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Sample records for human hepatic cell

  1. Hepatic differentiation potential of commercially available human mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Ong, Shin-Yeu; Dai, Hui; Leong, Kam W

    2006-12-01

    The ready availability and low immunogenicity of commercially available mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) render them a potential cell source for the development of therapeutic products. With cell source a major bottleneck in hepatic tissue engineering, we investigated whether commercially available human MSC (hMSC) can transdifferentiate into the hepatic lineage. Based on previous studies that find rapid gain of hepatic genes in bone marrow-derived stem cells cocultured with liver tissue, we used a similar approach to drive hepatic differentiation by coculturing the hMSC with rat livers treated or untreated with gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). After a 24-hour coculture period with liver tissue injured by GdCl(3) in a Transwell configuration, approximately 34% of the cells differentiated into albumin-expressing cells. Cocultured cells were subsequently maintained with growth factors to complete the hepatic differentiation. Cocultured cells expressed more hepatic gene markers, and had higher metabolic functions and P450 activity than cells that were only differentiated with growth factors. In conclusion, commercially available hMSC do show hepatic differentiation potential, and a liver microenvironment in culture can provide potent cues to accelerate and deepen the differentiation. The ability to generate hepatocyte-like cells from a commercially available cell source would find interesting applications in liver tissue engineering.

  2. Imaging of Human Hepatic Stem Cells In Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    Report on progress in MRI and PET of stem cell tracking. Human hepatic stem cell imaging for both MRI and PET have been accomplished within SCID/nod mice, and succeeded in cell specificity labeling with in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo image tracking. For MRI, stem cell labeling was accomplished by two methods: (1) in vitro labeling the stem cells just prior to in vivo transplantation, and/or (2) transplanting the stem cells into SCID/nod mice and in vivo specificity labeling the cells just prior to MRI. For labeling techniques 1 and 2, multiple image controls were utilized and include: (A) stem cells(-) and contrast label(-), (B) stem cells(+) and contrast label(-), and (C) stem cells(-) and contrast label(+) help to confirm signal noise background interference, which is a result of slight nonspecific cell labeling. Contrast labeled stem cells are directly transplanted into liver tissues, the tissues excised, and immediately MR imaged to determine cell dispersion dynamics. In this method, the contrast labeled cells appear as void foci throughout the organs. The images are imported into Metamorph imaging software and analyzed for foci radii, diameter, and to discern spheroid volumes. Then, cell numbers are extrapolated to understand ''imaged'' cell aggregate requirements using this technique. For this ex vivo method, a cell aggregate of ∼100 stem cells is required to MRI monitor signal activities. For in vivo imaging, contrast labeled human stem cells within SCID/nod mice are also confirmed as small foci voids and are evident within liver tissues. Initially, these short-term studies where accomplished by in vitro labeling stem cells, transplanting the cells, then in vivo imaging the tissues between days 3-15. Next and to avoid imaged time limitations of detaching contrast agents, the proliferative stem cells were labeled after transplantation, and before MR imaging. This was accomplished to confirm the ability to specifically label unique cell subsets after the

  3. Bioenergetic Changes during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells along the Hepatic Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkinson, Branden M; Madsen, Claus Desler; Kalisz, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated to result in premature aging due to its effects on stem cells. Nevertheless, a full understanding of the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics through differentiation is still lacking. Here we show the bioenergetics profile of human stem cells...... of embryonic origin differentiating along the hepatic lineage. Our study reveals especially the transition between hepatic specification and hepatic maturation as dependent on mitochondrial respiration and demonstrates that even though differentiating cells are primarily dependent on glycolysis until induction...

  4. Profile of Inflammation-associated genes during Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Joseph Ignatius Irudayam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of genes associated with inflammation was analyzed during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs to hepatic cells. Messenger RNA transcript profiles of differentiated endoderm (day 5, hepatoblast (day 15 and hepatocyte-like cells (day 21 were obtained by RNA sequencing analysis. When compared to endoderm cells an immature cell type, the hepatic cells (days 15 and 21 had significantly higher expression of acute phase protein genes including complement factors, coagulation factors, serum amyloid A and serpins. Furthermore, hepatic phase of cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines IL18 and IL32 as well as cytokine receptors IL18R1, IL1R1, IL1RAP, IL2RG, IL6R, IL6ST and IL10RB. These cells also produced CCL14, CCL15, and CXCL- 1, 2, 3, 16 and 17 chemokines. Endoderm cells had higher levels of chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, than that of hepatic cells. Sirtuin family of genes involved in aging, inflammation and metabolism were differentially regulated in endoderm and hepatic phase cells. Ligands and receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF family as well as downstream signaling factors TRAF2, TRAF4, FADD, NFKB1 and NFKBIB were differentially expressed during hepatic differentiation.

  5. Coinfection of Hepatic Cell Lines with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus Leads to an Increase in Intracellular Hepatitis B Surface Antigen▿

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    Iser, David M.; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter A.; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Saleh, Suha; Crane, Megan; Cameron, Paul U.; Bowden, Scott; Nguyen, Tin; Pereira, Cândida F.; Desmond, Paul V.; Locarnini, Stephen A.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2010-01-01

    Liver-related mortality is increased in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. However, interactions between HIV and HBV to explain this observation have not been described. We hypothesized that HIV infection of hepatocytes directly affects the life cycle of HBV. We infected human hepatic cell lines expressing HBV (Hep3B and AD38 cells) or not expressing HBV (Huh7, HepG2, and AD43 cells) with laboratory strains of HIV (NL4-3 and AD8), as well as a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotyped HIV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Following HIV infection with NL4-3 or AD8 in hepatic cell lines, we observed a significant increase in HIV reverse transcriptase activity which was infectious. Despite no detection of surface CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 by flow cytometry, AD8 infection of AD38 cells was inhibited by maraviroc and NL4-3 was inhibited by AMD3100, demonstrating that HIV enters AD38 hepatic cell lines via CCR5 or CXCR4. High-level infection of AD38 cells (50%) was achieved using VSV-pseudotyped HIV. Coinfection of the AD38 cell line with HIV did not alter the HBV DNA amount or species as determined by Southern blotting or nucleic acid signal amplification. However, coinfection with HIV was associated with a significant increase in intracellular HBsAg when measured by Western blotting, quantitative HBsAg, and fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that HIV infection of HBV-infected hepatic cell lines significantly increased intracellular HBsAg but not HBV DNA synthesis and that increased intrahepatic HBsAg secondary to direct infection by HIV may contribute to accelerated liver disease in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals. PMID:20357083

  6. Coinfection of hepatic cell lines with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus leads to an increase in intracellular hepatitis B surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, David M; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter A; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Saleh, Suha; Crane, Megan; Cameron, Paul U; Bowden, Scott; Nguyen, Tin; Pereira, Cândida F; Desmond, Paul V; Locarnini, Stephen A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2010-06-01

    Liver-related mortality is increased in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. However, interactions between HIV and HBV to explain this observation have not been described. We hypothesized that HIV infection of hepatocytes directly affects the life cycle of HBV. We infected human hepatic cell lines expressing HBV (Hep3B and AD38 cells) or not expressing HBV (Huh7, HepG2, and AD43 cells) with laboratory strains of HIV (NL4-3 and AD8), as well as a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotyped HIV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Following HIV infection with NL4-3 or AD8 in hepatic cell lines, we observed a significant increase in HIV reverse transcriptase activity which was infectious. Despite no detection of surface CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 by flow cytometry, AD8 infection of AD38 cells was inhibited by maraviroc and NL4-3 was inhibited by AMD3100, demonstrating that HIV enters AD38 hepatic cell lines via CCR5 or CXCR4. High-level infection of AD38 cells (50%) was achieved using VSV-pseudotyped HIV. Coinfection of the AD38 cell line with HIV did not alter the HBV DNA amount or species as determined by Southern blotting or nucleic acid signal amplification. However, coinfection with HIV was associated with a significant increase in intracellular HBsAg when measured by Western blotting, quantitative HBsAg, and fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that HIV infection of HBV-infected hepatic cell lines significantly increased intracellular HBsAg but not HBV DNA synthesis and that increased intrahepatic HBsAg secondary to direct infection by HIV may contribute to accelerated liver disease in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals.

  7. Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bacha , Tatiana; Midlej , Victor; Silva , Ana Paula Pereira Da; Costa , Leandro Silva Da; Benchimol , Marlene; Galina , Antonio; Poian , Andrea T. Da

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial and bioenergetic dysfunction in human hepatic cells infected with dengue 2 virus correspondence: Corresponding author. Fax: +55 21 22708647. (El-Bacha, Tatiana) (El-Bacha, Tatiana) Laboratorio de Bioquimica de Virus, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - RJ-Brasil--> , Av. Bauhinia n? 400 ? CCS Bloco H 2? andar--> , sala 22. Ilha do Governador--> ...

  8. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

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    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  9. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  10. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  11. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors.

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    Yang, Guanghua; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Corbineau, Sébastien; Vernet, Rémi; Gayon, Régis; Dianat, Noushin; Martinet, Clémence; Clay, Denis; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tachdjian, Gérard; Burks, Deborah; Vallier, Ludovic; Bouillé, Pascale; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Weber, Anne

    2013-07-19

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells.

  12. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Multicompartment Bioreactor

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    Nora Freyer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great potential for application in regenerative medicine, pharmacological drug screening, and toxicity testing. However, full maturation of hiPSC into functional hepatocytes has not yet been achieved. In this study, we investigated the potential of a dynamic three-dimensional (3D hollow fiber membrane bioreactor technology to improve the hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in comparison to static two-dimensional (2D cultures. A total of 100 × 106 hiPSC were seeded into each 3D bioreactor (n = 3. Differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE was induced by adding activin A, Wnt3a, and sodium butyrate to the culture medium. For further maturation, hepatocyte growth factor and oncostatin M were added. The same differentiation protocol was applied to hiPSC maintained in 2D cultures. Secretion of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, a marker for DE, was significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 2D cultures, while secretion of albumin, a typical characteristic for mature hepatocytes, was higher after hepatic differentiation of hiPSC in 3D bioreactors. Functional analysis of multiple cytochrome P450 (CYP isoenzymes showed activity of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in both groups, although at a lower level compared to primary human hepatocytes (PHH. CYP2B6 activities were significantly (p < 0.05 higher in 3D bioreactors compared with 2D cultures, which is in line with results from gene expression. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the majority of cells was positive for albumin, cytokeratin 18 (CK18, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4A at the end of the differentiation process. In addition, cytokeratin 19 (CK19 staining revealed the formation of bile duct-like structures in 3D bioreactors similar to native liver tissue. The results indicate a better maturation of hiPSC in the 3D bioreactor system compared to 2D cultures and emphasize the potential of dynamic 3D culture

  13. Activated effects of parathyroid hormone-related protein on human hepatic stellate cells.

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    Fen-Fen Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: After years of experiments and clinical studies, parathyroid hormone-related protein(PTHrP has been shown to be a bone formation promoter that elicits rapid effects with limited adverse reaction. Recently, PTHrP was reported to promote fibrosis in rat kidney in conjunction with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1, which is also a fibrosis promoter in liver. However, the effect of PTHrP in liver has not been determined. In this study, the promoting actions of PTHrP were first investigated in human normal hepatic stellate cells (HSC and LX-2 cell lines. METHODS: TGF-β1, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, and collagen I mRNA were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR after HSCs or LX-2 cells were treated with PTHrP(1-36 or TGF-β1. Protein levels were also assessed by western-blot analysis. Alpha-SMA were also detected by immunofluorescence, and TGF-β1 secretion was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA of HSC cell culture media. RESULTS: In cultured human HSCs, mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, collagen I, MMP-2, and TGF-β1 were increased by PTHrP treatment. A similar increasing pattern was also observed in LX-2 cells. Moreover, PTHrP significantly increased TGF-β1 secretion in cultured media from HSCs. CONCLUSIONS: PTHrP activated HSCs and promoted the fibrosis process in LX-2 cells. These procedures were probably mediated via TGF-β1, highlighting the potential effects of PTHrP in the liver.

  14. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

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    Ruchi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  15. Genetic Correction and Hepatic Differentiation of Hemophilia B-specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

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    He, Qiong; Wang, Hui-Hui; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Ma, Yu-Po; Jiang, Yong-Ping; Ren, Zhi-Hua

    2017-09-27

    Objective To genetically correct a disease-causing point mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a hemophilia B patient. Methods First, the disease-causing mutation was detected by sequencing the encoding area of human coagulation factor IX (F IX) gene. Genomic DNA was extracted from the iPSCs, and the primers were designed to amplify the eight exons of F IX. Next, the point mutation in those iPSCs was genetically corrected using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in the presence of a 129-nucleotide homologous repair template that contained two synonymous mutations. Then, top 8 potential off-target sites were subsequently analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Finally, the corrected clones were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells, and the secretion of F IX was validated by immunocytochemistry and ELISA assay. Results The cell line bore a missense mutation in the 6 th coding exon (c.676 C>T) of F IX gene. Correction of the point mutation was achieved via CRISPR/Cas9 technology in situ with a high efficacy at about 22% (10/45) and no off-target effects detected in the corrected iPSC clones. F IX secretion, which was further visualized by immunocytochemistry and quantified by ELISA in vitro, reached about 6 ng/ml on day 21 of differentiation procedure. Conclusions Mutations in human disease-specific iPSCs could be precisely corrected by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and corrected cells still maintained hepatic differentiation capability. Our findings might throw a light on iPSC-based personalized therapies in the clinical application, especially for hemophilia B.

  16. The intraportal injection model: A practical animal model for hepatic metastases and tumor cell dissemination in human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalheimer, Andreas; Waaga-Gasser, Ana M; Otto, Christoph; Bueter, Marco; Illert, Bertram; Gattenlohner, Stefan; Gasser, Martin; Meyer, Detlef; Fein, Martin; Germer, Christoph T

    2009-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of metastasized colorectal carcinoma requires biologically relevant and adequate animal models that generate both reproducible metastasis and the dissemination of tumor cells in the form of so-called minimal residual disease (MRD), an expression of the systemic character of neoplastic disease. We injected immunoincompetent nude mice intraportally with different numbers (1 × 10 5 , 1 × 10 6 and 5 × 10 6 cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and SW-620 and investigated by histological studies and CK-20 RT-PCR the occurrence of hematogenous metastases and the dissemination of human tumor cells in bone marrow. Only the injection of 1 × 10 6 cells of each colon carcinoma cell line produced acceptable perioperative mortality with reproducible induction of hepatic metastases in up to 89% of all animals. The injection of 1 × 10 6 cells also generated tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow in up to 63% of animals with hepatic metastases. The present intraportal injection model in immunoincompetent nude mice represents a biologically relevant and adequate animal model for the induction of both reproducible hepatic metastasis and tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow as a sign of MRD

  17. An in vitro expansion system for generation of human iPS cell-derived hepatic progenitor-like cells exhibiting a bipotent differentiation potential.

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    Ayaka Yanagida

    Full Text Available Hepatoblasts, hepatic stem/progenitor cells in liver development, have a high proliferative potential and the ability to differentiate into both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In regenerative medicine and drug screening for the treatment of severe liver diseases, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived mature functional hepatocytes are considered to be a potentially good cell source. However, induction of proliferation of these cells is difficult ex vivo. To circumvent this problem, we generated hepatic progenitor-like cells from human iPS cells using serial cytokine treatments in vitro. Highly proliferative hepatic progenitor-like cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using antibodies against CD13 and CD133 that are known cell surface markers of hepatic stem/progenitor cells in fetal and adult mouse livers. When the purified CD13(highCD133(+ cells were cultured at a low density with feeder cells in the presence of suitable growth factors and signaling inhibitors (ALK inhibitor A-83-01 and ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, individual cells gave rise to relatively large colonies. These colonies consisted of two types of cells expressing hepatocytic marker genes (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α and α-fetoprotein and a cholangiocytic marker gene (cytokeratin 7, and continued to proliferate over long periods of time. In a spheroid formation assay, these cells were found to express genes required for mature liver function, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, and secrete albumin. When these cells were cultured in a suitable extracellular matrix gel, they eventually formed a cholangiocytic cyst-like structure with epithelial polarity, suggesting that human iPS cell-derived hepatic progenitor-like cells have a bipotent differentiation ability. Collectively these data indicate that this novel procedure using an in vitro expansion system is useful for not only liver regeneration but also for the determination of molecular mechanisms that

  18. Hepatic esterase activity is increased in hepatocyte-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using a 3D culture system.

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    Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Ji-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study is to generate a spherical three-dimensional (3D) aggregate of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human embryonic stem cells and to investigate the effect of the 3D environment on hepatic maturation and drug metabolism. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that gene expression of mature hepatocyte markers, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and hepatic transporters was significantly higher in HLCs cultured in the 3D system than in those cultured in a two-dimensional system (p formation, were increased in HLCs cultured in the 3D system. In particular, 3D spheroidal culture increased expression of CES1 and BCHE, which encode hepatic esterases (p 3D spheroidal culture enhances the maturation and drug metabolism of stem cell-derived HLCs, and this may help to optimize hepatic differentiation protocols for hepatotoxicity testing.

  19. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone deactivates human and rat hepatic stellate cells and reduces portal hypertension in cirrhotic rats.

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    Vilaseca, Marina; García-Calderó, Héctor; Lafoz, Erica; Ruart, Maria; López-Sanjurjo, Cristina Isabel; Murphy, Michael P; Deulofeu, Ramon; Bosch, Jaume; Hernández-Gea, Virginia; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2017-07-01

    In cirrhosis, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a major role in increasing intrahepatic vascular resistance and developing portal hypertension. We have shown that cirrhotic livers have increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that antioxidant therapy decreases portal pressure. Considering that mitochondria produce many of these ROS, our aim was to assess the effects of the oral mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone on hepatic oxidative stress, HSC phenotype, liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. Ex vivo: Hepatic stellate cells phenotype was analysed in human precision-cut liver slices in response to mitoquinone or vehicle. In vitro: Mitochondrial oxidative stress was analysed in different cell type of livers from control and cirrhotic rats. HSC phenotype, proliferation and viability were assessed in LX2, and in primary human and rat HSC treated with mitoquinone or vehicle. In vivo: CCl 4 - and thioacetamide-cirrhotic rats were treated with mitoquinone (5 mg/kg/day) or the vehicle compound, DecylTPP, for 2 weeks, followed by measurement of oxidative stress, systemic and hepatic haemodynamic, liver fibrosis, HSC phenotype and liver inflammation. Mitoquinone deactivated human and rat HSC, decreased their proliferation but with no effects on viability. In CCl 4 -cirrhotic rats, mitoquinone decreased hepatic oxidative stress, improved HSC phenotype, reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance and diminished liver fibrosis. These effects were associated with a significant reduction in portal pressure without changes in arterial pressure. These results were further confirmed in the thioacetamide-cirrhotic model. We propose mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as a novel treatment approach against portal hypertension and cirrhosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Differential effects of arsenic trioxide on chemosensitization in human hepatic tumor and stellate cell lines

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    Rangwala Fatima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crosstalk between malignant hepatocytes and the surrounding peritumoral stroma is a key modulator of hepatocarcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. To examine the chemotherapy resistance of these two cellular compartments in vitro, we evaluated a well-established hepatic tumor cell line, HepG2, and an adult hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. The aim was to compare the chemosensitization potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO in combination with sorafenib or fluorouracil (5-FU, in both hepatic tumor cells and stromal cells. Methods Cytotoxicity of ATO, 5-FU, and sorafenib, alone and in combination against HepG2 cells and LX2 cells was measured by an automated high throughput cell-based proliferation assay. Changes in survival and apoptotic signaling pathways were analyzed by flow cytometry and western blot. Gene expression of the 5-FU metabolic enzyme, thymidylate synthase, was analyzed by real time PCR. Results Both HepG2 and LX2 cell lines were susceptible to single agent sorafenib and ATO at 24 hr (ATO IC50: 5.3 μM in LX2; 32.7 μM in HepG2; Sorafenib IC50: 11.8 μM in LX2; 9.9 μM in HepG2. In contrast, 5-FU cytotoxicity required higher concentrations and prolonged (48–72 hr drug exposure. Concurrent ATO and 5-FU treatment of HepG2 cells was synergistic, leading to increased cytotoxicity due in part to modulation of thymidylate synthase levels by ATO. Concurrent ATO and sorafenib treatment showed a trend towards increased HepG2 cytotoxicity, possibly due to a significant decrease in MAPK activation in comparison to treatment with ATO alone. Conclusions ATO differentially sensitizes hepatic tumor cells and adult hepatic stellate cells to 5-FU and sorafenib. Given the importance of both of these cell types in hepatocarcinogenesis, these data have implications for the rational development of anti-cancer therapy combinations for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.

  1. Differential effects of arsenic trioxide on chemosensitization in human hepatic tumor and stellate cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangwala, Fatima; Williams, Kevin P; Smith, Ginger R; Thomas, Zainab; Allensworth, Jennifer L; Lyerly, H Kim; Diehl, Anna Mae; Morse, Michael A; Devi, Gayathri R

    2012-01-01

    Crosstalk between malignant hepatocytes and the surrounding peritumoral stroma is a key modulator of hepatocarcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. To examine the chemotherapy resistance of these two cellular compartments in vitro, we evaluated a well-established hepatic tumor cell line, HepG2, and an adult hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. The aim was to compare the chemosensitization potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in combination with sorafenib or fluorouracil (5-FU), in both hepatic tumor cells and stromal cells. Cytotoxicity of ATO, 5-FU, and sorafenib, alone and in combination against HepG2 cells and LX2 cells was measured by an automated high throughput cell-based proliferation assay. Changes in survival and apoptotic signaling pathways were analyzed by flow cytometry and western blot. Gene expression of the 5-FU metabolic enzyme, thymidylate synthase, was analyzed by real time PCR. Both HepG2 and LX2 cell lines were susceptible to single agent sorafenib and ATO at 24 hr (ATO IC 50 : 5.3 μM in LX2; 32.7 μM in HepG2; Sorafenib IC 50 : 11.8 μM in LX2; 9.9 μM in HepG2). In contrast, 5-FU cytotoxicity required higher concentrations and prolonged (48–72 hr) drug exposure. Concurrent ATO and 5-FU treatment of HepG2 cells was synergistic, leading to increased cytotoxicity due in part to modulation of thymidylate synthase levels by ATO. Concurrent ATO and sorafenib treatment showed a trend towards increased HepG2 cytotoxicity, possibly due to a significant decrease in MAPK activation in comparison to treatment with ATO alone. ATO differentially sensitizes hepatic tumor cells and adult hepatic stellate cells to 5-FU and sorafenib. Given the importance of both of these cell types in hepatocarcinogenesis, these data have implications for the rational development of anti-cancer therapy combinations for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

  2. Studies on the propagation in cell culture and the infectivity for baboons of human hepatitis A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.B.

    1985-05-01

    Current aspects of hepatitis A and hepatitis A virus (HAV) research and the techniques used for the propagation and monitoring of HAV and HAV antigen (HA Ag) production in vitro and HAV infection in vivo, and its sequelae are reviewed. Radioimmunoassay, immunofluorescence and electron microscopic techniques for the demonstration of HA Ag were adapted for this investigation. The cell-adapted strain of HAV(MBB) was successfully propagated in the human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5 at 32 degrees Celsius. A crystalline structure was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of HAV-infected cells by thin-section electron microscopy. The origin and significance of this structure is uncertain. A possible temperature variant of HAV (strain MBB) or an HAV-related baboon virus was detected in PLC/PRF/5 cells maintained at 37 degrees Celsius after infection with a faecal extract prepared from baboons which had been infected with the cell-cultured HAV. Baboons, both free-ranging and in captivity, were found to have antibodies to HAV, which suggests susceptibility to human HAV or another cross-reacting virus. The experimental infection of the Cape baboon orally, intravenously or by both routes with HAV were investigated. The results of the study suggest reasons for the presence of anti-HAV antibodies in certain baboon populations and show that the baboon is not an ideal model for hepatitis A investigations

  3. Studies on the propagation in cell culture and the infectivity for baboons of human hepatitis A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M B

    1985-01-01

    Current aspects of hepatitis A and hepatitis A virus (HAV) research and the techniques used for the propagation and monitoring of HAV and HAV antigen (HA Ag) production in vitro and HAV infection in vivo, and its sequelae are reviewed. Radioimmunoassay, immunofluorescence and electron microscopic techniques for the demonstration of HA Ag were adapted for this investigation. The cell-adapted strain of HAV(MBB) was successfully propagated in the human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5 at 32 degrees Celsius. A crystalline structure was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of HAV-infected cells by thin-section electron microscopy. The origin and significance of this structure is uncertain. A possible temperature variant of HAV (strain MBB) or an HAV-related baboon virus was detected in PLC/PRF/5 cells maintained at 37 degrees Celsius after infection with a faecal extract prepared from baboons which had been infected with the cell-cultured HAV. Baboons, both free-ranging and in captivity, were found to have antibodies to HAV, which suggests susceptibility to human HAV or another cross-reacting virus. The experimental infection of the Cape baboon orally, intravenously or by both routes with HAV were investigated. The results of the study suggest reasons for the presence of anti-HAV antibodies in certain baboon populations and show that the baboon is not an ideal model for hepatitis A investigations.

  4. Ex vivo analysis of human memory CD4 T cells specific for hepatitis C virus using MHC class II tetramers

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Cheryl L.; Seth, Nilufer P.; Lucas, Michaela; Appel, Heiner; Gauthier, Laurent; Lauer, Georg M.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M.; Casson, Deborah R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Bell, Shannon; Harcourt, Gillian; Walker, Bruce D.; Klenerman, Paul; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2003-01-01

    Containment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other chronic human viral infections is associated with persistence of virus-specific CD4 T cells, but ex vivo characterization of circulating CD4 T cells has not been achieved. To further define the phenotype and function of these cells, we developed a novel approach for the generation of tetrameric forms of MHC class II/peptide complexes that is based on the cellular peptide-exchange mechanism. HLA-DR molecules were expressed as precursors with a c...

  5. Effects of treatment with Maraviroc a CCR5 inhibitor on a human hepatic stellate cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Nicola; Perna, Angelica; Lucariello, Angela; Martini, Salvatore; Macera, Margherita; Carleo, Maria A; Guerra, Germano; Esposito, Vincenzo; De Luca, Antonio

    2018-08-01

    After an acute liver damage, tissue regeneration repairs lesions with degradation of deposed fibrotic material, while mechanisms of tissue restoration are persistently activated following several repeated injuries, inducing deposition of extracellular matrix. (ECM). Factors responsible for ECM remodeling have been identified in a pathway involving a family of zinc-dependent enzyme matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), together with tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Recent experimental models suggested a role of CCR5 receptor in the genesis of liver fibrosis. Drawing from these background we decided to evaluate the effects of the treatment with the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc on LX-2, a human hepatic stellate cell line (HSC). Treatment with Maraviroc resulted in a block in S phase of LX-2 cells with increased expression levels of cyclin D1 and p21 while the expression of p53 was reduced. Treatment with Maraviroc was also able to block the accumulation of fibrillar collagens and extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), as demonstrated by the decrease of specific markers as Collagen type I, α-SMA, and TGF-β1. In addition we observed a down regulation of both metalloproteins (MMP-2, MMP-9), used for the degradation of the extracellular matrix and their inhibitors (TIMP-1, TIMP-2). The identification of a compound that may modulate the dynamic of liver fibrosis could be crucial in all chronic liver diseases. Maraviroc could play an important role because, in addition to its own anti-HIV activity, it could reduce the release of pro-inflammatory citokynes implicated in liver fibrogenesis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rapid fabricating technique for multi-layered human hepatic cell sheets by forceful contraction of the fibroblast monolayer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sakai

    Full Text Available Cell sheet engineering is attracting attention from investigators in various fields, from basic research scientists to clinicians focused on regenerative medicine. However, hepatocytes have a limited proliferation potential in vitro, and it generally takes a several days to form a sheet morphology and multi-layered sheets. We herein report our rapid and efficient technique for generating multi-layered human hepatic cell (HepaRG® cell sheets using pre-cultured fibroblast monolayers derived from human skin (TIG-118 cells as a feeder layer on a temperature-responsive culture dish. Multi-layered TIG-118/HepaRG cell sheets with a thick morphology were harvested on day 4 of culturing HepaRG cells by forceful contraction of the TIG-118 cells, and the resulting sheet could be easily handled. In addition, the human albumin and alpha 1-antitrypsin synthesis activities of TIG-118/HepaRG cells were approximately 1.2 and 1.3 times higher than those of HepaRG cells, respectively. Therefore, this technique is considered to be a promising modality for rapidly fabricating multi-layered human hepatocyte sheets from cells with limited proliferation potential, and the engineered cell sheet could be used for cell transplantation with highly specific functions.

  7. Gene expression profiling and secretome analysis differentiate adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells and human hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Berardis

    Full Text Available Adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC are obtained after primary culture of the liver parenchymal fraction. The cells are of fibroblastic morphology and exhibit a hepato-mesenchymal phenotype. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC derived from the liver non-parenchymal fraction, present a comparable morphology as ADHLSC. Because both ADHLSC and HSC are described as liver stem/progenitor cells, we strived to extensively compare both cell populations at different levels and to propose tools demonstrating their singularity. ADHLSC and HSC were isolated from the liver of four different donors, expanded in vitro and followed from passage 5 until passage 11. Cell characterization was performed using immunocytochemistry, western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene microarray analyses. The secretion profile of the cells was evaluated using Elisa and multiplex Luminex assays. Both cell types expressed α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, fibronectin, CD73 and CD90 in accordance with their mesenchymal origin. Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression profiles. HSC present high expression levels of neuronal markers as well as cytokeratins. Such differences were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and western blotting assays. Furthermore, both cell types displayed distinct secretion profiles as ADHLSC highly secreted cytokines of therapeutic and immuno-modulatory importance, like HGF, interferon-γ and IL-10. Our study demonstrates that ADHLSC and HSC are distinct liver fibroblastic cell populations exhibiting significant different expression and secretion profiles.

  8. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  9. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    BACKGROUND. Nigeria which has one of the world's highest burden of children living with. Sickle cell anaemia is also endemic for hepatitis B, C and the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study set out to determine the prevalence of. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and.

  10. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Soumya C; Kannan, Anbarasu; Gopal, Ashidha; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy

  11. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Soumya C, E-mail: chidambaram.soumya@gmail.com [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Kannan, Anbarasu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Gopal, Ashidha [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Devaraj, Niranjali [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Halagowder, Devaraj [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  12. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  13. Manipulating the mitochondria activity in human hepatic cell line Huh7 by low-power laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnyk, Anna; Lunova, Mariia; Jirsa, Milan; Egorova, Daria; Kulikov, Andrei; Kubinová, Šárka; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2018-01-01

    Low-power laser irradiation of red light has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications. However, deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind laser-induced cellular effects remains a significant challenge. Here, we investigated mechanisms involved in the death process in human hepatic cell line Huh7 at a laser irradiation. We decoupled distinct cell death pathways targeted by laser irradiations of different powers. Our data demonstrate that high dose laser irradiation exhibited the highest levels of total reactive oxygen species production, leading to cyclophilin D-related necrosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition. On the contrary, low dose laser irradiation resulted in the nuclear accumulation of superoxide and apoptosis execution. Our findings offer a novel insight into laser-induced cellular responses, and reveal distinct cell death pathways triggered by laser irradiation. The observed link between mitochondria depolarization and triggering ROS could be a fundamental phenomenon in laser-induced cellular responses. PMID:29541521

  14. Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) increases human hepatic stellate cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, Wendy A.; Jurgensen, Kimberly; Pu, Xinzhu; Lamb, Cheri L.; Cornell, Kenneth A.; Clark, Reilly J.; Klocke, Carolyn; Mitchell, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon that elicits toxicity through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In the liver, gross markers of TCDD toxicity are attributed to AhR activation in parenchymal hepatocytes. However, less is known regarding the consequences of TCDD treatment on non-parenchymal cells in the liver. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are non-parenchymal cells that store vitamin A when quiescent. Upon liver injury, activated HSCs lose this storage ability and instead function in the development and maintenance of inflammation and fibrosis through the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and collagen type I. Reports that TCDD exposure disrupts hepatic retinoid homeostasis and dysregulates extracellular matrix remodeling in the liver led us to speculate that TCDD treatment may disrupt HSC activity. The human HSC line LX-2 was used to test the hypothesis that TCDD treatment directly activates HSCs. Results indicate that exposure to 10 nM TCDD almost Completely inhibited lipid droplet storage in LX-2 cells cultured with retinol and palmitic acid. TCDD treatment also increased LX-2 cell proliferation, expression of α-smooth muscle actin, and production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), all of which are characteristics of activated HSCs. However, TCDD treatment had no effect on Col1a1 mRNA levels in LX-2 cells stimulated with the potent profibrogenic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. The TCDD-mediated increase in LX-2 cell proliferation, but not MCP-1 production, was abolished when phosphoinositide 3-kinase was inhibited. These results indicate that HSCs are susceptible to direct modulation by TCDD and that TCDD likely increases HSC activation through a multi-faceted mechanism.

  15. Human dental pulp stem cells derived from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease demonstrate hepatic-like differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y K; Huang, Anderson H C; Chan, Anthony W S; Lin, L M

    2016-06-01

    Reviewing the literature, hepatic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease has not been studied. This study is aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease could possess potential hepatic differentiation. Forty vital extracted teeth with disease recruited for hDPSCs isolation, stem cell characterization and hepatic differentiation were randomly and equally divided into group A (liquid nitrogen-stored dental pulp tissues) and group B (freshly derived dental pulp tissues). Samples of hDPSCs isolated from groups A and B but without hepatic growth factors formed negative controls. A well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma cell line was employed as a positive control. All the isolated hDPSCs from groups A and B showed hepatic-like differentiation with morphological change from a spindle-shaped to a polygonal shape and normal karyotype. Differentiated hDPSCs and the positive control expressed hepatic metabolic function genes and liver-specific genes. Glycogen storage of differentiated hDPSCs was noted from day 7 of differentiation-medium culture. Positive immunofluorescence staining of low-density lipoprotein and albumin was observed from day 14 of differentiation-medium culture; urea production in the medium was noted from week 6. No hepatic differentiation was observed for any of the samples of the negative controls. We not only demonstrated the feasibility of hepatic-like differentiation of hDPSCs from cryopreserved dental pulp tissues of vital extracted teeth with disease but also indicated that the differentiated cells possessed normal karyotype and were functionally close to normal hepatic-like cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Analysis of B Cell Repertoire Dynamics Following Hepatitis B Vaccination in Humans, and Enrichment of Vaccine-specific Antibody Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D. Galson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Generating a diverse B cell immunoglobulin repertoire is essential for protection against infection. The repertoire in humans can now be comprehensively measured by high-throughput sequencing. Using hepatitis B vaccination as a model, we determined how the total immunoglobulin sequence repertoire changes following antigen exposure in humans, and compared this to sequences from vaccine-specific sorted cells. Clonal sequence expansions were seen 7 days after vaccination, which correlated with vaccine-specific plasma cell numbers. These expansions caused an increase in mutation, and a decrease in diversity and complementarity-determining region 3 sequence length in the repertoire. We also saw an increase in sequence convergence between participants 14 and 21 days after vaccination, coinciding with an increase of vaccine-specific memory cells. These features allowed development of a model for in silico enrichment of vaccine-specific sequences from the total repertoire. Identifying antigen-specific sequences from total repertoire data could aid our understanding B cell driven immunity, and be used for disease diagnostics and vaccine evaluation.

  17. Analysis of B Cell Repertoire Dynamics Following Hepatitis B Vaccination in Humans, and Enrichment of Vaccine-specific Antibody Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galson, Jacob D; Trück, Johannes; Fowler, Anna; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Münz, Márton; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Reinhard, Claudia; van der Most, Robbert; Pollard, Andrew J; Lunter, Gerton; Kelly, Dominic F

    2015-12-01

    Generating a diverse B cell immunoglobulin repertoire is essential for protection against infection. The repertoire in humans can now be comprehensively measured by high-throughput sequencing. Using hepatitis B vaccination as a model, we determined how the total immunoglobulin sequence repertoire changes following antigen exposure in humans, and compared this to sequences from vaccine-specific sorted cells. Clonal sequence expansions were seen 7 days after vaccination, which correlated with vaccine-specific plasma cell numbers. These expansions caused an increase in mutation, and a decrease in diversity and complementarity-determining region 3 sequence length in the repertoire. We also saw an increase in sequence convergence between participants 14 and 21 days after vaccination, coinciding with an increase of vaccine-specific memory cells. These features allowed development of a model for in silico enrichment of vaccine-specific sequences from the total repertoire. Identifying antigen-specific sequences from total repertoire data could aid our understanding B cell driven immunity, and be used for disease diagnostics and vaccine evaluation.

  18. Profiling of Concanavalin A-Binding Glycoproteins in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells Activated with Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Qin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins play important roles in maintaining normal cell functions depending on their glycosylations. Our previous study indicated that the abundance of glycoproteins recognized by concanavalin A (ConA was increased in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs following activation by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1; however, little is known about the ConA-binding glycoproteins (CBGs of HSCs. In this study, we employed a targeted glycoproteomics approach using lectin-magnetic particle conjugate-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to compare CBG profiles between LX-2 HSCs with and without activation by TGF-β1, with the aim of discovering novel CBGs and determining their possible roles in activated HSCs. A total of 54 and 77 proteins were identified in the quiescent and activated LX-2 cells, respectively. Of the proteins identified, 14.3% were glycoproteins and 73.3% were novel potential glycoproteins. Molecules involved in protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (e.g., calreticulin and calcium signaling (e.g., 1-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate phosphodiesterase β-2 [PLCB2] were specifically identified in activated LX-2 cells. Additionally, PLCB2 expression was upregulated in the cytoplasm of the activated LX-2 cells, as well as in the hepatocytes and sinusoidal cells of liver cirrhosis tissues. In conclusion, the results of this study may aid future investigations to find new molecular mechanisms involved in HSC activation and antifibrotic therapeutic targets.

  19. In vitro structure-toxicity relationship of chalcones in human hepatic stellate cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zenger, Katharina; Dutta, Subhajit; Wolff, Horst; Genton, Marc G.; Kraus, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated chalcone from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), has received much attention within the last years, due to its multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, pro-apoptotic, anti-bacterial and anti-adhesive effects. However, there exists a huge number of metabolites and structurally-related chalcones, which can be expected, or are already known, to exhibit various effects on cells. We have therefore analyzed the effects of XN and 18 other chalcones in a panel, consisting of multiple cell-based assays. Readouts of these assays addressed distinct aspects of cell-toxicity, like proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell cycle and other cellular features. Besides known active structural elements of chalcones, like the Michael system, we have identified several moieties that seem to have an impact on specific effects and toxicity in human liver cells in vitro. Based on these observations, we present a structure-toxicity model, which will be crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of wanted effects and unwanted side-effects of chalcones.

  20. In vitro structure-toxicity relationship of chalcones in human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenger, Katharina; Dutta, Subhajit; Wolff, Horst; Genton, Marc G; Kraus, Birgit

    2015-10-02

    Xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated chalcone from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), has received much attention within the last years, due to its multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, pro-apoptotic, anti-bacterial and anti-adhesive effects. However, there exists a huge number of metabolites and structurally-related chalcones, which can be expected, or are already known, to exhibit various effects on cells. We have therefore analyzed the effects of XN and 18 other chalcones in a panel, consisting of multiple cell-based assays. Readouts of these assays addressed distinct aspects of cell-toxicity, like proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell cycle and other cellular features. Besides known active structural elements of chalcones, like the Michael system, we have identified several moieties that seem to have an impact on specific effects and toxicity in human liver cells in vitro. Based on these observations, we present a structure-toxicity model, which will be crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of wanted effects and unwanted side-effects of chalcones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro structure-toxicity relationship of chalcones in human hepatic stellate cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zenger, Katharina

    2015-07-19

    Xanthohumol (XN), the major prenylated chalcone from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), has received much attention within the last years, due to its multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, pro-apoptotic, anti-bacterial and anti-adhesive effects. However, there exists a huge number of metabolites and structurally-related chalcones, which can be expected, or are already known, to exhibit various effects on cells. We have therefore analyzed the effects of XN and 18 other chalcones in a panel, consisting of multiple cell-based assays. Readouts of these assays addressed distinct aspects of cell-toxicity, like proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell cycle and other cellular features. Besides known active structural elements of chalcones, like the Michael system, we have identified several moieties that seem to have an impact on specific effects and toxicity in human liver cells in vitro. Based on these observations, we present a structure-toxicity model, which will be crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms of wanted effects and unwanted side-effects of chalcones.

  2. Cholesterol can modulate mitochondrial aquaporin-8 expression in human hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Mauro; Capiglioni, Alejo M; Marrone, Julieta; Calamita, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2017-05-01

    Hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 (mtAQP8) works as a multifunctional membrane channel protein that facilitates the uptake of ammonia for its detoxification to urea as well as the mitochondrial release of hydrogen peroxide. Since early oligonucleotide microarray studies in liver of cholesterol-fed mice showed an AQP8 downregulation, we tested whether alterations of cholesterol content per se modulate mtAQP8 expression in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. Cholesterol loading with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD):cholesterol complexes downregulated the proteolytic activation of cholesterol-responsive sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptions factors 1 and 2, and the expression of the target gene 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Under such conditions, mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced. In contrast, cholesterol depletion using mβCD alone increased SREBP-1 and 2 activation and upregulated HMGCR and mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions. The results suggest that cholesterol can regulate transcriptionally human hepatocyte mtAQP8 expression likely via SREBPs. The functional implications of our findings are discussed. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(5):341-346, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy is of great importance for health planners and program managers. However, few published data on viral hepatitis and HIV are available in Sudan especially during pregnancy. Objectives: The current study was ...

  4. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C viruses (HCV) are major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They are also among the commonest transfusiontransmissible infectious agents. Students of higher institutions are often used as voluntary unpaid donors by many ...

  5. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  6. Identification of hepatic niche harboring human acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

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    Itaru Kato

    Full Text Available In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients, the bone marrow niche is widely known to be an important element of treatment response and relapse. Furthermore, a characteristic liver pathology observed in ALL patients implies that the hepatic microenvironment provides an extramedullary niche for leukemic cells. However, it remains unclear whether the liver actually provides a specific niche. The mechanism underlying this pathology is also poorly understood. Here, to answer these questions, we reconstituted the histopathology of leukemic liver by using patients-derived primary ALL cells into NOD/SCID/Yc (null mice. The liver pathology in this model was similar to that observed in the patients. By using this model, we clearly demonstrated that bile duct epithelial cells form a hepatic niche that supports infiltration and proliferation of ALL cells in the liver. Furthermore, we showed that functions of the niche are maintained by the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, proposing a novel therapeutic approach targeting the extramedullary niche by inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the liver dissemination of leukemia is not due to nonselective infiltration, but rather systematic invasion and proliferation of leukemic cells in hepatic niche. Although the contribution of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is reported in some cancer cells or leukemic niches such as bone marrow, we demonstrated that this axis works even in the extramedullary niche of leukemic cells. Our findings form the basis for therapeutic approaches that target the extramedullary niche by inhibiting the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  7. In vivo hepatic differentiation potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells: Therapeutic effect on liver fibrosis/cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guo-Zun; Sun, Hui-Cong; Zheng, Li-Bo; Guo, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Lan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the hepatic differentiation potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) and to evaluate their therapeutic effect on liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. METHODS A CCl4-induced liver fibrotic/cirrhotic rat model was used to assess the effect of hUC-MSCs. Histopathology was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson trichrome and Sirius red staining. The liver biochemical profile was measured using a Beckman Coulter analyzer. Expression analysis was ...

  8. Stable Human Hepatoma Cell Lines for Efficient Regulated Expression of Nucleoside/Nucleotide Analog Resistant and Vaccine Escape Hepatitis B Virus Variants and Woolly Monkey Hepatitis B Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cheng

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Due to its error-prone replication via reverse transcription, HBV can rapidly evolve variants that escape vaccination and/or become resistant to CHB treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NAs. This is particularly problematic for the first generation NAs lamivudine and adefovir. Though now superseded by more potent NAs, both are still widely used. Furthermore, resistance against the older NAs can contribute to cross-resistance against more advanced NAs. For lack of feasible HBV infection systems, the biology of such variants is not well understood. From the recent discovery of Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP as an HBV receptor new in vitro infection systems are emerging, yet access to the required large amounts of virions, in particular variants, remains a limiting factor. Stably HBV producing cell lines address both issues by allowing to study intracellular viral replication and as a permanent source of defined virions. Accordingly, we generated a panel of new tetracycline regulated TetOFF HepG2 hepatoma cell lines which produce six lamivudine and adefovir resistance-associated and two vaccine escape variants of HBV as well as the model virus woolly monkey HBV (WMHBV. The cell line-borne viruses reproduced the expected NA resistance profiles and all were equally sensitive against a non-NA drug. The new cell lines should be valuable to investigate under standardized conditions HBV resistance and cross-resistance. With titers of secreted virions reaching >3 x 10(7 viral genome equivalents per ml they should also facilitate exploitation of the new in vitro infection systems.

  9. Rhein triggers apoptosis via induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, caspase-4 and intracellular calcium in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KoraMagazi, Arouna [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Dandan [Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yousef, Bashir; Guerram, Mounia [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yu, Feng, E-mail: yufengcpu14@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-04-22

    Rhein is an active component of rhubarb; a traditional Chinese medicine reported to induce apoptosis and cause liver toxicity. However, rhein's apoptotic-inducing effects, as well as its molecular mechanisms of action on hepatic cells need to be further explored. In the present study, rhein was found to trigger apoptosis in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells as showed by annexin V/PI double staining assay and nuclear morphological changes demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining. Moreover, it was observed that the mechanism implicated in rhein-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent, presumably via ER-stress associated pathways, as illustrated by up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP 78), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Meanwhile, caspase-4 as a hallmark of ER-stress, was also showed to be activated following by caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, rhein also promoted intracellular elevation of calcium that contributed in apoptosis induction. Interestingly, pre-treatment with calpain inhibitor I reduced the effects of rhein on apoptosis induction and JNK activation. These data suggested that rhein-induced apoptosis through ER-stress and elevated intracellular calcium level in HL-7702 cells. - Highlights: • Rhein triggers apoptotic cell death on primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells. • Rhein leads to caspase-4 activation in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein causes elevation of intracellular calcium concentrations in HL-7702 cells.

  10. Cytotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloid in human hepatic parenchymal and sinusoidal endothelial cells: Firm evidence for the reactive metabolites mediated pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengbi; Ruan, Jianqing; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-05

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) widely distribute in plants and can cause hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (HSOS), which typically presents as a primary sinusoidal endothelial cell damage. It is well-recognized that after ingestion, PAs undergo hepatic cytochromes P450 (CYPs)-mediated metabolic activation to generate dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs), which are hydrolyzed to dehydroretronecine (DHR). DHPAs and DHR are reactive metabolites having same core pyrrole moiety, and can bind proteins to form pyrrole-protein adducts, which are believed as the primary cause for PA-induced HSOS. However, to date, the direct evidences supporting the toxicity of DHPAs and DHR in the liver, in particular in the sinusoidal endothelial cells, are lacking. Using human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC) and HepG2 (representing hepatic parenchymal cells), cells that lack CYPs activity, this study determined the direct cytotoxicity of dehydromonocrotaline, a representative DHPA, and DHR, but no cytotoxicity of the intact PA (monocrotaline) in both cell lines, confirming that reactive metabolites mediate PA intoxication. Comparing with HepG2, HSEC had significantly lower basal glutathione (GSH) level, and was significantly more susceptible to the reactive metabolites with severer GSH depletion and pyrrole-protein adducts formation. The toxic potency of two reactive metabolites was also compared. DHPA was more reactive than DHR, leading to severer toxicity. In conclusion, our results unambiguously provided the first direct evidence for the critical role of DHPA and DHR in the reactive metabolites-mediated PA-induced hepatotoxicity, which occurs predominantly in HSEC due to severe GSH depletion and the significant formation of pyrrole-protein adducts in HSEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Hepatitis: a longstanding companion in human history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craxi, Lucia

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis has gone along with human history since its origins, due to its prompt identifiability linked to jaundice as a symptom. Written evidence of outbreaks of epidemic jaundice can be tracked back a few millenniums before Christ. Unavoidable confusion arises due to the overlap of different sources possibly linked to different aetiologies, identified over time as epidemic jaundice (HAV or HEV hepatitis?) and serum hepatitis (HBV or HCV hepatitis?). The journey that brought to recognize viruses as the main cause of jaundice was long and started midway during the last century, when the infectious hypothesis, which had taken place step by step, was finally confirmed by epidemiological investigations of an outbreak occurring in the US army in 1942, after a yellow fever immunization campaign. Further research identified two clinically different types of hepatitis, called for the first time hepatitis A and hepatitis B.

  12. The use of non-human primates as animal models for the study of hepatitis viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Vitral

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis viruses belong to different families and have in common a striking hepatotropism and restrictions for propagation in cell culture. The transmissibility of hepatitis is in great part limited to non-human primates. Enterically transmitted hepatitis viruses (hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus can induce hepatitis in a number of Old World and New World monkey species, while the host range of non-human primates susceptible to hepatitis viruses transmitted by the parenteral route (hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis delta virus is restricted to few species of Old World monkeys, especially the chimpanzee. Experimental studies on non-human primates have provided an invaluable source of information regarding the biology and pathogenesis of these viruses, and represent a still indispensable tool for vaccine and drug testing.

  13. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  14. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

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    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  15. Modulation of hepatic stellate cells and reversibility of hepatic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yu, E-mail: 1293363632@QQ.com [Faculty of Graduate Studies of Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530001, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (China); Deng, Xin, E-mail: Hendly@163.com [Ruikang Hospital Affiliated to Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, 10 East China Road, Nanning 530011, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (China); Liang, Jian, E-mail: lj99669@163.com [Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530001, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (China)

    2017-03-15

    Hepatic fibrosis (HF) is the pathological component of a variety of chronic liver diseases. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are the main collagen-producing cells in the liver and their activation promotes HF. If HSC activation and proliferation can be inhibited, HF occurrence and development can theoretically be reduced and even reversed. Over the past ten years, a number of studies have addressed this process, and here we present a review of HSC modulation and HF reversal. - Highlights: • We present a review of the modulation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and reversibility of hepatic fibrosis (HF). • HSC are the foci of HF occurrence and development, HF could be prevented and treated by modulating HSC. • If HSC activation and proliferation can be inhibited, HF could theoretically be inhibited and even reversed. • Prevention or reversal of HSC activation, or promotion of HSC apoptosis, immune elimination, and senescence may prevent, inhibit or reverse HF.

  16. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosch, Birke; Cosset, Francois-Loic

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion

  17. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A simple and rapid Hepatitis A Virus (HAV titration assay based on antibiotic resistance of infected cells: evaluation of the HAV neutralization potency of human immune globulin preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Gerardo G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the causative agent of acute hepatitis in humans, is an atypical Picornaviridae that grows poorly in cell culture. HAV titrations are laborious and time-consuming because the virus in general does not cause cytopathic effect and is detected by immunochemical or molecular probes. Simple HAV titration assays could be developed using currently available viral construct containing selectable markers. Results We developed an antibiotic resistance titration assay (ARTA based on the infection of human hepatoma cells with a wild type HAV construct containing a blasticidin (Bsd resistance gene. Human hepatoma cells infected with the HAV-Bsd construct survived selection with 2 μg/ml of blasticidin whereas uninfected cells died within a few days. At 8 days postinfection, the color of the pH indicator phenol red in cell culture media correlated with the presence of HAV-Bsd-infected blasticidin-resistant cells: an orange-to-yellow color indicated the presence of growing cells whereas a pink-to-purple color indicated that the cells were dead. HAV-Bsd titers were determined by an endpoint dilution assay based on the color of the cell culture medium scoring orange-to-yellow wells as positive and pink-to-purple wells as negative for HAV. As a proof-of-concept, we used the ARTA to evaluate the HAV neutralization potency of two commercially available human immune globulin (IG preparations and a WHO International Standard for anti-HAV. The three IG preparations contained comparable levels of anti-HAV antibodies that neutralized approximately 1.5 log of HAV-Bsd. Similar neutralization results were obtained in the absence of blasticidin by an endpoint dilution ELISA at 2 weeks postinfection. Conclusion The ARTA is a simple and rapid method to determine HAV titers without using HAV-specific probes. We determined the HAV neutralization potency of human IG preparations in 8 days by ARTA compared to the 14 days required by the

  19. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian

    2005-01-01

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells

  20. Natural Killer Cells in Viral HepatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rehermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV, two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN. Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFNα has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor-α production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. Keywords: HBV, HCV, Infection, Interferon, T Cell

  1. Four stages of hepatic hematopoiesis in human embryos and fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanni, D; Angotzi, F; Lai, F; Gerosa, C; Senes, G; Fanos, V; Faa, G

    2018-03-01

    The liver is a major hematopoietic organ during embryonic and fetal development in humans. Its hematopoietic activity starts during the first weeks of gestation and continues until birth. During this period the liver is colonized by undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that gradually differentiate and once mature, enter the circulatory system through the hepatic sinusoids, this process is called hepatic hematopoiesis. The morphology of hepatic hematopoiesis, has been studied in humans through the years, and led to a characterization of all the cell types that make up these phenomena. Studies on murine models also helped to describe the extent of hepatic hematopoiesis at different gestational ages. Using this knowledge, we attempted to describe how hepatic hematopoiesis morphologically evolves as gestation progresses, in human embryos and fetuses. Thus, we observed a total of 32 tissue specimens obtained from the livers of embryos and fetuses at different gestational ages. Basing our observations on the four stages of liver hematopoiesis identified by Sasaki and Sonoda in mice, we also described four consecutive stages of liver hematopoiesis in humans, which resulted to be highly similar to those described in murine models.

  2. Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis viruses and their correlation with CD4 T-cell lymphocyte counts in pregnant women in the Buea Health District of Cameroon. Rebecca Enow Tanjong, Pride Teyim, Henry Lucien Kamga, Edwin Suh Neba, Theresia Nkuo-Akenji ...

  3. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Protein Induces Upregulation of IL-8 Pathways and Production of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Thyroid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstad, Sara Salehi; Stefan, Mihaela; Blackard, Jason; Owen, Randall P; Lee, Hanna J; Concepcion, Erlinda; Yi, Zhengzi; Zhang, Weijia; Tomer, Yaron

    2017-02-01

    Thyroiditis is one of the most common extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. By binding to surface cell receptor CD81, HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 mediates entry of HCV into cells. Studies have shown that different viral proteins may individually induce host responses to infection. We hypothesized that HCV E2 protein binding to CD81 expressed on thyroid cells activates a cascade of inflammatory responses that can trigger autoimmune thyroiditis in susceptible individuals. Human thyroid cell lines ML-1 and human thyrocytes in primary cell culture were treated with HCV recombinant E2 protein. The expression of major proinflammatory cytokines was measured at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Next-generation transcriptome analysis was used to identify early changes in gene expression in thyroid cells induced by E2. HCV envelope protein E2 induced strong inflammatory responses in human thyrocytes, resulting in production of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the E2 protein induced production of several heat shock proteins including HSP60, HSP70p12A, and HSP10, in human primary thyrocytes. In thyroid cell line ML-1, RNA sequencing identified upregulation of molecules involved in innate immune pathways with high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased expression of costimulatory molecules, specifically CD40, known to be a major thyroid autoimmunity gene. Our data support a key role for HCV envelope protein E2 in triggering thyroid autoimmunity through activation of cytokine pathways by bystander mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  4. In vivo hepatic differentiation potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells: Therapeutic effect on liver fibrosis/cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Zun; Sun, Hui-Cong; Zheng, Li-Bo; Guo, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Lan

    2017-12-14

    To investigate the hepatic differentiation potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) and to evaluate their therapeutic effect on liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. A CCl 4 -induced liver fibrotic/cirrhotic rat model was used to assess the effect of hUC-MSCs. Histopathology was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson trichrome and Sirius red staining. The liver biochemical profile was measured using a Beckman Coulter analyzer. Expression analysis was performed using immunofluorescent staining, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR. We demonstrated that the infused hUC-MSCs could differentiate into hepatocytes in vivo . Functionally, the transplantation of hUC-MSCs to CCl 4 -treated rats improved liver transaminases and synthetic function, reduced liver histopathology and reversed hepatobiliary fibrosis. The reversal of hepatobiliary fibrosis was likely due to the reduced activation state of hepatic stellate cells, decreased collagen deposition, and enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling via the up-regulation of MMP-13 and down-regulation of TIMP-1. Transplanted hUC-MSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocytes that improved both the biochemical and histopathologic changes in a CCl 4 -induced rat liver fibrosis model. hUC-MSCs may offer therapeutic opportunities for treating hepatobiliary diseases, including cirrhosis.

  5. Impaired quality of the hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T-cell response in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-HBV coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Judy; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Thompson, Alex J V; Revill, Peter; Iser, David; Slavin, John; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Marks, Pip; Matthews, Gail; Cooper, David A; Kent, Stephen J; Cameron, Paul U; Sasadeusz, Joe; Desmond, Paul; Locarnini, Stephen; Dore, Gregory J; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lewin, Sharon R

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells play a key role both in the control of HBV replication and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coinfection and the presence or absence of HBV e (precore) antigen (HBeAg) significantly alter the natural history of chronic HBV infection. We examined the HBV-specific T-cell responses in treatment-naïve HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative HIV-1-HBV-coinfected (n = 24) and HBV-monoinfected (n = 39) Asian patients. Peripheral blood was stimulated with an overlapping peptide library for the whole HBV genome, and tumor necrosis factor alpha and gamma interferon cytokine expression in CD8+ T cells was measured by intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. There was no difference in the overall magnitude of the HBV-specific T-cell responses, but the quality of the response was significantly impaired in HIV-1-HBV-coinfected patients compared with monoinfected patients. In coinfected patients, HBV-specific T cells rarely produced more than one cytokine and responded to fewer HBV proteins than in monoinfected patients. Overall, the frequency and quality of the HBV-specific T-cell responses increased with a higher CD4+ T-cell count (P = 0.018 and 0.032, respectively). There was no relationship between circulating HBV-specific T cells and liver damage as measured by activity and fibrosis scores, and the HBV-specific T-cell responses were not significantly different in patients with either HBeAg-positive or HBeAg-negative disease. The quality of the HBV-specific T-cell response is impaired in the setting of HIV-1-HBV coinfection and is related to the CD4+ T-cell count.

  6. Modulation of Oxidative Stress by 17 β-Estradiol and Genistein in Human Hepatic Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Surico

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: estrogens and phytoestrogens exert hepatoprotection through mechanisms not clearly examined yet. Here, we investigated the protective effects exerted by 17β-estradiol and genistein against oxidative stress in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and the involvement of specific receptors and the intracellular signalling. Methods: Huh7.5 and LX-2, alone or in co-culture with Huh7.5, were treated with 17β-estradiol and genistein alone or in the presence of menadione and of estrogen receptors (ERs and G protein-coupled-estrogenic-receptors (GPER blockers. Cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidant/antioxidant system were measured by specific kits. Western Blot was used for the analysis of Akt and p38-mitogen-activated-protein kinases (MAPK activation and α-smooth-muscle actin expression. Results: In Huh7.5, 17β-estradiol and genistein prevented the effects of peroxidation by modulating Akt and p38MAPK activation. Similar antioxidant and protective findings were obtained in LX-2 of co-culture experiments, only. ERs and GPER blockers were able to prevent the effects of 17β-estradiol and genistein. Conclusion: In Huh7.5 and LX-2, 17β-estradiol and genistein counteract the effects of peroxidation through the involvement of ERs and GPER and by an intracellular signalling related to Akt and p38MAPK. As concerning LX-2, paracrine factors released by Huh7.5 play a key role in protection against oxidative stress.

  7. Hepatitis C Virus Sensing by Human Trophoblasts Induces Innate Immune Responses and Recruitment of Maternal NK Cells: Potential Implications for Limiting Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Petroff, Margaret G; Warren, Bryce D; Jasti, Susmita; Linscheid, Caitlin; Ward, Ashley; Kramer, Anita; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Sheiko, Melissa A; Gale, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Winn, Virginia D; Rosen, Hugo R

    2015-10-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the world's most common blood-borne viral infection for which there is no vaccine. The rates of vertical transmission range between 3 and 6% with odds 90% higher in the presence of HIV coinfection. Prevention of vertical transmission is not possible because of lack of an approved therapy for use in pregnancy or an effective vaccine. Recently, HCV has been identified as an independent risk factor for preterm delivery, perinatal mortality, and other complications. In this study, we characterized the immune responses that contribute to the control of viral infection at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) in the early gestational stages. In this study, we show that primary human trophoblast cells and an extravillous trophoblast cell line (HTR8), from first and second trimester of pregnancy, express receptors relevant for HCV binding/entry and are permissive for HCV uptake. We found that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells induces robust upregulation of type I/III IFNs and secretion of multiple chemokines that elicit recruitment and activation of decidual NK cells. Furthermore, we observed that HCV-RNA transfection induces a proapoptotic response within HTR8 that could affect the morphology of the placenta. To our knowledge, for the first time, we demonstrate that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells elicits a strong antiviral response that alters the recruitment and activation of innate immune cells at the MFI. This work provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of HCV-specific immunity at the MFI as well as novel insights into mechanisms that limit vertical transmission but may paradoxically lead to virus-related pregnancy complications. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Production and release of infectious hepatitis C virus from human liver cell cultures in the three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizaki, Hideki; Nagamori, Seishi; Matsuda, Mami; Kawakami, Hayato; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Kawada, Masaaki; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Hasumura, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    Lack of efficient culture systems for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a major obstacle in HCV research. Human liver cells grown in a three-dimensional radial-flow bioreactor were successfully infected following inoculation with plasma from an HCV carrier. Subsequent detection of increased HCV RNA suggested viral replication. Furthermore, transfection of HCV RNA transcribed from full-length cDNA also resulted in the production and release of HCV virions into supernatant. Infectivity was shown by successful secondary passage to a new culture. Introduction of mutations in RNA helicase and polymerase regions of HCV cDNA abolished virus replication, indicating that reverse genetics of this system is possible. The ability to replicate and detect the extracellular release of HCV might provide clues with regard to the persistent nature of HCV infection. It will also accelerate research into the pathogenicity of HCV, as well as the development of prophylactic agents and new therapy

  9. Stable expression and replication of hepatitis B virus genome in an integrated state in a human hepatoma cell line transfected with the cloned viral DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Fujiyama, A.; Matsubara, K.

    1987-01-01

    A human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Huh6-c15) was transfected with a recombinant DNA molecule that consists of tandemly arranged hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome and a neomycin-resistant gene. One clone resistant to G-418 produces and releases surface antigen and e antigen into medium at a high level and accumulates core particles intracellularly. This clone has a chromosomally integrated set of the original recombinant DNA and produces a 3.5-kilobase transcript corresponding to the pregenome RNA as well as HBV DNAs in an extrachromosomal form. Most of these DNAs were in single-stranded or partially double-stranded form and were packaged in the intracellular core particles. In the medium, particles were detected that contained HBV DNA and were morphologically indistinguishable from Dane particles. These results demonstrate that the HBV genome in an integrated state acted as a template for viral gene expression and replication. The cells were maintained for more than 6 months without losing the ability to produce the extrachromosomal HBV DNA and Dane-like particles. Thus, the cells can be used as a model system for analyses of gene expression and DNA replication of HBV in human hepatocytes

  10. Inhibitory effects of crude extracts from some edible Thai plants against replication of hepatitis B virus and human liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiyaput Wanwisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edible plants such as Cratoxylum formosum (Jack Dyer, Curcumin longa Lin, Momordica charantia Lin and Moringa oleifera Lam have long been believed in Thai culture to relieve ulcers and the symptoms of liver disease. However, little is known about their anti-liver cancer properties and antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities of crude extracts from these edible plants on human liver cancer cells. Methods Plant samples were prepared and extracted using buffer and hydro-alcoholic solvents. The MTT assay was performed to investigate the effects of the plant extracts on the cell viability of HepG2 cells. The inhibitory effect on replication of HBV was analysed by determining the level of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells with the DNA expression plasmid of the HBV genome using a quantitative real-time PCR. Results Buffer and hydroalcoholic extracts from C. formosum (leaf reduced cell viability of HepG2 cells and they also inhibited HBV cccDNA. Crude extracts from C. longa (bulb in both solvents did not have any cytotoxic effects on the HepG2 cells, but they significantly decreased the level of HBV cccDNA. Buffer extracts from the leaves of M. charantia and the fruits of M. oleifera showed to have anti-HBV activity and also a mild cytotoxicity effect on the HepG2 cells. In addition, leaves of M. Oleifera extracted by hydroalcoholic solvent drastically decreased the level of cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Conclusion Some crude extracts of edible plants contain compounds that demonstrate anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities.

  11. [Effect of Hepatitis C virus proteins on the production of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines in Huh7.5 human hepatoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalova, O V; Lesnova, E I; Permyakova, K Yu; Samokhvalov, E I; Ivanov, A V; Kochetkov, S N; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a widespread dangerous human pathogen. Up to 80% of HCV-infected individuals develop chronic infection, which is often accompanied by liver inflammation and fibrosis and, at terminal stages, liver cirrhosis and cancer. Treatment of patients with end-stage liver disease is often ineffective, and even patients with suppressed HCV replication have higher risk of death as compared with noninfected subjects. Therefore, investigating the mechanisms that underlie HCV pathogenesis and developing treatments for virus-associated liver dysfunction remain an important goal. The effect of individual HCV proteins on the production of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines in hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7.5 cells was analyzed in a systematic manner. Cells were transfected with plasmids encoding HCV proteins. Cytokine production and secretion was accessed by immunocytochemistry and ELISA of the culture medium, and transcription of the cytokine genes was assessed using reverse transcription and PCR. HCV proteins proved to differ in effect on cytokine production. Downregulation of interleukin 6 (IL-6) production was observed in cells expressing the HCV core, NS3, and NS5A proteins. Production of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) was lower in cells expressing the core proteins, NS3, or E1/E2 glycoproteins. A pronounced increase in production and secretion of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was observed in response to expression of the HCV E1/E2 glycoproteins. A higher biosynthesis, but a lower level in the cell culture medium, was detected for interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in cells harboring NS4 and IL-6 in cells expressing NS5В. The finding was possibly explained by protein-specific retention and consequent accumulation of the respective cytokines in the cell.

  12. [Low-molecular-weight regulators of biogenic polyamine metabolism affect cytokine production and expression of hepatitis С virus proteins in Huh7.5 human hepatocarcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalova, O V; Lesnova, E I; Samokhvalov, E I; Permyakova, K Yu; Ivanov, A V; Kochetkov, S N; Kushch, A A

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces the expression of the genes of proinflammatory cytokines, the excessive production of which may cause cell death, and contribute to development of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinoma. The relationship between cytokine production and metabolic disorders in HCV-infected cells remains obscure. The levels of biogenic polyamines, spermine, spermidine, and their precursor putrescine, may be a potential regulator of these processes. The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of the compounds which modulate biogenic polyamines metabolism on cytokine production and HCV proteins expression. Human hepatocarcinoma Huh7.5 cells have been transfected with the plasmids that encode HCV proteins and further incubated with the following low-molecular compounds that affect different stages of polyamine metabolism: (1) difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), the inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of polyamines; (2) N,N'-bis(2,3-butane dienyl)-1,4-diaminobutane (MDL72.527), the inhibitor of proteins involved in polyamine degradation; and (3) synthetic polyamine analog N^(I),N^(II)-diethylnorspermine (DENSpm), an inducer of polyamine degradation enzyme. The intracellular accumulation and secretion of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and TGF-β) was assessed by immunocytochemistry and in the immunoenzyme assay, while the cytokine gene expression was studied using reverse transcription and PCR. The effects of the compounds under analysis on the expression of HCV proteins were analyzed using the indirect immunofluorescence with anti-HCV monoclonal antibodies. It has been demonstrated that, in cells transfected with HCV genes, DFMO reduces the production of three out of four tested cytokines, namely, TNF-α and TGF-β in cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, NS3, NS5A, and NS5B proteins, and IL-1β in the cells that express HCV core, Е1Е2, and NS3 proteins. MDL72527 and DENSpm decreased cytokine production

  13. Albumin modified with mannose 6-phosphate : A potential carrier for selective delivery of antifibrotic drugs to rat and human hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beljaars, Leonie; Molema, Ingrid; Weert, B; Olinga, Peter; Groothuis, Geny; Meijer, D.K F; Poelstra, Klaas

    The hallmark of liver fibrosis is an increased extracellular matrix deposition, caused by an activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Therefore, this cell type is an important target for pharmacotherapeutic intervention. Antifibrotic drugs are not efficiently taken up by HSC or may produce

  14. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  15. Targeted therapy for human hepatic carcinoma cells using folate-functionalized polymeric micelles loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide and sorafenib in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lei Zhang,1 Faming Gong,2 Fang Zhang,3 Jing Ma,1 Peidong Zhang,1 Jun Shen3 1Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, 2PCFM Laboratory of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of targeted folate-functionalized micelles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and sorafenib on human hepatic carcinoma (HepG2 cells in vitro, and to observe the feasibility of surveillance of this targeting therapeutic effect by magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Sorafenib and SPIONs were loaded into polymeric micelles. The targeted nanocarrier was synthesized by functionalizing the micelles with folate. Folate-free micelles loaded with sorafenib and SPIONs were used as control (nontargeted micelles. Uptake of the nanocarrier by cells was assessed using Prussian blue staining after 1 hour of incubation with the polymeric micelles. The inhibitory effect of the targeted micelles on HepG2 cell proliferation at various concentrations of sorafenib was assessed in vitro using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay and apoptotic analysis using flow cytometry. Magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 1.5 T scanner was performed to detect changes in the signal intensity of cells after incubation with the targeted micelles. Results: Prussian blue staining showed significantly more intracellular SPIONs in cells incubated with the targeted micelles than those incubated with nontargeted micelles. The MTT assay showed that the average inhibitory ratio in the targeted group was significantly higher than that in the nontargeted group (38.13% versus 22.54%, P = 0.028. The mean apoptotic rate in the targeted cells, nontargeted cells, and untreated cells was 17.01%, 11.04%, and 7.89%, respectively. The apoptotic rate in the

  16. Evidence of vanillin binding to CAMKIV explains the anti-cancer mechanism in human hepatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Tarique, Mohd; Khan, Parvez; Luqman, Suaib; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr kinase family, and is associated with different types of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Vanillin is a natural compound, a primary component of the extract of the vanilla bean which possesses varieties of pharmacological features including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor. Here, we have investigated the binding mechanism and affinity of vanillin to the CAMKIV which is being considered as a potential drug target for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. We found that vanillin binds strongly to the active site cavity of CAMKIV and stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions. We explored the utility of vanillin as anti-cancer agent and found that it inhibits the proliferation of human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, vanillin treatment resulted into the significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS production that eventually leads to apoptosis in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cancer cells. These findings may offer a novel therapeutic approach by targeting the CAMKIV using natural product and its derivative with a minimal side effect.

  17. Reduced Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-HBV-Coinfected Individuals Receiving HBV-Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Wightman, Fiona; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Ayres, Anna; Kent, Stephen J.; Sasadeusz, Joseph; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2005-01-01

    Functional hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells are significantly diminished in individuals chronically infected with HBV compared to individuals with self-limiting HBV infection or those on anti-HBV therapy. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), coinfection with HBV is associated with an increased risk of worsening liver function following antiviral therapy and of more rapid HBV disease progression. Total HBV-specific T-cell responses in subjects with ...

  18. Synthetic Polymer with a Structure-Driven Hepatic Deposition and Curative Pharmacological Activity in Hepatic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Halling Folkmar Andersen, Anna; Anegaard Rolskov, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic polymers make strong contributions as tools for delivery of biological drugs and chemotherapeutics. The most praised characteristic of polymers in these applications is complete lack of pharmacological function such as to minimize the side effects within the human body. In contrast......, synthetic polymers with curative pharmacological activity are truly rare. Moreover, such activity is typically nonspecific rather than structure-defined. In this work, we present the discovery of poly(ethylacrylic acid) (PEAA) as a polymer with a suit of structure-defined, unexpected, pharmacological......, and pharmacokinetic properties not observed in close structural analogues. Specifically, PEAA reveals capacity to bind to albumin with ensuing natural hepatic deposition in vivo and exhibits concurrent inhibitory activity against the hepatitis C virus and inflammation in hepatic cells. Our findings provide a view...

  19. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  20. Making the invisible visible: searching for human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in Brazilian patients with viral hepatitis B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Caterino-de-Araujo

    Full Text Available With this study, the authors hope to alert clinicians regarding the presence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/-2 infections in patients with viral hepatitis B and C in Brazil. HTLV-1/-2 were detected in 1.3% of hepatitis B virus (HBV- and 5.3% of hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected blood samples sent for laboratory viral load measurements. A partial association of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-1/-2 infection was detected in patients with HCV (HIV+, 27.3%, whereas this association was almost 100% in HBV-infected patients (HIV+, all except one. The high prevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection among patients with hepatitis C was of concern, as HTLV-1/-2 could change the natural course of subsequent liver disease. The authors suggest including HTLV-1/-2 serology in the battery of tests used when following patients with viral hepatitis in Brazil, regardless of the HIV status.

  1. Making the invisible visible: searching for human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) in Brazilian patients with viral hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele; Alves, Fabiana Aparecida; Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Lemos, Marcílio Figueiredo; Moreira, Regina Célia

    2018-02-01

    With this study, the authors hope to alert clinicians regarding the presence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/-2) infections in patients with viral hepatitis B and C in Brazil. HTLV-1/-2 were detected in 1.3% of hepatitis B virus (HBV)- and 5.3% of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected blood samples sent for laboratory viral load measurements. A partial association of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and HTLV-1/-2 infection was detected in patients with HCV (HIV+, 27.3%), whereas this association was almost 100% in HBV-infected patients (HIV+, all except one). The high prevalence of HTLV-1/-2 infection among patients with hepatitis C was of concern, as HTLV-1/-2 could change the natural course of subsequent liver disease. The authors suggest including HTLV-1/-2 serology in the battery of tests used when following patients with viral hepatitis in Brazil, regardless of the HIV status.

  2. Proteomic analysis of cell proliferation in a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702) induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate using iTRAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Hongxia [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Cui, Qianqian; Wang, Jianshe [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • PFOS stimulates cell proliferation of human liver cell line (HL-7702). • Differential expressed proteins are identified by iTRAQ. • Most of differential proteins caused by PFOS are related to cell proliferation. • Up-regulation of cyclin/cdk by PFOS plays a role in driving cells into cell cycle. - Abstract: Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a commonly used and widely distributed perfluorinated compound proven to cause adverse health outcomes. However, how PFOS affects liver cell proliferation is not well understood. In this experiment, we exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOS for 48 h and 96 h. We identified 52 differentially expressed proteins using a quantitative proteomic approach. Among them, 27 were associated with cell proliferation, including hepatoma-derived growth factor (Hdgf) and proliferation biomarkers Mk167 (Ki67) and Top2α. Results from MTT, cell counting, and cell cycle analysis showed low-dose PFOS (<200 μM) stimulated HL-7702 cell viability at 48 h and 96 h, reduced the G0/G1 percentage, and increased the S + G2/M percentage. Moreover, levels of Cyclin D1, Cyclin E2, Cyclin A2, Cyclin B1 and their partner Cdks were elevated, and the expression of regulating proteins like c-Myc, p53, p21 waf/cip1 and Myt1, as well as the phosphorylation levels of p-Wee1(S642), p-Chk1(S345) and p-Chk2(T68), were disturbed. We hypothesized that low-dose PFOS stimulated HL-7702 proliferation by driving cells into G1 through elevating cyclins/cdks expression, and by promoting cell cycle progression through altering other regulating proteins. This research will shed light on the mechanisms behind PFOS-mediated human hepatotoxicity.

  3. Proteomic analysis of cell proliferation in a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702) induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate using iTRAQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Hongxia; Guo, Xuejiang; Cui, Qianqian; Wang, Jianshe; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PFOS stimulates cell proliferation of human liver cell line (HL-7702). • Differential expressed proteins are identified by iTRAQ. • Most of differential proteins caused by PFOS are related to cell proliferation. • Up-regulation of cyclin/cdk by PFOS plays a role in driving cells into cell cycle. - Abstract: Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a commonly used and widely distributed perfluorinated compound proven to cause adverse health outcomes. However, how PFOS affects liver cell proliferation is not well understood. In this experiment, we exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOS for 48 h and 96 h. We identified 52 differentially expressed proteins using a quantitative proteomic approach. Among them, 27 were associated with cell proliferation, including hepatoma-derived growth factor (Hdgf) and proliferation biomarkers Mk167 (Ki67) and Top2α. Results from MTT, cell counting, and cell cycle analysis showed low-dose PFOS (<200 μM) stimulated HL-7702 cell viability at 48 h and 96 h, reduced the G0/G1 percentage, and increased the S + G2/M percentage. Moreover, levels of Cyclin D1, Cyclin E2, Cyclin A2, Cyclin B1 and their partner Cdks were elevated, and the expression of regulating proteins like c-Myc, p53, p21 waf/cip1 and Myt1, as well as the phosphorylation levels of p-Wee1(S642), p-Chk1(S345) and p-Chk2(T68), were disturbed. We hypothesized that low-dose PFOS stimulated HL-7702 proliferation by driving cells into G1 through elevating cyclins/cdks expression, and by promoting cell cycle progression through altering other regulating proteins. This research will shed light on the mechanisms behind PFOS-mediated human hepatotoxicity.

  4. NATURAL KILLER T CELLS IN HEPATIC LEUCOCYTE INFILTRATES IN PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANT PROCESS AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Lebedinskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphology, topography, and immunohistochemical features of leukocyte infiltrates were studied in various sites of the liver samples from the patients with metastatic disease, been affected by hepatitis B and C viruses at different degree of activity. Liver of СВА mice with implanted САО-1 tumour was also under study. Histochemical, and functional features, as well as immune phenotype of these cells were investigated. It has been shown that the major fraction of leukocyte infiltrates, mostly associated with implanted tumours in experimental mice, and in the areas adjacent to the tumor in humans, like as on the peak of viral hepatitis activity, is composed of lymphocytes. They are presented by large numvers of activated proliferating and differentiating cells bearing specific antigens, as well as natural killers and T-lymphocytes, possessing high-level killer activity towards NK-sensitive, and autologous lines of cancer cells. Hence, the results of our study, generally, confirm the data from literature reporting on existence of a special lymphocyte subpopulation, NKT cells, in human or murine liver affected by hepatitis virus or malignant tumors. The data concerning functional properties of these cells may be used for development of immunotherapy methods of viral diseases and oncological conditions complicated by liver metastases.

  5. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hua; Luan Fang; Ju Ying; Shen Hongyu; Gao Lifen; Wang Xiaoyan; Liu Suxia; Zhang Lining; Sun Wensheng; Ma Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation

  6. In vitro transfection of the hepatitis B virus PreS2 gene into the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 induces upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Liu [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Fang, Luan [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Ying, Ju [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Hongyu, Shen [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lifen, Gao [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Xiaoyan, Wang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Suxia, Liu [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lining, Zhang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wensheng, Sun [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Chunhong, Ma [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology, Ministry of Education (China)]. E-mail: machunhong@sdu.edu.cn

    2007-04-06

    The preS2 domain is the minimal functional unit of transcription activators that is encoded by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface (S) gene. It is present in more than one-third of the HBV-integrates in HBV induced hepatocarcinoma (HCC). To further understand the functional role of PreS2 in hepatocytes, a PreS2 expression plasmid, pcS2, was constructed and stably transfected into HepG2 cells. We conducted growth curve and colony-forming assays to study the impact of PreS2 expression on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with PreS2 proliferated more rapidly and formed colonies in soft agar. PreS2 expressing cells also induced upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase activation by RT-PCR and the modified TRAP assay. Blocking expression of hTERT with antisense oligonuleotide reversed the growth rate in cells stably transfected with PreS2. Our data suggest that PreS2 may increase the malignant transformation of human HCC cell line HepG2 by upregulating hTERT and inducing telomerase activation.

  7. Human hepatic lipase overexpression in mice induces hepatic steatosis and obesity through promoting hepatic lipogenesis and white adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedó, Lídia; Santos, David; Roglans, Núria; Julve, Josep; Pallarès, Victor; Rivas-Urbina, Andrea; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; Laguna, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Human hepatic lipase (hHL) is mainly localized on the hepatocyte cell surface where it hydrolyzes lipids from remnant lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins and promotes their hepatic selective uptake. Furthermore, hepatic lipase (HL) is closely associated with obesity in multiple studies. Therefore, HL may play a key role on lipid homeostasis in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT). In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of hHL expression on hepatic and white adipose triglyceride metabolism in vivo. Experiments were carried out in hHL transgenic and wild-type mice fed a Western-type diet. Triglyceride metabolism studies included β-oxidation and de novo lipogenesis in liver and WAT, hepatic triglyceride secretion, and adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated free fatty acid (FFA) lipolysis and influx. The expression of hHL promoted hepatic triglyceride accumulation and de novo lipogenesis without affecting triglyceride secretion, and this was associated with an upregulation of Srebf1 as well as the main genes controlling the synthesis of fatty acids. Transgenic mice also exhibited more adiposity and an increased LPL-mediated FFA influx into the WAT without affecting glucose tolerance. Our results demonstrate that hHL promoted hepatic steatosis in mice mainly by upregulating de novo lipogenesis. HL also upregulated WAT LPL and promoted triglyceride-rich lipoprotein hydrolysis and adipose FFA uptake. These data support the important role of hHL in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis and confirm the broad cardiometabolic role of HL.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and dose dependent antimicrobial and anti-cancerous activity of phycogenic silver nanoparticles against human hepatic carcinoma (HepG2 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Supraja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were successfully synthesized using aqueous extract of sea weed, Gracilaria corticata. The aqueous callus extract (5% treated with 1 mM silver nitrate solution resulted in the formation of AgNPs and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR of the formed AgNPs was recorded at 405 nm using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The molecules involved in the formation of AgNPs were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, surface morphology was studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD was used to determine the crystalline structure. SEM micrograph clearly revealed the size of the AgNPs was in the range of 20–55 nm with spherical, hexagonal in shape and poly-dispersed nature. High positive Zeta potential (22.9 mV of formed AgNPs indicates the stability and XRD pattern revealed the crystal structure of the AgNPs by showing the Bragg’s peaks corresponding to (111, (200, (220 planes of face-centered cubic crystal phase of silver. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited effective anticancerous activity (at doses 6.25 and 12.5 µg/ml of AgNPs against human hepatic carcinoma cell line (HepG2.

  9. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Up-Regulates AKR1C1 Expression Through Nuclear Factor-Y in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Ding, Shijia; Chen, Ke; Qin, Dongdong; Qu, Jialin; Wang, Sen; Sheng, Yanrui; Zou, Chengcheng; Chen, Limin; Tang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has long been recognized as an important transcriptional transactivator of several genes. Human aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1 (AKR1C1), a member of the family of AKR1CS, is significantly increased in HBx-expressed cells. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of HBx in regulating AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells and the role of AKR1C1 for HBV-induced HCC. RT-PCR was performed to detect AKR1C1 expression on mRNA level in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cell. The promoter activity of AKR1C1 was assayed by transient transfection and Dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The AKR1C1 promoter sequence was screened using the TFSEARCH database and the ALIBABA 2.0 software. The potential transcription factors binding sites were identified using 5' functional deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, we found that HBx promoted AKR1C1 expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Knockdown of HBx inhibited AKR1C1 activation. The role of HBx expression in regulating the promoter activity of human AKR1C1 gene was analyzed. The 5'functional deletion analysis identified that the region between -128 and -88 was the minimal promoter region of HBx to activate AKR1C1 gene expression. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) plays an important role in this HBx-induced AKR1C1 activation. In HepG2.2.1.5 cell, HBx can promote AKR1C1 promoter activity and thus activates the basal transcription of AKR1C1 gene. This process is mediated by the transcription factor NF-Y. This study explored the mechanism for the regulation of HBV on AKR1C1 expression and has provided a new understanding of HBV-induced HCC.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV are common blood-borne infections unevenly distributed across regions in Nigeria. Few population-based prevalence studies have been done in Nigeria. Objective. To determine the prevalence of HBV, HCV and HIV and risk factors for infection with ...

  11. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  12. Hepatic natural killer cells exclusively kill splenic/blood natural killer-resistant tumor cells by the perforin/granzyme pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermijlen, David; Luo, Dianzhong; Froelich, Christopher J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Kummer, Jean Alain; Willems, Erik; Braet, Filip; Wisse, Eddie

    2002-01-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells are located in the liver sinusoids adherent to the endothelium. Human and rat hepatic NK cells induce cytolysis in tumor cells that are resistant to splenic or blood NK cells. To investigate the mechanism of cell death, we examined the capacity of isolated, pure

  13. In-Vivo Imaging Of Transplanted Human Hepatic Stem Cells: Negative Contrast Labeling And 7t Micro-MRI Tracking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClelland, Randall E; Wauthier, Eliane; Reid, Lola; Hsu, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Stem cell therapies have great potential as alternative options to whole organ transplantations in treating dysfunction or failure, and alleviating the chronic shortage of donor availability of organs such as the...

  14. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  15. Hepatic Diacylglycerol-Associated Protein Kinase Cε Translocation Links Hepatic Steatosis to Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Kasper W.; Gilijamse, Pim W.; Versteeg, Ruth I.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Nederveen, Aart J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Zhang, Dongyan; Samuel, Varman T.; Vatner, Daniel F.; Petersen, Kitt F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, but translational evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the relationship between liver fat and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity in 133 obese subjects. Although the presence of hepatic steatosis in

  16. Human Embryonic and Hepatic Stem Cell Differentiation Visualized in Two and Three Dimensions Based on Serial Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter S.; Brøchner, Christian B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ESC colony, and prepare 3-5 μm thick serial sections. Immunohistochemistry applied to individual sections produces a 2-dimensional survey of the developing hESC colony. Based on serial paraffin sections of the 2D-expression pattern, a new and useful 3D-visualization can be modeled. The actual 3D rendering...... visualization of hESC colonies and stem cells in organs, which leads to new insights into and information about the interaction of stem cells with their surroundings....

  17. Methodological approaches to disinfection of human hepatitis B virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, D L; Prince, H N; Thraenhart, O; Muchmore, E; Bonder, E; Pugh, J

    1993-01-01

    Three commercial disinfectants (two quaternary formulations and one phenolic) were tested against human hepatitis B virus (HHBV). The treated virus was assayed for infectivity by the chimpanzee assay and for morphological alteration by the Morphological Alteration and Disintegration Test. The same agents were tested against duck hepatitis B virus in a duck hepatocyte infectivity assay. It is apparent that human and duck hepatitis viruses were relatively susceptible to disinfection, becoming n...

  18. Inhibition of the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway by melatonin in mice with liver fibrosis and human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Bárbara; Sánchez, Diana I; Crespo, Irene; San-Miguel, Beatriz; Álvarez, Marcelino; Tuñón, María J; González-Gallego, Javier

    2017-03-01

    The sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) system is involved in different pathological processes, including fibrogenesis. Melatonin abrogates activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and attenuates different profibrogenic pathways in animal models of fibrosis, but it is unknown if protection associates with its inhibitory effect on the SphK1/S1P axis. Mice in treatment groups received carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) 5 μL g -1 body wt i.p. twice a week for 4 or 6 weeks. Melatonin was given at 5 or 10 mg kg -1  day -1 i.p, beginning 2 weeks after the start of CCl 4 administration. At both 4 and 6 weeks following CCl 4 treatment, liver mRNA levels, protein concentration and immunohistochemical labelling for SphK1 increased significantly. S1P production, and expression of S1P receptor (S1PR)1, S1PR3 and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) were significantly elevated. However, there was a decreased expression of S1PR2 and S1P lyase (S1PL). Melatonin attenuated liver fibrosis, as shown by a significant inhibition of the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen (Col) Ι. Furthermore, melatonin inhibited S1P production, lowered expression of SphK1, S1PR1, SP1R3, and ASMase, and increased expression of S1PL. Melatonin induced a reversal of activated human HSCs cell line LX2, as evidenced by a reduction in α-SMA, TGF-β, and Col I expression. Melatonin-treated cells also exhibited an inhibition of the SphK1/S1P axis. Antifibrogenic effect of SphK1 inhibition was confirmed by treatment of LX2 cells with PF543. Abrogation of the lipid signaling pathway by the indole reveals novel molecular pathways that may account for the protective effect of melatonin in liver fibrogenesis. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(2):272-282, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Hepatic steatosis in transgenic mice overexpressing human histone deacetylase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-Guo; Seo, Sang-Beom; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Shin, Hye-Jun; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2005-01-01

    It is generally thought that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the transcriptional regulation of genes. However, little information is available concerning the specific functions of individual HDACs in disease states. In this study, two transgenic mice lines were established which harbored the human HDAC1 gene. Overexpressed HDAC1 was detected in the nuclei of transgenic liver cells, and HDAC1 enzymatic activity was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in control littermates. The HDAC1 transgenic mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatic steatosis and nuclear pleomorphism. Molecular studies showed that HDAC1 may contribute to nuclear pleomorphism through the p53/p21 signaling pathway

  20. SKLB70326, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cell-cycle progression, induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and apoptosis in human hepatic carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuanyuan; He, Haiyun [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Peng, Feng [Department of Thoracic Oncology of the Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Jiyan; Dai, Xiaoyun; Lin, Hongjun; Xu, Youzhi; Zhou, Tian; Mao, Yongqiu; Xie, Gang; Yang, Shengyong; Yu, Luoting; Yang, Li [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhao, Yinglan, E-mail: alancenxb@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 is a novel compound and has activity of anti-HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest via inhibiting the activity of CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SKLB70326 induces apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. -- Abstract: We previously reported the potential of a novel small molecule 3-amino-6-(3-methoxyphenyl)thieno[2.3-b]pyridine-2-carboxamide (SKLB70326) as an anticancer agent. In the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects and possible mechanisms of SKLB70326 in vitro. We found that SKLB70326 treatment significantly inhibited human hepatic carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro, and the HepG2 cell line was the most sensitive to its treatment. The inhibition of cell proliferation correlated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest, which was followed by apoptotic cell death. The SKLB70326-mediated cell-cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4 and CDK6 but not cyclin D1 or cyclin E. The phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was also observed. SKLB70326 treatment induced apoptotic cell death via the activation of PARP, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2. The expression levels of p53 and p21 were also induced by SKLB70326 treatment. Moreover, SKLB70326 treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, SKLB70326, a novel cell-cycle inhibitor, notably inhibits HepG2 cell proliferation through the induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Its potential as a candidate anticancer agent warrants further investigation.

  1. Exosomes from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hiPSC-MSCs) Protect Liver against Hepatic Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury via Activating Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingdong; Li, Dawei; Han, Conghui; Wu, Haoyu; Xu, Longmei; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Chen, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exosomes produced by human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hiPSC-MSCs-Exo) on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Exosomes derived from hiPSC-MSCs were isolated and characterized both biochemically and biophysically. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo were injected systemically into a murine ischemia/reperfusion injury model via the inferior vena cava, and then the therapeutic effects were evaluated. The serum levels of transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as histological changes were examined. Primary hepatocytes and human hepatocyte cell line HL7702 were used to test whether exosomes could induce hepatocytes proliferation in vitro. In addition, the expression levels of proliferation markers (proliferation cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; Phosphohistone-H3, PHH3) were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Moreover, SK inhibitor (SKI-II) and S1P1 receptor antagonist (VPC23019) were used to investigate the role of sphingosine kinase and sphingosine-1-phosphate-dependent pathway in the effects of hiPSC-MSCs-Exo on hepatocytes. hiPSCs were efficiently induced into hiPSC-MSCs that had typical MSC characteristics. hiPSC-MSCs-Exo had diameters ranging from 100 to 200 nm and expressed exosome markers (Alix, CD63 and CD81). After hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration, hepatocyte necrosis and sinusoidal congestion were markedly suppressed in the ischemia/reperfusion injury model, with lower histopathological scores. The levels of hepatocyte injury markers AST and ALT were significantly lower in the treatment group compared to control, and the expression levels of proliferation markers (PCNA and PHH3) were greatly induced after hiPSC-MSCs-Exo administration. Moreover, hiPSC-MSCs-Exo also induced primary hepatocytes and HL7702 cells proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. We found that hiPSC-MSCs-Exo could

  2. Dual-color fluorescence imaging to monitor CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 expression in human hepatic carcinoma HepG2 and HepaRG cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saori Tsuji

    Full Text Available Human adult hepatocytes expressing CYP3A4, a major cytochrome P450 enzyme, are required for cell-based assays to evaluate the potential risk of drug-drug interactions caused by transcriptional induction of P450 enzymes in early-phase drug discovery and development. However, CYP3A7 is preferentially expressed in premature hepatoblasts and major hepatic carcinoma cell lines. The human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepaRG possesses a high self-renewal capacity and can differentiate into hepatic cells similar to human adult hepatocytes in vitro. Transgenic HepaRG cells, in which the expression of fluorescent reporters is regulated by 35 kb regulatory elements of CYP3A4, have a distinct advantage over human hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion, which are unstable in culture. Thus, we created transgenic HepaRG and HepG2 cells by replacing the protein-coding regions of human CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and DsRed reporters, respectively, in a bacterial artificial chromosome vector that included whole regulatory elements. The intensity of DsRed fluorescence was initially high during the proliferation of transgenic HepaRG cells. However, most EGFP-positive cells were derived from those in which DsRed fluorescence was extinguished. Comparative analyses in these transgenic clones showed that changes in the total fluorescence intensity of EGFP reflected fold changes in the mRNA level of endogenous CYP3A4. Moreover, CYP3A4 induction was monitored by the increase in EGFP fluorescence. Thus, this assay provides a real-time evaluation system for quality assurance of hepatic differentiation into CYP3A4-expressing cells, unfavourable CYP3A4 induction, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting-mediated enrichment of CYP3A4-expressing hepatocytes based on the total fluorescence intensities of fluorescent reporters, without the need for many time-consuming steps.

  3. Biliary Secretion of Quasi-Enveloped Human Hepatitis A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Hirai-Yuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV is an unusual picornavirus that is released from cells cloaked in host-derived membranes. These quasi-enveloped virions (eHAV are the only particle type circulating in blood during infection, whereas only nonenveloped virions are shed in feces. The reason for this is uncertain. Hepatocytes, the only cell type known to support HAV replication in vivo, are highly polarized epithelial cells with basolateral membranes facing onto hepatic (blood sinusoids and apical membranes abutting biliary canaliculi from which bile is secreted to the gut. To assess whether eHAV and nonenveloped virus egress from cells via vectorially distinct pathways, we studied infected polarized cultures of Caco-2 and HepG2-N6 cells. Most (>99% progeny virions were released apically from Caco-2 cells, whereas basolateral (64% versus apical (36% release was more balanced with HepG2-N6 cells. Both apically and basolaterally released virions were predominantly enveloped, with no suggestion of differential vectorial release of eHAV versus naked virions. Basolateral to apical transcytosis of either particle type was minimal (<0.02%/h in HepG2-N6 cells, arguing against this as a mechanism for differences in membrane envelopment of serum versus fecal virus. High concentrations of human bile acids converted eHAV to nonenveloped virions, whereas virus present in bile from HAV-infected Ifnar1−/−Ifngr1−/− and Mavs−/− mice banded over a range of densities extending from that of eHAV to that of nonenveloped virions. We conclude that nonenveloped virions shed in feces are derived from eHAV released across the canalicular membrane and stripped of membranes by the detergent action of bile acids within the proximal biliary canaliculus.

  4. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola, about 166 000 individuals are living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% ...

  5. Human hepatic lipase overexpression in mice induces hepatic steatosis and obesity through promoting hepatic lipogenesis and white adipose tissue lipolysis and fatty acid uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Cedó

    Full Text Available Human hepatic lipase (hHL is mainly localized on the hepatocyte cell surface where it hydrolyzes lipids from remnant lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins and promotes their hepatic selective uptake. Furthermore, hepatic lipase (HL is closely associated with obesity in multiple studies. Therefore, HL may play a key role on lipid homeostasis in liver and white adipose tissue (WAT. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of hHL expression on hepatic and white adipose triglyceride metabolism in vivo. Experiments were carried out in hHL transgenic and wild-type mice fed a Western-type diet. Triglyceride metabolism studies included β-oxidation and de novo lipogenesis in liver and WAT, hepatic triglyceride secretion, and adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL-mediated free fatty acid (FFA lipolysis and influx. The expression of hHL promoted hepatic triglyceride accumulation and de novo lipogenesis without affecting triglyceride secretion, and this was associated with an upregulation of Srebf1 as well as the main genes controlling the synthesis of fatty acids. Transgenic mice also exhibited more adiposity and an increased LPL-mediated FFA influx into the WAT without affecting glucose tolerance. Our results demonstrate that hHL promoted hepatic steatosis in mice mainly by upregulating de novo lipogenesis. HL also upregulated WAT LPL and promoted triglyceride-rich lipoprotein hydrolysis and adipose FFA uptake. These data support the important role of hHL in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis and confirm the broad cardiometabolic role of HL.

  6. Efficient generation of hepatic cells from mesenchymal stromal cells by an innovative bio-microfluidic cell culture device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Meng-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Yi; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Rimando, Marilyn; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2016-08-19

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and have great potential in cell therapy. Previously we reported the differentiation potential of human MSCs into hepatocytes in vitro and that these cells can rescue fulminant hepatic failure. However, the conventional static culture method neither maintains growth factors at an optimal level constantly nor removes cellular waste efficiently. In addition, not only is the duration of differentiating hepatocyte lineage cells from MSCs required to improve, but also the need for a large number of hepatocytes for cell therapy has not to date been addressed fully. The purpose of this study is to design and develop an innovative microfluidic device to overcome these shortcomings. We designed and fabricated a microfluidic device and a culture system for hepatic differentiation of MSCs using our protocol reported previously. The microfluidic device contains a large culture chamber with a stable uniform flow to allow homogeneous distribution and expansion as well as efficient induction of hepatic differentiation for MSCs. The device enables real-time observation under light microscopy and exhibits a better differentiation efficiency for MSCs compared with conventional static culture. MSCs grown in the microfluidic device showed a higher level of hepatocyte marker gene expression under hepatic induction. Functional analysis of hepatic differentiation demonstrated significantly higher urea production in the microfluidic device after 21 days of hepatic differentiation. The microfluidic device allows the generation of a large number of MSCs and induces hepatic differentiation of MSCs efficiently. The device can be adapted for scale-up production of hepatic cells from MSCs for cellular therapy.

  7. Luteolin-7-O-Glucoside Present in Lettuce Extracts Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Production and Viral Replication by Human Hepatoma Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xian Cui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in Asia and chronic hepatitis B (CHB is a major public health issue worldwide. Current treatment strategies for CHB are not satisfactory as they induce a low rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg loss. Extracts were prepared from lettuce hydroponically cultivated in solutions containing glycine or nitrate as nitrogen sources. The lettuce extracts exerted potent anti-HBV effects in HepG2 cell lines in vitro, including significant HBsAg inhibition, HBV replication and transcription inhibition, without exerting cytotoxic effects. When used in combination interferon-alpha 2b (IFNα-2b or lamivudine (3TC, the lettuce extracts synergistically inhibited HBsAg expression and HBV replication. By using differential metabolomics analysis, Luteolin-7-O-glucoside was identified and confirmed as a functional component of the lettuce extracts and exhibited similar anti-HBV activity as the lettuce extracts in vitro. The inhibition rate on HBsAg was up to 77.4%. Moreover, both the lettuce extracts and luteolin-7-O-glucoside functioned as organic antioxidants and, significantly attenuated HBV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. Luteolin-7-O-glucoside also normalized ROS-induced mitochondrial membrane potential damage, which suggests luteolin-7-O-glucoside inhibits HBsAg and HBV replication via a mechanism involving the mitochondria. Our findings suggest luteolin-7-O-glucoside may have potential value for clinical application in CHB and may enhance HBsAg and HBV clearance when used as a combination therapy.

  8. Back to the drawing board: Understanding the complexity of hepatic innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotel, Marie; Hasan, Uzma; Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of immune populations in nonlymphoid organs have highlighted the great diversity of the innate lymphoid system. It has also become apparent that mouse and human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have distinct phenotypes and properties. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Harmon et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 2111-2120] characterized human hepatic NK-cell subsets. The authors report that hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells resemble mouse liver ILC1s in that they express CXCR6 and have an immature phenotype. However, unlike mouse ILC1s, they express high levels of Eomes and low levels of T-bet, and upon stimulation with tumor cells, secrete low amounts of cytokines. These unexpected findings further support the differences between human and mouse immune populations and prompt the study of the role of hepatic ILC subsets in immune responses. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez Souza

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the ‘90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly monkey human hepatitis B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory suggests a co-speciation of human hepatitis B virus in non-human primate hosts because of the proximity between the phylogeny of Old and New World non-human primate and their human hepatitis B virus variants. The importance of further research, related to the subject in South American wild fauna, is paramount and highly relevant for understanding the origin of human hepatitis B virus.

  10. Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) presenting as subfulminant hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Z; Broida, E; Monselise, Y; Kazatsker, A; Baruch, J; Pappo, O; Skappa, E; Tur-Kaspa, R

    2000-03-01

    Giant cell hepatitis (GCH) in adults is a rare event. The diagnosis of GCH is based on findings of syncytial giant hepatocytes. It is commonly associated with either viral infection or autoimmune hepatitis type I. A patient with GCH due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) is described, a combination that has not been previously reported. Corticosteroid therapy was effective in decreasing serum liver enzymes; however, the patient deteriorated rapidly and developed subfulminant hepatic failure. Although an emergency orthotopic liver transplantation was performed, the patient died because of reperfusion injury. Interestingly, only a few giant hepatocytes were noted in the explanted liver. This case stresses the association of GCH with autoimmune disorders, the possible immune mechanism involved in the formation of giant cell hepatocytes, and illustrates the rapidly progressive course and unfavorable prognosis that these patients can develop.

  11. Hepatic cholesterol ester hydrolase in human liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J B; Poon, R W

    1978-09-01

    Human liver contains an acid cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) of presumed lysosomal origin, but its significance is unknown. We developed a modified CEH radioassay suitable for needle biopsy specimens and measured hepatic activity of this enzyme in 69 patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy. Histologically normal livers hydrolyzed 5.80 +/- 0.78 SEM mumoles of cholesterol ester per hr per g of liver protein (n, 10). Values were similar in alcoholic liver disease (n, 17), obstructive jaundice (n, 9), and miscellaneous hepatic disorders (n, 21). In contrast, mean hepatic CEH activity was more than 3-fold elevated in 12 patients with acute hepatitis, 21.05 +/- 2.45 SEM mumoles per hr per g of protein (P less than 0.01). In 2 patients studied serially, CEH returned to normal as hepatitis resolved. CEH activity in all patients paralleled SGOT levels (r, 0.84; P less than 0.01). There was no correlation with serum levels of free or esterified cholesterol nor with serum activity of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. These studies confirm the presence of CEH activity in human liver and show markedly increased activity in acute hepatitis. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of altered hepatic CEH activity in liver disease require further study.

  12. The cyclophilin inhibitor Debio-025 shows potent anti-hepatitis C effect in patients coinfected with hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisiak, Robert; Horban, Andrzej; Gallay, Philippe; Bobardt, Michael; Selvarajah, Suganya; Wiercinska-Drapalo, Alicja; Siwak, Ewa; Cielniak, Iwona; Higersberger, Jozef; Kierkus, Jarek; Aeschlimann, Christian; Grosgurin, Pierre; Nicolas-Métral, Valérie; Dumont, Jean-Maurice; Porchet, Hervé; Crabbé, Raf; Scalfaro, Pietro

    2008-03-01

    Debio-025 is an oral cyclophilin (Cyp) inhibitor with potent anti-hepatitis C virus activity in vitro. Its effect on viral load as well as its influence on intracellular Cyp levels was investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Mean hepatitis C viral load decreased significantly by 3.6 log(10) after a 14-day oral treatment with 1200 mg twice daily (P CypB) levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased from 67 +/- 6 (standard error) ng/mg protein (baseline) to 5 +/- 1 ng/mg protein at day 15 (P CypB levels, coinciding with the decrease in hepatitis C viral load. These are the first preliminary human data supporting the hypothesis that CypB may play an important role in hepatitis C virus replication and that Cyp inhibition is a valid target for the development of anti-hepatitis C drugs.

  13. Interaction between amiodarone and hepatitis-C virus nucleotide inhibitors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and HEK-293 Cav1.2 over-expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrutta, Armando; Zeng, Haoyu; Imredy, John; Balasubramanian, Bharathi; Dech, Spencer; Lis, Edward; Wang, Jixin; Zhai, Jin; DeGeorge, Joseph; Sannajust, Frederick

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical cases of severe bradyarrhythmias have been reported upon co-administration of the Hepatitis-C NS5B Nucleotide Polymerase Inhibitor (HCV-NI) direct-acting antiviral agent, sofosbuvir (SOF), and the Class-III anti-arrhythmic amiodarone (AMIO). We model the cardiac drug-drug interaction (DDI) between AMIO and SOF, and between AMIO and a closely-related SOF analog, MNI-1 (Merck Nucleotide Inhibitor #1), in functional assays of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), to provide mechanistic insights into recently reported clinical cases. AMIO co-applied with SOF or MNI-1 increased beating rate or field potential (FP) rate and decreased impedance (IMP) and Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in hiPSC-CM syncytia. This action resembled that of Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs) in the model, but CCBs did not substitute for AMIO in the DDI. AMIO analog dronedarone (DRON) did not substitute for, but competed with AMIO in the DDI. Ryanodine and thapsigargin, decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and SEA-0400, a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 (NCX1) inhibitor, partially antagonized or suppressed DDI effects. Other agents affecting FP rate only exerted additive or subtractive effects, commensurate with their individual effects. We also describe an interaction between AMIO and MNI-1 on Cav1.2 ion channels in an over-expressing HEK-293 cell line. MNI-1 enhanced Cav1.2 channel inhibition by AMIO, but did not affect inhibition of Cav1.2 by DRON, verapamil, nifedipine, or diltiazem. Our data in hiPSC-CMs indicate that HCV-NI agents such as SOF and MNI-1 interact with key intracellular Ca(2+)-handling mechanisms. Additional study in a Cav1.2 HEK-293 cell-line suggests that HCV-NIs potentiate the inhibitory action of AMIO on L-type Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biliary Secretion of Quasi-Enveloped Human Hepatitis A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai-Yuki, Asuka; Hensley, Lucinda; Whitmire, Jason K; Lemon, Stanley M

    2016-12-06

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an unusual picornavirus that is released from cells cloaked in host-derived membranes. These quasi-enveloped virions (eHAV) are the only particle type circulating in blood during infection, whereas only nonenveloped virions are shed in feces. The reason for this is uncertain. Hepatocytes, the only cell type known to support HAV replication in vivo, are highly polarized epithelial cells with basolateral membranes facing onto hepatic (blood) sinusoids and apical membranes abutting biliary canaliculi from which bile is secreted to the gut. To assess whether eHAV and nonenveloped virus egress from cells via vectorially distinct pathways, we studied infected polarized cultures of Caco-2 and HepG2-N6 cells. Most (>99%) progeny virions were released apically from Caco-2 cells, whereas basolateral (64%) versus apical (36%) release was more balanced with HepG2-N6 cells. Both apically and basolaterally released virions were predominantly enveloped, with no suggestion of differential vectorial release of eHAV versus naked virions. Basolateral to apical transcytosis of either particle type was minimal (work reveals that it has an unusual life cycle. Virus is found in cell culture supernatant fluids in two mature, infectious forms: one wrapped in membranes (quasi-enveloped) and another that is nonenveloped. Membrane-wrapped virions circulate in blood during acute infection and are resistant to neutralizing antibodies, likely facilitating HAV dissemination within the liver. On the other hand, virus shed in feces is nonenveloped and highly stable, facilitating epidemic spread and transmission to naive hosts. Factors controlling the biogenesis of these two distinct forms of the virus in infected humans are not understood. Here we characterize vectorial release of quasi-enveloped virions from polarized epithelial cell cultures and provide evidence that bile acids strip membranes from eHAV following its secretion into the biliary tract. These results

  15. Human Placenta Extract Therapy for Feline Hepatic Lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    2018-01-01

    Feline hepatic lipidosis (HL), the most common hepatobiliary disease in cats, is characterized by the accumulation of excessive triglycerides (TGs) in more than 80% of hepatocytes. Forced oral feeding is recommended as the only therapy for this disease but the prognosis is often poor. As human placenta extract (Laennec) has been used to improve hepatic metabolism, we investigated the efficacy of this drug for the treatment of cats with HL. Ten cats diagnosed with HL in this study were treated...

  16. Interaction between amiodarone and hepatitis-C virus nucleotide inhibitors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and HEK-293 Cav{sub 1.2} over-expressing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrutta, Armando, E-mail: armando_lagrutta@merck.com; Zeng, Haoyu; Imredy, John; Balasubramanian, Bharathi; Dech, Spencer; Lis, Edward; Wang, Jixin; Zhai, Jin; DeGeorge, Joseph; Sannajust, Frederick

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical cases of severe bradyarrhythmias have been reported upon co-administration of the Hepatitis-C NS5B Nucleotide Polymerase Inhibitor (HCV-NI) direct-acting antiviral agent, sofosbuvir (SOF), and the Class-III anti-arrhythmic amiodarone (AMIO). We model the cardiac drug-drug interaction (DDI) between AMIO and SOF, and between AMIO and a closely-related SOF analog, MNI-1 (Merck Nucleotide Inhibitor #1), in functional assays of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), to provide mechanistic insights into recently reported clinical cases. AMIO co-applied with SOF or MNI-1 increased beating rate or field potential (FP) rate and decreased impedance (IMP) and Ca{sup 2+} transient amplitudes in hiPSC-CM syncytia. This action resembled that of Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers (CCBs) in the model, but CCBs did not substitute for AMIO in the DDI. AMIO analog dronedarone (DRON) did not substitute for, but competed with AMIO in the DDI. Ryanodine and thapsigargin, decreasing intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, and SEA-0400, a Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger-1 (NCX1) inhibitor, partially antagonized or suppressed DDI effects. Other agents affecting FP rate only exerted additive or subtractive effects, commensurate with their individual effects. We also describe an interaction between AMIO and MNI-1 on Cav{sub 1.2} ion channels in an over-expressing HEK-293 cell line. MNI-1 enhanced Cav{sub 1.2} channel inhibition by AMIO, but did not affect inhibition of Cav{sub 1.2} by DRON, verapamil, nifedipine, or diltiazem. Our data in hiPSC-CMs indicate that HCV-NI agents such as SOF and MNI-1 interact with key intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-handling mechanisms. Additional study in a Cav{sub 1.2} HEK-293 cell-line suggests that HCV-NIs potentiate the inhibitory action of AMIO on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels. - Highlights: • Adverse clinical interaction between amiodarone and HCV-NI drugs is captured by in vitro models. • Human iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte

  17. An Hepatic Abscess in a Patient With Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marolf, Marissa D; Chaudhary, Manu; Kaplan, Sheldon L

    2016-11-01

    We present a case of hepatic abscess in a transfusion-dependent 16-year-old patient with sickle cell disease. There have been 10 such cases in sickle cell disease patients reported, with the last report published greater than a decade ago. The diagnosis of hepatic abscess merits consideration in sickle cell disease patients presenting with fever without a source and/or abdominal pain.

  18. Identification of valid reference genes for microRNA expression studies in a hepatitis B virus replicating liver cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kari Stougaard; Nielsen, Kirstine Overgaard; Nordmann Winther, Thilde

    2016-01-01

    expressed microRNAs with liver-specific target genes in plasma from children with chronic hepatitis B. To further understand the biological role of these microRNAs in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B, we have used the human liver cell line HepG2, with and without HBV replication, after transfection...

  19. Variability of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, JM; Lester, R; Kuipers, F; Vonk, R; Mackenzie, PI; Drake, RR; Frame, L; Radominska-Pandya, A

    1999-01-01

    The availability of a unique series of liver samples from human subjects, both control patients (9) and those with liver disease (6; biliary atresia (2), retransplant, chronic tyrosinemia type I, tyrosinemia, Wilson's disease) allowed us to characterize human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  20. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez; Drexler, Jan Felix; Lima, Renato Santos de; Rosário, Mila de Oliveira Hughes Veiga do; Netto, Eduardo Martins

    2014-01-01

    The human hepatitis B virus causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is considered one of the most serious human health issues by the World Health Organization, causing thousands of deaths per year. There are similar viruses belonging to the Hepadnaviridae family that infect non-human primates and other mammals as well as some birds. The majority of non-human primate virus isolates were phylogenetically close to the human hepatitis B virus, but like the human genotypes, the origins of these viruses remain controversial. However, there is a possibility that human hepatitis B virus originated in primates. Knowing whether these viruses might be common to humans and primates is crucial in order to reduce the risk to humans. To review the existing knowledge about the evolutionary origins of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates. This review was done by reading several articles that provide information about the Hepadnaviridae virus family in non-human primates and humans and the possible origins and evolution of these viruses. The evolutionary origin of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates has been dated back to several thousand years; however, recent analyses of genomic fossils of avihepadnaviruses integrated into the genomes of several avian species have suggested a much older origin of this genus. Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the '90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly monkey human hepatitis B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory suggests a co-speciation of human hepatitis B virus in non-human primate

  1. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surface antigen (HBsAg), syphilis and HCV from the antenatal records. The data were extracted by two trained assistants. Hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HCV were determined using Clinotech diagnostic enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kits (Clinotech Laboratories,. USA; batch/lot no. for ...

  2. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  3. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa: a case report with a review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Son

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas are very rare. We report a primary hepatic PEComa with a review of the literature. A 56-year-old women presented with a nodular mass detected during the management of chronic renal failure and chronic hepatitis C. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested a nodular hepatocellular carcinoma in segment 5 of the liver. The patient underwent partial hepatectomy. A brown-colored expansile mass measuring 3.2×3.0 cm was relatively demarcated from the surrounding liver parenchyma. The tumor was mainly composed of epithelioid cells that were arranged in a trabecular growth pattern. Adipose tissue and thick-walled blood vessels were minimally identified. A small amount of extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the sinusoidal spaces between tumor cells. Tumor cells were diffusely immunoreactive for human melanoma black 45 (HMB45 and Melan A, focally immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, but not for hepatocyte specific antigen (HSA.

  4. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types of viral hepatitis. What Is Hepatitis A? For kids, hep A is the most common ... they recover, it does not come back. Can Hepatitis A Be Prevented? The following will help keep people ...

  5. Epigenetic Changes during Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Götze

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cells (HSC, which can participate in liver regeneration and fibrogenesis, have recently been identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. During their activation HSC adopt a myofibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound changes in the gene expression profile. DNA methylation changes at single genes have been reported during HSC activation and may participate in the regulation of this process, but comprehensive DNA methylation analyses are still missing. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of DNA methylation during in vitro activation of HSC.The analysis of DNA methylation changes by antibody-based assays revealed a strong decrease in the global DNA methylation level during culture-induced activation of HSC. To identify genes which may be regulated by DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide Methyl-MiniSeq EpiQuest sequencing comparing quiescent and early culture-activated HSC. Approximately 400 differentially methylated regions with a methylation change of at least 20% were identified, showing either hypo- or hypermethylation during activation. Further analysis of selected genes for DNA methylation and expression were performed revealing a good correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression. Furthermore, global DNA demethylation during HSC activation was investigated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay and L-mimosine treatment showing that demethylation was independent of DNA synthesis and thereby excluding a passive DNA demethylation mechanism.In summary, in vitro activation of HSC initiated strong DNA methylation changes, which were associated with gene regulation. These results indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are important for the control of early HSC activation. Furthermore, the data show that global DNA demethylation during activation is based on an active DNA demethylation mechanism.

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis C Antibody in Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-25

    Oct 25, 2015 ... Abstract: Background: Hepatitis. C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem for Human Immu- nodeficiency virus (HIV) infected population. Both infections share same routes of transmission, and quite often co-exist, with dual infections associated with recipro- cal and mutually more rapid pro- gression ...

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis C Antibody in Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem for Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected population. Both infections share same routes of transmission, and quite often co-exist, with dual infections associated with reciprocal and mutually more rapid progression than either infection alone.

  8. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity and hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A total of 130 donors comprising 120 commercial donors and 10 voluntary donors were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B surface antigen in Benin city using Immunocomb HIV - 1 and 2 Biospot kit and Quimica Clinica Aplicada direct latex agglutination method respectively.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: Investigation of the Genetic Diversity and Virulent ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... DNA sequencing, and bioinformatics tools for sequence management and analysis.

  11. Hepatitis C virus in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Hasan, Syed; Giday, Samuel; Alamgir, Laila; Banks, Alpha; Frederick, Winston; Smoot, Duane; Castro, Oswaldo

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV) in patients with sickle cell disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1983 and 2001, 150 patients from the Howard University Hospital Center for Sickle Cell Disease were screened for HCV antibody (52% women, 48% men, mean age 34 years). Frozen serum samples from 56 adult sickle cell patients who had participated in previous surveys (1983-92) of HIV and HTLV-1 serology and who were tested in 1992 for anti-HCV antibody--when commercial ELISA test (Ortho) became available--were included in this paper. Of the 150 patients in the study, 132 had sickle cell anemia genotype (SS), 15 had sickle cell hemoglobin-C disease (SC) and three had sickle beta thalassemia. Clinical charts were reviewed for history of blood transfusion, IV drug abuse, homosexuality, tattooing, iron overload, and alcohol abuse. RESULTS: Antibodies to HCV were detected in 53 patients (35.3%). Of the 55 patients who had frozen serum samples tested in 1992, 32 (58%) were reactive for anti-HCV, while only 21 of the 95 patients (22%) tested after 1992 were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). Thirty-nine of 77 patients (51%) who received more than 10 units of packed red blood cells were positive for HCV antibody, and only 14 of 61 patients (23%) who received less than 10 units of packed red blood cells transfusion were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). None of the 12 patients who never received transfusion were positive for HCV antibody. In the 53 anti-HCV positive patients, the mean alanine amino-transferase (ALT) value was 98- and 81 U/L, respectively, for males and females. These values were normal for the HCV-antibody negative patients. The aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and the total bilirubin were also higher in the anti-HCV positive patients compared to patients in the anti-HCV negative group. Forty-four patients (57.1%) who were transfused more than 10 units developed iron overload defined by a serum ferritin

  12. Complete replication of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in a newly developed hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Darong; Zuo, Chaohui; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Xianghe; Xue, Binbin; Liu, Nianli; Yu, Rong; Qin, Yuwen; Gao, Yimin; Wang, Qiuping; Hu, Jun; Wang, Ling; Zhou, Zebin; Liu, Bing; Tan, Deming; Guan, Yang; Zhu, Haizhen

    2014-04-01

    The absence of a robust cell culture system for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has limited the analysis of the virus lifecycle and drug discovery. We have established a hepatoma cell line, HLCZ01, the first cell line, to the authors' knowledge, supporting the entire lifecycle of both HBV and HCV. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive particles can be observed in the supernatant and the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum of the cells via electron microscopy. Interestingly, HBV and HCV clinical isolates propagate in HLCZ01 cells. Both viruses replicate in the cells without evidence of overt interference. HBV and HCV entry are blocked by antibodies against HBsAg and human CD81, respectively, and the replication of HBV and HCV is inhibited by antivirals. HLCZ01 cells mount an innate immune response to virus infection. The cell line provides a powerful tool for exploring the mechanisms of virus entry and replication and the interaction between host and virus, facilitating the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccines.

  13. [Use of medroxyprogesterone in human hepatic cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, A; Ríos, B; Bruno, M; Heinrichs, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of medroxyprogesterone in 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis demonstrated with histological technics was studied. Eight of the 14 patients were controlled over a period of one year and three months. Six of this eight patients presented subjective clinical improvement and the ascitis disappeared in 5/7 cases, so that the doses of lactona could be diminished. Three of the male patients recovered their sexual potency although all were in alcoholic abstinence for more than one year. Histologically 5/6 patients presented a diminishing fibrosis in the control biopsy and the 3 patients controlled with hemodynamic studies presented lower portal pression. We didn't found secondary effects, except obesity in 3 cases. We concluded that it would be important to continue this experience with a greater number of patients and adding appropriate biochemical controls.

  14. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  15. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  16. Hepatitis B Virus Infection In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnebe-Agumadu U H, and Abiodun P O. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (HbSS): Need for Intervention. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002; 1:79-87. This is a prospective study of 213 patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years ...

  17. Long-term culture of human liver tissue with advanced hepatic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Soon Seng; Xiong, Anming; Nguyen, Khanh; Masek, Marilyn; No, Da Yoon; Elazar, Menashe; Shteyer, Eyal; Winters, Mark A; Voedisch, Amy; Shaw, Kate; Rashid, Sheikh Tamir; Frank, Curtis W; Cho, Nam Joon; Glenn, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-02

    A major challenge for studying authentic liver cell function and cell replacement therapies is that primary human hepatocytes rapidly lose their advanced function in conventional, 2-dimensional culture platforms. Here, we describe the fabrication of 3-dimensional hexagonally arrayed lobular human liver tissues inspired by the liver's natural architecture. The engineered liver tissues exhibit key features of advanced differentiation, such as human-specific cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and the ability to support efficient infection with patient-derived inoculums of hepatitis C virus. The tissues permit the assessment of antiviral agents and maintain their advanced functions for over 5 months in culture. This extended functionality enabled the prediction of a fatal human-specific hepatotoxicity caused by fialuridine (FIAU), which had escaped detection by preclinical models and short-term clinical studies. The results obtained with the engineered human liver tissue in this study provide proof-of-concept determination of human-specific drug metabolism, demonstrate the ability to support infection with human hepatitis virus derived from an infected patient and subsequent antiviral drug testing against said infection, and facilitate detection of human-specific drug hepatotoxicity associated with late-onset liver failure. Looking forward, the scalability and biocompatibility of the scaffold are also ideal for future cell replacement therapeutic strategies.

  18. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T-cell responses to recombinant HBV core protein in patients with normal liver function and co-infected with chronic HBV and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about HBV-specific T-cell responses in chronic Hepatitis B patients (HBV) that are co-infected with Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), especially those with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Methods Twenty-five patients with chronic HBV (11 hepatitis B e antigen [HBeAg]-positive, 14 HBeAg-negative) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. A longitudinal study as also conducted in which follow-up was done at 3, 12, and 24 months, after acute HIV-1 infection, in 11 individuals who also had chronic HBV. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with recombinant HBV surface protein (S protein), core protein (C protein) or gag peptide. IFN-γ-secreting T cells were identified by ELISPOT assay. Results In the cross-sectional study, co-infected chronic HBV patients had lower C protein-specific T-cell responses compared with mono-infected individuals, though the difference was not significant. In co-infected, chronic HBV patients, the magnitude of C protein-specific T-cell responses was significantly greater in HBeAg-positive subjects compared to HBeAg-negative subjects (p = 0.011). C protein-specific T-cell responses were positively correlated with HBV viral load (rs = 0.40, p = 0.046). However, gag-specific T-cell responses were negatively correlated with HIV viral load (rs = −0.44, p = 0.026) and positively correlated with CD4+ count (rs = 0.46, p = 0.021). The results were different in mono-infected individuals. PBMCs from co-infected HBeAg-positive patients secreted more specific-IFN-γ in cultured supernatants compared with PBMCs from co-infected HBeAg-negative patients (p = 0.019). In the longitudinal study, S protein- and C protein-specific T-cell responses were decreased as the length of follow-up increased (p = 0.034, for S protein; p = 0.105, for C protein). Additionally, the S protein- and C protein-specific T-cell responses were significantly higher in HBe

  19. Correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human ex vivo hepatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hang; You, Fusheng; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen; Shi, Xuetao; He, Yong; Yang, Min; Yan, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric properties are vital biophysical features of biological tissues, and biological activity is an index to ascertain the active state of tissues. This study investigated the potential correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human hepatic tissue with prolonged ex vivo time through correlation and regression analyses. The dielectric properties of 26 cases of normal human hepatic tissue at 10 Hz to 100 MHz were measured from 15 min after isolation to 24 h at 37 °C with 90% humidity. Cell morphologies, including nucleus area (NA) and alteration rate of intercellular area (ICAR), were analyzed as indicators of biological activities. Conductivity, complex resistivity, and NA exhibited opposing changes 1 h after isolation. Relative permittivity and ex vivo time were not closely correlated (p > 0.05). The dielectric properties measured at low frequencies (i.e. <1 MHz) were more sensitive than those measured at high frequencies in reflecting the biological activity of ex vivo tissue. Highly significant correlations were found between conductivity, resistivity and the ex vivo time (p < 0.05) as well as conductivity and the cell morphology (p < 0.05). The findings indicated that establishing the correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human hepatic tissue is of great significance for promoting the role of dielectric properties in biological science, particularly in human biology. (paper)

  20. Human gamma interferon production by cytotoxic T lymphocytes sensitized during hepatitis A virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, K.; Gabriel, P.; Koscielniak, E.; Stierhof, Y.D.; Wiedmann, K.H.; Flehmig, B.; Vallbracht, A.

    1988-01-01

    The production of interferon (IFN) during a chromium-51 release assay with hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected fibroblasts and autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with acute HAV infection was studied to determine whether IFN plays a role in immunopathogenesis of hepatitis A infection in humans. Skin fibroblasts of eight patients after acute HAV infection and from two control persons without history of current of past HAV infection were infected with HAV. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected at different times after the onset of icterus and tested in a chromium-51 release assay against autologous HAV-infected skin fibroblasts for their cytolytic and IFN-producing activity. The IFN produced during the assay was characterized and found to have the properties of human gamma IFN. Cytotoxicity and gamma IFN release were virus specific. The cell types responsible for both functions were characterized and found to be in the HLA-dependent T8 + lymphocyte subset. Considering that gamma IFN has an antiviral effect on persistent HAV infection in vitro and that it probably accounts for stimulation of HLA class I antigen expression on hepatocytes, these experimental results presented here demonstrate that human gamma IFN produced by HAV-specific T cells may participate in pathogenesis of hepatitis A infection in humans

  1. Antiproliferative effect of isolated isoquinoline alkaloid from Mucuna pruriens seeds in hepatic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pranesh; Rawat, Atul; Keshari, Amit K; Singh, Ashok K; Maity, Siddhartha; De, Arnab; Samanta, Amalesh; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative action of isolated M1 (6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) from Mucuna pruriens seeds using human hepatic carcinoma cell line (Huh-7 cells). Initially, docking studies was performed to find out the binding affinities of M1 to caspase-3 and 8 enzymes. Later, cytotoxic action of M1 was measured by cell growth inhibition (MTT), followed by caspase-3 and 8 enzymes assay colorimetrically. Our results collectively suggested that M1 had strong binding affinity to caspase-8 in molecular modelling. M1 possessed antiproliferative activity on Huh-7 cells (EC50 = 13.97 μM) and also inhibited the action of caspase-8 enzyme, signified process of apoptosis. M1 was active against Huh-7 cells that may be useful for future hepatic cancer treatment.

  2. Fibronectin and Kupffer cell function in fulminant hepatic failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imawari, M.; Hughes, R.D.; Gove, C.D.; Williams, R.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between plasma fibronectin, in vitro plasma opsonic activity, which measures the biological activity of fibronectin, and in vivo Kupffer cell function, as assessed by the systemic clearance of microaggregated [ 125 I]albumin, were determined simultaneously in 15 patients with fulminant hepatic failure and 12 normal subjects. Both the plasma fibronectin and plasma opsonic activity were significantly reduced in patients with fulminant hepatic failure, while the systemic clearance of microaggregated albumin was decreased. There was a significant correlation between plasma fibronectin and the plasma opsonic activity on admission, but no correlation could be detected between either parameter and the clearance of microaggregated albumin. A gelatin-derived plasma expander was shown to block the plasma opsonic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The low plasma fibronectin and decreased clearance of microaggregated albumin in fulminant hepatic failure reflect different aspects of the overall impairment of Kupffer cell function

  3. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  4. Extracellular adenosine controls NKT-cell-dependent hepatitis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Meenakshi; Kini, Radhika; Madasu, Manasa; Ohta, Akiko; Nowak, Michael; Exley, Mark; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ohta, Akio

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular adenosine regulates inflammatory responses via the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR). A2AR deficiency results in much exaggerated acute hepatitis, indicating nonredundancy of adenosine-A2AR pathway in inhibiting immune activation. To identify a critical target of immunoregulatory effect of extracellular adenosine, we focused on NKT cells, which play an indispensable role in hepatitis. An A2AR agonist abolished NKT-cell-dependent induction of acute hepatitis by concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide in mice, corresponding to downregulation of activation markers and cytokines in NKT cells and of NK-cell co-activation. These results show that A2AR signaling can downregulate NKT-cell activation and suppress NKT-cell-triggered inflammatory responses. Next, we hypothesized that NKT cells might be under physiological control of the adenosine-A2AR pathway. Indeed, both Con A and α-galactosylceramide induced more severe hepatitis in A2AR-deficient mice than in WT controls. Transfer of A2AR-deficient NKT cells into A2AR-expressing recipients resulted in exaggeration of Con A-induced liver damage, suggesting that NKT-cell activation is controlled by endogenous adenosine via A2AR, and this physiological regulatory mechanism of NKT cells is critical in the control of tissue-damaging inflammation. The current study suggests the possibility to manipulate NKT-cell activity in inflammatory disorders through intervention to the adenosine-A2AR pathway. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Structure of the human hepatic triglyceride lipase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shengjian; Wong, D.M.; Chen, Sanhwan; Chan, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structure of the human hepatic triglyceride lipase gene was determined from multiple cosmid clones. All the exons, exon-intron junctions, and 845 bp of the 5' and 254 bp of the 3' flanking DNA were sequenced. Comparison of the exon sequences to three previously published cDNA sequences revealed differences in the sequence of the codons for residue 133, 193, 202, and 234 that may represent sequence polymorphisms. By primer extension, hepatic lipase mRNA initiates at an adenine 77 bases upstream of the translation initiation site. The hepatic lipase gene spans over 60 kb containing 9 exons and 8 introns, the latter being all located within the region encoding the mature protein. The exons are all of average size (118-234 bp). Exon 1 encodes the signal peptide, exon 4, a region that binds to the lipoprotein substrate, and exon 5, an evolutionarily highly conserved region of potential catalytic function, and exons 6 and 9 encode sequences rich in basic amino acids thought to be important in anchoring the enzyme to the endothelial surface by interacting with acidic domains of the surface glycosaminoglycans. The human lipoprotein lipase gene has been recently reported to have an identical exon-intron organization containing the analogous structural domains. The observations strongly support the common evolutionary origin of these two lipolytic enzymes

  6. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  7. Transfusion Related Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection in Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine retrospectively, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in relation to a background history of blood transfusion; through anti HCV antibody screening test, amongst adult sickle cell disease patients. Anti HCV antibody was tested for in the serum of 92 consecutively selected ...

  8. Transfusion associated hepatitis B virus infection among sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Transfusion of blood products is a recognised way of transmitting infections particularly viruses. The extent to which blood transfusion contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in transfused patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) has been found to be 20% in Lagos, Nigeria. Mamman in Zaria however ...

  9. Hepatic Metastases of Granulosa Cell Tumour of the Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I. Rodríguez García

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of metastatic granulosa cell tumour of the ovary is reported. Investigations revealed a secondary tumour in segment VI and VII of the liver. Right hepatic resection was performed. Microscopic findings revealed a tumour with histological features identical to that removed eleven years before.

  10. Hepatic stellate cells secreted hepatocyte growth factor contributes to the chemoresistance of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Yu

    Full Text Available As the main source of extracellular matrix proteins in tumor stroma, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs have a great impact on biological behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In the present study, we have investigated a mechanism whereby HSCs modulate the chemoresistance of hepatoma cells. We used human HSC line lx-2 and chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to investigate their effects on human HCC cell line Hep3B. The results showed that cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells was enhanced with LX-2 CM (cultured medium exposure in vitro as well as co-injection with LX-2 cells in null mice. Meanwhile, in presence of LX-2 CM, Hep3B cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and upregulation of cancer stem cell (CSC -like properties. Besides, LX-2 cells synthesized and secreted hepatic growth factor (HGF into the CM. HGF receptor tyrosine kinase mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (Met was activated in Hep3B cells after LX-2 CM exposure. The HGF level of LX-2 CM could be effectively reduced by using HGF neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, depletion of HGF in LX-2 CM abolished its effects on activation of Met as well as promotion of the EMT, CSC-like features and cisplatin resistance in Hep3B cells. Collectively, secreting HGF into tumor milieu, HSCs may decrease hepatoma cells sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting EMT and CSC-like features via HGF/Met signaling.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Satoshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kakinuma, Sei, E-mail: skakinuma.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department for Liver Disease Control, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kamiya, Akihide [Institute of Innovative Science and Technology, Tokai University, Isehara (Japan); Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Asahina, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department for Liver Disease Control, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Koshikawa, Naohiko [Division of Cancer Cell Research, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Seiki, Motoharu [Medical School, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14–deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14–deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14–deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14–deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14–mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Loss of MMP-14 delayed formation of bile duct-like structures in perinatal liver. • Overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatobalsts promoted the biliary formation in vitro. • Loss of MMP-14 promoted hepatocyte maturation of hepatoblasts in vivo. • MMP-14–mediated signaling regulates terminal differentiation of

  12. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zan, Yanlu [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yuxia, E-mail: yzhang@wehi.edu.au [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Tien, Po, E-mail: tienpo@sun.im.ac.cn [Center for Molecular Virology, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  13. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs

  14. TIM-1 Promotes Hepatitis C Virus Cell Attachment and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Qiao, Luhua; Hou, Zhouhua; Luo, Guangxiang

    2017-01-15

    Human TIM and TAM family proteins were recently found to serve as phosphatidylserine (PS) receptors which promote infections by many different viruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus, and Zika virus. In the present study, we provide substantial evidence demonstrating that TIM-1 is important for efficient infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV). The knockdown of TIM-1 expression significantly reduced HCV infection but not HCV RNA replication. Likewise, TIM-1 knockout in Huh-7.5 cells remarkably lowered HCV cell attachment and subsequent HCV infection. More significantly, the impairment of HCV infection in the TIM-1 knockout cells could be restored completely by ectopic expression of TIM-1 but not TIM-3 or TIM-4. Additionally, HCV infection and cell attachment were inhibited by PS but not by phosphatidylcholine (PC), demonstrating that TIM-1-mediated enhancement of HCV infection is PS dependent. The exposure of PS on the HCV envelope was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of HCV particles with a PS-specific monoclonal antibody. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TIM-1 promotes HCV infection by serving as an attachment receptor for binding to PS exposed on the HCV envelope. TIM family proteins were recently found to enhance infections by many different viruses, including several members of the Flaviviridae family. However, their importance in HCV infection has not previously been examined experimentally. The TIM family proteins include three members in humans: TIM-1, TIM-3, and TIM-4. The findings derived from our studies demonstrate that TIM-1, but not TIM-3 or TIM-4, promotes HCV infection by functioning as an HCV attachment factor. Knockout of the TIM-1 gene resulted in a remarkable reduction of HCV cell attachment and infection. PS-containing liposomes blocked HCV cell attachment and subsequent HCV infection. HCV particles could also be precipitated with a PS-specific monoclonal antibody. These findings suggest that TIM-1

  15. Immunohistochemical characterisation of the hepatic stem cell niche in feline hepatic lipidosis: a preliminary morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtolina, Chiara; Robben, Joris H; Favier, Robert P; Rothuizen, Jan; Grinwis, Guy Cm; Schotanus, Baukje A; Penning, Louis C

    2018-05-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the cellular and stromal components of the hepatic progenitor cell niche in feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL). Methods Immunohistochemical staining for the progenitor/bile duct marker (K19), activated Kupffer cells (MAC387), myofibroblasts (alpha-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) and the extracellular matrix component laminin were used on seven liver biopsies of cats with FHL and three healthy cats. Double immunofluorescence stainings were performed to investigate co-localisation of different cell types in the hepatic progenitor cell (HPC) niche. Results HPCs, Kupffer cells, myofibroblasts and laminin deposition were observed in the liver samples of FHL, although with variability in the expression and positivity of the different immunostainings between different samples. When compared with the unaffected cats where K19 positivity and minimal α-SMA and laminin positivity were seen mainly in the portal area, in the majority of FHL samples K19 and α-SMA-positive cells and laminin positivity were seen also in the periportal and parenchymatous area. MAC387-positive cells were present throughout the parenchyma. Conclusions and relevance This is a preliminary morphological study to describe the activation and co-localisation of components of the HPC niche in FHL. Although the HPC niche in FHL resembles that described in hepatopathies in dogs and in feline lymphocytic cholangitis, the expression of K19, α-SMA, MAC387 and lamin is more variable in FHL, and a common pattern of activation could not be established. Nevertheless, when HPCs were activated, a spatial association between HPCs and their niche could be demonstrated.

  16. Internalisation of hepatitis C virus core protein by human conjunctival fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmy, A R; Malathi, J; Madhavan, H N; Bhaskar, S; Iyer, G K

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins can mediate innate immune response and inflammation in conjunctival fibroblasts which contributes to the pathology of dry eye condition associated with chronic HCV infection. The present study investigates the phagocytic potential of human conjunctival fibroblasts (HCFj) for HCV core protein. HCFj cells were incubated with HCV core antigen for different periods of time, and fluorescent micrographs were taken to observe protein internalisation. HCFj cells were capable of internalising HCV core antigen within 1 h; this gives an insight into another molecular mechanism which may contribute towards HCV-associated conjunctival inflammation.

  17. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  18. Carcinogen-Induced Hepatic Tumors in KLF6+/- Mice Recapitulate Aggressive Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Associated with p53 Pathway Deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarocchi, Mirko; Hannivoort, Rebekka; Hoshida, Yujin; Lee, Ursula E.; Vetter, Diana; Narla, Goutham; Villanueva, Augusto; Oren, Moshe; Llovet, Josep M.; Friedman, Scott L.

    Inactivation of KLF6 is common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, thereby abrogating its normal antiproliferative activity in liver cells. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of KLF6 depletion on human HCC and experimental

  19. Andrographolide exerts anti-hepatitis C virus activity by up-regulating haeme oxygenase-1 via the p38 MAPK/Nrf2 pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Young, Kung-Chia; Sun, Hung-Yu; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Chen, Wei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone extracted from Andrographis paniculata, and to identify the signalling pathway involved in its antiviral action. Using HCV replicon and HCVcc infectious systems, we identified anti-HCV activity of andrographolide by measuring protein and RNA levels. A reporter activity assay was used to determine transcriptional regulation of anti-HCV agents. A specific inhibitor and short hairpin RNAs were used to investigate the mechanism responsible for the effect of andrographolide on HCV replication. In HCV replicon and HCVcc infectious systems, andrographolide time- and dose-dependently suppressed HCV replication. When combined with IFN-α, an inhibitor targeting HCV NS3/4A protease (telaprevir), or NS5B polymerase (PSI-7977), andrographolide exhibited a significant synergistic effect. Andrographolide up-regulated the expression of haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), leading to increased amounts of its metabolite biliverdin, which was found to suppress HCV replication by promoting the antiviral IFN responses and inhibiting NS3/4A protease activity. Significantly, these antiviral effects were attenuated by an HO-1-specific inhibitor or HO-1 gene knockdown, indicating that HO-1 contributed to the anti-HCV activity of andrographolide. Andrographolide activated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which stimulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated HO-1 expression, and this was found to be associated with its anti-HCV activity. Our results demonstrate that andrographolide has the potential to control HCV replication and suggest that targeting the Nrf2-HO-1 signalling pathway might be a promising strategy for drug development. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Evaluation of hepatic hemangioma by Tc-99 m red blood cell hepatic blood pool scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Myung Hee

    2005-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of the liver, with a prevalence estimated as high as 7%. Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) hepatic blood pool scan with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is extremely useful for the confirmation or exclusion of hepatic hemangiomas. The classic finding of absent or decreased perfusion and increased blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool mismatch') is the key diagnostic element in the diagnosis of hemangiomas. The combination of early arterial flow and delayed blood pooling ('perfusion/blood pool match') is shown uncommonly. In giant hemangioma, filling with radioactivity appears first in the periphery, with progressive central fill-in on sequential RBC blood pool scan. However, the reverse filling pattern, which begins first in the center with progressive peripheral filling, is also rarely seen. Studies with false-positive blood pooling have been reported infrequently in nonhemangiomas, including hemangiosarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic adenoma, and metastatic carcinomas (adenocarcinma of the colon, small cell carcinoma of the lung, neruroendocrine carcinoma). False-negative results have been also reported rarely except for small hemagniomas that are below the limits of spatial resolution of gamma camera

  1. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  2. Epirubicin-adsorbed nanodiamonds kill chemoresistant hepatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Low, Xinyi Casuarine; Hou, Weixin; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Toh, Tan Boon; Mohd Abdul Rashid, Masturah; Ho, Dean; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2014-12-23

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Epirubicin to nanodiamonds creates a rapidly synthesized and stable nanodiamond-drug complex that promotes endocytic uptake and enhanced tumor cell retention. These attributes mediate the effective killing of both cancer stem cells and noncancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Enhanced treatment of both tumor cell populations results in an improved impairment of secondary tumor formation in vivo compared with treatment by unmodified chemotherapeutics. On the basis of these results, nanodiamond-mediated drug delivery may serve as a powerful method for overcoming chemoresistance in cancer stem cells and markedly improving overall treatment against hepatic cancers.

  3. Gene expression data from acetaminophen-induced toxicity in human hepatic in vitro systems and clinical liver samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robim M. Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data set is composed of transcriptomics analyses of (i liver samples from patients suffering from acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF and (ii hepatic cell systems exposed to acetaminophen and their respective controls. The in vitro systems include widely employed cell lines i.e. HepaRG and HepG2 cells as well as a novel stem cell-derived model i.e. human skin-precursors-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hSKP-HPC. Data from primary human hepatocytes was also added to the data set “Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database” (Igarashi et al., 2015 [1]. Changes in gene expression due to acetaminophen intoxication as well as comparative information between human in vivo and in vitro samples are provided. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GEO: GSE74000. The provided data is used to evaluate the predictive capacity of each hepatic in vitro system and can be directly compared with large-scale publically available toxicogenomics databases. Further interpretation and discussion of these data feature in the corresponding research article “Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems” (Rodrigues et al., 2016 [2].

  4. Inhibitory effect of tanshinone IIA on rat hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Anti-inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB pathways in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs is one therapeutic approach to hepatic fibrosis. Tanshinone IIA (C19H18O3, Tan IIA is a lipophilic diterpene isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, with reported anti-inflammatory activity. We tested whether Tan IIA could inhibit HSC activation.The cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6 was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS (100 ng/ml. Cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. HSC-T6 cells were pretreated with Tan IIA (1, 3 and 10 µM, then induced by LPS (100 ng/ml. NF-κB activity was evaluated by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Western blotting analysis was performed to measure NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38. Cell chemotaxis was assessed by both wound-healing assay and trans-well invasion assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect gene expression in HSC-T6 cells.All concentrations of drugs showed no cytotoxicity against HSC-T6 cells. LPS stimulated NF-κB luciferase activities, nuclear translocation of NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of ERK, JNK and p38, all of which were suppressed by Tan IIA. In addition, Tan IIA significantly inhibited LPS-induced HSCs chemotaxis, in both wound-healing and trans-well invasion assays. Moreover, Tan IIA attenuated LPS-induced mRNA expressions of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, iNOS, and α-SMA in HSC-T6 cells.Our results demonstrated that Tan IIA decreased LPS-induced HSC activation.

  5. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Silva

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV, the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus and hare (Lepus europaeus genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  6. Immunodetection of hepatic stellate cells in dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Natália Cassaro; Mo Reira, Pamela Rodrigues Reina; Bertolo, Paulo Henrique Leal; Gava, Fábio Nelson; Vasconcelos, Rosemeri de Oliveira

    2018-06-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC), or Ito cells, store vitamin A when at rest but undergo phenotypic changes in situations of liver injury, which may induce fibrosis, and they may participate in the immune response in the liver. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of HSC in the livers of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Twenty-eight livers from dogs infected with VL that were living in an area endemic for the disease were evaluated, among which 13 were asymptomatic (A) and 15 were symptomatic (S). A control group (C) was formed by five dogs from an area that was not endemic for VL. These organs were subjected to histopathological analysis (Masson's trichrome for fibrosis) and immunohistochemical analysis (Leishmania, smooth-muscle α-actin and TGF-β). In the livers from the symptomatic dogs, a moderate to severe granulomatous inflammatory reaction was observed in the capsule and in the portal, centrilobular and intralobular regions. In the asymptomatic dogs, there was slight to moderate presence of granulomas, and these were even absent in some dogs. The intensity of hepatic fibrosis was predominantly low in the infected dogs (A and S), and fibrosis was absent in the control group. The immunomarking of HSC in the infected groups (A and S) differed significantly (P = 0.0153) from that of the control group. The symptomatic dogs presented the largest number of positive cells. This group also presented a larger number of parasitized macrophages, but did not differ statistically from the asymptomatic group (P > 0.05). The cytokine TGF-β was only detected at low levels, and only in the infected animals, but this did not differ from the control group. Immunomarking for HSC was observed mainly in the nuclei of cells present in the hepatic granulomas of symptomatic dogs and in the sinusoids of the asymptomatic dogs. It was concluded that in the livers of dogs with VL, the HSC are activated and participate in the hepatic response to the

  7. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iorio, Alfonso; Marchesini, Emanuela; Awad, Tahany

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).......Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C may be less effective if patients are co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)....

  8. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  10. Human Interferon Alpha2a as Anti Hepatitis B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih A. Ningrum

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver mainly caused by hepatitis viruses. There are 5 different types of hepatitis based on the infecting virus; A, B, C, D and E. Hepatitis B and C are chronic diseases that potentially develop into hepatocarcinoma and cirrhosis on unappropriate treatments. World Health Organization (WHO stated that currently 350 million people worldwide are living with chronic hepatitis B and 150 million people are living with Hepatitis C. The mortality rate in the world due to hepatitis is about 1.5 million people per year. The human interferon alpha2a (hIFNα2a is a therapeutic protein used as therapeutic protein for hepatitis B and C. This review discusses the hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viruses, mechanisms of hIFNα2a as antivirus through signal transduction pathway and improvement of hIFNα2a properties by protein modification. The application of recombinant hIFNα2a (rhIFNα2a in the treatment of hepatitis B and C that recommended by European Association for The Study of Liver (EASL and the viral resistance mechanism are also included. The status of hepatitis B and C and the development of rhIFNα2a is also described as well.

  11. Hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus and metabolic syndrome: interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Significant concerns have been raised about the metabolic effects of antiretroviral medication, including the classic triad of dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance (IR) and characteristic alterations in fat distribution (lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy). Co-infection with hepatitis C appears to exacerbate IR, reduce serum lipids and induce prothrombotic changes in the treated human immunodeficiency virus patient. The effects of co-infection are complex. While combination antiretroviral therapy has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events through promotion of dyslipidaemia, IR and fat redistribution, co-infection exacerbates IR while reducing serum lipids. Co-infection also promotes a prothrombotic state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation, which may enhance risk for cardiovascular disease. Consideration must be given to selection of appropriate treatment regimens and timing of therapy in co-infected patients to minimize metabolic derangements and, ultimately, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  12. Clear cell HCC: an imitator of hepatic adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incedayi, M.; Sivrioglu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A 60-year old male patient was complaining of a postprandial heartburn and of abdominal distension. Physical examination was normal except for nodular, painless hepatomegaly. Ultrasonographic examination of the liver showed diffuse increased echogenicity and coarse echotexture. A large mixed echogenic mass is seen in the right hepatic lobe. Computerized tomography showed heterogeneously hypodense mass lesions with fatty change on non-contrast scans and enhance heterogeneously on both arterial phase and venous phase postcontrast scans. Following true-cut biopsy, it was ascertained to be a clear cell HCC. Clear cell HCC may include large fatty areas and this is often misdiagnosed to be an adenoma. Clear cell HCC is characterized by high female prevalence, high rate of association with liver cirrhosis and has no significant difference in prognosis compared with non-clear cell HCC

  13. Hepatic differentiation of human iPSCs in different 3D models: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Florian; Freyer, Nora; Brzeszczynska, Joanna; Knöspel, Fanny; Armstrong, Lyle; Lako, Majlinda; Greuel, Selina; Damm, Georg; Ludwig-Schwellinger, Eva; Deschl, Ulrich; Ross, James A; Beilmann, Mario; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source from which to derive distinct somatic cell types for in vitro or clinical use. Existent protocols for hepatic differentiation of hiPSCs are primarily based on 2D cultivation of the cells. In the present study, the authors investigated the generation of hiPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells using two different 3D culture systems: A 3D scaffold-free microspheroid culture system and a 3D hollow-fiber perfusion bioreactor. The differentiation outcome in these 3D systems was compared with that in conventional 2D cultures, using primary human hepatocytes as a control. The evaluation was made based on specific mRNA expression, protein secretion, antigen expression and metabolic activity. The expression of α-fetoprotein was lower, while cytochrome P450 1A2 or 3A4 activities were higher in the 3D culture systems as compared with the 2D differentiation system. Cells differentiated in the 3D bioreactor showed an increased expression of albumin and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, as well as secretion of α-1-antitrypsin as compared with the 2D differentiation system, suggesting a higher degree of maturation. In contrast, the 3D scaffold-free microspheroid culture provides an easy and robust method to generate spheroids of a defined size for screening applications, while the bioreactor culture model provides an instrument for complex investigations under physiological-like conditions. In conclusion, the present study introduces two 3D culture systems for stem cell derived hepatic differentiation each demonstrating advantages for individual applications as well as benefits in comparison with 2D cultures.

  14. Malignant hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa)- Case report and a brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhirup, B.; Kaushal, K.; Ganesh, N.; Sanket, M.

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms which can arise from almost any location in the body. Diagnosing them pre-operatively is difficult as they mimic features of other hepatic neoplasms including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), fibrolamellar HCC, and focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) among others. The unique feature of these tumors is the coexpression of muscle and melanocytic markers. These are identified immunohistochemically by the expression of Human Melanin Black-45 (HMB-45), Melan-A and Smooth Muscle Antigen (SMA) which are seen in the majority of tumors. The liver is uncommonly associated with a PEComa and the approach to a patient with hepatic PEComa is not well described. There is no consensus regarding the neo-adjuvant/adjuvant therapy in these patients. The natural history of this condition is not well documented making it an unpredictable disease. Here we have discussed a case and reviewed the literature concerning these rare tumors.

  15. Radioimmunoassay and some properties of human antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurath, A R; Szmuness, W; Stevens, C E; Strick, N; Harley, E J [New York Blood Center, N.Y. (USA)

    1978-03-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBsub(c)) is described. Polystyrene beads coated with anti-HBsub(c), hepatitis B core antigen prepared from pooled sera of humans infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and /sup 125/I-labelled anti-HBsub(c) were used for the test. Distinct patterns of development and changes of anti-HBsub(c) and their immunological properties are all related to variations of other markers specific for HBV infections. Knowledge concerning the detailed features of the immune response to hepatitis B core antigen may provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of HBV infections.

  16. Recent Advances in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dubuisson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 170 million patients worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. Prevalence rates range from 0.5% in Northern European countries to 28% in some areas of Egypt. HCV is hepatotropic, and in many countries chronic hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver disease including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV persists in 50–85% of infected patients, and once chronic infection is established, spontaneous clearance is rare. HCV is a member of the Flaviviridae family, in which it forms its own genus. Many lines of evidence suggest that the HCV life cycle displays many differences to that of other Flaviviridae family members. Some of these differences may be due to the close interaction of HCV with its host’s lipid and particular triglyceride metabolism in the liver, which may explain why the virus can be found in association with lipoproteins in serum of infected patients. This review focuses on the molecular events underlying the HCV cell entry process and the respective roles of cellular co-factors that have been implied in these events. These include, among others, the lipoprotein receptors low density lipoprotein receptor and scavenger receptor BI, the tight junction factors occludin and claudin-1 as well as the tetraspanin CD81. We discuss the roles of these cellular factors in HCV cell entry and how association of HCV with lipoproteins may modulate the cell entry process.

  17. Apamin suppresses biliary fibrosis and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Yeon; An, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Woon-Hae; Park, Yoon-Yub; Park, Kyung Duck; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2017-05-01

    Cholestatic liver disease is characterized by the progressive destruction of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) followed by fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver failure. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and portal fibroblasts are the major cellular effectors of enhanced collagen deposition in biliary fibrosis. Apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide neurotoxin found in apitoxin (bee venom), is known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels and prevent carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to ascertain whether apamin inhibits biliary fibrosis and the proliferation of HSCs. Cholestatic liver fibrosis was established in mouse models with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) feeding. Cellular assays were performed on HSC-T6 cells (rat immortalized HSCs). DDC feeding led to increased hepatic damage and proinflammtory cytokine levels. Notably, apamin treatment resulted in decreased liver injury and proinflammatory cytokine levels. Moreover, apamin suppressed the deposition of collagen, proliferation of BECs and expression of fibrogenic genes in the DDC-fed mice. In HSCs, apamin suppressed activation of HSCs by inhibiting the Smad signaling pathway. These data suggest that apamin may be a potential therapeutic target in cholestatic liver disease.

  18. Committee Opinion No. 655 Summary: Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    To prevent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, it is important that health care providers adhere to standard precautions, follow fundamental infection-control principles, and use appropriate procedural techniques. All obstetrician-gynecologists who provide clinical care should receive the hepatitis B virus vaccine series. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has established guidelines for the management of health care providers who are infected with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The guidelines categorize representative obstetric and gynecologic procedures according to level of risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission and include recommendations for health care provider clinical activities, based on these categories and viral burden. It is important to note that when no restrictions are recommended, careful supervision should be carried out as highlighted. These recommendations provide a framework within which to consider such cases; however, each case should be independently considered in context by the expert review panel.

  19. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipids induce hepatic NKT cells deficiency through activation-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongfang Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD through alternation of liver innate immune response. AIMS: The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. METHODS: Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. RESULTS: High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. CONCLUSION: High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD.

  20. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipids induce hepatic NKT cells deficiency through activation-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tongfang; Sui, Yongheng; Lian, Min; Li, Zhiping; Hua, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Dietary lipids play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through alternation of liver innate immune response. The present study was to investigate the effect of lipid on Kupffer cells phenotype and function in vivo and in vitro. And further to investigate the impact of lipid on ability of Kupffer cell lipid antigen presentation to activate NKT cells. Wild type male C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal or high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis, Kupffer cell abundance, NKT cell number and cytokine gene expression were evaluated. Antigen presentation assay was performed with Kupffer cells treated with certain fatty acids in vitro and co-cultured with NKT cells. High-fat diet induced hepatosteatosis, significantly increased Kupffer cells and decreased hepatic NKT cells. Lipid treatment in vivo or in vitro induced increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines gene expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in Kupffer cells. Kupffer cells expressed high levels of CD1d on cell surface and only presented exogenous lipid antigen to activate NKT cells. Ability of Kupffer cells to present antigen and activate NKT cells was enhanced after lipid treatment. In addition, pro-inflammatory activated Kupffer cells by lipid treatment induced hepatic NKT cells activation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. High-fat diet increase Kupffer cells number and induce their pro-inflammatory status. Pro-inflammatory activated Kupfffer cells by lipid promote hepatic NKT cell over-activation and cell death, which lead to further hepatic NKT cell deficiency in the development of NAFLD.

  1. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies....... In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV...... genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host...

  2. Human innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune responses. As such, ILCs make up interesting therapeutic targets for several diseases. In patients with allergy and asthma, group 2 innate lymphoid cells produce high amounts of IL-5 and IL-13, thereby contributing to type 2-mediated inflammation. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells are implicated in intestinal homeostasis and psoriasis pathology through abundant IL-22 production, whereas group 1 innate lymphoid cells are accumulated in chronic inflammation of the gut (inflammatory bowel disease) and lung (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), where they contribute to IFN-γ-mediated inflammation. Although the ontogeny of mouse ILCs is slowly unraveling, the development of human ILCs is far from understood. In addition, the growing complexity of the human ILC family in terms of previously unrecognized functional heterogeneity and plasticity has generated confusion within the field. Here we provide an updated view on the function and plasticity of human ILCs in tissue homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient Generation of Functional Hepatocytes From Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by HNF4α Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Kazuo; Inamura, Mitsuru; Kawabata, Kenji; Katayama, Kazufumi; Higuchi, Maiko; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Nonaka, Aki; Sakurai, Fuminori; Hayakawa, Takao; Kusuda Furue, Miho; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are expected to be a useful source of cells drug discovery. Although we recently reported that hepatic commitment is promoted by transduction of SOX17 and HEX into human ESC- and iPSC-derived cells, these hepatocyte-like cells were not sufficiently mature for drug screening. To promote hepatic maturation, we utilized transduction of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) gene, which is kn...

  4. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Interferon gamma peptidomimetic targeted to hepatic stellate cells ameliorates acute and chronic liver fibrosis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai; De Ruiter, Marieke; Poelstra, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of pro-fibrotic activities of these cells might lead to an effective therapy for this disease. Among the potent antifibrotics, interferon gamma (IFN gamma), a proinflammatory

  6. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  7. Interferon gamma peptidomimetic targeted to hepatic stellate cells ameliorates acute and chronic liver fibrosis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai; de Ruiter, Marieke; Poelstra, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of pro-fibrotic activities of these cells might lead to an effective therapy for this disease. Among the potent anti-fibrotics, interferon gamma (IFNγ), a proinflammatory cytokine, is

  8. Peroxisomal abnormalities in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouwer, Femke C C; Koster, Janet; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R

    2017-04-01

    The immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) cell line is increasingly used for studies related to liver metabolism, including hepatic glucose, lipid, lipoprotein and triglyceride metabolism, and the effect of therapeutic interventions. To determine whether the IHH cell line is a good model to investigate hepatic peroxisomal metabolism, we measured several peroxisomal parameters in IHH cells and, for comparison, HepG2 cells and primary skin fibroblasts. This revealed a marked plasmalogen deficiency and a deficient fatty acid α-oxidation in the IHH cells, due to a defect of PEX7, a cytosolic receptor protein required for peroxisomal import of a subset of peroxisomal proteins. These abnormalities have consequences for the lipid homeostasis of these cells and thus should be taken into account for the interpretation of data previously generated by using this cell line and when considering using this cell line for future research.

  9. Hepatic stellate cells lack AP-1 responsiveness to electrophiles and phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichard, John F.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Stellate cell profibrotic gene induction and transdifferentiation are central events in liver fibrosis. Oxidative stress has been implicated as an activator of the transcription factors Nrf2 and AP-1 through shared kinase signaling pathways that also purportedly contribute to stellate cell activation. The present study examined the role of oxidative stress in ARE- and TRE-regulated gene induction in isolated hepatic stellate cells. Using a portion of the human Nqo1 promoter consisting of an ARE imbedded TRE, it was demonstrated that while the ARE was responsible for mediating inducible gene expression in response to the electrophiles 4-HNE and tBHQ, the TRE was refractory to induction by either electrophiles or PMA. It was demonstrated that stellate cells possess nuclear TRE-binding proteins that were identified as JunB, JunD, Fra1, and Fra2, which were unaffected by either electrophiles or PMA treatment. This report demonstrates that, in contrast to the ARE, the TRE and its binding cognate AP-1 did not mediate independent gene induction in hepatic stellate cells. This observation is significant given the presumed importance attributed to AP-1 in mediating profibrogenic gene expression

  10. Chemical and biological insights into uranium-induced apoptosis of rat hepatic cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; You, Yong [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); Du, Ke-Jie [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); Fang, Zhen [Anhui Normal University, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Wuhu (China); Wen, Ge-Bo [University of South China, College of Hunan Province, Key Laboratory of Tumor Cellular and Molecular Pathology, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China); Lin, Ying-Wu [University of South China, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Laboratory of Protein Structure and Function, Hengyang (China)

    2015-05-15

    Uranium release into the environment is a threat to human health, and the mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by uranium are not well-understood. To improve our understanding in this respect, we herein evaluated the effects of uranium exposure on normal rat hepatic BRL cells. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope analysis, uranyl nitrate was found to be transformed into uranyl phosphate particles in the medium and taken up by BRL cells in an endocytotic uptake manner, which presumably initiates apoptosis of the cell, although soluble uranyl ion may also be toxic. The apoptosis of BRL cells upon uranium exposure was also confirmed by both the acridine orange and ethidium bromide double staining assay and the Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining assay. Further studies revealed that uranium induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the uranium-induced apoptosis was found to be associated with the activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, indicating both a mitochondria-dependent signaling pathway and a death receptor pathway by a crosstalk. This study provides new chemical and biological insights into the mechanism of uranium toxicity toward hepatic cells, which will help seek approaches for biological remediation of uranium. (orig.)

  11. Hepatitis B virus evasion from cGAS sensing in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Eloi R; Yim, Seung-Ae; Heydmann, Laura; El Saghire, Houssein; Bach, Charlotte; Turon-Lagot, Vincent; Mailly, Laurent; Durand, Sarah C; Lucifora, Julie; Durantel, David; Pessaux, Patrick; Manel, Nicolas; Hirsch, Ivan; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Pochet, Nathalie; Schuster, Catherine; Baumert, Thomas F

    2018-04-20

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and cancer worldwide. The mechanisms of viral genome sensing and the evasion of innate immune responses by HBV infection are still poorly understood. Recently, the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) was identified as a DNA sensor. In this study, we aimed to investigate the functional role of cGAS in sensing of HBV infection and elucidate the mechanisms of viral evasion. We performed functional studies including loss- and gain-of-function experiments combined with cGAS effector gene expression profiling in an infectious cell culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HBV-infected human liver chimeric mice. Here we show that cGAS is expressed in the human liver, primary human hepatocytes and human liver chimeric mice. While naked relaxed-circular HBV DNA is sensed in a cGAS-dependent manner in hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocytes, host cell recognition of viral nucleic acids is abolished during HBV infection, suggesting escape from sensing, likely during packaging of the genome into the viral capsid. While the hepatocyte cGAS pathway is functionally active, as shown by reduction of viral cccDNA levels in gain-of-function studies, HBV infection suppressed cGAS expression and function in cell culture models and humanized mice. HBV exploits multiple strategies to evade sensing and antiviral activity of cGAS and its effector pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Using Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) As Surrogate for Human Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This test is designed to validate virucidal effectiveness claims for a product to be registered as a virucide. It determines the potential of the test agent to disinfect hard surfaces contaminated with human Hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  13. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India

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    B.G. Nath

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21% of the non-human primate samples and three (75% human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05. No significant difference (p=0.86 was seen between male and female non-human primates

  14. Tracking virus-specific CD4+ T cells during and after acute hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Michaela Lucas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays.Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C.During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists.

  15. A hepatocellular carcinoma cell line producing mature hepatitis B viral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellig, Yakov; Almogy, Gidon; Galun, Eithan; Ketzinel-Gilad, Mali

    2004-01-01

    Current in vitro models for hepatitis B virus (HBV) are based on human hepatoblastoma cell lines transfected with HBV genome. The objective of this work was to develop an in vitro, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-based system supporting HBV full replication and producing mature viral particles. The FLC4 human HCC cell line was stably transfected with a plasmid carrying a head-to-tail dimer of the adwHBV genome. One of the clones, FLC4A10 II , exhibited prolonged expression of HBV, as was demonstrated by secreted levels of HBsAg, HBeAg, and HBV DNA in the culture medium of the growing cells. Furthermore, the cells produced HBV particles that were detected by a cesium chloride density gradient performed on the culture medium. Analysis by Southern blot revealed that HBV DNA has integrated into the FLC4A10 II cell genome. The presence of HBV in the FLC4A10 II cells did not cause alterations in cell morphology and the cells continued to resemble mature hepatocytes. They do exhibit a high mitotic activity. The new HBV stably transfected cell line, FLC4A10 II , can serve as an important tool for further exploration of HBV host-pathogen interaction, viral life cycle, and for assessing new antiviral agents

  16. An implantable vascularized protein gel construct that supports human fetal hepatoblast survival and infection by hepatitis C virus in mice.

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    Martha J Harding

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Widely accessible small animal models suitable for the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV in vivo are lacking, primarily because rodent hepatocytes cannot be productively infected and because human hepatocytes are not easily engrafted in immunodeficient mice.We report here on a novel approach for human hepatocyte engraftment that involves subcutaneous implantation of primary human fetal hepatoblasts (HFH within a vascularized rat collagen type I/human fibronectin (rCI/hFN gel containing Bcl-2-transduced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (Bcl-2-HUVEC in severe combined immunodeficient X beige (SCID/bg mice. Maturing hepatic epithelial cells in HFH/Bcl-2-HUVEC co-implants displayed endocytotic activity at the basolateral surface, canalicular microvilli and apical tight junctions between adjacent cells assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Some primary HFH, but not Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells, appeared to differentiate towards a cholangiocyte lineage within the gels, based on histological appearance and cytokeratin 7 (CK7 mRNA and protein expression. Levels of human albumin and hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha mRNA expression in gel implants and plasma human albumin levels in mice engrafted with HFH and Bcl-2-HUVEC were somewhat enhanced by including murine liver-like basement membrane (mLBM components and/or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-HUVEC within the gel matrix. Following ex vivo viral adsorption, both HFH/Bcl-2-HUVEC and Huh-7.5/Bcl-2-HUVEC co-implants sustained HCV Jc1 infection for at least 2 weeks in vivo, based on qRT-PCR and immunoelectron microscopic (IEM analyses of gel tissue.The system described here thus provides the basis for a simple and robust small animal model of HFH engraftment that is applicable to the study of HCV infections in vivo.

  17. Hepatitis A virus infection and hepatitis A vaccination in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Guan-Jhou; Lee, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Aristine; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Eng; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2017-05-28

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common infectious etiologies of acute hepatitis worldwide. The virus is known to be transmitted fecal-orally, resulting in symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. HAV can also be transmitted through oral-anal sex. Residents from regions of low endemicity for HAV infection often remain susceptible in their adulthood. Therefore, clustered HAV infections or outbreaks of acute hepatitis A among men who have sex with men and injecting drug users have been reported in countries of low endemicity for HAV infection. The duration of HAV viremia and stool shedding of HAV may be longer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals with acute hepatitis A. Current guidelines recommend HAV vaccination for individuals with increased risks of exposure to HAV (such as from injecting drug use, oral-anal sex, travel to or residence in endemic areas, frequent clotting factor or blood transfusions) or with increased risks of fulminant disease (such as those with chronic hepatitis). The seroconversion rates following the recommended standard adult dosing schedule (2 doses of HAVRIX 1440 U or VAQTA 50 U administered 6-12 mo apart) are lower among HIV-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals. While the response rates may be augmented by adding a booster dose at week 4 sandwiched between the first dose and the 6-mo dose, the need of booster vaccination remain less clear among HIV-positive individuals who have lost anti-HAV antibodies.

  18. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human fascioliasis: MR imaging findings of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevikol, Can; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku; Kabaalioglu, Adnan; Apaydin, Ali; Lueleci, Ersin; Saba, Rabin

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to describe MR imaging findings of liver lesions in human fascioliasis. The MR imaging of the liver was performed in 29 patients with fascioliasis. Seventeen patients were women and 12 were men, with a mean age of 47.5 years (age range 17-75 years). Hepatic lesions were grouped into five types based on their signal characteristics. Three patients had normal imaging findings. One or more lesions were observed in the other 26 patients. The lesion types and the frequency of appearances were as follows: hyperintensity of the liver capsule on T2-weighted images (n=16, 55.2%); ill-defined slightly hyperintense areas on T2-weighted images (n=18, 62.1%); lesions which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images (n=10, 34.5%); hypointense on T1-weighted images and centrally hypo- or hyperintense, surrounded by peripherally less hyperintense area on T2-weighted images (n=4, 13.8%); and hypointense foci or ill-defined hypointense areas on T1- and T2-weighted images (n=10, 34.5%). We describe the MR imaging features of the disease. Our findings may help the differential diagnosis in which fascioliasis should be added to the list. (orig.)

  20. IFNα gene/cell therapy curbs colorectal cancer colonization of the liver by acting on the hepatic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarinella, Mario; Monestiroli, Andrea; Escobar, Giulia; Fiocchi, Amleto; Tran, Ngoc Lan; Aiolfi, Roberto; Marra, Paolo; Esposito, Antonio; Cipriani, Federica; Aldrighetti, Luca; Iannacone, Matteo; Naldini, Luigi; Guidotti, Luca G; Sitia, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) metastatic dissemination to the liver is one of the most life-threatening malignancies in humans and represents the leading cause of CRC-related mortality. Herein, we adopted a gene transfer strategy into mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to generate immune-competent mice in which TEMs-a subset of Tie2(+) monocytes/macrophages found at peritumoral sites-express interferon-alpha (IFNα), a pleiotropic cytokine with anti-tumor effects. Utilizing this strategy in mouse models of CRC liver metastasis, we show that TEMs accumulate in the proximity of hepatic metastatic areas and that TEM-mediated delivery of IFNα inhibits tumor growth when administered prior to metastasis challenge as well as on established hepatic lesions, improving overall survival. Further analyses unveiled that local delivery of IFNα does not inhibit homing but limits the early phases of hepatic CRC cell expansion by acting on the radio-resistant hepatic microenvironment. TEM-mediated IFNα expression was not associated with systemic side effects, hematopoietic toxicity, or inability to respond to a virus challenge. Along with the notion that TEMs were detected in the proximity of CRC metastases in human livers, these results raise the possibility to employ similar gene/cell therapies as tumor site-specific drug-delivery strategies in patients with CRC. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. 18F-FAC PET selectively images hepatic infiltrating CD4 and CD8 T cells in a mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Jessica R; Chen, Bao Ying; Wong, Alicia; Cheng, Donghui; Van Arnam, John S; Witte, Owen N; Clark, Peter M

    2018-04-26

    Immune cell-mediated attack on the liver is a defining feature of autoimmune hepatitis and hepatic allograft rejection. Despite an assortment of diagnostic tools, invasive biopsies remain the only method for identifying immune cells in the liver. We evaluated whether PET imaging with radiotracers that quantify immune activation ( 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FAC) and hepatocyte biology ( 18 F-DFA) can visualize and quantify hepatic infiltrating immune cells and hepatocyte inflammation, respectively, in a preclinical model of autoimmune hepatitis. Methods: Mice treated with Concanavalin A (ConA) to induce a model of autoimmune hepatitis or vehicle were imaged with 18 F-FDG, 18 F-FAC, and 18 F-DFA PET. Immunohistochemistry, digital autoradiography, and ex vivo accumulation assays were used to localize areas of altered radiotracer accumulation in the liver. For comparison, mice treated with an adenovirus to induce a viral hepatitis or vehicle were imaged with 18 F-FDG, 18 F-FAC, and 18 F-DFA PET. 18 F-FAC PET was performed on mice treated with ConA, and vehicle or dexamethasone. Biopsy samples of patients suffering from autoimmune hepatitis were immunostained for deoxycytidine kinase (dCK). Results: Hepatic accumulation of 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FAC was 173% and 61% higher, respectively, and hepatic accumulation of 18 F-DFA was 41% lower in a mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis compared to control mice. Increased hepatic 18 F-FDG accumulation was localized to infiltrating leukocytes and inflamed sinusoidal endothelial cells, increased hepatic 18 F-FAC accumulation was concentrated in infiltrating CD4 and CD8 cells, and decreased hepatic 18 F-DFA accumulation was apparent in hepatocytes throughout the liver. In contrast, viral hepatitis increased hepatic 18 F-FDG accumulation by 109% and decreased hepatic 18 F-DFA accumulation by 20% but had no effect on hepatic 18 F-FAC accumulation (non-significant 2% decrease). 18 F-FAC PET provided a non-invasive biomarker of the efficacy of

  2. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  3. Applications of human hepatitis B virus preS domain in bio- and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toita, Riki; Kawano, Takahito; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Murata, Masaharu

    2015-06-28

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a member of the family Hepadnaviridae, and causes acute and chronic infections of the liver. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) contains the large (L), middle (M), and small (S) surface proteins. The L protein consists of the S protein, preS1, and preS2. In HBsAg, the preS domain (preS1 + preS2) plays a key role in the infection of hepatocytic cells by HBV and has several immunogenic epitopes. Based on these characteristics of preS, several preS-based diagnostic and therapeutic materials and systems have been developed. PreS1-specific monoclonal antibodies (e.g., MA18/7 and KR127) can be used to inhibit HBV infection. A myristoylated preS1 peptide (amino acids 2-48) also inhibits the attachment of HBV to HepaRG cells, primary human hepatocytes, and primary tupaia hepatocytes. Antibodies and antigens related to the components of HBsAg, preS (preS1 + preS2), or preS1 can be available as diagnostic markers of acute and chronic HBV infections. Hepatocyte-targeting delivery systems for therapeutic molecules (drugs, genes, or proteins) are very important for increasing the clinical efficacy of these molecules and in reducing their adverse effects on other organs. The selective delivery of diagnostic molecules to target hepatocytic cells can also improve the efficiency of diagnosis. In addition to the full-length HBV vector, preS (preS1 + preS2), preS1, and preS1-derived fragments can be useful in hepatocyte-specific targeting. In this review, we discuss the literature concerning the applications of the HBV preS domain in bio- and nanotechnology.

  4. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Del Campo

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC while metformin (M and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the determination of trace elements in nucleic acids and histones in human leukaemic cells by activation analysis are reported. The Cr 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ and Sb 2+ content of DNA and RNA of leukaemic cells compared to that of lymphocytes from a patient with infectious mononucleosis or a normal donor are shown tabulated. Similar comparisons are shown for the same trace metal content of histones isolated from the same type of cells. It is felt that the results afford further interesting speculation that trace metals may be involved in the interactions between histones and DNA (especially at the binding sites of histones to DNA), which affect transcription characteristics. (U.K.)

  6. The induction of autoimmune hepatitis in the human leucocyte antigen-DR4 non-obese diabetic mice autoimmune hepatitis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, M; Xiao, X; Tai, N; Vijay, G M; Gülden, E; Beland, K; Lapierre, P; Alvarez, F; Hu, Z; Colle, I; Ma, Y; Wen, L

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease characterized by progressive inflammation, female preponderance and seropositivity for autoantibodies such as anti-smooth muscle actin and/or anti-nuclear, anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) in more than 80% of cases. AIH is linked strongly to several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, including human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3, -DR7 and -DR13. HLA-DR4 has the second strongest association with adult AIH, after HLA-DR3. We investigated the role of HLA-DR4 in the development of AIH by immunization of HLA-DR4 (DR4) transgenic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with DNA coding for human CYP2D6/FTCD fusion autoantigen. Immunization of DR4 mice leads to sustained mild liver injury, as assessed biochemically by elevated alanine aminotransferase, histologically by interface hepatitis, plasma cell infiltration and mild fibrosis and immunologically by the development of anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 antibodies. In addition, livers from DR4 mice had fewer regulatory T cells (T regs ), which had decreased programmed death (PD)-1 expression. Splenic T regs from these mice also showed impaired inhibitory capacity. Furthermore, DR4 expression enhanced the activation status of CD8 + T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in naive DR4 mice compared to naive wild-type (WT) NOD mice. Our results demonstrate that HLA-DR4 is a susceptibility factor for the development of AIH. Impaired suppressive function of T regs and reduced PD-1 expression may result in spontaneous activation of key immune cell subsets, such as antigen-presenting cells and CD8 + T effectors, facilitating the induction of AIH and persistent liver damage. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  7. The induction of autoimmune hepatitis in the human leucocyte antigen‐DR4 non‐obese diabetic mice autoimmune hepatitis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, M.; Xiao, X.; Tai, N.; Vijay, G. M.; Gülden, E.; Beland, K.; Lapierre, P.; Alvarez, F.; Hu, Z.; Colle, I.; Ma, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease characterized by progressive inflammation, female preponderance and seropositivity for autoantibodies such as anti‐smooth muscle actin and/or anti‐nuclear, anti‐liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti‐LKM1) and anti‐liver cytosol type 1 (anti‐LC1) in more than 80% of cases. AIH is linked strongly to several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, including human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐DR3, ‐DR7 and ‐DR13. HLA‐DR4 has the second strongest association with adult AIH, after HLA‐DR3. We investigated the role of HLA‐DR4 in the development of AIH by immunization of HLA‐DR4 (DR4) transgenic non‐obese diabetic (NOD) mice with DNA coding for human CYP2D6/FTCD fusion autoantigen. Immunization of DR4 mice leads to sustained mild liver injury, as assessed biochemically by elevated alanine aminotransferase, histologically by interface hepatitis, plasma cell infiltration and mild fibrosis and immunologically by the development of anti‐LKM1/anti‐LC1 antibodies. In addition, livers from DR4 mice had fewer regulatory T cells (Tregs), which had decreased programmed death (PD)‐1 expression. Splenic Tregs from these mice also showed impaired inhibitory capacity. Furthermore, DR4 expression enhanced the activation status of CD8+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells in naive DR4 mice compared to naive wild‐type (WT) NOD mice. Our results demonstrate that HLA‐DR4 is a susceptibility factor for the development of AIH. Impaired suppressive function of Tregs and reduced PD‐1 expression may result in spontaneous activation of key immune cell subsets, such as antigen‐presenting cells and CD8+ T effectors, facilitating the induction of AIH and persistent liver damage. PMID:27414259

  8. A murine model of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis: Xenoimmunization with human antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Vitozzi, Susana; Alvarez, Fernando

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by an immune-mediated injury of the hepatic parenchyma of unknown pathogenesis. Type 2 AIH is identified by the presence of anti-liver-kidney microsomes type 1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) autoantibodies. The current study shows that a murine model of AIH can be generated by DNA immunization against type 2 AIH self-antigens (P450 2D6 and formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase). A pCMV plasmid containing the N-terminal region of mouse CTLA-4 and the antigenic region of human CYP2D6 (672-1,377 bp) and human formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD; 1,232-1,668 bp) was used for DNA immunization of C57BL/6 female mice. Immunized mice showed elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), with peaks at 4 and 7 months postinjection. Periportal, portal, and intralobular liver inflammatory infiltrates were observed at histology. Mainly CD4+ lymphocytes, but also CD8+ and B lymphocytes, were found in the liver. Cytotoxic-specific T cells were found in both the liver and spleen of these animals. Mice developed anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 antibodies of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) subclass, against specific mouse autoantigens. The ALT levels correlated with both the presence of anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 antibodies and the presence of liver necroinflammation. In conclusion, in mice, DNA immunization against human autoantigens breaks tolerance and induces an autoimmune liver disease. Molecular mimicry between foreign and self-antigens explains the liver injury. This model of AIH resembles human type 2 AIH and will be helpful for the study of its pathogenesis.

  9. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxia Xu

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health.Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010-2011. Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting.Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively. The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%, Emergency (1.71%, and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12% departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60-70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.During 2010-2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection increased (with

  10. Intra-Hepatic Depletion of Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Liver Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Fabian J; O'Keefe, Ashley C; Webb, Lauren M; Serti, Elisavet; Rivera, Elenita; Liang, T Jake; Ghany, Marc; Rehermann, Barbara

    2017-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis affects phenotypes of innate and adaptive immune cells. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are enriched in the liver as compared with the blood, respond to intra-hepatic cytokines, and (via the semi-invariant T-cell receptor) to bacteria translocated from the gut. Little is known about the role of MAIT cells in livers of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and their fate after antiviral therapy. We collected blood samples from 42 patients with chronic HCV infection who achieved a sustained virologic response after 12 weeks of treatment with sofosbuvir and velpatasvir. Mononuclear cells were isolated from blood before treatment, at weeks 4 and 12 during treatment, and 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Liver biopsies were collected from 37 of the patients prior to and at week 4 of treatment. Mononuclear cells from 56 blood donors and 10 livers that were not suitable for transplantation were used as controls. Liver samples were assessed histologically for inflammation and fibrosis. Mononuclear cells from liver and blood were studied by flow cytometry and analyzed for responses to cytokine and bacterial stimulation. The frequency of MAIT cells among T cells was significantly lower in blood and liver samples of patients with HCV infection than of controls (median, 1.31% vs 2.32% for blood samples, P = .0048; and median, 4.34% vs 13.40% for liver samples, P = .001). There was an inverse correlation between the frequency of MAIT cells in the liver and histologically determined levels of liver inflammation (r = -.5437, P = .0006) and fibrosis (r = -.5829, P = .0002). MAIT cells from the liver had higher levels of activation and cytotoxicity than MAIT cells from blood (P liver inflammation and MAIT cell activation and cytotoxicity, and increased the MAIT cell frequency among intra-hepatic but not blood T cells. The MAIT cell response to T-cell receptor-mediated stimulation did not change during the 12 weeks of

  11. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS: We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment......, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION: DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV...

  12. CD40 dependent exacerbation of immune mediated hepatitis by hepatic CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Manns, Michael P.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing mice. We studied hepatic MDSC in two murine models of immune mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of tumor bearing mice with Concanavalin A or α-Galactosylceramide resulted in increased ALT and AST serum levels in comparison to tumor free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC into naïve mice exacerbated Concanavalin A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells revealed a polarized pro-inflammatory gene signature after Concanavalin A treatment. An interferon gamma- dependent up-regulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells along with an up-regulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Concanavalin A treatment was observed. Concanavalin A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSC led to increased arginase activity upon Concanavalin A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40−/− tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased reactive oxygen species production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSC act as pro-inflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner. PMID:25616156

  13. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen impairs myeloid dendritic cell function: a possible immune escape mechanism of hepatitis B virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op den Brouw, Marjoleine L; Binda, Rekha S; van Roosmalen, Mark H; Protzer, Ulrike; Janssen, Harry L A; van der Molen, Renate G; Woltman, Andrea M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the result of an inadequate immune response towards the virus. Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) of patients with chronic HBV are impaired in their maturation and function, resulting in more tolerogenic rather than immunogenic responses, which may contribute to viral persistence. The mechanism responsible for altered mDC function remains unclear. The HBV-infected patients display large amounts of HBV particles and viral proteins in their circulation, especially the surface antigen HBsAg, which allows multiple interactions between the virus, its viral proteins and DC. To assess whether HBV directly influences mDC function, the effects of HBV and HBsAg on human mDC maturation and function were investigated in vitro. As already described for internalization of HBV by DC, the present study shows that peripheral blood-derived mDC of healthy controls also actively take up HBsAg in a time-dependent manner. Cytokine-induced maturation in the presence of HBV or HBsAg resulted in a significantly more tolerogenic mDC phenotype as demonstrated by a diminished up-regulation of costimulatory molecules and a decreased T-cell stimulatory capacity, as assessed by T-cell proliferation and interferon-γ production. In addition, the presence of HBV significantly reduced interleukin-12 production by mDC. These results show that both HBV particles and purified HBsAg have an immune modulatory capacity and may directly contribute to the dysfunction of mDC in patients with chronic HBV. The direct immune regulatory effect of HBV and circulating HBsAg particles on the function of DC can be considered as part of the mechanism by which HBV escapes immunity. PMID:18624732

  14. Human leukaemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikashvili, E.L.; Mosulishvili, L.M.; Belokobil'skiy, A.I.; Kharabadze, N.E.; Shonia, N.I.; Desai, L.S.; Foley, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    Trace metals were measured by neutron-activation analyses in purified nucleic acids and histone(s) of lymphocytes from patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia or infectious mononucleosis, and from normal donors. DNA isolated from lymphocytes of a patient with infectious mononucleosis and a normal donor showed a high content of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Zn 2+ , whereas DNA of lymphoblasts from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukaemia had a lower content of these trace metals, but the Co 2+ content was 20-fold higher than in DNA of normal donor lymphocytic cells. Total histones from leukaemic cells had higher contents of most of the trace metals except for Zn 2+ , which was present in lesser concentration than in histones from normal donor lymphocytic cells. Lysine-rich (F1) histones showed lower contents of Cr 2+ , Sb 2+ and Co 2+ , whereas arginine-rich (F3) histones had significantly higher contents of these trace metals. These observations may be of interest in that F3 histones more effectively inhibit RNA synthesis in human lymphocytic cells than do other species of histones. (author)

  15. The accumulation of regulatory T cells in the hepatic hilar lymph nodes in biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Muraji, Toshihiro; Ohtani, Haruo; Masumoto, Kouji

    2017-10-01

    A proposed etiopathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA) involves T-cell-mediated inflammatory bile duct damage and progressive hepatic fibrosis. Pediatric surgeons often observe swelling of the hepatic hilar lymph nodes during the Kasai procedure. Given the importance of regulatory mechanisms in immune responses, the present study was designed to analyze the quantitative changes of regulatory T cells (T reg cells) in the hepatic hilar lymph nodes (hepatic hilar LNs) and peripheral blood (PB) in BA. The hepatic hilar LNs and PB obtained during the Kasai procedure were analyzed by flow cytometry. The ratios of total and active Tregs to the total CD4 + cells in the PB and the hepatic hilar LNs were compared. In patients with BA, the ratios of both the total and active T reg cells in the hepatic hilar LNs were higher than those in the PB (total T reg cells: PB vs. LN; P hilar lymph nodes of BA patients. This finding could shed light on the pathogenesis of BA.

  16. [Epidemiologic aspects of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Minta, D; Sounko, A; Dembele, M; Toure, C S; Kalle, A; Traore, H H; Maiga, M Y

    2006-01-01

    In order to determinate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus among patients infected by the HIV, We realized a transverse survey case--control in hepato-gastro-enterological ward and serology unity of National Institute of Research in Public health (INRSP). Our sample was constituted with 100 patients HIV positive compared to 100 controls HIV negative. The viral markers research has been made by methods immuno-enzymatiqueses of ELISA 3rd generation. Tests permitted to get the following results: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag) was positive among 21% with patients HIV positive versus 23% among control (p = 0,732); Antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV ab) was present among 23% with patients HIV positive versus 0% among control (p <0,05). Female was predominant among co-infections patient, but without statistic link (p = 0,9 and p = 0,45); The co-infection HBV- HCV was significatively linked to age beyond 40 years (p = 0,0005). Co-infections with HIV infection and hepatitis virus are not rare and deserve to be investigated.

  17. A serine palmitoyltransferase inhibitor blocks hepatitis C virus replication in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsume, Asao; Tokunaga, Yuko; Hirata, Yuichi; Munakata, Tsubasa; Saito, Makoto; Hayashi, Hitohisa; Okamoto, Koichi; Ohmori, Yusuke; Kusanagi, Isamu; Fujiwara, Shinya; Tsukuda, Takuo; Aoki, Yuko; Klumpp, Klaus; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; El-Gohary, Ahmed; Sudoh, Masayuki; Kohara, Michinori

    2013-10-01

    Host cell lipid rafts form a scaffold required for replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Serine palmitoyltransferases (SPTs) produce sphingolipids, which are essential components of the lipid rafts that associate with HCV nonstructural proteins. Prevention of the de novo synthesis of sphingolipids by an SPT inhibitor disrupts the HCV replication complex and thereby inhibits HCV replication. We investigated the ability of the SPT inhibitor NA808 to prevent HCV replication in cells and mice. We tested the ability of NA808 to inhibit SPT's enzymatic activity in FLR3-1 replicon cells. We used a replicon system to select for HCV variants that became resistant to NA808 at concentrations 4- to 6-fold the 50% inhibitory concentration, after 14 rounds of cell passage. We assessed the ability of NA808 or telaprevir to inhibit replication of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, and 4a in mice with humanized livers (transplanted with human hepatocytes). NA808 was injected intravenously, with or without pegylated interferon alfa-2a and HCV polymerase and/or protease inhibitors. NA808 prevented HCV replication via noncompetitive inhibition of SPT; no resistance mutations developed. NA808 prevented replication of all HCV genotypes tested in mice with humanized livers. Intravenous NA808 significantly reduced viral load in the mice and had synergistic effects with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and HCV polymerase and protease inhibitors. The SPT inhibitor NA808 prevents replication of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, and 4a in cultured hepatocytes and in mice with humanized livers. It might be developed for treatment of HCV infection or used in combination with pegylated interferon alfa-2a or HCV polymerase or protease inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro and in vivo infectivity and pathogenicity of the lymphoid cell-derived woodchuck hepatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Y Y; Michalak, T I

    2001-02-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and human hepatitis B virus are closely related, highly hepatotropic mammalian DNA viruses that also replicate in the lymphatic system. The infectivity and pathogenicity of hepadnaviruses propagating in lymphoid cells are under debate. In this study, hepato- and lymphotropism of WHV produced by naturally infected lymphoid cells was examined in specifically established woodchuck hepatocyte and lymphoid cell cultures and coculture systems, and virus pathogenicity was tested in susceptible animals. Applying PCR-based assays discriminating between the total pool of WHV genomes and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), combined with enzymatic elimination of extracellular viral sequences potentially associated with the cell surface, our study documents that virus replicating in woodchuck lymphoid cells is infectious to homologous hepatocytes and lymphoid cells in vitro. The productive replication of WHV from lymphoid cells in cultured hepatocytes was evidenced by the appearance of virus-specific DNA, cccDNA, and antigens, transmissibility of the virus through multiple passages in hepatocyte cultures, and the ability of the passaged virus to infect virus-naive animals. The data also revealed that WHV from lymphoid cells can initiate classical acute viral hepatitis in susceptible animals, albeit small quantities (approximately 10(3) virions) caused immunovirologically undetectable (occult) WHV infection that engaged the lymphatic system but not the liver. Our results provide direct in vitro and in vivo evidence that lymphoid cells in the infected host support propagation of infectious hepadnavirus that has the potential to induce hepatitis. They also emphasize a principal role of the lymphatic system in the maintenance and dissemination of hepadnavirus infection, particularly when infection is induced by low virus doses.

  19. Effect of TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor on migration of hepatic stellate cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SU Min

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWAEK and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14 on the migration of hepatic stellate cells and the possible mechanism. Methods The human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2 cells were treated with TWEAK or Fn14 specific small interfering RNA (Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK. Transwell chamber was used to observe the migration of hepatic stellate cells, and real-time PCR and Western blot were used to measure the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups; a one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between two groups. Results Compared with normal LX-2 cells, the TWEAK group had a significant increase in the migration of LX-2 cells (105±8 vs 164±17, t=5.287,P<0.01, and compared with the negative control group, the Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK group had a significant reduction in the number of migrated cells (122±9 vs 58±7, t=9.836, P<0.01. When LX-2 cells were treated with TWEAK, the mRNA and protein expression of MMP9 increased in a time-dependent manner (both P<0.05, while the Fn14 siRNA+TWEAK group had significant reductions in the mRNA and protein expression of MMP9 compared with the TWEAK group (t=5.358, P<0.01. Conclusion TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 can promote the migration of hepatic stellate cells by upregulating MMP9, and blockade of this pathway may become a potential target for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  20. Efficient infectious cell culture systems of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) prototype strains HCV-1 and H77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Mikkelsen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The first discovered and sequenced hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome and the first in vivo infectious HCV clones originated from the HCV prototype strains HCV-1 and H77, respectively, both widely used in research of this important human pathogen. In the present study, we developed...... efficiently after transfection and subsequent infection of naive Huh7.5 cells, reaching titers of 10(3.5) and 10(4.4) FFU/ml, respectively. IMPORTANCE: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989 with the cloning of the prototype strain HCV-1 genome. In 1997, two molecular clones of H77, the other HCV...... prototype strain, were shown to be infectious in chimpanzees, but not in vitro. HCV research was hampered by a lack of infectious cell culture systems, which became available only in 2005 with the discovery of JFH1 (genotype 2a), a genome that could establish infection in Huh7.5 cells. Recently, we...

  1. Elevated Levels of Endocannabinoids in Chronic Hepatitis C May Modulate Cellular Immune Response and Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Patsenker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid (EC system is implicated in many chronic liver diseases, including hepatitis C viral (HCV infection. Cannabis consumption is associated with fibrosis progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC, however, the role of ECs in the development of CHC has never been explored. To study this question, anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG were quantified in samples of HCV patients and healthy controls by gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and monoaclyglycerol lipase (MAGL activity was assessed by [3H]AEA and [3H]2-AG hydrolysis, respectively. Gene expression and cytokine release were assayed by TaqMan PCR and ELISpot, respectively. AEA and 2-AG levels were increased in plasma of HCV patients, but not in liver tissues. Hepatic FAAH and MAGL activity was not changed. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, ECs inhibited IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 secretion. Inhibition of IL-2 by endogenous AEA was stronger in PBMC from HCV patients. In hepatocytes, 2-AG induced the expression of IL-6, -17A, -32 and COX-2, and enhanced activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC co-cultivated with PBMC from subjects with CHC. In conclusion, ECs are increased in plasma of patients with CHC and might reveal immunosuppressive and profibrogenic effects.

  2. Osteopontin-enhanced hepatic metastasis of colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjin Huang

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis is a major cause of mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. However, mechanisms underlying this process are largely unknown. Osteopontin (OPN is a secreted phosphorylated glycoprotein that is involved in tumor migration and metastasis. The role of OPN in cancer is currently unclear. In this study, OPN mRNA was examined in tissues from CRC, adjacent normal mucosa, and liver metastatic lesions using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The protein expression of OPN and its receptors (integrin αv and CD44 v6 was detected by using an immunohistochemical (IHC method. The role of OPN in liver metastasis was studied in established colon cancer Colo-205 and SW-480 cell lines transfected with sense- or antisense-OPN eukaryotic expression plasmids by flow cytometry and cell adhesion assay. Fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP was used to study gap functional intercellular communication (GJIC among OPN-transfected cells. It was found that OPN was highly expressed in metastatic hepatic lesions from CRC compared to primary CRC tissue and adjacent normal mucosa. The expression of OPN mRNA in tumor tissues was significantly related with the CRC stages. OPN expression was also detected in normal hepatocytes surrounding CRC metastatic lesions. Two known receptors of OPN, integrin αv and CD44v6 proteins, were strongly expressed in hepatocytes from normal liver. CRC cells with forced OPN expression exhibited increased heterotypic adhesion with endothelial cells and weakened intercellular communication. OPN plays a significant role in CRC metastasis to liver through interaction with its receptors in hepatocytes, decreased homotypic adhesion, and enhanced heterotypic adhesion.

  3. Deciduous and permanent dental pulp mesenchymal cells acquire hepatic morphologic and functional features in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Yaegaki, Ken; Calenic, Bogdan; Nakahara, Taka; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Mitiev, Vanyo; Haapasalo, Markus

    2010-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells display extensive proliferative capacity of multilineage differentiation. The stromal compartment of mesenchymal tissues is considered to harbor stem cells. We assessed the endodermal differentiation of mesenchymal cells from deciduous and wisdom tooth pulp. Dental mesenchymal cells were isolated and expanded in vitro. After cell cultures had been established, cells were characterized using known stem cell markers. For hepatic differentiation the media was supplemented with hepatic growth factor, dexamethasone, Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium-X, and oncostatin. Both cultures showed a number of cells positive for specific hepatic markers including alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, and hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha after differentiation. Also, small clusters of cells positive for insulin-like growth factor 1 were found. The concentration of urea increased significantly in the media. Moreover, a significant amount of glycogen was found in the cells. Because the cells proved to produce specific hepatic proteins and to start functions specific for hepatocytes, such as storing glycogen and urea production, we may state that the mesenchymal cell cultures from wisdom and deciduous tooth pulp acquired morphologic and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The let-7/Lin28 axis regulates activation of hepatic stellate cells in alcoholic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Kelly; Huang, Li; Sato, Keisaku; Wu, Nan; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Ramos-Lorenzo, Sugeily; Wan, Ying; Huang, Qiaobing; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2017-07-07

    The let-7/Lin28 axis is associated with the regulation of key cellular regulatory genes known as microRNAs in various human disorders and cancer development. This study evaluated the role of the let-7/Lin28 axis in regulating a mesenchymal phenotype of hepatic stellate cells in alcoholic liver injury. We identified that ethanol feeding significantly down-regulated several members of the let-7 family in mouse liver, including let-7a and let-7b. Similarly, the treatment of human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) significantly decreased the expressions of let-7a and let-7b. Conversely, overexpression of let-7a and let-7b suppressed the myofibroblastic activation of cultured human HSCs induced by LPS and TGF-β, as evidenced by repressed ACTA2 (α-actin 2), COL1A1 (collagen 1A1), TIMP1 (TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1), and FN1 (fibronectin 1); this supports the notion that HSC activation is controlled by let-7. A combination of bioinformatics, dual-luciferase reporter assay, and Western blot analysis revealed that Lin28B and high-mobility group AT-hook (HMGA2) were the direct targets of let-7a and let-7b. Furthermore, Lin28B deficiency increased the expression of let-7a/let-7b as well as reduced HSC activation and liver fibrosis in mice with alcoholic liver injury. This feedback regulation of let-7 by Lin28B is verified in hepatic stellate cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from the model. The identification of the let-7/Lin28 axis as an important regulator of HSC activation as well as its upstream modulators and down-stream targets will provide insights into the involvement of altered microRNA expression in contributing to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver fibrosis and novel therapeutic approaches for human alcoholic liver diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. → Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. → PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  6. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20% of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection.

  7. Epidemiological studies on viral infections and co-infections : Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and human papillomavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, D.K.

    2018-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aimed to increase our understanding of the incidence, disease progression and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and co-infections in key populations. Chapter 1 contains an overview

  8. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins are crucial for the viability of activated rat hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Dunning, Sandra; Borght, Sara Vander; Schroyen, Ben; Woudenberg, Jannes; Oakley, Fiona; Buist-Homan, Manon; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Geuken, Mariska; Geerts, Albert; Roskams, Tania; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) survive and proliferate in the chronically injured liver. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a crucial role in cell viability by transporting toxic metabolites or xenobiotics out of the cell. ABC transporter expression in HSCs and its relevance to cell

  9. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  10. The isolation and in vitro expansion of hepatic Sca-1 progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, Elizabeth; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2009-01-01

    The intra-hepatic population of liver progenitor cells expands during liver injury when hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited. These cells can be purified by density gradient centrifugation and cultured. Separated by size only this population contains small cells of hematopoietic, epithelial and endothelial lineages and is thought to contain liver stem cells. The identity of liver stem cells remains unknown although there is some evidence that tissue Sca1 + CD45 - cells display progenitor cell characteristics. We identified both intra-hepatic and gall bladder Sca1 + cells following liver injury and expanded ex vivo Sca1 cells as part of heterogenous cell culture or as a purified population. We found significant difference between the proliferation of Sca-1 cells when plated on laminin or collagen I while proliferation of heterogenous population was not affected by the extracellular matrix indicating the necessity for culture of Sca1 + cells with laminin matrix or laminin producing cells in long term liver progenitor cell cultures.

  11. Prevalence of nucleic acid sequences specific for human parvoviruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E viruses in coagulation factor concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrow, S; Wenzel, J J; Schimanski, S; Schwarzbeck, J; Rothe, U; Oldenburg, J; Jilg, W; Eis-Hübinger, A M

    2011-05-01

    Due to their high resistance to inactivation procedures, nonenveloped viruses such as parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV), human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) pose a particular threat to blood products. Virus transmission to patients treated with blood products presents an additional burden to disease. We determined the frequency and the amount of nucleic acid specific for nonenveloped viruses in recently manufactured preparations of commercial coagulation factor concentrates. At least three different batches of each of 13 different plasma-derived and recombinant coagulation factor products were tested for the presence and the amount of nucleic acid for parvovirus B19, HBoV, human parvovirus 4, hepatitis A virus and HEV by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whereas none of the recombinant products tested positive for any of these viruses, parvovirus B19 DNA with amounts ranging between 2×10(1) and 1.3×10(3) genome equivalents/ml was detected in five plasma-derived products. In addition to parvovirus B19 genotype 1, genotypes 2 and 3 were observed in two batches of a factor VIII/von-Willebrand factor product. In two products (one factor VIII concentrate and one activated prothrombin complex concentrate), a combination of both genotypes 1 and 2 of parvovirus B19 was detected. The data show that nucleic acids from several relevant nonenveloped viruses are not found at detectable levels in coagulation factor concentrates. In some cases, parvovirus B19 DNA was detectable at low levels. Testing of the plasma pools for the full range of parvovirus genotypes is advocated for ensuring product safety. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms in Organic Cation Transporter 1 Attenuates Hepatic Metformin Exposure in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundelin, E. I.O.; Gormsen, Lars C; Jensen, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    the transporter protein OCT1, affect the hepatic distribution of metformin in humans. We performed noninvasive 11C-metformin positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to determine hepatic exposure in 12 subjects genotyped for variants in SLC22A1. Hepatic distribution of metformin...... was significantly reduced after oral intake in carriers of M420del and R61C variants in SLC22A1 without being associated with changes in circulating levels of metformin. Our data show that genetic polymorphisms in transporter proteins cause variation in hepatic exposure to metformin, and it demonstrates......Metformin has been used successfully to treat type 2 diabetes for decades. However, the efficacy of the drug varies considerably from patient to patient and this may in part be due to its pharmacokinetic properties. The aim of this study was to examine if common polymorphisms in SLC22A1, encoding...

  13. Liver cell-derived microparticles activate hedgehog signaling and alter gene expression in hepatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Rafal P; Yang, Liu; Liu, Renshui; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Syn, Wing-Kin; Choi, Steve S; Cheong, Yeiwon; Fearing, Caitlin M; Agboola, Kolade M; Chen, Wei; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis contributes to vascular remodeling during cirrhosis. In cirrhotic livers, cholangiocytes, and myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (MF-HSC) produce Hedgehog (Hh) ligands. During embryogenesis Hh ligands are released from ligand-producing cells in microparticles and activate Hh signaling in endothelial cells. We studied whether adult liver cell-derived microparticles contain Hh ligands that alter hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). MF-HSC and cholangiocytes were exposed to platelet-derived growth factor to induce Hh ligands; microparticles were isolated from medium, analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots, and applied to Hh-reporter-containing cells. Microparticles were obtained from serum and bile of rats after bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery and applied to normal primary liver SEC with or without cyclopamine, an Hh signaling inhibitor. Effects on SEC gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Hh target gene expression and SEC activation markers were compared in primary SEC and in liver sections from healthy and BDL rats. Platelet-derived growth factor-treated MF-HSC and cholangiocytes released exosome-enriched microparticles containing biologically-active Hh ligands. BDL increased release of Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles into plasma and bile. Transmission electron microscopy and immunoblots revealed similarities among microparticles from all sources; all microparticles induced similar Hh-dependent changes in SEC gene expression. SEC from healthy livers did not express Hh target genes or activation markers, but both were up-regulated in SEC after BDL. Hh-containing exosome-enriched microparticles released from liver cells alter hepatic SEC gene expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for cirrhotic vasculopathy.

  14. Glutathione and antioxidant enzymes serve complementary roles in protecting activated hepatic stellate cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunning, Sandra; Rehman, Atta Ur; Tiebosch, Marjolein H.; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Haijer, Floris W.; Woudenberg, Jannes; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background: In chronic liver disease, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are activated, highly proliferative and produce excessive amounts of extracellular matrix, leading to liver fibrosis. Elevated levels of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during chronic liver injury have been implicated

  15. Microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses in human blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, Chu Chieh; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Yang, Amy X.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Hewlett, Indira; Duncan, Robert; Puri, Raj K.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) are transfusion-transmitted human pathogens that have a major impact on blood safety and public health worldwide. We developed a microarray multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of these three viruses. The microarray consists of 16 oligonucleotide probes, immobilized on a silylated glass slide. Amplicons from multiplex PCR were labeled with Cy-5 and hybridized to the microarray. The assay detected 1 International Unit (IU), 10 IU, 20 IU of HBV, HCV, and HIV-1, respectively, in a single multiplex reaction. The assay also detected and discriminated the presence of two or three of these viruses in a single sample. Our data represent a proof-of-concept for the possible use of highly sensitive multiplex microarray assay to screen and confirm the presence of these viruses in blood donors and patients

  16. Restored Circulating Invariant NKT Cells Are Associated with Viral Control in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaotao; Zhang, Mingxia; Lai, Qintao; Huang, Xuan; Li, Yongyin; Sun, Jian; Abbott, William G.H.; Ma, Shiwu; Hou, Jinlin

    2011-01-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. However, their role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is not fully understood, especially in human species. In this study, 35 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, 25 inactive carriers (IC) and 36 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled and the proportions of circulating iNKT cells in fresh isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were detected by flow cytometry. A longitudinal analysis was also conducted in 19 CHB patients who received antiviral therapy with telbivudine. Thereafter, the immune functions of iNKT cells were evaluated by cytokine secretion and a two-chamber technique. The median frequency of circulating iNKT cells in CHB patients (0.13%) was lower than that in HC (0.24%, P = 0.01) and IC (0.19%, P = 0.02), and increased significantly during antiviral therapy with telbivudine (P = 0.0176). The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CCR6 were dramatically higher on iNKT cells (82.83%±9.87%, 67.67%±16.83% respectively) than on conventional T cells (30.5%±5.65%, 14.02%±5.92%, both P<0.001) in CHB patients. Furthermore, iNKT cells could migrate toward the CC chemokine ligand 5. Patients with a high ratio (≥1.0) of CD4−/CD4+ iNKT cells at baseline had a higher rate (58.33%) of HBeAg seroconversion than those with a low ratio (<1.0, 0%, P = 0.0174). In conclusion, there is a low frequency of peripheral iNKT cells in CHB patients, which increases to normal levels with viral control. The ratio of CD4−/CD4+ iNKT cells at baseline may be a useful predictor for HBeAg seroconversion in CHB patients on telbivudine therapy. PMID:22194934

  17. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  18. Formation of human hepatocyte-like cells with different cellular phenotypes by human umbilical cord blood-derived cells in the human-rat chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Xi-Gu

    2007-01-01

    We took advantage of the proliferative and permissive environment of the developing pre-immune fetus to develop a noninjury human-rat xenograft small animal model, in which the in utero transplantation of low-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) into fetal rats at 9-11 days of gestation led to the formation of human hepatocyte-like cells (hHLCs) with different cellular phenotypes, as revealed by positive immunostaining for human-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and albumin (Alb), and with some animals exhibiting levels as high as 10.7% of donor-derived human cells in the recipient liver. More interestingly, donor-derived human cells stained positively for CD34 and CD45 in the liver of 2-month-old rat. Human hepatic differentiation appeared to partially follow the process of hepatic ontogeny, as evidenced by the expression of AFP gene at an early stage and albumin gene at a later stage. Human hepatocytes generated in this model retained functional properties of normal hepatocytes. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in the recipient liver for at least 6 months after birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that the donor-derived human cells with different cellular phenotypes are found in the recipient liver and hHLCs hold biological activity. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling the situations in human, provides an invaluable approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future

  19. Hepatic progenitor cell resistance to TGF-β1's proliferative and apoptotic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J. Brian; Rice, Lisa; Sadiq, Tim; Brittain, Evan; Song, Lujun; Wang Jian; Gerber, David A.

    2005-01-01

    The success of hepatocellular therapies using stem or progenitor cell populations is dependent upon multiple factors including the donor cell, microenvironment, and etiology of the liver injury. The following experiments investigated the impact of TGF-β1 on a previously described population of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC). The majority of the hepatic progenitor cells were resistant to endogenously produced TGF-β1's proapoptotic and anti-proliferative effects unlike more well-differentiated cellular populations (e.g., mature hepatocytes). Surprisingly, in vitro TGF-β1 supplementation significantly inhibited de novo hepatic progenitor cell colony formation possibly via an indirect mechanism(s). Therefore despite the HPC's direct resistance to supplemental TGF-β1, this cytokine's inhibitory effect on colony formation could have a potential negative impact on the use of these cells as a therapy for patients with liver disease

  20. One window-period donation in two years of individual donor-nucleic acid test screening for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Eduardo Levi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe general data on nucleic acid/serology testing and report the first hepatitis B-nucleic acid testing yield case of an immunized donor in Brazil. Methods: A total of 24,441 donations collected in 2010 and 2011 were submitted to individual nucleic acid testing for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus using the TaqMan® MPX kit (Roche on the Cobas s201 platform, in addition to routine screening for serological markers. Nucleic acid testing-reactive donations were further evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction using Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus tests. Results: Thirty-two donations were reactive by nucleic acid testing, 31 were also serologically reactive and one first-time donor was identified as having hepatitis B in the window period. Follow-up samples showed increasing titers of anti-HBs rising from 19 UI/mL in the index donation to 109 IU/mL seven months later attributable to his vaccination history. Curiously, this donor was never reactive for HbsAg nor for anti-HBc. In the yield donation, he was concomitantly reactive for syphilis (enzyme immunoassay and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption; venereal disease research laboratory non-reactive. Overall, six donors (0.02% were characterized as occult hepatitis B. A total of 35% of the confirmed (recombinant immunoblot assay positive hepatitis C donations were nucleic acid testing non-reactive and no human immunodeficiency virus "elite controller" was identified. Conclusion: The yield rate (1:24,441; 95% confidence interval: 1:9,537 - 1:89,717 contrasts to the North American rate (1:410,540 donations and strongly advocates the adoption of nucleic acid testing for hepatitis B in Brazil despite the increasing rate of anti-HBs reactive subjects due to the successful immunization program.

  1. Nanovaccine for immunotherapy and reduced hepatitis-B virus in humanized model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Hitesh Kumar; Pandey, Tarun; Singh, Sanjay

    2017-11-27

    Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infections are severe with weak antiviral immune responses. The lack of an appropriate small animal model for chronic hepatitis, a major hurdle for studying the immunotolerance and immunopathogenesis induced by hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection. In this study, for enhancing the antibody production efficiency the prepared polymeric HBsAg-loaded nanoparticles (nanovaccine) will be tested in immune-deficit mice, which suffer from chronic Hepatitis B virus. Vaccination of Balb/c mice by this prepared nanoparticles that were engrafted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which was already lethally irradiated and transplanted by the bone marrow of NOD (knockout mice) mice. In the present study, after the vaccination detected the high frequencies of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-secreting B cells and mitogen-responsive interferon-Y (IFN-Y) secreting T cells in serum, determined by specific ELISA technique. During the entire observation period, unvaccinated animals showed lower concentration of specific IgG secreting B cells and IFN-Y secreting T cells found in comparison to vaccinated mice group. Chronic HBV carrier PBMCs transplanted into the chimera failed to produce antigen and increased the antibodies production due to vaccination. Furthermore, another advantage was that the viral gene expression and viral DNA replication was no longer observed in vaccinated group. This prepared nanovaccine formulations is better for the cure of Hepatitis B viral infection carrier. Therefore, specific memory responses were elicited by vaccination with Hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) antigen of chimeric mice transplanted with PBMCs derived from HBV donors.

  2. Inactivated ORF virus shows antifibrotic activity and inhibits human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Daniela; Urban, Andreas; Knorr, Andreas; Hirth-Dietrich, Claudia; Siegling, Angela; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Mercer, Andrew A; Limmer, Andreas; Schumak, Beatrix; Knolle, Percy; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Weber, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Inactivated orf virus (iORFV), strain D1701, is a potent immune modulator in various animal species. We recently demonstrated that iORFV induces strong antiviral activity in animal models of acute and chronic viral infections. In addition, we found D1701-mediated antifibrotic effects in different rat models of liver fibrosis. In the present study, we compare iORFV derived from two different strains of ORFV, D1701 and NZ2, respectively, with respect to their antifibrotic potential as well as their potential to induce an antiviral response controlling infections with the hepatotropic pathogens hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Both strains of ORFV showed anti-viral activity against HCV in vitro and against HBV in a transgenic mouse model without signs of necro-inflammation in vivo. Our experiments suggest that the absence of liver damage is potentially mediated by iORFV-induced downregulation of antigen cross-presentation in liver sinus endothelial cells. Furthermore, both strains showed significant anti-fibrotic activity in rat models of liver fibrosis. iORFV strain NZ2 appeared more potent compared to strain D1701 with respect to both its antiviral and antifibrotic activity on the basis of dosages estimated by titration of active virus. These results show a potential therapeutic approach against two important human liver pathogens HBV and HCV that independently addresses concomitant liver fibrosis. Further studies are required to characterize the details of the mechanisms involved in this novel therapeutic principle.

  3. Inactivated ORF virus shows antifibrotic activity and inhibits human hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV replication in preclinical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Paulsen

    Full Text Available Inactivated orf virus (iORFV, strain D1701, is a potent immune modulator in various animal species. We recently demonstrated that iORFV induces strong antiviral activity in animal models of acute and chronic viral infections. In addition, we found D1701-mediated antifibrotic effects in different rat models of liver fibrosis. In the present study, we compare iORFV derived from two different strains of ORFV, D1701 and NZ2, respectively, with respect to their antifibrotic potential as well as their potential to induce an antiviral response controlling infections with the hepatotropic pathogens hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. Both strains of ORFV showed anti-viral activity against HCV in vitro and against HBV in a transgenic mouse model without signs of necro-inflammation in vivo. Our experiments suggest that the absence of liver damage is potentially mediated by iORFV-induced downregulation of antigen cross-presentation in liver sinus endothelial cells. Furthermore, both strains showed significant anti-fibrotic activity in rat models of liver fibrosis. iORFV strain NZ2 appeared more potent compared to strain D1701 with respect to both its antiviral and antifibrotic activity on the basis of dosages estimated by titration of active virus. These results show a potential therapeutic approach against two important human liver pathogens HBV and HCV that independently addresses concomitant liver fibrosis. Further studies are required to characterize the details of the mechanisms involved in this novel therapeutic principle.

  4. Tribbles-1: a novel regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert C; Yenilmez, Batuhan O; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    The protein tribbles-1, encoded by the gene TRIB1, is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of multiple cellular and physiological processes in humans. Recent human genetic studies, as well as molecular biological approaches, have implicated this intriguing protein in the aetiology of multiple human diseases, including myeloid leukaemia, Crohn's disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidaemia and coronary artery disease (CAD). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have repeatedly identified variants at the genomic TRIB1 locus as being significantly associated with multiple plasma lipid traits and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in humans. The involvement of TRIB1 in hepatic lipid metabolism has been validated through viral-mediated hepatic overexpression of the gene in mice; increasing levels of TRIB1 decreased plasma lipids in a dose-dependent manner. Additional studies have implicated TRIB1 in the regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and NAFLD. The exact mechanisms of TRIB1 regulation of both plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenesis remain undetermined, although multiple signalling pathways and transcription factors have been implicated in tribbles-1 function. Recent reports have been aimed at developing TRIB1-based lipid therapeutics. In summary, tribbles-1 is an important modulator of human energy metabolism and metabolic syndromes and worthy of future studies aimed at investigating its potential as a therapeutic target. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. Interleukin 17-producing γδT cells promote hepatic regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Graffeo, Christopher S; Gulati, Rishabh; Jamal, Mohsin; Narayan, Suchithra; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Barilla, Rocky; Deutsch, Michael; Greco, Stephanie H; Ochi, Atsuo; Tomkötter, Lena; Blobstein, Reuven; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel M; Gelbstein, Yisroel; Van Heerden, Eliza; Miller, George

    2014-08-01

    Subsets of leukocytes synergize with regenerative growth factors to promote hepatic regeneration. γδT cells are early responders to inflammation-induced injury in a number of contexts. We investigated the role of γδT cells in hepatic regeneration using mice with disruptions in Tcrd (encodes the T-cell receptor δ chain) and Clec7a (encodes C-type lectin domain family 7 member a, also known as DECTIN1). We performed partial hepatectomies on wild-type C57BL/6, CD45.1, Tcrd(-/-), or Clec7a(-/-) mice. Cells were isolated from livers of patients and mice via mechanical and enzymatic digestion. γδT cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In mice, partial hepatectomy up-regulated expression of CCL20 and ligands of Dectin-1, which was associated with recruitment and activation of γδT cells and their increased production of interleukin (IL)-17 family cytokines. Recruited γδT cells induced production of IL-6 by antigen-presenting cells and suppressed expression of interferon gamma by natural killer T cells, promoting hepatocyte proliferation. Absence of IL-17-producing γδT cells or deletion of Dectin-1 prevented development of regenerative phenotypes in subsets of innate immune cells. This slowed liver regeneration and was associated with reduced expression of regenerative growth factors and cell cycle regulators. Conversely, exogenous administration of IL-17 family cytokines or Dectin-1 ligands promoted regeneration. More broadly, we found that γδT cells are required for inflammatory responses mediated by IL-17 and Dectin-1. γδT cells regulate hepatic regeneration by producing IL-22 and IL-17, which have direct mitogenic effects on hepatocytes and promote a regenerative phenotype in hepatic leukocytes, respectively. Dectin-1 ligation is required for γδT cells to promote hepatic regeneration. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A SELEX-screened aptamer of human hepatitis B virus RNA encapsidation signal suppresses viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The specific interaction between hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase (P protein and the ε RNA stem-loop on pregenomic (pg RNA is crucial for viral replication. It triggers both pgRNA packaging and reverse transcription and thus represents an attractive antiviral target. RNA decoys mimicking ε in P protein binding but not supporting replication might represent novel HBV inhibitors. However, because generation of recombinant enzymatically active HBV polymerase is notoriously difficult, such decoys have as yet not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a SELEX approach, based on a new in vitro reconstitution system exploiting a recombinant truncated HBV P protein (miniP, to identify potential ε decoys in two large ε RNA pools with randomized upper stem. Selection of strongly P protein binding RNAs correlated with an unexpected strong enrichment of A residues. Two aptamers, S6 and S9, displayed particularly high affinity and specificity for miniP in vitro, yet did not support viral replication when part of a complete HBV genome. Introducing S9 RNA into transiently HBV producing HepG2 cells strongly suppressed pgRNA packaging and DNA synthesis, indicating the S9 RNA can indeed act as an ε decoy that competitively inhibits P protein binding to the authentic ε signal on pgRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the first successful identification of human HBV ε aptamers by an in vitro SELEX approach. Effective suppression of HBV replication by the S9 aptamer provides proof-of-principle for the ability of ε decoy RNAs to interfere with viral P-ε complex formation and suggests that S9-like RNAs may further be developed into useful therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  7. Human neutrophil peptide-1 promotes alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Ibusuki

    Full Text Available Neutrophil infiltration of the liver is a typical feature of alcoholic liver injury. Human neutrophil peptide (HNP-1 is an antimicrobial peptide secreted by neutrophils. The aim of this study was to determine if HNP-1 affects ethanol-induced liver injury and to examine the mechanism of liver injury induced by HNP-1.Transgenic (TG mice expressing HNP-1 under the control of a β-actin-based promoter were established. Ethanol was orally administered to HNP-1 TG or wild-type C57BL/6N (WT mice. SK-Hep1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were used to investigate the effect of HNP-1 on hepatocytes in vitro.After 24 weeks of ethanol intake, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis were significantly more severe in TG mice than in WT mice. Levels of CD14, TLR4, and IL-6 in liver tissues were higher in TG mice than in WT mice. Apoptosis was accompanied by higher protein levels of caspase-3, caspase-8, and cleaved PARP in liver tissue. In addition, phosphorylated ASK1, ASK1, phosphorylated JNK, JNK1, JNK2, Bax, Bak and Bim were all more abundant in TG mice than in WT mice. In contrast, the level of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 in the liver was significantly lower in TG mice than in WT mice. Analysis of microRNAs in liver tissue showed that miR-34a-5p expression was significantly higher in TG mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, in the presence of ethanol, HNP-1 increased the apoptosis with the decreased level of Bcl2 in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro.HNP-1 secreted by neutrophils may exacerbate alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis and hepatocyte apoptosis with a decrease in Bcl2 expression and an increase in miR-34a-5p expression.

  8. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko; Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-01-01

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or α-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  9. A TLR4/MD2 fusion protein inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabl, Bernd; Brandl, Katharina; Fink, Marina; Gross, Philipp; Taura, Kojiro; Gaebele, Erwin; Hellerbrand, Claus; Falk, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in hepatic fibrogenesis. In injured liver they are the main extracellular matrix protein producing cell type and further perpetuate hepatic injury by secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Since LPS-mediated signaling through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been identified as key fibrogenic signal in HSCs we aimed to test TLR4 as potential target of therapy via ligand-binding soluble receptors. Incubation of human HSCs with a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of TLR4 and MD2 which binds LPS inhibited LPS-induced NFκB and JNK activation. TLR4/MD2 abolished LPS-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP1, and RANTES in HSCs. In addition, TLR4/MD2 fused to human IgG-Fc neutralized LPS activity. Since TLR4 mutant mice are resistant to liver fibrosis, the TLR4/MD2 soluble receptor might represent a new therapeutic molecule for liver fibrogenesis in vivo

  10. The depuration dynamics of oysters (Crassostrea gigas artificially contaminated with hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Abreu Corrêa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the country of Brazil, Santa Catarina is a major shellfish producer. Detection of viral contamination is an important step to ensure production quality and consumer safety during this process. In this study, we used a depuration system and ultraviolet (UV disinfection to eliminate viral pathogens from artificially infected oysters and analysed the results. Specifically, the oysters were contaminated with hepatitis A virus (HAV or human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV5. After viral infection, the oysters were placed into a depuration tank and harvested after 48, 72 and 96 h. After sampling, various oyster tissues were dissected and homogenised and the viruses were eluted with alkaline conditions and precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The oyster samples were evaluated by cell culture methods, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative-PCR. Moreover, at the end of the depuration period, the disinfected seawater was collected and analysed by PCR. The molecular assays showed that the HAdV5 genome was present in all of the depuration time samples, while the HAV genome was undetectable after 72 h of depuration. However, viral viability tests (integrated cell culture-PCR and immunofluorescence assay indicated that both viruses were inactivated with 96 h of seawater recirculation. In conclusion, after 96 h of UV treatment, the depuration system studied in this work purified oysters that were artificially contaminated with HAdV5 and HAV.

  11. Lack of evidence for metabolism of p-phenylenediamine by human hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, Lesley A.; Skare, Julie A.; Doyle, Edward; Powrie, Robert; D'Angelo, Diane; Elcombe, Clifford R.

    2005-01-01

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a widely used ingredient in permanent hair dyes; however, little has been published on its metabolism, especially with respect to hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidation. This is regarded as a key step in the activation of carcinogenic arylamines that ultimately leads to the development of bladder cancer. Most epidemiology studies show no significant association between personal use of hair dyes and bladder cancer, but one recent study reported an increased risk of bladder cancer in women who were frequent users of permanent hair dyes. The aim of the present study was to use intact human hepatocytes, human liver microsomes, and heterologously expressed human CYPs to determine whether PPD is metabolised by hepatic CYPs to form an N-hydroxylamine. p-Phenylenediamine was N-acetylated by human hepatocytes to form N-acetylated metabolites, but there was no evidence for the formation of mono-oxygenated metabolites or for enzyme-mediated covalent binding of 14 C-PPD to microsomal protein. In contrast, 2-aminofluorene underwent CYP-mediated metabolism to ≥4 different hydroxylated metabolites. The lack of evidence for hepatic CYP-mediated metabolism of PPD is inconsistent with the hypothesis that this compound plays a causal role in the development of bladder cancer via a mode of action involving hepatic metabolism to an N-hydroxyarylamine

  12. Co–inection of hepatitis B and C viruses among human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The co–infection of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and C viruses remains a public health problem particularly in resource limited setting like Nigeria. Studies on these co–infections have been done principally among adult and pregnant women with limited information on the pediatric ...

  13. Age-Dependent Human Hepatic Carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) and Carboxylesterase 2 (Ces2) Postnatal Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human hepatic carboxylesterase 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) are important for ester- and amide- bond containing pharmaceutical and environmental chemical disposition. Despite concern regarding juvenile sensitivity to such compounds, CES1 and CES2 ontogeny has not been well characteriz...

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and...

  15. Amelioration of High Cholesterol Diet Caused Lipids Accumulation in Hepatic Cells by Rutin and Ascorbic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz M. Aleisa

    2013-01-01

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) has become a very common metabolic disorder. It refers to a group of conditions where excess fats are deposited in hepatic cells. Several approaches have been considered for the management of NAFLD including dietary changes, which were reported to suppress hepatic lipids accumulation in previous studies. The present study was designed to investigate the possible synergistic effects of Rutin (RT) and Ascorbic Acid (AA) against lipids accumulation in he...

  16. Combining Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells with a Lipophilic Bisphosphonate Efficiently Kills Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs are now established as a central driver of fibrosis in human liver injury. In the presence of chronic or repeated injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can occur, so there is interest in down-regulating aHSCs activity in order to treat these diseases. Here, we report that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are reduced in patients with liver cirrhosis, stimulating us to investigate possible interactions between Vγ9Vδ2 T cells and aHSCs. We find that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells kill aHSCs and killing is enhanced when aHSCs are pretreated with BPH-1236, a lipophilic analog of the bone resorption drug zoledronate. Cytotoxicity is mediated by direct cell-to-cell contact as shown by Transwell experiments and atomic force microscopy, with BPH-1236 increasing the adhesion between aHSCs and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Mechanistically, BPH-1236 functions by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase, leading to accumulation of the phosphoantigen isopentenyl diphosphate and recognition by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The cytolytic process is largely dependent on the perforin/granzyme B pathway. In a Rag2−/−γc−/− immune-deficient mouse model, we find that Vγ9Vδ2 T cells home-in to the liver, and when accompanied by BPH-1236, kill not only orthotopic aHSCs but also orthotopic HCC tumors. Collectively, our results provide the first proof-of-concept of a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of fibrosis–cirrhosis–HCC diseases using adoptively transferred Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, combined with a lipophilic bisphosphonate.

  17. CD161+CD4+ T cells are enriched in the liver during chronic hepatitis and associated with co-secretion of IL-22 and Interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoi eKang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. CD4+ T cells play a key role in disease outcome. However, the critical functions and associated phenotypes of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells are not well defined. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells expressing the C type lectin CD161 are highly enriched in the human liver, especially during chronic hepatitis. These cells are associated with a type 17 differentiation pattern and express cytokines including IL-17A, IL-22 and IFNγ. We therefore analysed expression of CD161 on CD4+ T cells in blood and liver and addressed the relevant phenotype and functional capacity of these populations. We observed marked enrichment of CD161+CD4+ T cells in the liver during chronic hepatitis such that they are the dominant subtype (mean 55% of CD4+ T cells. IL-22 and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells were readily found in the livers of HCV+ and NASH donors, although not enriched compared to blood. There was, however, specific enrichment of a novel subset of IL-22/IFN-γ dual secretors (p=0.02 compared to blood, a result reconfirmed with direct ex vivo analyses. These data indicate the dominance of CD161+ expressing lymphocyte populations within the hepatic infiltrate, associated with a distinct cytokine profile. Given their documented roles as antiviral and hepatoprotective cytokines respectively, the impact of co-secretion of IFNγ and IL-22 in the liver may be particularly significant.

  18. Changes in distribution of hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II in human hepatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Imaoka, S.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of the hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II (AT-II) were studied in human hepatic cancers using extremely short-lived radioisotope (RI) (krypton 81 m [/sup 81m/Kr]; half-life, 13 seconds). After the start of continuous infusion of AT-II, the radioactivity of the tumor showed about a two-fold increase, whereas that of the nontumor region decreased to about one half as much as the level before the infusion. Consequently, the mean ratio of the arterial blood flow in the tumor region to that in the nontumor region (T/N ratio) increased to 3.30 (P less than 0.001). The T/N ratio showed a peak before the peripheral blood pressure reached the maximum, and thereafter tended to decrease. Intra-arterial infusion of AT-II raised the T/N ratio more obviously than did intravenous infusion of the drug, with less rise in the peripheral blood pressure. It is believed that intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with local use of AT-II enables better accessibility of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors

  19. Tumor induced hepatic myeloid derived suppressor cells can cause moderate liver damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Eggert

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous tumors induce the accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC not only in blood and spleens, but also in livers of these animals. Unexpectedly, we observed a moderate increase in serum transaminases in mice with EL4 subcutaneous tumors, which prompted us to study the relationship of hepatic MDSC accumulation and liver injury. MDSC were the predominant immune cell population expanding in livers of all subcutaneous tumor models investigated (RIL175, B16, EL4, CT26 and BNL, while liver injury was only observed in EL4 and B16 tumor-bearing mice. Elimination of hepatic MDSC in EL4 tumor-bearing mice using low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment reversed transaminase elevation and adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice caused transaminase elevation indicating a direct MDSC mediated effect. Surprisingly, hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice partially lost their damage-inducing potency when transferred into mice bearing non damage-inducing RIL175 tumors. Furthermore, MDSC expansion and MDSC-mediated liver injury further increased with growing tumor burden and was associated with different cytokines including GM-CSF, VEGF, interleukin-6, CCL2 and KC, depending on the tumor model used. In contrast to previous findings, which have implicated MDSC only in protection from T cell-mediated hepatitis, we show that tumor-induced hepatic MDSC themselves can cause moderate liver damage.

  20. Tumor induced hepatic myeloid derived suppressor cells can cause moderate liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Tobias; Medina-Echeverz, José; Kapanadze, Tamar; Kruhlak, Michael J; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous tumors induce the accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) not only in blood and spleens, but also in livers of these animals. Unexpectedly, we observed a moderate increase in serum transaminases in mice with EL4 subcutaneous tumors, which prompted us to study the relationship of hepatic MDSC accumulation and liver injury. MDSC were the predominant immune cell population expanding in livers of all subcutaneous tumor models investigated (RIL175, B16, EL4, CT26 and BNL), while liver injury was only observed in EL4 and B16 tumor-bearing mice. Elimination of hepatic MDSC in EL4 tumor-bearing mice using low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment reversed transaminase elevation and adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice caused transaminase elevation indicating a direct MDSC mediated effect. Surprisingly, hepatic MDSC from B16 tumor-bearing mice partially lost their damage-inducing potency when transferred into mice bearing non damage-inducing RIL175 tumors. Furthermore, MDSC expansion and MDSC-mediated liver injury further increased with growing tumor burden and was associated with different cytokines including GM-CSF, VEGF, interleukin-6, CCL2 and KC, depending on the tumor model used. In contrast to previous findings, which have implicated MDSC only in protection from T cell-mediated hepatitis, we show that tumor-induced hepatic MDSC themselves can cause moderate liver damage.

  1. Determinants in the Ig Variable Domain of Human HAVCR1 (TIM-1) Are Required To Enhance Hepatitis C Virus Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachko, Alla; Costafreda, Maria Isabel; Zubkova, Iryna; Jacques, Jerome; Takeda, Kazuyo; Wells, Frances; Kaplan, Gerardo; Major, Marian E

    2018-03-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis in humans. Several host molecules participate in HCV cell entry, but this process remains unclear. The complete unraveling of the HCV entry process is important to further understand viral pathogenesis and develop therapeutics. Human hepatitis A virus (HAV) cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), CD365, also known as TIM-1, functions as a phospholipid receptor involved in cell entry of several enveloped viruses. Here, we studied the role of HAVCR1 in HCV infection. HAVCR1 antibody inhibited entry in a dose-dependent manner. HAVCR1 soluble constructs neutralized HCV, which did not require the HAVCR1 mucinlike region and was abrogated by a mutation of N to A at position 94 (N94A) in the Ig variable (IgV) domain phospholipid-binding pocket, indicating a direct interaction of the HAVCR1 IgV domain with HCV virions. However, knockout of HAVCR1 in Huh7 cells reduced but did not prevent HCV growth. Interestingly, the mouse HAVCR1 ortholog, also a phospholipid receptor, did not enhance infection and a soluble form failed to neutralize HCV, although replacement of the mouse IgV domain with the human HAVCR1 IgV domain restored the enhancement of HCV infection. Mutations in the cytoplasmic tail revealed that direct HAVCR1 signaling is not required to enhance HCV infection. Our data show that the phospholipid-binding function and other determinant(s) in the IgV domain of human HAVCR1 enhance HCV infection. Although the exact mechanism is not known, it is possible that HAVCR1 facilitates entry by stabilizing or enhancing attachment, leading to direct interactions with specific receptors, such as CD81. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters cells through a multifaceted process. We identified the human hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), CD365, also known as TIM-1, as a facilitator of HCV entry. Antibody blocking and silencing or knockout of HAVCR1 in hepatoma cells reduced HCV entry. Our findings that the

  2. Eradication of Human Hepatic and Pulmonary Melanoma Metastases in SCID Mice by Antibody--Interleukin 2 Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jurgen C.; Pancook, James D.; Gillies, Stephen D.; Mendelsohn, John; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1996-04-01

    Antibody--cytokine fusion proteins combine the unique targeting ability of antibodies with the multifunctional activity of cytokines. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of such constructs for the treatment of hepatic and pulmonary metastases of different melanoma cell lines. Two antibody--interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins, ch225-IL2 and ch14.18-IL2, constructed by fusion of a synthetic sequence coding for human IL-2 to the carboxyl end of the Cγ 1 gene of the corresponding antibodies, were tested for their therapeutic efficacy against xenografted human melanoma in vivo. Tumorspecific fusion proteins completely inhibited the growth of hepatic and pulmonary metastases in C.B-17 scid/scid mice previously reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells, whereas treatment with combinations of the corresponding antibodies plus recombinant IL-2 only reduced the tumor load. Even when treatment with fusion proteins was delayed up to 8 days after inoculation of tumor cells, it still resulted in complete eradication of micrometastases that were established at that time point. Selection of tumor cell lines expressing or lacking the targeted antigen of the administered fusion protein proved the specificity of the observed antitumor effect. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the tumorspecific fusion protein accumulated not only in subcutaneous tumors but also in lungs and livers affected with micrometastases. Survival times of animals treated with the fusion protein were more than doubled as compared to those treated with the combination of the corresponding antibody plus IL-2. Our data demonstrate that an immunotherapeutic approach using cytokines targeted by antibodies to tumor sites has potent effects against disseminated human melanoma.

  3. Antibodies against human cytochrome P-450db1 in autoimmune hepatitis type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Zanger, U M; Hauri, H P; Loeper, J; Homberg, J C; Meyer, U A

    1988-01-01

    In a subgroup of children with chronic active hepatitis, circulating autoantibodies occur that bind to liver and kidney endoplasmic reticulum (anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody type I or anti-LKM1). Anti-LKM1 titers follow the severity of the disease and the presence of these antibodies serves as a diagnostic marker for this autoimmune hepatitis type II. We demonstrate that anti-LKM1 IgGs specifically inhibit the hydroxylation of bufuralol in human liver microsomes. Using two assay systems...

  4. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  5. Interferon alpha treatment stimulates interferon gamma expression in type I NKT cells and enhances their antiviral effect against hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Eisuke; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Uchida, Takuro; Kan, Hiromi; Tsuge, Masataka; Abe-Chayama, Hiromi; Hayes, C Nelson; Makokha, Grace Naswa; Serikawa, Masahiro; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Ohdan, Hideki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication through up-regulation of intrahepatic IFN-stimulated gene expression but also through activation of host immune cells. In the present study, we analyzed the immune cell-mediated antiviral effects of IFN-α using HCV-infected mice. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with transplanted human hepatocytes were infected with genotype 1b HCV and injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). IFN-α treatment following human PBMC transplantation resulted in a significant reduction in serum HCV RNA titers and a higher human CD45-positive mononuclear cell chimerism compared to mice without human PBMC transplantation. In mice with human PBMCs treated with IFN-α, serum concentrations of IFN-γ increased, and natural killer T (NKT) cells, especially type I NKT cells, produced IFN-γ. Mice in which IFN-γ signaling was blocked using antibody or in which transplanted PBMCs were depleted for type I NKT cells showed similar levels of anti-HCV effect compared with mice treated only with IFN-α. These results show that IFN-α stimulates IFN-γ expression in type 1 NKT cells and enhances the inhibition of HCV replication. We propose that type 1 NKT cells might represent a new therapeutic target for chronic hepatitis C patients.

  6. The epigenetic regulation of stem cell factors in hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reister, Sven; Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2011-10-01

    The epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation is an important mechanism to control the expression of stem cell factors as demonstrated in tumor cells. It was recently shown that hepatic stellate cells (HSC) express stem/progenitor cell factors and have a differentiation potential. The aim of this work was to investigate if the expression of stem cell markers is regulated by DNA methylation during activation of rat HSC. It was found that CD133, Notch1, and Notch3 are regulated via DNA methylation in HSC, whereas Nestin shows no DNA methylation in HSC and other undifferentiated cells such as embryonic stem cells and umbilical cord blood stem cells from rats. In contrast to this, DNA methylation controls Nestin expression in differentiated cells like hepatocytes and the hepatoma cell line H4IIE. Demethylation by 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine was sufficient to induce Nestin in H4IIE cells. In quiescent stellate cells and embryonic stem cells, the Nestin expression was suppressed by histone H3 methylation at lysine 9, which is another epigenetic mechanism. Apart from the known induction of Nestin in cultured HSC, this intermediate filament protein was also induced after partial hepatectomy, indicating activation of HSC during liver regeneration. Taken together, this study demonstrates for the first time that the expression of stem cell-associated factors such as CD133, Notch1, and Notch3 is controlled by DNA methylation in HSC. The regulation of Nestin by DNA methylation seems to be restricted to differentiated cells, whereas undifferentiated cells use different epigenetic mechanisms such as histone H3 methylation to control Nestin expression.

  7. Thyroid hormone negatively regulates CDX2 and SOAT2 mRNA expression via induction of miRNA-181d in hepatic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Chui Sun; Sinha, Rohit Anthony [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore); Ota, Sho; Katsuki, Masahito [Department of Molecular Endocrinology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Yen, Paul Michael, E-mail: paul.yen@duke-nus.edu.sg [Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 8, College Road, Singapore 169857 (Singapore)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Thyroid hormone induces miR-181d expression in human hepatic cells and mouse livers. •Thyroid hormone downregulates CDX2 and SOAT2 (or ACAT2) via miR-181d. •miR-181d reduces cholesterol output from human hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Thyroid hormones (THs) regulate transcription of many metabolic genes in the liver through its nuclear receptors (TRs). Although the molecular mechanisms for positive regulation of hepatic genes by TH are well understood, much less is known about TH-mediated negative regulation. Recently, several nuclear hormone receptors were shown to downregulate gene expression via miRNAs. To further examine the potential role of miRNAs in TH-mediated negative regulation, we used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNAs that were directly regulated by TH in a human hepatic cell line. In our screen, we discovered that miRNA-181d is a novel hepatic miRNA that was regulated by TH in hepatic cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, we identified and characterized two novel TH-regulated target genes that were downstream of miR-181d signaling: caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) and sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2 or ACAT2). CDX2, a known positive regulator of hepatocyte differentiation, was regulated by miR-181d and directly activated SOAT2 gene expression. Since SOAT2 is an enzyme that generates cholesteryl esters that are packaged into lipoproteins, our results suggest miR-181d plays a significant role in the negative regulation of key metabolic genes by TH in the liver.

  8. Substance P increases liver fibrosis by differential changes in senescence of cholangiocytes and hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying; Meng, Fanyin; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Tianhao; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Kennedy, Lindsey; Glaser, Trenton; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Invernizzi, Pietro; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2017-08-01

    Substance P (SP) is involved in the proliferation of cholangiocytes in bile duct-ligated (BDL) mice and human cholangiocarcinoma growth by interacting with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). To identify whether SP regulates liver fibrosis during cholestasis, wild-type or NK-1R knockout (NK-1R -/- ) mice that received BDL or sham surgery and multidrug resistance protein 2 knockout (Mdr2 -/- ) mice treated with either an NK-1R antagonist (L-733,060) or saline were used. Additionally, wild-type mice were treated with SP or saline intraperitoneally. In vivo, there was increased expression of tachykinin precursor 1 (coding SP) and NK-1R in both BDL and Mdr2 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. Expression of tachykinin precursor 1 and NK-1R was significantly higher in liver samples from primary sclerosing cholangitis patients compared to healthy controls. Knockout of NK-1R decreased BDL-induced liver fibrosis, and treatment with L-733,060 resulted in decreased liver fibrosis in Mdr2 -/- mice, which was shown by decreased sirius red staining, fibrosis gene and protein expression, and reduced transforming growth factor-β1 levels in serum and cholangiocyte supernatants. Furthermore, we observed that reduced liver fibrosis in NK-1R -/- mice with BDL surgery or Mdr2 -/- mice treated with L-733,060 was associated with enhanced cellular senescence of hepatic stellate cells and decreased senescence of cholangiocytes. In vitro, L-733,060 inhibited SP-induced expression of fibrotic genes in hepatic stellate cells and cholangiocytes; treatment with L-733,060 partially reversed the SP-induced decrease of senescence gene expression in cultured hepatic stellate cells and the SP-induced increase of senescence-related gene expression in cultured cholangiocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrate the regulatory effects of the SP/NK-1R axis on liver fibrosis through changes in cellular senescence during cholestatic liver injury. (Hepatology 2017;66:528-541). © 2017 by the American

  9. Optical diagnostic of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) from human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis is the second most common disease worldwide with half of the cases arising in the developing world. The mortality associated with hepatitis B and C can be reduced if the disease is detected at the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to detect biochemical changes accompanying hepatitis progression. Raman spectra were acquired from 20 individuals with six hepatitis B infected patients, six hepatitis C infected patients and eight healthy patients in order to gain an insight into the determination of biochemical changes for early diagnostic. The human blood serum was examined at a 532 nm excitation laser source. Raman characteristic peaks were observed in normal sera at 1006, 1157 and 1513 cm −1 , while in the case of hepatitis B and C these peaks were found to be blue shifted with decreased intensity. New Raman peaks appeared in HBV and HCV infected sera at 1194, 1302, 844, 905, 1065 and 1303 cm −1 respectively. A Mat lab subroutine and frequency domain filter program is developed and applied to signal processing of Raman scattering data. The algorithms have been successfully applied to remove the signal noise found in experimental scattering signals. The results show that Raman spectroscopy displays a high sensitivity to biochemical changes in blood sera during disease progression resulting in exceptional prediction accuracy when discriminating between normal and malignant. Raman spectroscopy shows enormous clinical potential as a rapid non-invasive diagnostic tool for hepatitis and other infectious diseases. (letter)

  10. Optical diagnostic of hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) from human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis is the second most common disease worldwide with half of the cases arising in the developing world. The mortality associated with hepatitis B and C can be reduced if the disease is detected at the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to detect biochemical changes accompanying hepatitis progression. Raman spectra were acquired from 20 individuals with six hepatitis B infected patients, six hepatitis C infected patients and eight healthy patients in order to gain an insight into the determination of biochemical changes for early diagnostic. The human blood serum was examined at a 532 nm excitation laser source. Raman characteristic peaks were observed in normal sera at 1006, 1157 and 1513 cm-1, while in the case of hepatitis B and C these peaks were found to be blue shifted with decreased intensity. New Raman peaks appeared in HBV and HCV infected sera at 1194, 1302, 844, 905, 1065 and 1303 cm-1 respectively. A Mat lab subroutine and frequency domain filter program is developed and applied to signal processing of Raman scattering data. The algorithms have been successfully applied to remove the signal noise found in experimental scattering signals. The results show that Raman spectroscopy displays a high sensitivity to biochemical changes in blood sera during disease progression resulting in exceptional prediction accuracy when discriminating between normal and malignant. Raman spectroscopy shows enormous clinical potential as a rapid non-invasive diagnostic tool for hepatitis and other infectious diseases.

  11. Peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Marchesini, Emanuela; Iorio, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of peginterferon plus ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: Trials were identified through manual and electronic searches. Randomized trials comparing peginterferon plus ribavirin...... with other antiviral treatments for patients with chronic hepatitis C and HIV were included. The primary outcome measure was virological response at the end of treatment and after > or =6 months (sustained). Intention-to-treat meta-analyses including data on all patients who were randomized were carried out....... RESULTS: Seven randomized trials were eligible for inclusion. The patients included had chronic hepatitis C and stable HIV and were not previously treated with interferon or ribavirin (treatment naive). The mean dosages were 180 or 1.5 microg/kg once weekly for peginterferon and 800 mg daily for ribavirin...

  12. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  13. DYRK1A is a regulator of S phase entry in hepatic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruitwagen, Hedwig Suzanne; Westendorp, Bart; Viebahn, Cornelia S; Post, Krista; van Wolferen, Monique E; Oosterhoff, Loes A; Egan, David A; Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Toussaint, Mathilda Jm; Schotanus, Baukje A; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C; Spee, Bart

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are adult liver stem cells that act as second line of defense in liver regeneration. They are normally quiescent, but in case of severe liver damage HPC proliferation is triggered by external activation mechanisms from their niche. Although several important

  14. Melatonin suppresses activation of hepatic stellate cells through ROR alpha-mediated inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shajari, Shiva; Laliena, Almudena; Heegsma, Janette; Jesus Tunon, Maria; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is scar tissue resulting from an uncontrolled wound-healing process in response to chronic liver injury. Liver damage generates an inflammatory reaction that activates hepatic stellate cells (HSC) that transdifferentiate from quiescent cells that control retinol metabolism to

  15. Sofosbuvir and Simeprevir Treatment of a Stem Cell Transplanted Teenager With Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischler, Björn; Priftakis, Peter; Sundin, Mikael

    2016-06-01

    There have been no previous reports on the use of interferon-free combinations in pediatric patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. An infected adolescent with severe sickle cell disease underwent stem cell transplantation and subsequent treatment with sofosbuvir and simeprevir during ongoing immunosuppression. Despite the emergence of peripheral edema as a side effect, treatment was continued with sustained antiviral response.

  16. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Mette D.; Spits, Hergen

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are lymphoid cells that do not express rearranged receptors and have important effector and regulatory functions in innate immunity and tissue remodeling. ILCs are categorized into 3 groups based on their distinct patterns of cytokine production and the requirement of

  17. Human innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly acknowledged as important mediators of immune homeostasis and pathology. ILCs act as early orchestrators of immunity, responding to epithelium-derived signals by expressing an array of cytokines and cell-surface receptors, which shape subsequent immune

  18. Fasting inhibits hepatic stellate cells activation and potentiates anti-cancer activity of Sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Re, Oriana; Panebianco, Concetta; Porto, Stefania; Cervi, Carlo; Rappa, Francesca; Di Biase, Stefano; Caraglia, Michele; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2018-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor outcome. Most HCCs develop in the context of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis caused by chronic inflammation. Short-term fasting approaches enhance the activity of chemotherapy in preclinical cancer models, other than HCC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sorafenib is the mainstay of treatment in HCC. However, its benefit is frequently short-lived. Whether fasting can alleviate liver fibrosis and whether combining fasting with Sorafenib is beneficial remains unknown. A 24 hr fasting (2% serum, 0.1% glucose)-induced changes on human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) LX-2 proliferation/viability/cell cycle were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry. Expression of lypolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation markers (vimentin, αSMA) was evaluated by qPCR and immunoblotting. Liver fibrosis and inflammation were evaluated in a mouse model of steatohepatitis exposed to cycles of fasting, by histological and biochemical analyses. A 24 hr fasting-induced changes were also analyzed on the proliferation/viability/glucose uptake of human HCC cells exposed to Sorafenib. An expression panel of genes involved in survival, inflammation, and metabolism was examined by qPCR in HCC cells exposed to fasting and/or Sorafenib. Fasting decreased the proliferation and the activation of HSC. Repeated cycles of short term starvation were safe in mice but did not improve fibrosis. Fasting synergized with Sorafenib in hampering HCC cell growth and glucose uptake. Finally, fasting normalized the expression levels of genes which are commonly altered by Sorafenib in HCC cells. Fasting or fasting-mimicking diet diets should be evaluated in preclinical studies as a mean to potentiate the activity of Sorafenib in clinical use. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Arctigenin protects against liver injury from acute hepatitis by suppressing immune cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Huafeng; Yang, Jinlai; Cheng, Yingnan; Wang, Dan; Yang, Fengrui; Li, Yan; Zhou, Dongmei; Wang, Yanxia; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Luhong; Zhang, Rongxin; Da, Yurong

    2018-06-01

    As a phenylpropanoid and dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan present in medical plants, such as those used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine, including Arctium lappa (Niubang), arctigenin exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the protective role of arctigenin in Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatitis in mice. Arctigenin remarkably reduced the congestion and necroinflammation of livers, and improved hepatic function (ALT and AST) in ConA-induced acute hepatitis in vivo. The infiltration of CD4 T, NKT and macrophages into the livers was found to be reduced with arctigenin treatment. Arctigenin suppressed ConA-induced T lymphocyte proliferations that might have resulted from enhanced IL-10 production by macrophages and CD4 T cells. These results suggested that arctigenin could be a powerful drug candidate for acute hepatitis through immune suppression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Brivanib attenuates hepatic fibrosis in vivo and stellate cell activation in vitro by inhibition of FGF, VEGF and PDGF signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo Nakamura

    Full Text Available Brivanib is a selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR tyrosine kinases, which are both involved in mechanisms of liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that inhibition of VEGFR and FGFR by brivanib would inhibit liver fibrosis. We therefore examined the effect of brivanib on liver fibrosis in three mouse models of fibrosis.In vivo, we induced liver fibrosis by bile duct ligation (BDL, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, and chronic thioacetamide (TAA administration. Liver fibrosis was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western immunoblotting. In vitro, we used LX-2 human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs to assess the effect of brivanib on stellate cell proliferation and activation.After in vivo induction with BDL, CCl4, and TAA, mice treated with brivanib showed reduced liver fibrosis and decreased expression of collagen Iα1 and α-smooth muscle actin in the liver. In vitro, brivanib decreased proliferation of HSCs induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, VEGF, and FGF. Brivanib also decreased stellate cell viability and inhibited PDGFBB-induced phosphorylation of its cognate receptor.Brivanib reduces liver fibrosis in three different animal models and decreases human hepatic stellate cell activation. Brivanib may represent a novel therapeutic approach to treatment of liver fibrosis and prevention of liver cancer.

  1. Evolution of a Cell Culture-Derived Genotype 1a Hepatitis C Virus (H77S.2) during Persistent Infection with Chronic Hepatitis in a Chimpanzee

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    Yi, MinKyung; Hu, Fengyu; Joyce, Michael; Saxena, Vikas; Welsch, Christoph; Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Yamane, Daisuke; Veselenak, Ronald; Pyles, Rick; Walker, Christopher M.; Tyrrell, Lorne; Bourne, Nigel; Lanford, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistent infection is a key feature of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, chimpanzee infections with cell culture-derived viruses (JFH1 or related chimeric viruses that replicate efficiently in cell culture) have been limited to acute-transient infections with no pathogenicity. Here, we report persistent infection with chronic hepatitis in a chimpanzee challenged with cell culture-derived genotype 1a virus (H77S.2) containing 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations. Following acute-transient infection with a chimeric H77/JFH1 virus (HJ3-5), intravenous (i.v.) challenge with 106 FFU H77S.2 virus resulted in immediate seroconversion and, following an unusual 4- to 6-week delay, persistent viremia accompanied by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, intrahepatic innate immune responses, and diffuse hepatopathy. This first persistent infection with cell culture-produced HCV provided a unique opportunity to assess evolution of cell culture-adapted virus in vivo. Synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates were greatest during the first 8 weeks of infection. Of 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations in H77S.2, Q1067R (NS3) had reverted to Q1067 and S2204I (NS5A) was replaced by T2204 within 8 weeks of infection. By 62 weeks, 4 of 6 mutations had reverted to the wild-type sequence, and all reverted to the wild-type sequence by 194 weeks. The data suggest H77S.2 virus has greater potential for persistence and pathogenicity than JFH1 and demonstrate both the capacity of a nonfit virus to persist for weeks in the liver in the absence of detectable viremia as well as strong selective pressure against cell culture-adaptive mutations in vivo. IMPORTANCE This study shows that mutations promoting the production of infectious genotype 1a HCV in cell culture have the opposite effect and attenuate replication in the liver of the only fully permissive animal species other than humans. It provides the only example to date of persistent infection in a chimpanzee

  2. Evolution of a cell culture-derived genotype 1a hepatitis C virus (H77S.2) during persistent infection with chronic hepatitis in a chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, MinKyung; Hu, Fengyu; Joyce, Michael; Saxena, Vikas; Welsch, Christoph; Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Yamane, Daisuke; Veselenak, Ronald; Pyles, Rick; Walker, Christopher M; Tyrrell, Lorne; Bourne, Nigel; Lanford, Robert E; Lemon, Stanley M

    2014-04-01

    Persistent infection is a key feature of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, chimpanzee infections with cell culture-derived viruses (JFH1 or related chimeric viruses that replicate efficiently in cell culture) have been limited to acute-transient infections with no pathogenicity. Here, we report persistent infection with chronic hepatitis in a chimpanzee challenged with cell culture-derived genotype 1a virus (H77S.2) containing 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations. Following acute-transient infection with a chimeric H77/JFH1 virus (HJ3-5), intravenous (i.v.) challenge with 10(6) FFU H77S.2 virus resulted in immediate seroconversion and, following an unusual 4- to 6-week delay, persistent viremia accompanied by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, intrahepatic innate immune responses, and diffuse hepatopathy. This first persistent infection with cell culture-produced HCV provided a unique opportunity to assess evolution of cell culture-adapted virus in vivo. Synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates were greatest during the first 8 weeks of infection. Of 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations in H77S.2, Q1067R (NS3) had reverted to Q1067 and S2204I (NS5A) was replaced by T2204 within 8 weeks of infection. By 62 weeks, 4 of 6 mutations had reverted to the wild-type sequence, and all reverted to the wild-type sequence by 194 weeks. The data suggest H77S.2 virus has greater potential for persistence and pathogenicity than JFH1 and demonstrate both the capacity of a nonfit virus to persist for weeks in the liver in the absence of detectable viremia as well as strong selective pressure against cell culture-adaptive mutations in vivo. This study shows that mutations promoting the production of infectious genotype 1a HCV in cell culture have the opposite effect and attenuate replication in the liver of the only fully permissive animal species other than humans. It provides the only example to date of persistent infection in a chimpanzee challenged with cell

  3. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stem cells via hepatic artery for the treatment of acute hepatic injury: an experimental study in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinghe; Han Jinling; Liu Yanping; Gao Jue; Xu Ke; Zhang Xitong; Ding Guomin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the transplantation of autologous bone marrow stem cells via hepatic artery in treating acute hepatic injury in experimental rabbit models and to clarify the synergistic effect of hepatocyte growth-promoting factor (pHGF) in stem cell transplantation therapy for liver injury. Methods Acute hepatic injury models were established in 15 experimental rabbits by daily subcutaneous injection of CCl 4 olive oil solution with the dose of 0.8 ml/kg for 4 days in succession. The experimental rabbits were randomly and equally divided into three groups: study group A (stem cell transplant, n = 5), study group B (stem cell transplant + pFHG, n = 5), and control group (n = 5). Bone marrow of 5 ml was drawn from the tibia in all rabbits of both study groups, from which bone marrow stem cells were isolated by using density gradient centrifugation, and 5 ml cellular suspension was prepared. Under fluoroscopic guidance, catheterization through the femoral artery was performed and the cellular suspension was infused into the liver via the hepatic artery. Only injection of saline was carried out in the rabbits of control group. For the rabbits in group B, pFHG (2.0 mg/kg) was administered intravenously every other day for 20 days. At 2, 4 and 8 weeks after stem cell transplantation, hepatic function was determined. Eight weeks after the transplantation all the rabbits were sacrificed and the liver specimens were collected and sent for pathological examination. Results After stem cell transplantation, the hepatic function was gradually improved.Eight weeks after the transplantation, the activity of AST, ALT and the content of ALB, TBIL were significantly lower than that before the procedure, while the content of GOLB was markedly increased in all rabbits. In addition, the difference in the above parameters between three groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Pathologically, the hepatocyte degeneration and the fiberous hyperplasia in the study groups

  4. A rare case of hepatic T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL) in a juvenile dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ho; Lamm, Catherine; Choi, Young-Chul; Lee, Jung-Woo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Ul-Soo

    2014-10-01

    A 7-month-old castrated male French Bull dog was presented with vomiting, lethargy, anorexia and weight loss of 2 weeks duration. The patient's history and clinical manifestations of suspected hepatopathy were subjected to ultrasonography, radiography, biochemical investigations and cytology of hepatic lesion. The cytologic impression was hepatic lymphoma, which was later confirmed by histopathology. The neoplastic cells were strongly diffusely immunoreactive for PAX5, but not immunoreactive for CD3, and B lymphocyte specific clonal proliferation was detected using by assay of antigen receptor rearrangement. Large numbers of immunoreactive mature non-neoplastic lymphocytes were admixed with the neoplastic cell population. Therefore, the immunohistochemical results were definitively consistent with a T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma (TCRBCL). This is the first description of a hepatic TCRBCL in a juvenile dog showing a poor response to aggressive chemotherapy.

  5. Measurement of Hepatic Protein Fractional Synthetic Rate with Stable Isotope Labeling Technique in Thapsigargin Stressed HepG2 Cells

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    Song, Juquan; Zhang, Xiao-jun; Boehning, Darren; Brooks, Natasha C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2012-01-01

    Severe burn-induced liver damage and dysfunction is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress has been shown to regulate global protein synthesis. In the current study, we induced ER stress in vitro and estimated the effect of ER stress on hepatic protein synthesis. The aim was two-fold: (1) to establish an in vitro model to isotopically measure hepatic protein synthesis and (2) to evaluate protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) in response to ER stress. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were cultured in medium supplemented with stable isotopes 1,2-13C2-glycine and L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine. ER stress was induced by exposing the cells to 100 nM of thapsigargin (TG). Cell content was collected from day 0 to 14. Alterations in cytosolic calcium were measured by calcium imaging and ER stress markers were confirmed by Western blotting. The precursor and product enrichments were detected by GC-MS analysis for FSR calculation. We found that the hepatic protein FSR were 0.97±0.02 and 0.99±0.05%/hr calculated from 1,2-13C2-glycine and L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine, respectively. TG depleted ER calcium stores and induced ER stress by upregulating p-IRE-1 and Bip. FSR dramatically decreased to 0.68±0.03 and 0.60±0.06%/hr in the TG treatment group (pisotope tracer incorporation technique is a useful method for studying the effects of ER stress on hepatic protein synthesis. PMID:22298954

  6. Addressing liver fibrosis with Liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Joanna E.; Poelstra, Klaas; Kamps, Jan A. A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a chronic disease that results from hepatitis B and C infections, alcohol abuse or metabolic and genetic disorders. Ultimately, progression of fibrosis leads to cirrhosis, a stage of the disease characterized by failure of the normal liver functions. Currently, the treatment of

  7. Cell cycle deregulation by the HBx protein of hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Cell cycle control by oncogenic viruses usually involves disruption of the normal restraints on cellular proliferation via abnormal proteolytic degradation and malignant transformation of cells. The cell cycle regulatory molecules viz. cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks and inhibitors of cdks as well as the transcriptional targets of signaling pathways induce cells to move through the cell cycle checkpoints. These check points are often found deregulated in tumor cells and in the cells afflicted with DNA tumor viruses predisposing them towards transformation. The X protein or HBx of hepatitis B virus is a promiscuous transactivator that has been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. However, the exact role of HBx in establishing a permissive environment for hepatocarcinogenesis is not fully understood. HBx activates the Ras-Raf-MAP kinase signaling cascade, through which it activates transcription factors AP-1 and NFkappa B, and stimulates cell DNA synthesis. HBx shows a profound effect on cell cycle progression even in the absence of serum. It can override the replicative senescence of cells in G0 phase by binding to p55sen. It stimulates the G0 cells to transit through G1 phase by activating Src kinases and the cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 complexes, that in turn induces the cyclin A promoter. There is an early and sustained level of cyclin-cdk2 complex in the presence of HBx during the cell cycle which is coupled with an increased protein kinase activity of cdk2 suggesting an early appearance of S phase. The interaction between cyclin-cdk2 complex and HBx occurs through its carboxyterminal region (amino acids 85-119 and requires a constitutive Src kinase activity. The increased cdk2 activity is associated with stabilization of cyclin E as well as proteasomal degradation of cdk inhibitor p27Kip1. Notably, the HBx mutant

  8. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

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    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-11-15

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) and HBV Co-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z.; Nishikawa, S.; Gao, S.; Eksteen, J. B.; Czub, M.; Gill, M. J.; Osiowy, C.; van der Meer, F.; van Marle, G.; Coffin, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets by the HBV. Aims To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells) in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals. Methods Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy) and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy) were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc)-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing. Results All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (PHBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R) were detected in a minor percentage of the population. Summary HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation. PMID:26390290

  10. 3D hepatic cultures simultaneously maintain primary hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell phenotypes.

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    Yeonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM, which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1 demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism

  11. Establishment and characterization of a spontaneously immortalized trophoblast cell line (HPT-8) and its hepatitis B virus-expressing clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Weilu; Shao, Chen; Zhang, Jingxia; Men, Ke; Shao, Zhongjun; Yan, Yongping; Xu, Dezhong

    2011-08-01

    Most trophoblast cell lines currently available to study vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are immortalized by viral transformation. Our goal was to establish and characterize a spontaneously immortalized human first-trimester trophoblast cell line and its HBV-expressing clone. Chorionic villi of Asian human first-trimester placentae were digested with trypsin and collagenase I to obtain the primary trophoblast cell culture. A spontaneously immortalized trophoblast cell line (HPT-8) was analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, cell cycle analysis, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. HPT-8 cells were stably transfected with the adr subtype of HBV (HPT-8-HBV) and characterized by PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We obtained a clonal derivative of a spontaneously immortalized primary cell clone (HPT-8). HPT-8 cells were epithelioid and polygonal, and formed multinucleate, giant cells. They exhibited microvilli, distinct desmosomes between adjacent cells, abundant endoplasm, lipid inclusions and glycogen granules, which are all characteristic of cytotrophoblasts. HPT-8 cells expressed cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 18, vimentin, cluster of differentiation antigen 9, epidermal growth factor receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1 and placental alkaline phosphatase. They secreted prolactin, estradiol, progesterone and hCG, and were positive for HLA-G, a marker of extravillous trophoblasts. HPT-8-HBV cells were positive for HBV relaxed-circular, covalently closed circular DNA and pre-S sequence. HPT-8-HBV cells also produced and secreted HBV surface antigen and HBV e antigen. We established a trophoblast cell line, HPT-8 and its HBV-expressing clone which could be valuable in exploring the mechanism of HBV viral integration in human trophoblasts during intrauterine infection.

  12. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Hepatitis B Virus Among Homeless and Nonhomeless United States Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noska, Amanda J; Belperio, Pamela S; Loomis, Timothy P; O'Toole, Thomas P; Backus, Lisa I

    2017-07-15

    Veterans are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Homeless veterans are at particularly high risk for HIV, HCV, and HBV due to a variety of overlapping risk factors, including high rates of mental health disorders and substance use disorders. The prevalence of HIV, HCV, and HBV among homeless veterans nationally is currently unknown. This study describes national testing rates and prevalence of HIV, HCV, and HBV among homeless veterans. Using data from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Corporate Warehouse Data from 2015, we evaluated HIV, HCV, and HBV laboratory testing and infection confirmation rates and diagnoses on the Problem List for nonhomeless veterans and for veterans utilizing homeless services in 2015. Among 242740 homeless veterans in VA care in 2015, HIV, HCV, and HBV testing occurred in 63.8% (n = 154812), 78.1% (n = 189508), and 52.8% (n = 128262), respectively. The HIV population prevalence was 1.52% (3684/242740) among homeless veterans, compared with 0.44% (23797/5424685) among nonhomeless veterans. The HCV population prevalence among homeless veterans was 12.1% (29311/242740), compared with 2.7% (148079/5424685) among nonhomeless veterans, while the HBV population prevalence was 0.99% (2395/242740) for homeless veterans and 0.40% (21611/5424685) among nonhomeless veterans. To our knowledge this work represents the most comprehensive tested prevalence and population prevalence estimates of HIV, HCV, and HBV among homeless veterans nationally. The data demonstrate high prevalence of HIV, HCV, and HBV among homeless veterans, and reinforce the need for integrated healthcare services along with homeless programming. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Hedgehog-mediated paracrine interaction between hepatic stellate cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Nan; Tang Zhaofeng; Deng Meihai; Zhong Yuesi; Lin Jizong; Yang Xuhui; Xiang Peng; Xu Ruiyun

    2008-01-01

    During liver injury, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can migrate and differentiate into hepatocytes. Hepatic stellate cell (SC) activation is a pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that SCs may play an important role in regulating MSC proliferation and differentiation through the paracrine signaling pathway. We demonstrate that MSCs and SCs both express hedgehog (Hh) pathway components, including its ligands, receptors, and target genes. Transwell co-cultures of SCs and MSCs showed that the SCs produced sonic hedgehog (Shh), which enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs. These findings demonstrate that SCs indirectly modulate the activity of MSCs in vitro via the Hh pathway, and provide a plausible explanation for the mechanisms of transplanted MSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis

  14. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

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    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  15. Application of human erythrocytes to a radioimmune assay of immune complexes in serum. [Lupus erythematosus, type B hepatitis

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    Tsuda, F; Miyakawa, Y; Mayumi, M [Tokyo Metropolitan Lab. of Public Health (Japan)

    1979-07-01

    An immune adherence receptor exists on the surface of primate erythrocytes, and has been characterized as a receptor for the activated third component of complement (C3b). Human red blood cells (RCBs, blood group O) were applied to a sensitive determination of complement-fixing, soluble immune complexes in serum. The method involved the binding of immune complexes with RBCs in the presence of complement and the detection of cell-bound IgG molecules by radiolabelled anti-human IgG antibodies. Since the binding of RBCs with monomeric IgG was minimal, cell bound IgG molecules were taken as representing immune complexes. When aggregated human gammaglobulin (AHG) was used as a model of immune complexes, as little as 5 ..mu..g dissolved in 1 ml of normal human serum were detected. The binding of RBCs with AHG was inhibited in EDTA solution where the classical complement pathway could not be activated. The RBC radioimmune assay was successfully applied to the determination of soluble immune complexes in pathological serum samples obtained from the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and those with fulminant Type B hepatitis. False-positive results by autoantibodies against RBCs could be excluded by a Coombs test and by comparing the binding in the presence of complement with that in EDTA solution. The ubiquitous availability of RBCs coupled with a high sensitivity would allow the RBC radioimmune assay to be used as a further method of determining immune complexes in the serum.

  16. Serotonin Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells Contribute to Sex Disparity in Hepatocellular CarcinomaSummary

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    Qiqi Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC occurs more frequently and aggressively in men than in women. Although sex hormones are believed to play a critical role in this disparity, the possible contribution of other factors largely is unknown. We aimed to investigate the role of serotonin on its contribution of sex discrepancy during HCC. Methods: By using an inducible zebrafish HCC model through hepatocyte-specific transgenic krasV12 expression, differential rates of HCC in male and female fish were characterized by both pharmaceutical and genetic interventions. The findings were validated further in human liver disease samples. Results: Accelerated HCC progression was observed in krasV12-expressing male zebrafish and male fish liver tumors were found to have higher hepatic stellate cell (HSC density and activation. Serotonin, which is essential for HSC survival and activation, similarly were found to be synthesized and accumulated more robustly in males than in females. Serotonin-activated HSCs could promote HCC carcinogenesis and concurrently increase serotonin synthesis via transforming growth factor (Tgfb1 expression, hence contributing to sex disparity in HCC. Analysis of liver disease patient samples showed similar male predominant serotonin accumulation and Tgfb1 expression. Conclusions: In both zebrafish HCC models and human liver disease samples, a predominant serotonin synthesis and accumulation in males resulted in higher HSC density and activation as well as Tgfb1 expression, thus accelerating HCC carcinogenesis in males. Keywords: Liver Cancer, TGFB1, Kras, Zebrafish

  17. Stimulated human fibroblast cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.P.; Gale, K.L.; Einspenner, M.; Greenstock, C.L.; Gentner, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for cloning cultured mammalian cells have supported the most universally-accepted method for measuring the induction of lethality by geno-toxicants such as ionizing radiation: the 'survival of colony-forming ability (CFA)' assay. Since most cultured human cell lines exhibit plating efficiency (i.e. the percentage of cells that are capable of reproductively surviving and dividing to form visible colonies) well below 100%, such assays are in essence 'survival of plating efficiency' assays, since they are referred to the plating (or cloning) efficiency of control (i.e. unirradiated) cells. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  18. Hepatitis B and C virus co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus positive North Indian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Singh, Sarman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients at a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. METHODS: Serum samples from 451 HIV positive patients were analyzed for HBsAg and HCV antibodies during three years (Jan 2003-Dec 2005). The control group comprised of apparently healthy bone-marrow and renal donors. RESULTS: The study population comprised essentially of heterosexually transmitted HIV infection. The prevalence rate of HBsAg in this population was 5.3% as compared to 1.4% in apparently healthy donors (P < 0.001). Though prevalence of HCV co-infection (2.43%) was lower than HBV in this group of HIV positive patients, the prevalence was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than controls (0.7%). Triple infection of HIV, HBV and HCV was not detected in any patient. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a significantly high prevalence of hepatitis virus infections in HIV infected patients. Hepatitis viruses in HIV may lead to faster progression to liver cirrhosis and a higher risk of antiretroviral therapy induced hepatotoxicity. Therefore, it would be advisable to detect hepatitis virus co-infections in these patients at the earliest. PMID:17106941

  19. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, syphilis, hepatitis B and C in blood donations in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavenyengwa, Rooyen T; Mukesi, Munyaradzi; Chipare, Israel; Shoombe, Esra

    2014-05-05

    Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are infections which are common in some communities in Southern Africa. It is important to screen blood donations for these infections. This is a retrospective study which involved reviewing of previous blood donation records for the year 2012 in Namibia. The records were analyzed to determine the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, Hepatitis B and C among blood donations with regard to gender, age and geographical region of the donors. The findings indicated a significantly low prevalence of HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-Hepatitis C among the blood donations. A low infection rate of 1.3% by any of the four tested TTIs was found among the blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia in 2012. The blood donations given by the donor population in Namibia has a low infection rate with the HIV, syphilis, HBsAg and anti-HCV. A strict screening regime must continue to be used as the infections are still present albeit in small numbers.

  20. Differential effect of combined lipase deficiency (cld/cld) on human hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, J C; Doolittle, M H; White, A L

    2001-11-01

    Combined lipase deficiency (cld) is a recessively inherited disorder in mice associated with a deficiency of LPL and hepatic lipase (HL) activity. LPL is synthesized in cld tissues but is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas mouse HL (mHL) is secreted but inactive. In this study we investigated the effect of cld on the secretion of human HL (hHL) protein mass and activity. Differentiated liver cell lines were derived from cld mice and their normal heterozygous (het) littermates by transformation of hepatocytes with SV40 large T antigen. After transient transfection with lipase expression constructs, secretion of hLPL activity from cld cells was only 12% of that from het cells. In contrast, the rate of secretion of hHL activity and protein mass per unit of expressed hHL mRNA was identical for the two cell lines. An intermediate effect was observed for mHL, with a 46% reduction in secretion of activity from cld cells. The ER glucosidase inhibitor, castanospermine, decreased secretion of both hLPL and hHL from het cells by approximately 70%, but by only approximately 45% from cld cells. This is consistent with data suggesting that cld may result from a reduced concentration of the ER chaperone calnexin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a differential effect of cld on hLPL, mHL, and hHL secretion, suggesting differential requirements for activation and exit of the enzymes from the ER.

  1. Antibodies against human cytochrome P-450db1 in autoimmune hepatitis type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, U M; Hauri, H P; Loeper, J; Homberg, J C; Meyer, U A

    1988-11-01

    In a subgroup of children with chronic active hepatitis, circulating autoantibodies occur that bind to liver and kidney endoplasmic reticulum (anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody type I or anti-LKM1). Anti-LKM1 titers follow the severity of the disease and the presence of these antibodies serves as a diagnostic marker for this autoimmune hepatitis type II. We demonstrate that anti-LKM1 IgGs specifically inhibit the hydroxylation of bufuralol in human liver microsomes. Using two assay systems with different selectivity for the two cytochrome P-450 isozymes catalyzing bufuralol metabolism in human liver, we show that anti-LKM1 exclusively recognizes cytochrome P-450db1. Immunopurification of the LKM1 antigen from solubilized human liver microsomes resulted in an electrophoretically homogenous protein that had the same molecular mass (50 kDa) as purified P-450db1 and an identical N-terminal amino acid sequence. Recognition of both purified P-450db1 and the immunoisolated protein on western blots by several monoclonal antibodies confirmed the identity of the LKM1 antigen with cytochrome P-450db1. Cytochrome P-450db1 has been identified as the target of a common genetic polymorphism of drug oxidation. However, the relationship between the polymorphic cytochrome P-450db1 and the appearance of anti-LKM1 autoantibodies as well as their role in the pathogenesis of chronic active hepatitis remains speculative.

  2. Generation and characterization of p53 null transformed hepatic progenitor cells: oval cells give rise to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumble, Melissa L; Croager, Emma J; Yeoh, George C T; Quail, Elizabeth A

    2002-03-01

    Oval cells are bipotential liver stem cells able to differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelia. In normal adult liver oval cells are quiescent, existing in low numbers around the periportal region, and proliferate following severe, prolonged liver trauma. There is evidence implicating oval cells in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and hence the availability of an immortalized oval cell line would be invaluable for the study of liver cell lineage differentiation and carcinogenesis. A novel approach in the generation of cell lines is the use of the p53 knockout mouse. Absence of p53 allows a cell to cycle past the normal Hayflick limit, rendering it immortalized, although subsequent genetic alterations are thought necessary for transformation. p53 knockout mice were fed a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet, previously shown to increase oval cell numbers in wild-type mice. The oval cells were isolated by centrifugal elutriation and maintained in culture. Colonies of hepatic cells were isolated and characterized with respect to phenotype, growth characteristics and tumorigenicity. Analysis of gene expression by Northern blotting and immunocytochemistry suggests they are oval-like cells by virtue of albumin and transferrin expression, as well as the oval cell markers alpha fetoprotein, M(2)-pyruvate kinase and A6. Injection into athymic nude mice shows the cell lines are capable of forming tumors which phenotypically resemble hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the use of p53 null hepatic cells successfully generated immortalized and tumorigenic hepatic stem cell lines. The results presented support the idea that deleting p53 allows immortalization and contributes to the transformation of the oval-like cell lines. Further, the tumorigenic status of the cell lines is direct evidence for the participation of oval cells in the formation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. A methionine-choline-deficient diet elicits NASH in the immunodeficient mouse featuring a model for hepatic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, Sandra; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Christ, Bruno

    2012-02-01

    Non-alcoholic staetohepatitis (NASH) is associated with fat deposition in the liver favoring inflammatory processes and development of fibrosis, cirrhosis and finally hepatocellular cancer. In Western lifestyle countries, NASH has reached a 20% prevalence in the obese population with escalating tendency in the future. Very often, liver transplantation is the only therapeutic option. Recently, transplantation of hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells was suggested a feasible alternative to whole organ transplantation to ameliorate donor organ shortage. Hence, in the present work an animal model of NASH was established in immunodeficient mice to investigate the feasibility of human stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cell transplantation. NASH was induced by feeding a methionine/choline-deficient diet (MCD-diet) for up to 5 weeks. Animals developed a fatty liver featuring fibrosis and elevation of the proinflammatory markers serum amyloid A (SAA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased as well as alanine aminotransferase demonstrating inflammation-linked hepatocyte damage. Elevation of αSMA mRNA and collagen I as well as liver architecture deterioation indicated massive fibrosis. Both short- and long-term post-transplantation human hepatocyte-like cells resided in the mouse host liver indicating parenchymal penetration and most likely functional engraftment. Hence, the NASH model in the immunodeficient mouse is the first to allow for the assessment of the therapeutic impact of human stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Duodenorenal Fistula as a Complication of Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatic Metastasis of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Erkan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Duodenorenal fistula is a rare condition. The right kidney and the second part of the duodenum are in close anatomic proximity. Although unusual, fistulae can occur between these two anatomic structures. We report a patient who presented with duodenorenal fistula after radiofrequency ablation for renal cell carcinoma and its hepatic metastasis.

  5. Bile acids induce hepatic stellate cell proliferation via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Ridolfi, F; Hannivoort, R; Saccomanno, S; Homan, M; De Minicis, S; Jansen, PLM; Candelaresi, C; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    Background B Aims: Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. In many liver diseases, HSCs are exposed to inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and bile acids. Although inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species are known to

  6. Bile acids induce hepatic stellate cell proliferation via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Ridolfi, Francesco; Hannivoort, Rebekka; Saccomanno, Stefania; Homan, Manon; de Minicis, Samuele; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Benedetti, Antonio; Moshage, Han

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. In many liver diseases, HSCs are exposed to inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and bile acids. Although inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species are known to

  7. Relationships among hepatitis C virus, hepatocellular carcinoma, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Seong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies have reported various associations between HCV and the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We report the radiologic findings in a rare case of simultaneous occurrence of HCC and diffuse large B cell lymphoma in a HCV carrier.

  8. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protects against high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing hepatic PPAR-γ expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Peng, Sophia; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Thorn, Natalie; Farris, Alton B; Jain, Sanjay; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier; Anania, Frank; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-01-15

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice, however, the mechanisms involved are not known. In this study we investigated the effects of GDNF overexpression and nanoparticle delivery of GDNF in mice on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis and the expression of genes involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis. Transgenic overexpression of GDNF in liver and other metabolically active tissues was protective against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. Mice overexpressing GDNF had significantly reduced P62/sequestosome 1 protein levels suggestive of accelerated autophagic clearance. They also had significantly reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CD36 gene expression and protein levels, and lower expression of mRNA coding for enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis. GDNF-loaded nanoparticles were protective against short-term HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and attenuated liver fibrosis in mice with long-standing HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. They also suppressed the liver expression of steatosis-associated genes. In vitro, GDNF suppressed triglyceride accumulation in Hep G2 cells through enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling and inhibition of PPAR-γ gene promoter activity. These results show that GDNF acts directly in the liver to protect against HFD-induced cellular stress and that GDNF may have a role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  9. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  10. Quantification of human hepatic binding protein (HBP) via sup 99m Tc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) liver scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgolini, I; Hoebart, J; Bergmann, H; Sinzinger, H [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Mueller, C [Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Klinik fuer Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie; Angelberger, P [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH (Austria). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1991-01-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ({sup 99m}Tc-NGA) was synthesized by covalent coupling of 2-imino-2-methoxyethyl-1-thio-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside to the primary amino groups of human serum albumin. Injections of {sup 99m}Tc-NGA (150 MBq; 3.5 mg (=50 nmol)/ml) demonstrated the liver to be the exclusive site of tracer-uptake. Simulation of {sup 99m}Tc-NGA-kinetics allowed quantification of binding to the hepatic binding protein (HBP). Using this model we studied 250 patients with various liver disease. In alcoholic liver cirrhosis such patients with Child B and Child C stage cirrhosis had a lower HBP-concentration in the liver compared to control individuals. The group with the most advanced cirrhosis had a significantly lower HBP-concentration (0.20-0.45 {mu}mol/l) than Child A patients (0.60-0.85 {mu}mol/l; p<0.01) and Child B patients (0.45-0.60 {mu}mol/l; p<0.05). In patients with biopsy proven liver fibrosis (0.80-1.22 {mu}mol/l) no difference in receptor concentration to normal individuals was estimated. Patients with recently diagnosed acute viral hepatitis underwent repeated {sup 99m}Tc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) scanning of the liver during the course of the disease. Return of liver function tests to normal values was associated with an increased hepatic imaging size as well as increase in HBP-concentration. In patients exhibiting a prolonged course of the disease changes in NGA-kinetic data were borderline and the hepatic image size unchanged. The values obtained for HBP-concentration in the liver amounted to 0.30-0.50 {mu}mol/l liver for patients with hepatoma, to 0.40-0.60 {mu}mol/l in patients with liver metastasis and to 0.90-1.20 {mu}mol/l in cancer patients without liver malignancy. It is concluded that scintigraphic evaluation of functional hepatic cell mass using the new receptor-tracer {sup 99m}Tc-NGA provides an in vivo diagnostic mean allowing quantitative data on liver function beside assessment of liver morphology.

  11. Superoxide produced by Kupffer cells is an essential effector in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Manabu; Nakashima, Masahiro; Habu, Yoshiko; Shono, Satoshi; Uchida, Takefumi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Seki, Shuhji

    2008-12-01

    Although concanavalin A (Con-A)-induced experimental hepatitis is thought to be induced by activated T cells, natural killer T (NKT) cells, and cytokines, precise mechanisms are still unknown. In the current study, we investigated the roles of Kupffer cells, NKT cells, FasL, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and superoxide in Con-A hepatitis in C57BL/6 mice. Removal of Kupffer cells using gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)) from the liver completely inhibited Con-A hepatitis, whereas increased serum TNF and IFN-gamma levels were not inhibited at all. Unexpectedly, anti-FasL antibody pretreatment did not inhibit Con-A hepatitis, whereas it inhibited hepatic injury induced by a synthetic ligand of NKT cells, alpha-galactosylceramide. Furthermore, GdCl(3) pretreatment changed neither the activation-induced down-regulation of NK1.1 antigens as well as T cell receptors of NKT cells nor the increased expression of the CD69 activation antigen of hepatic T cells. CD68(+) Kupffer cells greatly increased in proportion in the early phase after Con-A injection; this increase was abrogated by GdCl(3) pretreatment. Anti-TNF antibody (Ab) pretreatment did not inhibit the increase of Kupffer cells, but it effectively suppressed superoxide/reactive oxygen production from Kupffer cells and the resulting hepatic injury. Conversely, depletion of NKT cells in mice by NK1.1 Ab pretreatment did suppress both the increase of CD68(+) Kupffer cells and Con-A hepatitis. Consistently, the diminution of oxygen radicals produced by Kupffer cells by use of free radical scavengers greatly inhibited Con-A hepatitis without suppressing cytokine production. However, adoptive transfer experiments also indicate that a close interaction/cooperation of Kupffer cells with NKT cells is essential for Con-A hepatitis. Superoxide produced by Kupffer cells may be the essential effector in Con-A hepatitis, and TNF and NKT cells support their activation and superoxide production.

  12. Age dependent in vitro metabolism of bifenthrin in rat and human hepatic microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallani, Gopinath C; Chandrasekaran, Appavu; Kassahun, Kelem; Shen, Li; ElNaggar, Shaaban F; Liu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, undergoes oxidative metabolism leading to the formation of 4'-hydroxy-bifenthrin (4'-OH-BIF) and hydrolysis leading to the formation of TFP acid in rat and human hepatic microsomes. In this study, age-dependent metabolism of bifenthrin in rats and humans were determined via the rates of formation of 4'-OH-BIF and TFP acid following incubation of bifenthrin in juvenile and adult rat (PND 15 and PND 90) and human (18years) liver microsomes. Furthermore, in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearance (CL int ) of bifenthrin was determined by substrate consumption method in a separate experiment. The mean V max (±SD) for the formation of 4'-OH-BIF in juvenile rat hepatic microsomes was 25.0±1.5pmol/min/mg which was significantly lower (pbifenthrin occurs primarily via oxidative pathway with relatively lesser contribution (~30%) from hydrolytic pathway in both rat and human liver microsomes. The CL int values for bifenthrin, determined by monitoring the consumption of substrate, in juvenile and adult rat liver microsomes fortified with NADPH were 42.0±7.2 and 166.7±20.5μl/min/mg, respectively, and the corresponding values for human liver microsomes were 76.0±4.0 and 21.3±1.2μl/min/mg, respectively. The data suggest a major species difference in the age dependent metabolism of bifenthrin. In human liver microsomes, bifenthrin is metabolized at a much higher rate in juveniles than in adults, while the opposite appears to be true in rat liver microsomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. Conclusion: We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

  14. Occurrence of water-borne enteric viruses in two settlements based in Eastern Chad: analysis of hepatitis E virus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Latorre, Laura; Carratala, Anna; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Calgua, Byron; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of water-borne acute hepatitis in areas with poor sanitation. In 2004 an outbreak of HEV infection affected around 2,000 people in Eastern Chad (Dar Sila). This paper describes the decrease in the incidence of acute jaundice syndrome (AJS) from 2004 until 2009 when a mean incidence of 0.48 cases/1,000 people/year was recorded in the region. Outbreaks of AJS were identified in some of the camps in 2007 and 2008. Moreover, water samples from drinking water sources were screened for human adenoviruses considered as viral indicators and for hepatitis A virus and HEV. Screening of faecal samples from donkeys for HEV gave negative results. Some of the samples were also analysed for faecal coliforms showing values before disinfection treatment between 3 and >50 colony forming units per 100 mL. All water samples tested were negative for HEV and HAV; however, the presence of low levels of human adenoviruses in 4 out of 16 samples analysed indicates possible human faecal contamination of groundwater. Consequently, breakdowns in the treatment of drinking water and/or increased excretion of hepatitis viruses, which could be related to the arrival of a new population, could spread future outbreaks through drinking water.

  15. Antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of purple pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) extract on activated hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardin, Cristiane C; Parisi, Mariana M; Martins, Leo A M; Terra, Silvia R; Borojevic, Radovan; Vizzotto, Márcia; Perry, Marcos L S; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Guma, Fátima T C R

    2014-01-01

    The presence of phenolic compounds in fruit- and vegetable-rich diets has attracted researchers' attention due to their health-promoting effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of purple pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) extract on cell proliferation, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death and cell cycle in murine activated hepatic stellate cells (GRX). Cell viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was significantly decreased on cells treated with 50 and 100 µg ml(-1) of purple pitanga extract for 48 and 72 h, and the percentage of dead cell stained with 7-amino-actinomycin D was significantly higher in treated cells. The reduction of cell proliferation was dose dependent, and we also observed alterations on cell cycle progression. At all times studied, GRX cells treated with 50 and 100 µg ml(-1) of purple pitanga showed a significant reduction in cellular mitochondrial content as well as a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, our results indicated that purple pitanga extract induces early and late apoptosis/necrosis and necrotic death in GRX cells. This is the first report describing the antiproliferative, cytotoxic and apoptotic activity for E. uniflora fruits in hepatic stellate cells. The present study provides a foundation for the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis, and more studies will be carried to elucidate this effect. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cytochrome P450 isoform selectivity in human hepatic theobromine metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Simon; Miners, John O

    1999-01-01

    Aims The plasma clearance of theobromine (TB; 3,7-dimethylxanthine) is known to be induced in cigarette smokers. To determine whether TB may serve as a model substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, or possibly other isoforms, studies were undertaken to identify the individual human liver microsomal CYP isoforms responsible for the conversion of TB to its primary metabolites. Methods The kinetics of formation of the primary TB metabolites 3-methylxanthine (3-MX), 7-methylxanthine (7-MX) and 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7-DMU) by human liver microsomes were characterized using a specific hplc procedure. Effects of CYP isoform-selective xenobiotic inhibitor/substrate probes on each pathway were determined and confirmatory studies with recombinant enzymes were performed to define the contribution of individual isoforms to 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU formation. Results The CYP1A2 inhibitor furafylline variably inhibited (0–65%) 7-MX formation, but had no effect on other pathways. Diethyldithiocarbamate and 4-nitrophenol, probes for CYP2E1, inhibited the formation of 3-MX, 7-MX and 3,7-DMU by ≈55–60%, 35–55% and 85%, respectively. Consistent with the microsomal studies, recombinant CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 exhibited similar apparent Km values for 7-MX formation and CYP2E1 was further shown to have the capacity to convert TB to both 3-MX and 3,7-DMU. Conclusions Given the contribution of multiple isoforms to 3-MX and 7-MX formation and the negligible formation of 3,7-DMU in vivo, TB is of little value as a CYP isoform-selective substrate in humans. PMID:10215755

  17. Hepatitis c and human rights: comparison of legal experience of Ukraine and Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyuta, Iryna Y

    2018-01-01

    A comparative legal research of human rights provision in Ukraine and Georgia, in the aspect of combating viral HCV, was conducted. Ukrainian advocacy experience and Georgian strategic litigation experience with regard to human rights and HCV was analyzed. Key international instruments, which lay the conceptual foundations as well as outline the measures, which are directed at human rights in patient care provision and fighting viral hepatitis, were elucidated. Attention was paid to the Global health sector strategy. Viral hepatitis, 2016 - 2021 [1], which, for the first time, defined a global strategy on fighting viral hepatitis, in particular HCV and envisaged the advocacy vectors. The frames of interaction of the human rights in patient care concept and public health, which consists in realization of certain human rights were elucidated and the necessity to embody the human rights in patient care concept into the state policy in the field of public health was determined. It was found out that a common international problem in combating HCV is a deficiency of financial resources, which are necessary for effective fighting the epidemics and guarantee equal access to treatment for every person. The international community outlined five most important spheres, which require investments and will catalyze the measures, which need to be taken in order to fight hepatitis. Analysis of the Ukrainian experience was focused on the issue of donated blood safety and successful advocacy campaigns, which were carried out in order to promote the adoption of programs on prophylactics, diagnostics and treatment of HCV both on national and regional levels. Examples of ensuring the rights of the marginalized groups during HCV treatment, in particular of the people who inject drugs, people living with HIV, participants of the antiterrorist operation were provided. Interesting and important is the experience of Georgia concerning human rights protection in the ECtHR, which has a legal

  18. Discovery of a novel hepatovirus (Phopivirus of seals) related to human Hepatitis A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony. S.J.,; St. Leger, J.A; Liang, E.; Hicks, A.L.; Sanchez-Leon, M.D; Ip, Hon S.; Jain, K.; Lefkowitch, J. H.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Knowles, N.; Goldstein, T.; Pugliares, K.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2015-01-01

    Describing the viral diversity of wildlife can provide interesting and useful insights into the natural history of established human pathogens. In this study, we describe a previously unknown picornavirus in harbor seals (tentatively named phopivirus) that is related to human hepatitis A virus (HAV). We show that phopivirus shares several genetic and phenotypic characteristics with HAV, including phylogenetic relatedness across the genome, a specific and seemingly quiescent tropism for hepatocytes, structural conservation in a key functional region of the type III internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), and a codon usage bias consistent with that of HAV.

  19. Human hepatic carbohydrate metabolism. Dynamic observation using 13C MRS without proton decoupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehira, H.; Obata, T.; Koga, M.; Yoshida, K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic natural-abundance 13 C MR spectroscopy (MRS) studies without proton decoupling were performed in the human liver using commercial 1.5 T MR equipment. Material and methods: A single tuned custom-made circular surface coil with an OD of 20 cm operating at 16.04 MHz was used for the 13 C study. Seventy-five grams of glucose dissolved in water was administered for the natural-abundance 13 C-MRS dynamic study which lasted for approximately 40 to 60 min. Data acquisition was broken into 20-min and 1.7-min blocks. Localized proton shimming with a whole-body coil was performed with sufficient volume to include the observing area of the surface coil; the line width of the water signal was less than 20 Hz. Results and Conclusion: The glucose and glycogen spectra were clearly visible at 80 to 120 ppm after oral administration of the glucose solution. These data demonstrate that dynamic hepatic carbohydrate metabolism can be observed with commercially available MR equipment. Given that the human hepatic glycogen pool reaches maximum level within less than 10 min, this technique should provide a direct diagnosis of hepatic carbohydrate metabolic disorders. (orig.)

  20. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L

    2001-01-01

    The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin-converti......The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin......-converting enzyme (ACE) blockade] or without (control) administration of the ACE inhibitor enalapril (10 mg iv). Splanchnic blood flow was estimated by indocyanine green, and splanchnic substrate exchange was determined by the arteriohepatic venous difference. Exercise led to an approximately 20-fold increase (P ...-blockade group vs. the control group, hormones, metabolites, VO(2), and RER followed the same pattern of changes in ACE-blockade and control groups during exercise. Splanchnic blood flow (at rest: 1.67 +/- 0.12, ACE blockade; 1.59 +/- 0.18 l/min, control) decreased during moderate exercise (0.78 +/- 0.07, ACE...

  1. Primary hepatic peripheral T-cell lymphoma mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisun; Park, Kil Sun; Kang, Min Ho; Kim, Yook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Hanlim; Choi, Jae-Woon; Ryu, Dong Hee

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive neoplasms which may involve the liver. The imaging manifestations of hepatic lymphoma are highly variable and show overlapping appearances of numerous other hepatic diseases. As the management and prognosis of lymphoma differ markedly from those of other malignant diseases, prompt diagnosis and early effective treatment are very important. Here, we report an atypical case of primary PTCL not otherwise specified involving the liver that exhibited a solitary hepatic mass mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on CT. Liver biopsy is not commonly recommended in highly suspicious cases of HCC. However, in a patient without risk factors for HCC, consideration of other diagnostic possibilities is required and needle biopsy may be a more rational choice. An imaging approach, based on a careful review of clinical and laboratory findings is essential to prevent false-positive diagnosis of HCC and subsequent invasive treatment.

  2. Syngeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with immunosuppression for hepatitis-associated severe aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Savic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia occurs in up to 10% of all aplastic anemia cases. Syngeneic bone marrow transplantation is rare in patients with severe aplastic anemia and usually requires pre-transplant conditioning to provide engraftment. We report on a 29-year-old male patient with hepatitis-associated severe aplastic anemia who had a series of severe infectious conditions before transplantation, including tracheal inflammation. Life-threatening bleeding, which developed after bronchoscopy, was successfully treated with activated recombinant factor VII and platelet transfusions. Syngeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using immunosuppressive treatment with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin A without high-dose pre-transplant conditioning was performed, followed by complete hematologic and hepatic recovery.

  3. Study on the peripheral dendritic cell function in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ruihai; Chen Miaotian; Li Rui; Zheng Jiashui

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of peripheral dendritic cell function on the clinical course and anti-viral treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Methods: Dendritic cells (DCs) were cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and surface markers (phenotype) examined with flow-cytometry in 71 patients with chronic hepatitis B, 17 chronic HBV carriers and 42 controls. Those patients with positive HBV-DNA (57/71) were treated with lamivudine or interferon-α and DCs reexamined after completion of treatment. Results: The expression of DCs phenotypes CD1a and CD86 in chronic hepatitis B patients and chronic carriers were significantly lower than those in controls (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Among the 71 patients, CD1a, CD40, CD80 and CD86 expressions in the 57 HBV - DNA positive patients were all lower than those in the 14 HBV-DNA negative patients, but the difference was significant only in the case of CD86 (P<0.05). After a course of lamivudine treatment (six months, 38 patients), only CD40 expression was significantly increased, but both CD40 and CD86 expressions were significantly higher than those before treatment in the 19 patients treated with interferon-α. Conclusion: DCs function impairment could be demonstrated in patients with chronic hepatitis B, especially in those with positive HBV-DNA. Lamivudine or interferon-α treatment could improve the DCs function. (authors)

  4. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase modulates the activated phenotype of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Bertolani, Cristiana; Guerra, Cristina Tosti; Aleffi, Sara; Galastri, Sara; Trappoliere, Marco; Vizzutti, Francesco; Gelmini, Stefania; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2008-02-01

    Adiponectin limits the development of liver fibrosis and activates adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is a sensor of the cellular energy status, but its possible modulation of the fibrogenic properties of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) has not been established. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPK activation in the biology of activated human HSCs. A time-dependent activation of AMPK was observed in response to a number of stimuli, including globular adiponectin, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), or metformin. All these compounds significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation and migration of human HSCs and reduced the secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. In addition, AICAR limited the secretion of type I procollagen. Knockdown of AMPK by gene silencing increased the mitogenic effects of PDGF, confirming the negative modulation exerted by this pathway on HSCs. AMPK activation did not reduce PDGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or Akt at early time points, whereas a marked inhibition was observed 24 hours after addition of PDGF, reflecting a block in cell cycle progression. In contrast, AICAR blocked short-term phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70(S6K)) and 4E binding protein-1 (4EBP1), 2 downstream effectors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, by PDGF. The ability of interleukin-a (IL-1) to activate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was also reduced by AICAR. Activation of AMPK negatively modulates the activated phenotype of HSCs.

  5. Cell culture system of a hepatitis C genotype 3a and 2a chimera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A robust and genetically stable cell culture system for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) genotype 3a is provided. A genotype 3a/2a (S52/JFH1) recombinant containing the structural genes (Core, E1, E2), p7 and NS2 of strain S52 was constructed and characterized in Huh7.5 cells. S52/JFH1 and J6/JFH viruses ...

  6. PKCδ regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity and hepatosteatosis in mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bezy, Olivier; Tran, Thien T; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    C57BL/6J and 129S6/Sv (B6 and 129) mice differ dramatically in their susceptibility to developing diabetes in response to diet- or genetically induced insulin resistance. A major locus contributing to this difference has been mapped to a region on mouse chromosome 14 that contains the gene encoding...... tolerance, and reduced hepatosteatosis with aging. Conversely, mice with liver-specific overexpression of PKCδ developed hepatic insulin resistance characterized by decreased insulin signaling, enhanced lipogenic gene expression, and hepatosteatosis. Therefore, changes in the expression and regulation...... of PKCδ between strains of mice and in obese humans play an important role in the genetic risk of hepatic insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatosteatosis; and thus PKCδ may be a potential target in the treatment of metabolic syndrome....

  7. Prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in the Iranian patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Esghaei, Maryam; Zare-Karizi, Shohreh; Dermenaki-Farahani, Sahar-Sadat; Hesami-Zadeh, Khashayar; Fakhim, Shahin

    2016-11-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a new form of chronic HCV infection described by the presence of the genomic HCV-RNA in liver biopsy and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples, and undetectable levels or absence of HCV-RNA and in the absence or presence of anti HCV antibodies in the plasma specimens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of occult HCV infection (OCI) among Iranian subjects infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using RT-nested PCR. From March 2014 until April 2015, 109 Iranian patients with established HIV infection were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. After extraction of viral RNA from the plasma and PBMC samples, HCV-RNA status was examined by RT-nested PCR using primers from the 5'-NTR. HCV genotyping was conducted using RFLP analysis. For the confirmation of HCV genotyping by RFLP method, the PCR products were sequenced. Of the 109 patients, 50 were positive for antibodies against HCV. The HCV-RNA was detected in PBMC specimens in 6 (10.2%) out of the total 59 patients negative for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA and also from 4 (8.0%) out of the total 50 patients positive for anti-HCV Abs and undetectable plasma HCV-RNA. HCV genotyping analysis showed that 6 (60.0%) patients were infected with HCV subtype 3a, 3 (30.0%) were infected with HCV subtype 1a and 1 (10.0%) patient was infected with HCV subtype 1b. This study revealed the incidence of OCI (9.2%) in HIV-infected Iranian patients. Hence, designing prospective studies focusing on the detection of OCI in these patients would provide more information. J. Med. Virol. 88:1960-1966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells into low immunogenic hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinjun; Ren, Hongying; Li, Xiyuan; Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gong, Wei; Liu, Yongjun; Pang, Tianxiang; Han, Zhong Chao

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from several human tissues have been known to differentiate into the hepatic lineage in vitro, but the immunogenicity of the differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (DHC) has not been reported. Umbilical cord (UC) MSC are thought to be an attractive cell source for cell therapy because of their young age and low infection rate compared with adult tissue MSC. Hepatic differentiation of UC-MSC was induced with a 2-step protocol. The expressions of hepatic markers were detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Albumin production and urea secretion were measured by ELISA and colorimetric assay respectively. The immunosuppressive properties of DHC was detected by mixed lymphocyte culture. After incubation with specific growth factors, including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), UC MSC exhibited a high hepatic differentiation ability in an adherent culture condition. The differentiated UC MSC showed hepatocyte-like morphology and expressed several liver-specific markers at gene and protein levels. Furthermore, the DHC exhibited hepatocyte-specific functions, including albumin secretion, low-density lipoprotein uptake and urea production. More importantly, DHC did not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II antigen and were not able to induce lymphocyte proliferation in mixed lymphocyte culture, as undifferentiated UC MSC did. Our results indicate that UC MSC are able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells that still retain their low immunogenicity in vitro. More importantly, DHC incorporated into the parenchyma of liver when transplanted into mice with CCl(4)-induced liver injury. Therefore, DHC may be an ideal source for cell therapy of liver diseases.

  9. Characterization of two distinct liver progenitor cell subpopulations of hematopoietic and hepatic origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcelle, V.; Stieger, B.; Gjinovci, A.; Wollheim, C.B.; Gauthier, B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Despite extensive studies, the hematopoietic versus hepatic origin of liver progenitor oval cells remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the origin of such cells after liver injury and to establish an oval cell line. Rat liver injury was induced by subcutaneous insertion of 2-AAF pellets for 7 days with subsequent injection of CCl 4 . Livers were removed 9 to 13 days post-CCl 4 treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-c-kit, OV6, Thy1, CK19, AFP, vWF and Rab3b. Isolated non-parenchymal cells were grown on mouse embryonic fibroblast, and their gene expression profile was characterized by RT-PCR. We identified a subpopulation of OV6/CK19/Rab3b-expressing cells that was activated in the periportal region of traumatized livers. We also characterized a second subpopulation that expressed the HSCs marker c-kit but not Thy1. Although we successfully isolated both cell types, OV6/CK19/Rab3b + cells fail to propagate while c-kit + -HSCs appeared to proliferate for up to 7 weeks. Cells formed clusters which expressed c-kit, Thy1 and albumin. Our results indicate that a bona fide oval progenitor cell population resides within the liver and is distinct from c-kit + -HSCs. Oval cells require the hepatic niche to proliferate, while cells mobilized from the circulation proliferate and transdifferentiate into hepatocytes without evidence of cell fusion

  10. Ionone Derivatives from the Mycelium of Phellinus linteus and the Inhibitory Effect on Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiow-Chyn Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three new γ-ionylideneacetic acid derivatives, phellinulins A–C (1–3, were characterized from the mycelium extract of Phellinus linteus. The chemical structures were established based on the spectroscopic analysis. In addition, phellinulin A (1 was subjected to the examination of effects on activated rat hepatic stellate cells and exhibited significant inhibition of hepatic fibrosis.

  11. Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus among women with hepatitis C virus before liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, P A; Smolowitz, J; Carriero, D; Tarallo, J; Siegel, A; Jia, H; Emond, J C

    2013-08-01

    We sought to assess the prevalence and risk factors for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among female liver transplant (LT) candidates. Traditional health screening before LT listing has included Pap smear and is typically carried out by the patient's local provider. The prevalence of high-risk HPV in this population has not been studied. With Institutional Review Board approval, 62 LT candidates received a liquid-based Pap smear with high-risk HPV testing as part of their pre-transplant evaluation by a single provider. Clinical variables included age, ethnicity, insurance status, prior Pap smear, and HPV results, HPV risk factors including age of first intercourse, number of lifetime partners, last sexual activity, smoking, birth control pill use, history of sexually transmitted infections, human immunodeficiency virus status, immunosuppressive medication, medical diagnoses, prescribed medications, and history of hepatitis A, B, C, or D. The 62 women had a median age of 56 years, and 39% had high-risk behavior known to be associated with HPV. Ten of 62 patients (16.1%) had high-risk HPV at baseline screening, 5 of whom had atypical cytology. All of the patients who were positive for high-risk HPV had an etiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the underlying cause of liver disease, with the majority (90%) having no history of high-risk behavior for HPV. In contrast, all patients with high-risk behavior who were HCV negative were HPV negative. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between HPV and HCV; odds ratio = 24.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.4, 438.7, P-value = 0.0013. None of the other potential risk factors were associated with HPV in this cohort. In this study, we provide evidence of a strong association between HCV and HPV in LT candidates, which has not been previously reported. HPV positivity was observed in non-sexually active women, suggesting a reactivation of dormant HPV. An association between

  12. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist improve fulminant hepatic failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bao Zheng

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hepatic immunoactivation is regarded as the primary pathological mechanism of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF. The major acute-phase mediators associated with FHF, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, impair the regeneration of liver cells and stem cell grafts. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs have the capacity, under specific conditions, to differentiate into hepatocytes. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra plays an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic role in acute and chronic inflammation, and has been used in many experimental and clinical applications. In the present study, we implanted IL-1Ra-expressing AF-MSCs into injured liver via the portal vein, using D-galactosamine-induced FHF in a rat model. IL-1Ra expression, hepatic injury, liver regeneration, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and animal survival were assessed after cell transplantation. Our results showed that AF-MSCs over-expressing IL-1Ra prevented liver failure and reduced mortality in rats with FHF. These animals also exhibited improved liver function and increased survival rates after injection with these cells. Using green fluorescent protein as a marker, we demonstrated that the engrafted cells and their progeny were incorporated into injured livers and produced albumin. This study suggests that AF-MSCs genetically modified to over-express IL-1Ra can be implanted into the injured liver to provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of FHF.

  13. Modeling Inborn Errors of Hepatic Metabolism Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournasr, Behshad; Duncan, Stephen A

    2017-11-01

    Inborn errors of hepatic metabolism are because of deficiencies commonly within a single enzyme as a consequence of heritable mutations in the genome. Individually such diseases are rare, but collectively they are common. Advances in genome-wide association studies and DNA sequencing have helped researchers identify the underlying genetic basis of such diseases. Unfortunately, cellular and animal models that accurately recapitulate these inborn errors of hepatic metabolism in the laboratory have been lacking. Recently, investigators have exploited molecular techniques to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from patients' somatic cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into a wide variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, thereby offering an innovative approach to unravel the mechanisms underlying inborn errors of hepatic metabolism. Moreover, such cell models could potentially provide a platform for the discovery of therapeutics. In this mini-review, we present a brief overview of the state-of-the-art in using pluripotent stem cells for such studies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Novel Radiolytic Rotenone Derivative, Rotenoisin B with Potent Anti-Carcinogenic Activity in Hepatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilatha Badaboina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, isolated from roots of derris plant, has been shown to possess various biological activities, which lead to attempting to develop a potent drug against several diseases. However, recent studies have demonstrated that rotenone has the potential to induce several adverse effects such as a neurodegenerative disease. Radiolytic transformation of the rotenone with gamma-irradiation created a new product, named rotenoisin B. The present work was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of rotenoisin B with low toxicity and its molecular mechanism in hepatic cancer cells compared to a parent compound, rotenone. Our results showed rotenoisin B inhibited hepatic cancer cells’ proliferation in a dose dependent manner and increased in apoptotic cells. Interestingly, rotenoisin B showed low toxic effects on normal cells compared to rotenone. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential has been decreased, which leads to cytochrome c release. Down regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 levels as well as the up regulation of proapoptotic Bax levels were observed. The cleaved PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase level increased as well. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK and p38 slightly up regulated and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS increased as well as cell cycle arrest predominantly at the G2/M phase observed. These results suggest that rotenoisin B might be a potent anticancer candidate similar to rotenone in hepatic cancer cells with low toxicity to normal cells even at high concentrations compared to rotenone.

  15. Cryo-chemical decellularization of the whole liver for mesenchymal stem cells-based functional hepatic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Yen, Meng-Hua; Chang, Yin; Yang, Vincent W; Lee, Oscar K

    2014-04-01

    Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for severe hepatic failure to date. However, the limited supply of donor organs has severely hampered this treatment. So far, great potentials of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to replenish the hepatic cell population have been shown; nevertheless, there still is a lack of an optimal three-dimensional scaffold for generation of well-transplantable hepatic tissues. In this study, we utilized a cryo-chemical decellularization method which combines physical and chemical approach to generate acellular liver scaffolds (ALS) from the whole liver. The produced ALS provides a biomimetic three-dimensional environment to support hepatic differentiation of MSCs, evidenced by expression of hepatic-associated genes and marker protein, glycogen storage, albumin secretion, and urea production. It is also found that hepatic differentiation of MSCs within the ALS is much more efficient than two-dimensional culture in vitro. Importantly, the hepatic-like tissues (HLT) generated by repopulating ALS with MSCs are able to act as functional grafts and rescue lethal hepatic failure after transplantation in vivo. In summary, the cryo-chemical method used in this study is suitable for decellularization of liver and create acellular scaffolds that can support hepatic differentiation of MSCs and be used to fabricate functional tissue-engineered liver constructs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinct subpopulations of hepatitis C virus infectious cells with different levels of intracellular hepatitis C virus core protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Despite the clear clinical importance of virus-associated HCC, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclarified. Oxidative stress, in particular, DNA lesions associated with oxidative damage, plays a major role in carcinogenesis, and is strongly linked to the development of many cancers, including HCC. However, in identifying hepatocytes with HCV viral RNA, estimates of the median proportion of HCV-infected hepatocytes have been found as high as 40% in patients with chronic HCV infection. In order to explore the gene alternation and association between different viral loads of HCV-infected cells, we established a method to dissect high and low viral load cells and examined the expression of DNA damage-related genes using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. We found distinct expression patterns of DNA damage-related genes between high and low viral load cells. This study provides a new method for future study on virus-associated gene expression research.

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ...

  18. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl(-/-); or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF(-/-))] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl(-/-) MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF(-/-) MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  19. Isolation and characterization of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to the e1 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Russell, Rodney S.; Goossens, Vera

    2008-01-01

    The relative importance of humoral and cellular immunity in the prevention or clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is poorly understood. However, there is considerable evidence that neutralizing antibodies are involved in disease control. Here we describe the detailed analysis of human...... monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against HCV glycoprotein E1, which may have the potential to control HCV infection. We have identified two MAbs that can strongly neutralize HCV-pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) bearing the envelope glycoproteins of genotypes 1a, 1b, 4a, 5a, and 6a and less strongly...... neutralize HCVpp bearing the envelope glycoproteins of genotype 2a. Genotype 3a was not neutralized. The epitopes for both MAbs were mapped to the region encompassing amino acids 313 to 327. In addition, robust neutralization was also observed against cell culture-adapted viruses of genotypes 1a and 2a...

  20. Hepatic toxicology following single and multiple exposure of engineered nanomaterials utilising a novel primary human 3D liver microtissue model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Løhr, Mille; Roursgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundThe liver has a crucial role in metabolic homeostasis as well as being the principal detoxification centre of the body, removing xenobiotics and waste products which could potentially include some nanomaterials (NM). With the ever increasing public and occupational exposure associated...... with accumulative production of nanomaterials, there is an urgent need to consider the possibility of detrimental health consequences of engineered NM exposure. It has been shown that exposure via inhalation, intratracheal instillation or ingestion can result in NM translocation to the liver. Traditional in vitro...... or ex vivo hepatic nanotoxicology models are often limiting and/or troublesome (i.e. reduced metabolism enzymes, lacking important cell populations, unstable with very high variability, etc.).MethodsIn order to rectify these issues and for the very first time we have utilised a 3D human liver...

  1. Activated NKT cells facilitated functional switch of myeloid-derived suppressor cells at inflammation sites in fulminant hepatitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Danxiao; Shi, Yu; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Hanwen; Liu, Qiaoyun; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Lihuang; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) confer immunosuppressive properties, but their roles in fulminant hepatitis have not been well defined. In this study, we systematically examined the distribution of MDSCs in bone marrow (BM), liver and spleen, and their functional and differentiation status in an acute fulminant hepatitis mouse model induced by lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine (LPS-GalN). Moreover, the interaction between NKT cells and MDSCs was determined. Our study revealed that BM contained the largest pool of MDSCs during pathogenesis of fulminant hepatitis compared with liver and spleen. MDSCs in liver/spleen expressed higher levels of chemokine receptors such as CCR2, CX3CR1 and CXCR2. At inflamed tissues such as liver or spleen, activated NKT cells induced differentiation of MDSCs through cell-cell interaction, which markedly dampened the immunosuppressive effects and promoted MDSCs to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and activate inflammatory cells. Our findings thus demonstrated an unexpected pro-inflammatory state for MDSCs, which was mediated by the activated NKT cells that precipitated the differentiation and functional evolution of these MDSCs at sites of inflammation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Expression of hepatitis C virus envelope protein 2 induces apoptosis in cultured mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Zhu; Jing Liu; You-Hua Xie; Yu-Ying Kong; Ye Ye; Chun-Lin Wang; Guang-Di Li; Yuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein 2 (E2) in the induction of apoptosis.METHODS: A carboxyterminal truncated E2 (E2-661) was transiently expressed in several cultured mammalian cell lines or stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)cell line. Cell proliferation was assessed by 3H thymidine uptake. Apoptosis was examined by Hoechst 33258staining, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation analysis.RESULTS: Reduced proliferation was readily observed in the E2-661 expressing cells. These cells manifested the typical features of apoptosis, including cell shrinkage,chromatin condensation and hypodiploid genomic DNA content. Similar apoptotic cell death was observed in an E2-661 stably expressing cell line.CONCLUSION: HCV E2 can induce apoptosis in cultured mammalian cells.

  3. Treatment of chronic hepatic cirrhosis with autologous bone marrow stem cells transplantation in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinghe; Xu Ke; Zhang Xitong; Han Jinling; Ding Guomin; Gao Jue

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of treatment for rabbit model with hepatic cirrhosis by transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells via the hepatic artery and evaluate the effect of hepatocyte growth-promoting factors (pHGF) in the treatment of stem cells transplantation to liver cirrhosis. To provide empirical study foundation for future clinical application. Methods: Chronic hepatic cirrhosis models of rabbits were developed by subcutaneous injection with 50% CCl 4 0.2 ml/kg. Twenty-five model rabbits were randomly divided into three experimental groups, stem cells transplant group (10), stem cells transplant + pHGF group (10) and control group (5). Autologous bone marrow was harvested from fibia of each rabbit, and stem cells were disassociated using density gradient centrifugation and transplanted into liver via the hepatic artery under fluoroscopic guidance. In the stem cells transplant + pHGF group, the hepatocyte growth-promoting factor was given via intravenous injection with 2 mg/kg every other day for 20 days. Liver function tests were monitored at 4, 8,12 weeks intervals and histopathologic examinations were performed at 12 weeks following transplantation. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance Results: Following transplantation of stern cells, the liver function of rabbits improved gradually. Twelve weeks after transplantation, the activity of ALT and AST decreased from (73.0±10.6) U/L and (152.4± 22.8) U/L to (48.0±1.0) U/L and (86.7±2.1) U/L respectively; and the level of ALB and PTA increased from (27.5±1.8) g/L and 28.3% to (33.2±0.5) g/L and 44.1% respectively. The changes did not have statistically significant difference when compared to the control group (P>0.05). However, in the stem cellstransplant + pHGF group, the activity of ALT and AST decreased to (43.3±0.6) U/L and (78.7±4.0) U/L respectively and the level of ALB and PTA increased to (35.7±0.4) g/L and 50.5% respectively. The difference was

  4. Kupffer cells hasten resolution of liver immunopathology in mouse models of viral hepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sitia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs are widely considered important contributors to liver injury during viral hepatitis due to their pro-inflammatory activity. Herein we utilized hepatitis B virus (HBV-replication competent transgenic mice and wild-type mice infected with a hepatotropic adenovirus to demonstrate that KCs do not directly induce hepatocellular injury nor do they affect the pathogenic potential of virus-specific CD8 T cells. Instead, KCs limit the severity of liver immunopathology. Mechanistically, our results are most compatible with the hypothesis that KCs contain liver immunopathology by removing apoptotic hepatocytes in a manner largely dependent on scavenger receptors. Apoptotic hepatocytes not readily removed by KCs become secondarily necrotic and release high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1 protein, promoting organ infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. Overall, these results indicate that KCs resolve rather than worsen liver immunopathology.

  5. Defibrotide for children and adults with hepatic veno-occlusive disease post hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbacioglu, Selim; Richardson, Paul G

    2017-10-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) is a complication that is typically associated with conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In patients with concomitant multi-organ dysfunction, mortality may be >80%. Recently, the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation established separate criteria for diagnosis and severity of VOD/SOS for adults and children, to better reflect current understanding of the disease. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of post-HSCT hepatic VOD/SOS and defibrotide, including its pharmacological, clinical, and regulatory profile. In children and adults following HSCT, defibrotide is approved for the treatment of hepatic VOD/SOS with concomitant renal or pulmonary dysfunction in the United States and for the treatment of severe hepatic VOD/SOS in the European Union. Day +100 survival rates with defibrotide are superior to those of historical controls receiving best supportive care only, and safety profiles are similar. Expert commentary: Defibrotide appears to act through multiple mechanisms to restore thrombo-fibrinolytic balance and protect endothelial cells, and there are promising data on the use of defibrotide for VOD/SOS prophylaxis in high-risk children undergoing HSCT. An ongoing randomized controlled trial in children and adults will better assess the clinical value of defibrotide as a preventive medication.

  6. Connexin 32 and connexin 43 are involved in lineage restriction of hepatic progenitor cells to hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Pei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bi-potential hepatic progenitor cells can give rise to both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, which is the last phase and critical juncture in terms of sequentially hepatic lineage restriction from any kind of stem cells. If their differentiation can be controlled, it might access to functional hepatocytes to develop pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries as well as cell therapies for end-stage liver diseases. Methods In this study, we investigated the influence of Cx32 and Cx43 on hepatocyte differentiation of WB-F344 cells by in vitro gain and loss of function analyses. An inhibitor of Cx32 was also used to make further clarification. To reveal p38 MAPK pathway is closely related to Cxs, rats with 70% partial hepatectomy were injected intraperitoneally with a p38 inhibitor, SB203580. Besides, the effects of p38 MAPK pathway on differentiation of hepatoblasts isolated from fetal rat livers were evaluated by addition of SB203580 in culture medium. Results In vitro gain and loss of function analyses showed overexpression of Connexin 32 and knockdown of Connexin 43 promoted hepatocytes differentiation from hepatic progenitor cells. In addition, in vitro and ex vivo research revealed inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway can improve hepatocytes differentiation correlating with upregulation of Connexin 32 expression and downregulation of Connexin 43 expression. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that Connexins play crucial roles in facilitating differentiation of hepatic progenitors. Our work further implicates that regulators of Connexins and their related pathways might provide new insights to improve lineage restriction of stem cells to mature hepatocytes.

  7. Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Human Hepatoma HuH-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Jouan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatoma cells may represent a valuable alternative to the use of human hepatocytes for studying hepatic drug transporters, which is now a regulatory issue during drug development. In the present work, we have characterized hepatic drug transporter expression, activity and regulation in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells, in order to determine the potential relevance of these cells for drug transport assays. HuH-7 cells displayed notable multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP activity, presumed to reflect expression of various hepatic MRPs, including MRP2. By contrast, they failed to display functional activities of the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, and of the canalicular transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Concomitantly, mRNA expressions of various sinusoidal and canalicular hepatic drug transporters were not detected (NTCP, OATP1B1, organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2, OCT1 and bile salt export pump or were found to be lower (OATP1B3, OATP2B1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, BCRP and MRP3 in hepatoma HuH-7 cells than those found in human hepatocytes, whereas other transporters such as OAT7, MRP4 and MRP5 were up-regulated. HuH-7 cells additionally exhibited farnesoid X receptor (FXR- and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-related up-regulation of some transporters. Such data indicate that HuH-7 cells, although expressing rather poorly some main hepatic drug transporters, may be useful for investigating interactions of drugs with MRPs, notably MRP2, and for studying FXR- or Nrf2-mediated gene regulation.

  8. Portal inflammation during NAFLD is frequent and associated with the early phases of putative hepatic progenitor cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Simone; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Perrone, Giuseppe; Picardi, Antonio; Morini, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated whether portal tract inflammation observed in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with hepatic progenitor cell compartment activation, as thoroughly evaluated with different markers of the staminal lineage. Fifty-two patients with NAFLD were studied. NAFLD activity score, fibrosis and portal inflammation were histologically evaluated. Putative hepatic progenitor cells, intermediate hepatobiliary cells and bile ductules/interlobular bile ducts were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin (CK)-7, CK-19 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), and a hepatic progenitor cell compartment score was derived. Hepatic stellate cell and myofibroblast activity was determined by immunohistochemistry for α-smooth muscle actin. Portal inflammation was absent in a minority of patients, mild in 40% of cases and more than mild in about half of patients, showing a strong correlation with fibrosis (r=0.76, pcells (r=0.48, pcells (r=0.6, pcell compartment activation were associated with portal inflammation by univariate analysis. In the multivariate model, the only variable independently associated with portal inflammation was hepatic progenitor cell compartment activation (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6). Portal inflammation is frequent during NAFLD and strongly associated with activation of putative hepatic progenitor cells since the first steps of their differentiation, portal myofibroblast activity and fibrosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Metabolism of oxycodone in human hepatocytes from different age groups and prediction of hepatic plasma clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eKorjamo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1 and 10 µM was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 hours, and 1 µM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 µM. Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. In general, this in vitro to in vivo extrapolation method provides valuable information on the maturation of oxycodone metabolism that can be utilized in the design of clinical pharmacokinetic studies in infants and young children.

  10. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Berit [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Thomas, Maria [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart (Germany); Pützer, Brigitte M. [Institute of Experimental Gene Therapy and Cancer Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg [Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Vollmar, Brigitte [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Abshagen, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.abshagen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  11. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells

  12. Exosomes mediate hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and NK-cell dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Hou, Zhaohua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic material between cells. However, their roles in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remain unclear. Here, we report that exosomes present in the sera of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients contained both HBV nucleic acids and HBV proteins, and transferred HBV to hepatocytes in an active manner. Notably, HBV nucleic acids were detected in natural killer (NK) cells from both CHB patients and healthy donors after exposure to HBV-positive exosomes. Through real-time fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3',-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine, 4-chlorobenzenesulfnate salt (DiD)-labeled exosomes were observed to interact with NK cells and to be taken up by NK cells, which was enhanced by transforming growth factor-β treatment. Furthermore, HBV-positive exosomes impaired NK-cell functions, including interferon (IFN)-γ production, cytolytic activity, NK-cell proliferation and survival, as well as the responsiveness of the cells to poly (I:C) stimulation. HBV infection suppressed the expression of pattern-recognition receptors, especially retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), on NK cells, resulting in the dampening of the nuclear factor κB(NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of exosomes in HBV transmission and NK-cell dysfunction during CHB infection. PMID:27238466

  13. Tuft (caveolated) cells in two human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, D. H.; Whitehead, R. H.; Foster, H.; Tutton, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of an unusual cell type in two human colon carcinoma cell lines is reported. The cells show the same morphology as "tuft" (caveolated) cells present in normal gastrointestinal epithelium. Tuft cells were seen in cell line LIM 1863 growing in vitro and in human colon carcinoma cell line LIM 2210 growing as subcutaneous solid tumour xenografts in nude mice. Characteristic morphologic features of tuft cells included a wide base, narrow apex and a tuft of long microvilli projecting f...

  14. [Differentiation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells into low immunogenic and functional hepatocyte-like cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong-ying; Zhao, Qin-jun; Xing, Wen; Yang, Shao-guang; Lu, Shi-hong; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Lei; Han, Zhong-chao

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the biological function of hepatocyte-like cells derived from mesenchymal stem cells that isolated from human umbilical cord UC-MSCs in vitro, and to detect the changes in the immunogenicity of the differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (DHC). Transdifferentiation of UC-MSCs into hepatic lineage in vitro was induced in modified two-step induction medium. The expressions of hepatic specific markers were detected by RT-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence staining at different time points after induction. The levels of albumin and urea in the supernatants of cultures were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, the immunosuppressive property of DHC was detected by one-way mixed lymphocyte culture. The mRNA and proteins of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB),and cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) were expressed in naive UC-MSCs at low levels. DHC highly expressed hepatic markers AFP, ALB, CK-19, and tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase 14 and 28 days after hepatic differentiation and were accompanied by an increased production of ALB and urea in supernatant in a time-dependent manner. DHC did not express human leukocyte antigen DR antigen and significantly decreased the lymphocyte proliferation. UC-MSCs are able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells in vitro, while the immunogenicity of DHC remains low.

  15. Quantification of human hepatic binding protein (HBP) via 99mTc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) liver scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgolini, I.; Hoebart, J.; Bergmann, H.; Sinzinger, H.; Mueller, C.; Angelberger, P.

    1991-01-01

    99m Tc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ( 99m Tc-NGA) was synthesized by covalent coupling of 2-imino-2-methoxyethyl-1-thio-β-D-galactopyranoside to the primary amino groups of human serum albumin. Injections of 99m Tc-NGA (150 MBq; 3.5 mg (=50 nmol)/ml) demonstrated the liver to be the exclusive site of tracer-uptake. Simulation of 99m Tc-NGA-kinetics allowed quantification of binding to the hepatic binding protein (HBP). Using this model we studied 250 patients with various liver disease. In alcoholic liver cirrhosis such patients with Child B and Child C stage cirrhosis had a lower HBP-concentration in the liver compared to control individuals (0.85-1.2 μmol/l). The group with the most advanced cirrhosis (Child C stage) had a significantly lower HBP-concentration (0.20-0.45 μmol/l) than Child A patients (0.60-0.85 μmol/l; p 99m Tc-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) scanning of the liver during the course of the disease. Return of liver function tests to normal values was associated with an increased hepatic imaging size as well as increase in HBP-concentration (up to a 3-fold of initial concentration). In patients exhibiting a prolonged course of the disease changes in NGA-kinetic data were borderline and the hepatic image size unchanged. The values obtained for HBP-concentration in the liver amounted to 0.30-0.50 μmol/l liver for patients with hepatoma, to 0.40-0.60 μmol/l in patients with liver metastasis and to 0.90-1.20 μmol/l in cancer patients without liver malignancy. It is concluded that scintigraphic evaluation of functional hepatic cell mass using the new receptor-tracer 99m Tc-NGA provides an in vivo diagnostic mean allowing quantitative data on liver function beside assessment of liver morphology. (Authors)

  16. Gene expression variability in human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications.

  17. Retinol metabolism in hepatic stellate cells : a new vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Md Ajat, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) or its derivatives are involved in many physiological processes ranging from vision to cells differentiation. In mammals retinol is stored as retinyl ester (RE) and the liver is the major site for RE storage in the body. The liver is made of various cell types and REs

  18. New Approaches to Attenuated Hepatitis a Vaccine Development: Cloning and Sequencing of Cell-Culture Adapted Viral cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-13

    after multiple passages in vivo and in vitro. J. Gen. Virol. 67, 1741- 1744. Sabin , A.B. (1985). Oral poliovirus vaccine : history of its development...IN (N NEW APPROACHES TO ATTENUATED HEPATITIS A VACCINE DEVELOPMENT: Q) CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF CELL-CULTURE ADAPTED VIRAL cDNA I ANNUAL REPORT...6ll02Bsl0 A 055 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) New Approaches to Attenuated Hepatitis A Vaccine Development: Cloning and Sequencing of Cell

  19. Replacement of Retinyl Esters by Polyunsaturated Triacylglycerol Species in Lipid Droplets of Hepatic Stellate Cells during Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testerink, Nicole; Ajat, Mokrish; Houweling, Martin; Brouwers, Jos F.; Pully, Vishnu V.; van Manen, Henk-Jan; Otto, Cees; Helms, J. Bernd; Vaandrager, Arie B.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells has been recognized as one of the first steps in liver injury and repair. During activation, hepatic stellate cells transform into myofibroblasts with concomitant loss of their lipid droplets (LDs) and production of excessive extracellular matrix. Here we aimed to obtain more insight in the dynamics and mechanism of LD loss. We have investigated the LD degradation processes in rat hepatic stellate cells in vitro with a combined approach of confocal Raman microspectroscopy and mass spectrometric analysis of lipids (lipidomics). Upon activation of the hepatic stellate cells, LDs reduce in size, but increase in number during the first 7 days, but the total volume of neutral lipids did not decrease. The LDs also migrate to cellular extensions in the first 7 days, before they disappear. In individual hepatic stellate cells. all LDs have a similar Raman spectrum, suggesting a similar lipid profile. However, Raman studies also showed that the retinyl esters are degraded more rapidly than the triacylglycerols upon activation. Lipidomic analyses confirmed that after 7 days in culture hepatic stellate cells have lost most of their retinyl esters, but not their triacylglycerols and cholesterol esters. Furthermore, we specifically observed a large increase in triacylglycerol-species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, partly caused by an enhanced incorporation of exogenous arachidonic acid. These results reveal that lipid droplet degradation in activated hepatic stellate cells is a highly dynamic and regulated process. The rapid replacement of retinyl esters by polyunsaturated fatty acids in LDs suggests a role for both lipids or their derivatives like eicosanoids during hepatic stellate cell activation. PMID:22536341

  20. Replacement of retinyl esters by polyunsaturated triacylglycerol species in lipid droplets of hepatic stellate cells during activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Testerink

    Full Text Available Activation of hepatic stellate cells has been recognized as one of the first steps in liver injury and repair. During activation, hepatic stellate cells transform into myofibroblasts with concomitant loss of their lipid droplets (LDs and production of excessive extracellular matrix. Here we aimed to obtain more insight in the dynamics and mechanism of LD loss. We have investigated the LD degradation processes in rat hepatic stellate cells in vitro with a combined approach of confocal Raman microspectroscopy and mass spectrometric analysis of lipids (lipidomics. Upon activation of the hepatic stellate cells, LDs reduce in size, but increase in number during the first 7 days, but the total volume of neutral lipids did not decrease. The LDs also migrate to cellular extensions in the first 7 days, before they disappear. In individual hepatic stellate cells. all LDs have a similar Raman spectrum, suggesting a similar lipid profile. However, Raman studies also showed that the retinyl esters are degraded more rapidly than the triacylglycerols upon activation. Lipidomic analyses confirmed that after 7 days in culture hepatic stellate cells have lost most of their retinyl esters, but not their triacylglycerols and cholesterol esters. Furthermore, we specifically observed a large increase in triacylglycerol-species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, partly caused by an enhanced incorporation of exogenous arachidonic acid. These results reveal that lipid droplet degradation in activated hepatic stellate cells is a highly dynamic and regulated process. The rapid replacement of retinyl esters by polyunsaturated fatty acids in LDs suggests a role for both lipids or their derivatives like eicosanoids during hepatic stellate cell activation.

  1. A novel porcine cell culture based protocol for the propagation of hepatitis E virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Chingwaru

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a comprehensive protocol for the processing of hepatitis E virus (HEV infected samples and propagation of the virus in primary cell cultures. Methods: Hepatitis E was extracted from porcine liver and faecal samples following standard protocols. The virus was then allowed to attach in the presence of trypsin to primary cells that included porcine and bovine intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages over a period of up to 3 h. The virus was propagated by rotational passaging through the cell cultures. Propagation was confirmed by immunoblotting. Results: We developed a comprehensive protocol to propagate HEV in porcine cell model that includes (i rotational culturing of the virus between porcine cell types, (ii pre-incubation of infected cells for 210 min, (iii use of a semi-complete cell culture medium supplemented with trypsin (0.33 µg/mL and (iv the use of simple immunoblot technique to detect the amplified virus based on the open reading frame 2/3. Conclusions: This protocol opens doors towards systematic analysis of the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HEV in vitro. Using our protocol, one can complete the propagation process within 6 to 9 d.

  2. Natural killer T (NKT) cells in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattner, Jochen

    2013-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells represent an innate-like lymphocyte population endowed with unique antigen recognition and tissue distribution features. Their abundance in the microvascular compartments of the liver allows NKT cells to immediately respond to lipid antigens and soluble factors circulating through the portal vein system by releasing tremendous amounts of different cytokines and chemokines. Subsequently, dependent on the nature of the lipid antigen encountered as well as the accessory signal(s) provided, NKT cells not only contribute to the maintenance of immune tolerance, but also direct adverse immune reactions locally and systemically. Focusing on their potent immunomodulatory features and their interactions with various innate and adaptive immune cells, the role of NKT cells in perpetuating the loss of liver-specific immune tolerance will be discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolism of tributyltin and triphenyltin by rat, hamster and human hepatic microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohhira, Shuji; Watanabe, Masatomo; Matsui, Hisao [Department of Hygiene, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu-machi, 321-0293, Tochigi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Tributyltin and triphenyltin are metabolized by cytochrome P-450 system enzymes, and their metabolic fate may contribute to the toxicity of the chemicals. In the current study, the in vitro metabolism of tributyltin and triphenyltin by rat, hamster and human hepatic microsomes was investigated to elucidate the metabolic competence for these compounds in humans. The metabolic reaction using microsome-NADPH system that is usually conducted was not applicable to in vitro metabolism of organotins, especially triphenyltin. We therefore examined the effects of dithiothreitol (DTT), one of the antioxidants for sulfhydryl groups, to determine the in vitro metabolism of tributyltin and triphenyltin. As a result, the treatment with 0.1 mM DTT in vitro increased the activity of the microsomal monooxygenase system for metabolism of tributyltin as well as triphenyltin; the total yield of tributyltin and triphenyltin metabolites as tin increased, respectively, by approximately 1.8 and 8.9 times for rat, 2.1 and 1.2 times for hamster, and 1.6 and 1.5 times for human. It is suggested that the organotins directly inactivate cytochrome P-450 because of the interaction with critical sulfhydryl groups of the hemoprotein. We confirmed the utility of this in vitro metabolic system using DTT in the hepatic microsomes of phenobarbital (PB)-pretreated and untreated hamsters. Thus, the in vitro metabolic system described here was applied to a comparative study of the metabolism of organotins in rats, hamsters and humans. Tributyltin was metabolized more readily than triphenyltin in all the species. In humans, the in vitro metabolic pattern resembled that of hamsters, which were susceptible to in vivo triphenyltin toxicity because of incompetent metabolism. It is possible that the hamster is a qualitatively and quantitatively suitable animal model for exploring the influence of tributyltin and triphenyltin in humans. (orig.)

  4. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  5. Predicting Human Clearance of OATP substrates using Cynomolgus monkey: In vitro-in vivo scaling of hepatic uptake clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Tom; Ufuk, Ayse; Cantrill, Carina; Kosa, Rachel E; Bi, Yi-An; Niosi, Mark; Modi, Sweta; Rodrigues, A David; Tremaine, Larry M; Varma, Manthena Vs; Galetin, Aleksandra; Houston, J Brian

    2018-05-02

    This work explores the utility of the cynomolgus monkey as a preclinical model to predict hepatic uptake clearance mediated by organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) transporters. Nine OATP substrates (rosuvastatin, pravastatin, repaglinide, fexofenadine, cerivastatin, telmisartan, pitavastatin, bosentan and valsartan) were investigated in plated cynomolgus monkey and human hepatocytes. Total uptake clearance and passive diffusion were measured in vitro from initial rates in the absence and presence of the OATP inhibitor rifamycin SV, respectively. Total uptake clearance values in plated hepatocytes ranged over three orders of magnitude in both species with a similar rank order and good agreement in the relative contribution of active transport to total uptake between cynomolgus monkey and human. In vivo hepatic clearance for these nine drugs was determined in cynomolgus monkey after intravenous dosing. Hepatic clearances showed a similar range to human parameters and good predictions from respective hepatocyte parameters (with 2.7 and 3.8-fold bias on average, respectively). The use of cross species empirical scaling factors (based on either dataset average or individual drug scaling factor from cynomolgus monkey data) improved prediction (less bias, better concordance) of human hepatic clearance from human hepatocyte data alone. In vitro intracellular binding in hepatocytes also correlated well between species. It is concluded that the minimal species differences observed for the current dataset between cynomolgus monkey and human hepatocyte uptake, both in vitro and in vivo, support future use of this preclinical model to delineate drug hepatic uptake and enable prediction of human in vivo intrinsic hepatic clearance. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. The influence of the human genome on chronic viral hepatitis outcome A influência do genoma humano no curso das hepatites virais crônicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahir Ramos de Andrade Júnior

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that determine viral clearance or viral persistence in chronic viral hepatitis have yet to be identified. Recent advances in molecular genetics have permitted the detection of variations in immune response, often associated with polymorphism in the human genome. Differences in host susceptibility to infectious disease and disease severity cannot be attributed solely to the virulence of microbial agents. Several recent advances concerning the influence of human genes in chronic viral hepatitis B and C are discussed in this article: a the associations between human leukocyte antigen polymorphism and viral hepatic disease susceptibility or resistance; b protective alleles influencing hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV evolution; c prejudicial alleles influencing HBV and HCV; d candidate genes associated with HBV and HCV evolution; d other genetic factors that may contribute to chronic hepatitis C evolution (genes influencing hepatic stellate cells, TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha production, hepatic iron deposits and angiotensin II production, among others. Recent discoveries regarding genetic associations with chronic viral hepatitis may provide clues to understanding the development of end-stage complications such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the near future, analysis of the human genome will allow the elucidation of both the natural course of viral hepatitis and its response to therapy.Os mecanismos que determinam o clearance ou a persistência da infecção viral nas hepatites virais crônicas não estão ainda bem identificados. O progresso no conhecimento sobre as ferramentas genéticas moleculares tem permitido detectar variações na resposta imune, que freqüentemente são associadas com polimorfismos do genoma humano. As diferenças na susceptibilidade do hospedeiro para as doenças infecciosas e a intensidade das doenças não podem ser atribuídas apenas à virulência do agente microbiano. Neste

  7. Comparison of the effect of interferon on two human hepatoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M; Schoub, B D; Lyons, S F; Chiu, M N [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Virology

    1985-06-01

    Two human hepatoma cell lines, the PLC/PRF/5 and the Mahlavu cells, which differ in their production of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), responded differently to interferon (IFN). After IFN treatment both cell lines were able to inhibit Sindbis virus replication. Oligo A synthetase (E enzyme) could be activated in the PLC/PRF/5 cells although they were not sensitive to exogenous 2 - 5 oligoadenylic acid (2 - 5 A). In contrast, the Mahlavu cells were sensitive to exogenous 2 - 5 A, but unable to activate the E enzyme. Both cell lines were unable to stimulate phosphorylation of the exogenous initiator factor eIF-2.

  8. A Multiantigenic DNA Vaccine That Induces Broad Hepatitis C Virus-Specific T-Cell Responses in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummow, Jason; Li, Yanrui; Yu, Wenbo; Garrod, Tamsin; Wijesundara, Danushka; Brennan, Amelia J; Mullick, Ranajoy; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    currently available, and treatment is costly and often results in side effects, limiting the number of patients who are treated. Despite recent advances in treatment, prevention remains the key to efficient control and elimination of this virus. Here, we describe a novel DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus that is capable of inducing robust cell-mediated immune responses in mice and is a promising vaccine candidate for humans. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Counter-attack on viral hepatitis. [Hepatitis A; Hepatitis B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozesky, O W [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Virology; Jupp, P G; Joubert, J J; Taylor, M B; Grabow, W O.K.

    1985-07-01

    The most highly developed radioimmunoassay test system in medical virology is proving of exceptional value in research aimed at controlling and eventually eradicating the scourge of human hepatitis. The use of radioimmunoassay in detecting hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B (HBV) viruses is discussed. The hepatitis A virus is an enterovirus which infects the gastrointestinal tract and is usually transmitted by contaminated food, milk or water. Hepatitis B spreads mainly by the parenteral rate. Bedbugs and ticks are considered as possible transmitters of HBV. Another important contribution of radioimmunoassay is the ability to monitor the immune response of persons at risk who are vaccinated against hepatitis B.

  10. Donor-Dependent and Other Nondefined Factors Have Greater Influence on the Hepatic Phenotype Than the Starting Cell Type in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, James A; Kia, Richard; Pridgeon, Christopher S; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Elmasry, Mohamed; Fenwick, Stephen W; Mills, John S; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Park, Bong K

    2017-05-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is the greatest cause of post-marketing drug withdrawal; therefore, substantial resources are directed toward triaging potentially dangerous new compounds at all stages of drug development. One of the major factors preventing effective screening of new compounds is the lack of a predictive in vitro model of hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes offer a metabolically relevant model for which the molecular initiating events of hepatotoxicity can be examined; however, these cells vary greatly between donors and dedifferentiate rapidly in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) offer a reproducible, physiologically relevant and genotypically normal model cell; however, current differentiation protocols produce HLCs with a relatively immature phenotype. During the reprogramming of somatic cells, the epigenome undergoes dramatic changes; however, this "resetting" is a gradual process, resulting in an altered differentiation propensity, skewed toward the lineage of origin, particularly in early passage cultures. We, therefore, performed a comparison of human hepatocyte- and dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs, assessing the impact of epigenetic memory at all stages of HLC differentiation. These results provide the first isogenic assessment of the starting cell type in human iPSC-derived HLCs. Despite a trend toward improvement in hepatic phenotype in albumin secretion and gene expression, few significant differences in hepatic differentiation capacity were found between hepatocyte and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. We conclude that the donor and inter-clonal differences have a greater influence on the hepatocyte phenotypic maturity than the starting cell type. Therefore, it is not necessary to use human hepatocytes for generating iPSC-derived HLCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1321-1331. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Alpha

  11. [Phenotypic and functional features of NK and NKT cells in chronic hepatitis B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaofei; Li, Man; Sun, Xuehua; Zhou, Zhenhua; Zhu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xin; Gao, Yueqiu

    2015-06-01

    To detect the ratio of natural killer (NK)/natural killer T (NKT) cells in peripheral blood, the levels of NKG2D/NKG2A, interferon γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were harvested from CHB patients. The ratio of NK/NKT cells in PBMCs and the levels of NKG2D and NKG2A were detected by flow cytometry. The expressions of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α were analyzed by flow cytometry after the treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), brefeldin A (BFA) or ionomycin in vitro. The comparison between two groups was performed by independent sample t-test. The relationship of each index to hepatitis B virus load and serum alanine aminotransferase was analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Compared with healthy controls, CHB patients presented with significantly decreased peripheral blood NK/NKT cell ratio and significantly elevated proportions of NKG2A+ NK and NKG2A+NKT cells, and after the treatment with PMA/BFA/ionomycin, IFN-γ+ NK and IFN-γ+ NKT cells were significantly reduced in CHB patients. NK and NKT cells showed a reduced ratio, disordered receptor expressions and decreased cytokine secretion capacity in CHB patients.

  12. NKT cells are important mediators of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, James A; Wigmore, Stephen J; Anderton, Stephen M; Howie, Sarah E M

    2017-12-01

    IRI results from the interruption then reinstatement of an organ's blood supply, and this poses a significant problem in liver transplantation and resectional surgery. In this paper, we explore the role T cells play in the pathogenesis of this injury. We used an in vivo murine model of warm partial hepatic IRI, genetically-modified mice, in vivo antibody depletion, adoptive cell transfer and flow cytometry to determine which lymphocyte subsets contribute to pathology. Injury was assessed by measuring serum alanine aminotransfersase (ALT) and by histological examination of liver tissue sections. The absence of T cells (CD3εKO) is associated with significant protection from injury (p=0.010). Through a strategy of antibody depletion it appears that NKT cells (p=0.0025), rather than conventional T (CD4+ or CD8+) (p=0.11) cells that are the key mediators of injury. Our results indicate that tissue-resident NKT cells, but not other lymphocyte populations are responsible for the injury in hepatic IRI. Targeting the activation of NKT cells and/or their effector apparatus would be a novel approach in protecting the liver during transplantation and resection surgery; this may allow us to expand our current criteria for surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Kupffer cell inactivation on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Kiyosawa, Naoki; Ito, Kazumi; Yamoto, Takashi; Teranishi, Munehiro; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Manabe, Sunao

    2007-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that cycloheximide (CHX) induces hepatocellular necrosis as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. This article evaluates the role of Kupffer cells on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury using gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) for the inhibition of Kupffer cells. One group of rats was treated with CHX (CHX group), and another was treated with GdCl 3 before being treated with the same dose of CHX (GdCl 3 /CHX group). The necrotic change in the GdCl 3 /CHX group was exacerbated under the induction of hepatocellular apoptosis by the CHX treatment. A substantial diminution of the number of ED1- or ED2-positive cells was demonstrated in the GdCl 3 /CHX group compared to the CHX group. In addition, the degree of decrease in ED2-positive cells was more apparent than that in ED1-positive cells. Increases in the mRNA levels of IL-10 and Stat3 were observed in the CHX group, but not in the GdCl 3 /CHX group. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules such as Ccl20, LOX-1, and E-selectin were significantly increased only in the GdCl 3 /CHX group. Thus, Kupffer cell inactivation by the GdCl 3 treatment leads to a loss of the capacity to produce IL-10, supposedly resulting in the enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine activities such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling. These events are suggested to be a factor of the inflammatory exacerbation in the livers of the GdCl 3 /CHX group. In conclusion, Kupffer cells may play a role in protecting hepatic necroinflammatory changes by releasing anti-inflammatory cytokines following the hepatocellular apoptosis resulting from CHX treatment

  14. Human pegivirus (HPgV) infection in Ghanaians co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guessan, Kombo F; Boyce, Ceejay; Kwara, Awewura; Archampong, Timothy N A; Lartey, Margaret; Sagoe, Kwamena W; Kenu, Ernest; Obo-Akwa, Adjoa; Blackard, Jason T

    2018-03-17

    Human pegivirus (HPgV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus in the Flaviviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the presence of multiple HPgV genotypes with distinct geographic locations. HPgV is of interest because of its potential beneficial impact on HIV disease progression. Despite this, the effects of HPgV in the context of other viral infections, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV), are poorly understood, and data from resource-limited settings are scarce. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of HPgV in HIV/HBV co-infected patients in Ghana. Sera from 100 HIV/HBV co-infected individuals were evaluated for HPgV RNA, and the genotype determined by sequencing the 5' untranslated region. HPgV RNA was detected in 27 samples (27%). Of these, 26 were genotyped successfully with 23 belonging to HPgV genotype 1 and 3 belonging to HPgV genotype 2. The presence of HPgV RNA had no statistically significant impact on CD4 cell count or HBV DNA titers in the HIV/HBV co-infected patients. However, there was a trend towards decreased HBV DNA levels in HPgV RNA-positive patients with CD4 cell count HBV disease among HIV/HBV co-infected patients was minimal. However, decreased HBV DNA levels in HPgV RNA-positive patients with low CD4 cell counts highlight the need for prospective studies of HPgV in HIV and hepatitis co-infected patients, especially in those with advanced HIV disease, to study further the effects of HPgV on liver disease.

  15. DNA repair in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Kusano, I.; Furuno-Fukushi, I.; Dunn, W.C. Jr.; Francis, A.A.; Lee, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    Our primary objective is to elucidate the molecular events in human cells when cellular macromolecules such as DNA are damaged by radiation or chemical agents. We study and characterize (i) the sequence of DNA repair events, (ii) the various modalities of repair, (iii) the genetic inhibition of repair due to mutation, (iv) the physiological inhibition of repair due to mutation, (v) the physiological inhibition of repair due to biochemical inhibitors, and (vi) the genetic basis of repair. Our ultimate goals are to (i) isolate and analyze the repair component of the mutagenic and/or carcinogenic event in human cells, and (ii) elucidate the magnitude and significance of this repair component as it impinges on the practical problems of human irradiation or exposure to actual or potential chemical mutagens and carcinogens. The significance of these studies lies in (i) the ubiquitousness of repair (most organisms, including man, have several complex repair systems), (ii) the belief that mutagenic and carcinogenic events may arise only from residual (nonrepaired) lesions or that error-prone repair systems may be the major induction mechanisms of the mutagenic or carcinogenic event, and (iii) the clear association of repair defects and highly carcinogenic disease states in man [xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)

  16. A novel “humanized mouse” model for autoimmune hepatitis and the association of gut microbiota with liver inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Muhammed; Wang, Yipeng; Tai, Ningwen; Peng, Jian; Guo, Junhua; Beland, Kathie; Lapierre, Pascal; David, Chella; Alvarez, Fernando; Colle, Isabelle; Yan, Huiping; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego; Ma, Yun; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in humans is a severe inflammatory liver disease, characterized by interface hepatitis, the presence of circulating autoantibodies and hyper-gammaglobulinemia. There are two types of AIH, type-1 (AIH-1) and type-2 (AIH-2) characterized by distinct autoimmune serology. Patients with AIH-1 are positive for anti-smooth muscle and/or anti-nuclear (SMA/ANA) autoantibodies whereas patients with AIH-2 have anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) autoantibodies. Cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6) is the antigenic target of anti-LKM1 and formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD) is the antigenic target of anti-LC1. It is known that AIH, both type-1 and type-2, is strongly linked to the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles -DR3, -DR4 and -DR7. However, the direct evidence of the association of HLA with AIH is lacking. Methods We developed a novel mouse model of AIH using the HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse on the non-obese diabetic (NOD) background (HLA-DR3 NOD) by immunization of HLA-DR3− and HLA-DR3+ NOD mice with a DNA plasmid, coding for human CYP2D6/FTCD fusion protein. Results Immunization with CYP2D6/FTCD leads to a sustained elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), development of ANA and anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 autoantibodies, chronic immune cell infiltration and parenchymal fibrosis on liver histology in HLA-DR3+ mice. Immunized mice also showed an enhanced Th1 immune response and paucity of the frequency of regulatory T-cell (Treg) in the liver. Moreover, HLA-DR3+ mice with exacerbated AIH showed reduced diversity and total load of gut bacteria. Conclusion Our humanized animal model has provided a novel experimental tool to further elucidate the pathogenesis of AIH and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of immunoregulatory therapeutic interventions in vivo. PMID:26185095

  17. Hepatic stellate cell and myofibroblast-like cell gene expression in the explanted cirrhotic livers of patients undergoing liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, J Michael; O'Reilly, Linda; Grant, Geraldine; Piper, James; Jonsson, Johann; Afendy, Arian; Chandhoke, Vikas; Younossi, Zobair M

    2010-02-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. Cell signaling associated with an insult to the liver affects an HSC transdifferentiation to fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cells. To investigate the transcriptional expression distinguishing HSC and myofibroblast-like cells between livers with and without cirrhosis. Tissue from ten cirrhotic livers (undergoing transplant) and four non-cirrhotic livers from the National Disease Research Interchange underwent cell separation to extract HSC and myofibroblast-like cell populations. Separated cell types as well as LI-90 cells were subjected to microarray analysis. Selected microarray results were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Differential expression of some genes, such as IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, and IL-6, was associated with both transdifferentiation and disease. Other genes, such as fatty acid 2-hydroxylase only show differential expression in association with disease. Functional analysis supported these findings, indicating some signal transduction pathways (IL-6) are involved in disease and activation, whereas retinoid X receptor signaling in HSC from cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic livers varies in scope and quality. These findings indicate distinct phenotypes for HSC from cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, coordinated differential expression between genes involved in the same signal transduction pathways provides some insight into the mechanisms that may control the balance between fibrogenesis and fibrolysis.

  18. Prevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen in children with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Jibrin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B virus is known to be endemic in Africa. The seroepidemiological studies of HBV have shown that infection commonly occurs in childhood in Africa resulting in an increased tendency to chronicity. This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen among pediatric patients with homozygous hemoglobin S. Materials and Methods: Three hundred sickle cell anemia children aged 6 months-15 years (both in steady state and in crises attending the SCA clinic and on admission in emergency pediatrics unit and pediatrics medical ward, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria, were screened for hepatitis B infection using HBsAg as marker of infection. The sensitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method was used for detection of the marker. Three hundred children with minor illness attending pediatrics outpatient department and on admission in EPU/PMW for various treatment in the same hospital served as gender- and age-marched controls cohorts. Results: The sero-prevalence of HBsAg seropositivity for hepatitis B virus infection among SCA children was 17.3% (52/300 compared to 10.7% (32/300 of the control (P = 0.0875. The peak prevalence age group for HBV infection among SCA children was in the age group 1.1-5.0 years (6% compared to 10.1-15.0 years (4.7% in the control. Risk factors for HBV infection such as blood transfusion, traditional scarification/circumcision/uvulectomy, and tattooing did not significantly affect the prevalence of HBV infection in both SCA children and controls. Conclusion: Hepatitis B infection is common in Sokoto. The need for strict adherence to HBV immunization and further community-based studies on the risk factors are recommended.

  19. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CCSR Building Room 3115A, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Wonjae [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie [Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Frank, Curtis W, E-mail: jeffrey.glenn@stanford.ed, E-mail: curt.frank@stanford.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from {approx}50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 +- 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  20. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Lee, Wonjae; Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie; Frank, Curtis W

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from ∼50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 ± 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  1. Donor‐Dependent and Other Nondefined Factors Have Greater Influence on the Hepatic Phenotype Than the Starting Cell Type in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte‐Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, James A.; Kia, Richard; Pridgeon, Christopher S.; Sison‐Young, Rowena L.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Elmasry, Mohamed; Fenwick, Stephen W.; Mills, John S.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Park, Bong K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Drug‐induced liver injury is the greatest cause of post‐marketing drug withdrawal; therefore, substantial resources are directed toward triaging potentially dangerous new compounds at all stages of drug development. One of the major factors preventing effective screening of new compounds is the lack of a predictive in vitro model of hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes offer a metabolically relevant model for which the molecular initiating events of hepatotoxicity can be examined; however, these cells vary greatly between donors and dedifferentiate rapidly in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)‐derived hepatocyte‐like cells (HLCs) offer a reproducible, physiologically relevant and genotypically normal model cell; however, current differentiation protocols produce HLCs with a relatively immature phenotype. During the reprogramming of somatic cells, the epigenome undergoes dramatic changes; however, this “resetting” is a gradual process, resulting in an altered differentiation propensity, skewed toward the lineage of origin, particularly in early passage cultures. We, therefore, performed a comparison of human hepatocyte‐ and dermal fibroblast‐derived iPSCs, assessing the impact of epigenetic memory at all stages of HLC differentiation. These results provide the first isogenic assessment of the starting cell type in human iPSC‐derived HLCs. Despite a trend toward improvement in hepatic phenotype in albumin secretion and gene expression, few significant differences in hepatic differentiation capacity were found between hepatocyte and fibroblast‐derived iPSCs. We conclude that the donor and inter‐clonal differences have a greater influence on the hepatocyte phenotypic maturity than the starting cell type. Therefore, it is not necessary to use human hepatocytes for generating iPSC‐derived HLCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1321–1331 PMID:28456008

  2. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma.

  3. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived erythropoietin-producing cells ameliorate renal anemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kasahara, Tomoko; Katagiri, Naoko; Hoshina, Azusa; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Kotaka, Maki; Toyohara, Takafumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Niwa, Akira; Saito, Megumu K; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nishiyama, Akira; Osafune, Kenji

    2017-09-27

    The production of erythropoietin (EPO) by the kidneys, a principal hormone for the hematopoietic system, is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), eventually resulting in severe anemia. Although recombinant human EPO treatment improves anemia in patients with CKD, returning to full red blood cell production without fluctuations does not always occur. We established a method to generate EPO-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by modifying previously reported hepatic differentiation protocols. These cells showed increased EPO expression and secretion in response to low oxygen conditions, prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzyme inhibitors, and insulin-like growth factor 1. The EPO protein secreted from hiPSC-derived EPO-producing (hiPSC-EPO) cells induced the erythropoietic differentiation of human umbilical cord blood progenitor cells in vitro. Furthermore, transplantation of hiPSC-EPO cells into mice with CKD induced by adenine treatment improved renal anemia. Thus, hiPSC-EPO cells may be a useful tool for clarifying the mechanisms of EPO production and may be useful as a therapeutic strategy for treating renal anemia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Influence of human t-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 Infection on laboratory parameters of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus Influência da infecção pelo vírus linfotrópico humano tipo 1 (HTLV-1 em parâmetros laboratoriais de pacientes com hepatite C crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Fernandes Cardoso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 share routes of transmission and some individuals have dual infection. Although some studies point to a worse prognosis of hepatitis C virus in patients co-infected with HTLV-1, the interaction between these two infections is poorly understood. This study evaluated the influence of HTLV-1 infection on laboratory parameters in chronic HCV patients. Twelve HTLV-1/HCV-coinfected patients were compared to 23 patients infected only with HCV, in regard to demographic data, risk factors for viral acquisition, HCV genotype, presence of cirrhosis, T CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts and liver function tests. There was no difference in regard to age, gender, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, HCV genotype or presence of cirrhosis between the groups. Intravenous drug use was the most common risk factor among individuals co-infected with HTLV-1. These patients showed higher TCD8+ counts (p = 0.0159 and significantly lower median values of AST and ALT (p = 0.0437 and 0.0159, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected patients differs in laboratorial parameters involving both liver and immunological patterns. The meaning of these interactions in the natural history of these infections is a matter that deserves further studies.O vírus da hepatite C (VHC e vírus linfotrópico humano tipo 1 (HTLV-1 compartilham formas de transmissão e algumas pessoas apresentam coinfecção. Embora alguns estudos apontem para um pior prognóstico da infecção pelo VHC em pacientes coinfectados com HTLV-1, a interação entre estas infecções é mal compreendida. Este estudo avaliou a influência da infecção pelo HTLV-1 em parâmetros laboratoriais de pacientes com VHC. 12 coinfectados VHC/HTLV-1 foram comparados com 23 pacientes monoinfectados com VHC, no que diz respeito aos dados demográficos, fatores de risco para aquisição viral, genótipo do VHC, presença de cirrose

  5. A trans-activator function is generated by integration of hepatitis B virus preS/S sequences in human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caselmann, W.H.; Meyer, M.; Kekule, A.S.; Lauer, U.; Hofschneider, P.H.; Koshy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The X gene of wild-type hepatitis B virus or integrated DNA has recently been shown to stimulate transcription of a variety of enhancers and promoters. To further delineate the viral sequences responsible for trans-activation in hepatomas, the authors cloned the single hepatitis B virus insert from human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA M1. The plasmid pM1 contains 2004 base of hepatitis B virus DNA subtype adr, including truncated preS/S sequences and the enhancer element. The X promoter and 422 nucleotides of the X coding region are present. The entire preC/C gene is deleted. In transient cotransfection assays using Chang liver cells (CCL 13), pM1 DNA exerts a 6- to 10-fold trans-activating effect on the expression of the pSV2CAT reporter plasmid. The transactivation occurs by stimulation of transcription and is dependent on the simian virus 40 enhancer in the reporter plasmid. Deletion analysis of pM1 subclones reveals that the transactivator is encoded by preS/S and not by X sequences. A frameshift mutation within the preS2 open reading frame shows that this portion is indispensable for the trans-activating function. Initiation of transcription has been mapped to the S1 promoter. A comparable trans-activating effect is also observed with cloned wild-type hepatitis B virus sequences similarly truncated. These results show that a transcriptional trans-activator function not present in the intact gene is generated by 3' truncation of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA preS/S sequences

  6. Potential cellular receptors involved in hepatitis C virus entry into cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muellhaupt Beat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes and leads to permanent, severe liver damage. Since the genomic sequence of HCV was determined, progress has been made towards understanding the functions of the HCV-encoded proteins and identifying the cellular receptor(s responsible for adsorption and penetration of the virus particle into the target cells. Several cellular receptors for HCV have been proposed, all of which are associated with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. This article reviews the cellular receptors for HCV and suggests a general model for HCV entry into cells, in which lipoproteins play a crucial role.

  7. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population.Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels.The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  8. Prophylactic Hepatitis E Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E has been increasingly recognized as an underestimated global disease burden in recent years. Subpopulations with more serious infection-associated damage or death include pregnant women, patients with basic liver diseases, and elderly persons. Vaccine would be the most effective means for prevention of HEV infection. The lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV makes the development of classic inactive or attenuated vaccine infeasible. Hence, the recombinant vaccine approaches are explored deeply. The neutralizing sites are located almost exclusively in the capsid protein, pORF2, of the virion. Based on pORF2, many vaccine candidates showed potential of protecting primate animals; two of them were tested in human and evidenced to be well tolerated in adults and highly efficacious in preventing hepatitis E. The world's first hepatitis E vaccine, Hecolin ® (HEV 239 vaccine), was licensed in China and launched in 2012.

  9. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

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    Justin D. Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis.

  10. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel; Lagaudrière-Gesbert, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. ► HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. ► HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  11. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.lagaudriere-gesbert@u-psud.fr [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  12. Interferon gamma peptidomimetic targeted to hepatic stellate cells ameliorates acute and chronic liver fibrosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ruchi; Prakash, Jai; De Ruiter, Marieke; Poelstra, Klaas

    2014-04-10

    Hepatic stellate cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of pro-fibrotic activities of these cells might lead to an effective therapy for this disease. Among the potent anti-fibrotics, interferon gamma (IFNγ), a proinflammatory cytokine, is highly efficacious but it failed in clinical trials due to the poor efficacy and multiple adverse effects attributed to the ubiquitous IFNγ receptor (IFNγR) expression. To resolve these drawbacks, we chemically synthesized a chimeric molecule containing (a) IFNγ signaling peptide (IFNγ peptidomimetic, mimγ) that retains the agonistic activities of IFNγ but lacks an extracellular receptor recognition sequence for IFNγR; coupled via heterobifunctional PEG linker to (b) bicyclic platelet derived growth factor beta receptor (PDGFβR)-binding peptide (BiPPB) to induce internalization into the stellate cells that express PDGFβR. The synthesized targeted IFNγ peptidomimetic (mimγ-BiPPB) was extensively investigated for its anti-fibrotic and adverse effects in acute and chronic CCl4-induced liver fibrosis models in mice. Treatment with mimγ-BiPPB, after the onset of disease, markedly inhibited both early and established hepatic fibrosis as reflected by a reduced intrahepatic α-SMA, desmin and collagen-I mRNA expression and protein levels. While untargeted mimγ and BiPPB had no effect, and native IFNγ only induced a moderate reduction. Additionally, no off-target effects, e.g. systemic inflammation, were found with mimγ-BiPPB, which were substantially observed in mice treated with native IFNγ. The present study highlights the beneficial effects of a novel BiPPB mediated cell-specific targeting of IFNγ peptidomimetic to the disease-inducing cells and therefore represents a highly potential therapeutic approach to treat fibrotic diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PTP1B confers liver fibrosis by regulating the activation of hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Jie; Cai, Shuang-Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Wan-Xia; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Li, Jun, E-mail: lj@ahmu.edu.cn

    2016-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to chronic hepatic injuries. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. The currently accepted mechanism for the resolution of liver fibrosis is the apoptosis and inactivation of activated HSCs. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a prototype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be a vital modulator in cardiac fibrogenesis. However, the precise role of PTP1B on liver fibrosis and HSC activation is still unclear. Our study showed that the expression of PTP1B was elevated in fibrotic liver but reduced after spontaneous recovery. Moreover, stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) resulted in a dose/time-dependent increase of PTP1B mRNA and protein. Co-incubation of HSC-T6 cells with PTP1B-siRNA inhibited the cell proliferation and activation induced by TGF-β1. Additionally, both mRNA and protein of PTP1B were dramatically decreased in inactivated HSCs after treated with adipogenic differentiation mixture (MDI). Over-expression of PTP1B hindered the inactivation of HSC-T6 cells induced by MDI. These observations revealed a regulatory role of PTP1B in liver fibrosis and implied PTP1B as a potential therapeutic target. - Highlights: • The expression of PTP1B in the fibrotic livers and recovery livers • The expression of PTP1B in activated and inactivated HSCs • Blockade of PTP1B inhibited the TGF-β1-induced proliferation and activation of HSCs. • Over-expression of PTP1B abolished the inactivation of HSCs induced by MDI.

  14. PTP1B confers liver fibrosis by regulating the activation of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pei-Jie; Cai, Shuang-Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Wan-Xia; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to chronic hepatic injuries. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. The currently accepted mechanism for the resolution of liver fibrosis is the apoptosis and inactivation of activated HSCs. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a prototype of non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be a vital modulator in cardiac fibrogenesis. However, the precise role of PTP1B on liver fibrosis and HSC activation is still unclear. Our study showed that the expression of PTP1B was elevated in fibrotic liver but reduced after spontaneous recovery. Moreover, stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) resulted in a dose/time-dependent increase of PTP1B mRNA and protein. Co-incubation of HSC-T6 cells with PTP1B-siRNA inhibited the cell proliferation and activation induced by TGF-β1. Additionally, both mRNA and protein of PTP1B were dramatically decreased in inactivated HSCs after treated with adipogenic differentiation mixture (MDI). Over-expression of PTP1B hindered the inactivation of HSC-T6 cells induced by MDI. These observations revealed a regulatory role of PTP1B in liver fibrosis and implied PTP1B as a potential therapeutic target. - Highlights: • The expression of PTP1B in the fibrotic livers and recovery livers • The expression of PTP1B in activated and inactivated HSCs • Blockade of PTP1B inhibited the TGF-β1-induced proliferation and activation of HSCs. • Over-expression of PTP1B abolished the inactivation of HSCs induced by MDI.

  15. Molecular cloning of the human hepatitis C virus genome from Japanese patients with non-A, non-B hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Ootsuyama, Yuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ohkoshi, Showgo; Sugimura, Takashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Japanese type of hepatitis C virus (HCV-J) genome, consisting of 9413 nucleotides, was determined by analyses of cDNA clones from plasma specimens from Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis. HCV-J genome contains a long open reading frame that can encode a sequence of 3010 amino acid residues. Comparison of HCV-J with the American isolate of HCV showed 22.6% difference in nucleotide sequence and 15.1% difference in amino acid sequence. Thus HCV-J and the American isolate of HCV are probably different subtypes of HCV. The relationship of HCV-J with other animal RNA virus families and the putative organization of the HCV-J genome are discussed

  16. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  18. Detection of Osteopontin in the pericyst of human hepatic Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinyu; Li, Jianhui; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Shijie; Niu, Jianhua; Chen, Xiaoping; Yao, Jin; Sun, Hong

    2006-12-01

    It aims at investigating the expression and distribution of the Osteopontin (OPN) in the pericyst of human hepatic Echinococcus granulosus and their related significances. Sixty pericysts excised by "sub-adventitial cystectomy" were studied. OPN was detected in 80% (48/60) of cysts by Western blotting and distributed in the side of "exocyst" layer directing to the parasite, also macrophages were identified in the vicinity of OPN by immunohistochemistry staining. The coexpression of OPN and CD68 was observed by immunofluorescence double labeling and analyzed by Image-Pro Plus 5.1; with special stain techniques, variable degrees of calcium deposits were observed in 80% (48/60) cysts, and the calcium deposits concurrencely found with the OPN expression. The selective distribution of OPN, calcium in the "exocyst" provides a new pathological evidence for the "sub-adventitial cystectomy" we developed. The pericyst of hepatic E. granulosus consists of two detachable layers with different formative mechanisms: the "exocyst" layer directing towards the cyst of parasite was the result of granulomatous reaction; also the results suggest OPN is one regulator in the granulomatous reaction and calcification of "exocyst".

  19. Chloride concentrations in human hepatic cytosol and mitochondria are a function of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Stephan C; Rowland-Faux, Laura; Stacpoole, Peter W; James, Margaret O

    2015-04-10

    We recently reported that, in a concentration-dependent manner, chloride protects hepatic glutathione transferase zeta 1 from inactivation by dichloroacetate, an investigational drug used in treating various acquired and congenital metabolic diseases. Despite the importance of chloride ions in normal physiology, and decades of study of chloride transport across membranes, the literature lacks information on chloride concentrations in animal tissues other than blood. In this study we measured chloride concentrations in human liver samples from male and female donors aged 1 day to 84 years (n = 97). Because glutathione transferase zeta 1 is present in cytosol and, to a lesser extent, in mitochondria, we measured chloride in these fractions by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis following conversion of the free chloride to pentafluorobenzylchloride. We found that chloride concentration decreased with age in hepatic cytosol but increased in liver mitochondria. In addition, chloride concentrations in cytosol, (105.2 ± 62.4 mM; range: 24.7-365.7 mM) were strikingly higher than those in mitochondria (4.2 ± 3.8 mM; range 0.9-22.2 mM). These results suggest a possible explanation for clinical observations seen in patients treated with dichloroacetate, whereby children metabolize the drug more rapidly than adults following repeated doses, and also provide information that may influence our understanding of normal liver physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. THE STATE OF CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY AMONG HEPATITIS B SURFACE ,ANTGENI CARRIERS IN IRAN,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MASSOUD

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune (CMI s t a t us and sub- popul at i ons o f pe r ipheral b l ood lymphocytes were investigated in one hundre d volunt a ry blood donors who were car r ier s of Ag • HE S A signi f i c ant decr e ase of t otal T-cells observed in HB Ag carri e rs as compared t o normal controls. The percenS t age o f active T-cells a nd B-lymphocytes did not d i f f e r signi f icant ly between the t wo groups ."nAddi t ion of aut ologous serum from HE Ag c a r r iers t o s t heir l ymphocyt e s reduced the numbe r of detectabl e cells in HE Ag carriers . This reduction coul d be due to the s presence of a r osette i nhi bitory f actor in their serum. Our studies demonstrated a failur e o f CMI among HB Ags car r i ers detected by the l e ukocyte migr ation i nhibition (LMI test. This failure cannot be attributed to the presence of HE Ag-AB complexes in their serum. It is s possible that specific failure of CMI allows the hepatitis B virus to remain harmless in carriers a Hepatitis B surface-antigen (HE Ag; Hepatitis Bs coreantigen (HE Ag and Hepatitis Be-antigen (HE Ag, c e have been established as indicating ineffectivity in viral hepatitis B ({I, 6 , 20, 28."nA number of infected individuals also developed clini cal evidence of disease and HE Ag may s the serum of some subjects for a long rema•ln present I•n time (18. It has been suggested that to a defect in CMI, the persistence of HB Ag s whether liver disease is is related present or not, and impairment of the lymphocyte response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA in this group is presented in evide•"nnee (8, •9 , 13, 24, 25 .In contrast, other workers report a normal respons e t o PHA in healthy carriers of HE Ag and s they concludE that the defective T-cell response is relat ed to the live!' disease rather than the immune system (31. Dudley et al (8 have suggested that liver damage occurring after hepatitis B infection, may be an effect of thymus-dependent lymphocytes (12."n

  1. Prediction of linear B-cell epitopes of hepatitis C virus for vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background High genetic heterogeneity in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major challenge of the development of an effective vaccine. Existing studies for developing HCV vaccines have mainly focused on T-cell immune response. However, identification of linear B-cell epitopes that can stimulate B-cell response is one of the major tasks of peptide-based vaccine development. Owing to the variability in B-cell epitope length, the prediction of B-cell epitopes is much more complex than that of T-cell epitopes. Furthermore, the motifs of linear B-cell epitopes in different pathogens are quite different (e. g. HCV and hepatitis B virus). To cope with this challenge, this work aims to propose an HCV-customized sequence-based prediction method to identify B-cell epitopes of HCV. Results This work establishes an experimentally verified dataset comprising the B-cell response of HCV dataset consisting of 774 linear B-cell epitopes and 774 non B-cell epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database. An interpretable rule mining system of B-cell epitopes (IRMS-BE) is proposed to select informative physicochemical properties (PCPs) and then extracts several if-then rule-based knowledge for identifying B-cell epitopes. A web server Bcell-HCV was implemented using an SVM with the 34 informative PCPs, which achieved a training accuracy of 79.7% and test accuracy of 70.7% better than the SVM-based methods for identifying B-cell epitopes of HCV and the two general-purpose methods. This work performs advanced analysis of the 34 informative properties, and the results indicate that the most effective property is the alpha-helix structure of epitopes, which influences the connection between host cells and the E2 proteins of HCV. Furthermore, 12 interpretable rules are acquired from top-five PCPs and achieve a sensitivity of 75.6% and specificity of 71.3%. Finally, a conserved promising vaccine candidate, PDREMVLYQE, is identified for inclusion in a vaccine against HCV. Conclusions This work

  2. Calcium channel blockers ameliorate iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis by altering iron transport and stellate cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Department of Pathology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Hebei Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine Research on Cardio-Cerebrovascular Disease, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Zhao, Xin [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Chang, Yanzhong [Laboratory of Molecular Iron Metabolism, College of Life Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024, Hebei (China); Zhang, Yuanyuan [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Chu, Xi [Department of Pharmacy, The Forth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050011, Hebei (China); Zhang, Xuan [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Wang, Na [Department of Physiology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Gao, Yonggang [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Zhang, Jianping, E-mail: zhangjianping14@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Chu, Li, E-mail: chuli0614@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, Hebei University of Chinese Medicine, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China); Hebei Key Laboratory of Integrative Medicine on Liver-Kidney Patterns, Shijiazhuang 050200, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Liver fibrosis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with iron overload. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) can antagonize divalent cation entry into renal and myocardial cells and inhibit fibrogenic gene expression. We investigated the potential of CCBs to resolve iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis. Kunming mice were assigned to nine groups (n = 8 per group): control, iron overload, deferoxamine, high and low dose verapamil, high and low dose nimodipine, and high and low dose diltiazem. Iron deposition and hepatic fibrosis were measured in mouse livers. Expression levels of molecules associated with transmembrane iron transport were determined by molecular biology approaches. In vitro HSC-T6 cells were randomized into nine groups (the same groups as the mice). Changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and metalloproteinase expression in cells were detected to assess the anti-fibrotic effects of CCBs during iron overload conditions. We found that CCBs reduced hepatic iron content, intracellular iron deposition, the number of hepatic fibrotic areas, collagen expression levels, and hydroxyproline content. CCBs rescued abnormal expression of α1C protein in L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) and down-regulated divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) expression in mouse livers. In iron-overloaded HSC-T6 cells, CCBs reduced iron deposition, inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). CCBs are potential therapeutic agents that can be used to address hepatic fibrosis during iron overload. They resolve hepatic fibrosis probably correlated with regulating transmembrane iron transport and inhibiting HSC growth. - Highlights: • Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) reduced hepatic iron content. • CCBs decreased hepatic fibrotic areas and collagen expression levels. • CCBs resolve fibrosis by regulating iron transport and

  3. Structural analysis of a hepatitis B virus genome integrated into chromosome 17p of a human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.Z.; Slagle, B.L.; Donehower, L.A.; van Tuinen, P.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Butel, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is clearly a factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but its mechanism of action remains obscure. One possibility is that the HBV integration event alters the expression of a nearby growth-regulatory cellular gene. A 9-kilobase (kb) DNA fragment containing an HBV insert plus flanking cellular sequences was cloned from a hepatoma specimen from Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Restriction mapping of the insert revealed a large inverted repeat structure consisting of both viral sequences (encompassing all of the core and pre-S regions and portions of the X and S genes) and at least 3 kb of unique cellular sequences. The virus-cell junction mapped 11 nucleotides from the DRI region, in a position within the HBV X gene and included in the cohesive overlap region. A probe generated from 1.0 kb of the flanking cellular DNA mapped the viral insert to chromosome 17 in the region designated 17p11.2-17p12, which is near the human proto-oncogene p53. Sequence data from a portion of the flanking cellular DNA revealed a stretch of approximately 70 base pairs that showed highly significant homology with a conserved region of a number of functional mammalian DNA, including the human autonomously replicating sequence 1 (ASRI)

  4. Drug-binding ability of human serum albumin at children with chronic virus hepatitis radiochemical definition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Dadakhanov, J.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Shukurov, B.V.; Mavlyanov, I.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The chronic virus hepatitis produces numerous abnormalities of liver function. The viruses of B, C, D, F and G hepatitis possess the ability to cause chronically proceeding diseases. Earlier we have found that binding ability of serum albumin at patients with acute forms of virus hepatitis is authentically reduced in comparison with the given parameters of control group. At an acute virus hepatitis B with middle severity the reducing of binding ability of serum albumin was observed at 70 % of patients. At an acute virus hepatitis A the reduce of binding ability of serum albumin is less expressed than at acute virus hepatitis B. At of chronic virus intoxication in human organism there is a formation and accumulation of toxic compounds in the excessive concentrations, which are not inherent to a normal metabolism. One of universal mechanisms of reaction of an organism on the increasing concentration of metabolism products is formation of complexes of various compounds with blood plasma proteins. The formation in an organism of endo- and exotoxins excessive concentrations results in blocking the binding centers of albumin molecule that causes the change of its complexing ability. The purpose of the present research: investigation of binding ability of serum albumin with use of radiochemical method at children with a chronic virus hepatitis B and C. Materials and methods. Under clinical observation there were 52 children in the age from 3 till 14 years. From them at 32 the chronic virus hepatitis B was confirmed, at 20 chronic virus - hepatitis C. Etiological diagnostics was carried out by definition of specific markers of a hepatitis B and C method IFA and PCR. Binding ability of serum albumin was defined by radiochemical method with use of the tritium labeled no-spa (drotaverine hydrochloride). The control group consists from 10 conditionally health children of similar age. Results and their discussion. The results of investigation have shown, that at a

  5. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamala, Venkatakrishna

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI), a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP) and occult HBV infections (OBI). Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT) testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID) format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases.

  6. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishna Shyamala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI, a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP and occult HBV infections (OBI. Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases.

  7. Differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cell under flow conditions to mature hepatocytes for liver tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Hemmingsen, Mette; Larsen, Layla

    2018-01-01

    Hepatic differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under flow conditions in a 3D scaffold is expected to be a major step forward for construction of bioartificial livers. The aims of this study were to induce hepatic differentiation of hiPSCs under perfusion conditions...... and to perform functional comparisons with fresh human precision-cut liver slices (hPCLS), an excellent benchmark for the human liver in vivo. The majority of the mRNA expression of CYP isoenzymes and transporters and the tested CYP activities, Phase II metabolism, and albumin, urea, and bile acid synthesis...... in the hiPSC-derived cells reached values that overlap those of hPCLS, which indicates a higher degree of hepatic differentiation than observed until now. Differentiation under flow compared with static conditions had a strong inducing effect on Phase II metabolism and suppressed AFP expression but resulted...

  8. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...... mammary cell lineages, producing an increasing number of cells with distinct properties. Understanding the biological characteristics of human breast stem cells and their progeny is crucial in attempts to compare the features of normal stem cells and cancer precursor cells and distinguish these from...... nonprecursor cells and cells from the bulk of a tumor. A historical overview of research on human breast stem cells in primary tissue and in culture reveals the progress that has been made in this area, whereas a focus on the cell-of-origin and reprogramming that occurs during neoplastic conversion provides...

  9. Cytotoxic effects and apoptosis induction of enrofloxacin in hepatic cell line of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Cui, Yanting; Brown, Paul B; Ge, Xianping; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao

    2015-12-01

    We determined the effect of enrofloxacin on the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis in the hepatic cell line of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). Cultured cells were treated with different concentrations of enrofloxacin (12.5-200 ug/mL) for 24 h. We found that the cytotoxic effect of enrofloxacin was mediated by apoptosis, and that this apoptosis occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The doses of 50,100 and 200 μg/mL enrofloxacin increased the LDH release and MDA concentration, induced cell apoptosis and reduced the ΔΨm compared to the control. The highest dose of 200 ug/mL enrofloxacin also significantly induced apoptosis accompanied by ΔΨm disruption and ROS generation and significantly reduced T-AOC and increased MDA concentration compared to the control. Our results suggest that the dose of 200 ug/mL enrofloxacin exerts its cytotoxic effect and produced ROS via apoptosis by affecting the mitochondria of the hepatic cells of grass carp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatic Stellate Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent Hepatocytes from Injury Induced by APAP/H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, previously described for liver-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, appear to contribute to liver regeneration. Microvesicles (MVs are nanoscale membrane fragments, which can regulate target cell function by transferring contents from their parent cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HSC-derived MVs on xenobiotic-induced liver injury. Rat and human hepatocytes, BRL-3A and HL-7702, were used to build hepatocytes injury models by n-acetyl-p-aminophenol n-(APAP or H2O2 treatment. MVs were prepared from human and rat HSCs, LX-2, and HST-T6 and, respectively, added to injured BRL-3A and HL-7702 hepatocytes. MTT assay was utilized to determine cell proliferation. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and hoechst33258 staining. Western blot was used for analyzing the expression of activated caspase-3. Liver injury indicators, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in culture medium were also assessed. Results showed that (1 HSC-MVs derived from LX-2 and HST-T6 were positive to CD90 and annexin V surface markers; (2 HSC-MVs dose-dependently improved the viability of hepatocytes in both injury models; (3 HSC-MVs dose-dependently inhibited the APAP/H2O2 induced hepatocytes apoptosis and activated caspase-3 expression and leakage of LDH, ALT, and AST. Our results demonstrate that HSC-derived MVs protect hepatocytes from toxicant-induced injury.

  11. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  12. A novel monoclonal anti-CD81 antibody produced by genetic immunization efficiently inhibits Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission.

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    Isabel Fofana

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenge to prevent and treat because of the rapid development of drug resistance and escape. Viral entry is required for initiation, spread, and maintenance of infection, making it an attractive target for antiviral strategies.Using genetic immunization, we produced four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the HCV host entry factor CD81. The effects of antibodies on inhibition of HCV infection and dissemination were analyzed in HCV permissive human liver cell lines.The anti-CD81 mAbs efficiently inhibited infection by HCV of different genotypes as well as a HCV escape variant selected during liver transplantation and re-infecting the liver graft. Kinetic studies indicated that anti-CD81 mAbs target a post-binding step during HCV entry. In addition to inhibiting cell-free HCV infection, one antibody was also able to block neutralizing antibody-resistant HCV cell-cell transmission and viral dissemination without displaying any detectable toxicity.A novel anti-CD81 mAb generated by genetic immunization efficiently blocks HCV spread and dissemination. This antibody will be useful to further unravel the role of virus-host interactions during HCV entry and cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, this antibody may be of interest for the development of antivirals for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  13. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  14. Sensitive genotyping of foodborne-associated human noroviruses and hepatitis A virus using an array-based platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    The viral pathogens, human norovirus (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are significant contributors of foodborne associated outbreaks. To develop a typing tool for foodborne viruses, a focused, low-density DNA microarray was developed in conjunction with a rapid and high-throughput fluorescent meth...

  15. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  16. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus infection in undocumented migrants and refugees in southern Italy, January 2012 to June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Gualdieri, Luciano; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Sagnelli, Caterina; Caprio, Nunzio; Maffei, Rita; Starace, Mario; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Pasquale, Giuseppe; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Screening of undocumented migrants or refugees for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been offered free of charge and free from bureaucratic procedures since 2012 at four primary-level clinical centres in Naples and Caserta, Italy. Of 926 undocumented migrants and refugees visiting one of the primary-level clinical centres from January 2012 to June 2013, 882 (95%) were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), total hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and antibodies against HCV and HIV. Of the 882 individuals enrolled, 78 (9%) were HBsAg positive, 35 (4%) anti-HCV positive and 11 (1%) anti-HIV positive (single infections); seven (1%) had more than one infection (three were HBsAg positive). Of the 801 HBsAg-negative patients, 373 (47%) were anti-HBc positive. The HBsAg-positivity rate was high (14%; 62/444) in individuals from sub-Saharan Africa and intermediate in those from eastern Europe (6%; 12/198), northern Africa (2%; 2/80) and Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka (the 'India-Pakistan area') (3%; 4/126). Anti-HCV was detected in 9/126 (7%) individuals originating from the India-Pakistan area, in 12/198 (6%) from eastern Europe, in 17/444 (4%) from sub-Saharan and in 2/80 (2%) from northern Africa. The HBV, HCV and HIV infections in the undocumented migrants and refugees screened serve as a reminder to the Italian healthcare authorities to carry out extensive screening and educational programmes for these populations.

  17. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies to the Hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus in a hospital-based population in Jaipur, Rajasthan

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    Sood Smita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV infections are a serious global and public health problem. To assess the magnitude and dynamics of disease transmission and for its prevention and control, the study of its seroprevalence is important. A private hospital catering to the needs of a large population represents an important center for serological surveys. Available data, at Rajasthan state level, on the seroprevalence of these bloodborne pathogens is also very limited. Objective: A study was undertaken to estimate the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and antibodies to hepatitis C (anti-HCV Ab and human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV Ab in both the sexes and different age groups in a hospital-based population in Jaipur, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: Serum samples collected over a period of 14 months from patients attending OPDs and admitted to various IPDs of Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, were subjected within the hospital-based lab for the detection of HBsAg and anti-HCV Ab and anti-HIV Ab using rapid card tests. This was followed by further confirmation of all reactive samples by a microparticle enzyme immunoassay (Abbott AxSYM at Super Religare Laboratories (formerly SRL Ranbaxy Reference Lab, Mumbai. Results: The seroprevalence of HBsAg was found to be 0.87%, of anti-HCV Ab as 0.28%, and of anti-HIV Ab as 0.35%. Conclusion: The study throws light on the magnitude of viral transmission in the community in the state of Rajasthan and provides a reference for future studies.

  18. Hepatitis C virus core protein potentiates proangiogenic activity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yu-Yun; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Wang, Han-Yu; Li, Yong-Shi; Lin, Hang; Hsu, Hung-Wei; Huang, Chung-Yi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2017-10-17

    Increased angiogenic activity has been demonstrated in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the mechanism was unclear. To study the role of HCV core protein, we used tube formation and Matrigel plug assays to assess the proangiogenic activity of an HCC cell line, HuH7, and 2 of its stable clones-HuH7-core-high and HuH7-core-low, with high and low HCV core protein expression, respectively. In both assays, HuH7-core-high and HuH7-core-low cells dose-dependently induced stronger angiogenesis than control cells. HuH7 cells with HCV core protein expression showed increased mRNA and protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF inhibition by bevacizumab reduced the proangiogenic activity of HuH7-core-high cells. The promotor region of VEGF contains the binding site of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Compared with controls, HuH7-core-high cells had an increased AP-1 activity and nuclear localization of phospho-c-jun. AP-1 inhibition using either RNA knockdown or AP-1 inhibitors reduced the VEGF mRNA expression and the proangiogenic activity of HuH7-core-high cells. Among 131 tissue samples from HCC patients, HCV-related HCC revealed stronger VEGF expression than did hepatitis B virus-related HCC. In conclusion, increased VEGF expression through AP-1 activation is a crucial mechanism underlying the proangiogenic activity of the HCV core protein in HCC cells.

  19. N-terminal region of gelsolin induces apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells by a caspase-dependent mechanism.

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    Budhaditya Mazumdar

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs are the major source for alteration of extracellular matrix in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Conditioned medium (CM collected from immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH have earlier been shown to be responsible for apoptosis of HSCs. In this study, we have shown that antibodies raised against a peptide derived from a linear B-cell epitope in the N-terminal region of gelsolin identified a gelsolin fragment in IHH CM. Analysis of activated stellate cell death by CM collected from Huh7 cells transfected with plasmids encoding gelsolin deletion mutants suggested that the N-terminal half of gelsolin contained sequences which were responsible for stellate cell death. Further analysis determined that this activity was restricted to a region encompassing amino acids 1-70 in the gelsolin sequence; antibody directed to an epitope within this region was able to neutralize stellate cell death. Gelsolin modulation of cell death using this fragment involved upregulation of TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, and involved caspase 3 activation by extrinsic pathway. The apoptotic activity of N-terminal gelsolin fragments was restricted to activated but not quiescent stellate cells indicating its potential application in therapeutic use as an anti-fibrotic agent. Gelsolin fragments encompassing N-terminal regions in polypeptides of different molecular sizes were detected by N-terminal peptide specific antiserum in IHH CM immunoprecipitated with chronically HCV infected patient sera, suggesting the presence of autoantibodies generated against N-terminal gelsolin fragments in patients with chronic liver disease.

  20. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

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    Honglei eWeng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called second pathway of liver regeneration. The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin.

  1. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin.

  2. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workshops Follow Us Home Health Information Liver Disease Hepatitis (Viral) Hepatitis C Related Topics English English Español Section Navigation Hepatitis (Viral) What Is Viral Hepatitis? Hepatitis A Hepatitis B ...

  3. Advances in the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus Co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Guofang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are transmitted through the same pathways. Therefore, the incidence of HBV in the HIV-infected population is higher than that in the healthy population, and is more obvious in China given the high HBV prevalence in the country. HIV and HBV co-infection can accelerate the disease process of HBV. Moreover, the incidence of cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease is higher in patients co-infected with HIV and HBV than in patients infected HBV alone. When treating patients co-infected with HIV and HBV for HBV infection alone, care should be taken to avoid the induction of HIV resistance. HBV should be considered during drug selection for anti-retroviral treatment. Furthermore, the effective HBV treatment should be retained if anti-retroviral drugs require changing.

  4. Trapping of oxidized LDL in lysosomes of Kupffer cells is a trigger for hepatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieghs, Veerle; Walenbergh, Sofie M A; Hendrikx, Tim; van Gorp, Patrick J; Verheyen, Fons; Olde Damink, Steven W; Masclee, Ad A; Koek, Ger H; Hofker, Marten H; Binder, Christoph J; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2013-08-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by steatosis and inflammation. The transition from steatosis towards NASH represents a key step in pathogenesis, as it will set the stage for further severe liver damage. Under normal conditions, lipoproteins that are endocytosed by Kupffer cells (KCs) are easily transferred from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) that is taken up by the macrophages in vitro is trapped within the lysosomes, while acetylated LDL (acLDL) is leading to normal lysosomal hydrolysis, resulting in cytoplasmic storage. We have recently demonstrated that hepatic inflammation is correlated with lysosomal trapping of lipids. So far, a link between lysosomal trapping of oxLDL and inflammation was not established. We hypothesized that lysosomal trapping of oxLDL in KCs will lead to hepatic inflammation. Ldlr(-/-) mice were injected with LDL, acLDL and oxLDL and sacrificed after 2, 6 and 24 h. Electron microscopy of KCs demonstrated that after oxLDL injection, small lipid inclusions were present inside the lysosomes after all time points and were mostly pronounced after 6 and 24 h. In contrast, no lipid inclusions were present inside KCs after LDL or acLDL injection. Hepatic expression of several inflammatory genes and scavenger receptors was higher after oxLDL injections compared with LDL or acLDL. These data suggest that trapping of oxLDL inside lysosomes of KCs in vivo is causally linked to increased hepatic inflammatory gene expression. Our novel observations provide new bases for prevention and treatment of NASH. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Randomized Trial: Immunogenicity and Safety of Coadministered Human Papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine and Combined Hepatitis A and B Vaccine in Girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Court; Breindahl, Morten; Aggarwal, Naresh

    2012-01-01

    This randomized, open, controlled, multicenter study (110886/NCT00578227) evaluated human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (HPV-16/18 vaccine) coadministered with inactivated hepatitis A and B (HAB) vaccine. Coprimary objectives were to demonstrate noninferiority of hepatitis A......, hepatitis B, and HPV-16/18 immune responses at month 7 when vaccines were coadministered, compared with the same vaccines administered alone....

  6. c-Myc-Dependent Cell Competition in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish S; Shah, Heta S; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2017-07-01

    Cell Competition is an interaction between cells for existence in heterogeneous cell populations of multicellular organisms. This phenomenon is involved in initiation and progression of cancer where heterogeneous cell populations compete directly or indirectly for the survival of the fittest based on differential gene expression. In Drosophila, cells having lower dMyc expression are eliminated by cell competition through apoptosis when present in the milieu of cells having higher dMyc expression. Thus, we designed a study to develop c-Myc (human homolog) dependent in vitro cell competition model of human cancer cells. Cells with higher c-Myc were transfected with c-myc shRNA to prepare cells with lower c-Myc and then co-cultured with the same type of cells having a higher c-Myc in equal ratio. Cells with lower c-Myc showed a significant decrease in numbers when compared with higher c-Myc cells, suggesting "loser" and "winner" status of cells, respectively. During microscopy, engulfment of loser cells by winner cells was observed with higher expression of JNK in loser cells. Furthermore, elimination of loser cells was prevented significantly, when co-cultured cells were treated with the JNK (apoptosis) inhibitor. Above results indicate elimination of loser cells in the presence of winner cells by c-Myc-dependent mechanisms of cell competition in human cancer cells. This could be an important mechanism in human tumors where normal cells are eliminated by c-Myc-overexpressed tumor cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1782-1791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Tim-3/galectin-9 regulate the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhao-Hui; Liang, Shuwen; Potter, James; Jiang, Xuan; Mao, Hai-Quan; Li, Zhiping

    2013-02-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim)-3 is well known to interact with its natural ligand, Galectin-9 (Gal-9), to regulate T cell function. However, little is known about the function of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) mediated by hepatic NKT cells that also express Tim-3. In the current study, we define the role and the mechanism of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in hepatic NKT cell regulation in a mouse model of diet-induced NAFLD. Adult male wild-type or CD1d knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet to induce steatosis. Some of the mice also received one or a combination of Gal-9, anti-IL-15R/IL-15 mAb, rIL-15, α-galactosylceramide, and multilamellar liposomes containing Cl(2)MDP. The expression of Tim-3 and various markers reflecting cell proliferation, activation, cytokine production, and apoptosis was analyzed. Liver histology, steatosis grade, and hepatic triglyceride content were also evaluated. In the liver, Tim-3(+) NKT cells are in an activated state, and Gal-9 directly induces Tim-3(+) NKT cell apoptosis and contributes to the depletion of NKT cells in diet-induced steatosis. However, Gal-9 also interacts with Tim-3-expressing Kupffer cells to induce secretion of IL-15, thus promoting NKT cell proliferation. Exogenous administration of Gal-9 significantly ameliorates diet-induced steatosis by modulating hepatic NKT cell function. In summary, the Tim-3/Gal-9-signaling pathway plays a critical role in the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells through activation-induced apoptosis and secondary proliferation and, thus, contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  8. Tim-3/Galectin-9 Regulate the Homeostasis of Hepatic NKT Cells in a Murine Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuwen; Potter, James; Jiang, Xuan; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2013-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim)-3 is well known to interact with its natural ligand, Galectin-9 (Gal-9), to regulate T cell function. However, little is known about the function of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) mediated by hepatic NKT cells that also express Tim-3. In the current study, we define the role and the mechanism of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in hepatic NKT cell regulation in a mouse model of diet-induced NAFLD. Adult male wild-type or CD1d knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet to induce steatosis. Some of the mice also received one or a combination of Gal-9, anti–IL-15R/IL-15 mAb, rIL-15, α-galactosylceramide, and multilamellar liposomes containing Cl2MDP. The expression of Tim-3 and various markers reflecting cell proliferation, activation, cytokine production, and apoptosis was analyzed. Liver histology, steatosis grade, and hepatic triglyceride content were also evaluated. In the liver, Tim-3+ NKT cells are in an activated state, and Gal-9 directly induces Tim-3+ NKT cell apoptosis and contributes to the depletion of NKT cells in diet-induced steatosis. However, Gal-9 also interacts with Tim-3–expressing Kupffer cells to induce secretion of IL-15, thus promoting NKT cell proliferation. Exogenous administration of Gal-9 significantly ameliorates diet-induced steatosis by modulating hepatic NKT cell function. In summary, the Tim-3/Gal-9–signaling pathway plays a critical role in the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells through activation-induced apoptosis and secondary proliferation and, thus, contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:23296703

  9. Removal of hepatitis C virus-infected cells by a zymogenized bacterial toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Shapira

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and has become a global health threat. No HCV vaccine is currently available and treatment with antiviral therapy is associated with adverse side effects. Moreover, there is no preventive therapy for recurrent hepatitis C post liver transplantation. The NS3 serine protease is necessary for HCV replication and represents a prime target for developing anti HCV therapies. Recently we described a therapeutic approach for eradication of HCV infected cells that is based on protein delivery of two NS3 protease-activatable recombinant toxins we named "zymoxins". These toxins were inactivated by fusion to rationally designed inhibitory peptides via NS3-cleavable linkers. Once delivered to cells where NS3 protease is present, the inhibitory peptide is removed resulting in re-activation of cytotoxic activity. The zymoxins we described suffered from two limitations: they required high levels of protease for activation and had basal activities in the un-activated form that resulted in a narrow potential therapeutic window. Here, we present a solution that overcame the major limitations of the "first generation zymoxins" by converting MazF ribonuclease, the toxic component of the E. coli chromosomal MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, into an NS3-activated zymoxin that is introduced to cells by means of gene delivery. We constructed an expression cassette that encodes for a single polypeptide that incorporates both the toxin and a fragment of its potent natural antidote, MazE, linked via an NS3-cleavable linker. While covalently paired to its inhibitor, the ribonuclease is well tolerated when expressed in naïve, healthy cells. In contrast, activating proteolysis that is induced by even low levels of NS3, results in an eradication of NS3 expressing model cells and HCV infected cells. Zymoxins may thus become a valuable tool in eradicating cells infected by intracellular pathogens that

  10. Removal of Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Cells by a Zymogenized Bacterial Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Shapira, Shiran; Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and has become a global health threat. No HCV vaccine is currently available and treatment with antiviral therapy is associated with adverse side effects. Moreover, there is no preventive therapy for recurrent hepatitis C post liver transplantation. The NS3 serine protease is necessary for HCV replication and represents a prime target for developing anti HCV therapies. Recently we described a therapeutic approach for eradication of HCV infected cells that is based on protein delivery of two NS3 protease-activatable recombinant toxins we named “zymoxins”. These toxins were inactivated by fusion to rationally designed inhibitory peptides via NS3-cleavable linkers. Once delivered to cells where NS3 protease is present, the inhibitory peptide is removed resulting in re-activation of cytotoxic activity. The zymoxins we described suffered from two limitations: they required high levels of protease for activation and had basal activities in the un-activated form that resulted in a narrow potential therapeutic window. Here, we present a solution that overcame the major limitations of the “first generation zymoxins” by converting MazF ribonuclease, the toxic component of the E. coli chromosomal MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, into an NS3-activated zymoxin that is introduced to cells by means of gene delivery. We constructed an expression cassette that encodes for a single polypeptide that incorporates both the toxin and a fragment of its potent natural antidote, MazE, linked via an NS3-cleavable linker. While covalently paired to its inhibitor, the ribonuclease is well tolerated when expressed in naïve, healthy cells. In contrast, activating proteolysis that is induced by even low levels of NS3, results in an eradication of NS3 expressing model cells and HCV infected cells. Zymoxins may thus become a valuable tool in eradicating cells infected by intracellular pathogens that express

  11. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Melissa A; Hirschi, Karen K

    2009-05-01

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these studies. Using human embryonic stem cells as a model system, we were able to reproducibly and robustly generate differentiated endothelial cells via coculture on OP9 marrow stromal cells. We found that, in contrast to studies in the mouse, bFGF and VEGF had no specific effects on the initiation of human vasculogenesis. However, exogenous Ihh promoted endothelial cell differentiation, as evidenced by increased production of cells with cobblestone morphology that coexpress multiple endothelial-specific genes and proteins, form lumens, and exhibit DiI-AcLDL uptake. Inhibition of BMP signaling using Noggin or BMP4, specifically, using neutralizing antibodies suppressed endothelial cell formation; whereas, addition of rhBMP4 to cells treated with the hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine rescued endothelial cell development. Our studies revealed that Ihh promoted human endothelial cell differentiation from pluripotent hES cells via BMP signaling, providing novel insights applicable to modulating human endothelial cell formation and vascular regeneration for human clinical therapies.

  12. Prevalence and chemotherapy-induced reactivation of occult hepatitis B virus among hepatitis B surface antigen negative patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Significance of hepatitis B core antibodies screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbedewy, T.A.; Elashtokhy, H.A.; Rabee, E.S.; Kheder, G.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is characterized by negative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and detectable hepatitis B virus (HBV)-DNA in the liver and/or serum, with or without hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc). Anti-HBc is the most sensitive marker of previous HBV. HBV reactivation in patients under immunosuppressive treatment is life-threatening, occurring in both overt and occult HBV especially in hematological malignancies. Aim of the work: To evaluate the prevalence and chemotherapy-induced reactivation of OBI among hepatitis B surface antigen negative patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients and to determine the significance of anti-HBc screening among this group of patients before receiving chemotherapy. Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study included 72 DLBCL patients negative for HBsAg, HBsAb and hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV). Patients were subjected to investigations including anti-HBc. All patients underwent alanine transaminase (ALT) monitoring before each cycle of chemotherapy and monthly for 12 months after the end of chemotherapy. Patients with suspected OBI were tested for HBV-DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Anti-HBc was detected in 10 of 72 HBsAg negative sera (13.89%) (95% confidence interval 6.9-22.2%). Five of the 10 anti-HBc positive patients in this study had OBI reactivation. Conclusion: The study concluded that anti-HBc screening is mandatory before chemotherapy. HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive patients should be closely observed for signs of HBV reactivation through the regular monitoring of ALT. Prophylaxis lamivudine is recommended for anti-HBc positive patients before chemotherapy.

  13. CD81 Receptor Regions outside the Large Extracellular Loop Determine Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Banse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes using four essential entry factors, one of which is human CD81 (hCD81. The tetraspanin hCD81 contains a large extracellular loop (LEL, which interacts with the E2 glycoprotein of HCV. The role of the non-LEL regions of hCD81 (intracellular tails, four transmembrane domains, small extracellular loop and intracellular loop is poorly understood. Here, we studied the contribution of these domains to HCV susceptibility of hepatoma cells by generating chimeras of related tetraspanins with the hCD81 LEL. Our results show that non-LEL regions in addition to the LEL determine susceptibility of cells to HCV. While closely related tetraspanins (X. tropicalis CD81 and D. rerio CD81 functionally complement hCD81 non-LEL regions, distantly related tetraspanins (C. elegans TSP9 amd D. melanogaster TSP96F do not and tetraspanins with intermediate homology (hCD9 show an intermediate phenotype. Tetraspanin homology and susceptibility to HCV correlate positively. For some chimeras, infectivity correlates with surface expression. In contrast, the hCD9 chimera is fully surface expressed, binds HCV E2 glycoprotein but is impaired in HCV receptor function. We demonstrate that a cholesterol-coordinating glutamate residue in CD81, which hCD9 lacks, promotes HCV infection. This work highlights the hCD81 non-LEL regions as additional HCV susceptibility-determining factors.

  14. Kupffer cells promote hepatic steatosis via interleukin-1beta-dependent suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Rinke; Saudale, Fredy; Duval, Caroline; Keshtkar, Shohreh; Groener, Johanna E. M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Staels, Bart; Kersten, Sander; Müller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Kupffer cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. However, their involvement in metabolic disorders of the liver, including fatty liver disease, remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the impact of Kupffer cells on hepatic triglyceride storage and to

  15. Kupffer cells promote hepatic steatosis via interleukin-1-dependent suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, R.; Saudale, F.; Duval, C.N.C.; Keshtkar, S.; Groener, C.; Rooijen, van N.; Staels, B.; Kersten, A.H.; Müller, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Kupffer cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. However, their involvement in metabolic disorders of the liver, including fatty liver disease, remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the impact of Kupffer cells on hepatic triglyceride storage and to

  16. Seroprevalence of hepatitis and human immuno-deficiency virus in multitransfused patients from a pediatric hematology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suar Çakı Kılıç

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Transfusion transmitted hepatitis has been a severe problem in Turkey in pediatric cancer patients and in chronic congenital anemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in these patients in a University Hospital. METHODS: Multi-transfused 66 children (59 acute leukemia, 6 thalassemia major, 1 severe hereditary spherocytosis diagnosed and followed-up between May, 2000 and December, 2006 were evaluated. Screening of all the patients for HbsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HCV and anti-HIV was performed at presentation and during the last follow-up. Serologic studies of leukemic patients were also repeated at the end of the chemotherapy. Hepatitis B vaccination was administered to unvaccinated patients with anemia. All blood products were provided by Blood Bank of the Center. RESULTS: No patient was found HBsAg, anti-HCV or anti-HIV positive at diagnosis and at the end of the therapy. There was history of hepatitis B vaccination in only 42% of the patients at diagnosis due to administration of this vaccine to newborns since 1998. At the beginning of the study, 45 % (n=27 of the leukemic patients were immune for hepatitis B, but after completion of the intensive chemotherapy seropositivity persisted in only 28.8 % (n=17. CONCLUSION: Transmission of these viruses is no longer a real problem even in multitransfused immunosuppressed children in Pediatric Hematology Units as a result of the improvements in screening of voluntary blood donors, administration of disposable material in clinics and vaccination by hepatitis B.

  17. Design of a Vitronectin-Based Recombinant Protein as a Defined Substrate for Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Nagaoka

    Full Text Available Maintenance and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs usually requires culture on a substrate for cell adhesion. A commonly used substratum is Matrigel purified from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma cells, and consists of a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans, and growth factors. Several studies have successfully induced differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from hPSCs. However, most of these studies have used Matrigel as a cell adhesion substrate, which is not a defined culture condition. In an attempt to generate a substratum that supports undifferentiated properties and differentiation into hepatic lineage cells, we designed novel substrates consisting of vitronectin fragments fused to the IgG Fc domain. hPSCs adhered to these substrates via interactions between integrins and the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, and the cells maintained their undifferentiated phenotypes. Using a previously established differentiation protocol, hPSCs were efficiently differentiated into mesendodermal and hepatic lineage cells on a vitronectin fragment-containing substrate. We found that full-length vitronectin did not support stable cell adhesion during the specification stage. Furthermore, the vitronectin fragment with the minimal RGD-containing domain was sufficient for differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatic lineage cells under completely defined conditions that facilitate the clinical application of cells differentiated from hPSCs.

  18. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  19. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  20. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro