensity of human prion disease surveillance predicts observed disease incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Klug (Genevieve); H. Wand (Handan); M. Simpson (Marion); A. Boyd (Alison); M. Law (Matthew); C. Masters (Colin); R. Mateǰ (Radoslav); R. Howley (Rachel); M. Farrell (Michael); M. Breithaupt; I. Zerr (Inga); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); J. Mackenzie; R.G. Will (Robert); J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); A. Alperovitch (Annick); H. Budka (Herbert); G.G. Kovacs (Gabor); G.H. Jansen (Gerard); M. Coulthard (Michael); S.J. Collins (Steven)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prospective national screening and surveillance programmes serve a range of public health functions. Objectively determining their adequacy and impact on disease may be problematic for rare disorders. We undertook to assess whether objective measures of disease surveillance

  19. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8.

  20. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  1. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8. PMID:28018906

  2. Small Heat Shock Proteins and Distal Hereditary Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, V V; Muranova, L K; Sudnitsyna, M V; Ryzhavskaya, A S; Gusev, N B

    2015-12-01

    Classification of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) is presented and processes regulated by sHsp are described. Symptoms of hereditary distal neuropathy are described and the genes whose mutations are associated with development of this congenital disease are listed. The literature data and our own results concerning physicochemical properties of HspB1 mutants associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. Mutations of HspB1, associated with hereditary motor neuron disease, can be accompanied by change of the size of HspB1 oligomers, by decreased stability under unfavorable conditions, by changes in the interaction with protein partners, and as a rule by decrease of chaperone-like activity. The largest part of these mutations is accompanied by change of oligomer stability (that can be either increased or decreased) or by change of intermonomer interaction inside an oligomer. Data on point mutation of HspB3 associated with axonal neuropathy are presented. Data concerning point mutations of Lys141 of HspB8 and those associated with hereditary neuropathy and different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. It is supposed that point mutations of sHsp associated with distal neuropathies lead either to loss of function (for instance, decrease of chaperone-like activity) or to gain of harmful functions (for instance, increase of interaction with certain protein partners).

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  4. Hereditary orotic aciduria, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum probed by herpes simplex virus: /sup 125/I-iododeoxycytidine incorporation as an assay for viral growth. [Human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, J.; Hafner, J.; Boorstein, R.; Pardee, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    /sup 125/I-Iododeoxycytidine (/sup 125/IdC) incorporation into acid-insoluble material was a sensitive, rapid, and quantitative assay for the growth of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in human fibroblasts. Cellular utilization of the isotope was 10 to 25% of the incorporation by infected cells and could be 80% inhibited by tetrahydrouridine (THU). Viral utilization was inhibited by acycloguanosine, thioguanine (TG), and cytosine arabinoside. Isotope was incorporated equally well by growing or quiescent infected cells. HSV-1 was used to probe the metabolic capabilities of three mutant human fibroblast strains. /sup 125/IdC incorporation quantitatively measured the ability of the virus to grow in these cells. Viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to TG in normal fibroblasts but showed a 8- to 10-fold greater resistance to TG in fibroblasts derived from patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LN). Similarly, the growth of ultraviolet irradiated HSV-1 in normal fibroblasts was 5-fold greater than in fibroblasts derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In fibroblasts derived from patients with hereditary orotic aciduria, viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to adenosine (AD) at concentrations which were slightly stimulatory in normal fibroblasts. This was a 2-fold difference in AD sensitivity, which the radioassay reliably and quantitatively documented. HSV-1 infected cells could be individually identified by their incorporated /sup 125/IdC; such cells had blackened nuclei in autoradiograms prepared 12 hr after infection. Normal cells infected in the presence of TG had many fewer labeled nuclei than LN cells similarly infected in the presence of the drug. (JMT)

  5. Identification of "pathologs" (disease-related genes from the RIKEN mouse cDNA dataset using human curation plus FACTS, a new biological information extraction system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socha Luis A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major goal in the post-genomic era is to identify and characterise disease susceptibility genes and to apply this knowledge to disease prevention and treatment. Rodents and humans have remarkably similar genomes and share closely related biochemical, physiological and pathological pathways. In this work we utilised the latest information on the mouse transcriptome as revealed by the RIKEN FANTOM2 project to identify novel human disease-related candidate genes. We define a new term "patholog" to mean a homolog of a human disease-related gene encoding a product (transcript, anti-sense or protein potentially relevant to disease. Rather than just focus on Mendelian inheritance, we applied the analysis to all potential pathologs regardless of their inheritance pattern. Results Bioinformatic analysis and human curation of 60,770 RIKEN full-length mouse cDNA clones produced 2,578 sequences that showed similarity (70–85% identity to known human-disease genes. Using a newly developed biological information extraction and annotation tool (FACTS in parallel with human expert analysis of 17,051 MEDLINE scientific abstracts we identified 182 novel potential pathologs. Of these, 36 were identified by computational tools only, 49 by human expert analysis only and 97 by both methods. These pathologs were related to neoplastic (53%, hereditary (24%, immunological (5%, cardio-vascular (4%, or other (14%, disorders. Conclusions Large scale genome projects continue to produce a vast amount of data with potential application to the study of human disease. For this potential to be realised we need intelligent strategies for data categorisation and the ability to link sequence data with relevant literature. This paper demonstrates the power of combining human expert annotation with FACTS, a newly developed bioinformatics tool, to identify novel pathologs from within large-scale mouse transcript datasets.

  6. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children: Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özçeker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HA is a rare, autosomal-dominant genetic disorder presenting with recurrent attacks of angioedema. The most commonly involved organs include the extremites, face, neck, upper respiratory tract, genital region and the gastrointestinal tract. Edema of the intestinal mucosa can cause temporary obstruction and severe abdominal pain that can be confused with acute abdomen. Pediatricians and emergency physicians should keep in mind this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of severe abdominal pain.

  7. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3...... the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic...

  8. Hereditary epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasik, L G; Dimond, R L; Baughman, R D

    1981-04-01

    We describe herein a patient in whose family 11 of 20 members have a palmoplantar keratoderma. The pathologic findings in the proband were those of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. As in the other families described, the disease was found to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. All involved family members had hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles as infants. Light microscopy showed hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis with large irregular keratohyalin granules, and large clear spaces in the cells of the granular and upper spinous layers. Our electron microscopic findings showed that the clear spaces were areas of cytoplasm filled with a fibrillar material and cellular organelles; abnormal clumps of tonofilaments and keratohyalin were also present. We consider this disorder to be a form of keratoderma rather than a localized ichthyosis.

  9. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  10. HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA IN CHILDREN — A RARE CLINICAL CASE IN THE PRACTICE OF THE ABDOMINAL SURGEON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Yu. Dyakonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare and dangerous hereditary disease, the differential diagnostics of which is very difficult up to date. Children with this disorder come with acute abdominal pain that may be caused by diseases of the digestive and urinary system, various gynecological diseases, and infectious processes in the body. The main task of the children's surgeon is to exclude acute surgical pathology and perform differential diagnostics with diseases such as acute appendicitis, Meckel diverticulum, intestinal obstruction, omentum infarction and the other as soon as possible. The article presents the clinical observation of a 14-year-old female patient with angioedema.

  11. Recent efforts to model human diseases in vivo in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Cathie M; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2008-01-01

    Upon completion of sequencing the Drosophila genome, it was estimated that 61% of human disease-associated genes had sequence homologs in flies, and in some diseases such as cancer, the number was as high as 68%. We now know that as many as 75% of the genes associated with genetic disease have counterparts in Drosophila. Using better tools for mutation detection, association studies and whole genome analysis the number of human genes associated with genetic disease is steadily increasing. These detection efforts are outpacing the ability to assign function and understand the underlying cause of the disease at the molecular level. Drosophila models can therefore advance human disease research in a number of ways by: establishing the normal role of these gene products during development, elucidating the mechanism underlying disease pathology, and even identifying candidate therapeutic agents for the treatment of human disease. At the 49(th) Annual Drosophila Research Conference in San Diego this year, a number of labs presented their exciting findings on Drosophila models of human disease in both platform presentations and poster sessions. Here we can only briefly review some of these developments, and we apologize that we do not have the time or space to review all of the findings presented which use Drosophila to understand human disease etiology.

  12. Management of hereditary angioedema in pregnant women: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Caballero,1,2 Julio Canabal,1 Daniela Rivero-Paparoni,1 Rosario Cabañas1 1Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, (IdiPaz 2Biomedical Research Network on Rare Diseases-U754 (CIBERER, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Three types of hereditary angioedema (HAE have been described: two are due to C1 inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency (C1-INH-HAE types I and II and one is characterized by normal C1-INH (nC1-INH-HAE. The management of pregnancy in patients with HAE is often a clinical challenge owing to potential worsening of the disease in relation to the physiological increase in estrogens and the limited treatment options. This review addresses the potential influence of pregnancy on the clinical severity of hereditary angioedema and the management of this disease during pregnancy with currently available treatments. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, pregnancy, female, treatment, C1 inhibitor concentrate, tranexamic acid

  13. Human pluripotent stem cells: applications and challenges in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eHIBAOUI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to generate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs holds great promise for the understanding and the treatment of human neurological diseases in modern medicine. The hPSCs are considered for their in vitro use as research tools to provide relevant cellular model for human diseases, drug discovery and toxicity assays and for their in vivo use in regenerative medicine applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress, promises and challenges of hPSC applications in human neurological disease modelling and therapies.

  14. The aqueous layers within the myelin sheath modulate the membrane properties of simulated hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I; Krustev, S M; Daskalova, M

    2011-03-01

    To expand our studies on the mechanisms underlying the clinical decline of the nerve excitability properties in patients with hereditary demyelinating neuropathies, the contribution of myelin sheath aqueous layers on multiple membrane properties of simulated fiber demyelinations is investigated. Three progressively greater degrees of internodal systematic demyelinations (two mild and one severe termed as ISD1, ISD2 and ISD3, respectively) without/with aqueous layers are simulated using our previous multi-layered model of human motor nerve fiber. The calculated multiple membrane excitability properties are as follows: potentials (intracellular action, electrotonic), strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles. They reflect the propagating, accommodative and adaptive processes in the fibers. The results show that all membrane properties, except for the strength-duration time constants and refractoriness, worsen when the myelin lamellae and their corresponding aqueous layers are uniformly reduced along the fiber length. The effect of the aqueous layers is significantly higher on the accommodative and adaptive processes than on the propagating processes in the fibers. Our multi-layered model better approximated some of the functional deficits documented for axons of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. The study provides new and important information on the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

  15. Modeling human disease using organotypic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Pawel J; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    Reliable disease models are needed in order to improve quality of healthcare. This includes gaining better understanding of disease mechanisms, developing new therapeutic interventions and personalizing treatment. Up-to-date, the majority of our knowledge about disease states comes from in vivo...

  16. Hereditary otovestibular dysfunction and Ménière's disease in a large Belgian family is caused by a missense mutation in the COCH gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstreken, M; Declau, F; Wuyts, F L; D'Haese, P; Van Camp, G; Fransen, E; Van den Hauwe, L; Buyle, S; Smets, R E; Feenstra, L; Van der Stappen, A; Van de Heyning, P H

    2001-11-01

    To report the clinical, auditory, and vestibular characteristics of a nonsyndromic otovestibular dysfunction in a large Belgian family caused by a missense mutation of the DFNA9 gene: COCH. Retrospective study of the clinical, audiologic, and vestibular data of 60 genetically affected cases. Tertiary referral center. All members of a Belgian kindred who carry the genetic (P51S) defect linked to the inherited hearing and vestibular impairment. Diagnostic otologic, audiometric, and vestibular analysis and imaging. Pure tone audiometry, supraliminary audiometry. and vestibular investigation. The autosomal dominant inherited impairment was characterized by peripheral degeneration of the inner ear, leading to total deafness and bilateral vestibular areflexia. The genetically affected persons of a Belgian family shared a progressive sensorineural hearing loss starting between the third and sixth decade. Vestibular symptoms started at about the same age as the hearing loss. The vestibular symptoms consisted of instability in darkness, a tendency to fall sideways, light-headiness, a drunken feeling, and attacks of vertigo. Most of the patients reported tinnitus, and half of them reported pressure in the ears. Clinically, 9 of the 60 patients met the criteria for definite Ménière's disease, and another 13 and 17 patients met the criteria for probable or possible Ménière's disease, respectively. All 9 were older than the age of 35, but only 1 was older than 55 years, so more than 30% of the patients were between 35 and 55 years old. A specific pattern could be recognized in the evolution of the otovestibular impairment. Under the age of 35 years, almost all the affected family members had normal hearing, whereas above the age of 55 years, the hearing loss was at least moderate, and vestibular hypofunction occurred. In between, there was a transition period of two to three decades, when deterioration of the cochleovestibular function occurred, with a temporary audiometric

  17. High Prevalence of Hereditary Cancer Syndromes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Ying, Jun; Bannon, Sarah A; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vilar, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Established guidelines recommend evaluation for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients younger than 50 years diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). This group has been well described in the literature; however, patients diagnosed as adolescents and young adults are not well represented in CRC studies. Here, we define the clinical profile, including the extent of hereditary cancer syndromes and family history of cancer, in patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 or younger. We reviewed patients who underwent genetic counseling at our institution during 5 years (2009 to 2013). Data were collected regarding demographics, clinicopathologic information, tumor and genetic testing, and family history. Patients with an identified hereditary cancer syndrome were compared with those without a syndrome. Of the 193 patients with evaluable data, 35% had an identifiable hereditary cancer syndrome, including 23 with Lynch syndrome, 22 with mutation-negative Lynch syndrome, 16 with familial adenomatous polyposis, two with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, two with biallelic MUTYH mutations, and one with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Patients without a hereditary syndrome more frequently presented with metastatic disease, whereas patients with a syndrome were more likely to present at earlier stages and to have a family history of cancer. Nevertheless, a substantial proportion of the hereditary syndromes (19%) were diagnosed in individuals with no family history of the disease. We conclude that patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 years or younger should receive genetic counseling regardless of their family history and phenotype. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  19. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  20. Two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, N; Praveenkumar, G S; Rao, K Aravind; Vasanthi; Kakkilaya, Srinivas

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare cause of hepatic cirrhosis in the young. The disorder has a reported frequency of 1 in 20000 live births and no case has been reported from India so far. We report two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance, both with bilateral cataracts and one with cirrhosis of the liver.

  1. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  2. Multinational corporations and infectious disease: Embracing human rights management techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Singer, Burton H; Weiss, Mitchell G; Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Wielga, Mark; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Global health institutions have called for governments, international organisations and health practitioners to employ a human rights-based approach to infectious diseases. The motivation for a human rights approach is clear: poverty and inequality create conditions for infectious diseases to thrive, and the diseases, in turn, interact with social-ecological systems to promulgate poverty, inequity and indignity. Governments and intergovernmental organisations should be concerned with the control and elimination of these diseases, as widespread infections delay economic growth and contribute to higher healthcare costs and slower processes for realising universal human rights. These social determinants and economic outcomes associated with infectious diseases should interest multinational companies, partly because they have bearing on corporate productivity and, increasingly, because new global norms impose on companies a responsibility to respect human rights, including the right to health. We reviewed historical and recent developments at the interface of infectious diseases, human rights and multinational corporations. Our investigation was supplemented with field-level insights at corporate capital projects that were developed in areas of high endemicity of infectious diseases, which embraced rights-based disease control strategies. Experience and literature provide a longstanding business case and an emerging social responsibility case for corporations to apply a human rights approach to health programmes at global operations. Indeed, in an increasingly globalised and interconnected world, multinational corporations have an interest, and an important role to play, in advancing rights-based control strategies for infectious diseases. There are new opportunities for governments and international health agencies to enlist corporate business actors in disease control and elimination strategies. Guidance offered by the United Nations in 2011 that is widely embraced

  3. Differentiation of Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis From Primary Lateral Sclerosis in Sporadic Adult-Onset Upper Motor Neuron Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Frans; Veldink, Jan H.; Franssen, Hessel; de Visser, Marianne; de Jong, J. M. B. Vianney; Faber, Carin G.; Kremer, Berry H. P.; Schelhaas, H. Jurgen; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; Bruyn, Richard P. M.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Robberecht, Wim; Wokke, John H. J.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    Objective: To study whether clinical characteristics can differentiate sporadic presentations of hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) from primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Differentiation between these diseases is important for genetic counseling and prognostication. Design: Case series. Setting:

  4. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies.

  5. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  6. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  7. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  8. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    in various disease processes including cancer has been gained in recent years, and the present review may help to further elucidate its aberrant role in many disease states. Its peculiar structural features [3-9] may be advantageous in designing tailor-made compounds with the possibility to specifically...

  9. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease?Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... disease, hemoglobin SS disease, hemoglobin synthesis, hemoglobinopathies, ... cell anemia, sickle cell crisis, vaso-occlusive crisis Family Health, ...

  10. The genus Malassezia and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Sabouraud's Pityrosporum is now recognized as Malassezia. With taxonomic revision of the genus, newer species have been included. The role of this member of the normal human skin flora in different cutaneous and systemic disorders is becoming clearer. The immunological responses it induces in the human body are conflicting and their relevance to clinical features is yet to be explored.

  11. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a rare cause of long-lasting abdominal distension in an 8-year-old boy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雷铃; 郎诗明; 胡廷泽; 钟麟; 李俊杰

    2002-01-01

    @@ Abdominal distension is a common complaint encountered in pediatric surgery. In most cases, Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause associated with abdominal distension in older children. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare disease which commonly presents with hemorrhage and anemia. We treated an 8-year-old boy with long lasting intractable abdominal distension associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Clinicopathologic features of this rare entity are discussed with emphasis on its pathogenesis and diagnosis.

  12. Statistical insights into major human muscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shakti; Kim, Sung-Min; Wang, Yu; Dinasarapu, Ashok Reddy; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-07-15

    Muscular diseases lead to muscle fiber degeneration, impairment of mobility, and in some cases premature death. Many of these muscular diseases are largely idiopathic. The goal of this study was to identify biomarkers based on their functional role and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis, specific to individual muscular disease. We analyzed the muscle transcriptome from five major muscular diseases: acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) using pairwise statistical comparison to identify uniquely regulated genes in each muscular disease. The genome-wide information encoded in the transcriptome provided biomarkers and functional insights into dysregulation in each muscular disease. The analysis showed that the dysregulation of genes in forward membrane pathway, responsible for transmitting action potential from neural excitation, is unique to AQM, while the dysregulation of myofibril genes, determinant of the mechanical properties of muscle, is unique to ALS, dysregulation of ER protein processing, responsible for correct protein folding, is unique to DM, and upregulation of immune response genes is unique to PM. We have identified biomarkers specific to each muscular disease which can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Metatranscriptomics of the human oral microbiome during health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorth, Peter; Turner, Keith H; Gumus, Pinar; Nizam, Nejat; Buduneli, Nurcan; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-04-01

    The human microbiome plays important roles in health, but when disrupted, these same indigenous microbes can cause disease. The composition of the microbiome changes during the transition from health to disease; however, these changes are often not conserved among patients. Since microbiome-associated diseases like periodontitis cause similar patient symptoms despite interpatient variability in microbial community composition, we hypothesized that human-associated microbial communities undergo conserved changes in metabolism during disease. Here, we used patient-matched healthy and diseased samples to compare gene expression of 160,000 genes in healthy and diseased periodontal communities. We show that health- and disease-associated communities exhibit defined differences in metabolism that are conserved between patients. In contrast, the metabolic gene expression of individual species was highly variable between patients. These results demonstrate that despite high interpatient variability in microbial composition, disease-associated communities display conserved metabolic profiles that are generally accomplished by a patient-specific cohort of microbes. IMPORTANCE The human microbiome project has shown that shifts in our microbiota are associated with many diseases, including obesity, Crohn's disease, diabetes, and periodontitis. While changes in microbial populations are apparent during these diseases, the species associated with each disease can vary from patient to patient. Taking into account this interpatient variability, we hypothesized that specific microbiota-associated diseases would be marked by conserved microbial community behaviors. Here, we use gene expression analyses of patient-matched healthy and diseased human periodontal plaque to show that microbial communities have highly conserved metabolic gene expression profiles, whereas individual species within the community do not. Furthermore, disease-associated communities exhibit conserved changes

  14. Advocate's Viewpoint on Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolling-Dandrieu Francisca

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper discusses the presentation I held at the symposium on genetics during the 4th European Breast Cancer Conference held in Hamburg in March 2004. Primarily, the goals and working methods of the advocacy group specialised in Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer of the Dutch Breast Cancer Patient Organisation known as BorstkankerVereniging Nederland (BVN are explained. Furthermore, some specific individual problems that mutation carriers might encounter before and after BRCA1/2 susceptibility testing are discussed. These include: dilemmas in choosing preventive interventions, dealing with the psychological impact of knowing you are a mutation carrier, dealing with the social implications of being genetically at risk, an example of insurance discrimination. In addition, some controversial social and ethical issues that are currently under debate are highlighted, such as the issue of the European patenting of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Since this topic could also become relevant for other gene-related diseases, society as a whole has to consider the ethical and social implications related to the patenting of human genes in general. Another ethical area of debate is the controversial issue of prenatal BRCA testing and the choice of pregnancy termination. Finally, the Working Party pleads for the international co-operation and exchange of data and experience among professionals as well as patients. It appears that professionals in different European countries tend to advise on different risk management strategies and treatments and as such, the Working Party strongly advocates the international standardisation of risk management and treatment of mutation carriers. In this respect, specific attention should be given to a group that has had a non-informative or negative BRCA test result, because this group is still considered to be at high risk to develop the disease.

  15. Human Milk and Allergic Diseases: An Unsolved Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, Diego G.; Boix-Amorós, Alba; Hsu, Peter S.; Van’t Land, Belinda; Skevaki, Chrysanthi; Collado, Maria Carmen; Garssen, Johan; Geddes, Donna T.; Nanan, Ralph; Slupsky, Carolyn; Wegienka, Ganesa; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.; Warner, John O.

    2017-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the protective role of breastfeeding in relation to the development of allergic sensitisation and allergic disease. Studies vary in methodology and definition of outcomes, which lead to considerable heterogeneity. Human milk composition varies both within and between individuals, which may partially explain conflicting data. It is known that human milk composition is very complex and contains variable levels of immune active molecules, oligosaccharides, metabolites, vitamins and other nutrients and microbial content. Existing evidence suggests that modulation of human breast milk composition has potential for preventing allergic diseases in early life. In this review, we discuss associations between breastfeeding/human milk composition and allergy development. PMID:28817095

  16. Mental stress and human cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Murray

    2017-03-01

    The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Chronic psychological distress also can have adverse cardiovascular consequences, in the causal linkage of depressive illness to heart disease, and in the probable causation of atherosclerosis and hypertension by chronic mental stress. In patients with essential hypertension, stress biomarkers are present. The sympathetic nervous system is the usual mediator between these acute and chronic psychological substrates and cardiovascular disease.

  17. Disease Human - MDC_CLRDMortality2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Polygon feature class based on Zip Code boundaries showing the rate of deaths per 100,000 residents due to Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease (CLRD) in Miami-Dade...

  18. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format.

  19. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  20. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  1. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  2. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV. ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4 (2013) > ... HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital ...

  3. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful.

  4. Human copy number variation and complex genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Campbell, Catarina D; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in human disease and population diversity. Advancements in technology have allowed for the analysis of CNVs in thousands of individuals with disease in addition to thousands of controls. These studies have identified rare CNVs associated with neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism, schizophrenia, and intellectual disability. In addition, copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) are present at higher frequencies in the population, show high diversity in copy number, sequence, and structure, and have been associated with multiple phenotypes, primarily related to immune or environmental response. However, the landscape of copy number variation still remains largely unexplored, especially for smaller CNVs and those embedded within complex regions of the human genome. An integrated approach including characterization of single nucleotide variants and CNVs in a large number of individuals with disease and normal genomes holds the promise of thoroughly elucidating the genetic basis of human disease and diversity.

  5. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  6. Current concepts in the treatment of hereditary ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Braga Neto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary ataxias (HA represents an extensive group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by progressive ataxia combined with extra-cerebellar and multi-systemic involvements, including peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. There is no effective treatment for HA, and management remains supportive and symptomatic. In this review, we will focus on the symptomatic treatment of the main autosomal recessive ataxias, autosomal dominant ataxias, X-linked cerebellar ataxias and mitochondrial ataxias. We describe management for different clinical symptoms, mechanism-based approaches, rehabilitation therapy, disease modifying therapy, future clinical trials and perspectives, genetic counseling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  7. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant.

  8. Synopsis of the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary haemochromatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, D.W.; Jorna, A.T.; Raymakers, R.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is a disease related to mutations in the HFE gene and can lead to progressive iron accumulation, especially in the liver, eventually resulting in organ damage. We have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease according to CBO methodology (

  9. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype...

  10. Transferrin hypoglycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance: using the clues and avoiding the pitfalls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamowicz, M.; Ploski, R.; Rokicki, D.; Morava, E.; Gizewska, M.; Mierzewska, H.; Pollak, A.; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Pronicka, E.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is caused by a deficiency of aldolase B due to mutations of the ALDOB gene. The disease poses diagnostic problems because of unspecific clinical manifestations. We report three cases of HFI all of whom had a chronic disease with neurological, nephrological or ga

  11. Discoidin Domain Receptors Role in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker BADIOLA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 and Discodin Domain Receptor 2 are the two only members of the DDR family. The DDR family is a Tyrosine Kinase Receptor (TKR family with some peculiarities compared with other Tyrosine Kinase Receptors such as their natural ligand; which in this case is the fibrillar collagen; or the slow phosphorylation pattern. These peculiarities confer a special role to the receptors present in many diseases development processes as cancer, cirrhosis or lung fibrosis. In this review it is described the overview of the DDRs structure and their role in the different disease development and the possibility to consider them as therapeutic targets.

  12. Advances in chromatin remodeling and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Sang; Elizondo, Leah I; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2004-06-01

    Epigenetic factors alter phenotype without changing genotype. A primary molecular mechanism underlying epigenetics is the alteration of chromatin structure by covalent DNA modifications, covalent histone modifications, and nucleosome reorganization. Remodeling of chromatin structure regulates DNA methylation, replication, recombination, and repair as well as gene expression. As these functions would predict, dysfunction of the proteins that remodel chromatin causes an array of multi-system disorders and neoplasias. Insights from these diseases suggest that during embryonic and fetal life, environmental distortions of chromatin remodeling encode a 'molecular memory' that predispose the individual to diseases in adulthood.

  13. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    in various disease processes including cancer has been gained in recent years, and the present review may help to further elucidate its aberrant role in many disease states. Its peculiar structural features [3-9] may be advantageous in designing tailor-made compounds with the possibility to specifically...... target this protein kinase [10]. Since not all the aspects of what has been published on CK2 can be covered in this review, we would like to recommend the following reviews; (i) for general information on CK2 [11-18] and (ii) with a focus on aberrant CK2 [19-22]....

  14. Polymorphisms of the Toll-like receptors and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David A; Cook, Donald N

    2005-11-15

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family regulates both innate and adaptive immune responses. Given its broad effect on immunity, the function of TLRs in various human diseases has been investigated largely by comparing the incidence of disease among persons with different polymorphisms in the genes that participate in TLR signaling. These studies demonstrate that TLR function affects several diseases, including sepsis, immunodeficiencies, atherosclerosis, and asthma. These findings have resulted in new opportunities to study the pathogenesis of disease, identify subpopulations at greater risk of disease, and, potentially, identify novel therapeutic approaches.

  15. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S; Ricci, G; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2010-12-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a "spy sign," discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases.

  16. An overview of novel therapies for acute hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Rafael; Frank, Michael M

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Attacks are characterized by nonpitting edema of external or mucosal body surfaces. Patients often present with swelling of the extremities, abdominal pain, and swelling of the mouth and throat, which can at times lead to asphyxiation. The disease is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the complement C1-inhibitor protein, which leads to unregulated production of bradykinin. Long-term therapy has depended on the use of attenuated androgens or plasmin inhibitors but in the US there was, until recently, no specific therapy for acute attacks. As well, many patients with hereditary angioedema in the US were either not adequately controlled on previously available therapies or required doses of medications that exposed them to the risk of serious adverse effects. Five companies have completed or are currently conducting phase III clinical trials in the development of specific therapies to terminate acute attacks or to be used as prophylaxis. These products are based on either replacement therapy with purified plasma-derived or recombinant C1-inhibitor, or inhibition of the kinin-generating pathways with a recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor or bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist. Published studies thus far suggest that all of these products are likely to be effective. These new therapies will likely lead to a totally new approach in treating hereditary angioedema.

  17. Heterogeneity of Hereditary Hearing Loss in Iran: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Babanejad, Mojgan; Azaiez, Hela; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Kolbe, Diana; Sloan-Heggen, Christina; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Booth, Kevin; Mohseni, Marzieh; Frees, Kathy; Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Daneshi, Ahmad; Farhadi, Mohammad; Kahrizi, Kimia; Smith, Richard Jh; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    A significant contribution to the causes of hereditary hearing impairment comes from genetic factors. More than 120 genes and 160 loci have been identified to be involved in hearing impairment. Given that consanguine populations are more vulnerable to most inherited diseases, such as hereditary hearing loss (HHL), the genetic picture of HHL among the Iranian population, which consists of at least eight ethnic subgroups with a high rate of intermarriage, is expected to be highly heterogeneous. Using an electronic literature review through various databases such as PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus, we review the current picture of HHL in Iran. In this review, we present more than 39 deafness genes reported to cause non-syndromic HHL in Iran, of which the most prevalent causative genes include GJB2, SLC26A4, MYO15A, and MYO7A. In addition, we highlight some of the more common genetic causes of syndromic HHL in Iran. These results are of importance for further investigation and elucidation of the molecular basis of HHL in Iran and also for developing a national diagnostic tool tailored to the Iranian context enabling early and efficient diagnosis of hereditary hearing impairment.

  18. Immunoregulatory networks in human Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Walderez O.; Menezes, Cristiane A.S.; Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Gollob, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chagas disease, caused by the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in all Latin America. Due to the increase in population migration, Chagas disease has spread worldwide and is now considered a health issue not only in endemic countries. While most chronically infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30% of the patients develop a potentially deadly cardiomyopathy. The exact mechanisms that underlie the establishment and maintenance of the cardiac pathology are not clear. However, there is consistent evidence that immunoregulatory cytokines are critical for orchestrating the immune response and, thus, influence disease development or control. While the asymptomatic (indeterminate) form represents a state of balance between the host and the parasite, the establishment of the cardiac form represents the loss of this balance. Analysis of data obtained from several studies have led to the hypothesis that the indeterminate form is associated with an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, represented by high expression of IL-10, while cardiac form is associated with a high production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in relation to IL-10, leading to an inflammatory profile. Here, we discuss the immunoregulatory events that might influence disease outcome, as well as the mechanisms that influence the establishment of these complex immunoregulatory networks. PMID:24611805

  19. Cognitive impairment in human chronic Chagas' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Mangone

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We proposed to investigate subclinical cognitive impairment secondary to chronic Chagas' disease (CCD. No similar study was previously done. The neuropsychological performance of 45 chronic Chagasic patients and 26 matched controls (age, education place and years of residency in endemic area was compared using the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE, Weschler Memory Scale (WMS and the Weschler Adult Intelligent Scale (WAIS. Non-parametric tests and Chi2 were used to compare group means and multivariate statistics in two way frequency tables for measures of independence and association of categorical variables with the disease. Results: Chagasic patients showed lower MMSE scores (p<004, poor orientation (p<.004, and attention (p<.007. Lower WMS MQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 5.9; p<.01; Fisher test p<.02. Lower WAIS IQ were associated with CCD (Chi2 6.3, p<.01; Fisher test p<.01 being the digit symbol (p<.03, picture completion (p<.03, picture arrangement (p<.01 and object assembly (p<.03 subtests the most affected. The impairment in non-verbal reasoning, speed of information processing, problem solving, learning and sequencing observed in chronic Chagas disease patients resembles the cognitive dysfunction associated with white matter disease.

  20. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  1. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  2. Hereditary angioedema: quality of life in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abadia Consuelo M. S. Gomide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and it is associated with deficient production or dysfunction of the C1 esterase inhibitor. In most cases, affected patients experience unexpected and recurrent crises of subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and laryngeal edema. The unpredictability, intensity and other factors associated with the disease impact the quality of life of hereditary angioedema patients. We evaluated the quality of life in Brazilian hereditary angioedema patients. METHODS: Patients older than 15 years with any severity of hereditary angioedema and laboratory confirmation of C1 inhibitor deficiency were included. Two questionnaires were used: a clinical questionnaire and the SF-36 (a generic questionnaire. This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. RESULTS: The SF-36 showed that 90.4% (mean of all the patients had a score below 70 and 9.6% had scores equal to or higher than 70. The scores of the eight dimensions ranged from 51.03 to 75.95; vitality and social aspects were more affected than other arenas. The internal consistency of the evaluation was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha value above 0.7 in seven of the eight domains. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, Brazilian patients demonstrated an impaired quality of life, as measured by the SF-36. The most affected domains were those related to vitality and social characteristics. The generic SF-36 questionnaire was relevant to the evaluation of quality of life; however, there is a need for more specific instruments for better evaluation.

  3. Genetics and epigenetics of repeat derepression in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    A large part of the human genome consists of repetitive DNA. In this thesis two human diseases have been studied in which deregulation of repetitive DNA is a central feature: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrom

  4. DEGAS: de novo discovery of dysregulated pathways in human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Ulitsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular studies of the human disease transcriptome typically involve a search for genes whose expression is significantly dysregulated in sick individuals compared to healthy controls. Recent studies have found that only a small number of the genes in human disease-related pathways show consistent dysregulation in sick individuals. However, those studies found that some pathway genes are affected in most sick individuals, but genes can differ among individuals. While a pathway is usually defined as a set of genes known to share a specific function, pathway boundaries are frequently difficult to assign, and methods that rely on such definition cannot discover novel pathways. Protein interaction networks can potentially be used to overcome these problems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present DEGAS (DysrEgulated Gene set Analysis via Subnetworks, a method for identifying connected gene subnetworks significantly enriched for genes that are dysregulated in specimens of a disease. We applied DEGAS to seven human diseases and obtained statistically significant results that appear to home in on compact pathways enriched with hallmarks of the diseases. In Parkinson's disease, we provide novel evidence for involvement of mRNA splicing, cell proliferation, and the 14-3-3 complex in the disease progression. DEGAS is available as part of the MATISSE software package (http://acgt.cs.tau.ac.il/matisse. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The subnetworks identified by DEGAS can provide a signature of the disease potentially useful for diagnosis, pinpoint possible pathways affected by the disease, and suggest targets for drug intervention.

  5. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the p......It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...

  6. Novel use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S W; Ko, C H; Yau, S K; Mak, Chloe; Yuen, Y F; Lee, C Y

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of a young Chinese male presenting with sequential, painless, bilateral visual loss in Hong Kong. He was diagnosed to have Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with genetic workup showing G11778A mutation with over 80% heteroplasmy. He was started on idebenone treatment 11 months after onset of the binocular disease. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy treated with idebenone in Hong Kong. The recent evidence of the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease is reviewed.

  7. An ochre mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene causes hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 -resistant rickets in three families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, H.H.; Hughes, M.R.; Thompson, E.T.; Pike, J.W.; O' Malley, B.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Malloy, P.J.; Feldman, D. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Hochberg, Z. (Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel))

    1989-12-01

    Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets is a rare autosomal-recessive disease resulting from target-organ resistance to the action of the active hormonal form of vitamin D. Four affected children from three related families with the classical syndrome of hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets and the absence of detectable binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblasts were examined for genetic abnormalities in the VDR gene. Genomic DNA from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts of eight family members was isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Amplified fragments containing the eight structural exons encoding the VDR protein were sequenced. The DNA from all affected children exhibited a single C {yields} A base substitution within exon 7 at nucleotide 970. Although the affected children were all homozygotic for the mutation, the four parents tested all exhibited both wild-type and mutant alleles, indicating a heterozygous state. Recreated mutant receptor exhibited no specific 1,25-({sup 3}H)dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} binding and failed to activate a cotransfected VDR promoter-reporter gene construct. Thus these findings identify an ochre mutation in a human steroid hormone receptor in patients with hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-resistant rickets.

  8. Self-administered C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for the management of hereditary angioedema: usability and patient acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li HH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Huamin Henry Li Institute for Asthma and Allergy, Chevy Chase, MD, USA Abstract: Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. The primary cause for the most common form of HAE is a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH. The swelling caused by HAE can be painful, disfiguring, and life-threatening. It reduces daily function and compromises the quality of life of affected individuals and their caregivers. Among different treatment strategies, replacement with C1-INH concentrates is employed for on-demand treatment of acute attacks and long-term prophylaxis. Three human plasma-derived C1-INH preparations are approved for HAE treatment in the US, the European Union, or both regions: Cinryze®, Berinert®, and Cetor®; however, only Cinryze is approved for long-term prophylaxis. Postmarketing studies have shown that home therapy (self-administered or administered by a caregiver is a convenient and safe option preferred by many HAE patients. In this review, we summarize the role of self-administered plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate therapy with Cinryze at home in the prophylaxis of HAE. Keywords: C1-INH concentrate, hereditary angioedema, disease management, first line, prophylaxis, self-administration 

  9. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  10. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  11. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  12. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neubert TA, Lu Y, Rebeck GW, Frangione B, Greenberg SM, Ghiso J. Iowa variant of familial Alzheimer's ... ML, van Duinen SG, Roos RA, Frosch MP, Greenberg SM. The cerebral beta-amyloid angiopathies: hereditary and ...

  14. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  15. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jie Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases.

  16. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiyomasa; Nishii; Yosaburo; Shibata; Yasushi; Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin(Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  17. Human Microbiome and its Association With Health and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althani, Asmaa A; Marei, Hany E; Hamdi, Wedad S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Khodor, Souhaila; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Abdel-Aziz, Hassan; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Human microbiota are distinct communities of microorganisms that resides at different body niches. Exploration of the human microbiome has become a reality due to the availability of powerful metagenomics and metatranscriptomic analysis technologies. Recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatics over the past decade help provide a deep insight into the nature of the host-microbial interactions and identification of potential deriver genes and pathways associated with human health, well-being, and predisposition to different diseases. In the present review, we outline recent studies devoted to elucidate the possible link between the microbiota and various type of diseases. The present review also highlights the potential utilization of microbiota as a potential therapeutic option to treat a wide array of human diseases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1688-1694, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Kiyomasa; Shibata, Yosaburo; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2014-11-26

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin (Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  19. MicroRNA in human cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the non-coding RNAs that act as post-translational regulators to their complimentary messenger RNAs (mRNA). Due to their specific gene silencing property, miRNAs have been implicated in a number of cellular and developmental processes. Also, it has been proposed that a particular set of miRNA spectrum is expressed only in a particular type of tissue. Many interesting findings related to the differential expression of miRNAs in various human diseases including several types of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic diseases have been reported. Deregulation of miRNA expression in different types of human diseases and the roles various miRNAs play as tumour suppressors as well as oncogenes, suggest their contribution to cancer and/or in other disease development. These findings have possible implications in the development of diagnostics and/or therapeutics in human malignancies. In this review, we discuss various miRNAs that are differentially expressed in human chronic inflammatory diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and the further prospective development of miRNA based diagnostics and therapeutics.

  20. Natural selection on genes that underlie human disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekhman, Ran; Man, Orna; Herrmann, Leslie; Boyko, Adam R.; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-01-01

    What evolutionary forces shape genes that contribute to the risk of human disease? Do similar selective pressures act on alleles that underlie simple vs. complex disorders? [1-3]. Answers to these questions will shed light on the origin of human disorders (e.g., [4]), and help to predict the population frequencies of alleles that contribute to disease risk, with important implications for the efficient design of mapping studies [5-7]. As a first step towards addressing them, we created a hand-curated version of the Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). We then examined selective pressures on Mendelian disease genes, genes that contribute to complex disease risk and genes known to be essential in mouse, by analyzing patterns of human polymorphism and of divergence between human and rhesus macaque. We find that Mendelian disease genes appear to be under widespread purifying selection, especially when the disease mutations are dominant (rather than recessive). In contrast, the class of genes that influence complex disease risk shows little signs of evolutionary conservation, possibly because this category includes both targets of purifying and positive selection. PMID:18571414

  1. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field.

  2. Long Non-Coding RNAs and Complex Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changning Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a heterogeneous class of RNAs that are generally defined as non-protein-coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Recently, an increasing number of studies have shown that lncRNAs can be involved in various critical biological processes, such as chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and protein transport and trafficking. Moreover, lncRNAs are dysregulated in a number of complex human diseases, including coronary artery diseases, autoimmune diseases, neurological disorders, and various cancers, which indicates their important roles in these diseases. Here, we reviewed the current understanding of lncRNAs, including their definition and subclassification, regulatory functions, and potential roles in different types of complex human diseases.

  3. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus...... was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte...

  4. Advances in laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Mariela Granero

    2016-11-12

    Among the red cell membrane disorders, hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common causes of inherited hemolytic anemia. HS results from the deficiency or dysfunction of red blood cell membrane proteins, such as α spectrin, β spectrin, ankyrin, anion channel protein (Band-3 protein), protein 4.1 and protein 4.2. Conventionally, HS diagnosis is established through a series of tests, which include spherocytes identification in peripheral smear, reticulocyte count, osmotic fragility, etc. Currently, different hematological analyzers provide erythrocyte indicators that estimate the presence of spherocytes and correlate that with HS, which can be useful for disease screening. The most traditional method is the osmotic fragility (OF) test, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming to perform and presents low sensitivity and specificity values. Thus, new methods have been developed for HS diagnosis, such as flow cytometry. Current guidelines recommend the use of flow cytometry as a screening test for HS diagnosis using the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test. Thus, HS diagnosis is the result of a collaboration between clinicians and laboratories, who should take into account the family history and the exclusion of other causes of secondary spherocytosis.

  5. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1 gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation. Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes.

  6. [Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: a rare diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem-Jmili, N; Salem, N; Abdelkefi, S; Champ, B Grand; Bekri, S; Sboui, H; Mahjoub, T; Yacoub, S; Kortas, M

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia is a very rare disease recessive and X-linked that affect heme biosynthesis by deficit or decreased of delta aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) activity. We report a case of a six-month-old boy, admitted in the hospital for anemic syndrome. The hemogram showed anemia (hemoglobin: 4.5 g/dL), frankly hypochronic microcytic and a regenerated (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: 26 g/dL, mean cell volume: 53 fl, reticulocytes: 10 x 10(9)/L) with red cells morphologic disorders in smears (anisopoikylocytosis) without attack of the other lineages; white blood cells: 11 x 10(9)/L (neutrophils: 64% and lymphocytes: 35%); platelets: 350 x 10(9)/L. Examination of bone marrow showed an important erythroid hyperplasia (about 69%) with dyserythropoiesis. Perls stain revealed intense siderosis with 90% of ringed sideroblasts and a large number of siderocytes. Exploration of ALAS2 and ABC7 genes on the DNA of the infant was not found abnormalities. Treatment with pyridoxine corrects moderately the anemia. By the way, we proposed to remind that iron deficiency, inflammatory syndrome and thalassemia are the common microcytic anemia. However, it's mandatory to explore other causes if diagnosis is not solved.

  7. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT, low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis, insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability.

  8. DUF1220 domains, cognitive disease, and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, L; Sikela, J M

    2009-01-01

    We have established that human genome sequences encoding a novel protein domain, DUF1220, show a dramatically elevated copy number in the human lineage (>200 copies in humans vs. 1 in mouse/rat) and may be important to human evolutionary adaptation. Copy-number variations (CNVs) in the 1q21.1 region, where most DUF1220 sequences map, have now been implicated in numerous diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction, including autism, autism spectrum disorder, mental retardation, schizophrenia, microcephaly, and macrocephaly. We report here that these disease-related 1q21.1 CNVs either encompass or are directly flanked by DUF1220 sequences and exhibit a dosage-related correlation with human brain size. Microcephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are deletions, whereas macrocephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are duplications. Similarly, 1q21.1 deletions and smaller brain size are linked with schizophrenia, whereas 1q21.1 duplications and larger brain size are associated with autism. Interestingly, these two diseases are thought to be phenotypic opposites. These data suggest a model which proposes that (1) DUF1220 domain copy number may be involved in influencing human brain size and (2) the evolutionary advantage of rapidly increasing DUF1220 copy number in the human lineage has resulted in favoring retention of the high genomic instability of the 1q21.1 region, which, in turn, has precipitated a spectrum of recurrent human brain and developmental disorders.

  9. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2001. Animal origins of human infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A

    2001-06-29

    Since time immemorial animals have been a major source of human infectious disease. Certain infections like rabies are recognized as zoonoses caused in each case by direct animal-to-human transmission. Others like measles became independently sustained with the human population so that the causative virus has diverged from its animal progenitor. Recent examples of direct zoonoses are variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease arising from bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and the H5N1 avian influenza outbreak in Hong Kong. Epidemics of recent animal origin are the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Some retroviruses jump into and out of the chromosomal DNA of the host germline, so that they oscillate between being inherited Mendelian traits or infectious agents in different species. Will new procedures like animal-to-human transplants unleash further infections? Do microbes become more virulent upon cross-species transfer? Are animal microbes a threat as biological weapons? Will the vast reservoir of immunodeficient hosts due to the HIV pandemic provide conditions permissive for sporadic zoonoses to take off as human-to-human transmissible diseases? Do human infections now pose a threat to endangered primates? These questions are addressed in this lecture.

  10. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    arginine faster than after lysine. Construction of mutants was accomplished using standard molecular biology methodology. Please note that amino...Project Role: Research Assistant Professor Researcher Identifier (e.g. ORCID ID): orcid.org/0000-0001-8687-470X Nearest person month worked: 6 months...Support: This grant. Name: Laura Cosen de Binker, Ph.D. Project Role: Research Assistant Professor Researcher Identifier (e.g. ORCID ID): orcid.org

  11. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Pathogenesis of acidosis in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R M; Little, J A; Patten, R L; Goldstein, M B; Halperin, M L

    1979-11-01

    An 18-yr-old man with a classical history of hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) developed typical biochemical changes following an oral fructose load: fructosemia, hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hypokalemia (3.1 meq/liter) was also noted. Three aspects of this case expand the published literature on this syndrome: (1) Metabolic acidosis was found to be due to both lactic acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). We could quantitate the relative contribution of each, and found that urinary bicarbonate loss due to proximal RTA accounted for less than 10% of the fall in serum bicarbonate. The major cause of the metabolic acidosis was lactic acidosis. (2) Hypokalemia was found to be due to movement of potassium out of the extracellular space rather than to urinary loss. Potassium may have entered cells with phosphate or may have been sequestered in the gastrointestinal tract. (3) The coexistence of proximal RTA and acidemia made it possible to study the effect of acidemia on the urine-blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) gradient in alkaline urine (U-B PCO2). The U-B PCO2 measured during acidemia was much higher at the same urine bicarbonate concentration than in normal controls during alkalemia, providing evidence in humans that acidemia stimulates distal nephron hydrogen-ion secretion.

  13. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  14. Part 1: The Human Gut Microbiome in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Matthew J.; Plummer, Nigel T.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial cells harbored within the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) outnumber the host’s cells by a factor of 10 and the genes encoded by the bacteria resident within the GIT outnumber their host’s genes by more than 100 times. These human digestive-tract associated microbes are referred to as the gut microbiome. The human gut microbiome and its role in both health and disease has been the subject of extensive research, establishing its involvement in human metabolism, nutrition, physi...

  15. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  16. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  17. Infectious prion diseases in humans: cannibalism, iatrogenicity and zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In contrast with other neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, human prion diseases include infectious forms (also called transmitted forms) such as kuru, iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The transmissible agent is thought to be solely composed of the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein that accumulated in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Compared to its normal counterpart, PrP(Sc) is β-sheet enriched and aggregated and its propagation is based on an autocatalytic conversion process. Increasing evidence supports the view that conformational variations of PrP(Sc) encoded the biological properties of the various prion strains that have been isolated by transmission studies in experimental models. Infectious forms of human prion diseases played a pivotal role in the emergence of the prion concept and in the characterization of the very unconventional properties of prions. They provide a unique model to understand how prion strains are selected and propagate in humans. Here, we review and discuss how genetic factors interplay with strain properties and route of transmission to influence disease susceptibility, incubation period and phenotypic expression in the light of the kuru epidemics due to ritual endocannibalism, the various series iatrogenic diseases secondary to extractive growth hormone treatment or dura mater graft and the epidemics of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to dietary exposure to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

  18. Spectroscopy techniques for human disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Moreno, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Modern medicine would benefit from the pursuit of new, more specific and easier to implement diagnosis tools. In recent years, Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy have proven to be successful diagnostic techniques for a wide range of diseases including atherosclerosis, kidney stones, bone diseases, diabetes, and a wide collection of neoplasms. Optical spectroscopy has several advantages over more traditional diagnostic methods (i.e., histopathology, quantitative PCR, etc.) such as faster data analysis, nonspecific sample preparation, nonspecific labels/reagents/antibodies usage requirements, and immediate on-site implementation. In the present work, label-free in vitro fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been used to differentiate between blood cells of patients affected with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and those of healthy subjects. The SERS technique has also been applied to hemoglobin variants as well as to serum obtained from patients affected with chronic heart failure who positively or negatively responded to the seasonal influenza vaccine. We found that spectral ratios of the background fluorescence intensity that accompanies the SERS spectra of granulocytes serve as excellent markers for the presence of MPNs. In addition, we also found expression dysregulation of two hypoxia induced factor regulated genes, which correlates with our results obtained by SERS spectroscopy assay in MPN patients and supports the presence of the Warburg effect in MPNs. We hypothesize that SERS measures metabolic change in granulocytes through two possible mechanisms: (i) Changes in dielectric properties of the environment surrounding the silver-cell interface; and (ii) changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide concentrations, which in turn changes the relative contribution of the autofluorescence to the emission spectrum. These hypotheses are supported by SERS measurement of 2-deoxy

  19. Early Stage Disease Diagnosis System Using Human Nail Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti S. Indi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human’s hand nail is analyzed to identify many diseases at early stage of diagnosis. Study of person hand nail color helps in identification of particular disease in healthcare domain. The proposed system guides in such scenario to take decision in disease diagnosis. The input to the proposed system is person nail image. The system will process an image of nail and extract features of nail which is used for disease diagnosis. Human nail consist of various features, out of which proposed system uses nail color changes for disease diagnosis. Here, first training set data is prepared using Weka tool from nail images of patients of specific diseases. A feature extracted from input nail image is compared with the training data set to get result. In this experiment we found that using color feature of nail image average 65% results are correctly matched with training set data during three tests conducted.

  20. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  1. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  2. Human Disease Diagnosis Using a Fuzzy Expert System

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, Mir Anamul; Chowdhury, Ahsan Raja

    2010-01-01

    Human disease diagnosis is a complicated process and requires high level of expertise. Any attempt of developing a web-based expert system dealing with human disease diagnosis has to overcome various difficulties. This paper describes a project work aiming to develop a web-based fuzzy expert system for diagnosing human diseases. Now a days fuzzy systems are being used successfully in an increasing number of application areas; they use linguistic rules to describe systems. This research project focuses on the research and development of a web-based clinical tool designed to improve the quality of the exchange of health information between health care professionals and patients. Practitioners can also use this web-based tool to corroborate diagnosis. The proposed system is experimented on various scenarios in order to evaluate it's performance. In all the cases, proposed system exhibits satisfactory results.

  3. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana A. Janicijevic Petrovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy is a neuro-ophthalmological entity characterized by acute or subacute bilateral, not simultaneous visual loss with centro cekal scotoma and occasional further visual improvement. This rare ophthalmological disease can be accompanied with dyschromatopsia. It is associated with a matrilineal inheritance pattern. Its diagnosis used to be solely clini¬cal, aided by imaging and neuro-physiological studies, until the advent of descriptions of mitochondrial biochemical abnormalities and genetic testing. We describe a case of 24 year old male with progressive painless deterioration of visual acuity and positive family history.

  4. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  5. Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: 18 Year Interval Between Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohden, Kaitlyn L; Tang, Peter H; Lilley, Chrystia C; Lee, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy developed profound loss of vision in his right eye and was found to have a 11778 mitochondrial point mutation consistent with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). He maintained 20/20 vision in the left eye for 18 years until age 23, when he experienced loss of vision in that eye. This 18 year interval between eye involvement in LHON is the longest reported to date and reinforces the variability in presentation and progression seen in this disease.

  6. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking Susac's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolella, Stefano; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Prascina, Francesco; Artuso, Lucia; Pacillo, Francesca; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Avolio, Carlo; Delle Noci, Nicola; Attimonelli, Marcella; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2010-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by bilateral painless optic atrophy and blindness. It usually occurs in young men in association with three major mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). We report a patient with a history of alcohol abuse who developed at age 63 years visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, and memory dysfunction, suggestive of Susac's syndrome. The patient carried the heteroplasmic mt. 11778G>A mutation on the T2e mtDNA haplogroup. It remains unclear if chronic alcohol abuse combined with the mitochondrial genetic background prompted an aged-related neurodegeneration or deferred the onset of the LHON disease.

  7. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research.

  8. Cannabis potentially reduces recurrent episodes of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumpattra Chariyawong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare disease affecting an estimated 1 in 50,000 individuals in the United States.The clinical presentation involves recurrent episodes of angioedema, without urticaria or pruritus, in mucosal tissues of various organ systems. We present a case of HAE type II with concomitant use of cannabis that possibly decreased the frequency of his episodes of angioedema. Recent studies indicate that cannabis has an important role in regulating innate immunity and inflammatory responses through the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and upregulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. These effects might reduce episodes of angioedema, but more research is needed.

  9. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kartal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;abdominal pain and rdquo; is always important even though hereditary angioedema diagnosis exists. And the second; It can be hardy speculated that long term danazol treatment may cause different malignancies. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 567-569

  10. Human Disease Insight: An integrated knowledge-based platform for disease-gene-drug information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasleem, Munazzah; Ishrat, Romana; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-01-01

    The scope of the Human Disease Insight (HDI) database is not limited to researchers or physicians as it also provides basic information to non-professionals and creates disease awareness, thereby reducing the chances of patient suffering due to ignorance. HDI is a knowledge-based resource providing information on human diseases to both scientists and the general public. Here, our mission is to provide a comprehensive human disease database containing most of the available useful information, with extensive cross-referencing. HDI is a knowledge management system that acts as a central hub to access information about human diseases and associated drugs and genes. In addition, HDI contains well-classified bioinformatics tools with helpful descriptions. These integrated bioinformatics tools enable researchers to annotate disease-specific genes and perform protein analysis, search for biomarkers and identify potential vaccine candidates. Eventually, these tools will facilitate the analysis of disease-associated data. The HDI provides two types of search capabilities and includes provisions for downloading, uploading and searching disease/gene/drug-related information. The logistical design of the HDI allows for regular updating. The database is designed to work best with Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome and is freely accessible at http://humandiseaseinsight.com.

  11. Antisense Oligonucleotides: Translation from Mouse Models to Human Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Kathleen M; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-06-21

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by single-protein dysfunction and aggregation. Treatment strategies for these diseases have often targeted downstream pathways to ameliorate consequences of protein dysfunction; however, targeting the source of that dysfunction, the affected protein itself, seems most judicious to achieve a highly effective therapeutic outcome. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are small sequences of DNA able to target RNA transcripts, resulting in reduced or modified protein expression. ASOs are ideal candidates for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, given numerous advancements made to their chemical modifications and delivery methods. Successes achieved in both animal models and human clinical trials have proven ASOs both safe and effective. With proper considerations in mind regarding the human applicability of ASOs, we anticipate ongoing in vivo research and clinical trial development of ASOs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Shimoyama

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases.

  13. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; De Pons, Jeff; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; Tutaj, Marek; Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Ghiasvand, Omid; Thota, Jyothi; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases. PMID:27736745

  14. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases: A Systems Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2015-12-01

    The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction.

  15. DNA Aptamers in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinchang Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have a promising role in the field of life science and have been extensively researched for application as analytical tools, therapeutic agents and as vehicles for targeted drug delivery. Compared with RNA aptamers, DNA aptamers have inherent advantages in stability and facility of generation and synthesis. To better understand the specific potential of DNA aptamers, an overview of the progress in the generation and application of DNA aptamers in human disease diagnosis and therapy are presented in this review. Special attention is given to researches that are relatively close to practical application. DNA aptamers are expected to have great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

  16. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  17. Role of Epigenetics in Biology and Human Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Moosavi, Azam; Ardekani, Ali Motevalizadeh

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, scientists have tried to describe disorders just by genetic or environmental factors. However, the role of epigenetics in human diseases has been considered from a half of century ago. In the last decade, this subject has attracted many interests, especially in complicated disorders such as behavior plasticity, memory, cancer, autoimmune disease, and addiction as well as neurodegenerative and psychological disorders. This review first explains the history and classification o...

  18. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Therapy of Human Papillomavirus-Related Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Peter L.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Hampson, Ian N.; Broker, Thomas; Fiander, Alison; Lacey, Charles J.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the current treatment of chronic and neoplastic HPV-associated conditions and the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Surgical excision of HPV-associated lower genital tract neoplasia is very successful but largely depends on secondary prevention programmes for identification of disease. Only high-risk HPV-driven chronic, preneoplastic lesions and some very early cancers cannot be successfully treated by surgical procedures alone. Chemoradiation therapy of cervical cancer contributes to the 66–79% cervical cancer survival at 5 years. Outlook for those patients with persistent or recurrent cervical cancer following treatment is very poor. Topical agents such as imiquimod (immune response modifier), cidofovir (inhibition of viral replication; induction apoptosis) or photodynamic therapy (direct damage of tumour and augmentation of anti-tumour immunity) have all shown some useful efficacy (~50–60%) in treatment of high grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia. Provider administered treatments of genital warts include cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, or surgical removal which has the highest primary clearance rate. Patient applied therapies include podophyllotoxin and imiquimod. Recurrence after “successful” treatment is 30–40%. Further improvements could derive from a rational combination of current therapy with new drugs targeting molecular pathways mediated by HPV in cancer. Small molecule inhibitors targeting the DNA binding activities of HPV E1/E2 or the anti-apoptotic consequences of E6/E7 oncogenes are in preclinical development. Proteasome and histone deacetylase inhibitors, which can enhance apoptosis in HPV positive tumour cells, are being tested in early clinical trials. Chronic high-risk HPV infection/neoplasia is characterised by systemic and/or local immune suppressive regulatory or escape factors. Recently two E6/E7 vaccines have shown some clinical efficacy in high grade VIN patients and this correlated with strong

  20. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  1. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran

    2013-07-01

    Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  2. An integrated physical map covering 25 cM of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Hou, J.; Wagner, M.J.; Wells, D.E. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on an integrated physical map of human chromosome 8 using STS content analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC contigs. Such mapping efforts will help to localize genes linked to hereditary diseases. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Human prion diseases: surgical lessons learned from iatrogenic prion transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Khan, Fahd; Miller, Benjamin R; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Puoti, Gianfranco; Cohen, Mark L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Cali, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    The human prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, have captivated our imaginations since their discovery in the Fore linguistic group in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s. The mysterious and poorly understood "infectious protein" has become somewhat of a household name in many regions across the globe. From bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly identified as mad cow disease, to endocannibalism, media outlets have capitalized on these devastatingly fatal neurological conditions. Interestingly, since their discovery, there have been more than 492 incidents of iatrogenic transmission of prion diseases, largely resulting from prion-contaminated growth hormone and dura mater grafts. Although fewer than 9 cases of probable iatrogenic neurosurgical cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have been reported worldwide, the likelihood of some missed cases and the potential for prion transmission by neurosurgery create considerable concern. Laboratory studies indicate that standard decontamination and sterilization procedures may be insufficient to completely remove infectivity from prion-contaminated instruments. In this unfortunate event, the instruments may transmit the prion disease to others. Much caution therefore should be taken in the absence of strong evidence against the presence of a prion disease in a neurosurgical patient. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have devised risk assessment and decontamination protocols for the prevention of iatrogenic transmission of the prion diseases, incidents of possible exposure to prions have unfortunately occurred in the United States. In this article, the authors outline the historical discoveries that led from kuru to the identification and isolation of the pathological prion proteins in addition to providing a brief description of human prion diseases and iatrogenic forms of CJD, a brief history of prion disease nosocomial transmission

  4. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process. PMID:28362824

  5. Guidelines for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary recurrent fevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinar, Y; Obici, L; Aksentijevich, I

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible ...... and 19 September 2011 to ratify the draft and obtain a final consensus document. An agreed set of best practice guidelines was proposed for genetic diagnostic testing of HRFs, for reporting the genetic results and for defining their clinical significance.......Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible...... for these diseases has initiated genetic diagnostics in many countries around the world, including the Middle East, Europe, USA, Japan and Australia. However, diverse testing methods and reporting practices are employed and there is a clear need for consensus guidelines for HRF genetic testing. Draft guidelines were...

  6. Previously undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis in a patient with jaundice and pyelonephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tateno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary spherocytosis is autosomal dominant inherited extravascular hemolytic disorder and is the commonest cause of inherited hemolysis in northern Europe and the United States. The classical clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis are anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. However, all of these classical features are not always revealed in the case of mild hemolysis or when hemolysis is well compensated. Patients with hereditary spherocytosis may remain undiagnosed for years if their hemolysis is mild. Case presentation A 42-year-old Asian woman presented to our clinic with a sudden onset of high fever with shaking chills and jaundice, suggesting septicemia; however, following detailed investigation, the patient was diagnosed with pyelonephritis and accelerated hemolysis of hereditary spherocytosis due to infection. Conclusions It is important to note that transient anemia or jaundice can sometimes be the only initial presenting symptoms in cases of undiagnosed latent hereditary spherocytosis. This case also highlights the fact that physicians should consider concomitant hemolytic disease in patients in whom jaundice and infections that rarely cause jaundice coexist.

  7. Clinical course of 63 children with hereditary spherocytosis: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Lopes Araujo Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is an inherited hemolytic anemia that is caused by deficiency or dysfunction of erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course of hereditary spherocytosis in patients treated in the Pediatric Hematology Unit, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. METHODS: Sixty-three under 16-year-old patients with hereditary spherocytosis were retrospectively evaluated between January 1988 and December 2007. Hereditary spherocytosis was diagnosed based on clinical history, physical examination and on a positive osmotic fragility curve. Patients underwent screening for cholelithiasis by ultrasonography. They were classified into three groups: mild, moderate and severe. The events of interest were need for blood transfusion, cholelithiasis, splenic sequestration, aplastic crisis, and splenectomy. Differences between subgroups were evaluated by the two-sided log-rank test. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 5.2 years and most patients were classified as moderate (54%. Patients with the severe form of the disease were younger (p-value = 0.001 and needed more blood transfusions (p-value = 0.004. Seventeen patients (27% developed cholelithiasis, 14 (22.2% splenic sequestration and three (4.8% aplastic crises. Twenty-two patients (34.9% were splenectomized with the main indication being splenic sequestration in nine patients (41%. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical course of patients with hereditary spherocytosis in this study was relatively benign however cholelithiasis was a common complication.

  8. A Family with Hereditary Angioedema Having Been Followed as Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülben Sarıcı

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder resulting from the congenital deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor protein. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal viscera. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following stress or trauma. The disease is usually associated with attacks of abdominal pain. So, patients may apply for this complaint to other clinics rather than dermatology, and may be misdiagnosed and followed for a long time. Therefore hereditary angioedema should be thought in differential diagnosis of patients suffering from abdominal pain. Here in this writing, we describe a family with hereditary angioedema who has been followed as Familial Mediterranean Fever for a long time. The family members complained from swellings which have been occuring in various regions of the body and disappearing spontaneously, and complained from severe abdominal pain, since childhood. These patients have been followed and tried to be treated with the misdiagnosis of Familial Mediterranean Fever for many years. These patients were diagnosed as hereditary angioedema in our clinic, and benefited from danazol treatment

  9. A novel locus for a hereditary recurrent neuropathy on chromosome 21q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpena, E; Martínez-Rubio, D; Arpa, J; García-Peñas, J J; Montaner, D; Dopazo, J; Palau, F; Espinós, C

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary recurrent neuropathies are uncommon. Disorders with a known molecular basis falling within this group include hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) due to the deletion of the PMP22 gene or to mutations in this same gene, and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA) caused by mutations in the SEPT9 gene. We report a three-generation family presenting a hereditary recurrent neuropathy without pathological changes in either PMP22 or SEPT9 genes. We performed a genome-wide mapping, which yielded a locus of 12.4 Mb on chromosome 21q21. The constructed haplotype fully segregated with the disease and we found significant evidence of linkage. After mutational screening of genes located within this locus, encoding for proteins and microRNAs, as well as analysis of large deletions/insertions, we identified 71 benign polymorphisms. Our findings suggest a novel genetic locus for a recurrent hereditary neuropathy of which the molecular defect remains elusive. Our results further underscore the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this group of neuropathies.

  10. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Multiple, Complex Etiologies in an Idiopathic Hereditary Pancreatitis Kindred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Hereditary pancreatitis is the early onset form of chronic pancreatitis that is carried in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable penetrance. While 80% of hereditary pancreatitis has been shown to be due to a single mutation in the trypsinogen gene PRSS1, a number of hereditary pancreatitis families have no identified genetic cause for illness; thus no reliable screening options or clear therapy. Objective To explore the use of massive parallel DNA sequencing technology to discover the etiology of pancreatitis in a family with idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Design Candidate gene screening and verification within a kindred. Setting Prospective cohort study, university based. Patients or participants Kindred with idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Identification of DNA variants predicted to increase susceptibility to pancreatitis. Methods Whole exome sequencing of two distantly related subjects with variant-specific confirmation in the subjects and other family members. Results We identified three deleterious genetic changes in the three major pancreatitis associated genes (PRSS1 CNV, SPINK1 c.27delC and CFTR R117H, two of which were carried by each patient. Individual targeted assays confirmed these variations in the two whole exome sequencing patients as well as affected and non-affected pedigree members. Conclusion Whole exome sequencing was useful for rapid screening of candidate genes linked to pancreatitis. This method opens the door for time- and cost-effective screening of multiple disease-associated genes and modifying factors that associate in different ways to generate a complex geneticdisorder.

  11. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications.

  12. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bork Konrad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema is a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity and protein in plasma were described. Since then numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients by far were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. Recently, in some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor gene were detected in the affected persons.

  14. Hereditary angioedema type 2 presented as an orbital complication of acute rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somuk, Battal Tahsin; Göktas, Göksel; Özer, Samet; Sapmaz, Emrah; Bas, Yalcın

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant and life-threatening disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of non-pitting edema affecting the skin, respiratory system and digestive tracts and caused by a congenital deficiency or function defect of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Preseptal cellulitis is defined as an infection of the tissues of the anterior orbital septum. It is generally caused by complications from an upper respiratory tract infection, dacryocystitis, dermal infection, and, rarely, sinusitis. The disease presents with orbital pain, edema on the eyelids, erythema, and fever. In this case, a child with hereditary angioedema type 2 who presented as mimicking a complication of acute sinusitis is discussed.

  15. Disease modeling and drug screening for neurological diseases using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hong XU; Zhong ZHONG

    2013-01-01

    With the general decline of pharmaceutical research productivity,there are concerns that many components of the drug discovery process need to be redesigned and optimized.For example,the human immortalized cell lines or animal primary cells commonly used in traditional drug screening may not faithfully recapitulate the pathological mechanisms of human diseases,leading to biases in assays,targets,or compounds that do not effectively address disease mechanisms.Recent advances in stem cell research,especially in the development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology,provide a new paradigm for drug screening by permitting the use of human cells with the same genetic makeup as the patients without the typical quantity constraints associated with patient primary cells.In this article,we will review the progress made to date on cellular disease models using human stem cells,with a focus on patient-specific iPSCs for neurological diseases.We will discuss the key challenges and the factors that associated with the success of using stem cell models for drug discovery through examples from monogenic diseases,diseases with various known genetic components,and complex diseases caused by a combination of genetic,environmental and other factors.

  16. Disease modeling and drug screening for neurological diseases using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-hong; Zhong, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    With the general decline of pharmaceutical research productivity, there are concerns that many components of the drug discovery process need to be redesigned and optimized. For example, the human immortalized cell lines or animal primary cells commonly used in traditional drug screening may not faithfully recapitulate the pathological mechanisms of human diseases, leading to biases in assays, targets, or compounds that do not effectively address disease mechanisms. Recent advances in stem cell research, especially in the development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, provide a new paradigm for drug screening by permitting the use of human cells with the same genetic makeup as the patients without the typical quantity constraints associated with patient primary cells. In this article, we will review the progress made to date on cellular disease models using human stem cells, with a focus on patient-specific iPSCs for neurological diseases. We will discuss the key challenges and the factors that associated with the success of using stem cell models for drug discovery through examples from monogenic diseases, diseases with various known genetic components, and complex diseases caused by a combination of genetic, environmental and other factors.

  17. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra [Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Center of Molecular Medicine (CMMC) and Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); MPI for Neurological Research, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro [University of California Los Angeles (United States). Department of Medicine

    2005-12-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being

  18. Modeling Human Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Immunocompromised Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norelli, Margherita; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor is an effective form of cancer immunotherapy, especially for acute leukemias. HSCT is however frequently complicated by the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Immunocompromised mice infused with human T cells often develop a clinical syndrome resembling human GVHD (xenogeneic or X-GVHD). Herein, we describe a method for inducing X-GVHD in a highly reproducible manner. Given the human nature of immune effectors, this xenogeneic model can be routinely adopted for screening the efficacy of new treatments for GVHD.

  19. Is there alteration in aortic stiffness in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.; Chinnery, P.F.; Soliman, O.I.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Cate, FJ Ten

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is recognized as the most common cause of isolated blindness in young men. The current study was designed to test whether LHON as a mitochondrial disease is associated with vascular functional alterations characterized by aortic elastic properties

  20. LEBERS HEREDITARY OPTIC NEUROPATHY - CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MITOCHONDRIAL GENOTYPE AND VISUAL OUTCOME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTRA, RJ; BOLHUIS, PA; WIJBURG, FA; ZORNENDE, G; BLEEKERWAGEMAKERS, EM

    1994-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We describe the distribution of seven different mtDNA mutations and the clinical findings in 334 LHON patients belonging to 29 families. Mutations described only in LHON

  1. Is there alteration in aortic stiffness in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.; Chinnery, P.F.; Soliman, O.I.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Cate, FJ Ten

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is recognized as the most common cause of isolated blindness in young men. The current study was designed to test whether LHON as a mitochondrial disease is associated with vascular functional alterations characterized by aortic elastic properties du

  2. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor (C1-inh). The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks...

  3. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition ...

  4. Exome sequencing is a useful diagnostic tool for complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Lopez-Sendon, J. L.; Garcia-Caldentey, J.; Rizzu, P.; Bakker, I. M. C.; Shomroni, O.; Quintans, B.; Davila, J. R.; Bevova, M. R.; Sobrido, M-J; Heutink, P.; de Yebenes, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases encompassing pure and complicated forms, for which at least 52 loci and 31 causative genes have been identified. Although mutations in the SPAST gene explain approximately 40% of the pure autosomal dominant

  5. Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in North American farmed silver fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Hudson, Robert C; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis is a progressive growth of gingival tissues in foxes resulting in dental encapsulation. It is an autosomal recessive condition displaying a gender-biased penetrance, with an association with superior fur quality. This disease has been primarily described in European farmed foxes. Here we document its emergence in Canada.

  6. A frameshift mutation in LRSAM1 is responsible for a dominant hereditary polyneuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M.A.J.; Sorrentino, V.; Kasher, P.R.; Jakobs, M.E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Fluiter, K.; Wissel, M.B. de; Sizarov, A.; Nurnberg, G.; Nurnberg, P.; Zelcer, N.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Baas, F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the high number of genes identified in hereditary polyneuropathies/Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the genetic defect in many families is still unknown. Here we report the identification of a new gene for autosomal dominant axonal neuropathy in a large three-generation family. Linkage ana

  7. Mutations in the hereditary haemochromatosis gene HFE in professional endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Chicharro, J.; Hoyos, J; Gomez-Gallego, F; Villa, J.; Bandres, F; Celaya, P; Jimenez, F.; Alonso, J.; Cordova, A; Lucia, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hereditary haemochromatosis, a disease that affects iron metabolism, progresses with a greater or lesser tendency to induce iron overload, possibly leading to severe organ dysfunction. Most elite endurance athletes take iron supplements during their active sporting life, which could aggravate this condition.

  8. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  9. Widespread thalamic and cerebellar degeneration in a patient with a complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; De Vos, Rai; Derksen, L.; Bauer, P.; Riess, O.; den Dunnen, W.; Deller, T.; Hageman, G.; Rueb, U.

    2009-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are a heterogeneous group of familial movement disorders sharing progressive spastic paraplegia as a common disease sign. In the present study, we performed the first pathoanatomical investigation of the central nervous degeneration of a female patient with a

  10. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  11. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  12. Coexistence of gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis in a child presenting with extreme jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Moon, Kyung Rye

    2014-12-01

    Gilbert syndrome is the most common inherited disorder of bilirubin glucuronidation. It is characterized by intermittent episodes of jaundice in the absence of hepatocellular disease or hemolysis. Hereditary spherocytosis is the most common inherited hemolytic anemia and is characterized by spherical, osmotically fragile erythrocytes that are selectively trapped by the spleen. The patients have variable degrees of anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. Hereditary spherocytosis usually leads to mild-to-moderate elevation of serum bilirubin levels. Severe hyperbilirubinemia compared with the degree of hemolysis should be lead to suspicion of additional clinical conditions such as Gilbert syndrome or thalassemia. We present the case of a 12-year-old boy with extreme jaundice and nausea. The diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was confirmed by osmotic fragility test results and that of Gilbert syndrome by genetic analysis findings.

  13. Molecular functions of human endogenous retroviruses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntsova, Maria; Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and related genetic elements form 504 distinct families and occupy ~8% of human genome. Recent success of high-throughput experimental technologies facilitated understanding functional impact of HERVs for molecular machinery of human cells. HERVs encode active retroviral proteins, which may exert important physiological functions in the body, but also may be involved in the progression of cancer and numerous human autoimmune, neurological and infectious diseases. The spectrum of related malignancies includes, but not limits to, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, lupus, schizophrenia, multiple cancer types and HIV. In addition, HERVs regulate expression of the neighboring host genes and modify genomic regulatory landscape, e.g., by providing regulatory modules like transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Indeed, recent bioinformatic profiling identified ~110,000 regulatory active HERV elements, which formed at least ~320,000 human TFBS. These and other peculiarities of HERVs might have played an important role in human evolution and speciation. In this paper, we focus on the current progress in understanding of normal and pathological molecular niches of HERVs, on their implications in human evolution, normal physiology and disease. We also review the available databases dealing with various aspects of HERV genetics.

  14. Structure of the thermolabile mutant aldolase B, A149P: molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malay, Ali D; Allen, Karen N; Tolan, Dean R

    2005-03-18

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially lethal inborn error in metabolism caused by mutations in the aldolase B gene, which is critical for gluconeogenesis and fructose metabolism. The most common mutation, which accounts for 53% of HFI alleles identified worldwide, results in substitution of Pro for Ala at position 149. Structural and functional investigations of human aldolase B with the A149P substitution (AP-aldolase) have shown that the mutation leads to losses in thermal stability, quaternary structure, and activity. X-ray crystallography is used to reveal the structural basis of these perturbations. Crystals of AP-aldolase are grown at two temperatures (4 degrees C and 18 degrees C), and the structure solved to 3.0 angstroms resolution, using the wild-type structure as the phasing model. The structures reveal that the single residue substitution, A149P, causes molecular disorder around the site of mutation (residues 148-159), which is propagated to three adjacent beta-strand and loop regions (residues 110-129, 189-199, 235-242). Disorder in the 110-129-loop region, which comprises one subunit-subunit interface, provides an explanation for the disrupted quaternary structure and thermal instability. Greater structural perturbation, particularly at a Glu189-Arg148 salt bridge in the active-site architecture, is observed in the structure determined at 18 degrees C, which could explain the temperature-dependent loss in activity. The disorder revealed in these structures is far greater than that predicted by homology modeling and underscores the difficulties in predicting perturbations of protein structure and function by homology modeling alone. The AP-aldolase structure reveals the molecular basis of a hereditary disease and represents one of only a few structures known for mutant proteins at the root of the thousands of other inherited disorders.

  15. Pediatric Hereditary Angioedema as a Cause of Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Hand and Forearm: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditto, Chelsea; Jager, Zachary; LoGiudice, John; Matloub, Hani

    2017-05-01

    Compartment syndrome of the upper extremity is a surgical emergency that, when left untreated, can have dire consequences. Its causes are numerous, one of which is the uncommon entity hereditary angioedema, an autosomal dominant disease resulting in edema in a variety of potential locations, including the extremities. This is only the second time hereditary angioedema has been mentioned in the literature as a cause of compartment syndrome. We present a case of hereditary angioedema leading to hand and forearm compartment syndrome in a 13-year-old pediatric patient. Diagnosis of hereditary angioedema was made by our Rheumatology colleagues with physical exam and a thorough history, and confirmed by laboratory studies. Our patient presented with compartment syndrome of the hand and forearm and underwent hand and volar forearm fasciotomies. She was subsequently worked up for hereditary angioedema with laboratory results confirming the diagnosis. She was discharged after a 5-day hospitalization with prophylactic C1-inhibitor therapy. Hereditary angioedema is a rare but known cause of compartment syndrome of the upper extremity, and must be considered when patients present with compartment syndrome of unknown etiology. This disease can be diagnosed by laboratory studies and symptoms can be controlled with medical therapy.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions HSAN5 hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V ( HSAN5 ) is a condition that primarily affects the ...

  17. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury.

  18. Unravelling the genetic basis of hereditary disorders by high-throughput exome sequencing strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazayeri, Omid

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on using Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) to unravel the genetic basis of human hereditary disorders with different inheritance patterns. We set out to apply WES as a diagnostic approach for establishing a molecular diagnosis in a highly heterogeneous group

  19. Molecular Genetic Approaches to Human Diseases Involving Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, Samuel A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques provide new approaches to the diagnosis and analysis of inherited human diseases associated with mental retardation, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, phenylketonauria, the Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, and those associated with deletions or duplications of subchromosomal regions. (Author/CL)

  20. Recognizing filamentous basidiomycetes as agents of human disease: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhary, A.; Kathuria, S.; Agarwal, K.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous basidiomycetes (BM) are common environmental fungi that have recently emerged as important human pathogens, inciting a wide array of clinical manifestations that include allergic and invasive diseases. We reviewed 218 reported global cases of BM fungi. The most common etiologic agent was