WorldWideScience

Sample records for human hepatocyte cell

  1. Generation of human hepatocytes by stem cell technology: definition of the hepatocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengstler, Jan G; Brulport, Marc; Schormann, Wiebke; Bauer, Alexander; Hermes, Matthias; Nussler, Andreas K; Fandrich, Fred; Ruhnke, Maren; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Griffin, Louise; Bockamp, Ernesto; Oesch, Franz; von Mach, Marc-Alexander

    2005-06-01

    Since 1999, numerous articles have reported the generation of hepatocytes from different types of extrahepatic stem or precursor cells. This opens exciting new possibilities for pharmacology and toxicology, as well as for cell therapy. Hepatocyte marker expression, including albumin, cytokeratin 18, c-met, alpha-fetoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A4 and -2B6, has been observed after transplantation of different types of human stem cells into the liver of laboratory animals or in vitro after incubation with cytokines. These intriguing observations have prompted scientists to classify stem cell-derived cell populations as hepatocytes. However, this conclusion may be premature. It has been shown that factors of the liver microenvironment can induce expression of a limited number of hepatocyte marker genes in nonhepatic cell types. To conclude on the grounds of a limited number of markers that these cells are true hepatocytes is not indicated. In this case one should carefully evaluate crucial hepatocyte-defining enzymatic properties. The present article: i) reviews studies describing the fate of extrahepatic human stem and precursor cells in livers of laboratory animals, including the possibility of cell fusion; and ii) critically discusses the phenotype of stem cells after application of various differentiation protocols aimed at generating human hepatocytes. In addition, the necessary criteria needed for defining a true hepatocyte are suggested. Establishing the necessary properties for stem cell-derived hepatocytes is timely and reasonable, and thus avoids further misleading semantic confusion. Finally, it is essential to understand that the definition of a bona fide hepatocyte should not be limited to qualitative assays, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, but has to include a quantitative analysis of enzymatic activities, which allows direct comparison with primary hepatocytes. Although the stem cell-derived-hepatocyte

  2. Billion-scale production of hepatocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tomoki; Takayama, Kazuo; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-19

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells are expected to be utilized in drug screening and regenerative medicine. However, hepatocyte-like cells have not been fully used in such applications because it is difficult to produce such cells on a large scale. In this study, we tried to establish a method to mass produce hepatocyte-like cells using a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture bioreactor called the Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS). RCCS enabled us to obtain homogenous hepatocyte-like cells on a billion scale (>10 9  cells). The gene expression levels of some hepatocyte markers (alpha-1 antitrypsin, cytochrome (CYP) 1A2, CYP2D6, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) were higher in 3D-cultured hepatocyte-like cells than in 2D-cultured hepatocyte-like cells. This result suggests that RCCS could provide more suitable conditions for hepatocyte maturation than the conventional 2D cell culture conditions. In addition, more than 90% of hepatocyte-like cells were positive for albumin and could uptake low-density lipoprotein in the culture medium. We succeeded in the large-scale production of homogenous and functional hepatocyte-like cells from human iPS cells. This technology will be useful in drug screening and regenerative medicine, which require enormous numbers of hepatocyte-like cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Peroxisomal abnormalities in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouwer, Femke C C; Koster, Janet; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R

    2017-04-01

    The immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) cell line is increasingly used for studies related to liver metabolism, including hepatic glucose, lipid, lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism, and the effect of therapeutic interventions. To determine whether the IHH cell line is a good model to investigate hepatic peroxisomal metabolism, we measured several peroxisomal parameters in IHH cells and, for comparison, HepG2 cells and primary skin fibroblasts. This revealed a marked plasmalogen deficiency and a deficient fatty acid α-oxidation in the IHH cells, due to a defect of PEX7, a cytosolic receptor protein required for peroxisomal import of a subset of peroxisomal proteins. These abnormalities have consequences for the lipid homeostasis of these cells and thus should be taken into account for the interpretation of data previously generated by using this cell line and when considering using this cell line for future research.

  4. Generation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for drug toxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Because drug-induced liver injury is one of the main reasons for drug development failures, it is important to perform drug toxicity screening in the early phase of pharmaceutical development. Currently, primary human hepatocytes are most widely used for the prediction of drug-induced liver injury. However, the sources of primary human hepatocytes are limited, making it difficult to supply the abundant quantities required for large-scale drug toxicity screening. Therefore, there is an urgent need for a novel unlimited, efficient, inexpensive, and predictive model which can be applied for large-scale drug toxicity screening. Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are able to replicate indefinitely and differentiate into most of the body's cell types, including hepatocytes. It is expected that hepatocyte-like cells generated from human ES/iPS cells (human ES/iPS-HLCs) will be a useful tool for drug toxicity screening. To apply human ES/iPS-HLCs to various applications including drug toxicity screening, homogenous and functional HLCs must be differentiated from human ES/iPS cells. In this review, we will introduce the current status of hepatocyte differentiation technology from human ES/iPS cells and a novel method to predict drug-induced liver injury using human ES/iPS-HLCs. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation of hepatocyte- and endocrine pancreatic-like cells from human induced endodermal progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambathkumar, Rangarajan; Akkerman, Renate; Dastidar, Sumitava; Roelandt, Philip; Kumar, Manoj; Bajaj, Manmohan; Mestre Rosa, Ana Rita; Helsen, Nicky; Vanslembrouck, Veerle; Kalo, Eric; Khurana, Satish; Laureys, Jos; Gysemans, Conny; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2018-01-01

    Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells (MAPCs) are one potential stem cell source to generate functional hepatocytes or β-cells. However, human MAPCs have less plasticity than pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), as their ability to generate endodermal cells is not robust. Here we studied the role of 14

  6. Differentiation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu; Lv, Shuang; He, Xia; Liu, Xiaomei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Meiying; Chi, Guangfan; Li, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the limitations of organ donors and immune rejection in severe liver diseases, stem cell-based therapy presents a promising application for tissue repair and regeneration. As a novel cell source, mesenchymal stem cells separated from human hair follicles (HF-MSCs) are convenient to obtain and have no age limit. To date, the differentiation of HF-MSCs into hepatocytes has not been reported. In this study, we explored whether HF-MSCs and HF-MSC-derived-induced pluripotent stem cells (HF-iPS) could differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. Flow cytometry, Oil Red O stain and Alizarin Red stain were used to identify the characteristics of HF-MSCs. The expression of liver-specific gene was detected by immunofluorescence and Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. Periodic Acid-Schiff stain, Indocyanine Green stain and Low-Density Lipoprotein stain were performed to evaluate the functions of induced hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HF-MSCs were unable to differentiate into HLCs using previously reported procedures for MSCs from other tissues. However, HF-iPS efficiently induced the generation of HLCs that expressed hepatocyte markers and drug metabolism-related genes. HF-iPS can be used as novel and alternative cellular tools for inducing hepatocytes in vitro, simultaneously benefiting from utilizing HF-MSCs as a noninvasive and convenient cell source for reprogramming.

  7. Efficient Generation of Functional Hepatocytes From Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by HNF4α Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Kazuo; Inamura, Mitsuru; Kawabata, Kenji; Katayama, Kazufumi; Higuchi, Maiko; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Nonaka, Aki; Sakurai, Fuminori; Hayakawa, Takao; Kusuda Furue, Miho; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are expected to be a useful source of cells drug discovery. Although we recently reported that hepatic commitment is promoted by transduction of SOX17 and HEX into human ESC- and iPSC-derived cells, these hepatocyte-like cells were not sufficiently mature for drug screening. To promote hepatic maturation, we utilized transduction of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) gene, which is kn...

  8. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells into low immunogenic hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjun; Ren, Hongying; Li, Xiyuan; Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gong, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Pang, Tianxiang; Han, Zhong Chao

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from several human tissues have been known to differentiate into the hepatic lineage in vitro, but the immunogenicity of the differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (DHC) has not been reported. Umbilical cord (UC) MSC are thought to be an attractive cell source for cell therapy because of their young age and low infection rate compared with adult tissue MSC. Hepatic differentiation of UC-MSC was induced with a 2-step protocol. The expressions of hepatic markers were detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Albumin production and urea secretion were measured by ELISA and colorimetric assay respectively. The immunosuppressive properties of DHC was detected by mixed lymphocyte culture. After incubation with specific growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), UC MSC exhibited a high hepatic differentiation ability in an adherent culture condition. The differentiated UC MSC showed hepatocyte-like morphology and expressed several liver-specific markers at gene and protein levels. Furthermore, the DHC exhibited hepatocyte-specific functions, including albumin secretion, low-density lipoprotein uptake and urea production. More importantly, DHC did not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II antigen and were not able to induce lymphocyte proliferation in mixed lymphocyte culture, as undifferentiated UC MSC did. Our results indicate that UC MSC are able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells that still retain their low immunogenicity in vitro. More importantly, DHC incorporated into the parenchyma of liver when transplanted into mice with CCl(4)-induced liver injury. Therefore, DHC may be an ideal source for cell therapy of liver diseases.

  9. Resveratrol Differentially Regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Damm, Georg; Gebhardt, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells) and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382). Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells. PMID:24603648

  10. Resveratrol differentially regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma cells and primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schuster

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382. Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells.

  11. Possibility of Undifferentiated Human Thigh Adipose Stem Cells Differentiating into Functional Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hoon Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study aimed to investigate the possibility of isolating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human thigh adipose tissue and the ability of human thigh adipose stem cells (HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocytes.MethodsThe adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated from thigh adipose tissue. Growth factors, cytokines, and hormones were added to the collagen coated dishes to induce the undifferentiated HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. To confirm the experimental results, the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers on undifferentiated and differentiated HTASCs was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical staining. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated using functional tests such as periodic acid schiff (PAS staining and detection of the albumin secretion level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.ResultsThe majority of the undifferentiated HTASCs were changed into a more polygonal shape showing tight interactions between the cells. The differentiated HTASCs up-regulated mRNA of hepatocyte markers. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that they were intensely stained with anti-albumin antibody compared with undifferentiated HTASCs. PAS staining showed that HTASCs submitted to the hepatocyte differentiation protocol were able to more specifically store glycogen than undifferentiated HTASCs, displaying a purple color in the cytoplasm of the differentiated HTASCs. ELISA analyses showed that differentiated HTASCs could secrete albumin, which is one of the hepatocyte markers.ConclusionsMSCs were islolated from human thigh adipose tissue differentiate to heapatocytes. The source of ADSCs is not only abundant abdominal adipose tissue, but also thigh adipose tissue for cell therapy in liver regeneration and tissue regeneration.

  12. Modulation of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number to Induce Hepatocytic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Cain, Jason E; Lee, William; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Tuch, Bernard E; St John, Justin C

    2017-10-15

    Mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) copy number is tightly regulated during pluripotency and differentiation. There is increased demand of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during differentiation for energy-intensive cell types such as hepatocytes and neurons to meet the cell's functional requirements. During hepatocyte differentiation, mtDNA copy number should be synchronously increased to generate sufficient ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Unlike bone marrow mesenchymal cells, mtDNA copy number failed to increase by 28 days of differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) despite their expression of some end-stage hepatic markers. This was due to higher levels of DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, the mtDNA-specific replication factor. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent, 5-azacytidine, resulted in increased mtDNA copy number, reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, and reduced hepatic gene expression. Depletion of mtDNA followed by subsequent differentiation did not increase mtDNA copy number, but reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA and increased expression of hepatic and pluripotency genes. We encapsulated hAEC in barium alginate microcapsules and subsequently differentiated them into HLC. Encapsulation resulted in no net increase of mtDNA copy number but a significant reduction in DNA methylation of POLGA. RNAseq analysis showed that differentiated HLC express hepatocyte-specific genes but also increased expression of inflammatory interferon genes. Differentiation in encapsulated cells showed suppression of inflammatory genes as well as increased expression of genes associated with hepatocyte function pathways and networks. This study demonstrates that an increase in classical hepatic gene expression can be achieved in HLC through encapsulation, although they fail to effectively regulate mtDNA copy number.

  13. Small-Molecule-Directed Hepatocyte-Like Cell Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathapati, Santosh; Siller, Richard; Impellizzeri, Agata A R; Lycke, Max; Vegheim, Karianne; Almaas, Runar; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2016-08-17

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide an invaluable resource for basic research, regenerative medicine, drug screening, toxicology, and modeling of liver disease and development. This unit describes a small-molecule-driven protocol for in vitro differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs without the use of growth factors. hPSCs are coaxed through a developmentally relevant route via the primitive streak to definitive endoderm (DE) using the small molecule CHIR99021 (a Wnt agonist), replacing the conventional growth factors Wnt3A and activin A. The small-molecule-derived DE is then differentiated to hepatoblast-like cells in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. The resulting hepatoblasts are then differentiated to HLCs with N-hexanoic-Tyr, Ile-6 aminohexanoic amide (Dihexa, a hepatocyte growth factor agonist) and dexamethasone. The protocol provides an efficient and reproducible procedure for differentiation of hPSCs into HLCs utilizing small molecules. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro . Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro , the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro . Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering.

  15. Effect of Microenvironment on Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Hepatocytes In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gai Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are considered to be an ideal cell source for cell therapy of many diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of the microenvironment to the hepatic differentiation potential of hUCMSCs in vitro and in vivo and to explore their therapeutic use in acute liver injury in rats. We established a new model to simulate the liver tissue microenvironment in vivo using liver homogenate supernatant (LHS in vitro. This induced environment could drive hUCMSCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells within 7 days. The differentiated cells expressed hepatocyte-specific markers and demonstrated hepatocellular functions. We also injected hUCMSCs into rats with CCl4-induced acute hepatic injury. The hUCMSCs were detected in the livers of recipient rats and expressed the human hepatocyte-specific markers, suggesting that hUCMSCs could differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vivo in the liver tissue microenvironment. Levels of biochemistry markers improved significantly after transplantation of hUCMSCs compared with the nontransplantation group (P<0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the liver tissue microenvironment may contribute to the differentiation of hUCMSCs into hepatocytes both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Effect of Microenvironment on Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Hepatocytes In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gai; Han, Xiaolei; Ma, Xin; Wu, Honghai; Qin, Yabin; Liu, Jianfang; Hu, Yuqin; Hong, Yang; Hou, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are considered to be an ideal cell source for cell therapy of many diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of the microenvironment to the hepatic differentiation potential of hUCMSCs in vitro and in vivo and to explore their therapeutic use in acute liver injury in rats. We established a new model to simulate the liver tissue microenvironment in vivo using liver homogenate supernatant (LHS) in vitro. This induced environment could drive hUCMSCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells within 7 days. The differentiated cells expressed hepatocyte-specific markers and demonstrated hepatocellular functions. We also injected hUCMSCs into rats with CCl4-induced acute hepatic injury. The hUCMSCs were detected in the livers of recipient rats and expressed the human hepatocyte-specific markers, suggesting that hUCMSCs could differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vivo in the liver tissue microenvironment. Levels of biochemistry markers improved significantly after transplantation of hUCMSCs compared with the nontransplantation group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the liver tissue microenvironment may contribute to the differentiation of hUCMSCs into hepatocytes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27088093

  17. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  18. Formation of human hepatocyte-like cells with different cellular phenotypes by human umbilical cord blood-derived cells in the human-rat chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Xi-Gu

    2007-01-01

    We took advantage of the proliferative and permissive environment of the developing pre-immune fetus to develop a noninjury human-rat xenograft small animal model, in which the in utero transplantation of low-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) into fetal rats at 9-11 days of gestation led to the formation of human hepatocyte-like cells (hHLCs) with different cellular phenotypes, as revealed by positive immunostaining for human-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and albumin (Alb), and with some animals exhibiting levels as high as 10.7% of donor-derived human cells in the recipient liver. More interestingly, donor-derived human cells stained positively for CD34 and CD45 in the liver of 2-month-old rat. Human hepatic differentiation appeared to partially follow the process of hepatic ontogeny, as evidenced by the expression of AFP gene at an early stage and albumin gene at a later stage. Human hepatocytes generated in this model retained functional properties of normal hepatocytes. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in the recipient liver for at least 6 months after birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that the donor-derived human cells with different cellular phenotypes are found in the recipient liver and hHLCs hold biological activity. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling the situations in human, provides an invaluable approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future

  19. A pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform for the efficient differentiation of human hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Louis Jun Ye; Chong, Lor Huai; Jin, Lin; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Lee, Poh Seng; Yu, Hanry; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Leo, Hwa Liang; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2017-10-01

    The practical application of microfluidic liver models for in vitro drug testing is partly hampered by their reliance on human primary hepatocytes, which are limited in number and have batch-to-batch variation. Human stem cell-derived hepatocytes offer an attractive alternative cell source, although their 3D differentiation and maturation in a microfluidic platform have not yet been demonstrated. We develop a pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform to achieve long-term and efficient differentiation of human liver progenitor cells into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The device contains a micropillar array to immobilize cells three-dimensionally in a central cell culture compartment flanked by two side perfusion channels. Constant pump-free medium perfusion is accomplished by controlling the differential heights of horizontally orientated inlet and outlet media reservoirs. Computational fluid dynamic simulation is used to estimate the hydrostatic pressure heads required to achieve different perfusion flow rates, which are experimentally validated by micro-particle image velocimetry, as well as viability and functional assessments in a primary rat hepatocyte model. We perform on-chip differentiation of HepaRG, a human bipotent progenitor cell, and discover that 3D microperfusion greatly enhances the hepatocyte differentiation efficiency over static 2D and 3D cultures. However, HepaRG progenitor cells are highly sensitive to the time-point at which microperfusion is applied. Isolated HepaRG cells that are primed as static 3D spheroids before being subjected to microperfusion yield a significantly higher proportion of HLCs (92%) than direct microperfusion of isolated HepaRG cells (62%). This platform potentially offers a simple and efficient means to develop highly functional microfluidic liver models incorporating human stem cell-derived HLCs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2360-2370. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Differentiation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells into low immunogenic and functional hepatocyte-like cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong-ying; Zhao, Qin-jun; Xing, Wen; Yang, Shao-guang; Lu, Shi-hong; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Lei; Han, Zhong-chao

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the biological function of hepatocyte-like cells derived from mesenchymal stem cells that isolated from human umbilical cord UC-MSCs in vitro, and to detect the changes in the immunogenicity of the differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (DHC). Transdifferentiation of UC-MSCs into hepatic lineage in vitro was induced in modified two-step induction medium. The expressions of hepatic specific markers were detected by RT-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence staining at different time points after induction. The levels of albumin and urea in the supernatants of cultures were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, the immunosuppressive property of DHC was detected by one-way mixed lymphocyte culture. The mRNA and proteins of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB),and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) were expressed in naive UC-MSCs at low levels. DHC highly expressed hepatic markers AFP, ALB, CK-19, and tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase 14 and 28 days after hepatic differentiation and were accompanied by an increased production of ALB and urea in supernatant in a time-dependent manner. DHC did not express human leukocyte antigen DR antigen and significantly decreased the lymphocyte proliferation. UC-MSCs are able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells in vitro, while the immunogenicity of DHC remains low.

  1. Induction of highly functional hepatocytes from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells by HNF4α transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualian Hang

    Full Text Available To investigate the differentiation potential of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HuMSCs and the key factors that facilitate hepatic differentiation.HuMSCs were induced to become hepatocyte-like cells according to a previously published protocol. The differentiation status of the hepatocyte-like cells was examined by observing the morphological changes under an inverted microscope and by immunofluorescence analysis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α overexpression was achieved by plasmid transfection of the hepatocyte-like cells. The expression of proteins and genes of interest was then examined by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR or real-time RT-PCR methods.Our results demonstrated that HuMSCs can easily be induced into hepatocyte-like cells using a published differentiation protocol. The overexpression of HNF4α in the induced HuMSCs significantly enhanced the expression levels of hepatic-specific proteins and genes. HNF4α overexpression may be associated with liver-enriched transcription factor networks and the Wnt/β-Catenin pathway.The overexpression of HNF4α improves the hepatic differentiation of HuMSCs and is a simple way to improve cellular sources for clinical applications.

  2. A Cell Culture Platform to Maintain Long-term Phenotype of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Brenton R; Durham, Mitchell J; Monckton, Chase P; Khetani, Salman R

    2018-03-01

    Modeling interactions between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and primary human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) in vitro can help elucidate human-specific mechanisms underlying liver physiology/disease and drug responses; however, existing hepatocyte/endothelial coculture models are suboptimal because of their use of rodent cells, cancerous cell lines, and/or nonliver endothelial cells. Hence, we sought to develop a platform that could maintain the long-term phenotype of PHHs and primary human LSECs. Primary human LSECs or human umbilical vein endothelial cells as the nonliver control were cocultivated with micropatterned PHH colonies (to control homotypic interactions) followed by an assessment of PHH morphology and functions (albumin and urea secretion, and cytochrome P-450 2A6 and 3A4 enzyme activities) over 3 weeks. Endothelial phenotype was assessed via gene expression patterns and scanning electron microscopy to visualize fenestrations. Hepatic responses in PHH/endothelial cocultures were benchmarked against responses in previously developed PHH/3T3-J2 fibroblast cocultures. Finally, PHH/fibroblast/endothelial cell tricultures were created and characterized as described previously. LSECs, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells, induced PHH albumin secretion for ∼11 days; however, neither endothelial cell type could maintain PHH morphology and functions to the same magnitude/longevity as the fibroblasts. In contrast, both PHHs and endothelial cells displayed stable phenotype for 3 weeks in PHH/fibroblast/endothelial cell tricultures; furthermore, layered tricultures in which PHHs and endothelial cells were separated by a protein gel to mimic the space of Disse displayed similar functional levels as the coplanar tricultures. PHH/fibroblast/endothelial tricultures constitute a robust platform to elucidate reciprocal interactions between PHHs and endothelial cells in physiology, disease, and after drug exposure.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yijun; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-κB, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-κB, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease

  4. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  6. Direct induction of hepatocyte-like cells from immortalized human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by overexpression of HNF4α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Peiyi; Li, Weiqiang; Li, Zhengran; Shan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation. However, relatively low efficiency and repeatability of hepatic differentiation of human BM-MSCs remains an obstacle for clinical translation. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α), a critical transcription factor, plays an essential role in the entire process of liver development. In this study, immortalized hBM-MSCs, UE7T-13 cells were transduced with a lentiviral vector containing HNF4α. The typical fibroblast-like morphology of the MSCs changed, and polygonal, epithelioid cells grew out after HNF4α transduction. In hepatocyte culture medium, HNF4α-transduced MSCs (E7-hHNF4α cells) strongly expressed the albumin (ALB), CYP2B6, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), and FOXA2 mRNA and exhibited morphology markedly similar to that of mature hepatocytes. The E7-hHNF4α cells showed hepatic functions such as Indocyanine green (ICG) uptake and release, glycogen storage, urea production and ALB secretion. Approximately 28% of E7-hHNF4α cells expressed both ALB and AAT. Furthermore, these E7-hHNF4α cells via superior mesenteric vein (SMV) injection expressed human ALB in mouse chronic injured liver. In conclusion, this study represents a novel strategy by directly inducing hepatocyte-like cells from MSCs. - Highlights: • We overexpressed HNF4α in immortalized BM-MSCs by lentiviral transduction. • HNF4α-transduced MSCs transdifferentiated into hepatocytes with mature hepatic metabolic functions. • Our study represents a novel strategy by direct induction of hepatocyte-like cells from MSCs.

  7. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG: models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Véronique; Staels, Bart

    2012-07-01

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological stimuli is often lost. Here, we characterize two human hepatocyte cell lines, IHH and HepaRG, by analysing the expression and regulation of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. Our results show that the glycolysis pathway is activated by glucose and insulin in both lines. Gluconeogenesis gene expression is induced by forskolin in IHH cells and inhibited by insulin in both cell lines. The lipogenic pathway is regulated by insulin in IHH cells. Finally, both cell lines secrete apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, an effect promoted by increasing glucose concentrations. These two human cell lines are thus interesting models to study the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

  8. Comparison of the biological features between human fetal hepatocyte and immortalized L-02 hepatocyte in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Weiwei; Teng Gaojun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibilities of the potential donors in liver cell transplantation using the human fetal hepatocytes and immortalized L-02 hepatocytes by comparing their biological features. Methods: Human fetal hepatocytes were isolated from aborted fetal livers (gestational ages from 14 w to 24 w) by an improved two-stage perfusion method and cultured in a conditioned medium without any growth factors. α-fetal protein (AFP) and albumin (ALB) were detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19 ) was identified by cellular immunochemistry study. Immortalized L-02 hepatocytes were cultured in the same condition and the characteristic proteins were detected by the same methods. Results: The viability of human fetal hepatocytes was approximately 95% using the perfusion method, and the maximum survival time of the cultured hepatocytes was 3 weeks. The expression of AFP, ALB, and CK19 was detected at the same time, especially during Day 3 to Day 7 in the culture. By comparison, the proliferation ability of L-02 hepatocyte was greater, although with a lower level of ALB secretion. The expression of AFP and CK19 was not detected. Furthermore, during the long culture, L-02 hepatocytes may undergo a morphologic change and fail to express ALB. Conclusion: Human fetal hepatocyte may be a practical donor for hepatocyte transplantation with its high-level protein expression and potential bi-differentiation ability. In view of the absent expression of ALB and the morphologic change in culture, although with better proliferation, L-02 hepatocyte seems not useful for hepatocyte transplantation

  9. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine1. Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models. PMID:27077489

  10. Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz induce cell death via a JNK- and BimEL-dependent mechanism in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumpus, Namandje N., E-mail: nbumpus1@jhmi.edu

    2011-12-15

    Chronic use of efavirenz (EFV) has been linked to incidences of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving EFV to treat HIV-1. While recent studies have demonstrated that EFV stimulates hepatic cell death a role for the metabolites of efavirenz in this process has yet to be examined. In the present study, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with synthetic 8-hydroxyEFV (8-OHEFV), which is the primary metabolite of EFV, resulted in cell death, caspase-3 activation and reactive oxygen species formation. The metabolite exerted these effects at earlier time points and using lower concentrations than were required for the parent compound. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of EFV using 1-aminobenzotriazole markedly decreased reactive oxygen species formation and cell death. Treatment of primary human hepatocytes with EFV and 8-OHEFV also stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as phosphorylation of the JNK substrate c-Jun. Further, the mRNA and protein expression of an isoform of Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) denoted as BimEL, which is proapoptotic and has been shown to be modulated by JNK, was increased. Inhibition of JNK using SP600125 prevented the EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated cell death. Silencing of Bim using siRNA transfected into hepatocytes also prevented cell death resulting from 8-OHEFV-treatment. These data suggest that the oxidative metabolite 8-OHEFV is a more potent inducer of hepatic cell death than the parent compound EFV. Further, activation of the JNK signaling pathway and BimEL mRNA expression appear to be required for EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated hepatocyte death. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Hydroxyefavirenz is a more potent stimulator of cell death than efavirenz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz increase JNK activity and BimEL mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and Bim are required for efavirenz- and 8

  11. Effects of oral anorexiant sibutramine on the expression of cytochromes P450s in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzal, Radim; Knoppová, Barbora; Bachleda, Petr; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2013-12-01

    Sibutramine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that was used for weight-loss management in obese patients. Even though it was officially withdrawn from the market in 2010, it is still present in some tainted weight-loss pills (as reported by US Food and Drug Administration). Thus, it is still reasonable to study the effects of this compound. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of sibutramine to induce CYP1A1/CY3A4 in human cancer cell lines and CYP1A1/2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes, a competent model of metabolically active cells. The levels of mRNA and protein of CYP1A1/1A2/3A4/2A6/2B6 were compared with the typical inducers, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and rifampicin (RIF) for CYP1A1/2 and for other CYPs, respectively. The mRNA and protein levels of all genes in either cancer cell lines or human hepatocytes were induced when treated with typical inducers but not with sibutramine. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Improved Survival and Initiation of Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Hepatocyte-Like Cells upon Culture in William's E Medium followed by Hepatocyte Differentiation Inducer Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Tomizawa

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte differentiation inducer (HDI lacks both glucose and arginine, but is supplemented with galactose and ornithine, and is added together with other reagents such as apoptosis inhibitor and oncostatin M. Although human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells initiate hepatocyte differentiation, most die within 7 days. In this study, we investigated both HDI and conventional media for their potential to improve cell survival.201B7 iPS cells were cultured in conventional media. This consisted of three cycles of 5-day culture in William's E (WE medium, followed by a 2-day culture in HDI.Expression levels of α-feto protein (AFP were higher in cells cultured in WE and in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12. 201B7 cells expressed the highest AFP and albumin (ALB when cultured in HDI for 2 days following 7-day culture in WE. After three cycles of 5-day culture in WE followed by 2 days in HDI, 201B7 cells expressed AFP and ALB 54 ± 2.3 (average ± standard deviation and 73 ± 15.1 times higher, respectively, than those cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free condition.201B7 cells survived culture in WE for 7 days followed HDI for 2 days. After three cycles of culture under these conditions, hepatocyte differentiation was enhanced, as evidenced by increased AFP and ALB expression.

  13. Determination of Drug Toxicity Using 3D Spheroids Constructed From an Immortal Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Stephen J.; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Numerous publications have documented that the immortal cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) cultures possess physiological behavior, which is more reminiscent of their parental organ than when the same cells are cultivated using classical two-dimensional (2D) culture techniques. The goal of this study was to investigate whether this observation could be extended to the determination of LD50 values and whether 3D data could be correlated to in vivo observations. We developed a noninvasive means to estimate the amount of protein present in a 3D spheroid from it is planar area (± 21%) so that a precise dose can be provided in a manner similar to in vivo studies. This avoided correction of the actual dose given based on a protein determination after treatment (when some cells may have lysed). Conversion of published in vitro LC50 data (mM) for six common drugs (acetaminophen, amiodarone, diclofenac, metformin, phenformin, and valproic acid) to LD50 data (mg compound/mg cellular protein) showed that the variation in LD50 values was generally less than that suggested by the original LC50 data. Toxicological analysis of these six compounds in 3D spheroid culture (either published or presented here) demonstrated similar LD50 values. Although in vitro 2D HepG2 data showed a poor correlation, the primary hepatocyte and 3D spheroid data resulted in a much higher degree of correlation with in vivo lethal blood plasma levels. These results corroborate that 3D hepatocyte cultures are significantly different from 2D cultures and are more representative of the liver in vivo. PMID:22454432

  14. The potential of induced pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoun, Zara; Steichen, Clara; Dianat, Noushin; Weber, Anne; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation remains the only curative treatment for liver disease. However, the number of patients who die while on the waiting list (15%) has increased in recent years as a result of severe organ shortages; furthermore the incidence of liver disease is increasing worldwide. Clinical trials involving hepatocyte transplantation have provided encouraging results. However, transplanted cell function appears to often decline after several months, necessitating liver transplantation. The precise aetiology of the loss of cell function is not clear, but poor engraftment and immune-mediated loss appear to be important factors. Also, primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are not readily available, de-differentiate, and die rapidly in culture. Hepatocytes are available from other sources, such as tumour-derived human hepatocyte cell lines and immortalised human hepatocyte cell lines or porcine hepatocytes. However, all these cells suffer from various limitations such as reduced or differences in functions or risk of zoonotic infections. Due to their significant potential, one possible inexhaustible source of hepatocytes is through the directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This review will discuss the potential applications and existing limitations of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes in regenerative medicine, drug screening, in vitro disease modelling and bioartificial livers. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell-surface associated with transformation of human hepatocytes to the malignant phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.; Ozturk, M.; Takahashi, H.; Motte, P.; Kew, M.; Isselbacher, K.J.; Wands, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. To understand the cellular changes associated with transformation of hepatocytes to the malignant state, the authors have made several libraries of monoclonal antibodies against the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line FOCUS and have found six antibodies (AF-20, SF-25, SF-31, SF-90, XF-4, and XF-8) that recognize antigens expressed at consistently higher levels on hepatoma cells. They have studied malignant and nontransformed liver tissue from the same individual by using direct 125 I-labeled antibody binding and immunoperoxidase staining techniques. For each of these antibodies, they found striking increases in antigen expression on the transformed tissues. These antigens were found to be expressed throughout the tumor and on distant metastases, with little, if any, expression on the nontransformed adjacent liver. These antibodies demonstrate that hepatic transformation may be accompanied by stereotyped and predictable antigenic changes. The uniformity of such antigenic changes suggests an association between these cell-surface alterations and the malignant transformation process

  16. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes

  17. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atienzar, Franck A., E-mail: franck.atienzar@ucb.com [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Novik, Eric I. [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Gerets, Helga H. [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Parekh, Amit [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); MacDonald, James [Chrysalis Pharma Consulting, LLC, 385 Route 24, Suite 1G, Chester, NJ 07930 (United States); Yarmush, Martin L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dhalluin, Stéphane [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  18. Differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cell under flow conditions to mature hepatocytes for liver tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Hemmingsen, Mette; Larsen, Layla

    2018-01-01

    and to perform functional comparisons with fresh human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS), an excellent benchmark for the human liver in vivo. The majority of the mRNA expression of CYP isoenzymes and transporters and the tested CYP activities, Phase II metabolism, and albumin, urea, and bile acid synthesis...... in the hiPSC-derived cells reached values that overlap those of hPCLS, which indicates a higher degree of hepatic differentiation than observed until now. Differentiation under flow compared with static conditions had a strong inducing effect on Phase II metabolism and suppressed AFP expression but resulted...... in slightly lower activity of some of the Phase I metabolism enzymes. Gene expression data indicate that hiPSCs differentiated into both hepatic and biliary directions. In conclusion, the hiPSC differentiated under flow conditions towards hepatocytes express a wide spectrum of liver functions at levels...

  19. Hepatic esterase activity is increased in hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using a 3D culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Ji-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study is to generate a spherical three-dimensional (3D) aggregate of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human embryonic stem cells and to investigate the effect of the 3D environment on hepatic maturation and drug metabolism. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that gene expression of mature hepatocyte markers, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and hepatic transporters was significantly higher in HLCs cultured in the 3D system than in those cultured in a two-dimensional system (p formation, were increased in HLCs cultured in the 3D system. In particular, 3D spheroidal culture increased expression of CES1 and BCHE, which encode hepatic esterases (p 3D spheroidal culture enhances the maturation and drug metabolism of stem cell-derived HLCs, and this may help to optimize hepatic differentiation protocols for hepatotoxicity testing.

  20. Met-Independent Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated regulation of cell adhesion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Rodney

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells communicate reciprocally with the stromal cells surrounding them, inside the prostate, and after metastasis, within the bone. Each tissue secretes factors for interpretation by the other. One stromally-derived factor, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, was found twenty years ago to regulate invasion and growth of carcinoma cells. Working with the LNCaP prostate cancer progression model, we found that these cells could respond to HGF stimulation, even in the absence of Met, the only known HGF receptor. The new HGF binding partner we find on the cell surface may help to clarify conflicts in the past literature about Met expression and HGF response in cancer cells. Methods We searched for Met or any HGF binding partner on the cells of the PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell models, using HGF immobilized on agarose beads. By using mass spectrometry analyses and sequencing we have identified nucleolin protein as a novel HGF binding partner. Antibodies against nucleolin (or HGF were able to ameliorate the stimulatory effects of HGF on met-negative prostate cancer cells. Western blots, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess nucleolin levels during prostate cancer progression in both LNCaP and PC3 models. Results We have identified HGF as a major signaling component of prostate stromal-conditioned media (SCM and have implicated the protein nucleolin in HGF signal reception by the LNCaP model prostate cancer cells. Antibodies that silence either HGF (in SCM or nucleolin (on the cell surfaces eliminate the adhesion-stimulatory effects of the SCM. Likewise, addition of purified HGF to control media mimics the action of SCM. C4-2, an LNCaP lineage-derived, androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, responds to HGF in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing its adhesion and reducing its migration on laminin substratum. These HGF effects are not due to shifts in the expression levels of

  1. Met-Independent Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated regulation of cell adhesion in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tate, Amanda; Isotani, Shuji; Bradley, Michael J; Sikes, Robert A; Davis, Rodney; Chung, Leland WK; Edlund, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells communicate reciprocally with the stromal cells surrounding them, inside the prostate, and after metastasis, within the bone. Each tissue secretes factors for interpretation by the other. One stromally-derived factor, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), was found twenty years ago to regulate invasion and growth of carcinoma cells. Working with the LNCaP prostate cancer progression model, we found that these cells could respond to HGF stimulation, even in the absence of Met, the only known HGF receptor. The new HGF binding partner we find on the cell surface may help to clarify conflicts in the past literature about Met expression and HGF response in cancer cells. We searched for Met or any HGF binding partner on the cells of the PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell models, using HGF immobilized on agarose beads. By using mass spectrometry analyses and sequencing we have identified nucleolin protein as a novel HGF binding partner. Antibodies against nucleolin (or HGF) were able to ameliorate the stimulatory effects of HGF on met-negative prostate cancer cells. Western blots, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess nucleolin levels during prostate cancer progression in both LNCaP and PC3 models. We have identified HGF as a major signaling component of prostate stromal-conditioned media (SCM) and have implicated the protein nucleolin in HGF signal reception by the LNCaP model prostate cancer cells. Antibodies that silence either HGF (in SCM) or nucleolin (on the cell surfaces) eliminate the adhesion-stimulatory effects of the SCM. Likewise, addition of purified HGF to control media mimics the action of SCM. C4-2, an LNCaP lineage-derived, androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, responds to HGF in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing its adhesion and reducing its migration on laminin substratum. These HGF effects are not due to shifts in the expression levels of laminin-binding integrins, nor can they be linked to

  2. Immortalized human hepatocytes as a tool for the study of hepatocytic (de-)differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, IJ; Moshage, H; Roelofsen, H; Muller, M; Heymans, HSA; Ruiters, M; Kuipers, F

    Primary human hepatocytes were immortalized by stable transfection with a recombinant plasmid containing the early region of simian virus (SV) 40. The cells were cultured in serum-free, hormonally defined medium during the immortalization procedure. Foci of dividing cells were seen after 3 months.

  3. Three-dimensional polymer scaffolds for enhanced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrangi, Swati; Nair, Prabha; Khanna, Aparna

    2017-08-01

    Stem cell-based tissue engineering has emerged as a promising avenue for the treatment of liver diseases and as drug metabolism and toxicity models in drug discovery and development. The in vitro simulation of a micro-environmental niche for hepatic differentiation remains elusive, due to lack of information about crucial factors for the stem cell niche. For generation of functional hepatocytes, an in vivo three-dimensional (3D) micro-environment and architecture should be reproduced. Towards this, we fabricated three scaffolds as dextran-gelatin (DG1), chitosan-hyaluronic acid (CH1) and gelatin-vinyl acetate (GEVAC). Hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) was induced by culturing hUC-MSCs on these scaffolds. The scaffolds support hepatic differentiation by mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM) micro-environment and architecture to facilitate 3D cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression of hepatic markers, glycogen storage, urea production, albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activity indicated the hepatic differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The differentiated hUC-MSCs on the 3D scaffolds formed hepatospheroids (3D hepatocyte aggregates), as illustrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy and cytoskeleton organization. It was observed that the 3D scaffolds supported improved cell morphology, expression of hepatic markers and metabolic activities, as compared to Matrigel-coated plates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the use of a well-characterized scaffold (GEVAC) for enhanced differentiation of hUC-MSCs to hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Antioxidative and apoptotic properties of polyphenolic extracts from edible part of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) on cultured rat hepatocytes and on human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccadei, Stefania; Di Venere, Donato; Cardinali, Angela; Romano, Ferdinando; Durazzo, Alessandra; Foddai, Maria Stella; Fraioli, Rocco; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Maiani, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Cultured rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma HepG2 cells were used to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of artichoke (AE). The hepatocytes were exposed to H2O2generated in situ by glucose oxidase and were treated with either AE, or pure chlorogenic acid (ChA) or with the well known antioxidant, N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenilenediamine (DPPD). Addition of glucose oxidase to the culture medium caused depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) content, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the cultures, as a lipid peroxidation indicator, and cell death. These results demonstrated that AE protected cells from the oxidative stress caused by glucose oxidase, comparable to DPPD. Furthermore, AE, as well as ChA, prevented the loss of total GSH and the accumulation of MDA. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with AE reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, however, ChA had no prominent effects on the cell death rate. Similarly, AE rather than ChA induced apoptosis, measured by flow cytometric analysis of annexin and by activation of caspase-3, in HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that AE had a marked antioxidative potential that protects hepatocytes from an oxidative stress. Furthermore, AE reduced cell viability and had an apoptotic activity on a human liver cancer cell line.

  5. Lung fibroblasts accelerate wound closure in human alveolar epithelial cells through hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Schiel, John A; Finigan, Jay H; Prekeris, Rytis; Mason, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    There are 190,600 cases of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) each year in the United States, and the incidence and mortality of ALI/ARDS increase dramatically with age. Patients with ALI/ARDS have alveolar epithelial injury, which may be worsened by high-pressure mechanical ventilation. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells are the progenitor cells for the alveolar epithelium and are required to reestablish the alveolar epithelium during the recovery process from ALI/ARDS. Lung fibroblasts (FBs) migrate and proliferate early after lung injury and likely are an important source of growth factors for epithelial repair. However, how lung FBs affect epithelial wound healing in the human adult lung has not been investigated in detail. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is known to be released mainly from FBs and to stimulate both migration and proliferation of primary rat ATII cells. HGF is also increased in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and serum in patients with ALI/ARDS. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF secreted by FBs would enhance wound closure in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). Wound closure was measured using a scratch wound-healing assay in primary human AEC monolayers and in a coculture system with FBs. We found that wound closure was accelerated by FBs mainly through HGF/c-Met signaling. HGF also restored impaired wound healing in AECs from the elderly subjects and after exposure to cyclic stretch. We conclude that HGF is the critical factor released from FBs to close wounds in human AEC monolayers and suggest that HGF is a potential strategy for hastening alveolar repair in patients with ALI/ARDS. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Improved human endometrial stem cells differentiation into functional hepatocyte-like cells on a glycosaminoglycan/collagen-grafted polyethersulfone nanofibrous scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzaneh; Ai, Jafar; Soleimani, Masoud; Verdi, Javad; Mohammad Tavangar, Seyed; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil; Massumi, Mohammad; Mahmoud Hashemi, Seyed

    2017-11-01

    Liver tissue engineering (TE) is rapidly emerging as an effective technique which combines engineering and biological processes to compensate for the shortage of damaged or destroyed liver tissues. We examined the viability, differentiation, and integration of hepatocyte-like cells on an electrospun polyethersulfone (PES) scaffold, derived from human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs). Natural polymers were separately grafted on plasma-treated PES nanofibers, that is, collagen, heparan sulfate (HS) and collagen-HS. Galactosilated PES (PES-Gal) nanofibrous were created. The engineering and cell growth parameters were considered and compared with each sample. The cellular studies revealed increased cell survival, attachment, and normal morphology on the bioactive natural polymer-grafted scaffolds after 30 days of hepatic differentiation. The chemical and molecular assays displayed hepatocyte differentiation. These cells were also functional, showing glycogen storage, α-fetoprotein, and albumin secretion. The HS nanoparticle-grafted PES nanofibers demonstrated a high rate of cell proliferation, differentiation, and integration. Based on the observations mentioned above, engineered tissue is a good option in the future, for the commercial production of three-dimensional liver tissues for clinical purposes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2516-2529, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Phenotypic and functional analyses show stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells better mimic fetal rather than adult hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Melissa; Withey, Sarah; Harrison, Sean; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Zhang, Fang; Atkinson-Dell, Rebecca; Rowe, Cliff; Gerrard, Dave T; Sison-Young, Rowena; Jenkins, Roz; Henry, Joanne; Berry, Andrew A; Mohamet, Lisa; Best, Marie; Fenwick, Stephen W; Malik, Hassan; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Piper Hanley, Karen; Vallier, Ludovic; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs), differentiated from pluripotent stem cells by the use of soluble factors, can model human liver function and toxicity. However, at present HLC maturity and whether any deficit represents a true fetal state or aberrant differentiation is unclear and compounded by comparison to potentially deteriorated adult hepatocytes. Therefore, we generated HLCs from multiple lineages, using two different protocols, for direct comparison with fresh fetal and adult hepatocytes. Protocols were developed for robust differentiation. Multiple transcript, protein and functional analyses compared HLCs to fresh human fetal and adult hepatocytes. HLCs were comparable to those of other laboratories by multiple parameters. Transcriptional changes during differentiation mimicked human embryogenesis and showed more similarity to pericentral than periportal hepatocytes. Unbiased proteomics demonstrated greater proximity to liver than 30 other human organs or tissues. However, by comparison to fresh material, HLC maturity was proven by transcript, protein and function to be fetal-like and short of the adult phenotype. The expression of 81% phase 1 enzymes in HLCs was significantly upregulated and half were statistically not different from fetal hepatocytes. HLCs secreted albumin and metabolized testosterone (CYP3A) and dextrorphan (CYP2D6) like fetal hepatocytes. In seven bespoke tests, devised by principal components analysis to distinguish fetal from adult hepatocytes, HLCs from two different source laboratories consistently demonstrated fetal characteristics. HLCs from different sources are broadly comparable with unbiased proteomic evidence for faithful differentiation down the liver lineage. This current phenotype mimics human fetal rather than adult hepatocytes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Generation of Hepatocyte-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells By Co-culturing Embryoid Body Cells with Liver Non-parenchymal Cell Line TWNT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, M. S.; Yaqoob, N.; Iwamuro, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Fujiwara, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To generate a homogeneous population of patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from human iPS cells those show the morphologic and phenotypic properties of primary human hepatocytes. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, Okayama University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan, from April to December 2011. Methodology: Human iPS cells were generated and maintained on ES qualified matrigel coated plates supplemented with mTeSR medium or alternatively on mitotically inactivated MEF feeder layer in DMEM/F12 medium containing 20% KOSR, 4ng/ml bFGF-2, 1 x 10-4 M 2-mercaptoethanol, 1 mmol/L NEAA, 2mM L-glutamine and 1% penicillin-streptomycin. iPS cells were differentiated to HLCs by sequential culture using a four step differentiation protocol: (I) Generation of embryoid bodies (EBs) in suspension culture; (II) Induction of definitive endoderm (DE) from 2 days old EBs by growth in human activin-A (100 ng/ml) and basic fibroblasts growth factor (bFGF2) (100 ng/ml) on matrigel coated plates; (III) Induction of hepatic progenitors by co-culture with non-parenchymal human hepatic stellate cell line (TWNT-1); and (IV) Maturation by culture in dexamethasone. Characterization was performed by RT-PCR and functional assays. Results: The generated HLCs showed microscopically morphological phenotype of human hepatocytes, expressed liver specific genes (ASGPR, Albumin, AFP, Sox17, Fox A2), secreted human liver-specific proteins such as albumin, synthesized urea and metabolized ammonia. Conclusion: Functional HLCs were generated from human iPS cells, which could be used for autologus hepatocyte transplantation for liver failure and as in vitro model for determining the metabolic and toxicological properties of drug compounds. (author)

  9. Omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and cell lines via glucocorticoid receptor and pregnane X receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole drugs lansoprazole and omeprazole are used for treatment of various gastrointestinal pathologies. Both compounds cause drug-drug interactions because they activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induce CYP1A genes. In the current paper, we examined the effects of lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers on the expression of key drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines. Lansoprazole enantiomers, but not omeprazole, were equipotent inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA in HepG2 cells. All forms (S-, R-, rac-) of lansoprazole and omeprazole induced CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes. The quantitative profiles of CYP3A4 induction by individual forms of lansoprazole and omeprazole exerted enantiospecific patterns. Lansoprazole dose-dependently activated pregnane X receptor PXR in gene reporter assays, and slightly modulated rifampicin-inducible PXR activity, with similar potency for each enantiomer. Omeprazole dose-dependently activated PXR and inhibited rifampicin-inducible PXR activity. The effects of S-omeprazole were much stronger as compared to those of R-omeprazole. All forms of lansoprazole, but not omeprazole, slightly activated glucocorticoid receptor and augmented dexamethasone-induced GR transcriptional activity. Omeprazole and lansoprazole influenced basal and ligand inducible expression of tyrosine aminotransferase, a GR-target gene, in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. Overall, we demonstrate here that omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. The induction comprises differential interactions of omeprazole and lansoprazole with transcriptional regulators PXR and GR, and some of the effects were enantiospecific. The data presented here might be of toxicological and clinical importance, since the effects occurred in therapeutically relevant concentrations.

  10. Bioprinting of human pluripotent stem cells and their directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells for the generation of mini-livers in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Fyfe, Catherine; Cornelissen, Dirk-Jan; Gardner, John; King, Jason; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-10-21

    We report the first investigation into the bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), their response to a valve-based printing process as well as their post-printing differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HLCs differentiated from both hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) sources were bioprinted and examined for the presence of hepatic markers to further validate the compatibility of the valve-based bioprinting process with fragile cell transfer. Examined cells were positive for nuclear factor 4 alpha and were demonstrated to secrete albumin and have morphology that was also found to be similar to that of hepatocytes. Both hESC and hiPSC lines were tested for post-printing viability and pluripotency and were found to have negligible difference in terms of viability and pluripotency between the printed and non-printed cells. hESC-derived HLCs were 3D printed using alginate hydrogel matrix and tested for viability and albumin secretion during the remaining differentiation and were found to be hepatic in nature. 3D printed with 40-layer of HLC-containing alginate structures reached peak albumin secretion at day 21 of the differentiation protocol. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to print human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (both hESCs and hiPSCs) while either maintaining their pluripotency or directing their differentiation into specific lineages. The ability to bioprint hPSCs will pave the way for producing organs or tissues on demand from patient specific cells which could be used for animal-free drug development and personalized medicine.

  11. Bioprinting of human pluripotent stem cells and their directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells for the generation of mini-livers in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Cornelissen, Dirk-Jan; Shu, Wenmiao; Fyfe, Catherine; Gardner, John; King, Jason; Courtney, Aidan

    2015-01-01

    We report the first investigation into the bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), their response to a valve-based printing process as well as their post-printing differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HLCs differentiated from both hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) sources were bioprinted and examined for the presence of hepatic markers to further validate the compatibility of the valve-based bioprinting process with fragile cell transfer. Examined cells were positive for nuclear factor 4 alpha and were demonstrated to secrete albumin and have morphology that was also found to be similar to that of hepatocytes. Both hESC and hiPSC lines were tested for post-printing viability and pluripotency and were found to have negligible difference in terms of viability and pluripotency between the printed and non-printed cells. hESC-derived HLCs were 3D printed using alginate hydrogel matrix and tested for viability and albumin secretion during the remaining differentiation and were found to be hepatic in nature. 3D printed with 40-layer of HLC-containing alginate structures reached peak albumin secretion at day 21 of the differentiation protocol. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to print human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (both hESCs and hiPSCs) while either maintaining their pluripotency or directing their differentiation into specific lineages. The ability to bioprint hPSCs will pave the way for producing organs or tissues on demand from patient specific cells which could be used for animal-free drug development and personalized medicine. (paper)

  12. Oleate ameliorates palmitate-induced reduction of NAMPT activity and NAD levels in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penke, Melanie; Schuster, Susanne; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2017-10-03

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) levels are crucial for liver function. The saturated fatty acid palmitate and the unsaturated fatty acid oleate are the main free fatty acids in adipose tissue and human diet. We asked how these fatty acids affect cell survival, NAMPT and NAD levels in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were stimulated with palmitate (0.5mM), oleate (1mM) or a combination of both (0.5mM/1mM) as well as nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (0.5 mM) or the specific NAMPT inhibitor FK866 (10nM). Cell survival was measured by WST-1 assay and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. NAD levels were determined by NAD/NADH Assay or HPLC. Protein and mRNA levels were analysed by Western blot analyses and qPCR, respectively. NAMPT enzyme activity was measured using radiolabelled 14 C-nicotinamide. Lipids were stained by Oil red O staining. Palmitate significantly reduced cell survival and induced apoptosis at physiological doses. NAMPT activity and NAD levels significantly declined after 48h of palmitate. In addition, NAMPT mRNA expression was enhanced which was associated with increased NAMPT release into the supernatant, while intracellular NAMPT protein levels remained stable. Oleate alone did not influence cell viability and NAMPT activity but ameliorated the negative impact of palmitate on cell survival, NAMPT activity and NAD levels, as well as the increased NAMPT mRNA expression and secretion. NMN was able to normalize intracellular NAD levels but did not ameliorate cell viability after co-stimulation with palmitate. FK866, a specific NAMPT inhibitor did not influence lipid accumulation after oleate-treatment. Palmitate targets NAMPT activity with a consequent cellular depletion of NAD. Oleate protects from palmitate-induced apoptosis and variation of NAMPT and NAD levels. Palmitate-induced cell stress leads to an increase of NAMPT mRNA and accumulation in the supernatant. However

  13. Design of a Vitronectin-Based Recombinant Protein as a Defined Substrate for Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Nagaoka

    Full Text Available Maintenance and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs usually requires culture on a substrate for cell adhesion. A commonly used substratum is Matrigel purified from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma cells, and consists of a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans, and growth factors. Several studies have successfully induced differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from hPSCs. However, most of these studies have used Matrigel as a cell adhesion substrate, which is not a defined culture condition. In an attempt to generate a substratum that supports undifferentiated properties and differentiation into hepatic lineage cells, we designed novel substrates consisting of vitronectin fragments fused to the IgG Fc domain. hPSCs adhered to these substrates via interactions between integrins and the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, and the cells maintained their undifferentiated phenotypes. Using a previously established differentiation protocol, hPSCs were efficiently differentiated into mesendodermal and hepatic lineage cells on a vitronectin fragment-containing substrate. We found that full-length vitronectin did not support stable cell adhesion during the specification stage. Furthermore, the vitronectin fragment with the minimal RGD-containing domain was sufficient for differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatic lineage cells under completely defined conditions that facilitate the clinical application of cells differentiated from hPSCs.

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-11-15

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Cheng, Yan; Makarov, Edward; Ganesan, Murali; Gebhart, Catherine L.; Gorantla, Santhi; Osna, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361613

  16. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghubendra Singh Dagur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  17. Differential effects of omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers on aryl hydrocarbon receptor in human hepatocytes and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Srovnalova, Alzbeta; Svecarova, Michaela; Korhonova, Martina; Bartonkova, Iveta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and lansoprazole contain chiral sulfur atom and they are administered as a racemate, i.e. equimolar mixture of S- and R-enantiomers. The enantiopure drugs esomeprazole and dexlansoprazole have been developed and introduced to clinical practice due to their improved clinical and therapeutic properties. Since omeprazole and lansoprazole are activators of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and inducers of CYP1A genes, we examined their enantiospecific effects on AhR-CYP1A pathway in human cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes. We performed gene reporter assays for transcriptional activity of AhR, RT-PCR analyses for CYP1A1/2 mRNAs, western blots for CYP1A1/2 proteins and EROD assay for CYP1A1/2 catalytic activity. Lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers displayed differential effects on AhR-CYP1A1/2 pathway. In general, S-enantiomers were stronger activators of AhR and inducers of CYP1A genes as compared to R-enantiomers in lower concentrations, i.e. 1-10 µM for lansoprazole and 10-100 µM for omeprazole. In contrast, R-enantiomers were stronger AhR activators and CYP1A inducers than S-enantiomers in higher concentrations, i.e. 100 µM for lansoprazole and 250 µM for omeprazole. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence of enantiospecific effects of omeprazole and lansoprazole on AhR signaling pathway.

  18. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, R

    1986-01-01

    A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these DNA segments bind to a common, apparently limiting, transacting factor. Conventional techniques (Bal deletions, site directed mutagenesis, etc.) have been used to precisely identify the DNA sequences responsible for these effects. The emerging picture is complex: they have identified multiple, separate transcriptional signals, essential for maximal promoter activation and tissue specific expression. Some of these signals show a negative effect on transcription in fibroblast cell lines.

  19. Leflunomide or A77 1726 protect from acetaminophen-induced cell injury through inhibition of JNK-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition in immortalized human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Seah, Quee Ming; Tan, Rachel C.H.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Beerheide, Walter; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2006-01-01

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, protects against T-cell-mediated liver injury by poorly understood mechanisms. The active metabolite of leflunomide, A77 1726 (teriflunomide) has been shown to inhibit stress-activated protein kinases (JNK pathway), which are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that leflunomide may protect from drugs that induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) by blocking the JNK signaling pathway. To this end, we exposed cultured immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to the standard protoxicant drug acetaminophen (APAP), which induces CsA-sensitive mPT-mediated cell death. We determined the effects of leflunomide on the extent of APAP-induced hepatocyte injury and the upstream JNK-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathways. We found that leflunomide or A77 1726 concentration-dependently protected hepatocytes from APAP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial permeabilization and lethal cell injury. This was not due to proximal inhibition of CYP-catalyzed APAP bioactivation to its thiol-reactive metabolite. Instead, we demonstrate that leflunomide (20 μM) inhibited the APAP-induced early (3 h) activation (phosphorylation) of JNK1/2, thus inhibiting phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and preventing P-Bcl-2-mediated induction of the mPT. This greatly attenuated mitochondrial cytochrome c release, which we used as a marker for mitochondrial permeabilization. The specific JNK2 inhibitor SP600125 similarly protected from APAP-induced cell death. In conclusion, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that leflunomide protects from protoxicant-induced hepatocyte injury by inhibiting JNK signaling and preventing mPT induction

  20. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Resistant to HBV Infection during Differentiation into Hepatocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic methods for chronic hepatitis B are limited. The shortage of organ donors and hepatitis B virus (HBV reinfection obstruct the clinical application of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. In the present study, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs were isolated from chronic hepatitis B patients and characterized for morphology, growth potency, surface phenotype and the differentiation potential. The results showed that both MSCs had adipogenic, osteogenic and neuron differentiation potential, and nearly all MSCs expressed CD105, CD44 and CD29. Compared with AD-MSCs, BM-MSCs of chronic hepatitis B patients proliferated defectively. In addition, the ability of AD-MSCs to differentiate into hepatocyte was evaluated and the susceptibility to HBV infection were assessed. AD-MSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells. These cells express the hepatic-specific markers and have glycogen production and albumin secretion function. AD-MSCs and hepatic differentiation AD-MSCs were not susceptible to infection by HBV in vitro. Compared with BM-MSCs, AD-MSCs may be alternative stem cells for chronic hepatitis B patients.

  1. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high ...

  2. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pengpeng; Guan Rongfa; Jiang Jiaxin; Liu Mingqi; Huang Guangrong; Chen Xiaoting; Ye Xingqian

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 μg·mL -1 . LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs (≥ 25 μg mL -1 ) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 μg·mL -1 ). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage. Though the exact mechanism behind Ag NPs

  3. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Guan, Rongfa; Ye, Xingqian; Jiang, Jiaxin; Liu, Mingqi; Huang, Guangrong; Chen, Xiaoting

    2011-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 μg·mL-1. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs (>= 25 μg mL-1) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 μg·mL-1). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage. Though the exact mechanism behind Ag NPs

  4. Toxicity of nano- and micro-sized silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Pengpeng; Guan Rongfa; Jiang Jiaxin; Liu Mingqi; Huang Guangrong; Chen Xiaoting [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, College of Life Sciences, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Ye Xingqian, E-mail: rfguan@163.com [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 {mu}g{center_dot}mL{sup -1}. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs ({>=} 25 {mu}g mL{sup -1}) while micro-sized silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 {mu}g{center_dot}mL{sup -1}). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage

  5. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilowski, Maren; Kleespies, Axel; Toni, Enrico N. de; Donabauer, Barbara; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. → ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-β and actinomycin D. → ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. → A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-β, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-β and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  6. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) protects human hepatocytes against apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilowski, Maren [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Kleespies, Axel [Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Toni, Enrico N. de [Department of Medicine II, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Donabauer, Barbara [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Jauch, Karl-Walter [Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Hengstler, Jan G. [Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University, Dortmund (Germany); Thasler, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.thasler@med.uni-muenchen.de [Liver Regeneration Group, Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Department of Surgery, Grosshadern Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALR decreases cytochrome c release from mitochondria. {yields} ALR protects hepatocytes against apoptosis induction by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. {yields} ALR exerts a liver-specific anti-apoptotic effect. {yields} A possible medical usage of ALR regarding protection of liver cells during apoptosis inducing therapies. -- Abstract: Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is known to support liver regeneration and to stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes. However, it is not known if ALR exerts anti-apoptotic effects in human hepatocytes and whether this protective effect is cell type specific. This is relevant, because compounds that protect the liver against apoptosis without undesired effects, such as protection of metastatic tumour cells, would be appreciated in several clinical settings. Primary human hepatocytes (phH) and organotypic cancer cell lines were exposed to different concentrations of apoptosis inducers (ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta}, actinomycin D) and cultured with or without recombinant human ALR (rhALR). Apoptosis was evaluated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and by FACS with propidium iodide (PI) staining. ALR significantly decreased apoptosis induced by ethanol, TRAIL, anti-Apo, TGF-{beta} and actinomycin D. Further, the anti-apoptotic effect of ALR was observed in primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells but not in bronchial (BC1), colonic (SW480), gastric (GC1) and pancreatic (L3.6PL) cell lines. Therefore, the hepatotrophic growth factor ALR acts in a liver specific manner with regards to both its mitogenic and its anti-apoptotic effect. Unlike the growth factors HGF and EGF, rhALR acts in a liver specific manner. Therefore, ALR is a promising candidate for further evaluation as a possible hepatoprotective factor in clinical settings.

  7. Determination of Drug Toxicity Using 3D Spheroids Constructed From an Immortal Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S. J.; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    that a precise dose can be provided in a manner similar to in vivo studies. This avoided correction of the actual dose given based on a protein determination after treatment (when some cells may have lysed). Conversion of published in vitro LC50 data (mM) for six common drugs (acetaminophen, amiodarone...... different from 2D cultures and are more representative of the liver in vivo....

  8. A sequential EMT-MET mechanism drives the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuhong; Hutchins, Andrew P; Chen, Yong; Li, Shengbiao; Shan, Yongli; Liao, Baojian; Zheng, Dejin; Shi, Xi; Li, Yinxiong; Chan, Wai-Yee; Pan, Guangjin; Wei, Shicheng; Shu, Xiaodong; Pei, Duanqing

    2017-05-03

    Reprogramming has been shown to involve EMT-MET; however, its role in cell differentiation is unclear. We report here that in vitro differentiation of hESCs to hepatic lineage undergoes a sequential EMT-MET with an obligatory intermediate mesenchymal phase. Gene expression analysis reveals that Activin A-induced formation of definitive endoderm (DE) accompanies a synchronous EMT mediated by autocrine TGFβ signalling followed by a MET process. Pharmacological inhibition of TGFβ signalling blocks the EMT as well as DE formation. We then identify SNAI1 as the key EMT transcriptional factor required for the specification of DE. Genetic ablation of SNAI1 in hESCs does not affect the maintenance of pluripotency or neural differentiation, but completely disrupts the formation of DE. These results reveal a critical mesenchymal phase during the acquisition of DE, highlighting a role for sequential EMT-METs in both differentiation and reprogramming.

  9. Biguanide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction yields increased lactate production and cytotoxicity of aerobically-poised HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykens, James A.; Jamieson, Joseph; Marroquin, Lisa; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Billis, Puja A.; Will, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    As a class, the biguanides induce lactic acidosis, a hallmark of mitochondrial impairment. To assess potential mitochondrial impairment, we evaluated the effects of metformin, buformin and phenformin on: 1) viability of HepG2 cells grown in galactose, 2) respiration by isolated mitochondria, 3) metabolic poise of HepG2 and primary human hepatocytes, 4) activities of immunocaptured respiratory complexes, and 5) mitochondrial membrane potential and redox status in primary human hepatocytes. Phenformin was the most cytotoxic of the three with buformin showing moderate toxicity, and metformin toxicity only at mM concentrations. Importantly, HepG2 cells grown in galactose are markedly more susceptible to biguanide toxicity compared to cells grown in glucose, indicating mitochondrial toxicity as a primary mode of action. The same rank order of potency was observed for isolated mitochondrial respiration where preincubation (40 min) exacerbated respiratory impairment, and was required to reveal inhibition by metformin, suggesting intramitochondrial bio-accumulation. Metabolic profiling of intact cells corroborated respiratory inhibition, but also revealed compensatory increases in lactate production from accelerated glycolysis. High (mM) concentrations of the drugs were needed to inhibit immunocaptured respiratory complexes, supporting the contention that bioaccumulation is involved. The same rank order was found when monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production, and glutathione levels in primary human hepatocytes. In toto, these data indicate that biguanide-induced lactic acidosis can be attributed to acceleration of glycolysis in response to mitochondrial impairment. Indeed, the desired clinical outcome, viz., decreased blood glucose, could be due to increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux in response to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction

  10. Metabolism of lipoproteins by human fetal hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of clearance of lipoproteins from plasma appears to play a role in the development of atherogenesis. The liver may account for as much as two thirds of the removal of low-density lipoprotein and one third of the clearance of high-density lipoprotein in certain animal species and humans, mainly by receptor-mediated pathways. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if human fetal hepatocytes maintained in vitro take up and degrade lipoproteins. We first determined that the maximal binding capacity of iodine 125-iodo-LDL was approximately 300 ng of low-density lipoprotein protein/mg of membrane protein and an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 60 micrograms low-density lipoprotein protein/ml in membranes prepared from human fetal liver. We found that the maximal uptake of [ 125 I]iodo-LDL and [ 125 I]iodo-HDL by fetal hepatocytes occurred after 12 hours of incubation. Low-density lipoprotein uptake preceded the appearance of degradation products by 4 hours, and thereafter the degradation of low-density lipoprotein increased linearly for at least 24 hours. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein was not degraded to any extent by fetal hepatocytes. [ 125 I]Iodo-LDL uptake and degradation were inhibited more than 75% by preincubation with low-density lipoprotein but not significantly by high-density lipoprotein, whereas [ 125 I]iodo-HDL uptake was inhibited 70% by preincubation with high-density lipoprotein but not by low-density lipoprotein. In summary, human fetal hepatocytes take up and degrade low-density lipoprotein by a receptor-mediated process similar to that described for human extrahepatic tissues

  11. Controlled cell morphology and liver-specific function of engineered primary hepatocytes by fibroblast layer cell densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Koike, Makiko; Kawahara, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Hideko; Murai, Tomomi; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2018-03-05

    Engineered primary hepatocytes, including co-cultured hepatocyte sheets, are an attractive to basic scientific and clinical researchers because they maintain liver-specific functions, have reconstructed cell polarity, and have high transplantation efficiency. However, co-culture conditions regarding engineered primary hepatocytes were suboptimal in promoting these advantages. Here we report that the hepatocyte morphology and liver-specific function levels are controlled by the normal human diploid fibroblast (TIG-118 cell) layer cell density. Primary rat hepatocytes were plated onto TIG-118 cells, previously plated 3 days before at 1.04, 5.21, and 26.1×10 3  cells/cm 2 . Hepatocytes plated onto lower TIG-118 cell densities expanded better during the early culture period. The hepatocytes gathered as colonies and only exhibited small adhesion areas because of the pushing force from proliferating TIG-118 cells. The smaller areas of each hepatocyte result in the development of bile canaliculi. The highest density of TIG-118 cells downregulated albumin synthesis activity of hepatocytes. The hepatocytes may have undergone apoptosis associated with high TGF-β1 concentration and necrosis due to a lack of oxygen. These occurrences were supported by apoptotic chromatin condensation and high expression of both proteins HIF-1a and HIF-1b. Three types of engineered hepatocyte/fibroblast sheets comprising different TIG-118 cell densities were harvested after 4 days of hepatocyte culture and showed a complete cell sheet format without any holes. Hepatocyte morphology and liver-specific function levels are controlled by TIG-118 cell density, which helps to design better engineered hepatocytes for future applications such as in vitro cell-based assays and transplantable hepatocyte tissues. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term culture and expansion of primary human hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, G.; Bomze, D.; Heinz, S.; Ramachandran, S.D.; Noerenberg, A.; Cohen, M.; Shibolet, O.; Sklan, E.; Braspenning, J.C.; Nahmias, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes have a critical role in metabolism, but their study is limited by the inability to expand primary hepatocytes in vitro while maintaining proliferative capacity and metabolic function. Here we describe the oncostatin M (OSM)-dependent expansion of primary human hepatocytes by low

  13. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, M.S.; Lim, Priscilla L.K.; Gupta, Rashi; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2006-01-01

    Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca 2+ c ) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 μM). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca 2+ ] c (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca 2+ chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca 2+ plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, ΔΨ m (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca 2+ ] c . The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 μM) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca 2+ ] c , while it had no effect on the dissipation of the ΔΨ m . Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca 2+ ] c . In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca 2+ ] c , triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death

  14. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG : models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Helene; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological

  15. Hepatocyte transplantation and advancements in alternative cell sources for liver-based regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Charlotte A; Sinha, Siddharth; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Dhawan, Anil

    2018-06-01

    Human hepatocyte transplantation has been actively perused as an alternative to liver replacement for acute liver failure and liver-based metabolic defects. Current challenges in this field include a limited cell source, reduced cell viability following cryopreservation and poor engraftment of cells into the recipient liver with consequent limited life span. As a result, alternative stem cell sources such as pluripotent stem cells, fibroblasts, hepatic progenitor cells, amniotic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) can be used to generate induced hepatocyte like cells (HLC) with each technique exhibiting advantages and disadvantages. HLCs may have comparable function to primary human hepatocytes and could offer patient-specific treatment. However, long-term functionality of transplanted HLCs and the potential oncogenic risks of using stem cells have yet to be established. The immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are promising, and multiple clinical trials are investigating their effect in cirrhosis and acute liver failure. Here, we review the current status of hepatocyte transplantation, alternative cell sources to primary human hepatocytes and their potential in liver regeneration. We also describe recent clinical trials using hepatocytes derived from stem cells and their role in improving the phenotype of several liver diseases.

  16. Transplant of Hepatocytes, Undifferentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and In Vitro Hepatocyte-Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Chronic Liver Failure Experimental Model: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baz, Hanan; Demerdash, Zeinab; Kamel, Manal; Atta, Shimaa; Salah, Faten; Hassan, Salwa; Hammam, Olfat; Khalil, Heba; Meshaal, Safa; Raafat, Inas

    2018-02-01

    Liver transplant is the cornerstone line of treatment for chronic liver diseases; however, the long list of complications and obstacles stand against this operation. Searching for new modalities for treatment of chronic liver illness is a must. In the present research, we aimed to compare the effects of transplant of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cells, in vitro differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, and adult hepatocytes in an experimental model of chronic liver failure. Undifferentiated human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, pro-pagated, and characterized by morphology, gene expression analysis, and flow cytometry of surface markers and in vitro differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. Rat hepatocytes were isolated by double perfusion technique. An animal model of chronic liver failure was developed, and undifferentiated human cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, in vitro hepato-genically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, or freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were transplanted into a CCL4 cirrhotic experimental model. Animals were killed 3 months after transplant, and liver functions and histopathology were assessed. Compared with the cirrhotic control group, the 3 cell-treated groups showed improved alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, albumin, and bilirubin levels, with best results shown in the hepatocyte-treated group. Histopathologic examination of the treated groups showed improved fibrosis, with best results obtained in the undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cell-treated group. Both adult hepatocytes and cord blood mesenchymal stem cells proved to be promising candidates for cell-based therapy in liver regeneration on an experimental level. Improved liver function was evident in the hepatocyte-treated group, and fibrosis control was more evident in the undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cell-treated group.

  17. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  19. Differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cell under flow conditions to mature hepatocytes for liver tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Hemmingsen, Mette; Larsen, Layla

    2018-01-01

    Hepatic differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under flow conditions in a 3D scaffold is expected to be a major step forward for construction of bioartificial livers. The aims of this study were to induce hepatic differentiation of hiPSCs under perfusion conditions...... and to perform functional comparisons with fresh human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS), an excellent benchmark for the human liver in vivo. The majority of the mRNA expression of CYP isoenzymes and transporters and the tested CYP activities, Phase II metabolism, and albumin, urea, and bile acid synthesis...... in the hiPSC-derived cells reached values that overlap those of hPCLS, which indicates a higher degree of hepatic differentiation than observed until now. Differentiation under flow compared with static conditions had a strong inducing effect on Phase II metabolism and suppressed AFP expression but resulted...

  20. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone induced apoptosis and inflammation via the opposite modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-kB pathway in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Bin; Zhou, Yan; Li, Daowen; Zhang, Shen; Li, Hui; Xiao, Xilong; Tang, Shusheng

    2016-09-01

    The potential toxicity of quinocetone (QCT) has raised widely concern, but its mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanism in human hepatocyte L02 cells. The results showed that QCT treatment significantly decreased the cell viability of L02 cell and increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which was attenuated by curcumin pre-treatment at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μM. Compared to the QCT alone group, curcumin pre-treatment significantly attenuated QCT induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin pretreatment markedly attenuated QCT-induced increase of iNOS activity and NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, curcumin pretreatment markedly down-regulated the expression of nuclear factor -kB (NF-kB) and iNOS mRNAs, but up-regulated the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNAs, compared to the QCT alone group. Zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, markedly partly abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against QCT-induced caspase activation, NF-kB mRNA expression. These results indicate that curcumin could effectively inhibit QCT induced apoptosis and inflammatory response in L02 cells, which may involve the activation of Nrf2/HO-1 and inhibition of NF-kB pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  2. Isolation of primary human hepatocytes from normal and diseased liver tissue: a one hundred liver experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky H Bhogal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful and consistent isolation of primary human hepatocytes remains a challenge for both cell-based therapeutics/transplantation and laboratory research. Several centres around the world have extensive experience in the isolation of human hepatocytes from non-diseased livers obtained from donor liver surplus to surgical requirement or at hepatic resection for tumours. These livers are an important but limited source of cells for therapy or research. The capacity to isolate cells from diseased liver tissue removed at transplantation would substantially increase availability of cells for research. However no studies comparing the outcome of human hepatocytes isolation from diseased and non-diseased livers presently exist. Here we report our experience isolating human hepatocytes from organ donors, non-diseased resected liver and cirrhotic tissue. We report the cell yields and functional qualities of cells isolated from the different types of liver and demonstrate that a single rigorous protocol allows the routine harvest of good quality primary hepatocytes from the most commonly accessible human liver tissue samples.

  3. Cell therapy from bench to bedside: Hepatocytes from fibroblasts - the truth and myth of transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-06-07

    Hepatocyte transplantation is an alternative to liver transplantation in certain disorders such as inherited liver diseases and liver failure. It is a relatively less complicated surgical procedure, and has the advantage that it can be repeated several times if unsuccessful. Another advantage is that hepatocytes can be isolated from partly damaged livers which are not suitable for liver transplantation. Despite these advantages hepatocyte transplantation is less popular. Important issues are poor engraftment of the transplanted cells and the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. Generation of "hepatocyte like cells"/iHeps from embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by directed differentiation is an emerging solution to the latter issue. Direct conversation or trans-differentiation of fibroblasts to "hepatocyte like cells" is another way which is, being explored. However this method has several inherent and technical disadvantages compared to the directed differentiation from ES or iPSC. There are several methods claiming to be "highly efficient" for generating "highly functional" "hepatocyte like cells". Currently different groups are working independently and coming up with differentiation protocols and each group claiming an advantage for their protocol. Directed differentiation protocols need to be designed, compared, analyzed and tweaked systematically and logically than empirically. There is a need for a well-coordinated global initiative comparable to the Human Genome Project to achieve this goal in the near future.

  4. Development of MAPC derived induced endodermal progenitors : Generation of pancreatic beta cells and hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambathkumar, Rangarajan

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells (MAPCs) are one potential stem cell source to generate functional hepatocytes or β-cells. However, human MAPCs have less plasticity than pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), as their ability to generate endodermal cells is not robust. Here we studied the role of 14

  5. Cell swelling and glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes from fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafson, L. A.; Jumelle-Laclau, M. N.; van Woerkom, G. M.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Meijer, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Cell swelling is known to increase net glycogen production from glucose in hepatocytes from fasted rats by activating glycogen synthase. Since both active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase are present in hepatocytes, suppression of flux through phosphorylase may also contribute to the net increase

  6. Generation, characterization and potential therapeutic applications of mature and functional hepatocytes from stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Jianfang; Liu, Yang; Li, Zheng; Gao, Wei-Qiang; He, Zuping

    2013-02-01

    Liver cancer is the sixth most common tumor in the world and the majority of patients with this disease usually die within 1 year. The effective treatment for end-stage liver disease (also known as liver failure), including liver cancer or cirrhosis, is liver transplantation. However, there is a severe shortage of liver donors worldwide, which is the major handicap for the treatment of patients with liver failure. Scarcity of liver donors underscores the urgent need of using stem cell therapy to the end-stage liver disease. Notably, hepatocytes have recently been generated from hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells. We have obtained mature and functional hepatocytes from rat hepatic stem cells. Here, we review the advancements on hepatic differentiation from various stem cells, including hepatic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, the induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and probably spermatogonial stem cells. The advantages, disadvantages, and concerns on differentiation of these stem cells into hepatic cells are highlighted. We further address the methodologies, phenotypes, and functional characterization on the differentiation of numerous stem cells into hepatic cells. Differentiation of stem cells into mature and functional hepatocytes, especially from an extra-hepatic stem cell source, would circumvent the scarcity of liver donors and human hepatocytes, and most importantly it would offer an ideal and promising source of hepatocytes for cell therapy and tissue engineering in treating liver disease. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of clofibric acid on mRNA expression profiles in primary cultures of rat, mouse and human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richert, Lysiane; Lamboley, Christelle; Viollon-Abadie, Catherine; Grass, Peter; Hartmann, Nicole; Laurent, Stephane; Heyd, Bruno; Mantion, Georges; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Staedtler, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA expression profile in control and clofibric acid (CLO)-treated mouse, rat, and human hepatocytes was analyzed using species-specific oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (Affymetrix). A statistical empirical Bayes procedure was applied in order to select the significantly differentially expressed genes. Treatment with the peroxisome proliferator CLO induced up-regulation of genes involved in peroxisome proliferation and in cell proliferation as well as down-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis in hepatocytes of rodent but not of human origin. CLO treatment induced up-regulation of microsomal cytochrome P450 4a genes in rodent hepatocytes and in two of six human hepatocyte cultures. In addition, genes encoding phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P450s were also up-regulated by CLO in rodent and human hepatocyte cultures. Up-regulation of phenobarbital-inducible UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase genes by CLO was observed in both rat and human but not in mouse hepatocytes. CLO treatment induced up-regulation of L-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene in hepatocytes of both rodent and human origin. However, while genes of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial pathways involved in fatty acid transport and metabolism were up-regulated by CLO in both rodent and human hepatocyte cultures, genes of the peroxisomal pathway of lipid metabolism were up-regulated in rodents only. An up-regulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) by CLO was observed only in human hepatocyte cultures, suggesting that this trans-activating factor may play a key role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in human liver as well as in the nonresponsiveness of human liver to CLO-induced regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis

  8. Effects of clofibric acid on mRNA expression profiles in primary cultures of rat, mouse and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Lysiane; Lamboley, Christelle; Viollon-Abadie, Catherine; Grass, Peter; Hartmann, Nicole; Laurent, Stephane; Heyd, Bruno; Mantion, Georges; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Staedtler, Frank

    2003-09-01

    The mRNA expression profile in control and clofibric acid (CLO)-treated mouse, rat, and human hepatocytes was analyzed using species-specific oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (Affymetrix). A statistical empirical Bayes procedure was applied in order to select the significantly differentially expressed genes. Treatment with the peroxisome proliferator CLO induced up-regulation of genes involved in peroxisome proliferation and in cell proliferation as well as down-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis in hepatocytes of rodent but not of human origin. CLO treatment induced up-regulation of microsomal cytochrome P450 4a genes in rodent hepatocytes and in two of six human hepatocyte cultures. In addition, genes encoding phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P450s were also up-regulated by CLO in rodent and human hepatocyte cultures. Up-regulation of phenobarbital-inducible UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase genes by CLO was observed in both rat and human but not in mouse hepatocytes. CLO treatment induced up-regulation of L-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene in hepatocytes of both rodent and human origin. However, while genes of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial pathways involved in fatty acid transport and metabolism were up-regulated by CLO in both rodent and human hepatocyte cultures, genes of the peroxisomal pathway of lipid metabolism were up-regulated in rodents only. An up-regulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1alpha) by CLO was observed only in human hepatocyte cultures, suggesting that this trans-activating factor may play a key role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in human liver as well as in the nonresponsiveness of human liver to CLO-induced regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  9. Decrease in Dengue virus-2 infection and reduction of cytokine/chemokine production by Uncaria guianensis in human hepatocyte cell line Huh-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia da Silva Mello

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Dengue fever may present hemorrhages and cavitary effusions as result of exacerbated immune responses. We investigated hydro-alcoholic extracts from leaves (UGL and bark (UGB of the medicinal species Uncaria guinanensis with respect to antiviral effects in Dengue virus (DENV infection and in immunological parameters associated with in vivo physiopathological features. METHODS Chemical profiles from UGB or UGL were compared in thin layer chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance using flavonoid compounds and a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched fraction as references. DENV-2-infected hepatocytes (Huh-7 were treated with extracts. Cell viability, DENV antigens and immunological factors were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or flow cytometry. FINDINGS The UGL mainly differed from UGB by selectively containing the flavonoid kaempferitrin. UGB and UGL improved hepatocyte viability. Both extracts reduced intracellular viral antigen and inhibited the secretion of viral non-structural protein (NS1, which is indicative of viral replication. Reduction in secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was achieved by UGB, of interleukin-6 by UGL, and of interleukin-8 by both UGB and UGL. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The U. guianensis extracts presented, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects for DENV and possibly a hepatocyte-protective activity. Further studies may be performed to consider these products as potential candidates for the development of an herbal product for the future treatment of dengue.

  10. Decrease in Dengue virus-2 infection and reduction of cytokine/chemokine production by Uncaria guianensis in human hepatocyte cell line Huh-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Cíntia da Silva; Valente, Ligia Maria Marino; Wolff, Thiago; Lima-Junior, Raimundo Sousa; Fialho, Luciana Gomes; Marinho, Cintia Ferreira; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Pereira, Rita de Cássia Alves; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2017-06-01

    Dengue fever may present hemorrhages and cavitary effusions as result of exacerbated immune responses. We investigated hydro-alcoholic extracts from leaves (UGL) and bark (UGB) of the medicinal species Uncaria guinanensis with respect to antiviral effects in Dengue virus (DENV) infection and in immunological parameters associated with in vivo physiopathological features. Chemical profiles from UGB or UGL were compared in thin layer chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance using flavonoid compounds and a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched fraction as references. DENV-2-infected hepatocytes (Huh-7) were treated with extracts. Cell viability, DENV antigens and immunological factors were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or flow cytometry. The UGL mainly differed from UGB by selectively containing the flavonoid kaempferitrin. UGB and UGL improved hepatocyte viability. Both extracts reduced intracellular viral antigen and inhibited the secretion of viral non-structural protein (NS1), which is indicative of viral replication. Reduction in secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was achieved by UGB, of interleukin-6 by UGL, and of interleukin-8 by both UGB and UGL. MAIN. The U. guianensis extracts presented, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects for DENV and possibly a hepatocyte-protective activity. Further studies may be performed to consider these products as potential candidates for the development of an herbal product for the future treatment of dengue.

  11. Evaluation of perfluoroalkyl acid activity using primary mouse and human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Mitchell B.; Das, Kaberi P.; Wood, Carmen R.; Wolf, Cynthia J.; Abbott, Barbara D.; Lau, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    While perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been studied at length, less is known about the biological activity of other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) detected in the environment. Using a transient transfection assay developed in COS-1 cells, our group has previously evaluated a variety of PFAAs for activity associated with activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Here we use primary heptatocytes to further assess the biological activity of a similar group of PFAAs using custom designed Taqman Low Density Arrays. Primary mouse and human hepatoyctes were cultured for 48 h in the presence of varying concentrations of 12 different PFAAs or Wy14,643, a known activator of PPARα. Total RNA was collected and the expression of 48 mouse or human genes evaluated. Gene selection was based on either in-house liver microarray data (mouse) or published data using primary hepatocytes (human). Gene expression in primary mouse hepatocytes was more restricted than expected. Genes typically regulated in whole tissue by PPARα agonists were not altered in mouse cells including Acox1, Me1, Acaa1a, Hmgcs1, and Slc27a1. Cyp2b10, a gene regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor and a transcript normally up-regulated by in vivo exposure to PFAAs, was also unchanged in cultured mouse hepatocytes. Cyp4a14, Ehhadh, Pdk4, Cpt1b, and Fabp1 were regulated as expected in mouse cells. A larger group of genes were differentially expressed in human primary hepatocytes, however, little consistency was observed across compounds with respect to which genes produced a significant dose response making the determination of relative biological activity difficult. This likely reflects weaker activation of PPARα in human versus rodent cells as well as variation among individual cell donors. Unlike mouse cells, CYP2B6 was up-regulated in human hepatocytes by a number of PFAAs as was PPARδ. Rankings were conducted on the limited

  12. AR42J-B-13 cell: An expandable progenitor to generate an unlimited supply of functional hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Karen; Fairhall, Emma A.; Charlton, Keith A.; Wright, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocytes are the preparation of choice for Toxicological research in vitro. However, despite the fact that hepatocytes proliferate in vivo during liver regeneration, they are resistant to proliferation in vitro, do not tolerate sub-culture and tend to enter a de-differentiation program that results in a loss of hepatic function. These limitations have resulted in the search for expandable rodent and human cells capable of being directed to differentiate into functional hepatocytes. Research with stem cells suggests that it may be possible to provide the research community with hepatocytes in vitro although to date, significant challenges remain, notably generating a sufficiently pure population of hepatocytes with a quantitative functionality comparable with hepatocytes. This paper reviews work with the AR42J-B-13 (B-13) cell line. The B-13 cell was cloned from the rodent AR42J pancreatic cell line, express genes associated with pancreatic acinar cells and readily proliferates in simple culture media. When exposed to glucocorticoid, 75-85% of the cells trans-differentiate into hepatocyte-like (B-13/H) cells functioning at a level quantitatively similar to freshly isolated rat hepatocytes (with the remaining cells retaining the B-13 phenotype). Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells also appears to occur in vivo in rats treated with glucocorticoid; in mice with elevated circulating glucocorticoid and in humans treated for long periods with glucocorticoid. The B-13 response to glucocorticoid therefore appears to be related to a real pathophysiological response of a pancreatic cell to glucocorticoid. An understanding of how this process occurs and if it can be generated or engineered in human cells would result in a cell line with the ability to generate an unlimited supply of functional human hepatocytes in a cost effective manner.

  13. Microencapsulation of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P H; Montanari, Elisa; Morel, Philippe; Pimenta, Joël; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wandrey, Christine; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Mahou, Redouan; Bühler, Leo H

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulated hepatocyte transplantation and encapsulated mesenchymal stem cell transplantation are newly developed potential treatments for acute and chronic liver diseases, respectively. Cells are microencapsulated in biocompatible semipermeable alginate-based hydrogels. Microspheres protect cells against antibodies and immune cells, while allowing nutrients, small/medium size proteins and drugs to diffuse inside and outside the polymer matrix. Microencapsulated cells are assessed in vitro and designed for experimental transplantation and for future clinical applications.Here, we describe the protocol for microencapsulation of hepatocytes and mesenchymal stem cells within hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)-alginate hydrogels.

  14. Efficient derivation of functional hepatocytes from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells by a combination of cytokines and sodium butyrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi; YANG Yang; ZHANG Jian; WANG Guo-ying; LIU Wei; QIU Dong-bo; HEI Zi-qing; YING Qi-long; CHEN Gui-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to whole-organ transplantation to support many forms of hepatic insufficiency.Unfortunately,the lack of donor livers makes it difficult to obtain enough viable human hepatocytes for hepatocyte-based therapies.Therefore,it is urgent to find new ways to provide ample hepatocytes.Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells,a breakthrough in stem cell research,may terminate these hinders for cell transplantation.For the promise of iPS cells to be realized in liver diseases,it is necessary to determine if and how efficient they can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes.Methods In this study,we directly compared the hepatic-differentiation capacity of mouse iPS cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells with three different induction approaches:conditions via embryonic body (EB) formation plus cytokines,conditions by combination of dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium butyrate and chemically defined,serum free monolayer conditions.Among these three induction conditions,more homogenous populations can be promoted under chemically defined,serum free conditions.The cells generated under these conditions exhibited hepatic functions in vitro,including glycogen storage,indocynine green (ICG) uptake and release as well as urea secretion.Although efficient hepatocytes differentiation from mouse iPS cells were observed,mouse iPS cells showed relatively lower hepatic induction efficiency compared with mouse ES cells.Results Mouse iPS cells would be efficiently differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro,which may be helpful in facilitating the development of hepatocytes for transplantation and for research on drug discovery.Conclusion We demonstrate that mouse iPS cells retain full potential for fetal liver development and describe procedures that facilitates the efficient generation of highly differentiated human hepatocyte-like cells from iPS cells in vitro.

  15. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  16. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  17. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne R Roach

    Full Text Available Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF. The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  18. Hepatitis B virus evasion from cGAS sensing in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R; Yim, Seung-Ae; Heydmann, Laura; El Saghire, Houssein; Bach, Charlotte; Turon-Lagot, Vincent; Mailly, Laurent; Durand, Sarah C; Lucifora, Julie; Durantel, David; Pessaux, Patrick; Manel, Nicolas; Hirsch, Ivan; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Pochet, Nathalie; Schuster, Catherine; Baumert, Thomas F

    2018-04-20

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and cancer worldwide. The mechanisms of viral genome sensing and the evasion of innate immune responses by HBV infection are still poorly understood. Recently, the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) was identified as a DNA sensor. In this study, we aimed to investigate the functional role of cGAS in sensing of HBV infection and elucidate the mechanisms of viral evasion. We performed functional studies including loss- and gain-of-function experiments combined with cGAS effector gene expression profiling in an infectious cell culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HBV-infected human liver chimeric mice. Here we show that cGAS is expressed in the human liver, primary human hepatocytes and human liver chimeric mice. While naked relaxed-circular HBV DNA is sensed in a cGAS-dependent manner in hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocytes, host cell recognition of viral nucleic acids is abolished during HBV infection, suggesting escape from sensing, likely during packaging of the genome into the viral capsid. While the hepatocyte cGAS pathway is functionally active, as shown by reduction of viral cccDNA levels in gain-of-function studies, HBV infection suppressed cGAS expression and function in cell culture models and humanized mice. HBV exploits multiple strategies to evade sensing and antiviral activity of cGAS and its effector pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. [Study on the interface of human hepatocyte/micropore polypropylene ultrafiltration membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Hong; Han, Bao-San; Gao, Chang-You; Ma, Zu-Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Yong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Gui-di; Yang, Mei-Juan

    2004-09-02

    To found a new interface of human hepatocyte/micropore polypropylene ultrafiltration membrane (MPP) with good cytocompatibility so as to construct bioartificial bioreactor with polypropylene hollow fibers in future. MPP ultrafiltration membrane underwent chemical grafting modification through ultraviolet irradiation and Fe(2+) reduction. The contact angles of MPP and the modified MPP membranes were measured. Human hepatic cells L-02 were cultured. MPP and modified MPP membranes were spread on the wells of culture plate and human hepatic cells and cytodex 3 were inoculated on them. Different kinds of microscopy were used to observe the morphology of these cells. The water contact angle of MPP and the modified MPP membranes decreased from 78 degrees +/- 5 degrees to 27 degrees +/- 4 degrees (P < 0.05), which indicated that the hydrophilicity of the membrane was improved obviously after the grafting modification. Human hepatocyte L-02 did not adhere to and spread on the modified MPP membrane surface, and only grew on the microcarrier cytodex 3 with higher density and higher proliferation ratio measured by MTT. Grafting modification of acrylamide on MPP membrane is a good method to improve the human hepatocyte cytocompatibility with MPP ultrafiltration membrane.

  20. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  1. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes

  2. Pegylated interferons Lambda-1a and alfa-2a display different gene induction and cytokine and chemokine release profiles in whole blood, human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J; Baglino, S; Friborg, J; Kraft, Z; Gray, T; Hill, M; McPhee, F; Hillson, J; Lopez-Talavera, J C; Wind-Rotolo, M

    2014-06-01

    Pegylated interferon-lambda-1a (Lambda), a type III interferon (IFN) in clinical development for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, has shown comparable efficacy and an improved safety profile to a regimen based on pegylated IFN alfa-2a (alfa). To establish a mechanistic context for this improved profile, we investigated the ex vivo effects of Lambda and alfa on cytokine and chemokine release, and on expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in primary human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects. Our findings were further compared with changes observed in blood analysed from HCV-infected patients treated with Lambda or alfa in clinical studies. mRNA transcript and protein expression of the IFN-λ-limiting receptor subunit was lower compared with IFN-α receptor subunits in all cell types. Upon stimulation, alfa and Lambda induced ISG expression in hepatocytes and PBMCs, although in PBMCs Lambda-induced ISG expression was modest. Furthermore, alfa and Lambda induced release of cytokines and chemokines from hepatocytes and PBMCs, although differences in their kinetics of induction were observed. In HCV-infected patients, alfa treatment induced ISG expression in whole blood after single and repeat dosing. Lambda treatment induced modest ISG expression after single dosing and showed no induction after repeat dosing. Alfa and Lambda treatment increased IP-10, iTAC, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1β levels in serum, with alfa inducing higher levels of all mediators compared with Lambda. Overall, ex vivo and in vivo induction profiles reported in this analysis strongly correlate with clinical observations of fewer related adverse events for Lambda vs those typically associated with alfa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  4. Comparison of Species and Cell-Type Differences in Fraction Unbound of Liver Tissues, Hepatocytes, and Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Keith; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lin, Jian; Yates, Phillip; Tess, David; Li, Rui; Singh, Dhirender; Holder, Brian R; Kapinos, Brendon; Chang, George; Di, Li

    2018-04-01

    Fraction unbound ( f u ) of liver tissue, hepatocytes, and other cell types is an essential parameter used to estimate unbound liver drug concentration and intracellular free drug concentration. f u,liver and f u,cell are frequently measured in multiple species and cell types in drug discovery and development for various applications. A comparison study of 12 matrices for f u,liver and f u,cell of hepatocytes in five different species (mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human), as well as f u,cell of Huh7 and human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines, was conducted for 22 structurally diverse compounds with the equilibrium dialysis method. Using an average bioequivalence approach, our results show that the average difference in binding to liver tissue, hepatocytes, or different cell types was within 2-fold of that of the rat f u,liver Therefore, we recommend using rat f u,liver as a surrogate for liver binding in other species and cell types in drug discovery. This strategy offers the potential to simplify binding studies and reduce cost, thereby enabling a more effective and practical determination of f u for liver tissues, hepatocytes, and other cell types. In addition, f u under hepatocyte stability incubation conditions should not be confused with f u,cell , as one is a diluted f u and the other is an undiluted f u Cell density also plays a critical role in the accurate measurement of f u,cell . Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Endothelial cell-derived matrix promotes the metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte via integrin-Src signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinyue; Li, Weihong; Ma, Minghui; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is involved in the regulation of hepatocyte phenotype and function. Recently, the cell-derived extracellular matrix has been proposed to represent the bioactive and biocompatible materials of the native ECM. Here, we show that the endothelial cell-derived matrix (EC matrix) promotes the metabolic maturation of human adipose stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hASC-HLCs) through the activation of the transcription factor forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2) and the nuclear receptors hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and pregnane X receptor (PXR). Reducing the fibronectin content in the EC matrix or silencing the expression of α5 integrin in the hASC-HLCs inhibited the effect of the EC matrix on Src phosphorylation and hepatocyte maturation. The inhibition of Src phosphorylation using the inhibitor PP2 or silencing the expression of Src in hASC-HLCs also attenuated the up-regulation of the metabolic function of hASC-HLCs in a nuclear receptor-dependent manner. These data elucidate integrin-Src signalling linking the extrinsic EC matrix signals and metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte. This study provides a model for studying the interaction between hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cell-derived matrix. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-09-01

    Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5-7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2-4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose consumption. We established a

  7. Effects of human pharmaceuticals on cytotoxicity, EROD activity and ROS production in fish hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laville, N.; Aiet-Aiessa, S.; Gomez, E.; Casellas, C.; Porcher, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are found in the aquatic environment but their potential effects on non-target species like fish remain unknown. This in vitro study is a first approach in the toxicity assessment of human drugs on fish. Nine pharmaceuticals were tested on two fish hepatocyte models: primary cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes (PRTH) and PLHC-1 fish cell line. Cell viability, interaction with cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) enzyme and oxidative stress were assessed by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrasodium bromide tetrazolium (MTT), 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) and dichlorofluorescein (DCFH-DA) assays, respectively. The tested drugs were clofibrate (CF), fenofibrate (FF), carbamazepine (CBZ), fluoxetine (FX), diclofenac (DiCF), propranolol (POH), sulfamethoxazole (SFX), amoxicillin (AMX) and gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ). All substances were cytotoxic, except AMX at concentration up to 500 μM. The calculated MTT EC 50 values ranged from 2 μM (CF) to 651 μM (CBZ) in PLHC-1, and from 53 μM (FF) to 962 μM (GdCl 3 ) in PRTH. CF, FF, and FX were the most cytotoxic drugs and induced oxidative stress before being cytotoxic. Compared to hepatocytes from human and dog, fish hepatocytes seemed to be more susceptible to the peroxisome proliferators (PPs) CF and FF. In PLHC-1 cells none of the tested drugs induced the EROD activity whereas POH appeared as a weak EROD inducer in PRTH. Moreover, in PRTH, SFX, DiCF, CBZ and to a lesser extend, FF and CF inhibited the basal EROD activity at clearly sublethal concentrations which may be of concern at the biological and chemical levels in a multipollution context

  8. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells.

  9. HUMAN LIVER SLICES EXPRESS THE SAME LIDOCAINE BIOTRANSFORMATION RATE AS ISOLATED HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OLINGA, P; MEIJER, DKF; SLOOFF, MJH; GROOTHUIS, GMM; Merema, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate whether liver slices are a valuable tool for the assessment of drug metabolism in human liver, we compared the phase I metabolism of lidocaine in human liver slices and hepatocytes prepared from three human livers. Lidocaine is mainly metabolised to monoethylglycinexylidide

  10. Activation-dependent mitochondrial translocation of Foxp3 in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Teran-Angel, Guillermo; Barbosa, Luisa; Peterson, Darrell L.; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is considered to be the master regulator for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg). Recently Foxp3, has been detected in extra lymphoid tissue, and in hepatocytes and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its role has not been defined. Since it is expected that there is a relationship between protein localization, activity and cellular function, the aim of this study was to explore the subcellular localization of Foxp3 in resting and stimulated human hepatocytes. Foxp3 expression was measured by flow cytometry, subcellular fractioning, and immunofluorescence, and this data was used to track the shuttling of Foxp3 in different subcellular compartments in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell line), stimulated by using the PKC activators (PMA), core and preS1/2 antigen from hepatitis B virus (HBV). Our data shows that besides the nuclear location, mitochondrial translocation was detected after stimulation with PMA and at to a lesser extent, with preS1/2. In addition, Foxp3 is localizes at outer mitochondrial membrane. These results suggest a non-canonical role of Foxp3 in the mitochondrial compartment in human hepatocytes, and opens a new field about their role in liver damages during HBV infection. - Highlights: • The expression and subcellular distribution of Foxp3, is modulated by PMA and preS1/2. • PMA and preS1/2 increase Foxp3 expression on HepG2. • PMA and preS1/2 induce foxp3 enrichment at mitochondrial, microsomal and nuclear compartments. • Results suggest a non-canonical function of Foxp3 or a mitochondrial transcriptional activity.

  11. Activation-dependent mitochondrial translocation of Foxp3 in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Teran-Angel, Guillermo; Barbosa, Luisa [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Peterson, Darrell L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Berrueta, Lisbeth, E-mail: lberruet@ula.ve [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Salmen, Siham, E-mail: sihamsa@ula.ve [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3 is considered to be the master regulator for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg). Recently Foxp3, has been detected in extra lymphoid tissue, and in hepatocytes and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its role has not been defined. Since it is expected that there is a relationship between protein localization, activity and cellular function, the aim of this study was to explore the subcellular localization of Foxp3 in resting and stimulated human hepatocytes. Foxp3 expression was measured by flow cytometry, subcellular fractioning, and immunofluorescence, and this data was used to track the shuttling of Foxp3 in different subcellular compartments in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell line), stimulated by using the PKC activators (PMA), core and preS1/2 antigen from hepatitis B virus (HBV). Our data shows that besides the nuclear location, mitochondrial translocation was detected after stimulation with PMA and at to a lesser extent, with preS1/2. In addition, Foxp3 is localizes at outer mitochondrial membrane. These results suggest a non-canonical role of Foxp3 in the mitochondrial compartment in human hepatocytes, and opens a new field about their role in liver damages during HBV infection. - Highlights: • The expression and subcellular distribution of Foxp3, is modulated by PMA and preS1/2. • PMA and preS1/2 increase Foxp3 expression on HepG2. • PMA and preS1/2 induce foxp3 enrichment at mitochondrial, microsomal and nuclear compartments. • Results suggest a non-canonical function of Foxp3 or a mitochondrial transcriptional activity.

  12. Hepatocytes polyploidization and cell cycle control in liver physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentric, Géraldine; Desdouets, Chantal; Celton-Morizur, Séverine

    2012-01-01

    Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of "diploid-polyploid conversion" during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels), oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.). Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  13. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  14. Evaluating the uptake and intracellular fate of polystyrene nanoparticles by primary and hepatocyte cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Brown, David M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang; Tran, Lang; Stone, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being used within diverse applications such as medicines, clothing, cosmetics and food. In order to promote the safe development of such nanotechnologies it is essential to assess the potential adverse health consequences associated with human exposure. The liver is recognised as a target site for NP toxicity, due to NP accumulation within this organ subsequent to injection, inhalation or instillation. The uptake of fluorescent polystyrene carboxylated particles (20 nm or 200 nm diameter) by hepatocytes was determined using confocal microscopy; with cells imaged 'live' during particle exposure or after exposure within fixed cells. Comparisons between the uptake of polystyrene particles by primary rat hepatocytes, and human hepatocyte cell lines (C3A and HepG2) were made. Uptake of particles by hepatocytes was size, time, and serum dependent. Specifically, the uptake of 200 nm particles was limited, but 20 nm NPs were internalised by all cell types from 10 min onwards. At 10 min, 20 nm NP fluorescence co-localised with the tubulin cytoskeleton staining; after 30 min NP fluorescence compartmentalised into structures located within and/or between cells. The fate of internalised NPs was considered and they were not contained within early endosomes or lysosomes, but within mitochondria of cell lines. NPs accumulated within bile canaliculi to a limited extent, which suggests that NPs can be eliminated within bile. This is in keeping with the finding that gold NPs were eliminated in bile following intravenous injection into rats. The findings were, in the main, comparable between primary rat hepatocytes and the different human hepatocyte cell lines.

  15. Adenoviral-mediated correction of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency in murine fibroblasts and human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korson Mark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, a common organic aciduria, is caused by deficiency of the mitochondrial localized, 5'deoxyadenosylcobalamin dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT. Liver transplantation in the absence of gross hepatic dysfunction provides supportive therapy and metabolic stability in severely affected patients, which invites the concept of using cell and gene delivery as future treatments for this condition. Methods To assess the effectiveness of gene delivery to restore the defective metabolism in this disorder, adenoviral correction experiments were performed using murine Mut embryonic fibroblasts and primary human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes derived from a patient who harbored two early truncating mutations, E224X and R228X, in the MUT gene. Enzymatic and expression studies were used to assess the extent of functional correction. Results Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the native liver after removal subsequent to a combined liver-kidney transplantation procedure, or Mut murine fibroblasts were infected with a second generation recombinant adenoviral vector that expressed the murine methylmalonyl-CoA mutase as well as eGFP from distinct promoters. After transduction, [1-14C] propionate macromolecular incorporation studies and Western analysis demonstrated complete correction of the enzymatic defect in both cell types. Viral reconstitution of enzymatic expression in the human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes exceeded that seen in fibroblasts or control hepatocytes. Conclusion These experiments provide proof of principle for viral correction in methylmalonic acidemia and suggest that hepatocyte-directed gene delivery will be an effective therapeutic treatment strategy in both murine models and in human patients. Primary hepatocytes from a liver that was unsuitable for transplantation provided an important resource for these studies.

  16. Hepatic Stellate Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent Hepatocytes from Injury Induced by APAP/H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, previously described for liver-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, appear to contribute to liver regeneration. Microvesicles (MVs are nanoscale membrane fragments, which can regulate target cell function by transferring contents from their parent cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HSC-derived MVs on xenobiotic-induced liver injury. Rat and human hepatocytes, BRL-3A and HL-7702, were used to build hepatocytes injury models by n-acetyl-p-aminophenol n-(APAP or H2O2 treatment. MVs were prepared from human and rat HSCs, LX-2, and HST-T6 and, respectively, added to injured BRL-3A and HL-7702 hepatocytes. MTT assay was utilized to determine cell proliferation. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and hoechst33258 staining. Western blot was used for analyzing the expression of activated caspase-3. Liver injury indicators, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in culture medium were also assessed. Results showed that (1 HSC-MVs derived from LX-2 and HST-T6 were positive to CD90 and annexin V surface markers; (2 HSC-MVs dose-dependently improved the viability of hepatocytes in both injury models; (3 HSC-MVs dose-dependently inhibited the APAP/H2O2 induced hepatocytes apoptosis and activated caspase-3 expression and leakage of LDH, ALT, and AST. Our results demonstrate that HSC-derived MVs protect hepatocytes from toxicant-induced injury.

  17. A survey of consumer attitudes to the supply and use of human hepatocytes in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Tom D R; Orr, Samantha; Dennison, Ashley R

    2003-11-01

    Human hepatocytes are the model of choice for pharmacotoxicological studies, but their acquisition is often problematic due to ethical and logistical difficulties. The UK Human Tissue Bank is a not-for-profit organisation that acquires and processes human tissue, with a specialist interest in the isolation of human hepatocytes. A recent in-house survey of the processing of liver tissue over 1 year revealed that freshly isolated hepatocytes were underutilised due to mismatched consumer demand, despite the published need for them. We present the results of a telephone survey to investigate the reasons behind this paradox. This survey highlighted some problem areas, including "out of hours" availability of cells and personnel difficulties, but overall, demonstrated the value of such a service, with numerous researchers taking advantage of available good quality human hepatocytes. Although further work is required in optimising long-term storage protocols through cryopreservation, we have demonstrated that tissue handling of this type can be successful and beneficial to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  18. High efficient differentiation of functional hepatocytes from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ao

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte transplantation is considered to be a promising therapy for patients with liver diseases. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an unlimited source for the generation of functional hepatocytes. In this study, we generated iPSCs from porcine ear fibroblasts (PEFs by overexpressing Sox2, Klf4, Oct4, and c-Myc (SKOM, and developed a novel strategy for the efficient differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from porcine iPSCs by following the processes of early liver development. The differentiated cells displayed the phenotypes of hepatocytes, exhibited classic hepatocyte-associated bio-functions, such as LDL uptake, glycogen storage and urea secretion, as well as possessed the metabolic activities of cytochrome P-450 (CYP 3A and 2C. Furthermore, we compared the hepatocyte differentiation efficacy of our protocol with another published method, and the results demonstrated that our differentiation strategy could significantly improve the generation of morphological and functional hepatocyte-like cells from porcine iPSCs. In conclusion, this study establishes an efficient method for in vitro generation of functional hepatocytes from porcine iPSCs, which could represent a promising cell source for preclinical testing of cell-based therapeutics for liver failure and for pharmacological applications.

  19. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  20. The in Vitro Assessment of Biochemical Factors in Hepatocyte like Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A KHoramroodi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Umbilical cord blood (UCB is a source of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC and progenitor cells that can reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB have been differentiated to some kind of cells, such as osteobblast, adipoblast and chondroblast in Vitro. This study examined the differentiation of Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB derived stem cells to functional hepatocytes. Materials & Methods: The present study was an experimental study which was carried out in the Payam-e-Noor University of Tehran in cooperation with Hamedan University of Medical Sciences in 2008. Umbilical cord blood (UCB was obtained from Fatemieh hospital (Hamadan, Iran. Stem cells were isolated from the cord blood by combining density gradient centrifugation with plastic adherence. When the isolated cells reached 80% confluence, they differentiated to hepatocyte like cells. The medium which was used was consists of DMEM and 10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS supplemented with 20 ng/mL Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, 10 ng/mL basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF and 20 ng/mL Oncostatin M (OSM.The medium was changed every 3 days and stored for Albumin (ALB, Alpha Fetoprotein (AFP, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP, and urea assay. Finally PAS stain was done to study Glycogen storage in the differentiated cell. Results: Measurement of biochemical factors in different days showed that concentration of albumin (ALB, alpha fetoprotein (AFP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and Urea gradually increased. Also, PAS staining showed the storage of glycogen in these cells. Conclusion: Stem cell-derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB is a new source of cell types for cell transplantation therapy of hepatic diseases and under certain conditions these cells can differentiate into liver cells.

  1. Comparison of para-aminophenol cytotoxicity in rat renal epithelial cells and hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Bentzley, Catherine M; Tarloff, Joan B

    2005-04-01

    Several chemicals, including para-aminophenol (PAP), produce kidney damage in the absence of hepatic damage. Selective nephrotoxicity may be related to the ability of the kidney to reabsorb filtered water, thereby raising the intraluminal concentration of toxicants and exposing tubular epithelial cells to higher concentrations than would be present in other tissues. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that hepatocytes and renal epithelial cells exposed to equivalent concentrations of PAP would be equally susceptible to toxicity. Hepatocytes and renal epithelial cells were prepared by collagenase digestion of tissues obtained from female Sprague-Dawley rats. Toxicity was monitored using trypan blue exclusion, oxygen consumption and ATP content. We measured the rate of PAP clearance and formation of PAP-glutathione conjugate by HPLC. We found that renal epithelial cells accumulated trypan blue and showed declines in oxygen consumption and ATP content at significantly lower concentrations of PAP and at earlier time points than hepatocytes. The half-life of PAP in hepatocyte incubations was significantly shorter (0.71+/-0.07 h) than in renal epithelial cell incubations (1.33+/-0.23 h), suggesting that renal epithelial cells were exposed to PAP for longer time periods than hepatocytes. Renal epithelial cells formed significantly less glutathione conjugates of PAP (PAP-SG) than did hepatocytes, consistent with less efficient detoxification of reactive PAP intermediates by renal epithelial cells. Finally, hepatocytes contained significant more reduced glutathione (NPSH) than did renal epithelial cells, possibly explaining the enhanced formation of PAP-SG by this cell population. In conclusion, our data indicates that renal epithelial cells are intrinsically more susceptible to PAP cytotoxicity than are hepatocytes. This enhanced cytotoxicity may be due to longer exposure to PAP and/or reduced detoxification of reactive intermediates due to lower concentrations

  2. Protective effects of hesperidin against oxidative stress of tert-butyl hydroperoxide in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingcang; Gu, Honggang; Ye, Yiyi; Lin, Bing; Sun, Lijuan; Deng, Weiping; Zhang, Jingzhe; Liu, Jianwen

    2010-10-01

    Increasing evidence regarding free radical generating agents and the inflammatory process suggest that accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could involve hepatotoxicity. Hesperidin, a naturally occurring flavonoid presents in fruits and vegetables, has been reported to exert a wide range of pharmacological effects that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihypercholesterolemic, and anticarcinogenic actions. However, the cytoprotection and mechanism of hesperidin to neutralize oxidative stress in human hepatic L02 cells remain unclear. In this work, we assessed the capability of hesperidin to prevent tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH)-induced cell damage by augmenting cellular antioxidant defense. Hesperidin significantly protected hepatocytes against t-BuOOH-induced cell cytotoxicity, such as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) deplete and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Hesperidin also remarkably prevented indicators of oxidative stress, such as the ROS and lipid peroxidation level in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot showed that hesperidin facilitated ERK/MAPK phosphorylation which appeared to be responsible for nuclear translocation of Nrf2, thereby inducing cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Based on the results described above, it suggested that hesperidin has potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of oxidative stress-related hepatocytes injury and liver dysfunctions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dendritic cells and hepatocytes use distinct pathways to process protective antigen from plasmodium in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A Cockburn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-protective CD8+ T cells specific for the circumsporozoite (CS protein are primed by dendritic cells (DCs after sporozoite injection by infected mosquitoes. The primed cells then eliminate parasite liver stages after recognizing the CS epitopes presented by hepatocytes. To define the in vivo processing of CS by DCs and hepatocytes, we generated parasites carrying a mutant CS protein containing the H-2K(b epitope SIINFEKL, and evaluated the T cell response using transgenic and mutant mice. We determined that in both DCs and hepatocytes CS epitopes must reach the cytosol and use the TAP transporters to access the ER. Furthermore, we used endosomal mutant (3d and cytochrome c treated mice to address the role of cross-presentation in the priming and effector phases of the T cell response. We determined that in DCs, CS is cross-presented via endosomes while, conversely, in hepatocytes protein must be secreted directly into the cytosol. This suggests that the main targets of protective CD8+ T cells are parasite proteins exported to the hepatocyte cytosol. Surprisingly, however, secretion of the CS protein into hepatocytes was not dependent upon parasite-export (Pexel/VTS motifs in this protein. Together, these results indicate that the presentation of epitopes to CD8+ T cells follows distinct pathways in DCs when the immune response is induced and in hepatocytes during the effector phase.

  4. A serine palmitoyltransferase inhibitor blocks hepatitis C virus replication in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsume, Asao; Tokunaga, Yuko; Hirata, Yuichi; Munakata, Tsubasa; Saito, Makoto; Hayashi, Hitohisa; Okamoto, Koichi; Ohmori, Yusuke; Kusanagi, Isamu; Fujiwara, Shinya; Tsukuda, Takuo; Aoki, Yuko; Klumpp, Klaus; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; El-Gohary, Ahmed; Sudoh, Masayuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-10-01

    Host cell lipid rafts form a scaffold required for replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Serine palmitoyltransferases (SPTs) produce sphingolipids, which are essential components of the lipid rafts that associate with HCV nonstructural proteins. Prevention of the de novo synthesis of sphingolipids by an SPT inhibitor disrupts the HCV replication complex and thereby inhibits HCV replication. We investigated the ability of the SPT inhibitor NA808 to prevent HCV replication in cells and mice. We tested the ability of NA808 to inhibit SPT's enzymatic activity in FLR3-1 replicon cells. We used a replicon system to select for HCV variants that became resistant to NA808 at concentrations 4- to 6-fold the 50% inhibitory concentration, after 14 rounds of cell passage. We assessed the ability of NA808 or telaprevir to inhibit replication of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, and 4a in mice with humanized livers (transplanted with human hepatocytes). NA808 was injected intravenously, with or without pegylated interferon alfa-2a and HCV polymerase and/or protease inhibitors. NA808 prevented HCV replication via noncompetitive inhibition of SPT; no resistance mutations developed. NA808 prevented replication of all HCV genotypes tested in mice with humanized livers. Intravenous NA808 significantly reduced viral load in the mice and had synergistic effects with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and HCV polymerase and protease inhibitors. The SPT inhibitor NA808 prevents replication of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, and 4a in cultured hepatocytes and in mice with humanized livers. It might be developed for treatment of HCV infection or used in combination with pegylated interferon alfa-2a or HCV polymerase or protease inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR ® technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na + -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA concentrations

  6. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  7. Temperature shift and host cell contact up-regulate sporozoite expression of Plasmodium falciparum genes involved in hepatocyte infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Siau

    Full Text Available Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the skin by Anopheles mosquitoes. They then find their way to the liver, where they specifically invade hepatocytes in which they develop to yield merozoites infective to red blood cells. Relatively little is known of the molecular interactions during these initial obligatory phases of the infection. Recent data suggested that many of the inoculated sporozoites invade hepatocytes an hour or more after the infective bite. We hypothesised that this pre-invasive period in the mammalian host prepares sporozoites for successful hepatocyte infection. Therefore, the genes whose expression becomes modified prior to hepatocyte invasion would be those likely to code for proteins implicated in the subsequent events of invasion and development. We have used P. falciparum sporozoites and their natural host cells, primary human hepatocytes, in in vitro co-culture system as a model for the pre-invasive period. We first established that under co-culture conditions, sporozoites maintain infectivity for an hour or more, in contrast to a drastic loss in infectivity when hepatocytes were not included. Thus, a differential transcriptome of salivary gland sporozoites versus sporozoites co-cultured with hepatocytes was established using a pan-genomic P. falciparum microarray. The expression of 532 genes was found to have been up-regulated following co-culture. A fifth of these genes had no orthologues in the genomes of Plasmodium species used in rodent models of malaria. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a selection of 21 genes confirmed the reliability of the microarray data. Time-course analysis further indicated two patterns of up-regulation following sporozoite co-culture, one transient and the other sustained, suggesting roles in hepatocyte invasion and liver stage development, respectively. This was supported by functional studies of four hitherto uncharacterized proteins of which two were shown to be sporozoite surface

  8. 3D hepatic cultures simultaneously maintain primary hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM, which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1 demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism

  9. Microcystin-LR induces anoikis resistance to the hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3-expressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Shota; Ikema, Satoshi; Mizoue, Nozomi; Hotta, Yuki; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyclic peptide released by several bloom-forming cyanobacteria. Understanding the mechanism of microcystin-LR toxicity is important, because of the both potencies of its acute cytotoxicity and tumor-promoting activity in hepatocytes of animals and humans. Recently, we have reported that the expression of human hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3 was critical for the selective uptake of microcystin-LR into hepatocytes and for induction of its fatal cytotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a novel function of microcystin-LR which induced bipotential changes including anoikis resistance and cytoskeleton reorganization to OATP1B3-transfected HEK293 cells (HEK293-OATP1B3). After exposure to microcystin-LR, HEK293-OATP1B3 cells were divided to the floating cells and remaining adherent cells. After collection and reseeding the floating cells into a fresh flask, cells were confluently proliferated (HEK293-OATP1B3-FL) under the microcystin-LR-free condition. Both the proliferated HEK293-OATP1B3-FL and remaining adherent HEK293-OATP1B3-AD cells changed the character with down- and up-regulation of E-cadherin, respectively. Additionally, these cells acquired resistance to microcystin-LR. These results suggest that microcystin-LR could be associated with not only tumor promotion, but also epithelial–mesenchymal transition-mediated cancer metastasis. Furthermore, microcystin-LR might induce the cytoskeleton reorganization be accompanied epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  10. Human neutrophil peptide-1 promotes alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Ibusuki

    Full Text Available Neutrophil infiltration of the liver is a typical feature of alcoholic liver injury. Human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1 is an antimicrobial peptide secreted by neutrophils. The aim of this study was to determine if HNP-1 affects ethanol-induced liver injury and to examine the mechanism of liver injury induced by HNP-1.Transgenic (TG mice expressing HNP-1 under the control of a β-actin-based promoter were established. Ethanol was orally administered to HNP-1 TG or wild-type C57BL/6N (WT mice. SK-Hep1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were used to investigate the effect of HNP-1 on hepatocytes in vitro.After 24 weeks of ethanol intake, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis were significantly more severe in TG mice than in WT mice. Levels of CD14, TLR4, and IL-6 in liver tissues were higher in TG mice than in WT mice. Apoptosis was accompanied by higher protein levels of caspase-3, caspase-8, and cleaved PARP in liver tissue. In addition, phosphorylated ASK1, ASK1, phosphorylated JNK, JNK1, JNK2, Bax, Bak and Bim were all more abundant in TG mice than in WT mice. In contrast, the level of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 in the liver was significantly lower in TG mice than in WT mice. Analysis of microRNAs in liver tissue showed that miR-34a-5p expression was significantly higher in TG mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, in the presence of ethanol, HNP-1 increased the apoptosis with the decreased level of Bcl2 in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro.HNP-1 secreted by neutrophils may exacerbate alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis with a decrease in Bcl2 expression and an increase in miR-34a-5p expression.

  11. 3D cultured immortalized human hepatocytes useful to develop drugs for blood-borne HCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Hussein Hassan; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Hijikata, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Due to the high polymorphism of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants, existing recombinant HCV replication models have failed to be effective in developing effective anti-HCV agents. In the current study, we describe an in vitro system that supports the infection and replication of natural HCV from patient blood using an immortalized primary human hepatocyte cell line cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. Comparison of the gene expression profile of cells cultured in the 3D system to those cultured in the existing 2D system demonstrated an up-regulation of several genes activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) signaling. Furthermore, using PPARα agonists and antagonists, we also analyzed the effect of PPARα signaling on the modulation of HCV replication using this system. The 3D in vitro system described in this study provides significant insight into the search for novel anti-HCV strategies that are specific to various strains of HCV.

  12. Insulin infusion reduces hepatocyte growth factor in lean humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; de Courten, Maximilian; Dougherty, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is significantly elevated in obesity and may contribute to vascular disease, metabolic syndrome or cancer in obese individuals. The current studies were done to determine if hyperinsulinemia increases plasma HGF. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twenty-two parti...

  13. Cholesterol synthesis by human fetal hepatocytes: effect of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, B.R.; Simpson, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effect of various lipoproteins on the rate of cholesterol synthesis of human fetal liver cells maintained in culture. This was accomplished by measuring the rate of incorporation of tritium from tritiated water or carbon 14-labeled acetate into cholesterol in human fetal liver cells. Optimal conditions for each assay were determined. When human fetal liver cells were maintained in the presence of low-density lipoprotein, cholesterol synthesis was inhibited in a concentration-dependent fashion. Intermediate--density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein also suppressed cholesterol synthesis in human fetal liver cells. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein stimulated cholesterol synthesis in human fetal liver cells. The results of the present as well as our previous investigations suggest that multiple interrelationships exist between fetal liver cholesterol synthesis and lipoprotein-cholesterol utilization by the human fetal adrenal gland and that these processes serve to regulate the lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in fetal plasma

  14. The effect of hepatocyte growth factor on secretory functions in human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yumiko; Ueki, Shigeharu; Konno, Yasunori; Ito, Wataru; Takeda, Masahide; Nakamura, Yuka; Nishikawa, Junko; Moritoki, Yuki; Omokawa, Ayumi; Saga, Tomoo; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), originally identified as a potent mitogen for mature hepatocytes, is now recognized as a humoral mediator in inflammatory and immune responses. Previous studies indicated that HGF negatively regulated allergic airway inflammation. In view of eosinophils playing a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, especially in airway remodeling as a rich source of pro-fibrogenic mediators, the effects of HGF on the different types of eosinophil secretory functions were examined in this study. We found that HGF significantly inhibited IL-5-induced secretion of TGF-β and VEGF from human eosinophils. The inhibitory effect is not associated with TGF-β transcription; rather, it is associated with ultrastructural granule emptying and loss of intracellular TGF-β contents, indicating HGF inhibits the process of piecemeal degranulation. The effect of HGF on extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) that mediates cytolytic degranulation was also investigated; however, immobilized IgG- or phorbol myristate acetate-induced ETosis was only minimally attenuated by HGF. These results reveal the effect of HGF on the distinct pathways of eosinophil secretory functions and also provide novel insights into the role of HGF in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Two compartment model of diazepam biotransformation in an organotypical culture of primary human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acikgoez, Ali; Karim, Najibulla; Giri, Shibashish; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Bader, Augustinus

    2009-01-01

    Drug biotransformation is one of the most important parameters of preclinical screening tests for the registration of new drug candidates. Conventional existing tests rely on nonhuman models which deliver an incomplete metabolic profile of drugs due to the lack of proper CYP450 expression as seen in human liver in vivo. In order to overcome this limitation, we used an organotypical model of human primary hepatocytes for the biotransformation of the drug diazepam with special reference to metabolites in both the cell matrix phase and supernatant and its interaction of three inducers (phenobarbital, dexamethasone, aroclor 1254) in different time responses (1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h). Phenobarbital showed the strongest inducing effect in generating desmethyldiazepam and induced up to a 150 fold increase in oxazepam-content which correlates with the increased availability of the precursor metabolites (temazepam and desmethyldiazepam). Aroclor 1254 and dexamethasone had the strongest inducing effect on temazepam and the second strongest on oxazepam. The strong and overlapping inductive role of phenobarbital strengthens the participation of CYP2B6 and CYP3A in diazepam N-demethylation and CYP3A in temazepam formation. Aroclor 1254 preferentially generated temazepam due to the interaction with CYP3A and potentially CYP2C19. In parallel we represented these data in the form of a mathematical model with two compartments explaining the dynamics of diazepam metabolism with the effect of these other inducers in human primary hepatocytes. The model consists of ten differential equations, with one for each concentration c i,j (i = diazepam, temazepam, desmethyldiazepam, oxazepam, other metabolites) and one for each compartment (j = cell matrix phase, supernatant), respectively. The parameters p k (k = 1, 2, 3, 4, 13) are rate constants describing the biotransformation of diazepam and its metabolites and the other parameters (k = 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15) explain the

  16. Similarities in the immunoglobulin response and VH gene usage in rhesus monkeys and humans exposed to porcine hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borie Dominic C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of porcine cells and organs as a source of xenografts for human patients would vastly increase the donor pool; however, both humans and Old World primates vigorously reject pig tissues due to xenoantibodies that react with the polysaccharide galactose α (1,3 galactose (αGal present on the surface of many porcine cells. We previously examined the xenoantibody response in patients exposed to porcine hepatocytes via treatment(s with bioartficial liver devices (BALs, composed of porcine cells in a support matrix. We determined that xenoantibodies in BAL-treated patients are predominantly directed at porcine αGal carbohydrate epitopes, and are encoded by a small number of germline heavy chain variable region (VH immunoglobulin genes. The studies described in this manuscript were designed to identify whether the xenoantibody responses and the IgVH genes encoding antibodies to porcine hepatocytes in non-human primates used as preclinical models are similar to those in humans. Adult non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta were injected intra-portally with porcine hepatocytes or heterotopically transplanted with a porcine liver lobe. Peripheral blood leukocytes and serum were obtained prior to and at multiple time points after exposure, and the immune response was characterized, using ELISA to evaluate the levels and specificities of circulating xenoantibodies, and the production of cDNA libraries to determine the genes used by B cells to encode those antibodies. Results Xenoantibodies produced following exposure to isolated hepatocytes and solid organ liver grafts were predominantly encoded by genes in the VH3 family, with a minor contribution from the VH4 family. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene (VH cDNA library screening and gene sequencing of IgM libraries identified the genes as most closely-related to the IGHV3-11 and IGHV4-59 germline progenitors. One of the genes most similar to IGHV3-11, VH3-11cyno, has

  17. In vitro toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes in cultured human hepatocyte (HepG2) and lung epithelial (A549) cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roursgaard, Martin; Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cationic micelle and liposome drug delivery systems on liver and lung cells in a toxicological in vitro screening model, with observations on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. A screening battery was established for assessment of a broad range of p...

  18. Isolation of Kupffer Cells and Hepatocytes from a Single Mouse Liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Tencerova, Michaela; Morgantini, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Liver perfusion is a common technique used to isolate parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells for in vitro experiments. This method allows hepatic cells to be separated based on their size and weight, by centrifugation using a density gradient. To date, other methods allow the isolation of only...... one viable hepatic cellular fraction from a single mouse; either parenchymal (hepatocytes) or non-parenchymal cells (i.e., Kupffer cells or hepatic stellate cells). Here, we describe a method to isolate both hepatocytes and Kupffer cells from a single mouse liver, thereby providing the unique...... advantage of studying different liver cell types that have been isolated from the same organism....

  19. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  20. Comparison of the effects of the synthetic pyrethroid Metofluthrin and phenobarbital on CYP2B form induction and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Yamada, Tomoya; Deguchi, Yoshihito; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Isobe, Naohiko; Lake, Brian G.; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    High doses of Metofluthrin (MTF) have been shown to produce liver tumours in rats by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor leading to liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms and increased cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MTF with those of the known rodent liver tumour promoter phenobarbital (PB) on the induction CYP2B forms and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Treatment with 50 μM MTF and 50 μM PB for 72 h increased CYP2B1 mRNA levels in male Wistar rat hepatocytes and CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Replicative DNA synthesis was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine over the last 24 h of a 48 h treatment period. Treatment with 10-1000 μM MTF and 100-500 μM PB resulted in significant increases in replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. While replicative DNA synthesis was increased in human hepatocytes treated with 5-50 ng/ml epidermal growth factor or 5-100 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor, treatment with MTF and PB had no effect. These results demonstrate that while both MTF and PB induce CYP2B forms in both species, MTF and PB only induced replicative DNA synthesis in rat and not in human hepatocytes. These results provide further evidence that the MOA for MTF-induced rat liver tumour formation is similar to that of PB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B form inducers and that the key event of increased cell proliferation would not occur in human liver

  1. Comparison of the effects of the synthetic pyrethroid Metofluthrin and phenobarbital on CYP2B form induction and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Yamada, Tomoya; Deguchi, Yoshihito; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Isobe, Naohiko; Lake, Brian G; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-04-05

    High doses of Metofluthrin (MTF) have been shown to produce liver tumours in rats by a mode of action (MOA) involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor leading to liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms and increased cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of MTF with those of the known rodent liver tumour promoter phenobarbital (PB) on the induction CYP2B forms and replicative DNA synthesis in cultured rat and human hepatocytes. Treatment with 50 microM MTF and 50 microM PB for 72 h increased CYP2B1 mRNA levels in male Wistar rat hepatocytes and CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Replicative DNA synthesis was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine over the last 24 h of a 48 h treatment period. Treatment with 10-1000 microM MTF and 100-500 microM PB resulted in significant increases in replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes. While replicative DNA synthesis was increased in human hepatocytes treated with 5-50 ng/ml epidermal growth factor or 5-100 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor, treatment with MTF and PB had no effect. These results demonstrate that while both MTF and PB induce CYP2B forms in both species, MTF and PB only induced replicative DNA synthesis in rat and not in human hepatocytes. These results provide further evidence that the MOA for MTF-induced rat liver tumour formation is similar to that of PB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B form inducers and that the key event of increased cell proliferation would not occur in human liver.

  2. A fat option for the pig: Hepatocytic differentiated mesenchymal stem cells for translational research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.brueckner@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Liebigstraße 21, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael, E-mail: hans-michael.tautenhahn@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Liebigstraße 21, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); TRM, Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 55, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Winkler, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.pelz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Liebigstraße 21, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Stock, Peggy, E-mail: peggy.stock@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Liebigstraße 21, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Dollinger, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dollinger@uniklinik-ulm.de [University Hospital Ulm, First Department of Medicine, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, Ulm D-89081 (Germany); Christ, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.christ@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Liebigstraße 21, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); TRM, Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 55, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Study background: Extended liver resection is the only curative treatment option of liver cancer. Yet, the residual liver may not accomplish the high metabolic and regenerative capacity needed, which frequently leads to acute liver failure. Because of their anti-inflammatory and -apoptotic as well as pro-proliferative features, mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells might provide functional and regenerative compensation. Clinical translation of basic research requires pre-clinical approval in large animals. Therefore, we characterized porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from adipose tissue and bone marrow and their hepatocyte differentiation potential for future assessment of functional liver support after surgical intervention in the pig model. Methods: Mesenchymal surface antigens and multi-lineage differentiation potential of porcine MSC isolated by collagenase digestion either from bone marrow or adipose tissue (subcutaneous/visceral) were assessed by flow cytometry. Morphology and functional properties (urea-, glycogen synthesis and cytochrome P450 activity) were determined during culture under differentiation conditions and compared with primary porcine hepatocytes. Results: MSC from porcine adipose tissue and from bone marrow express the typical mesenchymal markers CD44, CD29, CD90 and CD105 but not haematopoietic markers. MSC from both sources displayed differentiation into the osteogenic as well as adipogenic lineage. After hepatocyte differentiation, expression of CD105 decreased significantly and cells adopted the typical polygonal morphology of hepatocytes. Glycogen storage was comparable in adipose tissue- and bone marrow-derived cells. Urea synthesis was about 35% lower in visceral than in subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived MSC. Cytochrome P450 activity increased significantly during differentiation and was twice as high in hepatocyte-like cells generated from bone marrow as from adipose tissue. Conclusion: The hepatocyte

  3. A fat option for the pig: Hepatocytic differentiated mesenchymal stem cells for translational research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brückner, Sandra; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Winkler, Sandra; Stock, Peggy; Dollinger, Matthias; Christ, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Study background: Extended liver resection is the only curative treatment option of liver cancer. Yet, the residual liver may not accomplish the high metabolic and regenerative capacity needed, which frequently leads to acute liver failure. Because of their anti-inflammatory and -apoptotic as well as pro-proliferative features, mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells might provide functional and regenerative compensation. Clinical translation of basic research requires pre-clinical approval in large animals. Therefore, we characterized porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from adipose tissue and bone marrow and their hepatocyte differentiation potential for future assessment of functional liver support after surgical intervention in the pig model. Methods: Mesenchymal surface antigens and multi-lineage differentiation potential of porcine MSC isolated by collagenase digestion either from bone marrow or adipose tissue (subcutaneous/visceral) were assessed by flow cytometry. Morphology and functional properties (urea-, glycogen synthesis and cytochrome P450 activity) were determined during culture under differentiation conditions and compared with primary porcine hepatocytes. Results: MSC from porcine adipose tissue and from bone marrow express the typical mesenchymal markers CD44, CD29, CD90 and CD105 but not haematopoietic markers. MSC from both sources displayed differentiation into the osteogenic as well as adipogenic lineage. After hepatocyte differentiation, expression of CD105 decreased significantly and cells adopted the typical polygonal morphology of hepatocytes. Glycogen storage was comparable in adipose tissue- and bone marrow-derived cells. Urea synthesis was about 35% lower in visceral than in subcutaneous adipose tissue-derived MSC. Cytochrome P450 activity increased significantly during differentiation and was twice as high in hepatocyte-like cells generated from bone marrow as from adipose tissue. Conclusion: The hepatocyte

  4. In vitro differentiation and maturation of mouse embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideaki; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Baba, Shinji; Naito, Masato; Machimoto, Takafumi; Kamo, Naoko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Ikai, Iwao

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to induce the maturation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into hepatocytes in vitro. We previously reported that Thy1-positive mesenchymal cells derived from the mouse fetal liver promote the maturation of hepatic progenitor cells. Here, we isolated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing cells from mouse ES cells for subsequent differentiation into hepatocytes in vitro by coculture with Thy1-positive cells. ES cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of an AFP promoter were cultured under serum- and feeder layer-free culture conditions. The proportion of GFP-positive cells plateaued at 41.6 ± 12.2% (means ± SD) by day 7. GFP-positive cells, isolated by flow cytometry, were cultured in the presence or absence of Thy1-positive cells as a feeder layer. Isolated GFP-positive cells were stained for AFP, Foxa2, and albumin. The expression of mRNAs encoding tyrosine amino transferase, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, and glucose-6-phosphatase were only detected following coculture with Thy1-positive cells. Following coculture with Thy1-positive cells, the isolated cells produced and stored glycogen. Ammonia clearance activity was also enhanced following coculture. Electron microscopic analysis indicated that the cocultured cells exhibited the morphologic features of mature hepatocytes. In conclusion, coculture with Thy1-positive cells in vitro induced the maturation of AFP-producing cells isolated from ES cell cultures into hepatocytes

  5. Lipidomic profiling of patient-specific iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Kiamehr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offer an alternative model to primary human hepatocytes to study lipid aberrations. However, the detailed lipid profile of HLCs is yet unknown. In the current study, functional HLCs were differentiated from iPSCs generated from dermal fibroblasts of three individuals by a three-step protocol through the definitive endoderm (DE stage. In parallel, detailed lipidomic analyses as well as gene expression profiling of a set of lipid-metabolism-related genes were performed during the entire differentiation process from iPSCs to HLCs. Additionally, fatty acid (FA composition of the cell culture media at different stages was determined. Our results show that major alterations in the molecular species of lipids occurring during DE and early hepatic differentiation stages mainly mirror the quality and quantity of the FAs supplied in culture medium at each stage. Polyunsaturated phospholipids and sphingolipids with a very long FA were produced in the cells at a later stage of differentiation. This work uncovers the previously unknown lipid composition of iPSC-HLCs and its alterations during the differentiation in conjunction with the expression of key lipid-associated genes. Together with biochemical, functional and gene expression measurements, the lipidomic analyses allowed us to improve our understanding of the concerted influence of the exogenous metabolite supply and cellular biosynthesis essential for iPSC-HLC differentiation and function. Importantly, the study describes in detail a cell model that can be applied in exploring, for example, the lipid metabolism involved in the development of fatty liver disease or atherosclerosis.

  6. Effects of bisphenol A-related diphenylalkanes on vitellogenin production in male carp (Cyprinus carpio) hepatocytes and aromatase (CYP19) activity in human H295r adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letcher, Robert J.; Sanderson, J. Thomas; Bokkers, Abraham; Giesy, John P.; Berg, Martin van den

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the known xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) relative to eight BPA-related diphenylalkanes on estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated vitellogenin (vtg) production in hepatocytes from male carp (Cyprinus carpio), and on aromatase (CYP19) activity in the human adrenocortical H295R carcinoma cell line. Of the eight diphenylalkanes, only 4,4'-(hexafluoropropylidene)diphenol (BHF) and 2,2'-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methylphenyl)propane (BPRO) induced vtg, i.e., to a maximum of 3% to 4% (at 100 μM) compared with 8% for BPA relative to the maximum induction by 17β-estradiol (E2, 1 μM). Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) was a potent antagonist of vtg production with an IC50 of 5.5 μM, virtually 100% inhibition of vtg at 20 μM, and an inhibitive (IC50) potency about one-tenth that of the known ER antagonist tamoxifen (IC50, 0.6 μM). 2,2'-Diallyl bisphenol A, 4,4'-(1,4-phenylene-diisopropylidene)bisphenol, BPRO, and BHF were much less inhibitory with IC50 concentrations of 20-70 μM, and relative potencies of 0.03 and 0.009 with tamoxifen. Bisphenol ethoxylate showed no anti-estrogenicity (up to 100 μM), and 4,4'-isopropylidene-diphenol diacetate was only antagonistic at 100 μM. When comparing the (anti)estrogenic potencies of these bisphenol A analogues/diphenylalkanes, anti-estrogenicity occurred at lower concentrations than estrogenicity. 4,4'-Isopropylidenebis(2,6-dimethylphenol) (IC50, 2.0 μM) reduced E2-induced (EC50, 100 nM) vtg production due to concentration-dependent cytotoxicity as indicated by a parallel decrease in MTT activity and vtg, whereas the remaining diphenylalkanes did not cause any cytotoxicity relative to controls. None of the diphenylalkanes (up to 100 μM) induced EROD activity indicating that concentration-dependent, CYP1A enzyme-mediated metabolism of E2, or any Ah-receptor-mediated interaction with the ER, was not a likely explanation for the observed anti-estrogenic effects. At concentrations as great as 100

  7. Marked stimulation of growth and motility of human keratinocytes by hepatocyte growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yoshikawa, K.; Nakamura, T.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on normal human epidermal keratinocytes cultured under conditions of low Ca2+ (0.1 mM, growth-promoting condition) and physiological Ca2+ (1.8 mM, differentiation-promoting condition) was investigated. In low Ca2+, HGF markedly enhanced the migration of keratinocytes while it suppressed cell growth and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, HGF enhanced the migration, cell growth, and DNA synthesis of keratinocytes cultured under conditions of physiological Ca2+. The maximal stimulation of DNA synthesis (2.4-fold stimulation) in physiological Ca2+ was seen at 2.5-5 ng/ml HGF and the stimulatory effect of HGF was suppressed by transforming growth factor-beta 1. Analysis of the HGF receptor using 125I-HGF as a ligand showed that human keratinocytes expressed a single class of specific, saturable receptor for HGF in both low and physiological Ca2+ conditions, exhibiting a Kd = 17.3 pM and approximately 690 binding sites/cell under physiological Ca2+. Thus, HGF is a potent factor which enhances growth and migration of normal human keratinocytes under conditions of physiological Ca2+. HGF may play an important role in epidermal tissue repair as it enhances both the migration and growth of keratinocytes

  8. Evidence of a DHA Signature in the Lipidome and Metabolome of Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ghini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell supplementation with bioactive molecules often causes a perturbation in the whole intracellular environment. Omics techniques can be applied for the assessment of this perturbation. In this study, the overall effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA supplementation on cultured human hepatocyte lipidome and metabolome has been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR in combination with traditional techniques. The effect of two additional bioactives sharing with DHA the lipid-lowering effect—propionic acid (PRO and protocatechuic acid (PCA—has also been evaluated in the context of possible synergism. NMR analysis of the cell lipid extracts showed that DHA supplementation, alone or in combination with PCA or PRO, strongly altered the cell lipid profile. The perfect discrimination between cells receiving DHA (alone or in combination and the other cells reinforced the idea of a global rearrangement of the lipid environment induced by DHA. Notably, gas chromatography and fluorimetric analyses confirmed the strong discrimination obtained by NMR. The DHA signature was evidenced not only in the cell lipidome, but also in the metabolome. Results reported herein indicate that NMR, combined with other techniques, represents a fundamental approach to studying the effect of bioactive supplementation, particularly in the case of molecules with a broad spectrum of mechanisms of action.

  9. Ferritin expression in rat hepatocytes and Kupffer cells after lead nitrate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Takeshi; Nanashima, Naoki; Akita, Miki; Suto, Kohji; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2009-02-01

    Lead nitrate induces hepatocyte proliferation and subsequent apoptosis in rat livers. Iron is a constituent of heme and is also required for cell proliferation. In this study, the expression of ferritin light-chain (FTL), the major iron storage protein, was investigated in rat livers after a single intravenous injection of lead nitrate. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that FTL was increased in hepatocytes around the central veins and strongly expressed in nonparenchymal cells. Some FTL-positive nonparenchymal cells were identified as Kupffer cells that were positive for CD68. FTL-positive Kupffer cells occupied about 60% of CD68-positive cells in the periportal and perivenous areas. The relationships between FTL expression and apoptosis induction or the engulfment of apoptotic cells were examined. TUNEL-positive cells were increased in the treatment group, and enhanced expression of milk fat globule EGF-like 8 was demonstrated in some Kupffer cells and hepatocytes, indicating enhanced apoptosis induction and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. FTL-positive Kupffer cells were not detected without lead nitrate treatment or in rat livers treated with clofibrate, which induces hepatocyte proliferation but not apoptosis. These results suggest that FTL expression in Kupffer cells after lead treatment is dependent on phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

  10. Relations between fatty acid synthesis, pyruvate concentration and cell concentration of suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Geelen, M.J.H.

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The cell concentration of suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes affects both the rate of pyruvate accumulation in the incubation medium and the rate of fatty acid synthesis. 2. 2. At low cell concentrations pyruvate accumulation is directly related to the cell concentration but levels off

  11. Acquisition of lipid metabolic capability in hepatocyte-like cells directly induced from mouse fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuka eMiura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the numbers of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH have increased worldwide. NAFLD and NASH are known as risk factors for liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Because many factors can promote the progression of NAFLD and NASH, the treatment of these patients involves various strategies. Thus, it is desired that drugs for patients with NAFLD and NASH should be developed more easily and rapidly using cultures of primary hepatocytes. However, it is difficult to use hepatocytes as a tool for drug screening, because these cells cannot be functionally maintained in culture. Thus, in this study, we sought to examine whether induced hepatocyte-like (iHep cells, which were directly induced from mouse dermal fibroblasts by infection with a retrovirus expressing Hnf4α and Foxa3, possess the potential for lipid metabolism, similar to hepatocytes. Our data showed that iHep cells were capable of synthesizing lipids from a cis-unsaturated fatty acid, a trans-unsaturated fatty acid, and a saturated fatty acid, accumulating the synthesized lipids in cellular vesicles, and secreting the lipids into the culture medium. Moreover, the lipid synthesis in iHep cells was significantly inhibited in cultures with lipid metabolism improvers. These results demonstrate that iHep cells could be useful not only for screening of drugs for patients with NAFLD and NASH, but also for elucidation of the mechanisms underlying hereditary lipid metabolism disorders, as an alternative to hepatocytes.

  12. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Ding, Wen-Xing [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated the absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adduct formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves the formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • AMAP induces cell death in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). • AMAP does not cause cell death in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). • AMAP leads to mitochondria dysfunction in PHH but not PMH. • Protein adduct formation and dysfunction in mitochondria correlate with toxicity.

  13. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated the absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adduct formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves the formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • AMAP induces cell death in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). • AMAP does not cause cell death in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). • AMAP leads to mitochondria dysfunction in PHH but not PMH. • Protein adduct formation and dysfunction in mitochondria correlate with toxicity.

  14. Donor-Dependent and Other Nondefined Factors Have Greater Influence on the Hepatic Phenotype Than the Starting Cell Type in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, James A; Kia, Richard; Pridgeon, Christopher S; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Elmasry, Mohamed; Fenwick, Stephen W; Mills, John S; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Park, Bong K

    2017-05-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is the greatest cause of post-marketing drug withdrawal; therefore, substantial resources are directed toward triaging potentially dangerous new compounds at all stages of drug development. One of the major factors preventing effective screening of new compounds is the lack of a predictive in vitro model of hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes offer a metabolically relevant model for which the molecular initiating events of hepatotoxicity can be examined; however, these cells vary greatly between donors and dedifferentiate rapidly in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) offer a reproducible, physiologically relevant and genotypically normal model cell; however, current differentiation protocols produce HLCs with a relatively immature phenotype. During the reprogramming of somatic cells, the epigenome undergoes dramatic changes; however, this "resetting" is a gradual process, resulting in an altered differentiation propensity, skewed toward the lineage of origin, particularly in early passage cultures. We, therefore, performed a comparison of human hepatocyte- and dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs, assessing the impact of epigenetic memory at all stages of HLC differentiation. These results provide the first isogenic assessment of the starting cell type in human iPSC-derived HLCs. Despite a trend toward improvement in hepatic phenotype in albumin secretion and gene expression, few significant differences in hepatic differentiation capacity were found between hepatocyte and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. We conclude that the donor and inter-clonal differences have a greater influence on the hepatocyte phenotypic maturity than the starting cell type. Therefore, it is not necessary to use human hepatocytes for generating iPSC-derived HLCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1321-1331. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Alpha

  15. Protective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in cultured human lymphocytes and isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Venugopal P.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce oxidative stress through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in an imbalance of the pro-oxidant and antioxidant status in the cells, which is suggested to culminate in cell death. The present work was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes and rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of rats by collagenase perfusion. The cellular changes were estimated using lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduced glutathione (GSH). The DNA damage was analyzed by comet assay, cytokinesis blocked micro nucleus assay, dicentric aberrations and translocation frequency. Cell cycle distribution and measurement of the percentage of apoptotic cells were performed by flow cytometry analysis. To investigate whether the dietary agents like curcumin and its analog have a role on cell cycle regulation, we analyzed the changes in cell cycle profiles by using fluorescence activated cell sorter. The increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase dose (1, 2 and 4 Gy) of γ-radiation in cultured lymphocytes and hepatocytes. TBARS were increased significantly, whereas the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in γ-irradiated hepatocytes and lymphocytes. On pretreatment with curcumin and its analog (1, 5 and 10 μg/ml) showed a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes were increased significantly along with the levels of GSH. The maximum protection of hepatocytes and lymphocytes was observed at 10 μg/ml curcumin and 5 μg/ml curcumin analog pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin and its analog helps in protecting the normal hepatocytes and lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced cellular

  16. Functional properties of hepatocytes in vitro are correlated with cell polarity maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigerer, Anja; Wuttke, Anne; Marsico, Giovanni; Seifert, Sarah; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the cell biology of hepatocytes in vitro could be a powerful strategy to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the structure and function of the liver in vivo. However, this approach relies on appropriate in vitro cell culture systems that can recapitulate the cell biological and metabolic features of the hepatocytes in the liver whilst being accessible to experimental manipulations. Here, we adapted protocols for high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and quantitative image analysis to compare two primary hepatocyte culture systems, monolayer and collagen sandwich, with respect to the distribution of two distinct populations of early endosomes (APPL1 and EEA1-positive), endocytic capacity, metabolic and signaling activities. In addition to the re-acquisition of hepatocellular polarity, primary hepatocytes grown in collagen sandwich but not in monolayer culture recapitulated the apico-basal distribution of EEA1 endosomes observed in liver tissue. We found that such distribution correlated with the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vitro and, surprisingly, was dependent on the nutritional state in vivo. Hepatocytes in collagen sandwich also exhibited faster kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) internalization, showed improved insulin sensitivity and preserved their ability for glucose production, compared to hepatocytes in monolayer cultures. Although no in vitro culture system can reproduce the exquisite structural features of liver tissue, our data nevertheless highlight the ability of the collagen sandwich system to recapitulate key structural and functional properties of the hepatocytes in the liver and, therefore, support the usage of this system to study aspects of hepatocellular biology in vitro. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Live cell imaging of cytosolic NADH/NAD+ ratio in hepatocytes and liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Ricard; McCarty, William J; Lahmann, Carolina; Luther, Jay; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L; Yellen, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Fatty liver disease (FLD), the most common chronic liver disease in the United States, may be caused by alcohol or the metabolic syndrome. Alcohol is oxidized in the cytosol of hepatocytes by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which generates NADH and increases cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio. The increased ratio may be important for development of FLD, but our ability to examine this question is hindered by methodological limitations. To address this, we used the genetically encoded fluorescent sensor Peredox to obtain dynamic, real-time measurements of cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in living hepatocytes. Peredox was expressed in dissociated rat hepatocytes and HepG2 cells by transfection, and in mouse liver slices by tail-vein injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-encoded sensor. Under control conditions, hepatocytes and liver slices exhibit a relatively low (oxidized) cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio as reported by Peredox. The ratio responds rapidly and reversibly to substrates of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). Ethanol causes a robust dose-dependent increase in cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio, and this increase is mitigated by the presence of NAD + -generating substrates of LDH or SDH. In contrast to hepatocytes and slices, HepG2 cells exhibit a relatively high (reduced) ratio and show minimal responses to substrates of ADH and SDH. In slices, we show that comparable results are obtained with epifluorescence imaging and two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2p-FLIM). Live cell imaging with Peredox is a promising new approach to investigate cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in hepatocytes. Imaging in liver slices is particularly attractive because it allows preservation of liver microanatomy and metabolic zonation of hepatocytes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We describe and validate a new approach for measuring free cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in hepatocytes and liver slices: live cell imaging with the fluorescent biosensor Peredox. This approach yields dynamic, real

  18. Connexin 32 and connexin 43 are involved in lineage restriction of hepatic progenitor cells to hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Pei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bi-potential hepatic progenitor cells can give rise to both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, which is the last phase and critical juncture in terms of sequentially hepatic lineage restriction from any kind of stem cells. If their differentiation can be controlled, it might access to functional hepatocytes to develop pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries as well as cell therapies for end-stage liver diseases. Methods In this study, we investigated the influence of Cx32 and Cx43 on hepatocyte differentiation of WB-F344 cells by in vitro gain and loss of function analyses. An inhibitor of Cx32 was also used to make further clarification. To reveal p38 MAPK pathway is closely related to Cxs, rats with 70% partial hepatectomy were injected intraperitoneally with a p38 inhibitor, SB203580. Besides, the effects of p38 MAPK pathway on differentiation of hepatoblasts isolated from fetal rat livers were evaluated by addition of SB203580 in culture medium. Results In vitro gain and loss of function analyses showed overexpression of Connexin 32 and knockdown of Connexin 43 promoted hepatocytes differentiation from hepatic progenitor cells. In addition, in vitro and ex vivo research revealed inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway can improve hepatocytes differentiation correlating with upregulation of Connexin 32 expression and downregulation of Connexin 43 expression. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that Connexins play crucial roles in facilitating differentiation of hepatic progenitors. Our work further implicates that regulators of Connexins and their related pathways might provide new insights to improve lineage restriction of stem cells to mature hepatocytes.

  19. Isoferritins in rat Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, and extrahepatic macrophages. Biosynthesis in cell suspensions and cultures in response to iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, R.L.; Richter, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    Cultures of Kupffer cells and of hepatocytes, prepared from single rat livers, synthesized ferritin protein equally efficiently. In culture but not in suspension, both sorts of cells responded significantly to stimulation with iron by increased ferritin synthesis. As determined by isoelectric focusing, the isoferritin profiles of newly synthesized 14 -labeled Kupffer cell and hepatocyte ferritin were identical, each having three bands. However, unlabeled ferritin, extracted from nonparenchymal liver cells (mainly Kupffer and endothelial cells) of iron-loaded rats, contained an acidic isoferritin that was not present in hepatocyte ferritin. Investigation of ferritin synthesis in cultured peritoneal and alveolar macrophages yielded similar results. The isofocusing profile of newly synthesized peritoneal macrophage ferritin was indistinguishable from the profile of fresh Kupffer cell or hepatocyte ferritin. Thus, the three isoferritins common to Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, and extrahepatic macrophages are neither cell- nor tissue-specific. However, modifications on intracellular storage may affect the isofocusing properties. The findings, although consistent with the LnH24-n subunit model of ferritin protein, indicate identical restrictive genomic control of the H:L ratios in these sorts of cells. Further, they make it probable that Kupffer cell ferritin iron, originating by endogenous synthesis, is the principal source of Kupffer cell hemosiderin iron

  20. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate [ 125 I]IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density

  2. Clearance Prediction Methodology Needs Fundamental Improvement: Trends Common to Rat and Human Hepatocytes/Microsomes and Implications for Experimental Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, F L; Houston, J B; Hallifax, D

    2017-11-01

    Although prediction of clearance using hepatocytes and liver microsomes has long played a decisive role in drug discovery, it is widely acknowledged that reliably accurate prediction is not yet achievable despite the predominance of hepatically cleared drugs. Physiologically mechanistic methodology tends to underpredict clearance by several fold, and empirical correction of this bias is confounded by imprecision across drugs. Understanding the causes of prediction uncertainty has been slow, possibly reflecting poor resolution of variables associated with donor source and experimental methods, particularly for the human situation. It has been reported that among published human hepatocyte predictions there was a tendency for underprediction to increase with increasing in vivo intrinsic clearance, suggesting an inherent limitation using this particular system. This implied an artifactual rate limitation in vitro, although preparative effects on cell stability and performance were not yet resolved from assay design limitations. Here, to resolve these issues further, we present an up-to-date and comprehensive examination of predictions from published rat as well as human studies (where n = 128 and 101 hepatocytes and n = 71 and 83 microsomes, respectively) to assess system performance more independently. We report a clear trend of increasing underprediction with increasing in vivo intrinsic clearance, which is similar both between species and between in vitro systems. Hence, prior concerns arising specifically from human in vitro systems may be unfounded and the focus of investigation in the future should be to minimize the potential in vitro assay limitations common to whole cells and subcellular fractions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D., E-mail: vappanna@laurentian.ca

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  4. Enzyme induction and cytotoxicity in human hepatocytes by chlorpyrifos and N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Parikshit C; Cao, Yan; Rose, Randy L; Cherrington, Nathan; Hodgson, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    Xenobiotics, including drugs and environmental chemicals, can influence cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels by altering the transcription of CYP genes. To minimize potential drug-pesticide and pesticide-pesticide interactions it is important to evaluate the potential of pesticides to induce CYP isoforms and to cause cytotoxicity in humans. The present study was designed to examine chlorpyrifos and DEET mediated induction of CYP isoforms and also to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects on primary human hepatocytes. DEET significantly induced CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP2A6 and CYP1A2 mRNA expression while chlorpyrifos induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA, and to a lesser extent, CYP1B1 and CYP2B6 mRNA in primary human hepatocytes. Chlorpyrifos and DEET also mediated the expression of CYP isoforms, particularly CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP1A1, as shown by CYP3A4-specific protein expression, testosterone metabolism and CYP1Al-specific activity assays. DEET is a mild, while chlorpyrifos is a relatively potent, inducer of adenylate kinase and caspase-3/7, an indicator of apoptosis, while inducing 15-20% and 25-30% cell death, respectively. Therefore, DEET and chlorpyrifos mediated induction of CYP mRNA and functional CYP isoforms together with their cytotoxic potential in human hepatocytes suggests that exposure to chlorpyrifos and/or DEET should be considered in human health impact analysis.

  5. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hidenori; Sasaki, Kohei; Okimura, Saya; Nagamura, Masako; Nakasone, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell–matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell–cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (ϕ = 100 μm) were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell–cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts) or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells) were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices. (paper)

  6. Chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes as a model for prediction of human drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    Preclinical studies in animal models are used routinely during drug development, but species differences of pharmacokinetics (PK) between animals and humans have to be taken into account in interpreting the results. Human hepatocytes are also widely used to examine metabolic activities mediated by cytochrome P450 (P450) and other enzymes, but such in vitro metabolic studies also have limitations. Recently, chimeric mice with humanized liver (h-chimeric mice), generated by transplantation of human donor hepatocytes, have been developed as a model for the prediction of metabolism and PK in humans, using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. The expression of human-specific metabolic enzymes and metabolic activities was confirmed in humanized liver of h-chimeric mice with high replacement ratios, and several reports indicate that the profiles of P450 and non-P450 metabolism in these mice adequately reflect those in humans. Further, the combined use of h-chimeric mice and r-chimeric mice, in which endogenous hepatocytes are replaced with rat hepatocytes, is a promising approach for evaluation of species differences in drug metabolism. Recent work has shown that data obtained in h-chimeric mice enable the semi-quantitative prediction of not only metabolites, but also PK parameters, such as hepatic clearance, of drug candidates in humans, although some limitations remain because of differences in the metabolic activities, hepatic blood flow and liver structure between humans and mice. In addition, fresh h-hepatocytes can be isolated reproducibly from h-chimeric mice for metabolic studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece); Hashimoto, Koshi [Department of Preemptive Medicine and Metabolism, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-city, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Kardassis, Dimitris, E-mail: kardasis@imbb.forth.gr [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5′ deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the −111 to −42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except −42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the −111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the −42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the −50 to −40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. - Highlights: • The human LXRα promoter contains a HNF-4α specific binding motif in the proximal −50/−40 region. • Mutations in this motif abolished HNF4α binding and transactivation of the h

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis; Hashimoto, Koshi; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5′ deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the −111 to −42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except −42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the −111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the −42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the −50 to −40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. - Highlights: • The human LXRα promoter contains a HNF-4α specific binding motif in the proximal −50/−40 region. • Mutations in this motif abolished HNF4α binding and transactivation of the h

  9. Cell proliferation studies in rodent hepatocytes during 1,4-dichlorobenzene administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, S.R.; Tilbury, L.F.; Randall, H.; Goldsworthy, T.L.; Butterworth, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    In the NTP bioassay, 1,4-dichlorobenzene (DCB) induced hepatocellular carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Because DCB is not DNA reactive, a cell proliferation study under conditions of the bioassay was undertaken to determine whether increased cell proliferation might play a role in DCB-induced hepatocarcinogenicity. DCB was administered in corn oil by gavage at the highest bioassay dose to male B6C3F1 mice (600 mg/kg) and male F344 rats (300 mg/kg) for five consecutive days. Cell proliferation was detected by labeling hepatocytes with either 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BRDU) or 3 H-thymidine delivered during the entire treatment period by subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps. An increase in liver weight as a percentage of body weight was observed in treated mice (6.7±0.6 vs. 5.9±0.2) and rats (4.7±0.1 vs. 4.0±0.2) compared to controls. No significant elevations in plasma enzymes were found in either treated species, indicating a lack of overt hepatotoxicity. Histopathological evaluation revealed no evidence of hepatotoxicity in either species. The percentage of hepatocytes in S-phase was increased approximately 10-fold in both treated mice and rats compared to the respective control animals. Mice exhibited a centrilobular pattern of labeled hepatocytes, whereas rat hepatocytes were labeled hepatocytes, whereas rat hepatocytes were labeled throughout the lobules. These data demonstrate the hepatic mitogenic activity of DCB in mice and rats. However, this response dose not correlate with DCB-induced hepatocarcinogenicity. Further studies are required to examine the extent, duration and nature of the proliferative response in order to understand the species-specific effects of DCB

  10. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  11. Gene disruption of Plasmodium falciparum p52 results in attenuation of malaria liver stage development in cultured primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben C L van Schaijk

    Full Text Available Difficulties with inducing sterile and long lasting protective immunity against malaria with subunit vaccines has renewed interest in vaccinations with attenuated Plasmodium parasites. Immunizations with sporozoites that are attenuated by radiation (RAS can induce strong protective immunity both in humans and rodent models of malaria. Recently, in rodent parasites it has been shown that through the deletion of a single gene, sporozoites can also become attenuated in liver stage development and, importantly, immunization with these sporozoites results in immune responses identical to RAS. The promise of vaccination using these genetically attenuated sporozoites (GAS depends on translating the results in rodent malaria models to human malaria. In this study, we perform the first essential step in this transition by disrupting, p52, in P. falciparum an ortholog of the rodent parasite gene, p36p, which we had previously shown can confer long lasting protective immunity in mice. These P. falciparum P52 deficient sporozoites demonstrate gliding motility, cell traversal and an invasion rate into primary human hepatocytes in vitro that is comparable to wild type sporozoites. However, inside the host hepatocyte development is arrested very soon after invasion. This study reveals, for the first time, that disrupting the equivalent gene in both P. falciparum and rodent malaria Plasmodium species generates parasites that become similarly arrested during liver stage development and these results pave the way for further development of GAS for human use.

  12. Effect of remifentanil on mitochondrial oxygen consumption of cultured human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Djafarzadeh

    Full Text Available During sepsis, liver dysfunction is common, and failure of mitochondria to effectively couple oxygen consumption with energy production has been described. In addition to sepsis, pharmacological agents used to treat septic patients may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. This study addressed the hypothesis that remifentanil interacts with hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and their isolated mitochondria were exposed to remifentanil, with or without further exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured by high-resolution respirometry, Caspase-3 protein levels by Western blotting, and cytokine levels by ELISA. Inhibitory κBα (IκBα phosphorylation, measurement of the cellular ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells were analysed using commercial ELISA kits. Maximal cellular respiration increased after one hour of incubation with remifentanil, and phosphorylation of IκBα occurred, denoting stimulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. The effect on cellular respiration was not present at 2, 4, 8 or 16 hours of incubation. Remifentanil increased the isolated mitochondrial respiratory control ratio of complex-I-dependent respiration without interfering with maximal respiration. Preincubation with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone prevented a remifentanil-induced increase in cellular respiration. Remifentanil at 10× higher concentrations than therapeutic reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content without uncoupling oxygen consumption and basal respiration levels. TNF-α exposure reduced respiration of complex-I, -II and -IV, an effect which was prevented by prior remifentanil incubation. Furthermore, prior remifentanil incubation prevented TNF-α-induced IL-6 release of HepG2 cells, and attenuated fragmentation of pro-caspase-3 into cleaved active caspase 3 (an early marker of apoptosis. Our data suggest that

  13. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlali, Thomas; Plissonnier, Marie-Laure; Romero-López, Cristina; Michelet, Maud; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Zoulim, Fabien; Mehlen, Patrick; Parent, Romain

    2016-05-01

    Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro-grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)), inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6). The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region-driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb), netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C-mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin transgenic mice. UPR-resistant, internal ribosome entry site-driven netrin-1 translation leads to

  14. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  15. Polyploidization of rat hepatocytes due to cell fusion under the effect of radiation of different let

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil'yano, N.Ya.; Malinovskij, O.V.; Khair, M.B.; Baldychev, A.S.; Smolin, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The method of flow cytometry was used to study polyploidization of hepatocytes following X-, γ-, and neutron-irradiation. Ionizing radiation was shown to induce cell polyploidization by two different ways: (1) cells and nuclei fusion, and (2) restriction of mitosis after DNA replication. RBE of 14 MeV neutrons with respect to fusion was about 5x10 3 . With neutron irradiation, the densitivity of cells by fusion was not lower than that by chromosome mutations

  16. Polyploidization of rat hepatocytes due to cell fusion under the effect of radiation of different LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, M.; Gil'yano, N.Ya.; Malinovskij, O.V.; Smolin, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The method of flow cytometry was used to study polyploidization of hepatocytes following X-, γ-, and neutron-irradiation. Ionizing radiation was shown to induce cell polyploidization by two different ways: (1) cells and nuclei fusion, and (2) restriction of mitosis after DNA replication. RBE of 14 MeV neutrons with respect to fusion was about 5x10 3 . With neutron irradiation, the sensitivity of cells by fusion was not lower than that by chromosome mutations. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs

  17. Zyxin regulates migration of renal epithelial cells through activation of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Hee; McNally, Brian T; Igarashi, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) is an epithelial tissue-specific transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine, and other organs. Mutations of HNF-1β in humans produce renal cysts and congenital kidney anomalies. Here, we identify the LIM-domain protein zyxin as a novel binding partner of HNF-1β in renal epithelial cells. Zyxin shuttles to the nucleus where it colocalizes with HNF-1β. Immunoprecipitation of zyxin in leptomycin B-treated cells results in coprecipitation of HNF-1β. The protein interaction requires the second LIM domain of zyxin and two distinct domains of HNF-1β. Overexpression of zyxin stimulates the transcriptional activity of HNF-1β, whereas small interfering RNA silencing of zyxin inhibits HNF-1β-dependent transcription. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces translocation of zyxin into the nucleus and stimulates HNF-1β-dependent promoter activity. The EGF-mediated nuclear translocation of zyxin requires activation of Akt. Expression of dominant-negative mutant HNF-1β, knockdown of zyxin, or inhibition of Akt inhibits EGF-stimulated cell migration. These findings reveal a novel pathway by which extracellular signals are transmitted to the nucleus to regulate the activity of a transcription factor that is essential for renal epithelial differentiation.

  18. Total hepatocellular disposition profiling of rosuvastatin and pitavastatin in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Yoshikado, Takashi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2018-04-09

    This study describes the total disposition profiling of rosuvastatin (RSV) and pitavastatin (PTV) using a single systematic procedure called D-PREX (Disposition Profile Exploration) in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH). The biliary excretion fractions of both statins were clearly observed, which were significantly decreased dependent on the concentration of Ko143, an inhibitor for breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Ko143 also decreased the basolateral efflux fraction of RSV, whereas that of PTV was not significantly affected. To understand these phenomena, effects of Ko143 on biliary excretion (BCRP and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2) and basolateral efflux (MRP3 and MRP4) transporters were examined using transporter-expressing membrane vesicles. BCRP, MRP3 and MRP4-mediated transport of RSV was observed, and Ko143 inhibited these transporters except MRP3. BCRP and MRP4 also mediated the transport of PTV, but the Ko143-mediated inhibition was only clear for BCRP. These results might explain the Ko143-mediated complete and partial inhibition of the biliary excretion and the basolateral efflux of RSV, respectively, in SCHH. In conclusion, D-PREX with sequential sampling of supernatants prior to cell lysis enables the evaluation of total drug disposition profiles resulting from complex interplays of intracellular pathways, which would provide high-throughput evaluation of drug disposition during drug discovery. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  20. Copper induces hepatocyte injury due to the endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cells and patients with Wilson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oe, Shinji; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element, however, excess copper is harmful to human health. Excess copper-derived oxidants contribute to the progression of Wilson disease, and oxidative stress induces accumulation of abnormal proteins. It is known that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an important role in proper protein folding, and that accumulation of misfolded proteins disturbs ER homeostasis resulting in ER stress. However, copper-induced ER homeostasis disturbance has not been fully clarified. We treated human hepatoma cell line (Huh7) and immortalized-human hepatocyte cell line (OUMS29) with copper and chemical chaperones, including 4-phenylbutyrate and ursodeoxycholic acid. We examined copper-induced oxidative stress, ER stress and apoptosis by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analyses. Furthermore, we examined the effects of copper on carcinogenesis. Excess copper induced not only oxidative stress but also ER stress. Furthermore, excess copper induced DNA damage and reduced cell proliferation. Chemical chaperones reduced this copper-induced hepatotoxicity. Excess copper induced hepatotoxicity via ER stress. We also confirmed the abnormality of ultra-structure of the ER of hepatocytes in patients with Wilson disease. These findings show that ER stress plays a pivotal role in Wilson disease, and suggests that chemical chaperones may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Wilson disease.

  1. Copper induces hepatocyte injury due to the endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cells and patients with Wilson disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oe, Shinji, E-mail: ooes@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Miyagawa, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Honma, Yuichi, E-mail: y-homma@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Harada, Masaru, E-mail: msrharada@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2016-09-10

    Copper is an essential trace element, however, excess copper is harmful to human health. Excess copper-derived oxidants contribute to the progression of Wilson disease, and oxidative stress induces accumulation of abnormal proteins. It is known that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an important role in proper protein folding, and that accumulation of misfolded proteins disturbs ER homeostasis resulting in ER stress. However, copper-induced ER homeostasis disturbance has not been fully clarified. We treated human hepatoma cell line (Huh7) and immortalized-human hepatocyte cell line (OUMS29) with copper and chemical chaperones, including 4-phenylbutyrate and ursodeoxycholic acid. We examined copper-induced oxidative stress, ER stress and apoptosis by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analyses. Furthermore, we examined the effects of copper on carcinogenesis. Excess copper induced not only oxidative stress but also ER stress. Furthermore, excess copper induced DNA damage and reduced cell proliferation. Chemical chaperones reduced this copper-induced hepatotoxicity. Excess copper induced hepatotoxicity via ER stress. We also confirmed the abnormality of ultra-structure of the ER of hepatocytes in patients with Wilson disease. These findings show that ER stress plays a pivotal role in Wilson disease, and suggests that chemical chaperones may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Wilson disease.

  2. Single-cell analysis of ploidy and centrosomes underscores the peculiarity of normal hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Faggioli

    Full Text Available Polyploidization is the most well recognized feature of the liver. Yet, a quantitative and behavioral analysis of centrosomes and DNA content in normal hepatocytes has been limited by the technical challenges of methods available. By using a novel approach employing FISH for chromosomes 18, X and Y we provide, for the first time, a detailed analysis of DNA copies during physiological development in the liver at single cell level. We demonstrate that aneuploidy and unbalanced DNA content in binucleated hepatocytes are common features in normal adult liver. Despite the common belief that hepatocytes contain 1, 2 or no more than 4 centrosomes, our double staining for centrosome associated proteins reveals extranumerary centrosomes in a high percentage of cells as early as 15 days of age. We show that in murine liver the period between 15 days and 1.5 months marks the transition from a prevalence of mononucleated cells to up to 75% of binucleated cells. Our data demonstrate that this timing correlates with a switch in centrosomes number. At 15 days the expected 1 or 2 centrosomes converge with several hepatocytes that contain 3 centrosomes; at 1.5 months the percentage of cells with 3 centrosomes decreases concomitantly with the increase of cells with more than 4 centrosomes. Our analysis shows that the extranumerary centrosomes emerge in concomitance with the process of binucleation and polyploidization and maintain α-tubulin nucleation activity. Finally, by integrating interphase FISH and immunofluorescent approaches, we detected an imbalance between centrosome number and DNA content in liver cells that deviates from the equilibrium expected in normal cells. We speculate that these unique features are relevant to the peculiar biological function of liver cells which are continuously challenged by stress, a condition that could predispose to genomic instability.

  3. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  4. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  5. A refined characterisation of the NeoHepatocyte phenotype necessitates a reappraisal of the transdifferentiation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Paloma; Wundt, Judith; Hutchinson, James A; Brulport, Marc; Jun, Yu; Sotnikova, Anna; Girreser, Ulrich; Braun, Felix; Gövert, Felix; Soria, Bernat; Nüssler, Andreas; Clement, Bernd; Hengstler, Jan G; Fändrich, Fred

    2009-03-01

    Under certain culture conditions human peripheral blood monocytes may be induced to express phenotypic markers of non-haematopoietic lineages, including hepatocyte-defining traits. One such example, the NeoHepatocyte, was previously shown to express a broad panel of hepatocyte-like marker antigens and metabolic activities, both in vitro and following engraftment in the liver of immunodeficient mice. In this report, a refined description of NeoHepatocytes, with regard to their expression of xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes, morphology, hepatocyte marker expression and cell surface phenotype, is presented in comparison with human macrophages in defined states of activation. Contrary to prior assertions, it would seem more likely that NeoHepatocytes express particular hepatocyte-defining genes during a normal programme of macrophage differentiation rather than undergoing a process of transdifferentiation to become hepatocyte-like cells.

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor secreted by ovarian cancer cells stimulates peritoneal implantation via the mesothelial-mesenchymal transition of the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Michihiko; Ono, Yoshihiro J; Kanemura, Masanori; Tanaka, Tomohito; Hayashi, Masami; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2015-11-01

    A current working model for the metastatic process of ovarian carcinoma suggests that cancer cells are shed from the ovarian tumor into the peritoneal cavity and attach to the layer of mesothelial cells that line the inner surface of the peritoneum, and several studies suggest that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays an important role in the dissemination of ovarian cancer. Our objectives were to evaluate the HGF expression of ovarian cancer using clinical data and assess the effect of HGF secreted from human ovarian cancer cells to human mesothelial cells. HGF expression was immunohistochemically evaluated in 165 epithelial ovarian cancer patients arranged as tissue microarrays. HGF expression in four ovarian cancer cell lines was evaluated by using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effect of ovarian cancer cell derived HGF to the human mesothelial cells was assessed by using morphologic analysis, Western blotting and cell invasion assay. The effect of HGF on ovarian cancer metastasis was assessed by using in vivo experimental model. The clinical data showed a significantly high correlation between the HGF expression and the cancer stage. The in vivo and in vitro experimental models revealed that HGF secreted by ovarian cancer cells induces the mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stimulates the invasion of mesothelial cells. Furthermore, manipulating the HGF activity affected the degree of dissemination and ascite formation. We demonstrated that HGF secreted by ovarian cancer cells plays an important role in cancer peritoneal implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of early target genes of aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes, inter-individual variability and comparison with other genotoxic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josse, Rozenn; Dumont, Julie; Fautrel, Alain; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has recently emerged as a promising approach to identify early target genes and discriminate genotoxic carcinogens from non-genotoxic carcinogens and non-carcinogens. However, early gene changes induced by genotoxic compounds in human liver remain largely unknown. Primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that induces DNA damage following enzyme-mediated bioactivation. Gene expression profile changes induced by a 24 h exposure of these hepatocyte models to 0.05 and 0.25 μM AFB1 were analyzed by using oligonucleotide pangenomic microarrays. The main altered signaling pathway was the p53 pathway and related functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Direct involvement of the p53 protein in response to AFB1 was verified by using siRNA directed against p53. Among the 83 well-annotated genes commonly modulated in two pools of three human hepatocyte populations and HepaRG cells, several genes were identified as altered by AFB1 for the first time. In addition, a subset of 10 AFB1-altered genes, selected upon basis of their function or tumor suppressor role, was tested in four human hepatocyte populations and in response to other chemicals. Although they exhibited large variable inter-donor fold-changes, several of these genes, particularly FHIT, BCAS3 and SMYD3, were found to be altered by various direct and other indirect genotoxic compounds and unaffected by non-genotoxic compounds. Overall, this comprehensive analysis of early gene expression changes induced by AFB1 in human hepatocytes identified a gene subset that included several genes representing potential biomarkers of genotoxic compounds. -- Highlights: ► Gene expression profile changes induced by aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes. ► AFB1 modulates various genes including tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. ► Important inter-individual variations in the response to AFB1. ► Some genes also altered by other

  8. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augment Sinonasal Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zheng, Chun-Quan; Li, Yong; Yang, Chen; Lin, Hai; Duan, Hong-Gang

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) transgenic mesenchymal stem cells (HGF-MSCs) on wound healing in the sinonasal mucosa and nasal epithelial cells (NECs). We also sought to determine whether HGF-MSCs and MSCs can migrate into the injured mucosa and differentiate into ciliated cells. Human HGF-overexpressing umbilical cord MSCs (hHGF-UCMSCs) were established, and upregulation of hHGF expression was confirmed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). To investigate the paracrine effect of human MSCs (hMSCs) on nasal epithelial repair, hMSC- and HGF-MSC-conditioned media (CM) were used in NEC proliferation assays and in an in vitro scratch-wound repair model. The in vivo sinonasal wound-healing model was established, and all enrolled rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: the GFP-MSC group, the HGF-MSC group, the Ad-HGF group, and the surgery control group. The average decreased diameter was recorded, and the medial wall of the maxillary sinus was removed for histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Collagen deposition in the wound tissue was detected via Masson trichrome (M&T) staining. The distribution of MSCs and HGF-MSCs was observed by immunofluorescence. MSCs improved nasal wound healing both in vivo and in vitro. HGF overexpression in MSCs augmented the curative effects. Reduced collagen deposition and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) expression were detected in the HGF-MSC group compared with the MSC-, Ad-HGF-, and phosphate-buffered saline-treated groups based on M&T staining and ELISA. The enhanced therapeutic effects of HGF-MSCs were accompanied by decreased level of the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1. In addition, both HGF-MSCs and MSCs can migrate to the injured mucosa and epithelial layer.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of human hepatocyte transplantation in a SCID/uPA mouse model with inducible liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna N Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe Combined Immune Deficient (SCID/Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA mice undergo liver failure and are useful hosts for the propagation of transplanted human hepatocytes (HH which must compete with recipient-derived hepatocytes for replacement of the diseased liver parenchyma. While partial replacement by HH has proven useful for studies with Hepatitis C virus, complete replacement of SCID/uPA mouse liver by HH has never been achieved and limits the broader application of these mice for other areas of biomedical research. The herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV system is a powerful tool for cell-specific ablation in transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to selectively eliminate murine-derived parenchymal liver cells from humanized SCID/uPA mouse liver in order to achieve mice with completely humanized liver parenchyma. Thus, we reproduced the HSVtk (vTK/GCV system of hepatic failure in SCID/uPA mice.In vitro experiments demonstrated efficient killing of vTK expressing hepatoma cells after GCV treatment. For in vivo experiments, expression of vTK was targeted to the livers of FVB/N and SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic sensitivity to GCV was first established in FVB/N mice since these mice do not undergo liver failure inherent to SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic vTK expression was found to be an integral component of GCV-induced pathologic and biochemical alterations and caused death due to liver dysfunction in vTK transgenic FVB/N and non-transplanted SCID/uPA mice. In SCID/uPA mice with humanized liver, vTK/GCV caused death despite extensive replacement of the mouse liver parenchyma with HH (ranging from 32-87%. Surprisingly, vTK/GCV-dependent apoptosis and mitochondrial aberrations were also localized to bystander vTK-negative HH.Extensive replacement of mouse liver parenchyma by HH does not provide a secure therapeutic advantage against vTK/GCV-induced cytotoxicity targeted to residual mouse hepatocytes

  10. Foxa1 reduces lipid accumulation in human hepatocytes and is down-regulated in nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Moya

    Full Text Available Triglyceride accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL results from unbalanced lipid metabolism which, in the liver, is controlled by several transcription factors. The Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox transcription factors comprises three members which play important roles in controlling both metabolism and homeostasis through the regulation of multiple target genes in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. In the mouse liver, Foxa2 is repressed by insulin and mediates fasting responses. Unlike Foxa2 however, the role of Foxa1 in the liver has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, we evaluate the role of Foxa1 in two human liver cell models, primary cultured hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, by adenoviral infection. Moreover, human and rat livers were analyzed to determine Foxa1 regulation in NAFL. Results demonstrate that Foxa1 is a potent inhibitor of hepatic triglyceride synthesis, accumulation and secretion by repressing the expression of multiple target genes of these pathways (e.g., GPAM, DGAT2, MTP, APOB. Moreover, Foxa1 represses the fatty acid transporter protein FATP2 and lowers fatty acid uptake. Foxa1 also increases the breakdown of fatty acids by inducing peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and ketone body synthesis. Finally, Foxa1 is able to largely up-regulate UCP1, thereby dissipating energy and consistently decreasing the mitochondria membrane potential. We also report that human and rat NAFL have a reduced Foxa1 expression, possibly through a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. We conclude that Foxa1 is an antisteatotic factor that coordinately tunes several lipid metabolic pathways to block triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. However, Foxa1 is down-regulated in human and rat NAFL and, therefore, increasing Foxa1 levels could protect from steatosis. Altogether, we suggest that Foxa1 could be a novel therapeutic target for NAFL disease and insulin resistance.

  11. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance

  12. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  13. Determination of acute lethal and chronic lethal dose thresholds of valproic acid using 3D spheroids constructed from the immortal human hepatocyte cell line HepG2/C3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S. J.; Wrzesinski, K.

    2013-01-01

    describe here a culture system based on 3D spheroid culture of immortal hepatocytes which can determine the toxicity of valproic acid (or structurally or functionally related molecules) in vitro. The spheroids were used to follow changes in ATP production, glucose uptake and adenylate kinase following...

  14. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Human hepatocytes support the hypertrophic but not the hyperplastic response to the murine nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen sodium phenobarbital in an in vivo study using a chimeric mouse with humanized liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Takeuchi, Hayato; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takako; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    High doses of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator, have been shown to produce hepatocellular tumors in rodents by a mitogenic mode of action (MOA) involving CAR activation. The effect of 1-week dietary treatment with NaPB on liver weight and histopathology, hepatic CYP2B enzyme activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA expression, replicative DNA synthesis and selected genes related to cell proliferation, and functional transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses was studied in male CD-1 mice, Wistar Hannover (WH) rats, and chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. The treatment of chimeric mice with 1000-1500-ppm NaPB resulted in plasma levels around 3-5-fold higher than those observed in human subjects given therapeutic doses of NaPB. NaPB produced dose-dependent increases in hepatic CYP2B activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA levels in all animal models. Integrated functional metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the responses to NaPB in the human liver were clearly different from those in rodents. Although NaPB produced a dose-dependent increase in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CD-1 mice and WH rats, no increase in replicative DNA synthesis was observed in human hepatocyte-originated areas of chimeric mice. In addition, treatment with NaPB had no effect on Ki-67, PCNA, GADD45β, and MDM2 mRNA expression in chimeric mice, whereas significant increases were observed in CD-1 mice and/or WH rats. However, increases in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis were observed in chimeric mice both in vivo and in vitro after treatment epidermal growth factor. Thus, although NaPB could activate CAR in both rodent and human hepatocytes, NaPB did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice, whereas it was mitogenic to rat and mouse hepatocytes. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of NaPB, the MOA for NaPB-induced rodent liver tumor formation is thus not relevant for humans. © The

  16. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in human hair follicles after in vitro exposure to 11 chemicals: comparison with unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Y H; Koopmans, M J; Heirbaut, P R; van der Hoeven, J C; Weterings, P J

    1992-06-01

    A new method is described to investigate unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in human tissue after exposure in vitro: the human hair follicle. A histological technique was applied to assess cytotoxicity and UDS in the same hair follicle cells. UDS induction was examined for 11 chemicals and the results were compared with literature findings for UDS in rat hepatocytes. Most chemicals inducing UDS in rat hepatocytes raised DNA repair at comparable concentrations in the hair follicle. However, 1 of 9 chemicals that gave a positive response in the rat hepatocyte UDS test, 2-acetylaminofluorene, failed to induce DNA repair in the hair follicle. Metabolizing potential of hair follicle cells was shown in experiments with indirectly acting compounds, i.e., benzo[a]pyrene, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and dimethylnitrosamine. The results support the conclusion that the test in its present state is valuable as a screening assay for the detection of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, the use of human tissues may result in a better extrapolation to man.

  17. Hepatic tissue environment in NEMO-deficient mice critically regulates positive selection of donor cells after hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Kaldenbach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte transplantation (HT is a promising alternative treatment strategy for end-stage liver diseases compared with orthotopic liver transplantation. A limitation for this approach is the low engraftment of donor cells. The deletion of the I-kappa B kinase-regulatory subunit IKKγ/NEMO in hepatocytes prevents nuclear factor (NF-kB activation and triggers spontaneous liver apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that NEMOΔhepa mice may therefore serve as an experimental model to study HT. METHODS: Pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice were transplanted with donor-hepatocytes from wildtype (WT and mice deficient for the pro-apoptotic mediator Caspase-8 (Casp8Δhepa. RESULTS: Transplantation of isolated WT-hepatocytes into pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice resulted in a 6-7 fold increase of donor cells 12 weeks after HT, while WT-recipients showed no liver repopulation. The use of apoptosis-resistant Casp8Δhepa-derived donor cells further enhanced the selection 3-fold after 12-weeks and up to 10-fold increase after 52 weeks compared with WT donors. While analysis of NEMOΔhepa mice revealed strong liver injury, HT-recipient NEMOΔhepa mice showed improved liver morphology and decrease in serum transaminases. Concomitant with these findings, the histological examination elicited an improved liver tissue architecture associated with significantly lower levels of apoptosis, decreased proliferation and a lesser amount of liver fibrogenesis. Altogether, our data clearly support the therapeutic benefit of the HT procedure into NEMOΔhepa mice. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of the NEMOΔhepa mouse as an in vivo tool to study liver repopulation after HT. The improvement of the characteristic phenotype of chronic liver injury in NEMOΔhepa mice after HT suggests the therapeutic potential of HT in liver diseases with a chronic inflammatory phenotype and

  18. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  19. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury

  20. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition, and cell death in Cu-exposed trout hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Manzl, Claudia; Berger, Christian; Hofer, Bettina

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that, in trout hepatocytes, exposure to a high dose of copper (Cu) leads to disruption of Ca 2+ homeostasis and elevated formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the latter ultimately causing cell death. In the present study, we aimed at identifying, using a lower Cu concentration, the role of mitochondria in this scenario, the potential involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), and the mode of cell death induced by the metal. Incubation with 10 μM Cu resulted in a strong stimulation of ROS formation, and after 2 h of exposure a significant increase of both apoptotic and necrotic cells was seen. Co-incubation of Cu-treated hepatocytes with the iron-chelator deferoxamine significantly inhibited ROS production and completely prevented cell death. The origin of the radicals generated was at least partly mitochondrial, as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ROS production was diminished by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, but since this also aggravated the elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ induced by Cu, it did not preserve cell viability. In a sub-population of cells, Cu induced a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and occurrence of the MPT. Cyclosporin A, which did not inhibit ROS formation, prevented the onset of the MPT and inhibited apoptotic, but not necrotic, cell death. Cu-induced apoptosis therefore appears to be dependent on induction of the MPT, but the prominent contribution of mitochondria to ROS generation also suggests an important role of mitochondria in necrotic cell death

  1. Metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klette, K L; Anderson, C J; Poch, G K; Nimrod, A C; ElSohly, M A

    2000-10-01

    The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) was investigated in liver microsomes and cyropreserved hepatocytes from humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that O-H-LSD is present in human urine at concentrations 16-43 times greater than LSD, the parent compound. Additionally, these studies have determined that O-H-LSD is not generated during the specimen extraction and analytical processes or due to parent compound degradation in aqueous urine samples. However, these studies have not been conclusive in demonstrating that O-H-LSD is uniquely produced during in vivo metabolism. Phase I drug metabolism was investigated by incubating human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes with LSD. The reaction was quenched at various time points, and the aliquots were extracted using liquid partitioning and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. O-H-LSD was positively identified in all human liver microsomal and human hepatocyte fractions incubated with LSD. In addition, O-H-LSD was not detected in any microsomal or hepatocyte fraction not treated with LSD nor in LSD specimens devoid of microsomes or hepatocytes. This study provides definitive evidence that O-H-LSD is produced as a metabolic product following incubation of human liver microsomes and hepatocytes with LSD.

  2. Trichloroethylene toxicity in a human hepatoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevenin, E.; McMillian, J. [Medical Univ. of Charleston South Carolina, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The experiments conducted in this study were designed to determine the usefullness of hepatocyte cultures and a human hepatoma cell line as model systems for assessing human susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma due to exposure to trichloroethylene. The results from these studies will then be analyzed to determine if human cell lines can be used to conduct future experiments of this nature.

  3. Expression profiling of interindividual variability following xenobiotic exposures in primary human hepatocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyak, Katy M.O.; Johnson, Mary C.; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the magnitude of human variability across the entire transcriptome after chemical challenge, we profiled gene expression responses to three different prototypic chemical inducers in primary human hepatocyte cultures from ten independent donors. Correlation between basal expression in any two hepatocyte donors ranged from r 2 values of 0.967 to 0.857, and chemical treatment tended to negatively impact correlation between donors. Including anticipated target genes, 10,812, 8373, and 7847 genes were changed in at least one donor by Aroclor 1254 (A1254), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and phenobarbital (PB), respectively. A subset of these gene targets (n = 41) were altered with a high level of reproducibility in at least 9 donors, gene responses that correlated well with literature-reported mechanism of action. Filtering responses to the level of gene subsets clarified the biological impact associated with the respective chemical effectors, in lieu of substantial interindividual variation among donor responses. In these respects, the use of hierarchical clustering methods successfully grouped seven of the ten donors into chemical-specific rather than donor-specific clusters. However, at the whole-genome level, the magnitude of conserved gene expression changes among donors was surprisingly small, with fewer than 50% of the gene responses altered by a single chemical conserved in more than one donor. The use of higher level descriptors, such as those defined by the PANTHER classification system, may enable more consistent categorization of gene expression changes across individuals, as increased reproducibility was identified using this method

  4. Comparative metabolism of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kong, Tae Yeon; Choi, Won Gu; Lee, Hye Suk

    2016-04-01

    Honokiol has antitumor, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. Here we aimed to identify the metabolic profile of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes and to characterize the enzymes responsible for the glucuronidation and sulfation of honokiol. Honokiol had a high hepatic extraction ratio in all five species, indicating that it was extensively metabolized. A total of 32 metabolites, including 17 common and 15 different metabolites, produced via glucuronidation, sulfation, and oxidation of honokiol allyl groups were tentatively identified using liquid chromatography-high resolution quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Glucuronidation of honokiol to M8 (honokiol-4-glucuronide) and M9 (honokiol-2'-glucuronide) was the predominant metabolic pathway in hepatocytes of all five species; however, interspecies differences between 4- and 2'-glucuronidation of honokiol were observed. UGT1A1, 1A8, 1A9, 2B15, and 2B17 played major roles in M8 formation, whereas UGT1A7 and 1A9 played major roles in M9 formation. Human cDNA-expressed SULT1C4 played a major role in M10 formation (honokiol-2'-sulfate), whereas SULT1A1*1, 1A1*2, and 1A2 played major roles in M11 formation (honokiol-4-sulfate). In conclusion, honokiol metabolism showed interspecies differences.

  5. The homeobox gene Hex regulates hepatocyte differentiation from embryonic stem cell-derived endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Kim, Yon Hui; Irion, Stefan; Kasuda, Shogo; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Iwano, Masayuki; Dohi, Yoshiko; Saito, Yoshihiko; Snodgrass, Ralph; Keller, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the role of the hematopoietically expressed homeobox (Hex) in the differentiation and development of hepatocytes within embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived embryoid bodies (EBs). Analyses of hepatic endoderm derived from Hex(-/-) EBs revealed a dramatic reduction in the levels of albumin (Alb) and alpha-fetoprotein (Afp) expression. In contrast, stage-specific forced expression of Hex in EBs from wild-type ESCs led to the up-regulation of Alb and Afp expression and secretion of Alb and transferrin. These inductive effects were restricted to c-kit(+) endoderm-enriched EB-derived populations, suggesting that Hex functions at the level of hepatic specification of endoderm in this model. Microarray analysis revealed that Hex regulated the expression of a broad spectrum of hepatocyte-related genes, including fibrinogens, apolipoproteins, and cytochromes. When added to the endoderm-induced EBs, bone morphogenetic protein 4 acted synergistically with Hex in the induction of expression of Alb, Afp, carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, transcription factor 1, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha. These findings indicate that Hex plays a pivotal role during induction of liver development from endoderm in this in vitro model and suggest that this strategy may provide important insight into the generation of functional hepatocytes from ESCs.

  6. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein ResponseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lahlali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Methods: Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro–grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. Results: HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α, and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6. The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region–driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb, netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C–mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin

  7. Maid (GCIP) is involved in cell cycle control of hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenberg-Riethmacher, Eva; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Miehe, Michaela

    2007-01-01

    . Therefore, we studied the role of Maid during cell cycle progression after partial hepatectomy (PH). Lack of Maid expression after PH was associated with a delay in G1/S-phase progression as evidenced by delayed cyclinA expression and DNA replication in Maid-deficient mice. However, at later time points......The function of Maid (GCIP), a cyclinD-binding helix-loop-helix protein, was analyzed by targeted disruption in mice. We show that Maid function is not required for normal embryonic development. However, older Maid-deficient mice-in contrast to wild-type controls--develop hepatocellular carcinomas...

  8. Restoring Ureagenesis in Hepatocytes by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Genomic Addition to Arginase-deficient Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick C; Truong, Brian; Vega-Crespo, Agustin; Gilmore, W Blake; Hermann, Kip; Angarita, Stephanie Ak; Tang, Jonathan K; Chang, Katherine M; Wininger, Austin E; Lam, Alex K; Schoenberg, Benjamen E; Cederbaum, Stephen D; Pyle, April D; Byrne, James A; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2016-11-29

    Urea cycle disorders are incurable enzymopathies that affect nitrogen metabolism and typically lead to hyperammonemia. Arginase deficiency results from a mutation in Arg1, the enzyme regulating the final step of ureagenesis and typically results in developmental disabilities, seizures, spastic diplegia, and sometimes death. Current medical treatments for urea cycle disorders are only marginally effective, and for proximal disorders, liver transplantation is effective but limited by graft availability. Advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell research has allowed for the genetic modification of stem cells for potential cellular replacement therapies. In this study, we demonstrate a universally-applicable CRISPR/Cas9-based strategy utilizing exon 1 of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus to genetically modify and restore arginase activity, and thus ureagenesis, in genetically distinct patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells and hepatocyte-like derivatives. Successful strategies restoring gene function in patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells may advance applications of genetically modified cell therapy to treat urea cycle and other inborn errors of metabolism.

  9. Metabolism of oxycodone in human hepatocytes from different age groups and prediction of hepatic plasma clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eKorjamo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1 and 10 µM was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 hours, and 1 µM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 µM. Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. In general, this in vitro to in vivo extrapolation method provides valuable information on the maturation of oxycodone metabolism that can be utilized in the design of clinical pharmacokinetic studies in infants and young children.

  10. PPARα regulates the hepatotoxic biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT1) gene expression in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thulin, Petra; Rafter, Ingalill; Stockling, Kenneth; Tomkiewicz, Celine; Norjavaara, Ensio; Aggerbeck, Martine; Hellmold, Heike; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Andersson, Ulf; Cotgreave, Ian; Glinghammar, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigated a potential mechanism behind the observation of increased aminotransferase levels in a phase I clinical trial using a lipid-lowering drug, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α agonist, AZD4619. In healthy volunteers treated with AZD4619, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were elevated without an increase in other markers for liver injury. These increases in serum aminotransferases have previously been reported in some patients receiving another PPARα agonist, fenofibrate. In subsequent in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of ALT1 protein and mRNA in human hepatocytes after treatment with fenofibric acid. The PPAR effect on ALT1 expression was shown to act through a direct transcriptional mechanism involving at least one PPAR response element (PPRE) in the proximal ALT1 promoter, while no effect of fenofibrate and AZD4619 was observed on the ALT2 promoter. Binding of PPARs to the PPRE located at - 574 bp from the transcriptional start site was confirmed on both synthetic oligonucleotides and DNA in hepatocytes. These data show that intracellular ALT expression is regulated by PPAR agonists and that this mechanism might contribute to increased ALT activity in serum

  11. Human hepatocyte growth factor promotes functional recovery in primates after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kazuya; Fujiyoshi, Kanehiro; Yamane, Jun-Ichi; Toyota, Fumika; Hikishima, Keigo; Nomura, Tatsuji; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Aoki, Masashi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    Many therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) using neurotrophic factors have focused on reducing the area damaged by secondary, post-injury degeneration, to promote functional recovery. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is a potent mitogen for mature hepatocytes and a mediator of the inflammatory responses to tissue injury, was recently highlighted as a potent neurotrophic factor in the central nervous system. We previously reported that introducing exogenous HGF into the injured rodent spinal cord using a herpes simplex virus-1 vector significantly reduces the area of damaged tissue and promotes functional recovery. However, that study did not examine the therapeutic effects of administering HGF after injury, which is the most critical issue for clinical application. To translate this strategy to human treatment, we induced a contusive cervical SCI in the common marmoset, a primate, and then administered recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) intrathecally. Motor function was assessed using an original open field scoring system focusing on manual function, including reach-and-grasp performance and hand placement in walking. The intrathecal rhHGF preserved the corticospinal fibers and myelinated areas, thereby promoting functional recovery. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed significant preservation of the intact spinal cord parenchyma. rhHGF-treatment did not give rise to an abnormal outgrowth of calcitonin gene related peptide positive fibers compared to the control group, indicating that this treatment did not induce or exacerbate allodynia. This is the first study to report the efficacy of rhHGF for treating SCI in non-human primates. In addition, this is the first presentation of a novel scale for assessing neurological motor performance in non-human primates after contusive cervical SCI.

  12. Human hepatocyte growth factor promotes functional recovery in primates after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kitamura

    Full Text Available Many therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI using neurotrophic factors have focused on reducing the area damaged by secondary, post-injury degeneration, to promote functional recovery. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, which is a potent mitogen for mature hepatocytes and a mediator of the inflammatory responses to tissue injury, was recently highlighted as a potent neurotrophic factor in the central nervous system. We previously reported that introducing exogenous HGF into the injured rodent spinal cord using a herpes simplex virus-1 vector significantly reduces the area of damaged tissue and promotes functional recovery. However, that study did not examine the therapeutic effects of administering HGF after injury, which is the most critical issue for clinical application. To translate this strategy to human treatment, we induced a contusive cervical SCI in the common marmoset, a primate, and then administered recombinant human HGF (rhHGF intrathecally. Motor function was assessed using an original open field scoring system focusing on manual function, including reach-and-grasp performance and hand placement in walking. The intrathecal rhHGF preserved the corticospinal fibers and myelinated areas, thereby promoting functional recovery. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed significant preservation of the intact spinal cord parenchyma. rhHGF-treatment did not give rise to an abnormal outgrowth of calcitonin gene related peptide positive fibers compared to the control group, indicating that this treatment did not induce or exacerbate allodynia. This is the first study to report the efficacy of rhHGF for treating SCI in non-human primates. In addition, this is the first presentation of a novel scale for assessing neurological motor performance in non-human primates after contusive cervical SCI.

  13. The effects of gender, age, ethnicity, and liver cirrhosis on cytochrome P450 enzyme activity in human liver microsomes and inducibility in cultured human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, Andrew; Mudra, Daniel R.; Johnson, Cory; Dwyer, Anne; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2004-01-01

    We have measured cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in nearly 150 samples of human liver microsomes and 64 samples of cryopreserved human hepatocytes, and we have performed induction studies in over 90 preparations of cultured human hepatocytes. We have analyzed these data to examine whether the expression of CYP enzyme activity in liver microsomes and isolated hepatocytes or the inducibility of CYP enzymes in cultured hepatocytes is influenced by the gender, age, or ethnicity of the donor (the latter being limited to Caucasians, African Americans, and Hispanics due to a paucity of livers from Asian donors). In human liver microsomes, there were no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) in CYP activity as a function of age, gender, or ethnicity with one exception. 7-Ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (CYP1A2) activity was greater in males than females, which is consistent with clinical observation. Liver microsomal testosterone 6β-hydroxylase (CYP3A4) activity was slightly greater in females than males, but the difference was not significant. However, in cryopreserved human hepatocytes, the gender difference in CYP3A4 activity (females = twice males) did reach statistical significance, which supports the clinical observation that females metabolize certain CYP3A4 substrates faster than do males. Compared with those from Caucasians and African Americans, liver microsomes from Hispanics had about twice the average activity of CYP2A6, CYP2B6, and CYP2C8 and half the activity of CYP1A2, although this apparent ethnic difference may be a consequence of the relatively low number of Hispanic donors. Primary cultures of hepatocytes were treated with β-naphthoflavone, an inducer of CYP1A2, phenobarbital or rifampin, both of which induce CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4, albeit it to different extents. Induction of these CYP enzymes in freshly cultured hepatocytes did not appear to be influenced by the gender or age of the donor. Furthermore, CYP3A4 induction in

  14. Supercooling as a viable non-freezing cell preservation method of rat hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Berk Usta

    Full Text Available Supercooling preservation holds the potential to drastically extend the preservation time of organs, tissues and engineered tissue products, and fragile cell types that do not lend themselves well to cryopreservation or vitrification. Here, we investigate the effects of supercooling preservation (SCP at -4(oC on primary rat hepatocytes stored in cryovials and compare its success (high viability and good functional characteristics to that of static cold storage (CS at +4(oC and cryopreservation. We consider two prominent preservation solutions a Hypothermosol (HTS-FRS and b University of Wisconsin solution (UW and a range of preservation temperatures (-4 to -10 (oC. We find that there exists an optimum temperature (-4(oC for SCP of rat hepatocytes which yields the highest viability; at this temperature HTS-FRS significantly outperforms UW solution in terms of viability and functional characteristics (secretions and enzymatic activity in suspension and plate culture. With the HTS-FRS solution we show that the cells can be stored for up to a week with high viability (~56%; moreover we also show that the preservation can be performed in large batches (50 million cells with equal or better viability and no loss of functionality as compared to smaller batches (1.5 million cells performed in cryovials.

  15. Definition of metabolism-dependent xenobiotic toxicity with co-cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in the novel integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture (IdMOC) experimental system: results with model toxicants aflatoxin B1, cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Albert P; Uzgare, Aarti; LaForge, Yumiko S

    2012-07-30

    The integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture system (IdMOC) allows the co-culturing of multiple cell types as physically separated cells interconnected by a common overlying medium. We report here the application of IdMOC with two cell types: the metabolically competent primary human hepatocytes, and a metabolically incompetent cell line, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, in the definition of the role of hepatic metabolism on the cytotoxicity of three model toxicants: cyclophosphamide (CPA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB) and tamoxifen (TMX). The presence of hepatic metabolism in IdMOC with human hepatocytes was demonstrated by the metabolism of the P450 isoform 3A4 substrate, luciferin-IPA. The three model toxicants showed three distinct patterns of cytotoxic profile: TMX was cytotoxic to 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes, with slightly lower cytotoxicity towards both 3T3 cells and hepatocytes in the IdMOC. AFB was selective toxic towards the human hepatocytes and relatively noncytotoxic towards 3T3 cells both in the presence and absence of the hepatocytes. CPA cytotoxicity to the 3T3 cells was found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of the hepatocytes, with the cytotoxicity dependent of the number of hepatocytes, and with the cytotoxicity attenuated by the presence of a non-specific P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. We propose here the following classification of toxicants based on the role of hepatic metabolism as defined by the human hepatocyte-3T3 cell IdMOC assay: type I: direct-acting cytotoxicants represented by TMX as indicated by cytotoxicity in 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes; type II: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity represented by AFB1 with effects localized within the site of metabolic activation (i. e. hepatocytes); and type III: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity with metabolites that can diffuse out of the hepatocytes to cause toxicity in cells distal from the site of metabolism, as exemplified by CPA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland

  16. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  17. DIFFERENCES IN PROPIONATE-INDUCED INHIBITION OF CHOLESTEROL AND TRIACYLGLYCEROL SYNTHESIS BETWEEN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES IN PRIMARY CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIN, YG; VONK, RJ; SLOOFF, MJH; KUIPERS, F; SMIT, MJ

    Propionate is a short-chain fatty acid formed in the colon and supposedly involved in the cholesterol-lowering effect of soluble fibre. To explore the underlying mechanism(s) of this fibre action, we have used human hepatocytes in primary culture to study the effects of propionate on hepatic lipid

  18. A preliminary study for constructing a bioartificial liver device with induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamuro Masaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioartificial liver systems, designed to support patients with liver failure, are composed of bioreactors and functional hepatocytes. Immunological rejection of the embedded hepatocytes by the host immune system is a serious concern that crucially degrades the performance of the device. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are considered a desirable source for bioartificial liver systems, because patient-derived iPS cells are free from immunological rejection. The purpose of this paper was to test the feasibility of a bioartificial liver system with iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells. Methods Mouse iPS cells were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells by a multi-step differentiation protocol via embryoid bodies and definitive endoderm. Differentiation of iPS cells was evaluated by morphology, PCR assay, and functional assays. iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells were cultured in a bioreactor module with a pore size of 0.2 μm for 7 days. The amount of albumin secreted into the circulating medium was analyzed by ELISA. Additionally, after a 7-day culture in a bioreactor module, cells were observed by a scanning electron microscope. Results At the final stage of the differentiation program, iPS cells changed their morphology to a polygonal shape with two nucleoli and enriched cytoplasmic granules. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed their polygonal shape, glycogen deposition in the cytoplasm, microvilli on their surfaces, and a duct-like arrangement. PCR analysis showed increased expression of albumin mRNA over the course of the differentiation program. Albumin and urea production was also observed. iPS-Heps culture in bioreactor modules showed the accumulation of albumin in the medium for up to 7 days. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the attachment of cell clusters to the hollow fibers of the module. These results indicated that iPS cells were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells after culture

  19. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in human lung emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchal Joëlle

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors are key growth factors in the process of alveolar repair. We hypothesized that excessive alveolar destruction observed in lung emphysema involves impaired expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors or their respective receptors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor. The aim of our study was to compare the expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in lung samples from 3 groups of patients: emphysema; smokers without emphysema and non-smokers without emphysema. Methods Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor proteins were analysed by immunoassay and western blot; mRNA expression was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor mRNA levels were similar in emphysema and non-emphysema patients. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlated negatively with FEV1 and the FEV1/FVC ratio both in emphysema patients and in smokers with or without emphysema. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor protein concentrations were similar in all patients' groups. Conclusion The expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors is preserved in patients with lung emphysema as compared to patients without emphysema. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlates with the severity of airflow obstruction in smokers.

  20. Cell polarity development and protein trafficking in hepatocytes lacking E-cadherin/beta-catenin-based adherens junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theard, Delphine; Steiner, Magdalena; Kalicharan, Dharamdajal; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Using a mutant hepatocyte cell line in which E-cadherin and ss-catenin are completely depleted from the cell surface, and, consequently, fail to form adherens junctions, we have investigated adherens junction requirement for apical-basolateral polarity development and polarized membrane trafficking.

  1. Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells Induce Tumor Progression of Neoplastic Hepatocytes in a TGF-β Dependent Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIKULA, M.; PROELL, V.; FISCHER, A.N.M.; MIKULITS, W.

    2010-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular carcinomas from malignant hepatocytes is frequently associated with intra- and peritumoral accumulation of connective tissue arising from activated hepatic stellate cells. For both tumorigenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling executes key roles and therefore is considered as a hallmark of these pathological events. By employing cellular transplantation we show that the interaction of neoplastic MIM-R hepatocytes with the tumor microenvironment, containing either activated hepatic stellate cells (M1-4HSCs) or myofibroblasts derived thereof (M-HTs), induces progression in malignancy. Cotransplantation of MIM-R hepatocytes with M-HTs yielded strongest MIM-R generated tumor formation accompanied by nuclear localization of Smad2/3 as well as of β-catenin. Genetic interference with TGF-β signaling by gain of antagonistic Smad7 in MIM-R hepatocytes diminished epithelial dedifferentiation and tumor progression upon interaction with M1-4HSCs or M-HTs. Further analysis showed that tumors harboring disrupted Smad signaling are devoid of nuclear β-catenin accumulation, indicating a crosstalk between TGF-β and β-catenin signaling. Together, these data demonstrate that activated HSCs and myofibroblasts directly govern hepatocarcinogenesis in a TGF-β dependent fashion by inducing autocrine TGF-β signaling and nuclear β-catenin accumulation in neoplastic hepatocytes. These results indicate that intervention with TGF-β signaling is highly promising in liver cancer therapy. PMID:16883581

  2. Metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoids AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48 in pooled human hepatocytes and rat hepatocytes analyzed by UHPLC-(IMS)-HR-MSE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardal, Marie; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Qi, Bing

    2018-01-01

    metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoids, AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48, using an in silico-assisted workflow with analytical data acquired using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–(ion mobility spectroscopy)–high resolution–mass spectrometry in data-independent acquisition mode (UHPLC......-(IMS)-HR-MSE). The metabolites were identified after incubation with rat and pooled human hepatocytes using UHPLC-HR-MSE, followed by UHPLC-IMS-HR-MSE. Metabolites of AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48 were predicted with Meteor (Lhasa Ltd) and imported to the UNIFI software (Waters). The predicted metabolites were assigned to analytical...... components supported by the UNIFI in silico fragmentation tool. The main metabolic pathway of AMB-CHMICA was O-demethylation and hydroxylation of the methylhexyl moiety. For 5C-AKB48, the main metabolic pathways were hydroxylation(s) of the adamantyl moiety and oxidative dechlorination with subsequent...

  3. Recent advances in 2D and 3D in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes, alternative hepatocyte sources and non-parenchymal liver cells and their use in investigating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, cell signaling and ADME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godoy, Patricio; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Albrecht, Ute; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ansari, Nariman; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Bode, Johannes Georg; Bolleyn, Jennifer; Borner, Christoph; Boettger, Jan; Braeuning, Albert; Budinsky, Robert A.; Burkhardt, Britta; Cameron, Neil R.; Camussi, Giovanni; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Rowlands, J. Craig; Dahmen, Uta; Damm, Georg; Dirsch, Olaf; Teresa Donato, Maria; Dong, Jian; Dooley, Steven; Drasdo, Dirk; Eakins, Rowena; Ferreira, Karine Sa; Fonsato, Valentina; Fraczek, Joanna; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gibson, Andrew; Glanemann, Matthias; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Jose Gomez-Lechon, Maria; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Gustavsson, Lena; Guyot, Christelle; Hallifax, David; Hammad, Seddik; Hayward, Adam; Haeussinger, Dieter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Hewitt, Philip; Hoehme, Stefan; Holzhuetter, Hermann-Georg; Houston, J. Brian; Hrach, Jens; Ito, Kiyomi; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Keitel, Verena; Kelm, Jens M.; Park, B. Kevin; Kordes, Claus; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A.; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Lu, Peng; Luebke-Wheeler, Jennifer; Lutz, Anna; Maltman, Daniel J.; Matz-Soja, Madlen; McMullen, Patrick; Merfort, Irmgard; Messner, Simon; Meyer, Christoph; Mwinyi, Jessica; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Olinga, Peter; Pampaloni, Francesco; Pi, Jingbo; Pluta, Linda; Przyborski, Stefan A.; Ramachandran, Anup; Rogiers, Vera; Rowe, Cliff; Schelcher, Celine; Schmich, Kathrin; Schwarz, Michael; Singh, Bijay; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Stieger, Bruno; Stoeber, Regina; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Tetta, Ciro; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Weiss, Thomas S.; Widera, Agata; Woods, Courtney G.; Xu, Jinghai James; Yarborough, Kathy M.; Hengstler, Jan G.

    This review encompasses the most important advances in liver functions and hepatotoxicity and analyzes which mechanisms can be studied in vitro. In a complex architecture of nested, zonated lobules, the liver consists of approximately 80 % hepatocytes and 20 % non-parenchymal cells, the latter being

  4. A characterization of the ZFL cell line and primary hepatocytes as in vitro liver cell models for the zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Marta; Rusten, Marte; Male, Rune; Jensen, Knut Helge Midtbø; Goksøyr, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The ZFL cell line and primary hepatocytes were characterized. •Basic and induced expression of nuclear receptors and target genes were found. •The ZFL cell line expresses very low basic levels of most genes. •The ZFL cells have low induction of gene expression following exposures. •Primary hepatocytes show large sex-dependent differences in gene expression. -- Abstract: The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a widely used model species in biomedical research. The ZFL cell line, established from zebrafish liver, and freshly isolated primary hepatocytes from zebrafish have been used in several toxicological studies. However, no previous report has compared and characterized these two systems at the level of gene expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ZFL cell line in comparison to primary hepatocytes as in vitro models for studying effects of environmental contaminants in zebrafish liver. Using quantitative real-time PCR, the basal level and transcriptional induction potential of key genes involved in toxic responses in the ZFL cell line, primary hepatocytes and whole liver from zebrafish were compared. The study showed that the ZFL cells have lower levels of mRNA of most selected genes compared to zebrafish liver. The induced gene transcription following exposure to ligand was much lower in ZFL cells compared to zebrafish primary hepatocytes at the doses tested. Importantly, oestrogen receptor and vitellogenin genes showed low basal transcription and no induction response in the ZFL cell line. In conclusion, it appears that primary hepatocytes are well suited for studying environmental contaminants including xenoestrogens, but may show large sex-dependent differences in gene transcription. The ZFL cell line shows potential in toxicological studies involving the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway. However, low potential for transcriptional induction of genes in general should be expected, especially notable when studying estrogenic

  5. A characterization of the ZFL cell line and primary hepatocytes as in vitro liver cell models for the zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eide, Marta, E-mail: marta.eide@bio.uib.no [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Rusten, Marte; Male, Rune [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Jensen, Knut Helge Midtbø; Goksøyr, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •The ZFL cell line and primary hepatocytes were characterized. •Basic and induced expression of nuclear receptors and target genes were found. •The ZFL cell line expresses very low basic levels of most genes. •The ZFL cells have low induction of gene expression following exposures. •Primary hepatocytes show large sex-dependent differences in gene expression. -- Abstract: The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a widely used model species in biomedical research. The ZFL cell line, established from zebrafish liver, and freshly isolated primary hepatocytes from zebrafish have been used in several toxicological studies. However, no previous report has compared and characterized these two systems at the level of gene expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ZFL cell line in comparison to primary hepatocytes as in vitro models for studying effects of environmental contaminants in zebrafish liver. Using quantitative real-time PCR, the basal level and transcriptional induction potential of key genes involved in toxic responses in the ZFL cell line, primary hepatocytes and whole liver from zebrafish were compared. The study showed that the ZFL cells have lower levels of mRNA of most selected genes compared to zebrafish liver. The induced gene transcription following exposure to ligand was much lower in ZFL cells compared to zebrafish primary hepatocytes at the doses tested. Importantly, oestrogen receptor and vitellogenin genes showed low basal transcription and no induction response in the ZFL cell line. In conclusion, it appears that primary hepatocytes are well suited for studying environmental contaminants including xenoestrogens, but may show large sex-dependent differences in gene transcription. The ZFL cell line shows potential in toxicological studies involving the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway. However, low potential for transcriptional induction of genes in general should be expected, especially notable when studying estrogenic

  6. Disturbance of gene expression in primary human hepatocytes by hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids: A whole genome transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckert, Claudia; Hessel, Stefanie; Lenze, Dido; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    1,2-unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) are plant metabolites predominantly occurring in the plant families Asteraceae and Boraginaceae. Acute and chronic PA poisoning causes severe hepatotoxicity. So far, the molecular mechanisms of PA toxicity are not well understood. To analyze its mode of action, primary human hepatocytes were exposed to a non-cytotoxic dose of 100 μM of four structurally different PA: echimidine, heliotrine, senecionine, senkirkine. Changes in mRNA expression were analyzed by a whole genome microarray. Employing cut-off values with a |fold change| of 2 and a q-value of 0.01, data analysis revealed numerous changes in gene expression. In total, 4556, 1806, 3406 and 8623 genes were regulated by echimidine, heliotrine, senecione and senkirkine, respectively. 1304 genes were identified as commonly regulated. PA affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation, cell death and cancer development. The transcription factors TP53, MYC, NFκB and NUPR1 were predicted to be activated upon PA treatment. Furthermore, gene expression data showed a considerable interference with lipid metabolism and bile acid flow. The associated transcription factors FXR, LXR, SREBF1/2, and PPARα/γ/δ were predicted to be inhibited. In conclusion, though structurally different, all four PA significantly regulated a great number of genes in common. This proposes similar molecular mechanisms, although the extent seems to differ between the analyzed PA as reflected by the potential hepatotoxicity and individual PA structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy [Bioreclamation In Vitro Technologies, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Swaan, Peter W. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Hongbing, E-mail: hwang@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  8. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  9. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  10. Expression of rat class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alloantigens and hepatocytes and hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.M.; Desai, P.A.; Chakraborty, S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered expression of Class I MHC alloantigens has been reported for murine tumors, and may be associated with the tumorigenic phenotype of tumor cells. To characterize MHC Class I alloantigen expression on a chemically-induced transplantable rat hepatoma cell line, 17X, derived from a (WF x F344) F 1 rat, polyvalent anti-F344 and anti-WF rat alloantisera were first used to immunoprecipitate the rat RT1.A Class I MHC alloantigens expressed on primary (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocyptes in short-term monolayer cultures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE of immunoprecipitates from 35 S-methionine-labeled (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocytes clearly resolved the RT1.A/sup u/ (WF) and RT1.A/sup LvI/ (F344) parental alloantigens. Identical radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation failed to detect either parental alloantigen on the 17X hepatoma cells. However, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses demonstrated the presence of parental alloantigens on the 17X cells. Immunization of F344 rats but not of WF rats with 17X cells resulted in antibodies cytotoxic for normal (WF X F344) F 1 spleen cells in the presence of complement. These findings indicate that a combination of detection techniques will be necessary to characterize altered alloantigen expression on rat hepatoma cells

  11. Extracellular matrix-dependent myosin dynamics during G1-S phase cell cycle progression in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Hansen, Linda K.

    2004-01-01

    Cell spreading and proliferation are tightly coupled in anchorage-dependent cells. While adhesion-dependent proliferation signals require an intact actin cytoskeleton, and some of these signals such as ERK activation have been characterized, the role of myosin in spreading and cell cycle progression under different extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions is not known. Studies presented here examine changes in myosin activity in freshly isolated hepatocytes under ECM conditions that promote either proliferation (high fibronectin density) or growth arrest (low fibronectin density). Three different measures were obtained and related to both spreading and cell cycle progression: myosin protein levels and association with cytoskeleton, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and its ATPase activity. During the first 48 h in culture, corresponding with transit through G1 phase, there was a six-fold increase in both myosin protein levels and myosin association with actin cytoskeleton. There was also a steady increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation and ATPase activity with spreading, which did not occur in non-spread, growth-arrested cells on low density of fibronectin. Myosin-inhibiting drugs blocked ERK activation, cyclin D1 expression, and S phase entry. Overexpression of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1 overcame both ECM-dependent and actomyosin-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that cyclin D1 is a key event downstream of myosin-dependent cell cycle regulation

  12. Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in human hepatocytes and increases lipid accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jung Hwan; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Choi, Yoonjeong; Seok, Jo Woon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-01-01

    Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (MGAT) is an enzyme that is involved in triglyceride synthesis by catalyzing the formation of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoAs. Recently, we reported that MGAT1 has a critical role in hepatic TG accumulation and that its suppression ameliorates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model. However, the function of MGAT enzymes in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been investigated in humans. Unlike in rodents, MGAT3 as well as MGAT1 and MGAT2 are present in humans. In this study, we evaluated the differences between MGAT subtypes and their association with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a regulator of mouse MGAT1 expression. In human primary hepatocytes, basal expression of MGAT1 was lower than that of MGAT2 or MGAT3, but was strongly induced by PPARγ overexpression. A luciferase assay as well as an electromobility shift assay revealed that human MGAT1 promoter activity is driven by PPARγ by direct binding to at least two regions of the promoter in 293T and HepG2 cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of MGAT1 expression significantly attenuated lipid accumulation by PPARγ overexpression in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by oil-red-O staining. These results suggest that human MGAT1 has an important role in fatty liver formation as a target gene of PPARγ, and blocking MGAT1 activity could be an efficient therapeutic way to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases in humans. - Highlights: • PPARγ promotes MGAT1 expression in human primary hepatocytes. • PPARγ directly regulates MGAT1 promoter activity. • Human MGAT1 promoter has at least two PPARγ-binding elements. • Inhibition of MGAT1 expression attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in humans

  13. Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in human hepatocytes and increases lipid accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jung Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo Jeong [Division of Metabolic Disease, Center for Biomedical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Hyeonjin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjeong; Seok, Jo Woon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-woo, E-mail: japol13@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (MGAT) is an enzyme that is involved in triglyceride synthesis by catalyzing the formation of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoAs. Recently, we reported that MGAT1 has a critical role in hepatic TG accumulation and that its suppression ameliorates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model. However, the function of MGAT enzymes in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been investigated in humans. Unlike in rodents, MGAT3 as well as MGAT1 and MGAT2 are present in humans. In this study, we evaluated the differences between MGAT subtypes and their association with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a regulator of mouse MGAT1 expression. In human primary hepatocytes, basal expression of MGAT1 was lower than that of MGAT2 or MGAT3, but was strongly induced by PPARγ overexpression. A luciferase assay as well as an electromobility shift assay revealed that human MGAT1 promoter activity is driven by PPARγ by direct binding to at least two regions of the promoter in 293T and HepG2 cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of MGAT1 expression significantly attenuated lipid accumulation by PPARγ overexpression in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by oil-red-O staining. These results suggest that human MGAT1 has an important role in fatty liver formation as a target gene of PPARγ, and blocking MGAT1 activity could be an efficient therapeutic way to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases in humans. - Highlights: • PPARγ promotes MGAT1 expression in human primary hepatocytes. • PPARγ directly regulates MGAT1 promoter activity. • Human MGAT1 promoter has at least two PPARγ-binding elements. • Inhibition of MGAT1 expression attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in humans.

  14. Metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid 5F-PY-PICA by human and rat hepatocytes and identification of biliary analytical targets by directional efflux in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes using UHPLC-HR-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardal, Marie; Annaert, Pieter; Noble, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    Analytical strategies for detecting drugs in biological samples rely on information on metabolism and elimination. 5F-PY-PICA belongs to the group of synthetic cannabinoids that are known to undergo excretion into the bile. The aims of this study were the in vitro identification of metabolites of 5......F-PY-PICA and to determine which analytical targets are excreted into the bile and urine. Metabolites identified after incubation of 5F-PY-PICA with pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM), pooled human hepatocytes (pHH), or suspended and sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH). Rat hepatocytes were......-PY-PICA, M4, and M22 are proposed as analytical targets for bile analysis in forensic screening protocols, whereas M6 should be one of the main urinary targets for 5F-PY-PICA analysis....

  15. Developing a New Two-Step Protocol to Generate Functional Hepatocytes from Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Hypoxic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharee Prasajak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of donor livers and hepatocytes is a major limitation of liver transplantation. Thus, generation of hepatocyte-like cells may provide alternative choice for therapeutic applications. In this study, we developed a new method to establish hepatocytes from Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs cell lines named WJMSCs-SUT1 and WJMSCs-SUT2 under hypoxic condition. This new method could rapidly drive both WJ-MSCs cell lines into hepatic lineage within 18 days. The achievement of hepatogenic differentiation was confirmed by the characterization of both phenotypes and functions. More than 80% MSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cells (MSCDHCs achieved functional hepatocytes including hepatic marker expressions both at gene and protein levels, glycogen storage, low-density lipoprotein uptake, urea production, and albumin secretion. This study highlights the establishment of new hepatogenic induction protocol under hypoxic condition in order to mimic hypoxic microenvironment in typical cell physiology. In conclusion, we present a simple, high-efficiency, and time saving protocol for the generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from WJ-MSCs in hypoxic condition. The achievement of this method may overcome the limitation of donor hepatocytes and provides a new avenue for therapeutic value in cell-based therapy for life-threatening liver diseases, regenerative medicine, toxicity testing for pharmacological drug screening, and other medical related applications.

  16. Protective effect of kombucha tea against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide induced cytotoxicity and cell death in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2011-07-01

    Kombucha (KT), a fermented black tea (BT), is known to have many beneficial properties. In the present study, antioxidant property of KT has been investigated against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) induced cytotoxicity using murine hepatocytes. TBHP, a reactive oxygen species inducer, causes oxidative stress resulting in organ pathophysiology. Exposure to TBHP caused a reduction in cell viability, increased membrane leakage and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries in hepatocytes. TBHP exposure disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptosis as evidenced by flow cytometric analyses. KT treatment, however, counteracted the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented apoptotic cell death of the hepatocytes. BT treatment also reverted TBHP induced hepatotoxicity, however KT was found to be more efficient. This may be due to the formation of antioxidant molecules like D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone (DSL) during fermentation process and are absent in BT. Moreover, the radical scavenging activities of KT were found to be higher than BT. Results of the study showed that KT has the potential to ameliorate TBHP induced oxidative insult and cell death in murine hepatocytes more effectively than BT.

  17. The Protection of Hepatocyte Cells from the Effects of Oxidative Stress by Treatment with Vitamin E in Conjunction with DTT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsiang Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of vitamin E on membrane protein thiols under oxidative stress, which we induced by treating hepatocytes with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBH for 60 mins. Those cells which we pretreated with vitamin E formed fewer blebs (22.3% compared to 60.0% in nonvitamin E-treated cells and maintained cytosolic calcium concentration and the number of membrane protein thiols instead of showing the usual symptoms in cells undergoing oxidative stress. Dithiothreitol (DTT also commonly reduces bleb formation in hepatocytes affected by TBH. However, our experiments clearly demonstrate that DTT does not prevent the changes in cytosolic calcium and membrane protein thiols in the blebbing cells. Consequently, we decided to pretreat cells with both DTT and vitamin E and found that the influence of TBH was entirely prevented. These findings may provide us with a new aspect for investigating the mechanism of bleb formation under oxidative stress.

  18. Protective effect of mild endoplasmic reticulum stress on radiation-induced bystander effects in hepatocyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuexia; Ye, Shuang; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Peifeng; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the defense and self-protective mechanisms of bystander normal cells are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia, where the ratio of the yield of bystander MN induction to the yield of radiation-induced MN formation under hypoxia was much higher than that of normoxia. Nonetheless, thapsigargin induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and dramatically suppressed this bystander response manifested as the decrease of MN and apoptosis inductions. Meanwhile, the interference of BiP gene, a major ER chaperone, amplified the detrimental RIBE. More precisely, thapsigargin provoked ER sensor of PERK to initiate an instantaneous and moderate ER stress thus defensed the hazard form RIBE, while BiP depletion lead to persistently destroyed homeostasis of ER and exacerbated cell injury. These findings provide new insights that the mild ER stress through BiP-PERK-p-eIF2α signaling pathway has a profound role in protecting cellular damage from RIBE and hence may decrease the potential secondary cancer risk after cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27958308

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.pelz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan, E-mail: ekamphorst@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Stock, Peggy, E-mail: peggy.stock@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Brückner, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.brueckner@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Dollinger, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dollinger@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department for Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Weiskirchen, Ralf, E-mail: rweiskirchen@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Christ, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.christ@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM), University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  1. Differential Expression Profile of lncRNAs from Primary Human Hepatocytes Following DEET and Fipronil Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew D.; Hodgson, Ernest; Roe, R. Michael

    2017-01-01

    While the synthesis and use of new chemical compounds is at an all-time high, the study of their potential impact on human health is quickly falling behind, and new methods are needed to assess their impact. We chose to examine the effects of two common environmental chemicals, the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) and the insecticide fluocyanobenpyrazole (fipronil), on transcript levels of long non-protein coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in primary human hepatocytes using a global RNA-Seq approach. While lncRNAs are believed to play a critical role in numerous important biological processes, many still remain uncharacterized, and their functions and modes of action remain largely unclear, especially in relation to environmental chemicals. RNA-Seq showed that 100 µM DEET significantly increased transcript levels for 2 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 18 lncRNAs, while fipronil at 10 µM increased transcript levels for 76 lncRNAs and decreased levels for 193 lncRNAs. A mixture of 100 µM DEET and 10 µM fipronil increased transcript levels for 75 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 258 lncRNAs. This indicates a more-than-additive effect on lncRNA transcript expression when the two chemicals were presented in combination versus each chemical alone. Differentially expressed lncRNA genes were mapped to chromosomes, analyzed by proximity to neighboring protein-coding genes, and functionally characterized via gene ontology and molecular mapping algorithms. While further testing is required to assess the organismal impact of changes in transcript levels, this initial analysis links several of the dysregulated lncRNAs to processes and pathways critical to proper cellular function, such as the innate and adaptive immune response and the p53 signaling pathway. PMID:28991164

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor signaling in intrapancreatic ductal cells drives pancreatic morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Anderson

    Full Text Available In a forward genetic screen for regulators of pancreas development in zebrafish, we identified donut(s908 , a mutant which exhibits failed outgrowth of the exocrine pancreas. The s908 mutation leads to a leucine to arginine substitution in the ectodomain of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF tyrosine kinase receptor, Met. This missense mutation impedes the proteolytic maturation of the receptor, its trafficking to the plasma membrane, and diminishes the phospho-activation of its kinase domain. Interestingly, during pancreatogenesis, met and its hgf ligands are expressed in pancreatic epithelia and mesenchyme, respectively. Although Met signaling elicits mitogenic and migratory responses in varied contexts, normal proliferation rates in donut mutant pancreata together with dysmorphic, mislocalized ductal cells suggest that met primarily functions motogenically in pancreatic tail formation. Treatment with PI3K and STAT3 inhibitors, but not with MAPK inhibitors, phenocopies the donut pancreatic defect, further indicating that Met signals through migratory pathways during pancreas development. Chimera analyses showed that Met-deficient cells were excluded from the duct, but not acinar, compartment in the pancreatic tail. Conversely, wild-type intrapancreatic duct and "tip cells" at the leading edge of the growing pancreas rescued the donut phenotype. Altogether, these results reveal a novel and essential role for HGF signaling in the intrapancreatic ducts during exocrine morphogenesis.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor limits autoimmune neuroinflammation via glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper expression in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Molnarfi, Nicolas; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Merkler, Doron; Schneiter, Gregory; Bruscoli, Stefano; Riccardi, Carlo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Reith, Walter; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Lalive, Patrice H

    2014-09-15

    Autoimmune neuroinflammation, including multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a prototype for T cell-mediated autoimmunity, is believed to result from immune tolerance dysfunction leading to demyelination and substantial neurodegeneration. We previously showed that CNS-restricted expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent neuroprotective factor, reduced CNS inflammation and clinical deficits associated with EAE. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic HGF treatment ameliorates EAE through the development of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) with high expression levels of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a transcriptional repressor of gene expression and a key endogenous regulator of the inflammatory response. RNA interference-directed neutralization of GILZ expression by DCs suppressed the induction of tolerance caused by HGF. Finally, adoptive transfer of HGF-treated DCs from wild-type but not GILZ gene-deficient mice potently mediated functional recovery in recipient mice with established EAE through effective modulation of autoaggressive T cell responses. Altogether, these results show that by inducing GILZ in DCs, HGF reproduces the mechanism of immune regulation induced by potent immunomodulatory factors such as IL-10, TGF-β1, and glucocorticoids and therefore that HGF therapy may have potential in the treatment of autoimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CYP Suppression in Human Hepatocytes by Monomethyl Auristatin E, the Payload in Brentuximab Vedotin (Adcetris®), is Associated with Microtubule Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolenski, Francis S; Xia, Cindy Q; Ma, Bingli; Han, Tae H; Shyu, Wen C; Balani, Suresh K

    2018-06-01

    Monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), the toxin linked to CD30-specific monoclonal antibody of Adcetris ® (brentuximab vedotin), is a potent anti-microtubule agent. Brentuximab vedotin has been approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction assessment of MMAE was conducted in human hepatocytes to assess DDI potentials and its translation to clinic. MMAE was incubated at 1-1000 nM with cultured primary human hepatocytes for 72 h, and CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and CYP-specific probe substrate by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, along with microtubule disruption by immunofluorescence staining using anti-β-tubulin antibody and imaging. MMAE up to 10 nM had no significant effect on CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 mRNA expression and activity, whereas at higher concentrations of 100- and 1000-nM MMAE, the CYP mRNA expression and activity were diminished substantially. Further investigation showed that the degree of CYP suppression was paralleled by that of microtubule disruption by MMAE, as measured by increase in the number of β-tubulin-positive aggregates. At the clinical dose, the concentration of MMAE was 7 nM which did not show any significant CYP suppression or microtubule disruption in hepatocytes. MMAE was not a CYP inducer in human hepatocytes. However, it caused a concentration-dependent CYP mRNA suppression and activity. The CYP suppression was associated with microtubule disruption, supporting the reports that intact microtubule architecture is required for CYP regulations. The absence of CYP suppression and microtubule disruption in vitro at the clinical plasma concentrations of MMAE (< 10 nM) explains the lack of pharmacokinetic drug interaction between brentuximab vedotin and midazolam, a sensitive CYP3A substrate, reported in patients.

  6. Glutamic Acid Signal Synchronizes Protein Synthesis Kinetics in Hepatocytes from Old Rats for the Following Several Days. Cell Metabolism Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, V Y; Malchenko, L A; Lazarev, D S; Butorina, N N; Dubovaya, T K; Zvezdina, N D

    2018-03-01

    The kinetics of protein synthesis was investigated in primary cultures of hepatocytes from old rats in serum-free medium. The rats were fed mixed fodder supplemented with glutamic acid and then transferred to a regular mixed fodder. The amplitude of protein synthesis rhythm in hepatocytes isolated from these rats increased on average 2-fold in comparison with the rats not receiving glutamic acid supplement. Based on this indicator reflecting the degree of cell-cell interactions, the cells from old rats were not different from those of young rats. The effect was preserved for 3-4 days. These results are discussed in connection with our previous data on preservation of the effect of single administration of gangliosides, noradrenaline, serotonin, and other synchronizers on various cell populations. In contrast to the other investigated factors, glutamic acid is capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier, which makes its effect possible not only in the case of hepatocytes and other non-brain cells, but also in neurons.

  7. Human hepatocytes apoptosis induced by replication of hepatitis B virus subgenotypes F1b and F4: Role of basal core promoter and preCore mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, María Mercedes; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor; Barbini, Luciana; Flichman, Diego Martin

    2018-01-01

    In the context of pathogenesis of HBV infection, HBV genotypes and mutants have been shown to affect the natural course of chronic infection and treatment outcomes. In this work, we studied the induction of apoptosis by the replication of HBV subgenotypes F1b and F4, and the naturally occurring mutants BCP and preCore. Both subgenotypes F1b and F4 HBV genome transfections induced cell death by apoptosis in human hepatocytes. The BCPdm (A1762T/G1764A) and preCore (G1896A) mutants induced higher levels of apoptosis than the wt virus. This increase in apoptosis was not associated with the enhanced viral replication of the variants. HBV-mediated apoptosis was independent of viral subgenotypes, and associated with the modulation of members of the regulatory Bcl-2 family proteins expression in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Finally, the apoptosis induction increase observed for the preCore mutants suggests that HBeAg might have an anti-apoptotic effect in human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  9. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Klepeisz

    Full Text Available Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs. A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  10. Human hepatocytes loaded in 3D bioprinting generate mini-liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Because of an increasing discrepancy between the number of potential liver graft recipients and the number of organs available, scientists are trying to create artificial liver to mimic normal liver function and therefore, to support the patient's liver when in dysfunction. 3D printing technique meets this purpose. The present study was to test the feasibility of 3D hydrogel scaffolds for liver engineering. We fabricated 3D hydrogel scaffolds with a bioprinter. The biocompatibility of 3D hydrogel scaffolds was tested. Sixty nude mice were randomly divided into four groups, with 15 mice in each group: control, hydrogel, hydrogel with L02 (cell line HL-7702), and hydrogel with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Cells were cultured and deposited in scaffolds which were subsequently engrafted into livers after partial hepatectomy and radiation-induced liver damage (RILD). The engrafted tissues were examined after two weeks. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin, total bilirubin, CYP1A2, CYP2C9, glutathione S-transferase (a-GST), and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT-2) were compared among the groups. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry of cKit and cytokeratin 18 (CK18) of engrafted tissues were evaluated. The survival time of the mice was also compared among the four groups. 3D hydrogel scaffolds did not impact the viability of cells. The levels of ALT, AST, albumin, total bilirubin, CYP1A2, CYP2C9, a-GST and UGT-2 were significantly improved in mice engrafted with 3D scaffold loaded with L02 compared with those in control and scaffold only (P<0.05). HE staining showed clear liver tissue and immunohistochemistry of cKit and CK18 were positive in the engrafted tissue. Mice treated with 3D scaffold+L02 cells had longer survival time compared with those in control and scaffold only (P<0.05). 3D scaffold has the potential of recreating liver tissue and partial liver functions and can be used in the

  11. Metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoids AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48 in pooled human hepatocytes and rat hepatocytes analyzed by UHPLC-(IMS)-HR-MSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardal, Marie; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Qi, Bing; Mollerup, Christian Brinch; Annaert, Pieter; Linnet, Kristian

    2018-04-15

    The main analytical targets of synthetic cannabinoids are often metabolites. With the high number of new psychoactive substances entering the market, suitable workflows are needed for analytical target identification in biological samples. The aims of this study were to identify the main metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoids, AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48, using an in silico-assisted workflow with analytical data acquired using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-(ion mobility spectroscopy)-high resolution-mass spectrometry in data-independent acquisition mode (UHPLC-(IMS)-HR-MS E ). The metabolites were identified after incubation with rat and pooled human hepatocytes using UHPLC-HR-MS E , followed by UHPLC-IMS-HR-MS E . Metabolites of AMB-CHMICA and 5C-AKB48 were predicted with Meteor (Lhasa Ltd) and imported to the UNIFI software (Waters). The predicted metabolites were assigned to analytical components supported by the UNIFI in silico fragmentation tool. The main metabolic pathway of AMB-CHMICA was O-demethylation and hydroxylation of the methylhexyl moiety. For 5C-AKB48, the main metabolic pathways were hydroxylation(s) of the adamantyl moiety and oxidative dechlorination with subsequent oxidation to the ω-COOH. The matrix components in the metabolite spectra were reduced with IMS, which improved the accuracy of the spectral interpretation; however, this left fewer fragment ions for assigning sites of metabolism. Meteor was able to predict the majority of the metabolites, with the most notable exception being the oxidative dechlorination and, consequently, all metabolites that underwent that transformation pathway. Oxidative dechlorination of ω-chloroalkanes in humans has not been previously reported in the literature. The postulated metabolites can be used for screening of biological samples, with four-dimensional identification based on retention time, collision cross section, precursor ion, and fragment ions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Met inactivation by S-allylcysteine suppresses the migration and invasion of nasopharyngeal cancer cells induced by hepatocyte growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, O Yeon; Hwang, Hye Sook; Lee, Bok Soon; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Chul Ho; Chun, Mi Son [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Past studies have reported that S-allylcysteine (SAC) inhibits the migration and invasion of cancer cells through the restoration of E-cadherin, the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and Slug protein expression, and inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, evidence is emerging that shows that ROS induced by radiation could increase Met activation. Following on these reports of SAC and Met, we investigated whether SAC could suppress Met activation. Wound healing, invasion, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT), soft agar colony forming, western blotting, and gelatin zymography assays were performed in the human nasopharyngeal cancer cell lines HNE1 and HONE1 treated with SAC (0, 10, 20, or 40 mM) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). This study showed that SAC could suppress the migration and invasion of HNE1 and HONE1 cell lines by inhibiting p-Met. An increase of migration and invasion induced by HGF and its decrease in a dose dependent manner by SAC in wound healing and invasion assays was observed. The reduction of p-Met by SAC was positively correlated with p-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK) and p-extracellular related kinase (p-ERK in both cell lines). SAC reduced Slug, MMP2, and MMP9 involved in migration and invasion with the inhibition of Met-FAK signaling. These results suggest that SAC inhibited not only Met activation but also the downstream FAK, Slug, and MMP expression. Finally, SAC may be a potent anticancer compound for nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy.

  13. Human extrahepatic portal vein obstruction correlates with decreased factor VII and protein C transcription but increased hepatocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bill; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Superina, Riccardo A

    2007-10-01

    A 3-year-old girl developed extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) after a liver transplant. She had sequelae of portal hypertension that required another transplantation. The circumstances allowed for comparison of liver-dependent coagulation factor production between the second donor liver and the explanted liver with EHPVO. Liver samples from the explanted first graft and the second transplant were obtained. Fresh tissue was used to perform reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with primers against factors V, VII, as well as VIII, protein C, and paraffin-embedded sections for hepatocyte proliferation using Ki-67 antibody as well as for apoptosis using TUNEL assay. The transcription of factor VII and that of protein C were decreased in the explant as compared with the newly transplanted liver (factor VII, 77% of the donor; protein C, 88% of the donor). The transcription of factor V and that of factor VIII were unchanged. The explant had a greater percentage of proliferating hepatocytes than the new organ (0.85% +/- 0.75% vs 0.11% +/- 0.21%). The percentage of apoptotic cells was similar between the 2 livers (0.09% +/- 0.13% vs 0.09% +/- 0.13%). Idiopathic EHPVO is associated with a reduction in liver-dependent coagulation factor transcription and an increase in hepatocyte proliferation. Portal blood flow deprivation alters hepatic homeostasis and initiates mechanisms that attempt to restore liver-dependent coagulation factors.

  14. Localization of Alkaline Phosphatase and Cathepsin D during Cell Restoration after Colchicine Treatment in Primary Cultures of Fetal Rat Hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Kohsuke; Taguchi, Meiko

    2011-01-01

    Localization of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and cathepsin D (CAPD) in primary cultures of fetal rat hepatocytes was examined using double immunofluorescent staining in order to investigate the relationship between lysosome movement and the fate of ALP during cell restoration after microtubule disruption by colchicine. At 3 hr and 24 hr after colchicine treatment, numerous coarse dots containing ALP were observed throughout the cytoplasm, and some of these showed colocalization with CAPD. At 48 hr and 72 hr after colchicine treatment, although most of the dots containing ALP in the cytoplasm disappeared, dots containing CAPD remained. The present results suggest that the denatured ALP proteins remaining in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during cell restoration after colchicine treatment are digested by lysosomes

  15. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  16. Study on differential transcriptional profile in human hepatocyte exposed to different doses γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianguo; Wen Jianhua; Duan Zhikai; Tian Yu; Wang Fang; Zuo Yahui

    2009-01-01

    The study analyzed the differential transcriptional profile of normal human hepatic cell and human hepatic cell radiated with three different doses (0.5 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy γ ray) by gene chip technique. The results showed that the whole differentially expressed genes of three different doses have 284 in 14112 human genes analyzed, in which 261 genes were up-regulated and 23 genes were down-regulated. These genes are mainly associated with interferon receptor, mitochondrial regulation, homo sapiens hepatitis A virus cellular receptor, cell cycle regulation, kinase and zinc finger protein etc. RT-PCR results indicated that up-regulated expression of gene HAVcr-1, HAVcr-2, MFTC, MOAP1 and down-regulated expression of gene TRIP12, DCN are consistent with gene chip data. (authors)

  17. Study of differential gene expression in human hepatocyte exposed to 50 cGy γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianhua; Li Jianguo; Tian Huancheng; Li Yanling; Wang Xiaoli; Zuo Yanhui

    2008-01-01

    The study analyzed the differential transcriptional profile of the normal human hepatic cell and the human hepatic cell radiated with 50 cGy γ ray by gene chip technique. The results showed that there were 614 differentially expressed genes among 14 112 human genes analyzed, in which 521 genes were up-regulated and 93 genes down-regulated. These genes are associated with mitochondrial regulation, homo sapiens hepatitis A virus cellular receptor, tumor necrosis factor, cell cycle regulation, kinase and zinc finger protein etc. RT-PCR results indicated that up-regulated expression of gene HAVcr-1, HAVcr-2, MFTC, MOAP1 and down-regulated expression of gene TRIP12, DCN were consistent with gene chip data. (authors)

  18. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune-mediated mechanism, are highly associated with potent inhibition of bile salt transport. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Transdifferentiated rat pancreatic progenitor cells (AR42J-B13/H) respond to phenobarbital in a rat hepatocyte-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, M; Haltalli, M; Currie, R; Wright, J; Gooderham, N J

    2016-07-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) is known to produce species-specific effects in the rat and mouse, being carcinogenic in certain mouse strains, but only in rats if treated after a DNA damaging event. PB treatment in the rat and mouse also produces disparate effects on cell signalling and miRNA expression profiles. These responses are induced by short term and prolonged PB exposure, respectively, with the latter treatments being difficult to examine mechanistically in primary hepatocytes due to rapid loss of the original hepatic phenotype and limited sustainability in culture. Here we explore the rat hepatocyte-like B13/H cell line as a model for hepatic response to PB exposure in both short-term and longer duration treatments. We demonstrate that PB with Egf treatment in the B13/H cells resulted in a significant increase in Erk activation, as determined by the ratio of phospho-Erk to total Erk, compared to Egf alone. We also show that an extended treatment with PB in the B13/H cells produces a miRNA response similar to that seen in the rat in vivo, via the time-dependent induction of miR-182/96. Additionally, we confirm that B13/H cells respond to Car activators in a typical rat-specific manner. These data suggest that the B13/H cells produce temporal responses to PB that are comparable to those reported in short-term primary rat hepatocyte cultures and in the longer term are similar to those in the rat in vivo. Finally, we also show that Car-associated miR-122 expression is decreased by PB treatment in B13/H cells, a PB-induced response that is common to the rat, mouse and human. We conclude that the B13/H cell system produces a qualitative response comparable to the rat, which is different to the response in the mouse, and that this model could be a useful tool for exploring the functional consequences of PB-sensitive miRNA changes and resistance to PB-mediated tumours in the rat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lignans from Opuntia ficus-indica seeds protect rat primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Wha; Yang, Heejung; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided isolation of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) seeds against ethanol-treated primary rat hepatocytes yielded six lignan compounds. Among the isolates, furofuran lignans 4-6, significantly protected rat hepatocytes against ethanol-induced oxidative stress by reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, preserving antioxidative defense enzyme activities, and maintaining the glutathione content. Moreover, 4 dose-dependently induced the heme oxygenase-1 expression in HepG2 cells.

  1. Differentiation of monkey embryonic stem cells to hepatocytes by feeder-free dispersion culture and expression analyses of cytochrome p450 enzymes responsible for drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Junya; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Yamaori, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Sakae; Kamada, Noboru; Nakamura, Katsunori; Kikuchi, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were differentiated into hepatocytes by formation of embryoid bodies (EBs). However, this EB formation method is not always efficient for assays using a large number of samples simultaneously. A dispersion culture system, one of the differentiation methods without EB formation, is able to more efficiently provide a large number of feeder-free undifferentiated cells. A previous study demonstrated the effectiveness of the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for feeder-free dispersion culture and induction of differentiation of monkey ESCs into neural cells. In the present study, the induction of differentiation of cynomolgus monkey ESCs (cmESCs) into hepatocytes was performed by the dispersion culture method, and the expression and drug inducibility of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in these hepatocytes were examined. The cmESCs were successfully differentiated into hepatocytes under feeder-free dispersion culture conditions supplemented with Y-27632. The hepatocytes differentiated from cmESCs expressed the mRNAs for three hepatocyte marker genes (α-fetoprotein, albumin, CYP7A1) and several CYP enzymes, as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In particular, the basal expression of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) in these hepatocytes was detected at mRNA and enzyme activity (testosterone 6β-hydroxylation) levels. Furthermore, the expression and activity of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) were significantly upregulated by rifampicin. These results indicated the effectiveness of Y-27632 supplementation for feeder-free dispersed culture and induction of differentiation into hepatocytes, and the expression of functional CYP enzyme(s) in cmESC-derived hepatic cells.

  2. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemantkumar Chavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis.

  3. A transgenic rat hepatocyte - Kupffer cell co-culture model for evaluation of direct and macrophage-related effect of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemnitz, Katalin; Bátai-Konczos, Attila; Szabó, Mónika; Ioja, Enikő; Kolacsek, Orsolya; Orbán, Tamás I; Török, György; Homolya, László; Kovács, Eszter; Jablonkai, István; Veres, Zsuzsa

    2017-02-01

    Increasing number of papers demonstrate that Kupffer cells (KCs) play a role in the development of drug induced liver injury (DILI). Furthermore, elevated intracellular Ca 2+ level of hepatocytes is considered as a common marker of DILI. Here we applied an in vitro model based on hepatocyte mono- and hepatocyte/KC co-cultures (H/KC) isolated from transgenic rats stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent Ca 2+ sensor protein to investigate the effects of polycationic (G5), polyanionic (G4.5) and polyethylene-glycol coated neutral (G5 Peg) dendrimers known to accumulate in the liver, primarily in KCs. Following dendrimer exposure, hepatocyte homeostasis was measured by MTT cytotoxicity assay and by Ca 2+ imaging, while hepatocyte functions were studied by CYP2B1/2 inducibility, and bilirubin and taurocholate transport. G5 was significantly more cytotoxic than G4.5 for hepatocytes and induced Ca 2+ oscillation and sustained Ca 2+ signals at 1μM and10 μM, respectively both in hepatocytes and KCs. Dendrimer-induced Ca 2+ signals in hepatocytes were attenuated by macrophages. Activation of KCs by lipopolysaccharide and G5 decreased the inducibility of CYP2B1/2, which was restored by depleting the KCs with gadolinium-chloride and pentoxyphylline, suggesting a role of macrophages in the hindrance of CYP2B1/2 induction by G5 and lipopolysaccharide. In the H/KC, but not in the hepatocyte mono-culture, G5 reduced the canalicular efflux of bilirubin and stimulated the uptake and canalicular efflux of taurocholate. In conclusion, H/KC provides a good model for the prediction of hepatotoxic potential of drugs, especially of nanomaterials known to be trapped by macrophages, activation of which presumably contributes to DILI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First characterization of AKB-48 metabolism, a novel synthetic cannabinoid, using human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-10-01

    Since the federal authorities scheduled the first synthetic cannabinoids, JWH-018 and JWH-073, new synthetic cannabinoids were robustly marketed. N-(1-Adamantyl)-1-pentylindazole-3-carboxamide (AKB-48), also known as APINACA, was recently observed in Japanese herbal smoking blends. The National Forensic Laboratory Information System registered 443 reports of AKB-48 cases in the USA from March 2010 to January 2013. In May 2013, the Drug Enforcement Administration listed AKB-48 as a Schedule I drug. Recently, AKB-48 was shown to have twice the CB1 receptor binding affinity than CB2. These pharmacological effects and the difficulty in detecting the parent compound in urine highlight the importance of metabolite identification for developing analytical methods for clinical and forensic investigations. Using human hepatocytes and TripleTOF mass spectrometry, we identified 17 novel phase I and II AKB-48 metabolites, products of monohydroxylation, dihydroxylation, or trihydroxylation on the aliphatic adamantane ring or N-pentyl side chain. Glucuronide conjugation of some mono- and dihydroxylated metabolites also occurred. Oxidation and dihydroxylation on the adamantane ring and N-pentyl side chain formed a ketone. More metabolites were identified after 3 h of incubation than at 1 h. For the first time, we present a AKB-48 metabolic scheme obtained from human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry. These data are needed to develop analytical methods to identify AKB-48 consumption in clinical and forensic testing.

  5. CULTIVATION OF HUMAN LIVER CELLS AND ADIPOSE-DERIVED MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS IN PERFUSION BIOREACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. В. Basok

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to show the progress of the experiment of cultivation of human liver cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in perfusion bioreactor.Materials and methods. The cultivation of a cell-engineered construct, consisting of a biopolymer microstructured collagen-containing hydrogel, human liver cells, adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, and William’s E Medium, was performed in a perfusion bioreactor.Results. On the 7th day large cells with hepatocyte morphology – of a polygonal shape and a centrally located round nucleus, – were present in the culture chambers of the bioreactor. The metabolic activity of hepatocytes in cell-engineered constructs was confi rmed by the presence of urea in the culture medium on the seventh day of cultivation in the bioreactor and by the resorption of a biopolymer microstructured collagen-containing hydrogel.

  6. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Signaling Activates Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-2 in Hepatocyte Cells via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase and Caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Dan Duc; Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Kukkonen, Jyrki P; Eriksson, Ove; Mogollón, Isabel; Korhonen, Laura T; Arumäe, Urmas; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-05-13

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) influences the survival and differentiation of a specific population of neurons during development, but its role in non-neuronal cells has been less studied. We observed here that NGF and its pro-form, pro-NGF, are elevated in fatty livers from leptin-deficient mice compared with controls, concomitant with an increase in low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs). Stimulation of mouse primary hepatocytes with NGF or pro-NGF increased LDLR expression through the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Studies using Huh7 human hepatocyte cells showed that the neurotrophins activate the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2) that regulates genes involved in lipid metabolism. The mechanisms for this were related to stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and activation of caspase-3 and SREBP2 cleavage following NGF and pro-NGF stimulations. Cell fractionation experiments showed that caspase-3 activity was increased particularly in the membrane fraction that harbors SREBP2 and caspase-2. Experiments showed further that caspase-2 interacts with pro-caspase-3 and that p38 MAPK reduced this interaction and caused caspase-3 activation. Because of the increased caspase-3 activity, the cells did not undergo cell death following p75NTR stimulation, possibly due to concomitant activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway by the neurotrophins. These results identify a novel signaling pathway triggered by ligand-activated p75NTR that via p38 MAPK and caspase-3 mediate the activation of SREBP2. This pathway may regulate LDLRs and lipid uptake particularly after injury or during tissue inflammation accompanied by an increased production of growth factors, including NGF and pro-NGF. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Hepatic stellate cells secreted hepatocyte growth factor contributes to the chemoresistance of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Yu

    Full Text Available As the main source of extracellular matrix proteins in tumor stroma, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs have a great impact on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In the present study, we have investigated a mechanism whereby HSCs modulate the chemoresistance of hepatoma cells. We used human HSC line lx-2 and chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to investigate their effects on human HCC cell line Hep3B. The results showed that cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells was enhanced with LX-2 CM (cultured medium exposure in vitro as well as co-injection with LX-2 cells in null mice. Meanwhile, in presence of LX-2 CM, Hep3B cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and upregulation of cancer stem cell (CSC -like properties. Besides, LX-2 cells synthesized and secreted hepatic growth factor (HGF into the CM. HGF receptor tyrosine kinase mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (Met was activated in Hep3B cells after LX-2 CM exposure. The HGF level of LX-2 CM could be effectively reduced by using HGF neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, depletion of HGF in LX-2 CM abolished its effects on activation of Met as well as promotion of the EMT, CSC-like features and cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells. Collectively, secreting HGF into tumor milieu, HSCs may decrease hepatoma cells sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting EMT and CSC-like features via HGF/Met signaling.

  8. Deficiency of G1 regulators P53, P21Cip1 and/or pRb decreases hepatocyte sensitivity to TGFβ cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison David J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGFβ is critical to control hepatocyte proliferation by inducing G1-growth arrest through multiple pathways leading to inhibition of E2F transcription activity. The retinoblastoma protein pRb is a key controller of E2F activity and G1/S transition which can be inhibited in viral hepatitis. It is not known whether the impairment of pRb would alter the growth inhibitory potential of TGFβ in disease. We asked how Rb-deficiency would affect responses to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. Results Primary hepatocytes isolated from Rb-floxed mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing CRE-recombinase to delete the Rb gene. In control cells treatment with TGFβ prevented cells to enter S phase via decreased cMYC activity, activation of P16INK4A and P21Cip and reduction of E2F activity. In Rb-null hepatocytes, cMYC activity decreased slightly but P16INK4A was not activated and the great majority of cells continued cycling. Rb is therefore central to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes. However some Rb-null hepatocytes remained sensitive to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. As these hepatocytes expressed very high levels of P21Cip1 and P53 we investigated whether these proteins regulate pRb-independent signaling to cell cycle arrest by evaluating the consequences of disruption of p53 and p21Cip1. Hepatocytes deficient in p53 or p21Cip1 showed diminished growth inhibition by TGFβ. Double deficiency had a similar impact showing that in cells containing functional pRb; P21Cip and P53 work through the same pathway to regulate G1/S in response to TGFβ. In Rb-deficient cells however, p53 but not p21Cip deficiency had an additive effect highlighting a pRb-independent-P53-dependent effector pathway of inhibition of E2F activity. Conclusion The present results show that otherwise genetically normal hepatocytes with disabled p53, p21Cip1 or Rb genes respond less well to the antiproliferative effects of TGFβ. As the function of

  9. Multiplicity of nuclear receptor activation by PFOA and PFOS in primary human and rodent hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, J.A.; Butenhoff, J.L.; Wallace, K.B.

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) are surface active fluorochemicals that, due to their exceptional stability to degradation, are persistent in the environment. Both PFOA and PFOS are eliminated slowly in humans, with geometric mean serum elimination half-lives estimated at 3.5 and 4.8 years, respectively. The biological activity of PFOA and PFOS in rodents is attributed primarily to transactivation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), which is an important regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. However, there are significant species-specific differences in the response to PFOA and PFOS exposure; non-rodent species, including humans, are refractory to several but not all of these effects. Many of the metabolic effects have been attributed to the activation of PPARA; however, recent studies using PPARα knockout mice demonstrate residual PPARA-independent effects, some of which may involve the activation of alternate nuclear receptors, including NR1I2 (PXR), NR1I3 (CAR), NR1H3 (LXRA), and NR1H4 (FXR). The objective of this investigation was to characterize the activation of multiple nuclear receptors and modulation of metabolic pathways associated with exposure to PFOA and PFOS, and to compare and contrast the effects between rat and human primary liver cells using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Our results demonstrate that multiple nuclear receptors participate in the metabolic response to PFOA and PFOS exposure resulting in a substantial shift from carbohydrate metabolism to fatty acid oxidation and hepatic triglyceride accumulation in rat liver cells. This shift in intermediary metabolism was more pronounced for PFOA than PFOS. Furthermore, while there is some similarity in the activation of metabolic pathways between rat and humans, particularly in PPARA regulated responses; the changes in primary human cells were more subtle and possibly reflect an adaptive

  10. Repolarization of hepatocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, M A; Kappus, B; Hubbard, A

    1997-01-01

    We have evaluated the biochemical, morphological, and functional redevelopment of polarity in freshly isolated hepatocytes cultured using a double layer collagen gel sandwich technique. Western blot analysis showed increased cellular levels of the cell adhesion protein uvomorulin as cultured hepatocytes repolarized. Immunofluorescence studies using antibodies against domain-specific membrane proteins showed polarity as early as 48 hours, although the pattern of the polymeric Immunoglobulin-A receptor (pIgA-R) differed from in vivo liver. Electron microscopy showed developing bile canaliculi at 1 day. However, the functional presence of tight junctions was absent at 1 day, but present at 5 days. We further showed functional polarity to be present at 4 days by documenting the ability of cultured hepatocytes to metabolize and excrete fluorescein diacetate into visible bile canaliculi. We conclude that hepatocytes cultured appropriately develop morphological and functional polarity. Hepatocyte culture is therefore a useful tool for the study of mechanisms responsible for the development of polarized function.

  11. Disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to defective proliferation of hepatocytes and bipotent fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyejin; Yoon, Min-Sik; Ryu, Kwon-Yul, E-mail: kyryu@uos.ac.kr

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Proliferation capacity of Ubc{sup −/−} FLCs was reduced during culture in vitro. •Ubc is required for proliferation of both hepatocytes and bipotent FLEPCs. •Bipotent FLEPCs exhibit highest Ubc transcription and proliferation capacity. •Cell types responsible for Ubc{sup −/−} fetal liver developmental defect were identified. -- Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to mid-gestation embryonic lethality most likely due to a defect in fetal liver development, which can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of Ub. In a previous study, we assessed the cause of embryonic lethality with respect to the fetal liver hematopoietic system. We confirmed that Ubc{sup −/−} embryonic lethality could not be attributed to impaired function of hematopoietic stem cells, which raises the question of whether or not FLECs such as hepatocytes and bile duct cells, the most abundant cell types in the liver, are affected by disruption of Ubc and contribute to embryonic lethality. To answer this, we isolated FLCs from E13.5 embryos and cultured them in vitro. We found that proliferation capacity of Ubc{sup −/−} cells was significantly reduced compared to that of control cells, especially during the early culture period, however we did not observe the increased number of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, levels of Ub conjugate, but not free Ub, decreased upon disruption of Ubc expression in FLCs, and this could not be compensated for by upregulation of other poly- or mono-ubiquitin genes. Intriguingly, the highest Ubc expression levels throughout the entire culture period were observed in bipotent FLEPCs. Hepatocytes and bipotent FLEPCs were most affected by disruption of Ubc, resulting in defective proliferation as well as reduced cell numbers in vitro. These results suggest that defective proliferation of these cell types may contribute to severe reduction of fetal liver size and potentially mid

  12. Hepatocyte polarization is essential for the productive entry of the hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Andreas; Mills, Kerry; Weiss, Thomas S; Urban, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is characterized by a high species specificity and a distinct liver tropism. Within the liver, HBV replication occurs in differentiated and polarized hepatocytes. Accordingly, the in vitro HBV infection of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and the human hepatoma cell line, HepaRG, is restricted to differentiated, hepatocyte-like cells. Though preparations of PHH contain up to 100% hepatic cells, cultures of differentiated HepaRG cells are a mixture of hepatocyte-like and biliary-like epithelial cells. We used PHH and HepaRG cells and compared the influence of virus inoculation dose, cell differentiation, and polarization on productive HBV infection. At multiplicities of genome equivalents (mge) >8,000, almost 100% of PHHs could be infected. In contrast, only a subset of HepaRG cells stained positive for HBcAg at comparable or even higher mge. Infection predominantly occurred at the edges of islands of hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells. This indicates a limited accessibility of the HBV receptor, possibly as a result of its polar sorting. Multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2), a marker selectively transported to the apical (i.e., canalicular) cell membrane, revealed two polarization phenotypes of HepaRG cells. HBV infection within the islands of hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells preferentially occurred in cells that resemble PHH, exhibiting canalicular structures. However, disruption of cell-cell junctions allowed the additional infection of cells that do not display a PHH-like polarization. HBV enters hepatocytes via the basolateral membrane. This model, at least partially, explains the difference of PHH and HepaRG cells in infection efficacy, provides insights into natural HBV infection, and establishes a basis for optimization of the HepaRG infection system. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Quantitative Nuclease Protection Assays (qNPA) as Windows into Chemical-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultures of Primary Human Hepatocytes (Concentration and Time-Response)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultures of primary human hepatocytes have been shown to be dynamic in vitro model systems that retain liver-like functionality (e.g. metabolism, transport, induction). We have utilized these culture models to interrogate 309 ToxCast chemicals. The study design characterized both...

  14. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Mohammad K; Avila, Diana; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentration...

  15. Enhanced cell survival and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing hepatocyte growth factor promote cardioprotection in myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Liyan; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Ding, Yue; Xu, Yan; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Poor cell survival post transplantation compromises the therapeutic benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in myocardial infarction (MI). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an important cytokine for angiogenesis, anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis. This study aimed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of MSCs overexpressing HGF in a mouse model of MI. The apoptosis of umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) and HGF-UC-MSCs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions was detected. The conditioned medium (CdM) of UC-MSCs and HGF-UC-MSCs under a hypoxic condition was harvested and its protective effect on neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) exposed to a hypoxic challenge was examined. UC-MSCs and HGF-UC-MSCs were transplanted into the peri-infarct region in mice following MI and heart function assessed 4 weeks post transplantation. The apoptosis of HGF-UC-MSCs under hypoxic conditions was markedly decreased compared with that of UC-MSCs. NCMs treated with HGF-UC-MSC hypoxic CdM (HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM) exhibited less cell apoptosis in response to hypoxic challenge than those treated with UC-MSC hypoxic CdM (UC-MSCs-hy-CdM). HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM released the inhibited p-Akt and lowered the enhanced ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 induced by hypoxia in the NCMs. HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM expressed higher levels of HGF, EGF, bFGF and VEGF than UC-MSCs-hy-CdM. Transplantation of HGF-UC-MSCs or UC-MSCs greatly improved heart function in the mouse model of MI. Compared with UC-MSCs, transplantation of HGF-UC-MSCs was associated with less cardiomyocyte apoptosis, enhanced angiogenesis and increased proliferation of cardiomyocytes. This study may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for MSC-based therapy in cardiovascular disease.

  16. Enhanced cell survival and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing hepatocyte growth factor promote cardioprotection in myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liyan; Liu, Xiaolin [Section of Pacing and Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zhang, Yuelin [Cardiology Division, Department of Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Liang, Xiaoting; Ding, Yue [Pudong District Clinical Translational Medical Research Center, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Yan; Fang, Zhen [Section of Pacing and Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zhang, Fengxiang, E-mail: njzfx6@njmu.edu.cn [Section of Pacing and Electrophysiology, Division of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Poor cell survival post transplantation compromises the therapeutic benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in myocardial infarction (MI). Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an important cytokine for angiogenesis, anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis. This study aimed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of MSCs overexpressing HGF in a mouse model of MI. The apoptosis of umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) and HGF-UC-MSCs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions was detected. The conditioned medium (CdM) of UC-MSCs and HGF-UC-MSCs under a hypoxic condition was harvested and its protective effect on neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) exposed to a hypoxic challenge was examined. UC-MSCs and HGF-UC-MSCs were transplanted into the peri-infarct region in mice following MI and heart function assessed 4 weeks post transplantation. The apoptosis of HGF-UC-MSCs under hypoxic conditions was markedly decreased compared with that of UC-MSCs. NCMs treated with HGF-UC-MSC hypoxic CdM (HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM) exhibited less cell apoptosis in response to hypoxic challenge than those treated with UC-MSC hypoxic CdM (UC-MSCs-hy-CdM). HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM released the inhibited p-Akt and lowered the enhanced ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 induced by hypoxia in the NCMs. HGF-UC-MSCs-hy-CdM expressed higher levels of HGF, EGF, bFGF and VEGF than UC-MSCs-hy-CdM. Transplantation of HGF-UC-MSCs or UC-MSCs greatly improved heart function in the mouse model of MI. Compared with UC-MSCs, transplantation of HGF-UC-MSCs was associated with less cardiomyocyte apoptosis, enhanced angiogenesis and increased proliferation of cardiomyocytes. This study may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for MSC-based therapy in cardiovascular disease.

  17. An inducible transgenic mouse model for immune mediated hepatitis showing clearance of antigen expressing hepatocytes by CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cebula

    Full Text Available The liver has the ability to prime immune responses against neo antigens provided upon infections. However, T cell immunity in liver is uniquely modulated by the complex tolerogenic property of this organ that has to also cope with foreign agents such as endotoxins or food antigens. In this respect, the nature of intrahepatic T cell responses remains to be fully characterized. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms that regulate the CD8+ T cell responses in the liver, we established a novel OVA_X_CreER(T2 mouse model. Upon tamoxifen administration OVA antigen expression is observed in a fraction of hepatocytes, resulting in a mosaic expression pattern. To elucidate the cross-talk of CD8+ T cells with antigen-expressing hepatocytes, we adoptively transferred K(b/OVA257-264-specific OT-I T cells to OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice or generated triple transgenic OVA_X CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice. OT-I T cells become activated in OVA_X_CreER(T2 mice and induce an acute and transient hepatitis accompanied by liver damage. In OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice, OVA induction triggers an OT-I T cell mediated, fulminant hepatitis resulting in 50% mortality. Surviving mice manifest a long lasting hepatitis, and recover after 9 weeks. In these experimental settings, recovery from hepatitis correlates with a complete loss of OVA expression indicating efficient clearance of the antigen-expressing hepatocytes. Moreover, a relapse of hepatitis can be induced upon re-induction of cured OVA_X_CreER(T2_X_OT-I mice indicating absence of tolerogenic mechanisms. This pathogen-free, conditional mouse model has the advantage of tamoxifen inducible tissue specific antigen expression that reflects the heterogeneity of viral antigen expression and enables the study of intrahepatic immune responses to both de novo and persistent antigen. It allows following the course of intrahepatic immune responses: initiation, the acute phase and antigen clearance.

  18. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  19. Estradiol-mediated hepatocyte growth factor is involved in the implantation of endometriotic cells via the mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshihiro J; Hayashi, Masami; Tanabe, Akiko; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kanemura, Masanori; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2015-06-01

    The pathogenesis of endometriosis, a chronic painful gynecological disease characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue located outside of the uterus and often adhering to the peritoneum, is known to be estrogen dependent. However, the precise pathophysiology of endometriosis remains elusive. Recent studies indicate that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of human endometrial cells is important for the progression of endometriosis, and another previous study has implicated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in endometriosis progression. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of estradiol in the regulation of HGF production and progression of peritoneal endometriosis, focusing on the interactions between the peritoneum and endometriotic cells. Consequently, estradiol was found to promote the proliferation, invasion, and migration of immortalized human endometrial epithelial cells (hEECs) via HGF upregulation, and the estradiol-induced direct binding of estrogen receptor-α to the HGF promoter was confirmed on a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Estradiol also induced the EMT in hEECs by promoting HGF production. Furthermore, human mesothelial cells underwent the mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) during culture with estradiol-stimulated hEEC conditioned medium. Importantly, estradiol itself did not induce the MMT, and the estradiol-stimulated hEEC-conditioned medium in the presence of HGF antibodies reversed the MMT process. These results, which were obtained using immortalized hEECs, indicate that estradiol-induced HGF production may play a crucial role in the peritoneal implantation of human endometriotic cells by exerting proliferative and invasive effects via the EMT in hEECs and promoting the MMT in mesothelial cells. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Hepatocyte polyploidization and its association with pathophysiological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Jun; Chen, Fei; Lau, Joseph T Y; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2017-05-18

    A characteristic cellular feature of the mammalian liver is the progressive polyploidization of the hepatocytes, where individual cells acquire more than two sets of chromosomes. Polyploidization results from cytokinesis failure that takes place progressively during the course of postnatal development. The proportion of polyploidy also increases with the aging process or with cellular stress such as surgical resection, toxic stimulation, metabolic overload, or oxidative damage, to involve as much as 90% of the hepatocytes in mice and 40% in humans. Hepatocyte polyploidization is generally considered an indicator of terminal differentiation and cellular senescence, and related to the dysfunction of insulin and p53/p21 signaling pathways. Interestingly, the high prevalence of hepatocyte polyploidization in the aged mouse liver can be reversed when the senescent hepatocytes are serially transplanted into young mouse livers. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of hepatocytes polyploidization during postnatal growth, aging, and liver diseases. The biologic significance of polyploidization in senescent reversal, within the context of new ways to think of liver aging and liver diseases is considered.

  1. Multiple regulatory mechanisms of hepatocyte growth factor expression in malignant cells with a short poly(dA) sequence in the HGF gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kazuko; Takeda, Masayuki; Okamoto, Isamu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression is a poor prognostic factor in various types of cancer. Expression levels of HGF have been reported to be regulated by shorter poly(dA) sequences in the promoter region. In the present study, the poly(dA) mononucleotide tract in various types of human cancer cell lines was examined and compared with the HGF expression levels in those cells. Short deoxyadenosine repeat sequences were detected in five of the 55 cell lines used in the present study. The H69, IM95, CCK-81, Sui73 and H28 cells exhibited a truncated poly(dA) sequence in which the number of poly(dA) repeats was reduced by ≥5 bp. Two of the cell lines exhibited high HGF expression, determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The CCK-81, Sui73 and H28 cells with shorter poly(dA) sequences exhibited low HGF expression. The cause of the suppression of HGF expression in the CCK-81, Sui73 and H28 cells was clarified by two approaches, suppression by methylation and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HGF gene. Exposure to 5-Aza-dC, an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase 1, induced an increased expression of HGF in the CCK-81 cells, but not in the other cells. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs72525097 in intron 1 was detected in the Sui73 and H28 cells. Taken together, it was found that the defect of poly(dA) in the HGF promoter was present in various types of cancer, including lung, stomach, colorectal, pancreas and mesothelioma. The present study proposes the negative regulation mechanisms by methylation and SNP in intron 1 of HGF for HGF expression in cancer cells with short poly(dA).

  2. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 ± 9.01 vs. 41.94 ± 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 ± 1303 vs. 1667 ± 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 ± 1084 vs. 1566 ± 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  3. Caspase 1 activation is protective against hepatocyte cell death by up-regulating beclin 1 protein and mitochondrial autophagy in the setting of redox stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R; Scott, Melanie J

    2013-05-31

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed.

  4. Caspase 1 Activation Is Protective against Hepatocyte Cell Death by Up-regulating Beclin 1 Protein and Mitochondrial Autophagy in the Setting of Redox Stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Gao, Wentao; Loughran, Patricia; Shapiro, Rick; Fan, Jie; Billiar, Timothy R.; Scott, Melanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase 1 activation can be induced by oxidative stress, which leads to the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL18 in myeloid cells and a potentially damaging inflammatory response. However, little is known about the role of caspase 1 in non-immune cells, such as hepatocytes, that express and activate the inflammasome but do not produce a significant amount of IL1β/IL18. Here we demonstrate that caspase 1 activation protects against cell death after redox stress induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in hepatocytes. Mechanistically, we show that caspase 1 reduces mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species by increasing mitochondrial autophagy and subsequent clearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes after hypoxia/reoxygenation. Caspase 1 increases autophagic flux through up-regulating autophagy initiator beclin 1 during redox stress and is an important cell survival factor in hepatocytes. We find that during hemorrhagic shock with resuscitation, an in vivo mouse model associated with severe hepatic redox stress, caspase 1 activation is also protective against liver injury and excessive oxidative stress through the up-regulation of beclin 1. Our findings suggest an alternative role for caspase 1 activation in promoting adaptive responses to oxidative stress and, more specifically, in limiting reactive oxygen species production and damage in cells and tissues where IL1β/IL18 are not highly expressed. PMID:23589298

  5. Rifampin modulation of xeno- and endobiotic conjugating enzyme mRNA expression and associated microRNAs in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gufford, Brandon T; Robarge, Jason D; Eadon, Michael T; Gao, Hongyu; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong; Desta, Zeruesenay; Skaar, Todd C

    2018-04-01

    Rifampin is a pleiotropic inducer of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. This work utilized a global approach to evaluate rifampin effects on conjugating enzyme gene expression with relevance to human xeno- and endo-biotic metabolism. Primary human hepatocytes from 7 subjects were treated with rifampin (10 μmol/L, 24 hours). Standard methods for RNA-seq library construction, EZBead preparation, and NextGen sequencing were used to measure UDP-glucuronosyl transferase UGT, sulfonyltransferase SULT, N acetyltransferase NAT, and glutathione-S-transferase GST mRNA expression compared to vehicle control (0.01% MeOH). Rifampin-induced (>1.25-fold) mRNA expression of 13 clinically important phase II drug metabolizing genes and repressed (>1.25-fold) the expression of 3 genes ( P  accounting for simultaneous induction of both CYP3A4 and UGT1A4 predicted a ~10-fold decrease in parent midazolam exposure with only a ~2-fold decrease in midazolam N-glucuronide metabolite exposure. These data reveal differential effects of rifampin on the human conjugating enzyme transcriptome and potential associations with miRNAs that form the basis for future mechanistic studies to elucidate the interplay of conjugating enzyme regulatory elements.

  6. Glutathione deficiency induced by cystine and/or methionine deprivation does not affect thyroid hormone deiodination in cultured rat hepatocytes and monkey hepatocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Robbins, J.

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the recently advanced hypothesis that glutathione [L-gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl glycine (GSH)] regulates deiodinating enzyme activities, accounting for the decreased conversion of T4 to T3 in the liver of fetal and starved animals, we investigated thyroid hormone metabolism in GSH-depleted neoplastic and normal hepatocytes. In monkey hepatocarcinoma cells, intracellular total GSH decreased below 10% of the control value (approximately 25 micrograms/mg protein) when cells were grown for 44 h in medium deficient in cystine and methionine or in cystine alone. The latter finding indicated that transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine was defective in these neoplastic cells. In primary cultured adult rat hepatocytes, on the other hand, the transsulfuration pathway was intact, and total GSH decreased below 10% of control (approximately 20 micrograms/mg protein) only in cells grown in cystine- and methionine-deficient medium. In both cell types, the oxidized GSH fraction remained constant (2-5% of total). Incubation with 125I-labeled T4 and T3, followed by chromatography, was used to evaluate 5-deiodination in hepatocarcinoma cells and both 5- and 5'-deiodination in normal hepatocytes. Deiodination was not decreased by GSH deficiency in either case, but was actually increased in hepatocarcinoma cells. This resulted from an increase in the Vmax of 5-deiodinase related to growth arrest. Diamide at 2 mM reversibly inhibited both 5'- and 5'-deiodination in rat hepatocytes, accompanied by decreased total GSH as well as increased GSH disulfide (27% of total). The data suggest that GSH is so abundant in the liver that hepatocytes can tolerate a greater than 90% decrease in intracellular concentration without any change in thyroid hormone deiodination and indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism in the fetus and in starvation cannot be accounted for by a decreased hepatic GSH concentration

  7. Long live the liver: immunohistochemical and stereological study of hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells of male and female rats throughout ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Ricardo; Correia-Gomes, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Male/female differences in enzyme activity and gene expression in the liver are known to be attenuated with ageing. Nevertheless, the effect of ageing on liver structure and quantitative cell morphology remains unknown. Male and female Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12 and 18 months were examined by means of stereological techniques and immunohistochemical tagging of hepatocytes (HEP), liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in order to assess the total number and number per gram of these cells throughout life. The mean cell volume of HEP and HSC, the lobular position and the collagen content of the liver were also evaluated with stereological techniques. The number per gram of HSC was similar for both genders and was maintained throughout ageing. The mean volume of HSC was also conserved but differences in the cell body and lobular location were observed. Statistically significant gender differences in HEP were noted in young rats (females had smaller and more binucleated HEP) but were attenuated with ageing. The same occurred for KC and LSEC, since the higher number per gram in young females disappeared in older animals. Liver collagen increased with ageing but only in males. Thus, the numbers of these four cell types are related throughout ageing, with well-defined cell ratios. The shape and lobular position of HSC change with ageing in both males and females. Gender dimorphism in HEP, KC and LSEC of young rat liver disappears with ageing.

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor/c-MET axis-mediated tropism of cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells for neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Thorsten; Kögler, Gesine; El-Khattouti, Abdelouahid; Sorg, Rüdiger V; Besselmann, Michael; Föcking, Melanie; Bührle, Christian P; Trompeter, Ingo; Fischer, Johannes C; Wernet, Peter

    2008-11-21

    An under-agarose chemotaxis assay was used to investigate whether unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSC) that were recently characterized in human cord blood are attracted by neuronal injury in vitro. USSC migrated toward extracts of post-ischemic brain tissue of mice in which stroke had been induced. Moreover, apoptotic neurons secrete factors that strongly attracted USSC, whereas necrotic and healthy neurons did not. Investigating the expression of growth factors and chemokines in lesioned brain tissue and neurons and of their respective receptors in USSC revealed expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in post-ischemic brain and in apoptotic but not in necrotic neurons and of the HGF receptor c-MET in USSC. Neuronal lesion-triggered migration was observed in vitro and in vivo only when c-MET was expressed at a high level in USSC. Neutralization of the bioactivity of HGF with an antibody inhibited migration of USSC toward neuronal injury. This, together with the finding that human recombinant HGF attracts USSC, document that HGF signaling is necessary for the tropism of USSC for neuronal injury. Our data demonstrate that USSC have the capacity to migrate toward apoptotic neurons and injured brain. Together with their neural differentiation potential, this suggests a neuroregenerative potential of USSC. Moreover, we provide evidence for a hitherto unrecognized pivotal role of the HGF/c-MET axis in guiding stem cells toward brain injury, which may partly account for the capability of HGF to improve function in the diseased central nervous system.

  9. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Bello, Rosario I.; Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Ana B.; Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Rodriguez, Blanca A.; Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora; Duran-Prado, Mario; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntane, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca 2+ on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca 2+ pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca 2+ entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca 2+ mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca 2+ concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca 2+ entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca 2+ entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca 2+ -dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  10. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I; Bello, Rosario I [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas (CIBEREH o Ciberehd) (Spain); Hidalgo, Ana B [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa [Department of Biostatistics, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Rodriguez, Blanca A [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas (CIBEREH o Ciberehd) (Spain); Duran-Prado, Mario [Instituto de Parasitologia y Biomedicina Lopez Neyra, CSIC, Granada (Spain); CIBER Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion CB06/03, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo (Spain); Aguilar-Melero, Patricia [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); De la Mata, Manuel [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas (CIBEREH o Ciberehd) (Spain); Muntane, Jordi [Liver Research Unit, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas (CIBEREH o Ciberehd) (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca{sup 2+} on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca{sup 2+} pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  11. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor is constitutively produced by donor-derived bone marrow cells and promotes regeneration of pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Takeshi; Yasuda, Daisuke; Koizumi, Tomotake; Suganuma, Chisaki; Saito, Koji; Murai, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Ken; Odaira, Masanori; Kusano, Tomokazu; Kushima, Miki; Kusano, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the transplantation of bone marrow cells following diabetes induced by streptozotocin can support the recovery of pancreatic β-cell mass and a partial reversal of hyperglycemia. To address this issue, we examined whether the c-Met/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling pathway was involved in the recovery of β-cell injury after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In this model, donor-derived bone marrow cells were positive for HGF immunoreactivity in the recipient spleen, liver, lung, and pancreas as well as in the host hepatocytes. Indeed, plasma HGF levels were maintained at a high value. The frequency of c-Met expression and its proliferative activity and differentiative response in the pancreatic ductal cells in the BMT group were greater than those in the PBS-treated group, resulting in an elevated number of endogenous insulin-producing cells. The induction of the c-Met/HGF signaling pathway following BMT promotes pancreatic regeneration in diabetic rats

  13. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-01-01

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  14. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs flox/flox ;mb1 cre/+ :Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  17. Data on gene and protein expression changes induced by apabetalone (RVX-208 in ex vivo treated human whole blood and primary hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Wasiak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Apabetalone (RVX-208 inhibits the interaction between epigenetic regulators known as bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins and acetyl-lysine marks on histone tails. Data presented here supports the manuscript published in Atherosclerosis “RVX-208, a BET-inhibitor for Treating Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease, Raises ApoA-I/HDL and Represses Pathways that Contribute to Cardiovascular Disease” (Gilham et al., 2016 [1]. It shows that RVX-208 and a comparator BET inhibitor (BETi JQ1 increase mRNA expression and production of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I, the main protein component of high density lipoproteins, in primary human and African green monkey hepatocytes. In addition, reported here are gene expression changes from a microarray-based analysis of human whole blood and of primary human hepatocytes treated with RVX-208. Keywords: Bromodomain, BET proteins, BET inhibitor, RVX-208, JQ1, Vascular inflammation, ApoA-I, Apolipoprotein A-I, African green monkey, Primary human hepatocytes, Gene expression, Microarrays

  18. Different effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on sterol synthesis in various human cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Huisman, R.H.; Moshage, H.; Yap, S.H.; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    The three vastatins examined, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin, are equally strong inhibitors of the sterol synthesis in human hepatocytes in culture with IC50-values of 4.1, 8.0 and 2.0 nM, respectively. However, in the human extrahepatic cells: umbilical vascular endothelial cells, retinal

  19. T cells infiltrate the liver and kill hepatocytes in HLA-B(∗)57:01-associated floxacillin-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuillemin, Natascha; Terracciano, Luigi; Beltraminelli, Helmut; Schlapbach, Christoph; Fontana, Stefano; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major safety issue. It can cause severe disease and is a common cause of the withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. Recent studies have identified the HLA-B(∗)57:01 allele as a risk factor for floxacillin (FLUX)-induced liver injury and have suggested a role for cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in the pathomechanism of liver injury caused by FLUX. This study aimed to confirm the importance of FLUX-reacting cytotoxic lymphocytes in the pathomechanism of liver injury and to dissect the involved mechanisms of cytotoxicity. IHC staining of a liver biopsy from a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury revealed periportal inflammation and the infiltration of cytotoxic CD3(+) CD8(+) lymphocytes into the liver. The infiltration of cytotoxic lymphocytes into the liver of a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury demonstrates the importance of FLUX-reacting T cells in the underlying pathomechanism. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells from 10 HLA-B(∗)57:01(+) healthy donors toward autologous target cells and HLA-B(∗)57:01-transduced hepatocytes was analyzed in vitro. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells was concentration dependent and required concentrations in the range of peak serum levels after FLUX administration. Killing of target cells was mediated by different cytotoxic mechanisms. Our findings emphasize the role of the adaptive immune system and especially of activated drug-reacting T cells in human leukocyte antigen-associated, drug-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  1. Transplantation of Gene-Edited Hepatocyte-like Cells Modestly Improves Survival of Arginase-1-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yan Sin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Progress in gene editing research has been accelerated by utilizing engineered nucleases in combination with induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology. Here, we report transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-mediated reincorporation of Arg1 exons 7 and 8 in iPSCs derived from arginase-1-deficient mice possessing Arg1Δ alleles lacking these terminal exons. The edited cells could be induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs in vitro and were subsequently used for transplantation into our previously described (Sin et al., PLoS ONE 2013 tamoxifen-inducible Arg1-Cre arginase-1-deficient mouse model. While successful gene-targeted repair was achieved in iPSCs containing Arg1Δ alleles, only minimal restoration of urea cycle function could be observed in the iHLC-transplanted mice compared to control mice, and survival in this lethal model was extended by up to a week in some mice. The partially rescued phenotype may be due to inadequate regenerative capacity of arginase-1-expressing cells in the correct metabolic zones. Technical hurdles exist and will need to be overcome for gene-edited iPSC to iHLC rescue of arginase-1 deficiency, a rare urea cycle disorder.

  2. MiR-375 inhibits the hepatocyte growth factor-elicited migration of mesenchymal stem cells by downregulating Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lihong; Wang, Xianyao; Kang, Naixin; Xu, Jianwei; Dai, Nan; Xu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2018-04-01

    The migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for their use in cell-based therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs are important regulators of MSC migration. Here, we report that the expression of miR-375 was downregulated in MSCs treated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which strongly stimulates the migration of these cells. Overexpression of miR-375 decreased the transfilter migration and the migration velocity of MSCs triggered by HGF. In our efforts to determine the mechanism by which miR-375 affects MSC migration, we found that miR-375 significantly inhibited the activation of Akt by downregulating its phosphorylation at T308 and S473, but had no effect on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Further, we showed that 3'phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1), an upstream kinase necessary for full activation of Akt, was negatively regulated by miR-375 at the protein level. Moreover, miR-375 suppressed the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin, two important regulators of focal adhesion (FA) assembly and turnover, and decreased the number of FAs at cell periphery. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-375 inhibits HGF-elicited migration of MSCs through downregulating the expression of PDK1 and suppressing the activation of Akt, as well as influencing the tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin and FA periphery distribution.

  3. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  4. Hepatitis C virus core protein expression leads to biphasic regulation of the p21 cdk inhibitor and modulation of hepatocyte cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Hau; Mudryj, Maria; Guadalupe, Moraima; Dandekar, Satya

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein is implicated in viral pathogenesis by the modulation of hepatocyte gene expression and function. To determine the effect of Core protein on the cell-cycle control of hepatocytes, a HepG2 cell line containing a Flag-tagged Core under the control of an inducible promoter was generated. Initial Core protein expression included the presence of unprocessed (191 aa) and processed (173 aa) forms of the Core proteins with the processed form becoming dominant later. Expression of the 191 aa form of Core protein corresponded to an increase in the expression of the p21, a decrease in cdk2-dependent kinase activity, and a decrease in the percentage of cells in S-phase along with an accumulation of cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle. As the processed form accumulated, the p21 levels started to decline, suggesting that Core protein regulates p21 expression in a biphasic manner. These findings implicate Core protein in potentially modulating hepatocyte cell cycle differentially in the early stages of infection through biphasic regulation of p21 cdk kinase inhibitor

  5. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [ 73 As]arsenite (iAs III ; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs III to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs III than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs III was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs III and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to the interspecies differences

  6. Morphological and Functional Analysis of Hepatocyte Spheroids Generated on Poly-HEMA-Treated Surfaces under the Influence of Fetal Calf Serum and Nonparenchymal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustinus Bader

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA has been used as a clinical material, in the form of a soft hydrogel, for various surgical procedures, including endovascular surgery of liver. It is a clear liquid compound and, as a soft, flexible, water-absorbing material, has been used to make soft contact lenses from small, concave, spinning molds. Primary rat hepatocyte spheroids were created on a poly-HEMA-coated surface with the intention of inducing hepatic tissue formation and improving liver functions. We investigated spheroid formation of primary adult rat hepatocyte cells and characterized hepatic-specific functions under the special influence of fetal calf serum (FCS and nonparencymal cells (NPC up to six days in different culture systems (e.g., hepatocytes + FCS, hepatocytes – FCS, NPC + FCS, NPC – FCS, co-culture + FCS, co-culture – FCS in both the spheroid model and sandwich model. Immunohistologically, we detected gap junctions, Ito cell/Kupffer cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells and an extracellular matrix in the spheroid model. FCS has no positive effect in the sandwich model, but has a negative effect in the spheroid model on albumin production, and no influence in urea production in either model. We found more cell viability in smaller diameter spheroids than larger ones by using the apoptosis test. Furthermore, there is no positive influence of the serum or NPC on spheroid formation, suggesting that it may only depend on the physical condition of the culture system. Since the sandwich culture has been considered a “gold standard” in vitro culture model, the hepatocyte spheroids generated on the poly-HEMA-coated surface were compared with those in the sandwich model. Major liver-specific functions, such as albumin secretion and urea synthesis, were evaluated in both the spheroid and sandwich model. The synthesis performance in the spheroid compared to the sandwich culture increases approximately by a factor of 1

  7. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  8. Globular adiponectin protects rat hepatocytes against acetaminophen-induced cell death via modulation of the inflammasome activation and ER stress: Critical role of autophagy induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2018-05-24

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose treatment causes severe liver injury. Adiponectin, a hormone predominantly produced by adipose tissue, exhibits protective effects against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. In the present study, we examined the protective effect of globular adiponectin (gAcrp) on APAP-induced hepatocyte death and its underlying mechanisms. We found that APAP (2 mM)-induced hepatocyte death was prevented by inhibition of the inflammasome. In addition, treatment with gAcrp (0.5 and 1 μg/ml) inhibited APAP-induced activation of the inflammasome, judged by suppression of interleukin-1β maturation, caspase-1 activation, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC) speck formation, suggesting that protective effects of gAcrp against APAP-induced hepatocyte death is mediated via modulation of the inflammasome. APAP also induced ER stress and treatment with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an ER chaperone and inhibitor of ER stress, abolished APAP-induced inflammasomes activation, implying that ER stress acts as signaling event leading to the inflammasome activation in hepatocytes stimulated with APAP. Moreover, gAcrp significantly suppressed APAP-induced expression of ER stress marker genes. Finally, the modulatory effects of gAcrp on ER stress and inflammasomes activation were abrogated by treatment with autophagy inhibitors, while an autophagy inducer (rapamycin) suppressed APAP-elicited ER stress, demonstrating that autophagy induction plays a crucial role in the suppression of APAP-induced inflammasome activation and ER stress by gAcrp. Taken together, these results indicate that gAcrp protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced cell death by modulating ER stress and the inflammasome activation, at least in part, via autophagy induction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  10. Evaluation and optimization of hepatocyte culture media factors by design of experiments (DoE) methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik; Lübberstedt, Marc; Urbaniak, Thomas; Nüssler, Andreas K N; Knobeloch, Daniel; Gerlach, Jörg C; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2008-07-01

    Optimization of cell culture media based on statistical experimental design methodology is a widely used approach for improving cultivation conditions. We applied this methodology to refine the composition of an established culture medium for growth of a human hepatoma cell line, C3A. A selection of growth factors and nutrient supplements were systematically screened according to standard design of experiments (DoE) procedures. The results of the screening indicated that the medium additives hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and fibroblast growth factor 4 significantly influenced the metabolic activities of the C3A cell line. Surface response methodology revealed that the optimum levels for these factors were 30 ng/ml for hepatocyte growth factor and 35 ng/ml for oncostatin M. Additional experiments on primary human hepatocyte cultures showed high variance in metabolic activities between cells from different individuals, making determination of optimal levels of factors more difficult. Still, it was possible to conclude that hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and oncostatin M had decisive effects on the metabolic functions of primary human hepatocytes.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor enhances the inflammation-alleviating effect of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in a bronchiolitis obliterans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Pei; Han, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Li; Guo, Zi-Kuan; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wang, Heng-Xiang; Wang, Hua

    2016-03-01

    Specific and effective therapy for prevention or reversal of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is lacking. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on BO. A mouse model of experimental BO was established by subcutaneously transplanting the tracheas from C57BL/6 mice into Balb/C recipients, which were then administered saline, Ad-HGF-modified human umbilical cord-MSCs (MSCs-HGF) or Ad-Null-modified MSCs (MSCs-Null). The therapeutic effects of MSCs-Null and MSCs-HGF were evaluated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for lymphocyte immunophenotype of spleen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) for cytokine expression, and histopathological analysis for the transplanted trachea. The histopathologic recovery of allograft tracheas was improved significantly after MSCs-Null and MSCs-HGF treatment and the beneficial effects were particularly observed in MSCs-HGF-treated mice. Furthermore, the allo-transplantation-induced immunophenotype disorders of the spleen, including regulatory T (Treg), T helper (Th)1, Th2 and Th17, were attenuated in both cell-treated groups. MSCs-HGF treatment reduced expression and secretion of inflammation cytokines interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and increased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. It also decreased the expression level of the profibrosis factor transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Treatment of BO with HGF gene modified MSCs results in reduction of local inflammation and promotion in recovery of allograft trachea histopathology. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for BO. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of diphenyl ether herbicides and oxadiazon on porphyrin biosynthesis in mouse liver, rat primary hepatocyte culture and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijt, J; van Holsteijn, I; Hassing, I; Vokurka, M; Blaauboer, B J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the herbicides fomesafen, oxyfluorfen, oxadiazon and fluazifop-butyl on porphyrin accumulation in mouse liver, rat primary hepatocyte culture and HepG2 cells were investigated. Ten days of herbicide feeding (0.25% in the diet) increased the liver porphyrins in male C57B1/6J mice from 1.4 +/- 0.6 to 4.8 +/- 2.1 (fomesafen) 16.9 +2- 2.9 (oxyfluorfen) and 25.9 +/- 3.1 (oxadiazon) nmol/g wet weight, respectively. Fluazifop-butyl had no effect on liver porphyrin metabolism. Fomesafen, oxyfluorfen and oxadiazon increased the cellular porphyrin content of rat hepatocytes after 24 h of incubation (control, 3.2 pmol/mg protein, fomesafen, oxyfluorfen and oxadiazon at 0.125 mM concentration 51.5, 54.3 and 44.0 pmol/mg protein, respectively). The porphyrin content of HepG2 cells increased from 1.6 to 18.2, 10.6 and 9.2 pmol/mg protein after 24 h incubation with the three herbicides. Fluazifop-butyl increased hepatic cytochrome P450 levels and ethoxy- and pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD and PROD) activity, oxyfluorfen increased PROD activity. Peroxisomal palmitoyl CoA oxidation increased after fomesafen and fluazifop treatment to about 500% of control values both in mouse liver and rat hepatocytes. Both rat hepatocytes and HepG2 cells can be used as a test system for the porphyrogenic potential of photobleaching herbicides.

  13. Strategies to distinguish new synthetic cannabinoid FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) intake from its isomer THJ-2201: metabolism of FUBIMINA in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Huestis, Marilyn A

    Since 2013, a new drugs-of-abuse trend attempts to bypass drug legislation by marketing isomers of scheduled synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), e.g., FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) and THJ-2201. It is much more challenging to confirm a specific isomer's intake and distinguish it from its structural analog because the isomers and their major metabolites usually have identical molecular weights and display the same product ions. Here, we investigated isomers FUBIMINA and THJ-2201 and propose strategies to distinguish their consumption. THJ-2201 was scheduled in the US, Japan, and Europe; however, FUBIMINA is easily available on the Internet. We previously investigated THJ-2201 metabolism in human hepatocytes, but human FUBIMINA metabolism is unknown. We aim to characterize FUBIMINA metabolism in human hepatocytes, recommend optimal metabolites to confirm its consumption, and propose strategies to distinguish between intakes of FUBIMINA and THJ-2201. FUBIMINA (10 μM) was incubated in human hepatocytes for 3 h, and metabolites were characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). We identified 35 metabolites generated by oxidative defluorination, further carboxylation, hydroxylation, dihydrodiol formation, glucuronidation, and their combinations. We recommend 5'-OH-BIM-018 (M34), BIM-018 pentanoic acid (M33), and BIM-018 pentanoic acid dihydrodiol (M7) as FUBIMINA specific metabolites. THJ-2201 produced specific metabolite markers 5'-OH-THJ-018 (F26), THJ-018 pentanoic acid (F25), and hydroxylated THJ-2201 (F13). Optimized chromatographic conditions to achieve different retention times and careful selection of specific product ion spectra enabled differentiation of isomeric metabolites, in this case FUBIMINA from THJ-2201. Our HR-MS approach should be applicable for differentiating future isomeric SCs, which is especially important when different isomers have different legal status.

  14. The cachectic mediator proteolysis inducing factor activates NF-kappaB and STAT3 in human Kupffer cells and monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watchorn, T.M.; Dowidar, N.; Dejong, C.H.; Waddell, I.D.; Garden, O.J.; Ross, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proteoglycan, proteolysis inducing factor (PIF), is capable of inducing muscle proteolysis during the process of cancer cachexia, and of inducing an acute phase response in human hepatocytes. We investigated whether PIF is able to activate pro-inflammatory pathways in human Kupffer cells,

  15. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  16. The effect of acyclic retinoid on the metabolomic profiles of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Yang Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Acyclic retinoid (ACR is a promising chemopreventive agent for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC that selectively inhibits the growth of HCC cells (JHH7 but not normal hepatic cells (Hc. To better understand the molecular basis of the selective anti-cancer effect of ACR, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based and capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS-based metabolome analyses in JHH7 and Hc cells after treatment with ACR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NMR-based metabolomics revealed a distinct metabolomic profile of JHH7 cells at 18 h after ACR treatment but not at 4 h after ACR treatment. CE-TOFMS analysis identified 88 principal metabolites in JHH7 and Hc cells after 24 h of treatment with ethanol (EtOH or ACR. The abundance of 71 of these metabolites was significantly different between EtOH-treated control JHH7 and Hc cells, and 49 of these metabolites were significantly down-regulated in the ACR-treated JHH7 cells compared to the EtOH-treated JHH7 cells. Of particular interest, the increase in adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP, the main cellular energy source, that was observed in the EtOH-treated control JHH7 cells was almost completely suppressed in the ACR-treated JHH7 cells; treatment with ACR restored ATP to the basal levels observed in both EtOH-control and ACR-treated Hc cells (0.72-fold compared to the EtOH control-treated JHH7 cells. Moreover, real-time PCR analyses revealed that ACR significantly increased the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases 4 (PDK4, a key regulator of ATP production, in JHH7 cells but not in Hc cells (3.06-fold and 1.20-fold compared to the EtOH control, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study suggest that ACR may suppress the enhanced energy metabolism of JHH7 cells but not Hc cells; this occurs at least in part via the cancer-selective enhancement of PDK4 expression. The cancer-selective metabolic pathways

  17. Fibronectin synthesized by a human hepatoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow, J.E.; Colman, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Fibronectin is a family of immunologically similar glycoproteins which mediate a variety of cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions. It is a constituent of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue and circulates in plasma. When suspension and adherent cultures of a human hepatoma cell line (SK-HEP-1) were incubated in serum-free medium, the resulting conditioned medium contained material which was specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera to human plasma fibronectin. By double immunodiffusion, a component in the conditioned culture medium was shown to form a line of identity with fibronectin in human plasma and to migrate as an alpha 2- to beta-globulin during immunoelectrophoresis. Human fibronectin was quantified in conditioned medium by electroimmunodiffusion, and was found to increase for at least three days at about 0.1 micrograms/10(6) cells/day. Adherent cultures of SK-HEP-1 cells were incubated with L-[ 35 S]methionine to label newly synthesized proteins. Labeled fibronectin in conditioned medium or in cell extracts comigrated with fibronectin in human plasma as shown by autoradiography following crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Fibronectin was demonstrated in the extra-cellular matrix of adherent SK-HEP-1 cultures by immunofluorescence. It was shown previously that SK-HEP-1 cells synthesize alpha 1-protease inhibitor, one of the products of normal hepatocytes. The finding that these hepatoma cells also synthesize fibronectin supports the concept that the hepatocyte may be one source of circulating fibronectin, a possibility consistent with the established role of this cell type in blood plasma protein synthesis

  18. The Mechanism of Gefitinib Resistance Induced by Hepatocyte Growth Factor 
in Sensitive Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan XUAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Previous studies have reported that Met might be related to gefitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The present study aims to explore the mechanism of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-induced gefitinib resistance in different gene types of sensitive NSCLC in vitro. Methods The PC-9 and H292 cell lines were chosen and induced by HGF. The cell survival was measured using MTT assay, the cell cycle distribution was measured using PI assay, and cell apoptosis with an Annexin V-PE assay, respectively. The c-Met and p-Met protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. Results Gefitinib inhibited the growth of PC-9 and H292 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration-survival curves of both cell lines shifted to the right when induced with HGF. HGF did not affect PC-9 and H292 cell proliferation. The cell also had a higher cell survival rate when treated with HGF and gefitinib compared with that under gefitinib alone (P<0.05. The apoptotic rate and cell cycle progression showed no significant difference between the HG and G group (P>0.05. HGF stimulated Met phosphorylation in the PC-9 and H292 cells. Gefitinib inhibited the HGF-induced Met phosphorylation in PC-9 cells, but not in H292 cells. Conclusion HGF induces gefitinib resistance in PC-9 and H292 cells. HGF-induced Met phosphorylation may be an important mechanism of gefitinib resistance in sensitive NSCLC.

  19. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and glutathione (GSH, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  20. The right choice of antihypertensives protects primary human hepatocytes from ethanol- and recombinant human TGF-β1-induced cellular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehnert S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Ehnert,1 Teresa Lukoschek,2 Anastasia Bachmann,2 Juan J Martínez Sánchez,1 Georg Damm,3 Natascha C Nussler,4 Stefan Pscherer,5 Ulrich Stöckle,1 Steven Dooley,2 Sebastian Mueller,6 Andreas K Nussler11Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, BG Trauma Center, Tübingen, Germany; 2Mol Hepatology - Alcohol Associated Diseases, Department of Medicine II, Medical Faculty, Mannheim, Germany; 3Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 4Clinic for General, Visceral, Endocrine Surgery and Coloproctology, Clinic Neuperlach, Städtisches Klinikum München GmbH, Munich, Germany; 5Department of Diabetology, Klinikum Traunstein, Kliniken Südostbayern AG, Traunstein, Germany; 6Department of Medicine, Salem Medical Center, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Heidelberg, GermanyBackground: Patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD often suffer from high blood pressure and rely on antihypertensive treatment. Certain antihypertensives may influence progression of chronic liver disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the commonly used antihypertensives amlodipine, captopril, furosemide, metoprolol, propranolol, and spironolactone on alcohol-induced damage toward human hepatocytes (hHeps.Methods: hHeps were isolated by collagenase perfusion. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured by fluorescence-based assays. Cellular damage was determined by lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH-leakage. Expression analysis was performed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β signaling was investigated by a Smad3/4-responsive luciferase-reporter assay.Results: Ethanol and TGF-β1 rapidly increased ROS in hHeps, causing a release of 40%–60% of total LDH after 72 hours. All antihypertensives dose dependently reduced ethanol-mediated oxidative stress and cellular damage. Similar results were observed for TGF-β1-dependent

  1. Obeticholic acid, a selective farnesoid X receptor agonist, regulates bile acid homeostasis in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Jonathan P; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a master regulator of bile acid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in bile acid synthesis and cellular membrane transport. Impairment of bile acid efflux due to cholangiopathies results in chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal elevation of intrahepatic and systemic bile acid levels. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent and selective FXR agonist that is 100-fold more potent than the endogenous ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The effects of OCA on genes involved in bile acid homeostasis were investigated using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. Gene expression was determined by measuring mRNA levels. OCA dose-dependently increased fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) which, in turn, suppress mRNA levels of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo synthesis of bile acids. Consistent with CYP7A1 suppression, total bile acid content was decreased by OCA (1 μmol/L) to 42.7 ± 20.5% relative to control. In addition to suppressing de novo bile acids synthesis, OCA significantly increased the mRNA levels of transporters involved in bile acid homeostasis. The bile salt excretory pump (BSEP), a canalicular efflux transporter, increased by 6.4 ± 0.8-fold, and the basolateral efflux heterodimer transporters, organic solute transporter α (OST α ) and OST β increased by 6.4 ± 0.2-fold and 42.9 ± 7.9-fold, respectively. The upregulation of BSEP and OST α and OST β, by OCA reduced the intracellular concentrations of d 8 -TCA, a model bile acid, to 39.6 ± 8.9% relative to control. These data demonstrate that OCA does suppress bile acid synthesis and reduce hepatocellular bile acid levels, supporting the use of OCA to treat bile acid-induced toxicity observed in cholestatic diseases. © 2017 Intercept Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and

  2. Induction of glutathione synthesis in human hepatocytes by acute and chronic arsenic exposure: Differential roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Yongyong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Huihui; Xu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Arsenic exposure increased intracellular levels of glutathione. • Mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in glutathione homeostasis. • ERK contributed to glutathione synthesis during acute arsenic exposure. • Glutathione synthesis was regulated by p38 at least in part independent of NRF2 during chronic arsenic exposure. - Abstract: Glutathione (GSH) is a vital component of antioxidant defense which protects cells from toxic insults. Previously we found intracellular GSH was involved in cell resistance against arsenic-induced cytotoxicity. However, molecular mechanisms of GSH homeostasis during arsenic exposure are largely undefined. Here, we investigated roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in GSH synthesis pathway with two arsenic exposure strategies by using Chang human hepatocytes. In one strategy, acute arsenic exposure (20 μM, 24 h) was applied, as MAPK signaling is generally considered to be transient. In the other one, chronic arsenic exposure (500 nM, 20 weeks) was applied, which mimicked the general human exposure to arsenic. We found that acute arsenic exposure activated extracellular signal-regulated 1/2 kinases (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in parallel with increased transcription and nuclear translocation of factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and enhanced expression of γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), resulting in elevated intracellular GSH levels. Specific ERK inhibitor abolished arsenic-induced NRF2 nuclear translocation and GSH synthesis. During chronic arsenic exposure which induced a malignant cellular phenotype, continuous p38 activation and NRF2 nuclear translocation were observed with enhanced GSH synthesis. Specific p38 inhibitor attenuated arsenic-enhanced GSH synthesis without changing NRF2 nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results indicate MAPK pathways play an important role in cellular GSH homeostasis in response to arsenic. However, the

  3. Safety of Desmodium adscendens extract on hepatocytes and renal cells. Protective effect against oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Francois

    2015-03-01

    RESULTS: A viability test (MTS, a cytotoxicity assay (LDH release and a study of the cell morphology revealed that pretreatment with 1 mg/ml or 10 mg/ml DA did not alter viability or LDH release in HEPG2 or LLCPK1 cells. However, DA at the dose of 100 mg/ml significantly decreased cell viability, by about 40% (P <0.05. Further, MTS studies revealed that DA 1 mg/ml or 10 mg/ml protected LLC-PK1 cells against a glucose-induced oxidative stress of 24 hours (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Hence, the lowest concentrations of DA (1mg/ml and 10mg/ml were safe for HEPG2 and LLCPK1 and protective against an oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 cells. These data suggest that DA extracts used as a traditional herbal as food health supplements should be used at the lowest dosage. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 1-5

  4. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-10-13

    To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM(+) cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM(+) cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM(+) cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of hepatocyte nuclear factors in transcriptional regulation of tissue specific hormonal expression of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (abcc2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Hu, L.-J.; Iwahashi, Mieko; Al-Zuabi, Subhi; Quattrochi, Linda C.; Simon, Francis R.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2) is an ATP-binding cassette membrane protein located primarily on apical surface of hepatocytes that mediates transport of conjugated xenobiotics and endogenous compounds into bile. MRP2 is highly expressed in hepatocytes, and at lower levels in small intestines, stomach and kidney. Previous reports have characterized mammalian MRP2 promoters, but none have established the molecular mechanism(s) involved in liver enriched expression. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of hepatic MRP2 regulation. A 2130 bp of MRP2 promoter was cloned from PAC-1 clone P108G1-7, to identify putative liver specific/hormone responsive functional DNA binding sites. Using deletion analysis, site specific mutagenesis and co-transfection studies, liver specific expression was determined. MRP2 promoter-LUC constructs were highly expressed in liver cell lines compared to non-liver cells. The region extending from - 3 to+ 458 bp of MRP2 promoter starting from AUG contained the potential binding sites for CAAATT box enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), hepatocytes nuclear factor 1, 3 and 4 (HNF1, HNF3, and HNF4. Only HNF1 and HNF4 co-transfection with MRP2 luciferase increased expression. Site specific mutational analysis of HNF1 binding site indicated an important role for HNF1α. HNF4α induction of MRP2 was independent of HNF1 binding site. C/EBP, HNF3, and HNF6 inhibited HNF1α while HNF4α induced MRP2 luciferase expression and glucocorticoids stimulated MRP2 expression. This study emphasizes the complex regulation of MRP2 with HNF1α and HNF4α playing a central role. The coordinated regulation of xenobiotic transporters and oxidative conjugation may determine the adaptive responses to cellular detoxification processes

  6. Human embryonic stem cell technologies and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Janne; Hyllner, Johan; Björquist, Petter

    2009-06-01

    Development of new drugs is costly and takes huge resources into consideration. The big pharmaceutical companies are currently facing increasing developmental costs and a lower success-rate of bringing new compounds to the market. Therefore, it is now of outmost importance that the drug-hunting companies minimize late attritions due to sub-optimal pharmacokinetic properties or unexpected toxicity when entering the clinical programs. To achieve this, a strong need to test new candidate drugs in assays of high human relevance in vitro as early as possible has been identified. The traditionally used cell systems are however remarkably limited in this sense, and new improved technologies are of greatest importance. The human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is one of the most powerful cell types known. They have not only the possibility to divide indefinitely; these cells can also differentiate into all mature cell types of the human body. This makes them potentially very valuable for pharmaceutical development, spanning from use as tools in early target studies, DMPK or safety assessment, as screening models to find new chemical entities modulating adult stem cell fate, or as the direct use in cell therapies. This review illustrates the use of hESC in the drug discovery process, today, as well as in a future perspective. This will specifically be exemplified with the most important cell type for pharmaceutical development-the hepatocyte. We discuss how hESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could improve this process, and how these cells should be cultured if optimized functionality and usefulness should be achieved. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 513-519, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor triggers signaling cascades mediating vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taher, Taher E. I.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.; de Boer, Onno J.; Spaargaren, Marcel; Teeling, Peter; van der Wal, Allard C.; Pals, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    A key event in neointima formation and atherogenesis is the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima. This is controlled by cytokines and extracellular matix (ECM) components within the microenvironment of the diseased vessel wall. At present, these signals have only been

  8. No evidence for protective erythropoietin alpha signalling in rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frede Stilla

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha (rHu-EPO has been reported to protect the liver of rats and mice from ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, direct protective effects of rHu-EPO on hepatocytes and the responsible signalling pathways have not yet been described. The aim of the present work was to study the protective effect of rHu-EPO on warm hypoxia-reoxygenation and cold-induced injury to hepatocytes and the rHu-EPO-dependent signalling involved. Methods Loss of viability of isolated rat hepatocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation or incubated at 4°C followed by rewarming was determined from released lactate dehydrogenase activity in the absence and presence of rHu-EPO (0.2–100 U/ml. Apoptotic nuclear morphology was assessed by fluorescence microscopy using the nuclear fluorophores H33342 and propidium iodide. Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR, EPO and Bcl-2 mRNAs were quantified by real time PCR. Activation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 in hepatocytes and rat livers perfused in situ was assessed by Western blotting. Results In contrast to previous in vivo studies on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the liver, rHu-EPO was without any protective effect on hypoxic injury, hypoxia-reoxygenation injury and cold-induced apoptosis to isolated cultured rat hepatocytes. EPOR mRNA was identified in these cells but specific detection of the EPO receptor protein was not possible due to the lack of antibody specificity. Both, in the cultured rat hepatocytes (10 U/ml for 15 minutes and in the rat liver perfused in situ with rHu-EPO (8.9 U/ml for 15 minutes no evidence for EPO-dependent signalling was found as indicated by missing effects of rHu-EPO on phosphorylation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 and on the induction of Bcl-2 mRNA. Conclusion Together, these results indicate the absence of any protective EPO signalling in rat hepatocytes. This implies that the protection provided by rHu-EPO in vivo against ischemia-reperfusion and

  9. β-Adrenergic induction of lipolysis in hepatocytes is inhibited by ethanol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Micah B; Rasineni, Karuna; Weller, Shaun G; Schulze, Ryan J; Sletten, Arthur C; Casey, Carol A; McNiven, Mark A

    2017-07-14

    In liver steatosis ( i.e. fatty liver), hepatocytes accumulate many large neutral lipid storage organelles known as lipid droplets (LDs). LDs are important in the maintenance of energy homeostasis, but the signaling mechanisms that stimulate LD metabolism in hepatocytes are poorly defined. In adipocytes, catecholamines target the β-adrenergic (β-AR)/cAMP pathway to activate cytosolic lipases and induce their recruitment to the LD surface. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine whether hepatocytes, like adipocytes, also undergo cAMP-mediated lipolysis in response to β-AR stimulation. Using primary rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma cells, we found that treatment with the β-AR agent isoproterenol caused substantial LD loss via activation of cytosolic lipases adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). β-Adrenergic stimulation rapidly activated PKA, which led to the phosphorylation of ATGL and HSL and their recruitment to the LD surface. To test whether this β-AR-dependent lipolysis pathway was altered in a model of alcoholic fatty liver, primary hepatocytes from rats fed a 6-week EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli diet were treated with cAMP agonists. Compared with controls, EtOH-exposed hepatocytes showed a drastic inhibition in β-AR/cAMP-induced LD breakdown and the phosphorylation of PKA substrates, including HSL. This observation was supported in VA-13 cells, an EtOH-metabolizing human hepatoma cell line, which displayed marked defects in both PKA activation and isoproterenol-induced ATGL translocation to the LD periphery. In summary, these findings suggest that β-AR stimulation mobilizes cytosolic lipases for LD breakdown in hepatocytes, and perturbation of this pathway could be a major consequence of chronic EtOH insult leading to fatty liver.

  10. Variations in DNA synthesis and mitotic indices in hepatocytes and sinusoid litoral cells of adult intact male mouse along a circadian time span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surur, J M; Moreno, F R; Badrán, A F; Llanos, J M

    1985-01-01

    Variations of DNA synthesis (DNAS) and mitotic indices along a circadian time span are described in the hepatocyte and sinusoid litoral cell populations of adult intact male mouse liver. Standardized (light from 0600 to 1800) mice were killed in groups of six to nine animals, every 2-4 hr along a circadian time span. Hepatocytes show significant peaks in the synthesis of DNA and the mitotic activity at 0200 and 1400, respectively. These results correspond to those previously described by us in young immature liver, regenerating liver and hepatomas. The phase differences between these peaks and the differences between their absolute values are discussed. Also considered are the practical consequences of our findings for experimental design. The curve of DNA synthesis of sinusoid litoral cells show a peak at 0200. The mitotic index show a bimodal waveform with peaks at 0800 and 2000. The existence of four different cell populations composing the so called sinusoid litoral cells and also the migration into and out of the liver of some macrophages considered as litoral (Kupffer) cells in our counts, makes interpretation of the curves somewhat complicated and deserves further analysis.

  11. Activation of PI3K-Akt-GSK3β pathway mediates hepatocyte growth factor inhibition of RANTES expression in renal tubular epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Rujun; Rifai, Abdalla; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2005-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was recently reported to ameliorate renal inflammation in a rat model of chronic renal failure. HGF exerted its action through suppression of RANTES expression in renal tubules. In the present study, we utilized an in vitro model of human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells (HKC) to elucidate the mechanisms of RANTES suppression by HGF. HGF significantly suppressed basal and TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in a time and dose dependent fashion. HGF elicited PI3K-Akt activation and inhibited GSK3, a downstream transducer of PI3K-Akt, by inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-9. When the PI3K-Akt pathway was blocked by wortmannin, HGF inhibition of RANTES was abrogated, demonstrating that the PI3K-Akt pathway is necessary for HGF action. In addition, specific inhibition of GSK3 activity by lithium ion suppressed basal and TNF-α-induced RANTES expression, reminiscent of the action of HGF. To further investigate the role of GSK3 in modulating RANTES expression, we examined the effect of forced expression of wild type GSK3β or an uninhibitable mutant GSK3β, in which the regulatory Ser-9 residue is changed to alanine (S9A-GSK3β) in HKC. Overexpression of wild type GSK3β did not alter the inhibitory action of HGF on RANTES. In contrast, expression of S9A-GSK3β abolished HGF inhibition of basal and TNF-α stimulated RANTES expression. These findings suggest that PI3K-Akt activation and subsequent inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β are required for HGF-induced suppression of RANTES in HKC

  12. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunohistochemical study of hepatocyte, cholangiocyte and stem cell markers of hepatocellular carcinoma: the second report: relationship with tumor size and cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arisa; Kondo, Fukuo; Sano, Keiji; Inoue, Masafumi; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Masato; Soejima, Yurie; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Tokairin, Takuo; Saito, Koji; Sasajima, Yuko; Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Uozaki, Hiroshi; Fukusato, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether ordinary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) show positivity of stem/progenitor cell markers and cholangiocyte markers during the process of tumor progression. Ninety-four HCC lesions no larger than 8 cm from 94 patients were immuno-histochemically studied using two hepatocyte markers (Hep par 1 and α-fetoprotein), five cholangiocyte markers (cytokeratin CK7, CK19, Muc1, epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen) and three hepatic stem/progenitor cell markers (CD56, c-Kit and EpCAM). The tumors were classified into three groups by tumor size: S1, tumors were also classified according to tumor differentiation: well, moderately and poorly differentiated. The relationship between the positive ratios of these markers, tumor size and tumor differentiation was examined. The positive ratios of cholangiocyte markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for CK7). The positive ratios of stem/progenitor cell markers tended to be higher in larger sized and more poorly differentiated tumors (except for c-Kit). Ordinary HCC can acquire the characteristic of positivity of cholangiocyte and stem/progenitor cell markers during the process of tumor progression. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  14. Distribution and Metabolism of Lipocurc™ (Liposomal Curcumin) in Dog and Human Blood Cells: Species Selectivity and Pharmacokinetic Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Gordon T; Licollari, Albert; Tan, Aimin; Greil, Richard; Vcelar, Brigitta; Majeed, Muhammad; Helson, Lawrence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of curcumin (in the form of Lipocurc™) and its major metabolite tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) in Beagle dog and human red blood cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and hepatocytes. Lipocurc™ was used as the source of curcumin for the cell distribution assays. In vitro findings with red blood cells were also compared to in vivo pharmacokinetic data available from preclinical studies in dogs and phase I clinical studies in humans. High levels of curcumin were measured in PBMCs (625.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7,297 pg/10 6 cells in dog and 353.7 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 6,809 pg/10 6 cells in human) and in hepatocytes (414.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 14,005 pg/10 6 cells in dog and 813.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 13,780 pg/10 6 cells in human). Lower curcumin levels were measured in red blood cells (dog: 78.4 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7.2 pg/10 6 cells, human: 201.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 18.6 pg/10 6 cells). A decrease in the medium concentration of curcumin was observed in red blood cells and hepatocytes, but not in PBMCs. Red blood cell levels of THC were ~5-fold higher in dog compared to human and similar between dog and human for hepatocytes and PBMCs. The ratio of THC to curcumin found in the red blood cell medium following incubation was 6.3 for dog compared to 0.006 for human, while for PBMCs and hepatocytes the ratio of THC to curcumin in the medium did not display such marked species differences. There was an excellent correlation between the in vitro disposition of curcumin and THC following incubation with red blood cells and in vivo plasma levels of curcumin and THC in dog and human following intravenous infusion. The disposition of curcumin in blood cells is, therefore, species-dependent and of pharmacokinetic relevance. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatocyte produced matrix metalloproteinases are regulated by CD147 in liver fibrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, Sarah R; Maczurek, Annette E; Morgan, Alison J; Tu, Thomas; Wen, Victoria W; Yee, Christine; Mridha, Auvro; Lee, Maggie; d'Avigdor, William; Locarnini, Stephen A; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Warner, Fiona J; McLennan, Susan V; Shackel, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The classical paradigm of liver injury asserts that hepatic stellate cells (HSC) produce, remodel and turnover the abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) of fibrosis via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In extrahepatic tissues MMP production is regulated by a number of mechanisms including expression of the glycoprotein CD147. Previously, we have shown that CD147 is expressed on hepatocytes but not within the fibrotic septa in cirrhosis [1]. Therefore, we investigated if hepatocytes produce MMPs, regulated by CD147, which are capable of remodelling fibrotic ECM independent of the HSC. Non-diseased, fibrotic and cirrhotic livers were examined for MMP activity and markers of fibrosis in humans and mice. CD147 expression and MMP activity were co-localised by in-situ zymography. The role of CD147 was studied in-vitro with siRNA to CD147 in hepatocytes and in-vivo in mice with CCl4 induced liver injury using ãCD147 antibody intervention. In liver fibrosis in both human and mouse tissue MMP expression and activity (MMP-2, -9, -13 and -14) increased with progressive injury and localised to hepatocytes. Additionally, as expected, MMPs were abundantly expressed by activated HSC. Further, with progressive fibrosis there was expression of CD147, which localised to hepatocytes but not to HSC. Functionally significant in-vitro regulation of hepatocyte MMP production by CD147 was demonstrated using siRNA to CD147 that decreased hepatocyte MMP-2 and -9 expression/activity. Further, in-vivo α-CD147 antibody intervention decreased liver MMP-2, -9, -13, -14, TGF-β and α-SMA expression in CCl4 treated mice compared to controls. We have shown that hepatocytes produce active MMPs and that the glycoprotein CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP expression. Targeting CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP production both in-vitro and in-vivo, with the net result being reduced fibrotic matrix turnover in-vivo. Therefore, CD147 regulation of hepatocyte MMP is a novel pathway that could be targeted by

  16. Hepatocyte produced matrix metalloproteinases are regulated by CD147 in liver fibrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Calabro

    Full Text Available The classical paradigm of liver injury asserts that hepatic stellate cells (HSC produce, remodel and turnover the abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM of fibrosis via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In extrahepatic tissues MMP production is regulated by a number of mechanisms including expression of the glycoprotein CD147. Previously, we have shown that CD147 is expressed on hepatocytes but not within the fibrotic septa in cirrhosis [1]. Therefore, we investigated if hepatocytes produce MMPs, regulated by CD147, which are capable of remodelling fibrotic ECM independent of the HSC.Non-diseased, fibrotic and cirrhotic livers were examined for MMP activity and markers of fibrosis in humans and mice. CD147 expression and MMP activity were co-localised by in-situ zymography. The role of CD147 was studied in-vitro with siRNA to CD147 in hepatocytes and in-vivo in mice with CCl4 induced liver injury using ãCD147 antibody intervention.In liver fibrosis in both human and mouse tissue MMP expression and activity (MMP-2, -9, -13 and -14 increased with progressive injury and localised to hepatocytes. Additionally, as expected, MMPs were abundantly expressed by activated HSC. Further, with progressive fibrosis there was expression of CD147, which localised to hepatocytes but not to HSC. Functionally significant in-vitro regulation of hepatocyte MMP production by CD147 was demonstrated using siRNA to CD147 that decreased hepatocyte MMP-2 and -9 expression/activity. Further, in-vivo α-CD147 antibody intervention decreased liver MMP-2, -9, -13, -14, TGF-β and α-SMA expression in CCl4 treated mice compared to controls.We have shown that hepatocytes produce active MMPs and that the glycoprotein CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP expression. Targeting CD147 regulates hepatocyte MMP production both in-vitro and in-vivo, with the net result being reduced fibrotic matrix turnover in-vivo. Therefore, CD147 regulation of hepatocyte MMP is a novel pathway that could be

  17. An in vitro expansion system for generation of human iPS cell-derived hepatic progenitor-like cells exhibiting a bipotent differentiation potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Yanagida

    Full Text Available Hepatoblasts, hepatic stem/progenitor cells in liver development, have a high proliferative potential and the ability to differentiate into both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In regenerative medicine and drug screening for the treatment of severe liver diseases, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived mature functional hepatocytes are considered to be a potentially good cell source. However, induction of proliferation of these cells is difficult ex vivo. To circumvent this problem, we generated hepatic progenitor-like cells from human iPS cells using serial cytokine treatments in vitro. Highly proliferative hepatic progenitor-like cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using antibodies against CD13 and CD133 that are known cell surface markers of hepatic stem/progenitor cells in fetal and adult mouse livers. When the purified CD13(highCD133(+ cells were cultured at a low density with feeder cells in the presence of suitable growth factors and signaling inhibitors (ALK inhibitor A-83-01 and ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, individual cells gave rise to relatively large colonies. These colonies consisted of two types of cells expressing hepatocytic marker genes (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α and α-fetoprotein and a cholangiocytic marker gene (cytokeratin 7, and continued to proliferate over long periods of time. In a spheroid formation assay, these cells were found to express genes required for mature liver function, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, and secrete albumin. When these cells were cultured in a suitable extracellular matrix gel, they eventually formed a cholangiocytic cyst-like structure with epithelial polarity, suggesting that human iPS cell-derived hepatic progenitor-like cells have a bipotent differentiation ability. Collectively these data indicate that this novel procedure using an in vitro expansion system is useful for not only liver regeneration but also for the determination of molecular mechanisms that

  18. Metabolism of six CYP probe substrates in fetal hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Naveed Shaik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P-450 (CYP are the most common drug metabolizing enzymes and are abundantly expressed in liver apart from kidney, lungs, intestine, brain etc. Their expression levels change with physiological conditions and disease states. The expression of these CYPs is less in human foetus and neonates compared to adults, which results in lower clearance of xenobiotics in infants and neonates compared to adults. Hepatocytes are the cells which are largely used to study these CYPs. We have isolated hepatocytes from aborted foetus to study the metabolism of six probe substrates: phenacetin, diclofenac, S-mephenytoin, dextromethorphan, nifedipine and testosterone. The results obtained show the expression of various CYPs (CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in human foetus and their involvement in metabolism of CYP probe substrates.

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 is a negative regulator of hepatocyte proliferation downregulated in the regenerating liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Cui-Ping; Ji, Wen-Min; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the expression and dynamic changes of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in hepatocytes in the regenerating liver in rats after partial hepatectomy (PH), and examine the effects of BMP-2 on proliferation of human Huh7 hepatoma cells. Fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 is a negative regulator of hepatocyte proliferation downregulated in the regenerating liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Cui-Ping; Ji, Wen-Min; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the expression and dynamic changes of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in hepatocytes in the regenerating liver in rats after partial hepatectomy (PH), and examine the effects of BMP-2 on proliferation of human Huh7 hepatoma cells. METHODS: Fifty-four adult male Wistar rats

  1. Recovery of important physiological functions in 3D culture of immortal hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    to grow human liver cells in ‘3 dimensional’ cultures so that they behave very similar to the liver in our bodies. By growing the immortal hepatocytes in specially designed bioreactors they form small pieces of ‘pseudotissue’ which exhibit several of the functions seen in the adult liver. We have grown...

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes long-term survival and axonal regeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury: comparison with CNTF and BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Kai; Cheung, Anny Wan-Suen; Yu, Sau-Wai; Sha, Ou; Cho, Eric Yu Pang

    2014-10-01

    Different trophic factors are known to promote retinal ganglion cell survival and regeneration, but each had their own limitations. We report that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) confers distinct advantages in supporting ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration, when compared to two well-established trophic factors ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Ganglion cells in adult hamster were injured by cutting the optic nerve. HGF, CNTF, or BDNF was injected at different dosages intravitreally after injury. Ganglion cell survival was quantified at 7, 14, or 28 days postinjury. Peripheral nerve (PN) grafting to the cut optic nerve of the growth factor-injected eye was performed either immediately after injury or delayed until 7 days post-injury. Expression of heat-shock protein 27 and changes in microglia numbers were quantified in different growth factor groups. The cellular distribution of c-Met in the retina was examined by anti-c-Met immunostaining. Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) was equally potent as BDNF in promoting short-term survival (up to 14 days post-injury) and also supported survival at 28 days post-injury when ganglion cells treated by CNTF or BDNF failed to be sustained. When grafting was performed without delay, HGF stimulated twice the number of axons to regenerate compared with control but was less potent than CNTF. However, in PN grafting delayed for 7 days after optic nerve injury, HGF maintained a better propensity of ganglion cells to regenerate than CNTF. Unlike CNTF, HGF application did not increase HSP27 expression in ganglion cells. Microglia proliferation was prolonged in HGF-treated retinas compared with CNTF or BDNF. C-Met was localized to both ganglion cells and Muller cells, suggesting HGF could be neuroprotective via interacting with both neurons and glia. Compared with CNTF or BDNF, HGF is advantageous in sustaining long-term ganglion cell survival and their propensity to respond to

  3. Comparative Cytotoxicity Study of Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs in a Variety of Rainbow Trout Cell Lines (RTL-W1, RTH-149, RTG-2 and Primary Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Connolly

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Among all classes of nanomaterials, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have potentially an important ecotoxicological impact, especially in freshwater environments. Fish are particularly susceptible to the toxic effects of silver ions and, with knowledge gaps regarding the contribution of dissolution and unique particle effects to AgNP toxicity, they represent a group of vulnerable organisms. Using cell lines (RTL-W1, RTH-149, RTG-2 and primary hepatocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss as in vitro test systems, we assessed the cytotoxicity of the representative AgNP, NM-300K, and AgNO3 as an Ag+ ion source. Lack of AgNP interference with the cytotoxicity assays (AlamarBlue, CFDA-AM, NRU assay and their simultaneous application point to the compatibility and usefulness of such a battery of assays. The RTH-149 and RTL-W1 liver cell lines exhibited similar sensitivity as primary hepatocytes towards AgNP toxicity. Leibovitz’s L-15 culture medium composition (high amino acid content had an important influence on the behaviour and toxicity of AgNPs towards the RTL-W1 cell line. The obtained results demonstrate that, with careful consideration, such an in vitro approach can provide valuable toxicological data to be used in an integrated testing strategy for NM-300K risk assessment.

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor gene-modified adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate radiation induced liver damage in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamin Zhang

    Full Text Available Liver damage caused by radiotherapy is associated with a high mortality rate, but no established treatment exists. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs are capable of migration to injured tissue sites, where they aid in the repair of the damage. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is critical for damage repair due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic and cell regeneration-promoting effects. This study was performed to investigate the therapeutic effects of HGF-overexpressing ADSCs on radiation-induced liver damage (RILD. ADSCs were infected with a lentivirus encoding HGF and HGF-shRNA. Sprague-Dawley (SD rats received 60Gy of irradiation to induce liver injury and were immediately given either saline, ADSCs, ADSCs + HGF or ADSCs + shHGF. Two days after irradiation, a significant reduction in apoptosis was observed in the HGF-overexpressing ADSC group compared with the RILD group, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. Scanning electron microscopy showed chromatin condensation after irradiation, which was ameliorated in the group that received ADSCs and was reversed in the group that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs ameliorated radiation- induced liver fibrosis through down regulation of α-SMA and fibronectin. Hepatocyte regeneration was significantly improved in rats treated with ADSCs compared with rats from the RILD group, as assessed by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Rats that received HGF-overexpressing ADSCs showed an even greater level of hepatocyte regeneration. HGF-overexpressing ADSCs completely blocked the radiation-induced increase in the enzymes ALT and AST. The effect of mitigating RILD was compromised in the ADSC + shHGF group compared with the ADSC group. Altogether, these results suggest that HGF-overexpressing ADSCs can significantly improve RILD in a rat model, which may serve as a valuable therapeutic alternative.

  5. Evaluation of Medicinal Plant Hepatotoxicity in Co-cultures of Hepatocytes and Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Saad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-parenchymal cells might play an important role in the modulation of xenobiotic metabolism in liver and its pharmacological and toxicological consequences. Therefore, the role of cell-to-cell interactions in herbal induced liver toxicity was investigated in monocultures of cells from the human hepatocyte cell line (HepG2 and in co-cultures of cells from the HepG2 cell line and cells from the human monocyte cell line (THP1. Cells were treated with various concentrations (1–500 µg ml−1 of extracts of Pistacia palaestina, Juglans regia and Quercus ithaburensis for 24 h. Extracts from Cleome droserifolia, a known toxic plant, were taken as positive control. In the co-culture system, toxic effects were observed after exposure to extracts of Pistacia palestina and C. droserifolia. These two extracts significantly reduced by cell viability as measured the MTT test and the LDH assay. Whereas in hepatocyte cultures, only extracts of C. droserifolia were found to affect the cell viability. The production levels of albumin from hepatocytes were not affected by treatment with plant extracts in both culture systems. It seems that the observed reduction in cell viability after exposure to extracts of P. palestina in co-cultures but not in monocultures is a result of monocyte-derived factors. The use of liver cell co-cultures is therefore a useful approach to investigate the influence of intercellular communication on xenobiotic metabolism in liver.

  6. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  7. Hepatocyte growth on polycapronolactone and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate nanofiber sheets enhanced by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareková, Dana; Lesný, Petr; Jendelová, Pavla; Michálek, Jiří; Kostecká, Petra; Přádný, Martin; Martinová, L.; Pantoflíček, T.; Ryska, M.; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 125 (2013), s. 1156-1163 ISSN 0172-6390 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/1129; GA AV ČR KAN200520804; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : nanofibers * hepatocytes * Bioartificial Liver Assist Device Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.907, year: 2013

  8. Inhibition of hepatocyte gap junctional intercellular communication by tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor promoters enhance neoplasia are poorly understood. One effect common to most tumor promoters is their ability to inhibit the cell-to-cell exchange of small molecules and ions through gap junctions, i.e., gap junctional intercellular communication (IC). IC maybe necessary for normal growth control and the loss of IC may predispose cells to enhanced growth. In the present studies, the effects of liver tumor promoters and other agents on IC between rodent hepatocytes in primary culture has been studied. IC was detected between hepatocytes: (1) autoradiographically following the passage and incorporation of [5- 3 H]uridine nucleotides from pre-labeled donor hepatocytes to non-labeled, adjacent recipient hepatocytes and (2) by fluorescence microscopy after microinjection of fluorescent Lucifer Yellow CH dye into hepatocytes and visualizing dye spread into adjacent hepatocytes

  9. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöspel, Fanny; Jacobs, Frank; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; De Bondt, An; van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Snoeys, Jan; Monshouwer, Mario; Richter, Marco; Strahl, Nadja; Seehofer, Daniel; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2016-04-16

    Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR)), while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR) metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  10. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Knöspel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR, while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  11. All-In-One: Advanced preparation of Human Parenchymal and Non-Parenchymal Liver Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Werner

    Full Text Available Liver cells are key players in innate immunity. Thus, studying primary isolated liver cells is necessary for determining their role in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In particular, the quantity and quality of isolated cells are crucial to their function. Our aim was to isolate a large quantity of high-quality human parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells from a single liver specimen.Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and stellate cells were isolated from liver tissues by collagenase perfusion in combination with low-speed centrifugation, density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic-activated cell sorting. The purity and functionality of cultured cell populations were controlled by determining their morphology, discriminative cell marker expression, and functional activity.Cell preparation yielded the following cell counts per gram of liver tissue: 2.0 ± 0.4 × 10(7 hepatocytes, 1.8 ± 0.5 × 10(6 Kupffer cells, 4.3 ± 1.9 × 10(5 liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and 3.2 ± 0.5 × 10(5 stellate cells. Hepatocytes were identified by albumin (95.5 ± 1.7% and exhibited time-dependent activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Kupffer cells expressed CD68 (94.5 ± 1.2% and exhibited phagocytic activity, as determined with 1 μm latex beads. Endothelial cells were CD146(+ (97.8 ± 1.1% and exhibited efficient uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Hepatic stellate cells were identified by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (97.1 ± 1.5%. These cells further exhibited retinol (vitamin A-mediated autofluorescence.Our isolation procedure for primary parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells resulted in cell populations of high purity and quality, with retained physiological functionality in vitro. Thus, this system may provide a valuable tool for determining liver function and disease.

  12. Human amnion epithelial cells expressing HLA-G as novel cell-based treatment for liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Stephen C; Gramignoli, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Despite routine liver transplantation and supporting medical therapies, thousands of patients currently wait for an organ and there is an unmet need for more refined and widely available regenerative strategies to treat liver diseases. Cell transplants attempt to maximize the potential for repair and/or regeneration in liver and other organs. Over 40years of laboratory pre-clinical research and 25years of clinical procedures have shown that certain liver diseases can be treated by the infusion of isolated cells (hepatocyte transplant). However, like organ transplants, hepatocyte transplant suffers from a paucity of tissues useful for cell production. Alternative sources have been investigated, yet with limited success. The tumorigenic potential of pluripotent stem cells together with their primitive level of hepatic differentiation, have limited the use of stem cell populations. Stem cell sources from human placenta, and the amnion tissue in particular are receiving renewed interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Unlike pluripotent stem cells, human amnion epithelial (AE) cells are easily available without ethical or religious concerns; they do not express telomerase and are not immortal or tumorigenic when transplanted. In addition, AE cells have been reported to express genes normally expressed in mature liver, when transplanted into the liver. Moreover, because of the possibility of an immune-privileged status related to their expression of HLA-G, it might be possible to transplant human AE cells without immunosuppression of the recipient. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hepatobiliary Clearance Prediction: Species Scaling From Monkey, Dog, and Rat, and In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Sandwich-Cultured Human Hepatocytes Using 17 Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Emi; Bi, Yi-An; Kosa, Rachel E; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena V S

    2017-09-01

    Hepatobiliary elimination can be a major clearance pathway dictating the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Here, we first compared the dose eliminated in bile in preclinical species (monkey, dog, and rat) with that in human and further evaluated single-species scaling (SSS) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance. Six compounds dosed in bile duct-cannulated (BDC) monkeys showed biliary excretion comparable to human; and the SSS of hepatobiliary clearance with plasma fraction unbound correction yielded reasonable predictions (within 3-fold). Although dog SSS also showed reasonable predictions, rat overpredicted hepatobiliary clearance for 13 of 24 compounds. Second, we evaluated the translatability of in vitro sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHHs) to predict human hepatobiliary clearance for 17 drugs. For drugs with no significant active uptake in SCHH studies (i.e., with or without rifamycin SV), measured intrinsic biliary clearance was directly scalable with good predictability (absolute average fold error [AAFE] = 1.6). Drugs showing significant active uptake in SCHH, however, showed improved predictability when scaled based on extended clearance term (AAFE = 2.0), which incorporated sinusoidal uptake along with a global scaling factor for active uptake and the canalicular efflux clearance. In conclusion, SCHH is a useful tool to predict human hepatobiliary clearance, whereas BDC monkey model may provide further confidence in the prospective predictions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mangifera indica L. extract and mangiferin modulate cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeiro, Idania; José Gómez-Lechón, M; Perez, Gabriela; Hernandez, Ivones; Herrera, José Alfredo; Delgado, Rene; Castell, José V; Teresa Donato, M

    2013-05-01

    The aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L. (MSBE) has been reported to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. In previous studies, we showed that MSBE and mangiferin, its main component, lower the activity of some cytochrome P-450 (P450) enzymes in rat hepatocytes and human liver microsomes. In the present study, the effects of MSBE and mangiferin on several P450 enzymes and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in human-cultured hepatocytes have been examined. After hepatocytes underwent a 48-h treatment with sub-cytotoxic concentrations of the products (50-250 µg/mL), a concentration-dependent decrease of the activity of the five P450 enzymes measured (CYP1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4) was observed. For all the activities, a reduction of at least 50% at the highest concentration (250 µg/mL) was observed. In addition, UGT activities diminished. MSBE considerably reduced UGT1A9 activity (about 60% at 250 µg/mL) and lesser effects on the other UGTs. In contrast, 250 µg/mL mangiferin had greater effects on UGT1A1 and 2B7 than on UGT1A9 (about 55% vs. 35% reduction, respectively). Quantification of specific mRNAs revealed reduced CYP3A4 and 3A5 mRNAs content, and an increase in CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 mRNAs. No remarkable effects on the CYP2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 2E1 levels were observed. Our results suggest that the activity and/or expression of major P450 and UGT enzymes is modulated by MSBE and that potential herb-drugs interactions could arise after a combined intake of this extract with conventional medicines. Therefore, the potential safety risks of this natural product derived by altering the ADMET properties of co-administered drugs should be examined. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. CD147 promotes liver fibrosis progression via VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signalling-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhaoyong; Qu, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Qichao; Qu, Ping; Xu, Xinsen; Yuan, Peng; Huang, Xiaojun; Shao, Yongping; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Although previous evidence indicates close involvement of CD147 in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, the underlying molecular mechanisms and its therapeutic value remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the biological roles of CD147 in liver fibrosis and assessed its therapeutic value as a target molecule in the CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model. We found that CD147 was highly expressed in both hepatocytes and SECs (sinusoidal endothelial cells) in fibrotic liver tissues. Additionally, it was significantly associated with the fibrosis stage. TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor β1) was found to be mainly responsible for the up-regulation of CD147. Bioinformatic and experimental data suggest a functional link between CD147 expression and VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor A)/VEGR-2 (VEGF receptor 2) signalling-mediated angiogenesis in fibrotic liver tissues. Furthermore, we observed that the CD147-induced activation of the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway promotes the production of VEGF-A in hepatocytes and expression of VEGFR-2 in SECs, which was found to enhance the angiogenic capability of SECs. Finally, our data indicate that blocking of CD147 using an mAb (monoclonal antibody) attenuated liver fibrosis progression via inhibition of VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling and subsequent amelioration of microvascular abnormality in the CCl4-induced mouse model. Our findings suggest a novel functional mechanism that CD147 may promote liver fibrosis progression via inducing the VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling pathway-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and SECs. New strategies based on the intervention of CD147 can be expected for prevention of liver fibrosis. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. Assessment of hepatocyte and kupffer cell function using Tc-99m DISIDA/Tc-99m tin colloid in thioacetamide-induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, B. C.; Chun, K. A.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.

    1997-01-01

    Toxic liver injury is not unusual in clinical field and liver biopsy is one of the most accurate method to define the severity of liver injury. But occasionally, it is impossible to obtain liver tissue in patients with acute toxic liver injury. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility of liver scintigraphy with Tc-99m DISIDA or Tc-99m tin colloid as a non-invasive tool in predicting functional status of hepatocyte and Kupffer cell and severity of liver injury. Intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide was performed to make acute liver injury in mice and rats, and liver status was assessed by pathologic specimen and scintigraphic methods. Scintigraphic evaluation were performed by biodistribution of Tc-99m DISIDA or Tc-99m tin colloid in thioacetamide-treated mice. Liver time-activity curves were generated. Comparison between histologic data and scintigraphic data was done with SAS program. Thioacetamide-treated mice demonstrated hepatocyte necrosis in histologic examination and low liver/blood uptake ratios in biodistribution studies using both radiotracers. Biodistribution study using Tc-99m tin colloid revealed increased lung radioactivity in thioacetamide-treated mice. Twenty-four hours after thioacetamide administration, thioacetamide-treated rats demonstrated maximal hepatocyte necrosis and inflammation in histologic finding and delayed maximal uptake time (Tmax) and prolonged half time (T 1/2 ) of liver time-activity curve in liver scintigraphy. Histologic results and scintigraphic data were well correlated, and these two scintigraphic parameters (Tmax T 1/2 ) seemed to be good predictors of histologic change of liver. These data showed that liver injury could be assessed by non-invasive scintigraphic study in rat and mouse. This experimental study might be used as a animal model to evaluate the liver protecting drugs, and this scintigraphic study could be applied to acute toxic hepatitis for assessment of liver status in men

  17. Human circulating monocytes internalize 125I-insulin in a similar fashion to rat hepatocytes: relevance to receptor regulation in target and nontarget tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunberger, G.; Robert, A.; Carpentier, J.L.; Dayer, J.M.; Roth, A.; Stevenson, H.C.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1985-01-01

    Circulating monocytes bind 125 I-insulin in a specific fashion and have been used to analyze the ambient receptor status in humans. When freshly isolated circulating monocytes are incubated with 125 I-insulin and examined by electron microscopic autoradiography, approximately 18% of the labeled material is internalized after 15 minutes at 37 degrees C. By 2 hours at 37 degrees C, approximately one half of the 125 I-insulin is internalized. Internalization occurs also at 15 degrees C but at a slower rate. Furthermore, the monocytes bind and internalize 125 I-insulin in a manner that mirrors that of major target tissues, such as rat hepatocytes. These data suggest that the insulin receptor of the circulating monocyte might be regulated by adsorptive endocytosis in a manner analogous to that of target tissue, such as the liver

  18. Cytochrome P450IID6 recognized by LKM1 antibody is not exposed on the surface of hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A M; Mura, C; De Lemos-Chiarandini, C; Krishnamoorthy, R; Alvarez, F

    1993-06-01

    LKM1 autoantibody, directed against P450IID6, is accepted as a marker of a particular type of autoimmune hepatitis, but its role in the pathogenesis of the disease is controversial. Localization of P450IID6 on the cell surface of rat hepatocytes was previously reported, suggesting that membrane-bound P450IID6 could be the target of LKM1 antibodies, thus allowing immune lysis of hepatocytes. The objective of the present study was to determine, using various methods, the cell localization of P450IID6 in human and rat hepatocytes. Incubation of rat and human hepatocytes with LKM1-positive serum showed slight, if any, cell membrane staining using immunofluorescence, immunoperoxidase and immunoelectron microscopic studies. No staining of the plasma membrane of human hepatocytes was observed when incubations were carried out with immunoaffinity-purified antibody directed against peptide 254-271, the main epitope of P450IID6 recognized by all LKM1 sera tested. Chinese hamster ovary cells, transfected with the complete P450IID6 cDNA and incubated with the supernatant from a B cell lymphoblastoid cell line prepared with the lymphocytes of a LKM1-positive patient, did not show any staining of the cell surface by immunofluorescence. Incubation of rat microsomal fraction vesicles with LKM1-positive serum, followed by protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, displayed a staining of almost all vesicles, confirming that P450IID6 is present on the cytoplasmic side of the microsomal membrane, which makes it unable to be expressed on the cell surface even if it were transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Sulpho NHS Biotin labelling of rat hepatocyte cell membranes did not show the presence of a 50-kD molecule that could have reacted with LKM1 antibody. DNA sequencing of exon 1 of the CYP2D6 gene of a patient positive for LKM1 antibody did not show any difference from that of the normal published sequence of the gene. This does not favour an alteration of the NH2 terminal

  19. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  20. Hanging Drop, A Best Three-Dimensional (3D) Culture Method for Primary Buffalo and Sheep Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shri, Meena; Agrawal, Himanshu; Rani, Payal; Singh, Dheer; Onteru, Suneel Kumar

    2017-04-26

    Livestock, having close resemblance to humans, could be a better source of primary hepatocytes than rodents. Herein, we successfully developed three-dimensional (3D) culturing system for primary sheep and buffalo hepatocytes. The 3D-structures of sheep hepatocytes were formed on the fifth-day and maintained until the tenth-day on polyHEMA-coated plates and in hanging drops with William's E media (HDW). Between the cultured and fresh cells, we observed a similar expression of GAPDH, HNF4α, ALB, CYP1A1, CK8 and CK18. Interestingly, a statistically significant increase was noted in the TAT, CPS, AFP, AAT, GSP and PCNA expression. In buffalo hepatocytes culture, 3D-like structures were formed on the third-day and maintained until the sixth-day on polyHEMA and HDW. The expression of HNF4α, GSP, CPS, AFP, AAT, PCNA and CK18 was similar between cultured and fresh cells. Further, a statistically significant increase in the TAT and CK8 expression, and a decrease in the GAPDH, CYP1A1 and ALB expression were noted. Among the culture systems, HDW maintained the liver transcript markers more or less similar to the fresh hepatocytes of the sheep and buffalo for ten and six days, respectively. Taken together, hanging drop is an efficient method for 3D culturing of primary sheep and buffalo hepatocytes.

  1. Exosomes from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hiPSC-MSCs) Protect Liver against Hepatic Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury via Activating Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingdong; Li, Dawei; Han, Conghui; Wu, Haoyu; Xu, Longmei; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Chen, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exosomes produced by human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hiPSC-MSCs-Exo) on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Exosomes derived from hiPSC-MSCs were isolated and characterized both biochemically and biophysically. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo were injected systemically into a murine ischemia/reperfusion injury model via the inferior vena cava, and then the therapeutic effects were evaluated. The serum levels of transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as histological changes were examined. Primary hepatocytes and human hepatocyte cell line HL7702 were used to test whether exosomes could induce hepatocytes proliferation in vitro. In addition, the expression levels of proliferation markers (proliferation cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; Phosphohistone-H3, PHH3) were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, SK inhibitor (SKI-II) and S1P1 receptor antagonist (VPC23019) were used to investigate the role of sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate-dependent pathway in the effects of hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatocytes. hiPSCs were efficiently induced into hiPSC-MSCs that had typical MSC characteristics. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo had diameters ranging from 100 to 200 nm and expressed exosome markers (Alix, CD63 and CD81). After hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration, hepatocyte necrosis and sinusoidal congestion were markedly suppressed in the ischemia/reperfusion injury model, with lower histopathological scores. The levels of hepatocyte injury markers AST and ALT were significantly lower in the treatment group compared to control, and the expression levels of proliferation markers (PCNA and PHH3) were greatly induced after hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration. Moreover, hiPSC-MSCs-Exo also induced primary hepatocytes and HL7702 cells proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hiPSC-MSCs-Exo could

  2. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  3. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  5. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4'-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, M R

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4'-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4'-OH-TMF) in this effect. We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4'-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4'-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4'-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. Tangeretin and 4'-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4'-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  7. Studies of the Ala/Val98 polymorphism of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha gene and the relationship to beta-cell function during an OGTT in glucose-tolerant women with and without previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, J; Damm, P; Ek, J

    2004-01-01

    In pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) an increased demand for insulin is not met due to beta-cell dysfunction. An Ala/Val polymorphism at codon 98 of the hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) gene has been associated with decreased serum insulin and C-peptide r...

  8. Hepatic differentiation potential of commercially available human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Shin-Yeu; Dai, Hui; Leong, Kam W

    2006-12-01

    The ready availability and low immunogenicity of commercially available mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) render them a potential cell source for the development of therapeutic products. With cell source a major bottleneck in hepatic tissue engineering, we investigated whether commercially available human MSC (hMSC) can transdifferentiate into the hepatic lineage. Based on previous studies that find rapid gain of hepatic genes in bone marrow-derived stem cells cocultured with liver tissue, we used a similar approach to drive hepatic differentiation by coculturing the hMSC with rat livers treated or untreated with gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). After a 24-hour coculture period with liver tissue injured by GdCl(3) in a Transwell configuration, approximately 34% of the cells differentiated into albumin-expressing cells. Cocultured cells were subsequently maintained with growth factors to complete the hepatic differentiation. Cocultured cells expressed more hepatic gene markers, and had higher metabolic functions and P450 activity than cells that were only differentiated with growth factors. In conclusion, commercially available hMSC do show hepatic differentiation potential, and a liver microenvironment in culture can provide potent cues to accelerate and deepen the differentiation. The ability to generate hepatocyte-like cells from a commercially available cell source would find interesting applications in liver tissue engineering.

  9. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  10. Usage of adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase mediated hepatocellular damage for enabling mouse liver repopulation with allogenic or xenogenic hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moreno

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the liver of immunodeficient mice can be efficiently repopulated with human hepatocytes when subjected to chronic hepatocellular damage. Mice with such chimeric livers represent useful reagents for medical and clinical studies. However all previously reported models of humanized livers are difficult to implement as they involve cross-breeding of immunodeficient mice with mice exhibiting genetic alterations causing sustained hepatic injury. In this paper we attempted to create chimeric livers by inducing persistent hepatocellular damage in immunodeficient Rag2(-/- γc(-/- mice using an adenovirus encoding herpes virus thymidine kinase (AdTk and two consecutive doses of ganciclovir (GCV. We found that this treatment resulted in hepatocellular damage persisting for at least 10 weeks and enabled efficient engraftment and proliferation within the liver of either human or allogenic hepatocytes. Interestingly, while the nodules generated from the transplanted mouse hepatocytes were well vascularized, the human hepatocytes experienced progressive depolarization and exhibited reduced numbers of murine endothelial cells inside the nodules. In conclusion, AdTk/GCV-induced liver damage licenses the liver of immunodeficient mice for allogenic and xenogenic hepatocyte repopulation. This approach represents a simple alternative strategy for chimeric liver generation using immunodeficient mice without additional genetic manipulation of the germ line.

  11. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  12. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αi PCR, inhibits bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnar Karimian

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis is a common event in acute and chronic liver diseases leading to loss of functional liver tissue. Approaches to prevent apoptosis have therefore high potential for the treatment of liver disease. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR play crucial roles in cell fate (proliferation, cell death and act through heterotrimeric G-proteins. G(αiPCRs have been shown to regulate lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes, but their role in inflammation- or bile acid-induced apoptosis is unknown. Here, we analyzed the effect of inhibiting G(αiPCR function, using pertussis toxin (PT, on bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Primary rat hepatocytes, HepG2-rNtcp cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma cells or H-4-II-E cells (rat hepatoma cells were exposed to glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα/actinomycin D (ActD. PT (50-200 nmol/L was added 30 minutes prior to the apoptotic stimulus. Apoptosis (caspase-3 activity, acridine orange staining and necrosis (sytox green staining were assessed. PT significantly reduced GCDCA- and TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes (-60%, p<0.05 in a dose-dependent manner (with no shift to necrosis, but not in HepG2-rNtcp cells or rat H-4-II-E cells. The protective effect of pertussis toxin was independent of the activation of selected cell survival signal transduction pathways, including ERK, p38 MAPK, PI3K and PKC pathways, as specific protein kinase inhibitors did not reverse the protective effects of pertussis toxin in GCDCA-exposed hepatocytes.Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αiPCRs, protects hepatocytes, but not hepatocellular carcinoma cells, against bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis and has therapeutic potential as primary hepatoprotective drug, as well as adjuvant in anti-cancer therapy.

  13. Endocrine disruption screening by protein and gene expression of vitellogenin in freshly isolated and cryopreserved rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markell, Lauren K; Mingoia, Robert T; Peterson, Heather M; Yao, Jianhong; Waters, Stephanie M; Finn, James P; Nabb, Diane L; Han, Xing

    2014-08-18

    Xenobiotics may activate the estrogen receptor, resulting in alteration of normal endocrine functions in animals and humans. Consequently, this necessitates development of assay end points capable of identifying estrogenic xenobiotics. In the present study, we screened the potential estrogenicity of chemicals via their ability to induce vitellogenin (VTG) expression in cultured primary hepatocytes from male trout. A routine method for VTG detection measures the secretion of the protein by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in freshly isolated trout hepatocytes. However, this lengthy (6 days) culturing procedure requires that hepatocyte isolation is performed each time the assay is run. We optimized this methodology by investigating the utility of cryopreserved hepatocytes, shortening the incubation time, performing a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method for VTG quantification, and verifying the model system with reference chemicals 17β-estradiol, estrone, diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, genistein, and a negative control, corticosterone. To test the performance of both freshly isolated and cryopreserved hepatocytes, mRNA was collected from hepatocytes following 24 h treatment for VTG gene expression analysis, whereas cell culture media was collected for a VTG ELISA 96 h post-treatment. EC50 values were obtained for each reference chemical except for corticosterone, which exhibited no induction of VTG gene or protein level. Our results show linear concordance between ELISA and qPCR detection methods. Although there was approximately 50% reduction in VTG inducibility following cryopreservation, linear concordance of EC50 values was found between freshly isolated and cryopreserved hepatocytes, indicating that cryopreservation does not alter the functional assessment of estrogen receptor activation and therefore VTG expression. These studies demonstrate that qPCR is a sensitive and specific method for detecting VTG gene expression that can be used together

  14. In vitro culture of functionally active buffalo hepatocytes isolated by using a simplified manual perfusion method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Panda

    Full Text Available In farm animals, there is no suitable cell line available to understand liver-specific functions. This has limited our understanding of liver function and metabolism in farm animals. Culturing and maintenance of functionally active hepatocytes is difficult, since they survive no more than few days. Establishing primary culture of hepatocytes can help in studying cellular metabolism, drug toxicity, hepatocyte specific gene function and regulation. Here we provide a simple in vitro method for isolation and short-term culture of functionally active buffalo hepatocytes.Buffalo hepatocytes were isolated from caudate lobes by using manual enzymatic perfusion and mechanical disruption of liver tissue. Hepatocyte yield was (5.3 ± 0.66×107 cells per gram of liver tissue with a viability of 82.3 ± 3.5%. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were spherical with well contrasted border. After 24 hours of seeding onto fibroblast feeder layer and different extracellular matrices like dry collagen, matrigel and sandwich collagen coated plates, hepatocytes formed confluent monolayer with frequent clusters. Cultured hepatocytes exhibited typical cuboidal and polygonal shape with restored cellular polarity. Cells expressed hepatocyte-specific marker genes or proteins like albumin, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, glucose-6-phosphatase, tyrosine aminotransferase, cytochromes, cytokeratin and α1-antitrypsin. Hepatocytes could be immunostained with anti-cytokeratins, anti-albumin and anti α1-antitrypsin antibodies. Abundant lipid droplets were detected in the cytosol of hepatocytes using oil red stain. In vitro cultured hepatocytes could be grown for five days and maintained for up to nine days on buffalo skin fibroblast feeder layer. Cultured hepatocytes were viable for functional studies.We developed a convenient and cost effective technique for hepatocytes isolation for short-term culture that exhibited morphological and functional characteristics of active hepatocytes

  15. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Domínguez-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system.

  16. Stathmin Mediates Hepatocyte Resistance to Death from Oxidative Stress by down Regulating JNK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Enpeng; Amir, Muhammad; Lin, Yu; Czaja, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Stathmin 1 performs a critical function in cell proliferation by regulating microtubule polymerization. This proliferative function is thought to explain the frequent overexpression of stathmin in human cancer and its correlation with a bad prognosis. Whether stathmin also functions in cell death pathways is unclear. Stathmin regulates microtubules in part by binding free tubulin, a process inhibited by stathmin phosphorylation from kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The involvement of JNK activation both in stathmin phosphorylation, and in hepatocellular resistance to oxidative stress, led to an examination of the role of stathmin/JNK crosstalk in oxidant-induced hepatocyte death. Oxidative stress from menadione-generated superoxide induced JNK-dependent stathmin phosphorylation at Ser-16, Ser-25 and Ser-38 in hepatocytes. A stathmin knockdown sensitized hepatocytes to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death from menadione without altering levels of oxidant generation. The absence of stathmin during oxidative stress led to JNK overactivation that was the mechanism of cell death as a concomitant knockdown of JNK1 or JNK2 blocked death. Hepatocyte death from JNK overactivation was mediated by the effects of JNK on mitochondria. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization occurred in stathmin knockdown cells at low concentrations of menadione that triggered apoptosis, whereas mitochondrial β-oxidation and ATP homeostasis were compromised at higher, necrotic menadione concentrations. Stathmin therefore mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which stathmin promotes cell survival and potentially tumor growth. PMID:25285524

  17. Stathmin mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enpeng Zhao

    Full Text Available Stathmin 1 performs a critical function in cell proliferation by regulating microtubule polymerization. This proliferative function is thought to explain the frequent overexpression of stathmin in human cancer and its correlation with a bad prognosis. Whether stathmin also functions in cell death pathways is unclear. Stathmin regulates microtubules in part by binding free tubulin, a process inhibited by stathmin phosphorylation from kinases including c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. The involvement of JNK activation both in stathmin phosphorylation, and in hepatocellular resistance to oxidative stress, led to an examination of the role of stathmin/JNK crosstalk in oxidant-induced hepatocyte death. Oxidative stress from menadione-generated superoxide induced JNK-dependent stathmin phosphorylation at Ser-16, Ser-25 and Ser-38 in hepatocytes. A stathmin knockdown sensitized hepatocytes to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death from menadione without altering levels of oxidant generation. The absence of stathmin during oxidative stress led to JNK overactivation that was the mechanism of cell death as a concomitant knockdown of JNK1 or JNK2 blocked death. Hepatocyte death from JNK overactivation was mediated by the effects of JNK on mitochondria. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization occurred in stathmin knockdown cells at low concentrations of menadione that triggered apoptosis, whereas mitochondrial β-oxidation and ATP homeostasis were compromised at higher, necrotic menadione concentrations. Stathmin therefore mediates hepatocyte resistance to death from oxidative stress by down regulating JNK and maintaining mitochondrial integrity. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism by which stathmin promotes cell survival and potentially tumor growth.

  18. Independent, parallel pathways to CXCL10 induction in HCV-infected hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Jessica; Wagoner, Jessica; Lovelace, Erica S; Thirstrup, Derek; Mohar, Isaac; Smith, Wesley; Giugliano, Silvia; Li, Kui; Crispe, I Nicholas; Rosen, Hugo R; Polyak, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    The pro-inflammatory chemokine CXCL10 is induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo, and is associated with outcome of IFN (interferon)-based therapy. We studied how hepatocyte sensing of early HCV infection via TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I) led to expression of CXCL10. CXCL10, type I IFN, and type III IFN mRNAs and proteins were measured in PHH (primary human hepatocytes) and hepatocyte lines harboring functional or non-functional TLR3 and RIG-I pathways following HCV infection or exposure to receptor-specific stimuli. HuH7 human hepatoma cells expressing both TLR3 and RIG-I produced maximal CXCL10 during early HCV infection. Neutralization of type I and type III IFNs had no impact on virus-induced CXCL10 expression in TLR3+/RIG-I+ HuH7 cells, but reduced CXCL10 expression in PHH. PHH cultures were positive for monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell mRNAs. Immunodepletion of non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) eliminated marker expression in PHH cultures, which then showed no IFN requirement for CXCL10 induction during HCV infection. Immunofluorescence studies also revealed a positive correlation between intracellular HCV Core and CXCL10 protein expression (r(2) = 0.88, p ≤ 0.001). While CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes during the initial phase of HCV infection is independent of hepatocyte-derived type I and type III IFNs, NPC-derived IFNs contribute to CXCL10 induction during HCV infection in PHH cultures. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad K; Avila, Diana; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. PMID:23026831

  20. Oxidative and ER stress-dependent ASK1 activation in steatotic hepatocytes and Kupffer cells sensitizes mice fatty liver to ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imarisio, Chiara; Alchera, Elisa; Bangalore Revanna, Chandrashekar; Valente, Guido; Follenzi, Antonia; Trisolini, Elena; Boldorini, Renzo; Carini, Rita

    2017-11-01

    Steatosis intensifies hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury increasing hepatocyte damage and hepatic inflammation. This study evaluates if this process is associated to a differential response of steatotic hepatocytes (HP) and Kupffer cells (KC) to I/R injury and investigates the molecular mechanisms involved. Control or steatotic (treated with 50 μmol palmitic acid, PA) mouse HP or KC were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). C57BL/6 mice fed 9 week with control or High Fat diet underwent to partial hepatic IR. PA increased H/R damage of HP and further activated the ASK1-JNK axis stimulated by ER stress during H/R. PA also induced the production of oxidant species (OS), and OS prevention nullified the capacity of PA to increase H/R damage and ASK1/JNK stimulation. ASK1 inhibition prevented JNK activation and entirely protected HP damage. In KC, PA directly activated ER stress, ASK1 and p38 MAPK and increased H/R damage. However, in contrast to HP, ASK1 inhibition further increased H/R damage by preventing p38 MAPK activation. In mice liver, steatosis induced the expression of activated ASK1 in only KC, whereas I/R exposure of steatotic liver activated ASK1 expression also in HP. "In vivo", ASK1 inhibition prevented ASK1, JNK and p38 MAPK activation and protected I/R damage and expression of inflammatory markers. Lipids-induced ASK1 stimulation differentially affects HP and KC by promoting cytotoxic or protective signals. ASK1 increases H/R damage of HP by stimulating JNK and protects KC activating p38MAPK. These data support the potentiality of the therapeutic employment of ASK1 inhibitors that can antagonize the damaging effects of I/R upon fatty liver surgery by the contextual reduction of HP death and of KC-mediated reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fullerene inhibits benzo(a)pyrene Efflux from Cyprinus carpio hepatocytes by affecting cell membrane fluidity and P-glycoprotein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiqing; Hu, Xialin; Wang, Rui; Yuan, Jin; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-05-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) can protect cells by pumping out toxic compounds, and has been found widely expressed in fish tissues. Here, we illustrate the P-gp efflux ability for benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in the hepatocytes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) after exposing to fullerene aqueous suspension (nC60). The results revealed that nC60 increased the membrane fluidity by decreasing the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids, and increased the cholesterol contents. These findings, combined with 10-38% and 70-75% down-regulation of P-gp mRNA and protein respectively, suggested that nC60 caused inhibition on P-gp efflux transport system. Therefore, we further investigated the cellular efflux ability for BaP. Results showed unequivocally that nC60 is a potent P-gp inhibitor. The retaining BaP amounts after efflux were elevated by 1.7-2.8 fold during the 10 day exposure. Meanwhile, 5mg/L humic acid (one of the important fractions of natural organic matter, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environment) alleviated the nC60 damage to hepatocytes in terms of oxidative damage, cholesterol increment, and P-gp content reduction; and finally attenuated the suppressed P-gp efflux ability. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence of nC60 toxicity to P-gp functionality in fish and illustrates the possible mechanism of the suppressed P-gp efflux ability for BaP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Matriptase is required for the active form of hepatocyte growth factor induced Met, focal adhesion kinase and protein kinase B activation on neural stem/progenitor cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jung-Da; Lee, Sheau-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a chemoattractant and inducer for neural stem/progenitor (NS/P) cell migration. Although the type II transmembrane serine protease, matriptase (MTP) is an activator of the latent HGF, MTP is indispensable on NS/P cell motility induced by the active form of HGF. This suggests that MTP's action on NS/P cell motility involves mechanisms other than proteolytic activation of HGF. In the present study, we investigate the role of MTP in HGF-stimulated signaling events. Using specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK), we demonstrated that in NS/P cells HGF-activated c-Met induces PI3k-Akt signaling which then leads to FAK activation. This signaling pathway ultimately induces MMP2 expression and NS/P cell motility. Knocking down of MTP in NS/P cells with specific siRNA impaired HGF-stimulation of c-Met, Akt and FAK activation, blocked HGF-induced production of MMP2 and inhibited HGF-stimulated NS/P cell motility. MTP-knockdown NS/P cells cultured in the presence of recombinant protein of MTP protease domain or transfected with the full-length wild-type but not the protease-defected MTP restored HGF-responsive events in NS/P cells. In addition to functioning as HGF activator, our data revealed novel function of MTP on HGF-stimulated c-Met signaling activation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients.

  4. Augmentation of DHCR24 expression by hepatitis C virus infection facilitates viral replication in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Takashi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Hirata, Yuichi; Satoh, Masaaki; Tokunaga, Yuko; Tateno, Chise; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Funata, Nobuaki; Sudoh, Masayuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2011-09-01

    We characterized the role of 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) in hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). DHCR24 is a cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme and cholesterol is a major component of lipid rafts, which is reported to play an important role in HCV replication. Therefore, we examined the potential of DHCR24 as a target for novel HCV therapeutic agents. We examined DHCR24 expression in human hepatocytes in both the livers of HCV-infected patients and those of chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. We targeted DHCR24 with siRNA and U18666A which is an inhibitor of both DHCR24 and cholesterol synthesis. We measured the level of HCV replication in these HCV replicon cell lines and HCV infected cells. U18666A was administrated into chimeric mice with humanized liver, and anti-viral effects were assessed. Expression of DHCR24 was induced by HCV infection in human hepatocytes in vitro, and in human hepatocytes of chimeric mouse liver. Silencing of DHCR24 by siRNA decreased HCV replication in replicon cell lines and HCV JFH-1 strain-infected cells. Treatment with U18666A suppressed HCV replication in the replicon cell lines. Moreover, to evaluate the anti-viral effect of U18666A in vivo, we administrated U18666A with or without pegylated interferon to chimeric mice and observed an inhibitory effect of U18666A on HCV infection and a synergistic effect with interferon. DHCR24 is an essential host factor which augmented its expression by HCV infection, and plays a significant role in HCV replication. DHCR24 may serve as a novel anti-HCV drug target. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic fate of desomorphine elucidated using rat urine, pooled human liver preparations, and human hepatocyte cultures as well as its detectability using standard urine screening approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lilian H J; Kaminski, Yeda Rumi; Noor, Fozia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-09-01

    Desomorphine is an opioid misused as "crocodile", a cheaper alternative to heroin. It is a crude synthesis product homemade from codeine with toxic byproducts. The aim of the present work was to investigate the metabolic fate of desomorphine in vivo using rat urine and in vitro using pooled human liver microsomes and cytosol as well as human liver cell lines (HepG2 and HepaRG) by Orbitrap-based liquid chromatography-high resolution-tandem mass spectrometry or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. According to the identified metabolites, the following metabolic steps could be proposed: N-demethylation, hydroxylation at various positions, N-oxidation, glucuronidation, and sulfation. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) initial activity screening revealed CYP3A4 to be the only CYP involved in all phase I steps. UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) initial activity screening showed that UGT1A1, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 formed desomorphine glucuronide. Among the tested in vitro models, HepaRG cells were identified to be the most suitable tool for prediction of human hepatic phase I and II metabolism of drugs of abuse. Finally, desomorphine (crocodile) consumption should be detectable by all standard urine screening approaches mainly via the parent compound and/or its glucuronide assuming similar kinetics in rats and humans.

  6. Expression of the α2-macroglobulin receptor on human neoplastic fibroblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grofova, M.; Matoska, J.; Bies, J.; Bizik, J.; Vaheri, A.

    1995-01-01

    The α 2 -macroglobulin membrane-associated receptor ( α 2 MR) has been previously detected on hepatocytes, fibroblast, macrophages, syncytiotrophoblasts and recently on human malignant blood cells of myelomonocytic leukemia. In cells growing in vitro from human germ cell tumors α 2 MR mRNA was detected by Northern blotting. Endocytosis of α 2 MR from culture medium was detected in these cells by indirect immunofluorescence. In cell extracts α 2 MR and its degradation products were detected by immunoblotting. The cells expressing α 2 MR and internalizing α 2 MR were identified as fibroblast both by their morphology and expression of vimentin intermediate filaments. The role and function of α 2 MR receptor in the analyzed neoplastic cells of teratomatous origin is discussed. (author)

  7. Preparation of Degradable Biological Carrier With LCC and its Application in Culture of Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. K.; Chen, X. K.; Wu, H. F.; Li, J. L.; Xie, Y. M.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to extract lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC) with poplar as raw material, which was used to prepare bio-carrier by freeze-drying method. The chemical properties and morphological of LCC porous biological carriers were analyzed by GPC, FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The FT-IR spectrum results indicated that LCC which are composed of lignin and polysaccharide, with a typical LCC structure. Galactose have a specific ability to recognize liver cells owing to the presence of receptors on hepatocytes. Cell counting results showed that the cells increases fastest while the proliferation rate of the liver cell in LCC is obviously higher than that of control group. These results indicated that poplar LCC is very biocompatible, in which it might be a great potential biological carrier material for human hepatocyte culture.

  8. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  9. PHA665752, a small-molecule inhibitor of c-Met, inhibits hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated migration and proliferation of c-Met-positive neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosswell, Hal E; Dasgupta, Anindya; Alvarado, Carlos S; Watt, Tanya; Christensen, James G; De, Pradip; Durden, Donald L; Findley, Harry W

    2009-01-01

    c-Met is a tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and both c-Met and its ligand are expressed in a variety of tissues. C-Met/HGF/SF signaling is essential for normal embryogenesis, organogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Abnormal c-Met/HGF/SF signaling has been demonstrated in different tumors and linked to aggressive and metastatic tumor phenotypes. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated inhibition of c-Met/HGF/SF signaling by the small-molecule inhibitor PHA665752. This study investigated c-Met and HGF expression in two neuroblastoma (NBL) cell lines and tumor tissue from patients with NBL, as well as the effects of PHA665752 on growth and motility of NBL cell lines. The effect of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN on migration and proliferation of tumor cells treated with PHA665752 was also evaluated. Expression of c-Met and HGF in NBL cell lines SH-EP and SH-SY5Y and primary tumor tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. The effect of PHA665752 on c-Met/HGF signaling involved in NBL cell proliferation and migration was evaluated in c-Met-positive cells and c-Met-transfected cells. The transwell chemotaxis assay and the MTT assay were used to measure migration and proliferation/cell-survival of tumor cells, respectively. The PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone was used to assess the effect of PTEN on PHA665752-induced inhibition of NBL cell proliferation/cell-survival and migration High c-Met expression was detected in SH-EP cells and primary tumors from patients with advanced-stage disease. C-Met/HGF signaling induced both migration and proliferation of SH-EP cells. Migration and proliferation/cell-survival were inhibited by PHA665752 in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that induced overexpression of PTEN following treatment with rosiglitazone significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect of PHA665752 on NBL-cell migration and proliferation. c-Met is highly expressed in most tumors from

  10. Rapid fabricating technique for multi-layered human hepatic cell sheets by forceful contraction of the fibroblast monolayer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sakai

    Full Text Available Cell sheet engineering is attracting attention from investigators in various fields, from basic research scientists to clinicians focused on regenerative medicine. However, hepatocytes have a limited proliferation potential in vitro, and it generally takes a several days to form a sheet morphology and multi-layered sheets. We herein report our rapid and efficient technique for generating multi-layered human hepatic cell (HepaRG® cell sheets using pre-cultured fibroblast monolayers derived from human skin (TIG-118 cells as a feeder layer on a temperature-responsive culture dish. Multi-layered TIG-118/HepaRG cell sheets with a thick morphology were harvested on day 4 of culturing HepaRG cells by forceful contraction of the TIG-118 cells, and the resulting sheet could be easily handled. In addition, the human albumin and alpha 1-antitrypsin synthesis activities of TIG-118/HepaRG cells were approximately 1.2 and 1.3 times higher than those of HepaRG cells, respectively. Therefore, this technique is considered to be a promising modality for rapidly fabricating multi-layered human hepatocyte sheets from cells with limited proliferation potential, and the engineered cell sheet could be used for cell transplantation with highly specific functions.

  11. GLP-1 analogs reduce hepatocyte steatosis and improve survival by enhancing the unfolded protein response and promoting macroautophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvetank Sharma

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a known outcome of hepatosteatosis. Free fatty acids (FFA induce the unfolded protein response (UPR or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress that may induce apoptosis. Recent data indicate ER stress to be a major player in the progression of fatty liver to more aggressive lesions. Autophagy on the other hand has been demonstrated to be protective against ER stress-induced cell death. We hypothesized that exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog treatment of fat loaded hepatocytes can reduce steatosis by autophagy which leads to reduced ER stress-related hepatocyte apoptosis.Primary human hepatocytes were loaded with saturated, cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic, oleic and elaidic acid respectively. Steatosis, induced with all three fatty acids, was significantly resolved after exendin-4 treatment. Exendin-4 sustained levels of GRP78 expression in fat-loaded cells when compared to untreated fat-loaded cells alone. In contrast, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein; the penultimate protein that leads to ER stress-related cell death was significantly decreased by exendin-4 in hepatocytes loaded with fatty acids. Finally, exendin-4 in fat loaded hepatocytes clearly promoted gene products associated with macroautophagy as measured by enhanced production of both Beclin-1 and LC3B-II, markers for autophagy; and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Similar observations were made in mouse liver lysates after mice were fed with high fat high fructose diet and treated with a long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide.GLP-1 proteins appear to protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-related death by prohibition of a dysfunctional ER stress response; and reduce fatty acid accumulation, by activation of both macro-and chaperone-mediated autophagy. These findings provide a novel role for GLP-1 proteins in halting the progression of more aggressive lesions from underlying steatosis in humans afflicted with NAFLD.

  12. Diffuse glomerular nodular lesions in diabetic pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha, an inheritant diabetic gene in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hara

    Full Text Available Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3 gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI with advanced glycation end-product (AGE and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicatin