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Sample records for human heartbeat dynamics

  1. Visibility graph analysis on heartbeat dynamics of meditation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sen; Bian, Chunhua; Ning, Xinbao; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the visibility graph analysis to human heartbeat dynamics by constructing the complex networks of heartbeat interval time series and investigating the statistical properties of the network before and during chi and yoga meditation. The experiment results show that visibility graph analysis can reveal the dynamical changes caused by meditation training manifested as regular heartbeat, which is closely related to the adjustment of autonomous neural system, and visibility graph analysis is effective to evaluate the effect of meditation.

  2. Multifractal analysis of heartbeat dynamics during meditation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Renliang; Bian, Chunhua; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the multifractality of heartbeat dynamics during Chinese CHI meditation in healthy young adults. The results show that the range of multifractal singularity spectrum of heartbeat interval time series during meditation is significantly narrower than those in the pre-meditation state of the same subject, which indicates that during meditation the heartbeat becomes regular and the degree of multifractality decreases.

  3. Dynamic analysis of heartbeat rate signals of epileptics using multidimensional phase space reconstruction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wu, Tzuyin; Yang, Po-Hua; Wang, Yeng-Tseng

    2008-04-01

    The heartbeat rate signal provides an invaluable means of assessing the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance of the human autonomic nervous system and thus represents an ideal diagnostic mechanism for detecting a variety of disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac disease and so forth. The current study analyses the dynamics of the heartbeat rate signal of known epilepsy sufferers in order to obtain a detailed understanding of the heart rate pattern during a seizure event. In the proposed approach, the ECG signals are converted into heartbeat rate signals and the embedology theorem is then used to construct the corresponding multidimensional phase space. The dynamics of the heartbeat rate signal are then analyzed before, during and after an epileptic seizure by examining the maximum Lyapunov exponent and the correlation dimension of the attractors in the reconstructed phase space. In general, the results reveal that the heartbeat rate signal transits from an aperiodic, highly-complex behaviour before an epileptic seizure to a low dimensional chaotic motion during the seizure event. Following the seizure, the signal trajectories return to a highly-complex state, and the complex signal patterns associated with normal physiological conditions reappear.

  4. Outlier-resilient complexity analysis of heartbeat dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Men-Tzung; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Young, Hsu-Wen Vincent; Lin, Yen-Hung; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Peng, Chung-Kang; Hu, Kun

    2015-03-01

    Complexity in physiological outputs is believed to be a hallmark of healthy physiological control. How to accurately quantify the degree of complexity in physiological signals with outliers remains a major barrier for translating this novel concept of nonlinear dynamic theory to clinical practice. Here we propose a new approach to estimate the complexity in a signal by analyzing the irregularity of the sign time series of its coarse-grained time series at different time scales. Using surrogate data, we show that the method can reliably assess the complexity in noisy data while being highly resilient to outliers. We further apply this method to the analysis of human heartbeat recordings. Without removing any outliers due to ectopic beats, the method is able to detect a degradation of cardiac control in patients with congestive heart failure and a more degradation in critically ill patients whose life continuation relies on extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO). Moreover, the derived complexity measures can predict the mortality of ECMO patients. These results indicate that the proposed method may serve as a promising tool for monitoring cardiac function of patients in clinical settings.

  5. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  6. Contact-Free Heartbeat Signal for Human Identification and Forensics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Irani, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The heartbeat signal, which is one of the physiological signals, is of great importance in many real-world applications, for example, in patient monitoring and biometric recognition. The traditional methods for measuring such this signal use contact-based sensors that need to be installed...

  7. Point-process high-resolution representations of heartbeat dynamics for multiscale analysis: A CHF survivor prediction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, G; Wendt, H; Kiyono, K; Hayano, J; Watanabe, E; Yamamoto, Y; Abry, P; Barbieri, R

    2015-01-01

    Multiscale analysis of human heartbeat dynamics has been proved effective in characterizeing cardiovascular control physiology in health and disease. However, estimation of multiscale properties can be affected by the interpolation procedure used to preprocess the unevenly sampled R-R intervals derived from the ECG. To this extent, in this study we propose the estimation of wavelet coefficients and wavelet leaders on the output of inhomogeneous point process models of heartbeat dynamics. The RR interval series is modeled using probability density functions (pdfs) characterizing and predicting the time until the next heartbeat event occurs, as a linear function of the past history. Multiscale analysis is then applied to the pdfs' instantaneous first order moment. The proposed approach is tested on experimental data gathered from 57 congestive heart failure (CHF) patients by evaluating the recognition accuracy in predicting survivor and non-survivor patients, and by comparing performances from the informative point-process based interpolation and non-informative spline-based interpolation. Results demonstrate that multiscale analysis of point-process high-resolution representations achieves the highest prediction accuracy of 65.45%, proving our method as a promising tool to assess risk prediction in CHF patients.

  8. Tracking instantaneous entropy in heartbeat dynamics through inhomogeneous point-process nonlinear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Measures of entropy have been proved as powerful quantifiers of complex nonlinear systems, particularly when applied to stochastic series of heartbeat dynamics. Despite the remarkable achievements obtained through standard definitions of approximate and sample entropy, a time-varying definition of entropy characterizing the physiological dynamics at each moment in time is still missing. To this extent, we propose two novel measures of entropy based on the inho-mogeneous point-process theory. The RR interval series is modeled through probability density functions (pdfs) which characterize and predict the time until the next event occurs as a function of the past history. Laguerre expansions of the Wiener-Volterra autoregressive terms account for the long-term nonlinear information. As the proposed measures of entropy are instantaneously defined through such probability functions, the proposed indices are able to provide instantaneous tracking of autonomic nervous system complexity. Of note, the distance between the time-varying phase-space vectors is calculated through the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance of two pdfs. Experimental results, obtained from the analysis of RR interval series extracted from ten healthy subjects during stand-up tasks, suggest that the proposed entropy indices provide instantaneous tracking of the heartbeat complexity, also allowing for the definition of complexity variability indices.

  9. A Unified Point Process Probabilistic Framework to Assess Heartbeat Dynamics and Autonomic Cardiovascular Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eChen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, time-varying inhomogeneous point process models have been introduced for assessment of instantaneous heartbeat dynamics as well as specific cardiovascular control mechanisms and hemodynamics. Assessment of the model's statistics is established through the Wiener-Volterra theory and a multivariate autoregressive (AR structure. A variety of instantaneous cardiovascular metrics, such as heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, and baroreceptor-cardiac reflex (baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, are derived within a parametric framework and instantaneously updated with adaptive and local maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Inclusion of second order nonlinearities, with subsequent bispectral quantification in the frequency domain, further allows for definition of instantaneous metrics of nonlinearity. We here organize a comprehensive review of the devised methods as applied to experimental recordings from healthy subjects during propofol anesthesia. Collective results reveal interesting dynamic trends across the different pharmacological interventions operated within each anesthesia session, confirming the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory elicited interactions, and pointing at our mathematical approach as a promising monitoring tool for an accurate, noninvasive assessment in clinical practice.

  10. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis.

  11. Nonlinear digital signal processing in mental health: characterization of major depression using instantaneous entropy measures of heartbeat dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Garcia, Ronald G; Citi, Luca; Scilingo, Enzo P; Tomaz, Carlos A; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear digital signal processing methods that address system complexity have provided useful computational tools for helping in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of pathologies. More specifically, nonlinear measures have been successful in characterizing patients with mental disorders such as Major Depression (MD). In this study, we propose the use of instantaneous measures of entropy, namely the inhomogeneous point-process approximate entropy (ipApEn) and the inhomogeneous point-process sample entropy (ipSampEn), to describe a novel characterization of MD patients undergoing affective elicitation. Because these measures are built within a nonlinear point-process model, they allow for the assessment of complexity in cardiovascular dynamics at each moment in time. Heartbeat dynamics were characterized from 48 healthy controls and 48 patients with MD while emotionally elicited through either neutral or arousing audiovisual stimuli. Experimental results coming from the arousing tasks show that ipApEn measures are able to instantaneously track heartbeat complexity as well as discern between healthy subjects and MD patients. Conversely, standard heart rate variability (HRV) analysis performed in both time and frequency domains did not show any statistical significance. We conclude that measures of entropy based on nonlinear point-process models might contribute to devising useful computational tools for care in mental health.

  12. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  13. Radar monitoring of heartbeats and respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Aardal, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    This thesis addresses the use of radar for heartbeat and respiration monitoring. Medical radar can be used for detecting vital signs at distances up to several meters. A medical radar works by transmitting electromagnetic waves towards a person, and receiving echoes reflected off the person. Vital signs appear as modulations in the radar data in period with the heartbeats and respiration. We have measured and analyzed these modulations. The ability to detect human heartbeats from a distanc...

  14. Sleep-wake differences in scaling behavior of the human heartbeat: analysis of terrestrial and long-term space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, A.; Amaral, L. A.; Havlin, S.; Fritsch-Yelle, J.; Baevsky, R. M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    We compare scaling properties of the cardiac dynamics during sleep and wake periods for healthy individuals, cosmonauts during orbital flight, and subjects with severe heart disease. For all three groups, we find a greater degree of anticorrelation in the heartbeat fluctuations during sleep compared to wake periods. The sleep-wake difference in the scaling exponents for the three groups is comparable to the difference between healthy and diseased individuals. The observed scaling differences are not accounted for simply by different levels of activity, but appear related to intrinsic changes in the neuroautonomic control of the heartbeat.

  15. Fractal dynamics of heartbeat time series of young persons with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Alonso-Martínez, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Martínez-Hernández, G.

    2012-10-01

    Many physiological systems have been in recent years quantitatively characterized using fractal analysis. We applied it to study heart variability of young subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS); we examined the RR time series (time between two R waves in ECG) with the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) method, the Higuchi's fractal dimension method and the multifractal analysis to detect the possible presence of heart problems. The results show that although the young persons have MS, the majority do not present alterations in the heart dynamics. However, there were cases where the fractal parameter values differed significantly from the healthy people values.

  16. Physics of Eclipsing Binaries: Heartbeat Stars and Tidally Induced Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Degroote, P.; Conroy, K.; Bloemen, S.; Kurtz, D.; Thompson, S. E.; Fuller, J.; Giammarco, J.; Pablo, H.; Prša, A.

    2013-02-01

    Heartbeat stars are a relatively new class of eccentric ellipsoidal variable first discovered by Kepler. An overview of the current field is given with details of some of the interesting objects identified in our current Kepler sample of 135 heartbeats stars. Three objects that have recently been or are undergoing detailed study are described along with suggestions for further avenues of research. We conclude by discussing why heartbeat stars are an interesting new tool to study tidally induced pulsations and orbital dynamics.

  17. Heartbeat Signal from Facial Video for Biometric Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Different biometric traits such as face appearance and heartbeat signal from Electrocardiogram (ECG)/Phonocardiogram (PCG) are widely used in the human identity recognition. Recent advances in facial video based measurement of cardio-physiological parameters such as heartbeat rate, respiratory rate......, and blood volume pressure provide the possibility of extracting heartbeat signal from facial video instead of using obtrusive ECG or PCG sensors in the body. This paper proposes the Heartbeat Signal from Facial Video (HSFV) as a new biometric trait for human identity recognition, for the first time...

  18. A Predictive and Preventative Computation for the Diagnosis of the Heartbeat Control Systems: DFA for the Risk of Mortality in Both, Animal Models and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Yazawa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the heartbeat interval by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA in models and humans. In models, the myocardium of the healthy heart contracted regularly. The deteriorated heart model, however, showed alternating beats so-called "alternans." The DFA revealed that if the heart is having "alternans" exhibited there is a declined scaling exponent (~0.5. In humans, the heart that had "alternans" also showed a low scaling exponent (~0.6. We consider that the coexistence of "alternans" and a low scaling exponent can be a risk marker in predictive and preventative diagnosis, supporting the idea that "alternans" can be a harbinger of sudden death.

  19. Heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B: Quantification by dynamic CTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim F. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ganten, Maria-Katharina [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: m.ganten@dkfz.de; Boeckler, Dittmar [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: dittmar.boeckler@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Geisbuesch, Philipp [University of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: philipp.geisbuesch@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: h.vontengg@dkfz.de

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize the heartbeat-related displacement of the thoracic aorta in patients with chronic aortic dissection type B (CADB). Materials and methods: Electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography was performed during inspiratory breath-hold in 11 patients with CADB: Collimation 16 mm x 1 mm, pitch 0.2, slice thickness 1 mm, reconstruction increment 0.8 mm. Multiplanar reformations were taken for 20 equidistant time instances through both ascending (AAo) and descending aorta (true lumen, DAoT; false lumen, DAoF) and the vertex of the aortic arch (VA). In-plane vessel displacement was determined by region of interest analysis. Results: Mean displacement was 5.2 {+-} 1.7 mm (AAo), 1.6 {+-} 1.0 mm (VA), 0.9 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoT), and 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm (DAoF). This indicated a significant reduction of displacement from AAo to VA and DAoT (p < 0.05). The direction of displacement was anterior for AAo and cranial for VA. Conclusion: In CADB, the thoracic aorta undergoes a heartbeat-related displacement that exhibits an unbalanced distribution of magnitude and direction along the thoracic vessel course. Since consecutive traction forces on the aortic wall have to be assumed, these observations may have implications on pathogenesis of and treatment strategies for CADB.

  20. Heartbeat of the Season

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra Tunajek

    2009-01-01

    ... sounds of the season. It can be tiring and even annoying-and yet, it is the heartbeat of holidays. Along with the candy canes and mistletoe, there we are surrounded, day and night, by Christmas carols, intended to put us in a festive mood. In the six weeks running up to Christmas, individuals who work in environments that play background music will hear "Ji...

  1. Visualizing the "Heartbeat" of a City with Tweets

    CERN Document Server

    França, Urbano; McSwiggen, Colin; Daneshvar, Roozbeh; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2014-01-01

    Describing the dynamics of a city is a crucial step to both understanding the human activity in urban environments and to planning and designing cities accordingly. Here we describe the collective dynamics of New York City and surrounding areas as seen through the lens of Twitter usage. In particular, we observe and quantify the patterns that emerge naturally from the hourly activities in different areas of New York City, and discuss how they can be used to understand the urban areas. Using a dataset that includes more than 6 million geolocated Twitter messages we construct a movie of the geographic density of tweets. We observe the diurnal "heartbeat" of the NYC area. The largest scale dynamics are the waking and sleeping cycle and commuting from residential communities to office areas in Manhattan. Hourly dynamics reflect the interplay of commuting, work and leisure, including whether people are preoccupied with other activities or actively using Twitter. Differences between weekday and weekend dynamics poi...

  2. Nonlinear Control of Heartbeat Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witt Thanom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel application of nonlinear control theory to heartbeat models. Existing heartbeat models are investigated and modified by incorporating the control input as a pacemaker to provide the control channel. A nonlinear feedback linearization technique is applied to force the output of the systems to generate artificial electrocardiogram (ECG signal using discrete data as the reference inputs. The synthetic ECG may serve as a flexible signal source to assess the effectiveness of a diagnostic ECG signal-processing device.

  3. Bursty human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview on emergent bursty patterns in the dynamics of human behaviour. It presents common and alternative understanding of the investigated phenomena, and points out open questions worthy of further investigations. The book is structured as follows. In the introduction the authors discuss the motivation of the field, describe bursty phenomena in case of human behaviour, and relate it to other disciplines. The second chapter addresses the measures commonly used to characterise heterogeneous signals, bursty human dynamics, temporal paths, and correlated behaviour. These definitions are first introduced to set the basis for the discussion of the third chapter about the observations of bursty human patterns in the dynamics of individuals, dyadic interactions, and collective behaviour. The subsequent fourth chapter discusses the models of bursty human dynamics. Various mechanisms have been proposed about the source of the heterogeneities in human dynamics, which leads to the in...

  4. [The study on non-contact detection of breathing and heartbeat based on radar principles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J Q; Wang, H B; Jin, X J; Yang, G S; Yang, B; Dong, X Z; Qiu, L J

    2001-05-01

    The paper introduces the design of hardware and software of non-contact detection system for breathing and heartbeat in human body with radar principles and technology. The detection technology is discussed. Under conditions of the illuminating power P non-contact breathing and heartbeat measurement, can be in different positions and with different clothing on the subject. The results show that the system with the technology has a high sensitivity, and is harmless to the health. It is a practicable non-contact detection technology for breathing and heartbeat of human body.

  5. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  6. FREQUENCY COMPONENT EXTRACTION OF HEARTBEAT CUES WITH SHORT TIME FOURIER TRANSFORM (STFT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sumarna Sumarna; Agus Purwanto; Dyah Kurniawati Agustika

    2017-01-01

    Abstract   Electro-acoustic human heartbeat detector have been made with the main parts : (a) stetoscope (piece chest), (b) mic condenser, (c) transistor amplifier, and (d) cues analysis program with MATLAB. The frequency components that contained in heartbeat. cues have also been extracted with Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) from 9 volunteers. The results of the analysis showed that heart rate appeared in every cue frequency spectrum with their harmony. The steps of the research ...

  7. Could Chocolate Guard Against an Irregular Heartbeat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165862.html Could Chocolate Guard Against an Irregular Heartbeat? 13-year study ... 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's delicious news for chocolate lovers: New research suggests the sweet might help ...

  8. Heartbeat detection system using piezoelectric transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamonangan, Yosua; Purnamaningsih, Wigajatri

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a simple piezoelectric based heartbeat detection system. The signal produced by the piezoelectric will undergo signal conditioning and then converted into digital data by Arduino Nano. Using serial communication, the data will be sent to a computer for display and further analysis. The detection of heartbeat is carried out on three locations; wrist, chest, and diaphragm. From the measurement results, it is shown that the system work best when the piezoelectric is placed on wrist.

  9. Heartbeat of the Southern Oscillation explains ENSO climatic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, John T.; Allen, J. Icarus; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) nonlinear oscillator phenomenon has a far reaching influence on the climate and human activities. The up to 10 year quasi-period cycle of the El Niño and subsequent La Niña is known to be dominated in the tropics by nonlinear physical interaction of wind with the equatorial waveguide in the Pacific. Long-term cyclic phenomena do not feature in the current theory of the ENSO process. We update the theory by assessing low (>10 years) and high (type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThe Pacific El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) nonlinear oscillator phenomenon has a far reaching influence on the climate and our human activities. This work can help predict both long-term and short-term future ENSO events and to assess the risk of future climate hysteresis changes: is the elastic band that regulates the ENSO climate breaking? We update the current theory of the ENSO process with a sophisticated analysis approach (Dominant Frequency State Analysis) to include long-term oscillations (up to 200 years) as well as tropical and extratropical interaction dynamics. The analysis uses instrumental and paleoproxy data records in combination with theoretical models of ENSO. This fundamental result that shows the ENSO phenomenon has a stable tropical Pacific attractor with El Niño and La Niña phases, tropical and extratropical coupling and an intermittency or longer-term form of chaos. We call this attractor the Heartbeat of the Southern Oscillation as the phenomenon is measurable in the Southern Oscillation. We predict future ENSO states based on a stable hysteresis scenario of short-term and long-term ENSO oscillations over the next century.

  10. Estimation of Heartbeat Peak Locations and Heartbeat Rate from Facial Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Available systems for heartbeat signal estimations from facial video only provide an average of Heartbeat Rate (HR) over a period of time. However, physicians require Heartbeat Peak Locations (HPL) to assess a patient’s heart condition by detecting cardiac events and measuring different physiolog......Available systems for heartbeat signal estimations from facial video only provide an average of Heartbeat Rate (HR) over a period of time. However, physicians require Heartbeat Peak Locations (HPL) to assess a patient’s heart condition by detecting cardiac events and measuring different...... physiological parameters including HR and its variability. This paper proposes a new method of HPL estimation from facial video using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), which provides clearly visible heartbeat peaks in a decomposed signal. The method also provides the notion of both color- and motion-based HR...... from facial videos, even when there are voluntary internal and external head motions in the videos. The employed signal processing technique has resulted in a system that could significantly advance, among others, health-monitoring technologies....

  11. Effects of heartbeat feedback on beliefs about heart rate and heartbeat counting: a cautionary tale about interoceptive awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Christopher; Brener, Jasper; Knapp, Kelley; Mailloux, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Heartbeat counting improves after exposure to heartbeat feedback either because feedback trains individuals to detect heartbeats or updates their knowledge/beliefs about heart rate. These possibilities were examined by assessing heartbeat counting, in different postures and following exercise, before and after exposure to immediate and delayed heartbeat feedback. Immediate and delayed feedback provided accurate information about heart rate and, therefore, either could update beliefs about heart rate. However, only immediate feedback marked each ventricular contraction and, thereby, could train participants to detect the beating of the heart by focusing attention on relevant internal sensations. Exposure to immediate and delayed feedback resulted in similar, significant increases in the accuracy of heartbeat counting, indicating that the feedback effect was mediated by non-sensory processes rather than by training participants to detect heartbeat sensations. The current findings demonstrate that the heartbeat counting task is not a valid method to assess cardioception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Heartbeat sensitivity in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Simon; Karsdorp, Petra A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a congenital heart disease are sensitive regarding heartbeat perception, reflected in enhanced attention for heartbeat, estimation of own heart rate, and a vulnerability to become anxious by listening to heartbeat sounds. Twenty adults with a

  13. Double dynamic scaling in human communication dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Feng, Xin; Wu, Ye; Xiao, Jinhua

    2017-05-01

    In the last decades, human behavior has been deeply understanding owing to the huge quantities data of human behavior available for study. The main finding in human dynamics shows that temporal processes consist of high-activity bursty intervals alternating with long low-activity periods. A model, assuming the initiator of bursty follow a Poisson process, is widely used in the modeling of human behavior. Here, we provide further evidence for the hypothesis that different bursty intervals are independent. Furthermore, we introduce a special threshold to quantitatively distinguish the time scales of complex dynamics based on the hypothesis. Our results suggest that human communication behavior is a composite process of double dynamics with midrange memory length. The method for calculating memory length would enhance the performance of many sequence-dependent systems, such as server operation and topic identification.

  14. Towards a psychophysics of interoceptive processes: the measurement of heartbeat detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Jasper; Ring, Christopher

    2016-11-19

    It is difficult to collect objective evidence of interoception. Unlike exteroception, the effective stimuli for interoception are often unknown, and even when identifiable, they are difficult to control experimentally. Furthermore, direct stimulation of the interoceptors is seldom appropriate in human experimentation. Hence, non-invasive behavioural measures of accuracy in heartbeat detection have frequently been adopted to index interoceptive sensitivity. However, there has been little standardization and the two most popular methods for assessing heartbeat detection, heartbeat tracking and two alternative forced choice methods, appear to be biased and of questionable validity. These issues do not arise with other methods that are based on classical psychophysics and that enable subjects to indicate when during the cardiac cycle their heartbeat sensations occur. Not only are these classical methods highly reliable, but they also provide continuous unbiased measures of the temporal locations of heartbeat sensations and the precision with which these sensations are detected.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interoception beyond homeostasis: affect, cognition and mental health'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Frequency shifting approach towards textual transcription of heartbeat sounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arvin, Farshad; Doraisamy, Shyamala; Safar Khorasani, Ehsan

    2011-01-01

    Auscultation is an approach for diagnosing many cardiovascular problems. Automatic analysis of heartbeat sounds and extraction of its audio features can assist physicians towards diagnosing diseases...

  16. FREQUENCY COMPONENT EXTRACTION OF HEARTBEAT CUES WITH SHORT TIME FOURIER TRANSFORM (STFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumarna Sumarna

    2017-01-01

      Electro-acoustic human heartbeat detector have been made with the main parts : (a stetoscope (piece chest, (b mic condenser, (c transistor amplifier, and (d cues analysis program with MATLAB. The frequency components that contained in heartbeat. cues have also been extracted with Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT from 9 volunteers. The results of the analysis showed that heart rate appeared in every cue frequency spectrum with their harmony. The steps of the research were including detector instrument design, test and instrument repair, cues heartbeat recording with Sound Forge 10 program and stored in wav file ; cues breaking at the start and the end, and extraction/cues analysis using MATLAB. The MATLAB program included filter (bandpass filter with bandwidth between 0.01 – 110 Hz, cues breaking with hamming window and every part was calculated using Fourier Transform (STFT mechanism and the result were shown in frequency spectrum graph.   Keywords: frequency components extraction, heartbeat cues, Short Time Fourier Transform

  17. Universality of human microbial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Amir; Gibson, Travis E.; Friedman, Jonathan; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Human-associated microbial communities have a crucial role in determining our health and well-being, and this has led to the continuing development of microbiome-based therapies such as faecal microbiota transplantation. These microbial communities are very complex, dynamic and highly personalized ecosystems, exhibiting a high degree of inter-individual variability in both species assemblages and abundance profiles. It is not known whether the underlying ecological dynamics of these communities, which can be parameterized by growth rates, and intra- and inter-species interactions in population dynamics models, are largely host-independent (that is, universal) or host-specific. If the inter-individual variability reflects host-specific dynamics due to differences in host lifestyle, physiology or genetics, then generic microbiome manipulations may have unintended consequences, rendering them ineffective or even detrimental. Alternatively, microbial ecosystems of different subjects may exhibit universal dynamics, with the inter-individual variability mainly originating from differences in the sets of colonizing species. Here we develop a new computational method to characterize human microbial dynamics. By applying this method to cross-sectional data from two large-scale metagenomic studies—the Human Microbiome Project and the Student Microbiome Project—we show that gut and mouth microbiomes display pronounced universal dynamics, whereas communities associated with certain skin sites are probably shaped by differences in the host environment. Notably, the universality of gut microbial dynamics is not observed in subjects with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection but is observed in the same set of subjects after faecal microbiota transplantation. These results fundamentally improve our understanding of the processes that shape human microbial ecosystems, and pave the way to designing general microbiome-based therapies.

  18. Dynamics of human innovative behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    How to promote the innovative activities is an important problem for modern society. In this paper, combining the evolutionary games with information spreading, we propose a lattice model to investigate dynamics of human innovative behaviors based on benefit-driven assumption. Simulations show several properties in agreement with peoples’ daily cognition on innovative behaviors, such as slow diffusion of innovative behaviors, gathering of innovative strategy on “innovative centers”, and quasi-localized dynamics. Furthermore, our model also emerges rich non-Poisson properties in the temporal-spatial patterns of the innovative status, including the scaling law in the interval time of innovation releases and the bimodal distributions on the spreading range of innovations, which would be universal in human innovative behaviors. Our model provides a basic framework on the study of the issues relevant to the evolution of human innovative behaviors and the promotion measurement of innovative activities.

  19. Efficient Secret Key Delivery Using Heartbeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Kwantae

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently many researchers have employed physiological signals like heartbeats as a source of the key seed used in key establishment protocols. The physiological signals make it easy to establish a secret key between implantable (or attachable medical devices which can sense physiological signals. A key establishment protocol is a fundamental requirement to support the security of the healthcare and medical services such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and follow-up services. However, existing key establishment protocols demand high computational and communication costs or need long key establishment time. In this paper, we propose an efficient IPI-based key establishment protocol that requires relatively short time while keeping the strength of security close.

  20. Human motion simulation predictive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Malek, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Simulate realistic human motion in a virtual world with an optimization-based approach to motion prediction. With this approach, motion is governed by human performance measures, such as speed and energy, which act as objective functions to be optimized. Constraints on joint torques and angles are imposed quite easily. Predicting motion in this way allows one to use avatars to study how and why humans move the way they do, given specific scenarios. It also enables avatars to react to infinitely many scenarios with substantial autonomy. With this approach it is possible to predict dynamic motion without having to integrate equations of motion -- rather than solving equations of motion, this approach solves for a continuous time-dependent curve characterizing joint variables (also called joint profiles) for every degree of freedom. Introduces rigorous mathematical methods for digital human modelling and simulation Focuses on understanding and representing spatial relationships (3D) of biomechanics Develops an i...

  1. Double-path acquisition of pulse wave transit time and heartbeat using self-mixing interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingbin; Huang, Wencai; Wei, Zheng; Zhang, Jie; An, Tong; Wang, Xiulin; Xu, Huizhen

    2017-06-01

    We present a technique based on self-mixing interferometry for acquiring the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) and heartbeat. A signal processing method based on Continuous Wavelet Transform and Hilbert Transform is applied to extract potentially useful information in the self-mixing interference (SMI) signal, including PWTT and heartbeat. Then, some cardiovascular characteristics of the human body are easily acquired without retrieving the SMI signal by complicated algorithms. Experimentally, the PWTT is measured on the finger and the toe of the human body using double-path self-mixing interferometry. Experimental statistical data show the relation between the PWTT and blood pressure, which can be used to estimate the systolic pressure value by fitting. Moreover, the measured heartbeat shows good agreement with that obtained by a photoplethysmography sensor. The method that we demonstrate, which is based on self-mixing interferometry with significant advantages of simplicity, compactness and non-invasion, effectively illustrates the viability of the SMI technique for measuring other cardiovascular signals.

  2. Heartbeat patterns during the postembryonic development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, Karel; Farkas, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Pulsations of the dorsal vessel were recorded in vivo during the whole postembryonic development of D. melanogaster, by means of a newly invented, pulse-light opto-cardiographic method. The young larvae of the 1st and 2nd instars submerged in the feeding medium exhibited extremely high rates of heartbeat, 7Hz at room temperature. These values are among the highest rates of heartbeat ever recorded in the animal kingdom. The fully grown larvae of the 3rd instar showed approximately half of the maximum heartbeat rate (3.5-4Hz), which became stabilized after pupariation to 2.5-2.7Hz. The larval heartbeat was always uni-directional, in the forward-oriented or anterograde direction and it was almost continuous. The slowly disintegrating, old larval heart used to beat at the constant frequency of 2.5-2.7Hz until complete cessation of all cardiac functions in 1-day-old puparium. In spite of the persisting constant heartbeat frequency, the transformation process of the larval heart was associated with successively decreasing amplitude of the systolic contractions and with the prolongation of the resting periods. The newly formed heart of the pupal-adult structure exhibited a qualitatively new pattern of heartbeat activity, which was manifested by periodic reversal of the heartbeat with the faster anterograde and slower retrograde phases. The frequencies of both of these reciprocal cardiac pulsations gradually increased during the advanced pharate adult period, reaching the values of 4-5Hz at the time of adult eclosion. Adult males and females also exhibited a perfect pattern of heartbeat reversal, with still very high rates of the anterograde heartbeat, in the range of 5-6Hz. In addition to the cardiac functions, we have recorded several kinds of extracardiac pulsations, which often interfered severely with the recordings of the heartbeat. There were strong, irregular extracardiac pulsations of a neurogenic nature (somatic muscles, oral armature) and relatively slow

  3. Nonlinear dynamics in human behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huys, Raoul [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France); Marseille Univ. (France). Movement Science Inst.; Jirsa, Viktor K. (eds.) [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France); Marseille Univ. (France). Movement Science Inst.; Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Humans engage in a seemingly endless variety of different behaviors, of which some are found across species, while others are conceived of as typically human. Most generally, behavior comes about through the interplay of various constraints - informational, mechanical, neural, metabolic, and so on - operating at multiple scales in space and time. Over the years, consensus has grown in the research community that, rather than investigating behavior only from bottom up, it may be also well understood in terms of concepts and laws on the phenomenological level. Such top down approach is rooted in theories of synergetics and self-organization using tools from nonlinear dynamics. The present compendium brings together scientists from all over the world that have contributed to the development of their respective fields departing from this background. It provides an introduction to deterministic as well as stochastic dynamical systems and contains applications to motor control and coordination, visual perception and illusion, as well as auditory perception in the context of speech and music. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Sleep by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of the Heartbeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Toru; Shimoda, Yukio; Hutapea, Albert M.

    2011-08-01

    There are already-established methods for investigating biological signals such as rhythmic heartbeats. We used detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), originally developed by Peng et al. (1995) to check power-law characteristics, because the method can quantify the heart condition numerically. In this article, we studied the heartbeat of sleeping subjects. Our purpose was to test whether DFA is useful to evaluate the subject's wellness of both during being awake and sleeping. This is a challenge to measure sleep without complex/expensive machine, an electro encephalography (EEG). We conducted electrophysiological recording to measure heartbeats during sleep using electrocardiograph with three-leads, one ground electrode and two active electrodes attached to chest. For good recording, a stable baseline must be maintained even when subjects move their body. We needed a tool to ensure long-term steady recording. We thus invented a new electric-circuit designed to produce this desired result. This gadget allowed us to perform heartbeat recording without any drifting baseline. We then were able to detect 100% of heartbeat peaks over the entire period of sleep. Here, we show a case study as empirical evidence that DFA is useful numerical method for quantifying sleep by using the scaling exponents.

  5. HBS: a novel biometric feature based on heartbeat morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Saiful; Alajlan, Naif; Bazi, Yakoub; Hichri, Haikel S

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a new feature named heartbeat shape (HBS) is proposed for ECG-based biometrics. HBS is computed from the morphology of segmented heartbeats. Computation of the feature involves three basic steps: 1) resampling and normalization of a heartbeat; 2) reduction of matching error; and 3) shift invariant transformation. In order to construct both gallery and probe templates, a few consecutive heartbeats which could be captured in a reasonably short period of time are required. Thus, the identification and verification methods become efficient. We have tested the proposed feature independently on two publicly available databases with 76 and 26 subjects, respectively, for identification and verification. The second database contains several subjects having clinically proven cardiac irregularities (atrial premature contraction arrhythmia). Experiments on these two databases yielded high identification accuracy (98% and 99.85%, respectively) and low verification equal error rate (1.88% and 0.38%, respectively). These results were obtained by using templates constructed from five consecutive heartbeats only. This feature compresses the original ECG signal significantly to be useful for efficient communication and access of information in telecardiology scenarios.

  6. Analysis of human vergence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher W; Elsaid, Anas M; Likova, Lora T; Gill, Navdeep; Nicholas, Spero C

    2012-10-25

    Disparity vergence is commonly viewed as being controlled by at least two mechanisms, an open-loop vergence-specific burst mechanism analogous to the ballistic drive of saccades, and a closed-loop feedback mechanism controlled by the disparity error. We show that human vergence dynamics for disparity jumps of a large textured field have a typical time course consistent with predominant control by the open-loop vergence-specific burst mechanism, although various subgroups of the population show radically different vergence behaviors. Some individuals show markedly slow divergence responses, others slow convergence responses, others slow responses in both vergence directions, implying that the two vergence directions have separate control mechanisms. The faster time courses usually had time-symmetric velocity waveforms implying open-loop burst control, while the slow response waveforms were usually time-asymmetric implying closed-loop feedback control. A further type of behavior seen in a distinct subpopulation was a compound anomalous divergence response consisting of an initial convergence movement followed by a large corrective divergence movement with time courses implying closed-loop feedback control. This analysis of the variety of human vergence responses thus contributes substantially to the understanding of the oculomotor control mechanisms underlying the generation of vergence movements [corrected].

  7. Low-cost fiber Bragg grating vibroacoustic sensor for voice and heartbeat detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Olivero, Massimo; Perrone, Guido

    2008-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibroacoustic sensor exploiting an intensity-based interrogation principle is presented. The optical system is complemented by signal processing techniques that allow disturbances to be mitigated and improve the spectral estimation. The sensor is capable of performing frequency analysis of sounds up to 3 kHz, with top sensitivity in the 100-500 Hz frequency range, and of dynamically tracking pulsed phenomena that induce a strain to the FBG. The sensor has been applied to the detection of voice, showing a great intelligibility of the speech despite the low-quality environment, and to the monitoring of the heartbeat rate from the wrist.

  8. Frequency shifting approach towards textual transcription of heartbeat sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Khorasani Ehsan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Auscultation is an approach for diagnosing many cardiovascular problems. Automatic analysis of heartbeat sounds and extraction of its audio features can assist physicians towards diagnosing diseases. Textual transcription allows recording a continuous heart sound stream using a text format which can be stored in very small memory in comparison with other audio formats. In addition, a text-based data allows applying indexing and searching techniques to access to the critical events. Hence, the transcribed heartbeat sounds provides useful information to monitor the behavior of a patient for the long duration of time. This paper proposes a frequency shifting method in order to improve the performance of the transcription. The main objective of this study is to transfer the heartbeat sounds to the music domain. The proposed technique is tested with 100 samples which were recorded from different heart diseases categories. The observed results show that, the proposed shifting method significantly improves the performance of the transcription.

  9. A deep convolutional neural network model to classify heartbeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Oh, Shu Lih; Hagiwara, Yuki; Tan, Jen Hong; Adam, Muhammad; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Tan, Ru San

    2017-10-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a standard test used to monitor the activity of the heart. Many cardiac abnormalities will be manifested in the ECG including arrhythmia which is a general term that refers to an abnormal heart rhythm. The basis of arrhythmia diagnosis is the identification of normal versus abnormal individual heart beats, and their correct classification into different diagnoses, based on ECG morphology. Heartbeats can be sub-divided into five categories namely non-ectopic, supraventricular ectopic, ventricular ectopic, fusion, and unknown beats. It is challenging and time-consuming to distinguish these heartbeats on ECG as these signals are typically corrupted by noise. We developed a 9-layer deep convolutional neural network (CNN) to automatically identify 5 different categories of heartbeats in ECG signals. Our experiment was conducted in original and noise attenuated sets of ECG signals derived from a publicly available database. This set was artificially augmented to even out the number of instances the 5 classes of heartbeats and filtered to remove high-frequency noise. The CNN was trained using the augmented data and achieved an accuracy of 94.03% and 93.47% in the diagnostic classification of heartbeats in original and noise free ECGs, respectively. When the CNN was trained with highly imbalanced data (original dataset), the accuracy of the CNN reduced to 89.07%% and 89.3% in noisy and noise-free ECGs. When properly trained, the proposed CNN model can serve as a tool for screening of ECG to quickly identify different types and frequency of arrhythmic heartbeats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Respiration and heartbeat monitoring using a distributed pulsed MIMO radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, Ingo; Smith, Graeme E

    2017-07-01

    This paper addresses non-contact monitoring of physiological signals induced by respiration and heartbeat. To detect the tiny physiological movements of the chest or other parts of the torso, a Mulitple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) radar is used. The spatially distributed transmitters and receivers are able to detect the chest surface movements of one or multiple persons in a room. Due to several bistatic measurements at the same time a robust detection and measuring of the breathing and heartbeat rate is possible. Using an appropriate geometrical configuration of the sensors even a localization of the person is feasible.

  11. Inhibition of the spider heartbeat by gravity and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, A.

    1984-01-01

    The rate and vigor of the spider heartbeat is controlled by an external pacemaker. A mechanical feature of the spider cardio-vascular system is the production of high serum pressure in the prosoma and the legs. This appears to be the source for leg extension. The lyriform organ on the patella of the leg is sensitive to vibratory and kinesthetic stimuli. This sensitivity depends upon the degree of leg extension. Thus the activity of the heart and the response characteristics of the sense receptor are related. The effect of a supra-threshold vibratory or gravitational stimulus is to produce an inhibition and a tachycardia of the spider heartbeat.

  12. Insula mediates heartbeat related effects on visual consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Roy; Ronchi, Roberta; Dönz, Jonathan; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Herbelin, Bruno; Faivre, Nathan; Schaller, Karl; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-01-31

    Interoceptive signals, such as the heartbeat, are processed in a network of brain regions including the insular cortex. Recent studies have shown that such signals modulate perceptual and cognitive processing, and that they impact visual awareness. For example, visual stimuli presented synchronously to the heartbeat take longer to enter visual awareness than the same stimuli presented asynchronously to the heartbeat, and this is reflected in anterior insular activation. This finding demonstrated a link between the processing of interoceptive and exteroceptive signals as well as visual awareness in the insular cortex. The advantage for visual stimuli which are asynchronous to the heartbeat to enter visual consciousness may indicate a role for the anterior insula in the suppression of the sensory consequences of cardiac signals. Here, we present data from the detailed investigation of two patients with insular lesions (as well as four patients with non-insular lesions and healthy age matched controls) indicating that a lesion of the anterior insular cortex, but not of other regions, abolished this cardio-visual suppression effect. The present data provide causal evidence for the role of the anterior insula in the integration of internal interoceptive and external sensory signals for visual awareness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidally Induced Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Kurtz, D.; Prša, A.; Fuller, J.; Thompson, S.

    2015-07-01

    With the advent of high precision photometry from satellites such as Kepler and CoRoT, a whole new layer of interesting and astounding astronomical objects has been revealed: heartbeat stars are a prime example of such objects. Heartbeat stars are eccentric ellipsoidal variables that undergo strong tidal interactions at the time of closest approach, when the stars are almost in contact. These interactions cause a significant variation in the surface areas of the stars and are observed in the form of a tidal pulse. A subset of these objects (˜20%) show prominent tidally induced pulsations. We now have a fully functional code that models binary star features (using PHOEBE) and stellar pulsations simultaneously, enabling a complete and accurate heartbeat model to be determined. In this talk we show the results of our new code, which uses emcee, a variant of MCMC, to generate a full set of stellar parameters. We further highlight some of the interesting features of selected heartbeat stars, including resonant pulsations, frequency modulation, solar-like oscillations, and resonantly locked modes.

  14. Effect of dynamic exercise on human carotid-cardiac baroreflex latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, J. T.; Raven, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    We compared the beat-to-beat responses of heart rate (HR) after brief activation of carotid baroreceptors in resting humans with the responses obtained during mild-to-moderate levels of dynamic exercise [25 and 50% of peak O2 uptake (VO2peak)] to investigate the effect of exercise on baroreflex latency. Carotid baroreceptors were activated by a pressure pulse (5 s) of neck suction (NS, -80 Torr) and neck pressure (NP, +40 Torr) during held expiration. At rest the peak change in HR to NS/NP occurred during the first several heartbeats (1st-3rd beat), whereas during mild and moderate exercise peak HR responses occurred near the end of the NS/NP pulse (6th-8th beat). In contrast, time (s) to the peak change in HR was not different between rest and exercise (P > 0.05). Reflex tachycadia to NP progressively decreased during exercise (17 +/- 3, 10 +/- 1, and 4 +/- 1% of control, rest vs. 25% VO2peak, vs. 50% VO2peak, respectively, P tachycardia and a measure of HR variability (cardiac vagal tone index, r = 0.74, P < 0.0001). Reflex bradycardia to NS gradually increased during exercise (13 +/- 2, 17 +/- 2, and 18 +/- 2% of control, rest vs. 25% VO2peak, vs. 50% VO2peak, respectively, P = 0.10) and was negatively correlated with cardiac vagal tone (r = 0.42, P < 0.06).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Neural Responses to Heartbeats in the Default Network Encode the Self in Spontaneous Thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo-Rebelo, Mariana; Richter, Craig G; Tallon-Baudry, Catherine

    2016-07-27

    The default network (DN) has been consistently associated with self-related cognition, but also to bodily state monitoring and autonomic regulation. We hypothesized that these two seemingly disparate functional roles of the DN are functionally coupled, in line with theories proposing that selfhood is grounded in the neural monitoring of internal organs, such as the heart. We measured with magnetoencephalograhy neural responses evoked by heartbeats while human participants freely mind-wandered. When interrupted by a visual stimulus at random intervals, participants scored the self-relatedness of the interrupted thought. They evaluated their involvement as the first-person perspective subject or agent in the thought ("I"), and on another scale to what degree they were thinking about themselves ("Me"). During the interrupted thought, neural responses to heartbeats in two regions of the DN, the ventral precuneus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, covaried, respectively, with the "I" and the "Me" dimensions of the self, even at the single-trial level. No covariation between self-relatedness and peripheral autonomic measures (heart rate, heart rate variability, pupil diameter, electrodermal activity, respiration rate, and phase) or alpha power was observed. Our results reveal a direct link between selfhood and neural responses to heartbeats in the DN and thus directly support theories grounding selfhood in the neural monitoring of visceral inputs. More generally, the tight functional coupling between self-related processing and cardiac monitoring observed here implies that, even in the absence of measured changes in peripheral bodily measures, physiological and cognitive functions have to be considered jointly in the DN. The default network (DN) has been consistently associated with self-processing but also with autonomic regulation. We hypothesized that these two functions could be functionally coupled in the DN, inspired by theories according to which selfhood is

  16. Quantitative evaluation of heartbeat interval time series using Poincaré analysis reveals distinct patterns of heart rate dynamics during cycles of vagus nerve stimulation in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbus, Imad; Nearing, Bruce D; Amurthur, Badri; KenKnight, Bruce H; Verrier, Richard L

    Optimization of stimulation parameters is essential to maximizing therapeutic efficacy and minimizing side effects. The ANTHEM-HF study enrolled patients with heart failure who received chronic autonomic regulation therapy (ART) with an implantable vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) system on either the right (n=30) or left side (n=29). Acute effects of continuously cycling VNS on R-R interval dynamics were evaluated using post hoc Poincaré analysis of ECG recordings collected during multiple titration sessions over an 8-12week period. During each titration session, VNS intensity associated with maximum tolerable dose was determined. Poincaré plots of R-R interval time series were created for epochs when VNS cycled from OFF to ON at varying intensity levels. VNS produced an immediate, relatively small change in beat-to-beat distribution of R-R intervals during the 14-sec ON time, which was correlated with stimulation current amplitude (r=0.85, p=0.05). During titration of right-sided stimulation, there was a strong correlation (r=0.91, p=0.01) between stimulus intensity and the Poincaré parameter of standard deviation, SD1, which is associated with high-frequency heart rate variability. The effect of VNS on instantaneous heart rate was indicated by a shift in the centroid of the beat-to-beat cloud distribution demarcated by the encircling ellipse. As anticipated, left-sided stimulation did not alter any Poincaré parameter except at high stimulation intensities (≥2mA). Quantitative Poincaré analysis reveals a tight coupling in beat-to-beat dynamics during VNS ON cycles that is directly related to stimulation intensity, providing a useful measurement for confirming autonomic engagement. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Heartbeat perception in social anxiety before and during speech anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Stephan; Gerlach, Alexander L; Cludius, Barbara; Silkens, Anna; Craske, Michelle G; Hermann, Christiane

    2011-02-01

    According to current cognitive models of social phobia, individuals with social anxiety create a distorted image of themselves in social situations, relying, at least partially, on interoceptive cues. We investigated differences in heartbeat perception as a proxy of interoception in 48 individuals high and low in social anxiety at baseline and while anticipating a public speech. Results revealed lower error scores for high fearful participants both at baseline and during speech anticipation. Speech anticipation improved heartbeat perception in both groups only marginally. Eight of nine accurate perceivers as determined using a criterion of maximum difference between actual and counted beats were high socially anxious. Higher interoceptive accuracy might increase the risk of misinterpreting physical symptoms as visible signs of anxiety which then trigger negative evaluation by others. Treatment should take into account that in socially anxious individuals perceived physical arousal is likely to be accurate rather than false alarm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Turning body and self inside out: visualized heartbeats alter bodily self-consciousness and tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Heydrich, Lukas; Marillier, Guillaume; Lavanchy, Tom; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-12-01

    Prominent theories highlight the importance of bodily perception for self-consciousness, but it is currently not known whether bodily perception is based on interoceptive or exteroceptive signals or on integrated signals from these anatomically distinct systems. In the research reported here, we combined both types of signals by surreptitiously providing participants with visual exteroceptive information about their heartbeat: A real-time video image of a periodically illuminated silhouette outlined participants' (projected, "virtual") bodies and flashed in synchrony with their heartbeats. We investigated whether these "cardio-visual" signals could modulate bodily self-consciousness and tactile perception. We report two main findings. First, synchronous cardio-visual signals increased self-identification with and self-location toward the virtual body, and second, they altered the perception of tactile stimuli applied to participants' backs so that touch was mislocalized toward the virtual body. We argue that the integration of signals from the inside and the outside of the human body is a fundamental neurobiological process underlying self-consciousness.

  19. Heartbeat stars, tidally excited oscillations and resonance locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-12-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric binary stars in short-period orbits whose light curves are shaped by tidal distortion, reflection and Doppler beaming. Some heartbeat stars exhibit tidally excited oscillations and present new opportunities for understanding the physics of tidal dissipation within stars. We present detailed methods to compute the forced amplitudes, frequencies and phases of tidally excited oscillations in eccentric binary systems. Our methods (i) factor out the equilibrium tide for easier comparison with observations, (ii) account for rotation using the traditional approximation, (iii) incorporate non-adiabatic effects to reliably compute surface luminosity perturbations, (iv) allow for spin-orbit misalignment and (v) correctly sum over contributions from many oscillation modes. We also discuss why tidally excited oscillations (TEOs) are more visible in hot stars with surface temperatures T ≳ 6500 K, and we derive some basic probability theory that can be used to compare models with data in a statistical manner. Application of this theory to heartbeat systems can be used to determine whether observed TEOs can be explained by chance resonances with stellar oscillation modes, or whether a resonance locking process is operating.

  20. Body conscious? Interoceptive awareness, measured by heartbeat perception, is negatively correlated with self-objectification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ainley, Vivien; Tsakiris, Manos

    2013-01-01

    ... effectiveness. Within objectification theory, it has been proposed that self-objectification accounts for the poorer interoceptive awareness observed in women, as measured by heartbeat perception...

  1. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of dynamic impacts on human bones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    1980-06-02

    Jun 2, 1980 ... Abstract. Flat bones of human skeleton were subjected to dynamic indentation with ball indenters. The impacted surface was studied under high magnification and also by using the technique of multiple beam interferometry. The impulse caused the pile up of material at a little distance from the edge of the ...

  3. Dynamic representations of human body movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtzi, Z; Shiffrar, M

    1999-01-01

    Psychophysical and neurophysiological studies suggest that human body motions can be readily recognized. Human bodies are highly articulated and can move in a nonrigid manner. As a result, we perceive highly dissimilar views of the human form in motion. How does the visual system integrate multiple views of a human body in motion so that we can perceive human movement as a continuous event? The results of a set of priming experiments suggest that motion can readily facilitate the linkage of different views of a moving human. Positive priming was found for novel views of a human body that fell within the path of human movement. However, no priming was observed for novel views outside the path of motion. Furthermore, priming was restricted to those views that satisfied the biomechanical constraints of human movement. These results suggest that visual representation of human movement may be based upon the movement limitations of the human body and may reflect a dynamic interaction of motion and object-recognition processes.

  4. In a Heartbeat: Light and Cardiovascular Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Chellappa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Light impinging on the retina fulfils a dual function: it serves for vision and it is required for proper entrainment of the endogenous circadian timing system to the 24-h day, thus influencing behaviors that promote health and optimal quality of life but are independent of image formation. The circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei modulates the cardiovascular system with an intrinsic ability to anticipate morning solar time and with a circadian nature of adverse cardiovascular events. Here, we infer that light exposure might affect cardiovascular function and provide evidence from existing research. Findings show a time-of-day dependent increase in relative sympathetic tone associated with bright light in the morning but not in the evening hours. Furthermore, dynamic light in the early morning hours can reduce the deleterious sleep-to-wake evoked transition on cardiac modulation. On the contrary, effects of numerous light parameters, such as illuminance level and wavelength of monochromatic light, on cardiac function are mixed. Therefore, in future research studies, light modalities, such as timing, duration, and its wavelength composition, should be taken in to account when testing the potential of light as a non-invasive countermeasure for adverse cardiovascular events.

  5. In a Heartbeat: Light and Cardiovascular Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Sarah L; Lasauskaite, Ruta; Cajochen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Light impinging on the retina fulfils a dual function: it serves for vision and it is required for proper entrainment of the endogenous circadian timing system to the 24-h day, thus influencing behaviors that promote health and optimal quality of life but are independent of image formation. The circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei modulates the cardiovascular system with an intrinsic ability to anticipate morning solar time and with a circadian nature of adverse cardiovascular events. Here, we infer that light exposure might affect cardiovascular function and provide evidence from existing research. Findings show a time-of-day dependent increase in relative sympathetic tone associated with bright light in the morning but not in the evening hours. Furthermore, dynamic light in the early morning hours can reduce the deleterious sleep-to-wake evoked transition on cardiac modulation. On the contrary, effects of numerous light parameters, such as illuminance level and wavelength of monochromatic light, on cardiac function are mixed. Therefore, in future research studies, light modalities, such as timing, duration, and its wavelength composition, should be taken in to account when testing the potential of light as a non-invasive countermeasure for adverse cardiovascular events.

  6. Heartbeat Stars: the Key to Unlocking the Formation and Circularization of Tight Binaries and Short Period Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, Kelly

    Heartbeat stars are an emerging class of eccentric (e > 0.2) short-period ellipsoidal variables that undergo strong tidal interactions near orbital periastron. In the Kepler data we have identified 173 heartbeat stars, %20 of which pulsate with tidally excited modes: stellar oscillation modes that are excited to observable amplitudes (> 10 ppm) by the tidal forcing of the companion star. We have obtained 6 or more follow-up spectra for 31 Kepler heartbeat stars with tidally induced pulsations, most of which we obtained with the Keck telescope, Mauna Kea, and the 4-m Mayal telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory. Using the combination of Kepler light curves and spectra (and distances from Gaia astrometry once available), we will produce binary star models for all the heartbeat stars in our sample by applying a combination of PHOEBE, a binary star modeling code; EMCEE, an afine invariant version of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods; and our own codes, which fit Doppler boosting and tidally induced pulsations. These models will provide accurate fundamental, orbital and pulsational parameters, which we will then use to pursue the two aims of this proposal. Our first aim is to determine orbital circularization rates due to tidally induced pulsations. It is predicted that the presence of tidally excited modes will cause an increase in the rate of orbital circularization. By analyzing the mode energies of the tidally excited modes using pulsation models (with the binary star parameters as inputs), we can determine the circularization rates of all the heartbeat stars in our sample. The results will provide key information on the link between tidally induced pulsations and orbital circularization, applicable to both binary stars and planets. Our second aim is to understand the impact of three body dynamics in forming tight binaries and short period planets. Approximately 96% of tight (P binaries have been observed to contain tertiary components. Heartbeat stars are

  7. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  8. Understanding human dynamics in microblog posting activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yubao; Wang, Hui; Li, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Human activity patterns are an important issue in behavior dynamics research. Empirical evidence indicates that human activity patterns can be characterized by a heavy-tailed inter-event time distribution. However, most researchers give an understanding by only modeling the power-law feature of the inter-event time distribution, and those overlooked non-power-law features are likely to be nontrivial. In this work, we propose a behavior dynamics model, called the finite memory model, in which humans adaptively change their activity rates based on a finite memory of recent activities, which is driven by inherent individual interest. Theoretical analysis shows a finite memory model can properly explain various heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions, including a regular power law and some non-power-law deviations. To validate the model, we carry out an empirical study based on microblogging activity from thousands of microbloggers in the Celebrity Hall of the Sina microblog. The results show further that the model is reasonably effective. We conclude that finite memory is an effective dynamics element to describe the heavy-tailed human activity pattern.

  9. Dynamic efficiency of the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Maccaferri, Simone; Figini, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The emerging dynamic dimensions of the human intestinal microbiota (IM) are challenging the traditional definition of healthy gut microbiota, principally based on the static concepts of phylogenetic and functional core. On the other hand, recent researches are revealing that the microbiota plasticity is strategic for several aspects of our biology, addressing the different immunological and metabolic needs at various ages, and adjusting the ecosystem services in response to different lifestyle, physiological states or diets. In light of these studies, we propose to revise the traditional concept of healthy human IM, including its degree of plasticity among the fundamental requisites for providing host health. In order to make a model taking into account the relative importance of IM core functions and plasticity for the maintenance of host health, we address to Economics, where the efficiency of a productive system is measured by computing static and dynamic parameters.

  10. Individual Identification Using Linear Projection of Heartbeat Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra Narain Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method to use the electrocardiogram (ECG signal as biometrics for individual identification. The ECG characterization is performed using an automated approach consisting of analytical and appearance methods. The analytical method extracts the fiducial features from heartbeats while the appearance method extracts the morphological features from the ECG trace. We linearly project the extracted features into a subspace of lower dimension using an orthogonal basis that represent the most significant features for distinguishing heartbeats among the subjects. Result demonstrates that the proposed characterization of the ECG signal and subsequently derived eigenbeat features are insensitive to signal variations and nonsignal artifacts. The proposed system utilizing ECG biometric method achieves the best identification rates of 85.7% for the subjects of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and 92.49% for the healthy subjects of our IIT (BHU database. These results are significantly better than the classification accuracies of 79.55% and 84.9%, reported using support vector machine on the tested subjects of MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and our IIT (BHU database, respectively.

  11. Binary Model for the Heartbeat Star System KIC 4142768

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are a class of eccentric (e > 0.2) binary systems that undergo strong tidal forces. These tidal forces cause the shape of each star and the temperature across the stellar surfaces to change. This effect also generates variations in the light curve in the form of tidally-induced pulsations, which are theorized to have a significant effect on the circularization of eccentric orbits (Zahn, 1975). Using the binary modeling software PHOEBE (Prša & Zwitter 2005) on the Kepler photometric data and Keck radial velocity data for the eclipsing, heartbeat star KIC 4142768, we have determined the fundamental parameters including masses and radii. The frequency analysis of the residual data has surprisingly revealed approximately 29 pulsations with 8 being Delta Scuti pulsations, 10 being Gamma Doradus pulsations, and 11 being tidally-induced pulsations. After subtracting an initial binary model from the original, detrended photometric data, we analyzed the pulsation frequencies in the residual data. We then were able to disentangle the identified pulsations from the original data in order to conduct subsequent binary modeling. We plan to continue this study by applying asteroseismology to KIC 4142768. Through our continued investigation, we hope to extract information about the star’s internal structure and expect this will yield additional, interesting results.

  12. Dynamic landscapes in human evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Inglis, Robyn; Williams, Matthew; Winder, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011, Winder et al. Antiquity in press). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, aims to develop systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. Examples are shown to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  13. Role of activity in human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Kiet, H. A. T.; Kim, B. J.; Wang, B.-H.; Holme, P.

    2008-04-01

    The human society is a very complex system; still, there are several non-trivial, general features. One type of them is the presence of power-law-distributed quantities in temporal statistics. In this letter, we focus on the origin of power laws in rating of movies. We present a systematic empirical exploration of the time between two consecutive ratings of movies (the interevent time). At an aggregate level, we find a monotonous relation between the activity of individuals and the power law exponent of the interevent time distribution. At an individual level, we observe a heavy-tailed distribution for each user, as well as a negative correlation between the activity and the width of the distribution. We support these findings by a similar data set from mobile phone text-message communication. Our results demonstrate a significant role of the activity of individuals on the society-level patterns of human behavior. We believe this is a common character in the interest-driven human dynamics, corresponding to (but different from) the universality classes of task-driven dynamics.

  14. The power of heartbeats through the lens of ι Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo, H.; Richardson, N. D.; Fuller, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Photometry Tiger Team (Phott)

    2017-09-01

    O star asteroseismology is a relatively new field which has not been able to gain significant traction due in large part to the lack of known pulsators in addition to the relatively sparse number of frequencies detected in those pulsators. This is likely due to a combination of factors, chief among them long frequencies, on the order of days, and weak amplitudes (≈ 1 mmag and below). Fortunately, through the discovery of the most massive heartbeat system ι Orionis and it's corresponding tidally induced oscillations with BRITE-Constellation there exists a new avenue with which to explore O star asteroseismology. In this paper we will give a prescription for using tidally induced oscillations to do asteroseismic analysis on O stars and present a list of candidate systems for this analysis within the BRITE sample.

  15. The soundscape dynamics of human agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; De Souza, Rodolfo T; Lenzi, Ervin K; Mendes, Renio S; Evangelista, Luiz R, E-mail: hvr@dfi.uem.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa, PR (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    We report on a statistical analysis of the people agglomeration soundscape. Specifically, we investigate the normalized sound amplitudes and intensities that emerge from human collective meetings. Our findings support the existence of non-trivial dynamics characterized by heavy tail distributions in the sound amplitudes, long-range correlations in the sound intensity and non-exponential distributions in the return interval distributions. Additionally, motivated by the time-dependent behavior present in the volatility/variance series, we compare the observational data with those obtained from a minimalist autoregressive stochastic model, namely the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic process (the GARCH process), and find that there is good agreement.

  16. Modeling correlated human dynamics with temporal preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-03-01

    We empirically study the activity pattern of individual blog-posting and observe the interevent time distributions decay as power-laws at both individual and population level. As different from previous studies, we find significant short-term memory in it. Moreover, the memory coefficient first decays in a power law and then turns to an exponential form. Our findings produce evidence for the strong short-term memory in human dynamics and challenge previous models. Accordingly, we propose a simple model based on temporal preference, which can well reproduce both the heavy-tailed nature and the strong memory effects. This work helps in understanding the temporal regularities of online human behaviors.

  17. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve and the dynamic force moduli (storage and loss) are measured at low frequency (from 3 to 45 Hz). All the samples were preserved in the PBS solution at room temperature and the measurements were perfomed within 4 hours after surgery. Young's modulus of the human bronchial airway walls are fond ranged between 0.17 and 1.65 MPa, ranged between 0.25 to 1.96 MPa for cartilages, and between 0.02 to 0.28 MPa for mucosa. The storage modulus are found varying 0.10 MPa with frequency while the loss modulus are found increasing from ...

  18. Probing the Interoceptive Network by Listening to Heartbeats: An fMRI Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleint, Nina I; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lueken, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to cues of homeostatic relevance (i.e. heartbeats) is supposed to increase the allocation of attentional resources towards the cue, due to its importance for self-regulatory, interoceptive processes...

  19. A novel design of heartbeat monitoring system for the motor vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gücüyener, İsmet

    2016-12-01

    Many traffic accidents take place throughout the world every day claiming lives as well as commodities and people involved in the accidents have to stay long periods at the hospitals. Traffic accidents are caused by many reasons. One of the reasons is the driver's having a heart attack just before the accident took place. If the heartbeat of the driver can continuously be measured, then most probably one of the reasons of traffic accidents can be eliminated. The designed model aims to measure the driver's heartbeat using infrared imaging. Some car models already have a driver heartbeat monitoring system and it measures the heartbeats by using the back seat electrodes. But these systems are expensive and unique to their models and what is more; its adaptation to other car models can pose a difficulty. Implementing on the car's rear-view mirror this new design monitoring system is very cheap and also it can be mounted to all motor vehicles easily.

  20. Probing the Interoceptive Network by Listening to Heartbeats: An fMRI Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleint, Nina I; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lueken, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    .... This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed at determining whether listening to heartbeats is accompanied by activation in brain areas associated with interoception, particularly the insular cortex...

  1. Human dynamics revealed through Web analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Ramasco, José J.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing ubiquity of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using the Web to better observe, understand, and monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Web sites with large numbers of frequently returning users are ideal for this task. If these sites belong to companies or universities, their usage patterns can furnish information about the working habits of entire populations. In this work, we analyze the properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University’s Web site. Emory is a medium-sized university located in Atlanta, Georgia. We find interesting structure in the activity patterns of the domain and study in a systematic way the main forces behind the dynamics of the traffic. In particular, we find that linear preferential linking, priority-based queuing, and the decay of interest for the contents of the pages are the essential ingredients to understand the way users navigate the Web.

  2. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  3. Disc-corona interaction in the heartbeat state of GRS 1915+105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Ji, Li; Liu, Si-Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Wang, Na; Li, Xiang-Dong; Qu, Jin-Lu; Sun, Wei; Ge, Ming-Yu; Liao, Jin-Yuan; Niu, Shu; Ding, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Qing-Zhong

    2018-02-01

    Timing analysis provides information about the dynamics of matter accreting on to neutron stars and black holes, and hence is crucial for studying the physics of the accretion flow around these objects. It is difficult, however, to associate the different variability components with each of the spectral components of the accretion flow. We apply several new methods to two Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer observations of the black hole binary GRS 1915+105 during its heartbeat state to explore the origin of the X-ray variability and the interactions of the accretion-flow components. We offer a promising window into the disc-corona interaction through analysing the formation regions of the disc aperiodic variabilities with different time-scales via comparing the corresponding transition energies of the amplitude-ratio spectra. In a previous paper, we analysed the Fourier power density as a function of energy and frequency to study the origin of the aperiodic variability, and combined that analysis with the phase lag as a function of frequency to derive a picture of the disc-corona interaction in this source. We here, for the first time, investigate the phase-lag as a function of energy and frequency, and display some interesting details of the disc-corona interaction. Besides, the results from the shape of amplitude-ratio spectrum and from several other aspects suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillation originates from the corona.

  4. Safer mountain climbing using the climbing heartbeat index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Akio; Nose, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    As the numbers of middle-aged and elderly mountain climbers have increased with the general aging of the population, accidents during mountain climbing have increased recently. A possible cause of such accidents is an excessively difficult expedition plan. To enjoy safe mountain climbing, the plans must take account of the climber's fitness level. We developed a method to plan mountain climbing using the climbing heartbeat index (CHI). This study is based on the assumption that the work expended when climbing a mountain is equal to the potential energy of the body and load weights elevated to the height of the mountain, and that the work is proportional to the heart rate. The CHI was calculated by the following equation The CHI values examined in this study ( n = 94) showed very small standard deviations and were significantly correlated with the maximum oxygen uptake, .VO(2 max) (ml kg(-1) min(-1)) ( r = -0.934, P < 0.01); it showed a characteristic value corresponding to the fitness level in each subject. In addition, this value remained nearly unchanged even when the load was changed. Therefore, if the CHI value of an individual is known (it can be estimated from .VO(2 max)), safer mountain climbing can be planned accordingly. Once determined, this CHI value can be used repeatedly unless the fitness level of the individual changes.

  5. Heartbeat classification using feature selection driven by database generalization criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamedo, Mariano; Martinez, Juan Pablo

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we studied and validated a simple heartbeat classifier based on ECG feature models selected with the focus on an improved generalization capability. We considered features from the RR series, as well as features computed from the ECG samples and different scales of the wavelet transform, at both available leads. The classification performance and generalization were studied using publicly available databases: the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia, the MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia, and the St. Petersburg Institute of Cardiological Technics (INCART) databases. The Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation recommendations for class labeling and results presentation were followed. A floating feature selection algorithm was used to obtain the best performing and generalizing models in the training and validation sets for different search configurations. The best model found comprehends eight features, was trained in a partition of the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia, and was evaluated in a completely disjoint partition of the same database. The results obtained were: global accuracy of 93%; for normal beats, sensitivity (S) 95%, positive predictive value (P(+)) 98%; for supraventricular beats, S 77%, P(+) 39%; and for ventricular beats S 81%, P(+) 87%. In order to test the generalization capability, performance was also evaluated in the INCART, with results comparable to those obtained in the test set. This classifier model has fewer features and performs better than other state-of-the-art methods with results suggesting better generalization capability.

  6. Transient Modulations of Neural Responses to Heartbeats Covary with Bodily Self-Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Dong; Bernasconi, Fosco; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Pfeiffer, Christian; Salomon, Roy; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-08-10

    Recent research has investigated self-consciousness associated with the multisensory processing of bodily signals (e.g., somatosensory, visual, vestibular signals), a notion referred to as bodily self-consciousness, and these studies have shown that the manipulation of bodily inputs induces changes in bodily self-consciousness such as self-identification. Another line of research has highlighted the importance of signals from the inside of the body (e.g., visceral signals) and proposed that neural representations of internal bodily signals underlie self-consciousness, which to date has been based on philosophical inquiry, clinical case studies, and behavioral studies. Here, we investigated the relationship of bodily self-consciousness with the neural processing of internal bodily signals. By combining electrical neuroimaging, analysis of peripheral physiological signals, and virtual reality technology in humans, we show that transient modulations of neural responses to heartbeats in the posterior cingulate cortex covary with changes in bodily self-consciousness induced by the full-body illusion. Additional analyses excluded that measured basic cardiorespiratory parameters or interoceptive sensitivity traits could account for this finding. These neurophysiological data link experimentally the cortical mapping of the internal body to self-consciousness. What are the brain mechanisms of self-consciousness? Prominent views propose that the neural processing associated with signals from the internal organs (such as the heart and the lung) plays a critical role in self-consciousness. Although this hypothesis dates back to influential views in philosophy and psychology (e.g., William James), definitive experimental evidence supporting this idea is lacking despite its recent impact in neuroscience. In the present study, we show that posterior cingulate activities responding to heartbeat signals covary with changes in participants' conscious self-identification with a body

  7. Body Conscious? Interoceptive Awareness, Measured by Heartbeat Perception, Is Negatively Correlated with Self-Objectification: e55568

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vivien Ainley; Manos Tsakiris

    2013-01-01

    ... effectiveness. Within objectification theory, it has been proposed that self-objectification accounts for the poorer interoceptive awareness observed in women, as measured by heartbeat perception...

  8. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  9. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  10. Inter-Patient ECG Heartbeat Classification with Temporal VCG Optimized by PSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gabriel; Moreira, Gladston; Menotti, David; Luz, Eduardo

    2017-09-05

    Classifying arrhythmias can be a tough task for a human being and automating this task is highly desirable. Nevertheless fully automatic arrhythmia classification through Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals is a challenging task when the inter-patient paradigm is considered. For the inter-patient paradigm, classifiers are evaluated on signals of unknown subjects, resembling the real world scenario. In this work, we explore a novel ECG representation based on vectorcardiogram (VCG), called temporal vectorcardiogram (TVCG), along with a complex network for feature extraction. We also fine-tune the SVM classifier and perform feature selection with a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. Results for the inter-patient paradigm show that the proposed method achieves the results comparable to state-of-the-art in MIT-BIH database (53% of Positive predictive (+P) for the Supraventricular ectopic beat (S) class and 87.3% of Sensitivity (Se) for the Ventricular ectopic beat (V) class) that TVCG is a richer representation of the heartbeat and that it could be useful for problems involving the cardiac signal and pattern recognition.

  11. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical ``Big Data'' sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  12. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical “Big Data” sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  13. The Use of β-blockers in Patients with Ventricular Ectopic Heartbeat in the Early and Distant Postinfarction Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kulayets

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to increase the effectiveness of patients after Q-, QS- myocardial infarction rehabilitation, based on the study of clinical, instrumental and biochemical changes in cases of cardiac arrhythmias, and development on this basis of new approaches to treatment. Materials and Methods. The clinical, instrumental and biochemical examinations were carried out for 70 patients who had Q-, QS-myocardial infarction (MI with a ventricular ectopic heartbeat on the regenerative period since the acute coronary syndrome development in 1, 3, and 6 months. The features of the ventricular ectopic heartbeat course in patients with myocardial infarction against the backdrop of sotalol and carvedilol use and influence of applied treatment on the clinical and pathogenetical features of patients’ functional recovery in early and distant (prolonged postinfarction period were analyzed. Results. Analyzing the dynamics of coronary artery disease clinical manifestations in patients with ventricular arrhythmia (VA with myocardial infarction against the backdrop of sotalol and carvedilol treatment it has been noted a marked decrease in anginal chest pain manifestation, feeling of palpitations, disruption of the heart, shortness of breath, feeling of breath shortness, etc. in all groups of patients. The positive effect of therapy had been increasing since the 3 week during the 3-month long treatment. Results of heart rate Holter monitoring have shown a marked antiarrhythmic effect of metoprolol, carvedilol and sotalol. In particular, in all groups of patients the frequency of VA reduced by half, the percentage of high grade VA decreased namely pair and group arrhythmia, ventricular bigeminy. Assessment of hemodynamic parameters in the process of patients with ST treatment has represented the marked trend and a further significant increase in ejection fraction and other contractile dysfunction forms correction. This positive trend was the most relevant in the application

  14. Can contact-free measurement of heartbeat signal be used in forensics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics and soft biometrics characteristics are of great importance in forensics applications for identifying criminals and law enforcement. Developing new biometrics and soft biometrics are therefore of interest of many applications, among them forensics. Heartbeat signals have been previously......-free extracted heartbeat signals are shown in this paper to have some potentials to be used as soft biometrics. Promising experimental results on a public database, have shown that utilizing these signals can improve the accuracy of spoofing detection in a face recognition system....

  15. Alteration in scaling behavior of short-term heartbeat time series for professional shooting athletes from rest to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jian Jun; Ning, Xin Bao; He, Ai Jun; Zou, Ming; Sun, Biao; Wu, Xu Hui

    2008-11-01

    Scaling analysis of heartbeat time series has emerged as a useful tool for assessing the autonomic cardiac control under various physiologic and pathologic conditions. We study the heartbeat activity and scaling behavior of heartbeat fluctuations regulated by autonomic nervous system for professional shooting athletes under two states: rest and exercise, by applying the detrended fluctuation analysis method. We focus on alteration in correlation properties of heartbeat intervals for the shooters from rest to exercise, which may have a potential value in monitoring the quality of training and evaluating the sports capacity of the athletes. The result shows that scaling exponents of short-term heart rate variability signals from the shooters get significantly larger during exercise compared with those obtained at rest. It demonstrates that during exercise stronger correlations appear in the heartbeat series of shooting athletes in order to satisfy the specific requirements for high concentration and better control on their heart beats.

  16. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA. Richard R Sinden Vladimir N ... Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, ...

  17. Human hand modelling : Kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand

  18. Heartbeat Cycle Length Detection by a Ballistocardiographic Sensor in Atrial Fibrillation and Sinus Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias Daniel; Brüser, Christoph; Winnersbach, Patrick; Napp, Andreas; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick; Mischke, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background. Heart rate monitoring is especially interesting in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and is routinely performed by ECG. A ballistocardiography (BCG) foil is an unobtrusive sensor for mechanical vibrations. We tested the correlation of heartbeat cycle length detection by a novel algorithm for a BCG foil to an ECG in AF and sinus rhythm (SR). Methods. In 22 patients we obtained BCG and synchronized ECG recordings before and after cardioversion and examined the correlation between heartbeat characteristics. Results. We analyzed a total of 4317 heartbeats during AF and 2445 during SR with a correlation between ECG and BCG during AF of r = 0.70 (95% CI 0.68–0.71, P < 0.0001) and r = 0.75 (95% CI 0.73–0.77, P < 0.0001) during SR. By adding a quality index, artifacts could be reduced and the correlation increased for AF to 0.76 (95% CI 0.74–0.77, P < 0.0001, n = 3468) and for SR to 0.85 (95% CI 0.83–0.86, P < 0.0001, n = 2176). Conclusion. Heartbeat cycle length measurement by our novel algorithm for BCG foil is feasible during SR and AF, offering new possibilities of unobtrusive heart rate monitoring. This trial is registered with IRB registration number EK205/11. This trial is registered with clinical trials registration number NCT01779674. PMID:26229965

  19. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives involved identifying whether repeated averaging in basal and mid left ventricular myocardial levels improves precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction for 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping versus assessment at a single ventricular level. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  20. Using cloud models of heartbeats as the entity identifier to secure mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Donglai; Liu, Yanhua

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices are extensively used to store more private and often sensitive information. Therefore, it is important to protect them against unauthorised access. Authentication ensures that authorised users can use mobile devices. However, traditional authentication methods, such as numerical or graphic passwords, are vulnerable to passive attacks. For example, an adversary can steal the password by snooping from a shorter distance. To avoid these problems, this study presents a biometric approach that uses cloud models of heartbeats as the entity identifier to secure mobile devices. Here, it is identified that these concepts including cloud model or cloud have nothing to do with cloud computing. The cloud model appearing in the study is the cognitive model. In the proposed method, heartbeats are collected by two ECG electrodes that are connected to one mobile device. The backward normal cloud generator is used to generate ECG standard cloud models characterising the heartbeat template. When a user tries to have access to their mobile device, cloud models regenerated by fresh heartbeats will be compared with ECG standard cloud models to determine if the current user can use this mobile device. This authentication method was evaluated from three aspects including accuracy, authentication time and energy consumption. The proposed method gives 86.04% of true acceptance rate with 2.73% of false acceptance rate. One authentication can be done in 6s, and this processing consumes about 2000 mW of power.

  1. Human Performance Modeling for Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory; Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Laboratory; Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reac- tor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Charac- terization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk framework. In this paper, we review simulation based and non simulation based human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This paper summarizes the founda- tional information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human in- teractions in RISMC simulations.

  2. Self-regulated dynamical criticality in human ECoG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eSolovey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting experimental and theoretical results indicate that neural systems are poised near a critical state. In human subjects, however, most evidence comes from functional MRI studies, an indirect measurement of neuronal activity with poor temporal resolution. Electrocorticography (ECoG provides a unique window into human brain activity: each electrode records, with high temporal resolution, the activity resulting from the sum of the local field potentials of sim 10^5 neurons. We show that the human brain ECoG recordings display features of self-regulated dynamical criticality: dynamical modes of activation drift around the critical stability threshold, moving in and out of the unstable region and equilibrating the global dynamical state at a very fast time scale. Moreover, the analysis also reveals differences between the resting state and a motor task, associated with increased stability of a fraction of the dynamical modes.

  3. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To

  4. Fundamental Dynamical Modes Underlying Human Brain Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Alvarado-Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the long-term dynamics of widely interacting cortical and subcortical networks during the wake-sleep cycle. Using large-scale intracranial recordings of epileptic patients during seizure-free periods, we investigated local- and long-range synchronization between multiple brain regions over several days. For such high-dimensional data, summary information is required for understanding and modelling the underlying dynamics. Here, we suggest that a compact yet useful representation is given by a state space based on the first principal components. Using this representation, we report, with a remarkable similarity across the patients with different locations of electrode placement, that the seemingly complex patterns of brain synchrony during the wake-sleep cycle can be represented by a small number of characteristic dynamic modes. In this space, transitions between behavioral states occur through specific trajectories from one mode to another. These findings suggest that, at a coarse level of temporal resolution, the different brain states are correlated with several dominant synchrony patterns which are successively activated across wake-sleep states.

  5. Complex Human Dynamics From Mind to Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Winkowska-Nowak, Katarzyna; Brée, David

    2013-01-01

    This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".

  6. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing....... Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight...

  7. Empirical analysis of online human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patterns of human activities have attracted increasing academic interests, since the quantitative understanding of human behavior is helpful to uncover the origins of many socioeconomic phenomena. This paper focuses on behaviors of Internet users. Six large-scale systems are studied in our experiments, including the movie-watching in Netflix and MovieLens, the transaction in Ebay, the bookmark-collecting in Delicious, and the posting in FreindFeed and Twitter. Empirical analysis reveals some common statistical features of online human behavior: (1) The total number of user's actions, the user's activity, and the interevent time all follow heavy-tailed distributions. (2) There exists a strongly positive correlation between user's activity and the total number of user's actions, and a significantly negative correlation between the user's activity and the width of the interevent time distribution. We further study the rescaling method and show that this method could to some extent eliminate the different statistics among users caused by the different activities, yet the effectiveness depends on the data sets.

  8. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Quadri

    Full Text Available In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages. Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  9. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  10. Human rights dynamics of abortion law reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rebecca J; Dickens, Bernard M

    2003-02-01

    The legal approach to abortion is evolving from criminal prohibition towards accommodation as a life-preserving and health-preserving option, particularly in light of data on maternal mortality and morbidity. Modern momentum for liberalization comes from international adoption of the concept of reproductive health, and wider recognition that the resort to safe and dignified healthcare is a major human right. Respect for women's reproductive self-determination legitimizes abortion as a choice when family planning services have failed, been inaccessible, or been denied by rape. Recognition of women's rights of equal citizenship with men requires that their choices for self-determination be legally respected, not criminalized.

  11. A dynamic model of human physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melissa; Kaplan, Carolyn; Oran, Elaine; Boris, Jay

    2010-11-01

    To study the systems-level transport in the human body, we develop the Computational Man (CMAN): a set of one-dimensional unsteady elastic flow simulations created to model a variety of coupled physiological systems including the circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and lymphatic systems. The model systems are collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To model the actions of a beating heart or expanding lungs, the flow is driven by user-defined changes to the equilibrium areas of the elastic vessels. The equations are then iteratively solved for pressure, area, and average velocity. The model is augmented with valves and contractions to resemble the biological structure of the different systems. CMAN will be used to track material transport throughout the human body for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Parameters will be adjustable to match those of individual patients. Validation of CMAN has used both higher-dimensional simulations of similar geometries and benchmark measurement from medical literature.

  12. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  13. Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

  14. Evaluation of human dynamic balance in Grassmann manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Wereszczyński, Kamil; Mucha, Romualda; Świtoński, Adam; Josiński, Henryk; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2017-07-01

    The authors present an application of Grassmann manifold to the evaluation of human dynamic balance based on the time series representing movements of hip, knee and ankle joints in the sagittal, frontal and transverse planes. Time series were extracted from gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland using the Vicon system.

  15. The dynamic of lipid oxidation in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Both endogenous and exogenous lipid levels may be regulators of total lipid oxidation in skeletal muscles. We studied the dynamics of lipid oxidation in human myotubes established from healthy, lean subjects exposed to acutely and chronically increased palmitate concentrations. The intramyocellul...... oxidation in human myotubes. A reduced exogenous lipid oxidation, secondary to increased triacylglycerol levels, may redirect free fatty acids into esterification and oxidation from intracellular stores, thereby protecting myotubes from FFA lipotoxic effects....

  16. The human dynamic clamp as a paradigm for social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Guillaume; de Guzman, Gonzalo C; Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2014-09-02

    Social neuroscience has called for new experimental paradigms aimed toward real-time interactions. A distinctive feature of interactions is mutual information exchange: One member of a pair changes in response to the other while simultaneously producing actions that alter the other. Combining mathematical and neurophysiological methods, we introduce a paradigm called the human dynamic clamp (HDC), to directly manipulate the interaction or coupling between a human and a surrogate constructed to behave like a human. Inspired by the dynamic clamp used so productively in cellular neuroscience, the HDC allows a person to interact in real time with a virtual partner itself driven by well-established models of coordination dynamics. People coordinate hand movements with the visually observed movements of a virtual hand, the parameters of which depend on input from the subject's own movements. We demonstrate that HDC can be extended to cover a broad repertoire of human behavior, including rhythmic and discrete movements, adaptation to changes of pacing, and behavioral skill learning as specified by a virtual "teacher." We propose HDC as a general paradigm, best implemented when empirically verified theoretical or mathematical models have been developed in a particular scientific field. The HDC paradigm is powerful because it provides an opportunity to explore parameter ranges and perturbations that are not easily accessible in ordinary human interactions. The HDC not only enables to test the veracity of theoretical models, it also illuminates features that are not always apparent in real-time human social interactions and the brain correlates thereof.

  17. Adaptive Wavelet Scale Selection-based Method for Separating Respiration and Heartbeat in Bio-radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xikun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracting periodic heartbeat signals based on the traditional Fourier transform using a noncontact bio-radar is difficult because chest displacements caused by the heart are much smaller than those caused by respiration. Normally, they can be separated using the continuous wavelet transform; however, the miniscule difference of wavelet scale selection under different conditions may influence the separation performance to some extent. To solve this problem, this study proposes a method based on signal-to-noise ratio calibration to adaptively select the Morletdyadic wavelet scales and then separate the heartbeat signal from the respiration one using the selected scales, which can be applied to detect vital signs of different conditions. The experimental results have exhibited the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Investigation of synchronization between musical beat and heartbeat with cardio-music synchrogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Nomura, Shusaku; Sawai, Masahiro; Imai, Jun-Ichi; Nagashima, Tomomasa

    To illuminate the synchronization phenomena between heartbeat and music, the effects of a sedative music of variable tempo on heart rates were investigated. In the experiment, nine subjects were exposed to the sedative music with having changes in its tempo. The tempo gradually increases, decreases, or stands stable in the music (hereafter these experimental condition are named as Up, Down, and Flat condition). With regard to the analysis of synchronization, we introduced our formerly developed Cardio-Music Synchrogram, which was used to extract statistically significant synchronization period between heartbeat and music. As a result, it was suggested that the sedative music in Down condition induced synchronization more frequently than Flat and Up conditions.

  19. Single-Heartbeat Electromechanical Wave Imaging with Optimal Strain Estimation Using Temporally-Unequispaced Acquisition Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Jean; Thiébaut, Stéphane; Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive, ultrasound-based imaging method capable of mapping the electromechanical wave (EW) in vivo, i.e., the transient deformations occurring in response to the electrical activation of the heart. Achieving the optimal imaging frame rates, in terms of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, to capture the EW in a full-view of the heart poses a technical challenge due to the limitations of conventional imaging sequences, in which the frame rate is low and tied to the imaging parameters. To achieve higher frame rates, EWI is typically performed in multiple small regions of interest acquired over separate heartbeats, which are then combined into a single view. However, the reliance on multiple heartbeats has previously precluded the method from its application in non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. Moreover, the frame rates achieved remain sub-optimal, because they are determined by the imaging parameters rather than being optimized to image the EW. In this paper, we develop a temporally-unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) for which a wide range of frame rates are achievable independently of the imaging parameters, while maintaining a full view of the heart at high beam density. TUAS is first used to determine the optimal frame rate for EWI in a paced canine heart in vivo. The feasibility of performing single-heartbeat EWI during ventricular fibrillation is then demonstrated. These results indicate that EWI can be performed optimally, within a single heartbeat, during free breathing, and implemented in real time for periodic and non-periodic cardiac events. PMID:22297208

  20. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  1. Dynamical Analysis in the Mathematical Modelling of Human Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Saebyok; Kang, Byungmin

    2012-01-01

    We want to apply the geometrical method to a dynamical system of human blood glucose. Due to the educational importance of model building, we show a relatively general modelling process using observational facts. Next, two models of some concrete forms are analysed in the phase plane by means of linear stability, phase portrait and vector…

  2. Molecular Dynamics and Bioactivity of a Novel Mutated Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To design and evaluate a novel human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) analog. Methods: Mutation stability prediction was processed on hPTH, docked the mutant hPTH with its receptor, and then proceeded with molecular dynamics using Discovery Studio 3.5 software package for the complex. The bioactivity of the ...

  3. Human opinion dynamics: An inspiration to solve complex optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rishemjit; Kumar, Ritesh; Bhondekar, Amol P.; Kapur, Pawan

    2013-10-01

    Human interactions give rise to the formation of different kinds of opinions in a society. The study of formations and dynamics of opinions has been one of the most important areas in social physics. The opinion dynamics and associated social structure leads to decision making or so called opinion consensus. Opinion formation is a process of collective intelligence evolving from the integrative tendencies of social influence with the disintegrative effects of individualisation, and therefore could be exploited for developing search strategies. Here, we demonstrate that human opinion dynamics can be utilised to solve complex mathematical optimization problems. The results have been compared with a standard algorithm inspired from bird flocking behaviour and the comparison proves the efficacy of the proposed approach in general. Our investigation may open new avenues towards understanding the collective decision making.

  4. Optimized reduction of uncertainty in bursty human dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung; Kaski, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    Human dynamics is known to be inhomogeneous and bursty but the detailed understanding of the role of human factors in bursty dynamics is still lacking. In order to investigate their role we devise an agent-based model, where an agent in an uncertain situation tries to reduce the uncertainty by communicating with information providers while having to wait time for responses. Here the waiting time can be considered as cost. We show that the optimal choice of the waiting time under uncertainty gives rise to the bursty dynamics, characterized by the heavy tailed distribution of optimal waiting time. We find that in all cases the efficiency for communication is relevant to the scaling behavior of the optimal waiting time distribution. On the other hand, the cost turns out in some cases to be irrelevant depending on the degree of uncertainty and efficiency.

  5. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, L.-E.; Fiddyment, G.; Madsen, J. R.; Eskandar, E. N.; Truccolo, W.; Eden, U. T.; Cash, S. S.; Kramer, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy--the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures--is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms--namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space--that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures--and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms--promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  6. Detection of Pathological and Normal Heartbeat Using Wavelet Packet, Support Vector Machines and Multilayer Perceptron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J. Orozco-Naranjo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained by developing a methodology to detect 5 types of heartbeats (Normal (N, Right bundle branch block (RBBB, Left bundle branch block (LBBB, Premature atrial contraction (APC and Premature ventricular contraction (PVC, using Wavelet transform packets with non-adaptative mode applied on features extraction from heartbeats. It was used the Shannon function to calculate the entropy and It was added an identification nodes stage per every type of cardiac signal in the Wavelet tree. The using of Wavelet packets transform allows the access to information which results of decomposition of low and high frecuency, giving providing a more integral analysis than achieved by the discrete Wavelet transform. Three families of mother Wavelet were evaluated on transformation: Daubechies, Symlet and Reverse Biorthogonal, which were results from a previous research in that were identified the mother Wavelet that had higher entropy with the cardiac signals. With non-adaptive mode, the computational cost is reduced when Wavelet packets are used; this cost represents the most marked disadvantage from the transform. To classify the heartbeats were used Support Vector Machines and Multilayer Perceptron. The best classification error was achieved employing Support Vector Machine and a radial basis function; it was 2.57 %.

  7. Animal-to-animal variability of connection strength in the leech heartbeat central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Rebecca C; Norris, Brian J; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2012-03-01

    The heartbeat central pattern generator (CPG) in medicinal leeches controls blood flow within a closed circulatory by programming the constrictions of two parallel heart tubes. This circuit reliably produces a stereotyped fictive pattern of activity and has been extensively characterized. Here we determined, as quantitatively as possible, the strength of each inhibitory synapse and electrical junction within the core circuit of the heartbeat CPG. We also examined the animal-to-animal variability in strengths of these connections and, for some, determined the correlations between connections to the same postsynaptic target. The core CPG is composed of seven bilateral pairs of heart interneurons connected via both inhibitory chemical synapses and electrical junctions. Fifteen different connections within the core CPG were measured for strength using extracellular presynaptic recordings and postsynaptic voltage-clamp recordings across a minimum of seven individuals each, and the animal-to-animal variability was characterized. Connection strengths within the core network varied three to more than sevenfold among individuals (depending on the specific connection). The balance between two inputs onto various postsynaptic targets was explored by within-individual comparisons and correlation across individuals. Of the seven comparisons made within the core CPG, three showed a clear correlation of connection strengths, while the other four did not. We conclude that the leech heartbeat CPG can withstand wide variability in connection strengths and still produce stereotyped output. The network appears to preserve the relative strengths of some pairs of inputs, despite the animal-to-animal variability.

  8. KIC 3749404: a heartbeat star with rapid apsidal advance indicative of a tertiary component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Kurtz, D. W.; Prša, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Fuller, J.; Murphy, S. J.; Thompson, S. E.; Latham, D. W.; Shporer, A.

    2016-12-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric (e > 0.2) ellipsoidal variables whose light curves resemble a cardiogram. We present the observations and corresponding model of KIC 3749404, a highly eccentric (e = 0.66), short period (P = 20.3 d) heartbeat star with tidally induced pulsations. A binary star model was created using PHOEBE, which we modified to include tidally induced pulsations and Doppler boosting. The morphology of the photometric periastron variation (heartbeat) depends strongly on the eccentricity, inclination and argument of periastron. We show that the inclusion of tidally induced pulsations in the model significantly changes the parameter values, specifically the inclination and those parameters dependent on it. Furthermore, we determine the rate of apsidal advance by modelling the periastron variation at the beginning and end of the 4-yr Kepler data set and dividing by the elapsed time. We compare the model with the theoretical expectations for classical and general relativistic apsidal motion and find the observed rate to be two orders of magnitude greater than the theoretical rate. We find that the observed rate cannot be explained by tidally induced pulsations alone and consequently hypothesize the presence of a third body in the system.

  9. Beat-ID: Towards a computationally low-cost single heartbeat biometric identity check system based on electrocardiogram wave morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joana S; Dias, Duarte; Cunha, João P S

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, safer and more reliable biometric methods have been developed. Apart from the need for enhanced security, the media and entertainment sectors have also been applying biometrics in the emerging market of user-adaptable objects/systems to make these systems more user-friendly. However, the complexity of some state-of-the-art biometric systems (e.g., iris recognition) or their high false rejection rate (e.g., fingerprint recognition) is neither compatible with the simple hardware architecture required by reduced-size devices nor the new trend of implementing smart objects within the dynamic market of the Internet of Things (IoT). It was recently shown that an individual can be recognized by extracting features from their electrocardiogram (ECG). However, most current ECG-based biometric algorithms are computationally demanding and/or rely on relatively large (several seconds) ECG samples, which are incompatible with the aforementioned application fields. Here, we present a computationally low-cost method (patent pending), including simple mathematical operations, for identifying a person using only three ECG morphology-based characteristics from a single heartbeat. The algorithm was trained/tested using ECG signals of different duration from the Physionet database on more than 60 different training/test datasets. The proposed method achieved maximal averaged accuracy of 97.450% in distinguishing each subject from a ten-subject set and false acceptance and rejection rates (FAR and FRR) of 5.710±1.900% and 3.440±1.980%, respectively, placing Beat-ID in a very competitive position in terms of the FRR/FAR among state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, the proposed method can identify a person using an average of 1.020 heartbeats. It therefore has FRR/FAR behavior similar to obtaining a fingerprint, yet it is simpler and requires less expensive hardware. This method targets low-computational/energy-cost scenarios, such as tiny wearable devices (e.g., a

  10. Analyzing, Modeling, and Simulation for Human Dynamics in Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the human behavior in the top-one social network system in China (Sina Microblog system. By analyzing real-life data at a large scale, we find that the message releasing interval (intermessage time obeys power law distribution both at individual level and at group level. Statistical analysis also reveals that human behavior in social network is mainly driven by four basic elements: social pressure, social identity, social participation, and social relation between individuals. Empirical results present the four elements' impact on the human behavior and the relation between these elements. To further understand the mechanism of such dynamic phenomena, a hybrid human dynamic model which combines “interest” of individual and “interaction” among people is introduced, incorporating the four elements simultaneously. To provide a solid evaluation, we simulate both two-agent and multiagent interactions with real-life social network topology. We achieve the consistent results between empirical studies and the simulations. The model can provide a good understanding of human dynamics in social network.

  11. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  12. Dynamic phenomena and human activity in an artificial society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.; Kruszewska, N.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We study dynamic phenomena in a large social network of nearly 3×104 individuals who interact in the large virtual world of a massive multiplayer online role playing game. On the basis of a database received from the online game server, we examine the structure of the friendship network and human dynamics. To investigate the relation between networks of acquaintances in virtual and real worlds, we carried out a survey among the players. We show that, even though the virtual network did not develop as a growing graph of an underlying network of social acquaintances in the real world, it influences it. Furthermore we find very interesting scaling laws concerning human dynamics. Our research shows how long people are interested in a single task and how much time they devote to it. Surprisingly, exponent values in both cases are close to -1 . We calculate the activity of individuals, i.e., the relative time daily devoted to interactions with others in the artificial society. Our research shows that the distribution of activity is not uniform and is highly correlated with the degree of the node, and that such human activity has a significant influence on dynamic phenomena, e.g., epidemic spreading and rumor propagation, in complex networks. We find that spreading is accelerated (an epidemic) or decelerated (a rumor) as a result of superspreaders’ various behavior.

  13. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  14. Estimating Neural Signal Dynamics in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Tyler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although brain imaging methods are highly effective for localizing the effects of neural activation throughout the human brain in terms of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD response, there is currently no way to estimate the underlying neural signal dynamics in generating the BOLD response in each local activation region (except for processes slower than the BOLD time course. Knowledge of the neural signal is critical information if spatial mapping is to progress to the analysis of dynamic information flow through the cortical networks as the brain performs its tasks. We introduce an analytic approach that provides a new level of conceptualization and specificity in the study of brain processing by noninvasive methods. This technique allows us to use brain imaging methods to determine the dynamics of local neural population responses to their native temporal resolution throughout the human brain, with relatively narrow confidence intervals on many response properties. The ability to characterize local neural dynamics in the human brain represents a significant enhancement of brain imaging capabilities, with potential application from general cognitive studies to assessment of neuropathologies.

  15. Dynamics Simulation of Human Gait Model With Predictive Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinming; Wu, Shaoli; Voglewede, Philip A

    2017-12-13

    In this article, it is proposed the central nervous system controls human gait using a predictive control approach in conjunction with classical feedback control instead of exclusive classical feedback control theory that controls based on past error. To validate this proposition, a dynamic model of human gait is developed using a novel predictive approach to investigate the principles of the central nervous system (CNS). The model developed includes two parts: a plant model that represents the dynamics of human gait and a controller that represents the CNS. The plant model is a seven-segment, six-joint model that has nine degrees of freedom. The plant model is validated using data collected from able-bodied human subjects. The proposed controller utilizes Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC uses an internal model to predict the output in advance, compare the predicted output to the reference and optimize the control input so that the predicted error is minimal. To decrease the complexity of the model, two joints are controlled using a PD controller. The developed predictive human gait model is validated by simulating able-bodied human gait. The simulation results show that the developed model is able to simulate the kinematic output close to experimental data.

  16. Activation of the insular cortex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Nobrega, A C; McColl, R

    1997-01-01

    1. The insular cortex has been implicated as a region of cortical cardiovascular control, yet its role during exercise remains undefined. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether the insular cortex was activated during volitional dynamic exercise and to evaluate further its...... alone. 5. These findings provide the first evidence of insular activation during dynamic exercise in humans, suggesting that the left insular cortex may serve as a site for cortical regulation of cardiac autonomic (parasympathetic) activity. Additionally, findings during passive cycling with electrical...

  17. Forward dynamics simulation of human body under tilting perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, D.; Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2012-02-01

    Human body uses different strategies to maintain its stability and these strategies vary from fixed-foot strategies to strategies which foot is moved in order to increase the support base. Tilting movement of foot is one type of the perturbations usually is exposed to human body. In the presence of such perturbations human body must employ appropriate reactions to prevent threats like falling. But it is not clear that how human body maintains its stability by central nervous system (CNS). At present study it is tried that by presenting a musculoskeletal model of human lower extremity with four links, three degrees of freedom (DOF) and eight skeletal muscles, the level of muscle activations causes the maintenance of stability, be investigated. Using forward dynamics solution, leads to a more general problem, rather than inverse dynamics. Hence, forward dynamics solution by forward optimization has been used for solving this highly nonlinear problem. To this end, first the system's equations of motion has been derived using lagrangian dynamics. Eight Hill-type muscles as actuators of the system were modeled. Because determination of muscle forces considering their number is an undetermined problem, optimization of an appropriate goal function should be practiced. For optimization problem, the characteristics of genetic algorithms as a method based on direct search, and the direct collocation method, has been profited. Also by considering requirements of problem, some constraints such as conservation of model stability are entered into optimization procedure. Finally to investigate validation of model, the results from optimization and experimental data are compared and good agreements are obtained.

  18. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyu; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  19. Population Dynamics of Early Human Migration in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahia, Mayank N.; Ladiwala, Uma; Mahathe, Pavan; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background Early human migration is largely determined by geography and human needs. These are both deterministic parameters when small populations move into unoccupied areas where conflicts and large group dynamics are not important. The early period of human migration into the British Isles provides such a laboratory which, because of its relative geographical isolation, may allow some insights into the complex dynamics of early human migration and interaction. Method and Results We developed a simulation code based on human affinity to habitable land, as defined by availability of water sources, altitude, and flatness of land, in choosing the path of migration. Movement of people on the British island over the prehistoric period from their initial entry points was simulated on the basis of data from the megalithic period. Topographical and hydro-shed data from satellite databases was used to define habitability, based on distance from water bodies, flatness of the terrain, and altitude above sea level. We simulated population movement based on assumptions of affinity for more habitable places, with the rate of movement tempered by existing populations. We compared results of our computer simulations with genetic data and show that our simulation can predict fairly accurately the points of contacts between different migratory paths. Such comparison also provides more detailed information about the path of peoples’ movement over ~2000 years before the present era. Conclusions We demonstrate an accurate method to simulate prehistoric movements of people based upon current topographical satellite data. Our findings are validated by recently-available genetic data. Our method may prove useful in determining early human population dynamics even when no genetic information is available. PMID:27148959

  20. Population Dynamics of Early Human Migration in Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank N Vahia

    Full Text Available Early human migration is largely determined by geography and human needs. These are both deterministic parameters when small populations move into unoccupied areas where conflicts and large group dynamics are not important. The early period of human migration into the British Isles provides such a laboratory which, because of its relative geographical isolation, may allow some insights into the complex dynamics of early human migration and interaction.We developed a simulation code based on human affinity to habitable land, as defined by availability of water sources, altitude, and flatness of land, in choosing the path of migration. Movement of people on the British island over the prehistoric period from their initial entry points was simulated on the basis of data from the megalithic period. Topographical and hydro-shed data from satellite databases was used to define habitability, based on distance from water bodies, flatness of the terrain, and altitude above sea level. We simulated population movement based on assumptions of affinity for more habitable places, with the rate of movement tempered by existing populations. We compared results of our computer simulations with genetic data and show that our simulation can predict fairly accurately the points of contacts between different migratory paths. Such comparison also provides more detailed information about the path of peoples' movement over ~2000 years before the present era.We demonstrate an accurate method to simulate prehistoric movements of people based upon current topographical satellite data. Our findings are validated by recently-available genetic data. Our method may prove useful in determining early human population dynamics even when no genetic information is available.

  1. Population Dynamics of Early Human Migration in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahia, Mayank N; Ladiwala, Uma; Mahathe, Pavan; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Early human migration is largely determined by geography and human needs. These are both deterministic parameters when small populations move into unoccupied areas where conflicts and large group dynamics are not important. The early period of human migration into the British Isles provides such a laboratory which, because of its relative geographical isolation, may allow some insights into the complex dynamics of early human migration and interaction. We developed a simulation code based on human affinity to habitable land, as defined by availability of water sources, altitude, and flatness of land, in choosing the path of migration. Movement of people on the British island over the prehistoric period from their initial entry points was simulated on the basis of data from the megalithic period. Topographical and hydro-shed data from satellite databases was used to define habitability, based on distance from water bodies, flatness of the terrain, and altitude above sea level. We simulated population movement based on assumptions of affinity for more habitable places, with the rate of movement tempered by existing populations. We compared results of our computer simulations with genetic data and show that our simulation can predict fairly accurately the points of contacts between different migratory paths. Such comparison also provides more detailed information about the path of peoples' movement over ~2000 years before the present era. We demonstrate an accurate method to simulate prehistoric movements of people based upon current topographical satellite data. Our findings are validated by recently-available genetic data. Our method may prove useful in determining early human population dynamics even when no genetic information is available.

  2. Consequences of traumatic brain injury for human vergence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher W; Likova, Lora T; Mineff, Kristyo N; Elsaid, Anas M; Nicholas, Spero C

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury involving loss of consciousness has focal effects in the human brainstem, suggesting that it may have particular consequences for eye movement control. This hypothesis was investigated by measurements of vergence eye movement parameters. Disparity vergence eye movements were measured for a population of 123 normally sighted individuals, 26 of whom had suffered diffuse traumatic brain injury (dTBI) in the past, while the remainder served as controls. Vergence tracking responses were measured to sinusoidal disparity modulation of a random-dot field. Disparity vergence step responses were characterized in terms of their dynamic parameters separately for the convergence and divergence directions. The control group showed notable differences between convergence and divergence dynamics. The dTBI group showed significantly abnormal vergence behavior on many of the dynamic parameters. The results support the hypothesis that occult injury to the oculomotor control system is a common residual outcome of dTBI.

  3. Dynamic Interactions Between Health, Human Capital and Wealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a dynamic economic model with health, human capital and wealth accumulation with elastic labor supply. The economic system consists of one industrial, one health, and one education sector. Our model is a synthesis of four main models in economic theory: Solow’s one-sector neoclassical growth mode, the Uzawa-Lucas two sector model, Arrow’s learning by doing model, and Grossman’s growth model with health. The model also includes Zhang’s idea about creative leisure or learning by consuming. Demand and supply of health service and education are determined by market mechanism. The model describes dynamic interdependence among wealth, health, human capital, economic structure, and time distribution among work, health caring, and education under perfect competition. We simulate the model and examine effects of changes in the propensity to consume health caring, the efficiency of producing health caring, the propensity to receive education, and the propensity to save.

  4. Emotional contagion and proto-organizing in human interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazy, James K; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or "proto-organizing," occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes) cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  5. Emotional Contagion and Proto-Organizing in Human Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hazy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or proto-organizing, occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  6. Dynamic Network Centrality Summarizes Learning in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Mantzaris, Alexander V.; Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Estrada, Ernesto; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J; Grafton, Scott T.; Higham, Desmond J.

    2012-01-01

    We study functional activity in the human brain using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and recently developed tools from network science. The data arise from the performance of a simple behavioural motor learning task. Unsupervised clustering of subjects with respect to similarity of network activity measured over three days of practice produces significant evidence of `learning', in the sense that subjects typically move between clusters (of subjects whose dynamics are similar) as time ...

  7. “Constructal Human Dynamics, Security and Sustainability”

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization, security infrastructure and energy sustainability can be designed based on a scientific principle. In this book, these objectives are approached based on constructal theory, which means to design such projects as global flow architectures that are alive with movement of personnel, equipment, information, education, etc. Constructal Human Dynamics, Security and Sustainability highlights the progress made during the NATO Advanced Research Workshop held in Évora, Portugal in May 2...

  8. Propagation of Computer Virus under Human Intervention: A Dynamical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chenquan Gan; Xiaofan Yang; Wanping Liu; Qingyi Zhu; Xulong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the propagation behavior of computer virus under human intervention. A dynamical model describing the spread of computer virus, under which a susceptible computer can become recovered directly and an infected computer can become susceptible directly, is proposed. Through a qualitative analysis of this model, it is found that the virus-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the basic reproduction number R0≤1, whereas the viral equilibrium is globally asympt...

  9. Multi-dimensional dynamics of human electromagnetic brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo eKida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency, which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  10. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  11. Uncontrolled non-heartbeating donors (types i-ii) with normothermic recirculation vs. heartbeating donors: evaluation of functional results and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Utrera, N; Medina-Polo, J; Pamplona-Casamayor, M; Passas-Martínez, J B; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; de la Rosa Kehrmann, F; Duarte-Ojeda, J M; Tejido-Sánchez, A; Villacampa Aubá, F; Andrés Belmonte, A

    2015-09-01

    Non-heartbeating donors (NHBD) are an alternative to heartbeating donors (HBD). Our objective was to compare functional results and kidney survival from NHBDs and HBDs. A retrospective study comparing the results of 236 normothermically preserved kidneys from type i and ii type NHBDs with the results of 250 from HBDs that were transplanted in our center between 2005 and 2012. Homogeneity between groups was tested and we evaluated the presence of delayed graft function (DGF) associated with pretransplant variables of the donor and recipient. Both groups show homogeneity in pretransplant characteristics in terms of: age, HLA incompatibilities, and recipient hemodialysis time. Average follow-up time was 33 months (range 0-87) for NHBDs and 38 months (range 0-90) for HBDs. 5.5% of NHBDs showed primary non-function (PNF) vs. 4% of HBDs (P=.42) and 80.9% of DGF vs. 46.8% of HBDs (P<.001). At the end of the follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences in the survival of grafts (92.8% for NHBD vs. 93.6% for HBD, P=.71) and recipients (99.1% NHBD vs. 98.6% HBD, P=.28). Although the DGF percentage was greater for NHBDs, final creatinine as well as graft and recipient survival were similar for both groups. Therefore, in our experience, kidneys from NHBDs have similar results to those from HBDs and are an excellent source of organs for transplantation. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Heartbeat Model for Component Failure in Simulation of Plant Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. W. Youngblood; R. R. Nourgaliev; D. L. Kelly; C. L. Smith; T-N. Dinh

    2011-03-01

    As part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), tools and methodology for risk-informed characterization of safety margin are being developed for use in supporting decision-making on plant life extension after the first license renewal. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize realistic probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system behavior. This way of thinking about margin comports with work done in the last 10 years. However, current capabilities to model in this way are limited: it is currently possible, but difficult, to validly simulate enough time histories to support quantification in realistic problems, and the treatment of environmental influences on reliability is relatively artificial in many existing applications. The INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability (widely referred to as “R7”) that will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin. In this paper, we show how to implement cumulative damage (“heartbeat”) models for component reliability that lend themselves naturally to being included as part of the phenomenology simulation. Implementation of this modeling approach relies on the way in which the phenomenology simulation implements its dynamic time step management. Within this approach, component failures influence the phenomenology, and the phenomenology influences the component failures.

  13. Electrically Insulated Sensing of Respiratory Rate and Heartbeat Using Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Suaste-Gómez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients’ health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subject’s health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phenomena. Photo-plethysmography and the relation between bending radius and attenuation of optical fiber were coupled through a single beam light traveling along this fiber.

  14. Human mobility patterns predict divergent epidemic dynamics among cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, Benjamin D; Pourbohloul, Babak; Ellner, Stephen P

    2013-09-07

    The epidemic dynamics of infectious diseases vary among cities, but it is unclear how this is caused by patterns of infectious contact among individuals. Here, we ask whether systematic differences in human mobility patterns are sufficient to cause inter-city variation in epidemic dynamics for infectious diseases spread by casual contact between hosts. We analyse census data on the mobility patterns of every full-time worker in 48 Canadian cities, finding a power-law relationship between population size and the level of organization in mobility patterns, where in larger cities, a greater fraction of workers travel to work in a few focal locations. Similarly sized cities also vary in the level of organization in their mobility patterns, equivalent on average to the variation expected from a 2.64-fold change in population size. Systematic variation in mobility patterns is sufficient to cause significant differences among cities in infectious disease dynamics-even among cities of the same size-according to an individual-based model of airborne pathogen transmission parametrized with the mobility data. This suggests that differences among cities in host contact patterns are sufficient to drive differences in infectious disease dynamics and provides a framework for testing the effects of host mobility patterns in city-level disease data.

  15. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  16. Single-heartbeat electromechanical wave imaging with optimal strain estimation using temporally unequispaced acquisition sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Jean; Thiébaut, Stéphane; Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-02-21

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive, ultrasound-based imaging method capable of mapping the electromechanical wave (EW) in vivo, i.e. the transient deformations occurring in response to the electrical activation of the heart. Optimal imaging frame rates, in terms of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, to capture the EW cannot be achieved due to the limitations of conventional imaging sequences, in which the frame rate is low and tied to the imaging parameters. To achieve higher frame rates, EWI is typically performed by combining sectors acquired during separate heartbeats, which are then combined into a single view. However, the frame rates achieved remain potentially sub-optimal and this approach precludes the study of non-periodic arrhythmias. This paper describes a temporally unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) for which a wide range of frame rates are achievable independently of the imaging parameters, while maintaining a full view of the heart at high beam density. TUAS is first used to determine the optimal frame rate for EWI in a paced canine heart in vivo and then to image during ventricular fibrillation. These results indicate how EWI can be optimally performed within a single heartbeat, during free breathing and in real time, for both periodic and non-periodic cardiac events.

  17. Image quality with single-heartbeat 320-multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle Claire; Weir, Nicholas W; Mirsadraee, Saeed; Scott, Anne E; Uren, Neal G; McKillop, Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Reid, John H; Newby, David E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to establish the feasibility of single-heartbeat 320-multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA) and assess variables affecting image quality. Consecutive patients (n = 249, 38% male) underwent CTCA. Two observers assessed image quality using a 4-point scale (1, excellent; 4, poor). Mean heart rate was 60 beats per minute (95% confidence interval, 59-62); body mass index, 29 kg/m (28-30); and dose-length product, 283 mGy·cm (266-301). During scanning, 133 (51%) received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), 9 (4%) had ectopics, and 12 (5%) had atrial fibrillation. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 99% with mean image quality of 1.4 (1.3, 1.5). Age, sex, atrial fibrillation, ectopics, diabetes mellitus (12%), and obstructive disease were not related to image quality. A lower heart rate and GTN were associated with improved image quality (P ≤ 0.001). Optimal image quality in single-heartbeat 320-multidetector CTCA is achievable in 99% of unselected patients. Image quality is improved by lower heart rate and GTN.

  18. Body-monitoring with photonic textiles: a reflective heartbeat sensor based on polymer optical fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Brit M; Braun, Fabian; Ferrario, Damien; Rossi, René M; Scheel-Sailer, Anke; Wolf, Martin; Bona, Gian-Luca; Hufenus, Rudolf; Scherer, Lukas J; Boesel, Luciano F

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of an individual's skin condition is important for pressure ulcer prevention. Detecting early changes in skin through perfusion, oxygen saturation values, and pressure on tissue and subsequent therapeutic intervention could increase patients' quality of life drastically. However, most existing sensing options create additional risk of ulcer development due to further pressure on and chafing of the skin. Here, as a first component, we present a flexible, photonic textile-based sensor for the continuous monitoring of the heartbeat and blood flow. Polymer optical fibres (POFs) are melt-spun continuously and characterized optically and mechanically before being embroidered. The resulting sensor shows flexibility when embroidered into a moisture-wicking fabric, and withstands disinfection with hospital-type laundry cycles. Additionally, the new sensor textile shows a lower static coefficient of friction (COF) than conventionally used bedsheets in both dry and sweaty conditions versus a skin model. Finally, we demonstrate the functionality of our sensor by measuring the heartbeat at the forehead in reflection mode and comparing it with commercial finger photoplethysmography for several subjects. Our results will allow the development of flexible, individualized, and fully textile-integrated wearable sensors for sensitive skin conditions and general long-term monitoring of patients with risk for pressure ulcer. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. THE EFFECTS OF LISTENING TO THE MOTHER'S HEARTBEAT ON THE DEPTH OF ANAESTHESIA IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Senem; Akça, Başak; Yilbaş, Aysun Ankay; Karagöz, Ayse Heves; Canbay, Özgür; Çelebi, Nalan; Öcal, Turgay

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of listening to the mother's heartbeat and womb sounds on the depth of anaesthesia in children. The present study included 40 children scheduled for minor surgery under general anaesthesia, with an American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) status of 1 to 2. Anaesthesia was induced with sevoflurane, and maintained with sevoflurane and oxygen in nitrous oxide. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The children in Group I were made to listen to recordings of their mothers' heartbeat and womb sounds via earphones during anaesthesia induction, while those in Group II were made to listen to ambient noise via earphones. The music was turned off when the inhalational anaesthetics were discontinued. Intraoperative monitoring included electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings, heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation, non-invasive systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), bispectral index system (BIS), end-tidal (ET) sevoflurane, ET N2O, ET CO2, and SaO2. In Group I, there was a significant decrease in bispectral index (BIS) values over time (p music had lower BIS values under anaesthesia, which indicates deeper anaesthesia levels.

  20. The most massive heartbeat: an in-depth analysis of ι Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo, Herbert; Richardson, N. D.; Fuller, J.; Rowe, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Kuschnig, R.; Popowicz, A.; Handler, G.; Neiner, C.; Pigulski, A.; Wade, G. A.; Weiss, W.; Buysschaert, B.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Bratcher, A. D.; Gerhartz, C. J.; Greco, J. J.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Lembryk, L.; Oswald, W. L.

    2017-05-01

    ι Ori is a well-studied massive binary consisting of an O9 III + B1 III/IV star. Due to its high eccentricity (e = 0.764) and short orbital period (Porb = 29.133 76 d), it has been considered to be a good candidate to show evidence of tidal effects; however, none have previously been identified. Using photometry from the BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE)-Constellation space photometry mission, we have confirmed the existence of tidal distortions through the presence of a heartbeat signal at periastron. We combine spectroscopic and light-curve analyses to measure the masses and radii of the components, revealing ι Ori to be the most massive heartbeat system known to date. In addition, using a thorough frequency analysis, we also report the unprecedented discovery of multiple tidally induced oscillations in an O star. The amplitudes of the pulsations allow us to empirically estimate the tidal circularization rate, yielding an effective tidal quality factor Q ˜ 4 × 104.

  1. Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M Patten

    Full Text Available The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

  2. Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury for Human Vergence Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Tyler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Traumatic brain injury involving loss of consciousness has focal effects in the human brainstem, suggesting that it may have particular consequences for eye movement control. This hypothesis was investigated by measurements of vergence eye movement parameters.Methods: Disparity vergence eye movements were measured for a population of 123 normally-sighted individuals, 26 of whom had suffered diffuse traumatic brain injury (dTBI in the past, while the remainder served as controls. Vergence tracking responses were measured to sinusoidal disparity modulation of a random-dot field. Disparity vergence step responses were characterized in terms of their dynamic parameters separately for the convergence and divergence directions.Results: The control group showed notable differences between convergence and divergence dynamics. The dTBI group showed significantly abnormal vergence behavior on many of the dynamic parameters.Conclusions: The support the hypothesis that occult injury to the oculomotor control system is a common residual outcome of dTBI.

  3. Characterization of chaotic dynamics in the human menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Gregory; Derry, Paula

    2010-03-01

    The human menstrual cycle exhibits much unexplained variability, which is typically dismissed as random variation. Given the many delayed nonlinear feedbacks in the reproductive endocrine system, however, the menstrual cycle might well be a nonlinear dynamical system in a chaotic trajectory, and that this instead accounts for the observed variability. Here, we test this hypothesis by performing a time series analysis on data for 7438 menstrual cycles from 38 women in the 20-40 year age range, using the database maintained by the Tremin Research Program on Women's Health. Using phase space reconstruction techniques with a maximum embedding dimension of 6, we find appropriate scaling behavior in the correlation sums for this data, indicating low dimensional deterministic dynamics. A correlation dimension of 2.6 is measured in this scaling regime, and this result is confirmed by recalculation using the Takens estimator. These results may be interpreted as offering an approximation to the fractal dimension of a strange attractor governing the chaotic dynamics of the menstrual cycle.

  4. Human growth and body weight dynamics: an integrative systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and capturing changes in body weight, composition and height. Integrating previous empirical and modeling findings and validated against several additional empirical studies, the model replicates key trends in human growth including A) Changes in energy requirements from birth to old ages. B) Short and long-term dynamics of body weight and composition. C) Stunted growth with chronic malnutrition and potential for catch up growth. From obesity policy analysis to treating malnutrition and tracking growth trajectories, the model can address diverse policy questions. For example I find that even without further rise in obesity, the gap between healthy and actual Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) has embedded, for different population groups, a surplus of 14%-24% in energy intake which will be a source of significant inertia in obesity trends. In another analysis, energy deficit percentage needed to reduce BMI by one unit is found to be relatively constant across ages. Accompanying documented and freely available simulation model facilitates diverse applications customized to different sub-populations.

  5. A Dynamic Approach to Modeling Dependence Between Human Failure Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    In practice, most HRA methods use direct dependence from THERP—the notion that error be- gets error, and one human failure event (HFE) may increase the likelihood of subsequent HFEs. In this paper, we approach dependence from a simulation perspective in which the effects of human errors are dynamically modeled. There are three key concepts that play into this modeling: (1) Errors are driven by performance shaping factors (PSFs). In this context, the error propagation is not a result of the presence of an HFE yielding overall increases in subsequent HFEs. Rather, it is shared PSFs that cause dependence. (2) PSFs have qualities of lag and latency. These two qualities are not currently considered in HRA methods that use PSFs. Yet, to model the effects of PSFs, it is not simply a matter of identifying the discrete effects of a particular PSF on performance. The effects of PSFs must be considered temporally, as the PSFs will have a range of effects across the event sequence. (3) Finally, there is the concept of error spilling. When PSFs are activated, they not only have temporal effects but also lateral effects on other PSFs, leading to emergent errors. This paper presents the framework for tying together these dynamic dependence concepts.

  6. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  7. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia

    2015-01-01

    Muscle stem cells, or satellite cells, play an important role in the maintenance and repair of muscle tissue and have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to physiological or environmental changes. Although they have been extensively studied, the key regulatory steps and the ......Muscle stem cells, or satellite cells, play an important role in the maintenance and repair of muscle tissue and have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to physiological or environmental changes. Although they have been extensively studied, the key regulatory steps...... and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis...... in vitro and characterize the fine-tuned changes in protein expression underlying the dramatic phenotypic conversion of primary mononucleated human muscle cells during in vitro differentiation to form multinucleated myotubes. Using an exclusively optimized triple encoding SILAC procedure, we generated...

  8. Dynamic Spatial Hearing by Human and Robot Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xuan

    This study consisted of several related projects on dynamic spatial hearing by both human and robot listeners. The first experiment investigated the maximum number of sound sources that human listeners could localize at the same time. Speech stimuli were presented simultaneously from different loudspeakers at multiple time intervals. The maximum of perceived sound sources was close to four. The second experiment asked whether the amplitude modulation of multiple static sound sources could lead to the perception of auditory motion. On the horizontal and vertical planes, four independent noise sound sources with 60° spacing were amplitude modulated with consecutively larger phase delay. At lower modulation rates, motion could be perceived by human listeners in both cases. The third experiment asked whether several sources at static positions could serve as "acoustic landmarks" to improve the localization of other sources. Four continuous speech sound sources were placed on the horizontal plane with 90° spacing and served as the landmarks. The task was to localize a noise that was played for only three seconds when the listener was passively rotated in a chair in the middle of the loudspeaker array. The human listeners were better able to localize the sound sources with landmarks than without. The other experiments were with the aid of an acoustic manikin in an attempt to fuse binaural recording and motion data to localize sounds sources. A dummy head with recording devices was mounted on top of a rotating chair and motion data was collected. The fourth experiment showed that an Extended Kalman Filter could be used to localize sound sources in a recursive manner. The fifth experiment demonstrated the use of a fitting method for separating multiple sounds sources.

  9. Interpersonal interactions and human dynamics in a large social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Andrzej

    2007-11-01

    We study a large social network consisting of over 106 individuals, who form an Internet community and organize themselves in groups of different sizes. On the basis of the users’ list of friends and other data registered in the database we investigate the structure and time development of the network. The structure of this friendship network is very similar to the structure of different social networks. However, here a degree distribution exhibiting two scaling regimes, power-law for low connectivity and exponential for large connectivity, was found. The groups size distribution and distribution of number of groups of an individual have power-law form. We found very interesting scaling laws concerning human dynamics. Our research has shown how long people are interested in a single task.

  10. Human Machine Interaction by Simulation of Dynamics of Construction Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard

    on long term basis. Whole-body vibrations are potential damaging for the human operator in a frequency range for which the dynamics of the machines are dominated by the inputs of the operator. The objective of this project is to reduce the amount of potential damaging wholebody vibrations for two...... different kinds of machinery; an articulated backhoe loader and an articulated dump truck. In this work a standardized procedure containing a set of duty cycles for measuring and declaring whole-body vibrations has been proposed for both of these machines. The result of the measuring is important......-body vibration exposure was more than 20 percent and at the same time the fuel consumption was reduced significant. Training of operators is hence beneficial for both employees and employers of the construction industry. The whole-body vibration exposure on operators of dump trucks are dominated by off...

  11. Dynamic protein interaction modules in human hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Lin, Chen-Ching; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles have been frequently integrated with the human protein interactome to uncover functional modules under specific conditions like disease state. Beyond traditional differential expression analysis, differential co-expression analysis has emerged as a robust approach to reveal condition-specific network modules, with successful applications in a few human disease studies. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is often interrelated with the Hepatitis C virus, typically develops through multiple stages. A comprehensive investigation of HCC progression-specific differential co-expression modules may advance our understanding of HCC's pathophysiological mechanisms. Compared with differentially expressed genes, differentially co-expressed genes were found more likely enriched with Hepatitis C virus binding proteins and cancer-mutated genes, and they were clustered more densely in the human reference protein interaction network. These observations indicated that a differential co-expression approach could outperform the standard differential expression network analysis in searching for disease-related modules. We then proposed a differential co-expression network approach to uncover network modules involved in HCC development. Specifically, we discovered subnetworks that enriched differentially co-expressed gene pairs in each HCC transition stage, and further resolved modules with coherent co-expression change patterns over all HCC developmental stages. Our identified network modules were enriched with HCC-related genes and implicated in cancer-related biological functions. In particular, APC and YWHAZ were highlighted as two most remarkable genes in the network modules, and their dynamic interaction partnership was resolved in HCC development. We demonstrated that integration of differential co-expression with the protein interactome could outperform the traditional differential expression approach in discovering network modules of human diseases

  12. Comparative Molecular Dynamics Studies of Human DNA Polymerase η

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High-energy ultraviolet radiation damages DNA through the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, which stall replication. When the lesion is a thymine–thymine dimer (TTD), human DNA polymerase η (Pol η) assists in resuming the replication process by inserting nucleotides opposite the damaged site. We performed extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical effects of four different Pol η complexes with or without a TTD and with either dATP or dGTP as the incoming base. No major differences in the overall structures and equilibrium dynamics were detected among the four systems, suggesting that the specificity of this enzyme is due predominantly to differences in local interactions in the binding regions. Analysis of the hydrogen-bonding interactions between the enzyme and the DNA and dNTP provided molecular-level insights. Specifically, the TTD was observed to engage in more hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme than its undamaged counterpart of two normal thymines. The resulting greater rigidity and specific orientation of the TTD are consistent with the experimental observation of higher processivity and overall efficiency at TTD sites than at analogous sites with two normal thymines. The similarities between the systems containing dATP and dGTP are consistent with the experimental observation of relatively low fidelity with respect to the incoming base. Moreover, Q38 and R61, two strictly conserved amino acids across the Pol η family, were found to exhibit persistent hydrogen-bonding interactions with the TTD and cation-π interactions with the free base, respectively. Thus, these simulations provide molecular level insights into the basis for the selectivity and efficiency of this enzyme, as well as the roles of the two most strictly conserved residues. PMID:26562587

  13. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: Statistical behavior and its modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  14. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  15. Unobtrusive Nocturnal Heartbeat Monitoring by a Ballistocardiographic Sensor in Patients with Sleep Disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias Daniel; Brüser, Christoph; Stüben, Björn-Ole; Napp, Andreas; Stöhr, Robert; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Nikolaus; Mischke, Karl; Schulz, Jörg B; Schiefer, Johannes

    2017-10-13

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is known for fluctuating heart rates and an increased risk of developing arrhythmias. The current reference for heartbeat analysis is an electrocardiogram (ECG). As an unobtrusive alternative, we tested a sensor foil for mechanical vibrations to perform a ballistocardiography (BCG) and applied a novel algorithm for beat-to-beat cycle length detection. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between beat-to-beat cycle length detection by the BCG algorithm and simultaneously recorded ECG. In 21 patients suspected for SDB undergoing polysomnography, we compared ECG to simultaneously recorded BCG data analysed by our algorithm. We analysed 362.040 heartbeats during a total of 93 hours of recording. The baseline beat-to-beat cycle length correlation between BCG and ECG was r s  = 0.77 (n = 362040) with a mean absolute difference of 15 ± 162 ms (mean cycle length: ECG 923 ± 220 ms; BCG 908 ± 203 ms). After filtering artefacts and improving signal quality by our algorithm, the correlation increased to r s  = 0.95 (n = 235367) with a mean absolute difference in cycle length of 4 ± 72 ms (ECG 920 ± 196 ms; BCG 916 ± 194 ms). We conclude that our algorithm, coupled with a BCG sensor foil provides good correlation of beat-to-beat cycle length detection with simultaneously recorded ECG.

  16. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  17. Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) to Quantify Human Liver Perfusion Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Bruinsma, Bote; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Swaminathan, Anandh; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2017-11-13

    Large-scale -omics data are now ubiquitously utilized to capture and interpret global responses to perturbations in biological systems, such as the impact of disease states on cells, tissues, and whole organs. Metabolomics data, in particular, are difficult to interpret for providing physiological insight because predefined biochemical pathways used for analysis are inherently biased and fail to capture more complex network interactions that span multiple canonical pathways. In this study, we introduce a nov-el approach coined Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) as a graph-based algorithm to systematically identify metabolic modules of reactions enriched with metabolites flagged to be statistically significant. A defining feature of the algorithm is its ability to determine modularity that highlights interactions between reactions mediated by the production and consumption of cofactors and other hub metabolites. As a case study, we evaluated the metabolic dynamics of discarded human livers using time-course metabolomics data and MMA to identify modules that explain the observed physiological changes leading to liver recovery during subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP). MMA was performed on a large scale liver-specific human metabolic network that was weighted based on metabolomics data and identified cofactor-mediated modules that would not have been discovered by traditional metabolic pathway analyses.

  18. DNA Methylation Dynamics of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlik, Matthias; Halbritter, Florian; Müller, Fabian; Choudry, Fizzah A; Ebert, Peter; Klughammer, Johanna; Farrow, Samantha; Santoro, Antonella; Ciaurro, Valerio; Mathur, Anthony; Uppal, Rakesh; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Ouwehand, Willem H; Laurenti, Elisa; Lengauer, Thomas; Frontini, Mattia; Bock, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cells in a differentiation process that involves widespread epigenome remodeling. Here we present genome-wide reference maps of the associated DNA methylation dynamics. We used a meta-epigenomic approach that combines DNA methylation profiles across many small pools of cells and performed single-cell methylome sequencing to assess cell-to-cell heterogeneity. The resulting dataset identified characteristic differences between HSCs derived from fetal liver, cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral blood. We also observed lineage-specific DNA methylation between myeloid and lymphoid progenitors, characterized immature multi-lymphoid progenitors, and detected progressive DNA methylation differences in maturing megakaryocytes. We linked these patterns to gene expression, histone modifications, and chromatin accessibility, and we used machine learning to derive a model of human hematopoietic differentiation directly from DNA methylation data. Our results contribute to a better understanding of human hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and provide a framework for studying blood-linked diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Human Face as a Dynamic Tool for Social Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Rachael E; Schyns, Philippe G

    2015-07-20

    As a highly social species, humans frequently exchange social information to support almost all facets of life. One of the richest and most powerful tools in social communication is the face, from which observers can quickly and easily make a number of inferences - about identity, gender, sex, age, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical health, attractiveness, emotional state, personality traits, pain or physical pleasure, deception, and even social status. With the advent of the digital economy, increasing globalization and cultural integration, understanding precisely which face information supports social communication and which produces misunderstanding is central to the evolving needs of modern society (for example, in the design of socially interactive digital avatars and companion robots). Doing so is challenging, however, because the face can be thought of as comprising a high-dimensional, dynamic information space, and this impacts cognitive science and neuroimaging, and their broader applications in the digital economy. New opportunities to address this challenge are arising from the development of new methods and technologies, coupled with the emergence of a modern scientific culture that embraces cross-disciplinary approaches. Here, we briefly review one such approach that combines state-of-the-art computer graphics, psychophysics and vision science, cultural psychology and social cognition, and highlight the main knowledge advances it has generated. In the light of current developments, we provide a vision of the future directions in the field of human facial communication within and across cultures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects.

  1. Linear and nonlinear analysis of human dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, R B; Dawson, S L; Potter, J F

    1999-09-01

    The linear dynamic relationship between systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) was studied by time- and frequency-domain analysis methods. A nonlinear moving-average approach was also implemented using Volterra-Wiener kernels. In 47 normal subjects, ABP was measured with Finapres and CBFV was recorded with Doppler ultrasound in both middle cerebral arteries at rest in the supine position and also during ABP drops induced by the sudden deflation of thigh cuffs. Impulse response functions estimated by Fourier transfer function analysis, a second-order mathematical model proposed by Tiecks, and the linear kernel of the Volterra-Wiener moving-average representation provided reconstructed velocity model responses, for the same segment of data, with significant correlations to CBFV recordings corresponding to r = 0.52 +/- 0.19, 0.53 +/- 0.16, and 0.67 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD), respectively. The correlation coefficient for the linear plus quadratic kernels was 0.82 +/- 0.08, significantly superior to that for the linear models (P linear impulse responses were also used to predict the velocity transient of a different baseline segment of data and of the thigh cuff velocity response with significant correlations. In both cases, the three linear methods provided equivalent model performances, but the correlation coefficient for the nonlinear model dropped to 0.26 +/- 0.25 for the baseline test set of data and to 0.21 +/- 0.42 for the thigh cuff data. Whereas it is possible to model dynamic cerebral autoregulation in humans with different linear methods, in the supine position a second-order nonlinear component contributes significantly to improve model accuracy for the same segment of data used to estimate model parameters, but it cannot be automatically extended to represent the nonlinear component of velocity responses of different segments of data or transient changes induced by the thigh cuff test.

  2. Protein stability and dynamics modulation: the case of human frataxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto A Roman

    Full Text Available Frataxin (FXN is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90-195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90-195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90-195 and hFXN90-210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function.

  3. Integrating human and robot decision-making dynamics with feedback : Models and convergence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Ming; Stewart, Andrew; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich

    2008-01-01

    Leveraging research by psychologists on human decision-making, we present a human-robot decision-making problem associated with a complex task and study the corresponding joint decision-making dynamics. The collaborative task is designed so that the human makes decisions just as human subjects make

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations for human CAR inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyrkkärinne, Johanna; Küblbeck, Jenni; Pulkkinen, Juha; Honkakoski, Paavo; Laatikainen, Reino; Poso, Antti; Laitinen, Tuomo

    2012-02-27

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), along with pregnane x receptor (PXR), is an important metabolic sensor in the hepatocytes. Like all other nuclear receptors (NRs), CAR works in concert with coregulator proteins, coactivators, and corepressors which bind to the NRs. The main basis for the receptor to distinguish between coactivators and corepressors is the position of the C-terminal helix 12 (H12), which is determined by the bound NR ligand. CAR, having constitutive activity, can be repressed or further activated by its ligands. Crystal structure of human CAR bound to an agonist and a coactivator peptide is available, but no structural information on an inverse agonist-bound human CAR and a corepressor exists. In our previous molecular dynamics (MD) studies, no corepressor peptide was included. Therefore, probably due to the strong interactions which keep the relatively short H12 of CAR in the active position, the structural changes elicited by inverse agonists were very subtle, and H12 of CAR seemed to more or less retain its active conformation. Here, we have run a series of MD simulations to study the movement of H12 in the presence of both activating and repressing ligands as well as a corepressor peptide. The presence of the corepressor on the coregulator surface of CAR induced a clear shift of H12 of the inverse agonists-bound CAR. In general, H12 moved toward H10 and not away from the ligand binding domain, as seen in some other NRs. However, H12 of CAR is short enough that this movement seems to be adequate to accommodate the binding of the corepressor.

  5. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = −10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of −4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks. PMID:23250278

  6. Dynamic regulation of sensorimotor integration in human postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J; Loughlin, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    Upright stance in humans is inherently unstable, requiring corrective action based on spatial-orientation information from sensory systems. One might logically predict that environments providing access to accurate orientation information from multiple sensory systems would facilitate postural stability. However, we show that, after a period in which access to accurate sensory information was reduced, the restoration of accurate information disrupted postural stability. In eyes-closed trials, proprioceptive information was altered by rotating the support surface in proportion to body sway (support surface "sway-referencing"). When the support surface returned to a level orientation, most subjects developed a transient 1-Hz body sway oscillation that differed significantly from the low-amplitude body sway typically observed during quiet stance. Additional experiments showed further enhancement of the 1-Hz oscillation when the surface transitioned from a sway-referenced to a reverse sway-referenced motion. Oscillatory behavior declined with repetition of trials, suggesting a learning effect. A simple negative feedback-control model of the postural control system predicted the occurrence of this 1-Hz oscillation in conditions where too much corrective torque is generated in proportion to body sway. Model simulations were used to distinguish between two alternative explanations for the excessive corrective torque generation. Simulation results favor an explanation based on the dynamic reweighting of sensory contributions to postural control rather than a load-compensation mechanism that scales torque in proportion to a fixed combination of sensory-orientation information.

  7. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus.

  8. Dynamic propagation channel characterization and modeling for human body communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-12-18

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = -10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of -4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  9. Dynamic Principles of Center of Mass in Human Walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    We present results of an analytic and numerical calculation that studies the relationship between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force of human gait and explores the dynamic principle of center of mass. Assuming the ground reaction force of both feet to be the same in the same phase of a stride cycle, we establish the relationships between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force, acceleration, velocity, displacement and average kinetic energy of center of mass. We employ the dispersion to analyze the effect of the time of the initial foot contact that imposes upon these physical quantities. Our study reveals that when the time of one foot's initial contact falls right in the middle of the other foot's stride cycle, these physical quantities reach extrema. An action function has been identified as the dispersion of the physical quantities and optimized analysis used to prove the least-action principle in gait. In addition to being very significant to the researc...

  10. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC. In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000 were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = −10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of −4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  11. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  12. Dynamics of human foveal development after premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Ramiro S; O'Connell, Rachelle V; Sarin, Neeru; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Cotten, C Michael; Winter, Katrina P; Stinnett, Sandra; Chiu, Stephanie J; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A

    2011-12-01

    To determine the dynamic morphologic development of the human fovea in vivo using portable spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Prospective, observational case series. Thirty-one prematurely born neonates, 9 children, and 9 adults. Sixty-two neonates were enrolled in this study. After examination for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), SD-OCT imaging was performed at the bedside in nonsedated infants aged 31 to 41 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) (= gestational age in weeks + chronologic age) and at outpatient follow-up ophthalmic examinations. Thirty-one neonates met eligibility criteria. Nine children and nine adults without ocular pathology served as control groups. Semiautomatic retinal layer segmentation was performed. Central foveal thickness, foveal to parafoveal (FP) ratio (central foveal thickness divided by thickness 1000 μm from the foveal center), and 3-dimensional thickness maps were analyzed. In vivo determination of foveal morphology, layer segmentation, analysis of subcellular changes, and spatiotemporal layer shifting. In contrast with the adult fovea, several signs of immaturity were observed in the neonates: a shallow foveal pit, persistence of inner retinal layers (IRLs), and a thin photoreceptor layer (PRL) that was thinnest at the foveal center. Three-dimensional mapping showed displacement of retinal layers out of the foveal center as the fovea matured and the progressive formation of the inner/outer segment band in the opposite direction. The FP-IRL ratios decreased as IRL migrated before term and minimally after that, whereas FP-PRL ratios increased as PRL subcellular elements formed closer to term and into childhood. A surprising finding was the presence of cystoid macular edema in 58% of premature neonates that appeared to affect inner foveal maturation. This study provides the first view into the development of living cellular layers of the human retina and of subcellular specialization at the fovea in premature infant eyes

  13. SIMULATED HUMAN ERROR PROBABILITY AND ITS APPLICATION TO DYNAMIC HUMAN FAILURE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberger, Sarah M.; Boring, Ronald L.

    2016-10-01

    Abstract Objectives: Human reliability analysis (HRA) methods typically analyze human failure events (HFEs) at the overall task level. For dynamic HRA, it is important to model human activities at the subtask level. There exists a disconnect between dynamic subtask level and static task level that presents issues when modeling dynamic scenarios. For example, the SPAR-H method is typically used to calculate the human error probability (HEP) at the task level. As demonstrated in this paper, quantification in SPAR-H does not translate to the subtask level. Methods: Two different discrete distributions were generated for each SPAR-H Performance Shaping Factor (PSF) to define the frequency of PSF levels. The first distribution was a uniform, or uninformed distribution that assumed the frequency of each PSF level was equally likely. The second non-continuous distribution took the frequency of PSF level as identified from an assessment of the HERA database. These two different approaches were created to identify the resulting distribution of the HEP. The resulting HEP that appears closer to the known distribution, a log-normal centered on 1E-3, is the more desirable. Each approach then has median, average and maximum HFE calculations applied. To calculate these three values, three events, A, B and C are generated from the PSF level frequencies comprised of subtasks. The median HFE selects the median PSF level from each PSF and calculates HEP. The average HFE takes the mean PSF level, and the maximum takes the maximum PSF level. The same data set of subtask HEPs yields starkly different HEPs when aggregated to the HFE level in SPAR-H. Results: Assuming that each PSF level in each HFE is equally likely creates an unrealistic distribution of the HEP that is centered at 1. Next the observed frequency of PSF levels was applied with the resulting HEP behaving log-normally with a majority of the values under 2.5% HEP. The median, average and maximum HFE calculations did yield

  14. Heartbeat detection in multimodal physiological signals using signal quality assessment based on sample entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Omkar; Sunkaria, Ramesh Kumar

    2017-09-08

    This paper presents a novel technique to identify heartbeats in multimodal data using electrocardiogram (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) signals. Multiple physiological signals such as ECG, ABP, and Respiration are often recorded in parallel from the activity of heart. These signals generally possess related information as they are generated by the same physical system. The ECG and ABP correspond to the same phenomenon of contraction and relaxation activity of heart. Multiple signals acquired from various sensors are generally processed independently, thus discarding the information from other measurements. In the estimation of heart rate and heart rate variability, the R peaks are generally identified from ECG signal. Efficient detection of R-peaks in electrocardiogram (ECG) is a key component in the estimation of clinically relevant parameters from ECG. However, when the signal is severely affected by undesired artifacts, this becomes a challenging task. Sometimes in clinical environment, other physiological signals reflecting the cardiac activity such as ABP signal are also acquired simultaneously. Under the availability of such multimodal signals, the accuracy of R peak detection methods can be improved using sensor-fusion techniques. In the proposed method, the sample entropy (SampEn) is used as a metric for assessing the noise content in the physiological signal and the R peaks in ECG and the systolic peaks in ABP signals are fused together to enhance the efficiency of heartbeat detection. The proposed method was evaluated on the 100 records from the computing in cardiology challenge 2014 training data set. The performance parameters are: sensitivity (Se) and positive predictivity (PPV). The unimodal R peaks detector achieved: Se gross = 99.40%, PPV gross = 99.29%, Se average = 99.37%, PPV average = 99.29%. Similarly unimodal BP delineator achieved Se gross = 99.93%, PPV gross = 99.99%, Se average = 99.93%, PPV average = 99.99% whereas, the proposed

  15. Dynamic Edematous Response of the Human Heart to Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Barreiro-Pérez, Manuel; Martin-García, Ana; Sánchez-González, Javier; Agüero, Jaume; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; García-Prieto, Jaime; Díaz-Pelaez, Elena; Vara, Pedro; Martinez, Irene; Zamarro, Ivan; Garde, Beatriz; Sanz, Javier; Fuster, Valentin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical protocols aimed to characterize the post–myocardial infarction (MI) heart by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) need to be standardized to take account of dynamic biological phenomena evolving early after the index ischemic event. Here, we evaluated the time course of edema reaction in patients with ST-segment–elevation MI by CMR and assessed its implications for myocardium-at-risk (MaR) quantification both in patients and in a large-animal model. Methods: A total of 16 patients with anterior ST-segment–elevation MI successfully treated by primary angioplasty and 16 matched controls were prospectively recruited. In total, 94 clinical CMR examinations were performed: patients with ST-segment–elevation MI were serially scanned (within the first 3 hours after reperfusion and at 1, 4, 7, and 40 days), and controls were scanned only once. T2 relaxation time in the myocardium (T2 mapping) and the extent of edema on T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (ie, CMR-MaR) were evaluated at all time points. In the experimental study, 20 pigs underwent 40-minute ischemia/reperfusion followed by serial CMR examinations at 120 minutes and 1, 4, and 7 days after reperfusion. Reference MaR was assessed by contrast-multidetector computed tomography during the index coronary occlusion. Generalized linear mixed models were used to take account of repeated measurements. Results: In humans, T2 relaxation time in the ischemic myocardium declines significantly from early after reperfusion to 24 hours, and then increases up to day 4, reaching a plateau from which it decreases from day 7. Consequently, edema extent measured by T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (CMR-MaR) varied with the timing of the CMR examination. These findings were confirmed in the experimental model by showing that only CMR-MaR values for day 4 and day 7 postreperfusion, coinciding with the deferred edema wave, were similar to values measured by reference contrast

  16. A Robust Apnea Period Detection Method in Changing Sleep Posture by Average Mutual Information of Heartbeat and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Tanaka

    Sleep disorders disturb the recovery from mental and physical fatigues, one of the functions of the sleep. The majority of those who with the disorders are suffering from Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS). Continuous Hypoxia during sleep due to SAS cause Circulatory Disturbances, such as hypertension and ischemic heart disease, and Malfunction of Autonomic Nervous System, and other severe complications, often times bringing the suffers to death. In order to prevent these from happening, it is important to detect the SAS in its early stage by monitoring the daily respirations during sleep, and to provide appropriate treatments at medical institutions. In this paper, the Pneumatic Method to detect the Apnea period during sleep is proposed. Pneumatic method can measure heartbeat and respiration signal. Respiration signal can be considered as noise against heartbeat signal, and the decrease in the respiration signal due to Apnea increases the Average Mutual Information of heartbeat. The result of scaling analysis of the average mutual information is defined as threshold to detect the apnea period. The root mean square error between the lengths of Apnea measured by Strain Gauge using for reference and those measured by using the proposed method was 3.1 seconds. And, error of the number of apnea times judged by doctor and proposal method in OSAS patients was 3.3 times.

  17. Respiration and heartbeat signal detection from airflow at airway in rat by catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Kawaoka, H.; Yamada, T.; Matsushima, M.; Kawabe, T.; Shikida, M.

    2017-12-01

    We previously proposed an evaluation method for detecting both respiration and heartbeat signals from the airflow at the mouth (Kawaoka et al 201518th Int. Conf. on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems; Kawaoka et al 2015 IEEE Sensors; Kawaoka et al 2016 Technical Digest IEEE Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Conf.). In the current study, we developed a catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation that uses MEMS technologies and used it to directly detect the breathing airflow in the airway of a rat. The temperature sensors were integrated with the catheter flow sensor. Heaters working as airflow and temperature sensors were produced on polymer film by using the same fabrication process so that the temperature coefficients of their resistances would coincide. As a result, the variation in sensor outputs due to the airflow temperature changes ranging from 20 °C to 34 °C was suppressed to less than 2.5%. The developed catheter flow sensor was inserted into the airway of a rat to detect both respiration and heartbeat signals. The accuracy of the breathing airflow measurements was improved thanks to the temperature compensation. The tidal volume variations between the expired and inspired air were suppressed to within 5%. Heartbeat signal information was extracted from the measured breathing waveforms by applying a discrete Fourier transform.

  18. Brain network dynamics in the human articulatory loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masaaki; Korzeniewska, Anna; Crone, Nathan E; Toyoda, Goichiro; Nakai, Yasuo; Ofen, Noa; Brown, Erik C; Asano, Eishi

    2017-08-01

    The articulatory loop is a fundamental component of language function, involved in the short-term buffer of auditory information followed by its vocal reproduction. We characterized the network dynamics of the human articulatory loop, using invasive recording and stimulation. We measured high-gamma activity70-110 Hz recorded intracranially when patients with epilepsy either only listened to, or listened to and then reproduced two successive tones by humming. We also conducted network analyses, and analyzed behavioral responses to cortical stimulation. Presentation of the initial tone elicited high-gamma augmentation bilaterally in the superior-temporal gyrus (STG) within 40ms, and in the precentral and inferior-frontal gyri (PCG and IFG) within 160ms after sound onset. During presentation of the second tone, high-gamma augmentation was reduced in STG but enhanced in IFG. The task requiring tone reproduction further enhanced high-gamma augmentation in PCG during and after sound presentation. Event-related causality (ERC) analysis revealed dominant flows within STG immediately after sound onset, followed by reciprocal interactions involving PCG and IFG. Measurement of cortico-cortical evoked-potentials (CCEPs) confirmed connectivity between distant high-gamma sites in the articulatory loop. High-frequency stimulation of precentral high-gamma sites in either hemisphere induced speech arrest, inability to control vocalization, or forced vocalization. Vocalization of tones was accompanied by high-gamma augmentation over larger extents of PCG. Bilateral PCG rapidly and directly receives feed-forward signals from STG, and may promptly initiate motor planning including sub-vocal rehearsal for short-term buffering of auditory stimuli. Enhanced high-gamma augmentation in IFG during presentation of the second tone may reflect high-order processing of the tone sequence. The articulatory loop employs sustained reciprocal propagation of neural activity across a network of

  19. Assessing the complexity of short-term heartbeat interval series by distribution entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Liu, Chengyu; Li, Ke; Zheng, Dingchang; Liu, Changchun; Hou, Yinglong

    2015-01-01

    Complexity of heartbeat interval series is typically measured by entropy. Recent studies have found that sample entropy (SampEn) or fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn) quantifies essentially the randomness, which may not be uniformly identical to complexity. Additionally, these entropy measures are heavily dependent on the predetermined parameters and confined to data length. Aiming at improving the robustness of complexity assessment for short-term RR interval series, this study developed a novel measure--distribution entropy (DistEn). The DistEn took full advantage of the inherent information underlying the vector-to-vector distances in the state space by probability density estimation. Performances of DistEn were examined by theoretical data and experimental short-term RR interval series. Results showed that DistEn correctly ranked the complexity of simulated chaotic series and Gaussian noise series. The DistEn had relatively lower sensitivity to the predetermined parameters and showed stability even for quantifying the complexity of extremely short series. Analysis further showed that the DistEn indicated the loss of complexity in both healthy aging and heart failure patients (both p < 0.01), whereas neither the SampEn nor the FuzzyEn achieved comparable results (all p ≥ 0.05). This study suggested that the DistEn would be a promising measure for prompt clinical examination of cardiovascular function.

  20. A portable infrared photoplethysmograph: heartbeat of Mytilus galloprovincialis analyzed by MRI and application to Bathymodiolus septemdierum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Seo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared photoplethysmogram (IR-PPG and magnetic resonance image (MRI of the Mytilus galloprovincialis heart were obtained simultaneously. Heart rate was varied by changing temperature, aerial exposure and hypoxia. Higher heart rates (35-20 beat min−1 were usually observed at 20°C under the aerobic condition, and typical IR-PPG represented a single peak (peak v. The upward and downward slopes of the peak v corresponded to the filling and contracting of the ventricle, respectively. A double-peak IR-PPG was observed in a wide range of heart rates (5 to 35 beats min−1 under various conditions. The initial peak v corresponded to the filling of the ventricle, and the origin of the second peak (v’ varied with the heart rate. A flat IR-PPG with a noise-level represented cardiac arrest. Although large movement of the shells and the foot caused slow waves or a baseline drift of the IR-PPG, the heart rate can be calculated from the v-v interval. Based on these results, we assembled a portable IR-PPG recording system, and measured the heartbeats of Bathymodiolus septemdierum (Mytilidae for 24 h on a research vessel just after sampling from the deep sea, showing that IR-PPG is a noninvasive, economical, robust method that can be used in field experiments.

  1. Correlations in magnitude series to assess nonlinearities: Application to multifractal models and heartbeat fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A.; Gómez-Extremera, Manuel; Romance, A. Ramón; Carpena, Pedro

    2017-09-01

    The correlation properties of the magnitude of a time series are associated with nonlinear and multifractal properties and have been applied in a great variety of fields. Here we have obtained the analytical expression of the autocorrelation of the magnitude series (C|x |) of a linear Gaussian noise as a function of its autocorrelation (Cx). For both, models and natural signals, the deviation of C|x | from its expectation in linear Gaussian noises can be used as an index of nonlinearity that can be applied to relatively short records and does not require the presence of scaling in the time series under study. In a model of artificial Gaussian multifractal signal we use this approach to analyze the relation between nonlinearity and multifractallity and show that the former implies the latter but the reverse is not true. We also apply this approach to analyze experimental data: heart-beat records during rest and moderate exercise. For each individual subject, we observe higher nonlinearities during rest. This behavior is also achieved on average for the analyzed set of 10 semiprofessional soccer players. This result agrees with the fact that other measures of complexity are dramatically reduced during exercise and can shed light on its relationship with the withdrawal of parasympathetic tone and/or the activation of sympathetic activity during physical activity.

  2. New real-time heartbeat detection method using the angle of a single-lead electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Hye; Cho, Sung-Pil; Kim, Wonky; Lee, Kyoung-Joung

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a new real-time heartbeat detection algorithm using the geometric angle between two consecutive samples of single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The angle was adopted as a new index representing the slope of ECG signal. The method consists of three steps: elimination of high-frequency noise, calculation of the angle of ECG signal, and detection of R-waves using a simple adaptive thresholding technique. The MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, QT database, European ST-T database, T-wave alternans database and synthesized ECG signals were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm and compare with the results of other methods suggested in literature. The proposed method shows a high detection rate-99.95% of the sensitivity, 99.95% of the positive predictivity, and 0.10% of the fail detection rate on the four databases. The result shows that the proposed method can yield better or comparable performance than other literature despite the relatively simple process. The proposed algorithm needs only a single-lead ECG, and involves a simple and quick calculation. Moreover, it does not require post-processing to enhance the detection. Thus, it can be effectively applied to various real-time healthcare and medical devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Short-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, André; Ferreira de Sá, Diana S; Dierolf, Angelika M; Lutz, Annika; van Dyck, Zoé; Vögele, Claus; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2015-05-01

    Nutritional state (i.e., fasting or nonfasting) may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate days: when satiated (standardized food intake) and after an 18-h food deprivation period. On both days, heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs) and cardiac and autonomic nervous system activation indices (heart rate, normalized low frequency heart rate variability [nLF HRV]) were assessed. The HEP is an EEG pattern that is considered an index of cortical representation of afferent cardiovascular signals. Average HEP activity (R wave +455-595 ms) was enhanced during food deprivation compared to normal food intake. Cardiac activation did not differ between nutritional conditions. Our results indicate that short-term food deprivation amplifies an electrophysiological correlate of the cortical representation of visceral-afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. This effect could not be attributed to increased cardiac activation, as estimated by heart rate and nLF HRV, after food deprivation. © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. KIC 8164262: a heartbeat star showing tidally induced pulsations with resonant locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, K.; Fuller, J.; Thompson, S.; Prša, A.; Kurtz, D. W.; Shporer, A.; Isaacson, H.; Howard, A. W.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W.; Murphy, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    We present the analysis of KIC 8164262, a heartbeat star with a high-amplitude (∼1 mmag), tidally resonant pulsation (a mode in resonance with the orbit) at 229 times the orbital frequency and a plethora of tidally induced g-mode pulsations (modes excited by the orbit). The analysis combines Kepler light curves with follow-up spectroscopic data from the Keck telescope, KPNO (Kitt Peak National Observatory) 4-m Mayall telescope and the 2.7-m telescope at the McDonald observatory. We apply the binary modelling software, PHOEBE, to the Kepler light curve and radial velocity data to determine a detailed binary star model that includes the prominent pulsation and Doppler boosting, alongside the usual attributes of a binary star model (including tidal distortion and reflection). The results show that the system contains a slightly evolved F star with an M secondary companion in a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.886). We use the results of the binary star model in a companion paper (Fuller) where we show that the prominent pulsation can be explained by a tidally excited oscillation mode held near resonance by a resonance locking mechanism.

  5. Dynamic Proteomics: a database for dynamics and localizations of endogenous fluorescently-tagged proteins in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Cohen, Ariel A; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Eden, Eran; Prilusky, Jaime; Issaeva, Irina; Sigal, Alex; Cohen-Saidon, Cellina; Liron, Yuvalal; Cohen, Lydia; Danon, Tamar; Perzov, Natalie; Alon, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances allow tracking the levels and locations of a thousand proteins in individual living human cells over time using a library of annotated reporter cell clones (LARC). This library was created by Cohen et al. to study the proteome dynamics of a human lung carcinoma cell-line treated with an anti-cancer drug. Here, we report the Dynamic Proteomics database for the proteins studied by Cohen et al. Each cell-line clone in LARC has a protein tagged with yellow fluorescent protein, expressed from its endogenous chromosomal location, under its natural regulation. The Dynamic Proteomics interface facilitates searches for genes of interest, downloads of protein fluorescent movies and alignments of dynamics following drug addition. Each protein in the database is displayed with its annotation, cDNA sequence, fluorescent images and movies obtained by the time-lapse microscopy. The protein dynamics in the database represents a quantitative trace of the protein fluorescence levels in nucleus and cytoplasm produced by image analysis of movies over time. Furthermore, a sequence analysis provides a search and comparison of up to 50 input DNA sequences with all cDNAs in the library. The raw movies may be useful as a benchmark for developing image analysis tools for individual-cell dynamic-proteomics. The database is available at http://www.dynamicproteomics.net/.

  6. Land use change and human systems dynamics: Cotacachi Ecuador 1963-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation reports on a study to analyze land-use change over 40 years in Cotacachi, Ecuador, link land-use change to human system dynamics, and discuss implications for sustainability. BA-2 (SANREM-Andes Research)

  7. Superiority of Classification Tree versus Cluster, Fuzzy and Discriminant Models in a Heartbeat Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Leber, Remo; Schmid, Ramun; Abächerli, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a 2-stage heartbeat classifier of supraventricular (SVB) and ventricular (VB) beats. Stage 1 makes computationally-efficient classification of SVB-beats, using simple correlation threshold criterion for finding close match with a predominant normal (reference) beat template. The non-matched beats are next subjected to measurement of 20 basic features, tracking the beat and reference template morphology and RR-variability for subsequent refined classification in SVB or VB-class by Stage 2. Four linear classifiers are compared: cluster, fuzzy, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification tree (CT), all subjected to iterative training for selection of the optimal feature space among extended 210-sized set, embodying interactive second-order effects between 20 independent features. The optimization process minimizes at equal weight the false positives in SVB-class and false negatives in VB-class. The training with European ST-T, AHA, MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia databases found the best performance settings of all classification models: Cluster (30 features), Fuzzy (72 features), LDA (142 coefficients), CT (221 decision nodes) with top-3 best scored features: normalized current RR-interval, higher/lower frequency content ratio, beat-to-template correlation. Unbiased test-validation with MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database rates the classifiers in descending order of their specificity for SVB-class: CT (99.9%), LDA (99.6%), Cluster (99.5%), Fuzzy (99.4%); sensitivity for ventricular ectopic beats as part from VB-class (commonly reported in published beat-classification studies): CT (96.7%), Fuzzy (94.4%), LDA (94.2%), Cluster (92.4%); positive predictivity: CT (99.2%), Cluster (93.6%), LDA (93.0%), Fuzzy (92.4%). CT has superior accuracy by 0.3-6.8% points, with the advantage for easy model complexity configuration by pruning the tree consisted of easy interpretable 'if-then' rules.

  8. The Faint "Heartbeats" of IGR J17091-3624: An Exceptional Black Hole Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, D.; Belloni, T.; Linares, M.; VanDerKlis, M.; Wunands, R.; Curran, P. A.; Kalamkar, M.; Stiele, H.; Motta, S.; Munoz-Darias, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first 180 days of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations of the outburst of the black hole candidate IGR Jl7091-3624. This source exhibits a broad variety of complex light curve patterns including periods of strong flares alternating with quiet intervals. Similar patterns in the X-ray light curves have been seen in the (up to now) unique black hole system GRS 1915+105. In the context of the variability classes defined by Belloni et al. for GRS 1915+105, we find that JGR J17091-3624 shows the nu, rho, alpha, lambda, Beta, and mu classes as well as quiet periods which resemble the chi class, all occurring at 2-60 keY count rate levels which can be 10-50 times lower than observed in GRS 1915+\\05. The so-called rho class "heartbeats" occur as fast as every few seconds and as slow as approx 100 s, tracing a loop in the hardness-intensity diagram which resembles that previously seen in GRS 1915+\\05. However, while GRS 1915+105 traverses this loop clockwise, IGR Jl7091-3624 does so in the opposite sense. We briefly discuss our findings in the context of the models proposed for GRS 1915+105 and find that either all models requiring near Eddington luminosities for GRS 1915+105-like variability fail, or IGR Il7091-3624 lies at a distance well in excess of 20 kpc, or it harbors one of the least massive black holes known( <3 solar M).

  9. Superiority of Classification Tree versus Cluster, Fuzzy and Discriminant Models in a Heartbeat Classification System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vessela Krasteva

    Full Text Available This study presents a 2-stage heartbeat classifier of supraventricular (SVB and ventricular (VB beats. Stage 1 makes computationally-efficient classification of SVB-beats, using simple correlation threshold criterion for finding close match with a predominant normal (reference beat template. The non-matched beats are next subjected to measurement of 20 basic features, tracking the beat and reference template morphology and RR-variability for subsequent refined classification in SVB or VB-class by Stage 2. Four linear classifiers are compared: cluster, fuzzy, linear discriminant analysis (LDA and classification tree (CT, all subjected to iterative training for selection of the optimal feature space among extended 210-sized set, embodying interactive second-order effects between 20 independent features. The optimization process minimizes at equal weight the false positives in SVB-class and false negatives in VB-class. The training with European ST-T, AHA, MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia databases found the best performance settings of all classification models: Cluster (30 features, Fuzzy (72 features, LDA (142 coefficients, CT (221 decision nodes with top-3 best scored features: normalized current RR-interval, higher/lower frequency content ratio, beat-to-template correlation. Unbiased test-validation with MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database rates the classifiers in descending order of their specificity for SVB-class: CT (99.9%, LDA (99.6%, Cluster (99.5%, Fuzzy (99.4%; sensitivity for ventricular ectopic beats as part from VB-class (commonly reported in published beat-classification studies: CT (96.7%, Fuzzy (94.4%, LDA (94.2%, Cluster (92.4%; positive predictivity: CT (99.2%, Cluster (93.6%, LDA (93.0%, Fuzzy (92.4%. CT has superior accuracy by 0.3-6.8% points, with the advantage for easy model complexity configuration by pruning the tree consisted of easy interpretable 'if-then' rules.

  10. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach by virtual microscopy the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was

  11. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to

  12. The sedimentary dynamics in natural and human-influenced delta channel belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobo, N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the increased anthropogenic influence on the within-channel belt sedimentary dynamics in the Rhine delta. To make this investigation, the sedimentary dynamics within the life-cycle of a single channel belt were reconstructed for three key periods of increasing human impact,

  13. Relating dynamic brain states to dynamic machine states: Human and machine solutions to the speech recognition problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Cai; Su, Li; Liu, Xunying; Zhang, Chao; Woodland, Phil; Thwaites, Andrew; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Marslen-Wilson, William D

    2017-09-01

    There is widespread interest in the relationship between the neurobiological systems supporting human cognition and emerging computational systems capable of emulating these capacities. Human speech comprehension, poorly understood as a neurobiological process, is an important case in point. Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) systems with near-human levels of performance are now available, which provide a computationally explicit solution for the recognition of words in continuous speech. This research aims to bridge the gap between speech recognition processes in humans and machines, using novel multivariate techniques to compare incremental 'machine states', generated as the ASR analysis progresses over time, to the incremental 'brain states', measured using combined electro- and magneto-encephalography (EMEG), generated as the same inputs are heard by human listeners. This direct comparison of dynamic human and machine internal states, as they respond to the same incrementally delivered sensory input, revealed a significant correspondence between neural response patterns in human superior temporal cortex and the structural properties of ASR-derived phonetic models. Spatially coherent patches in human temporal cortex responded selectively to individual phonetic features defined on the basis of machine-extracted regularities in the speech to lexicon mapping process. These results demonstrate the feasibility of relating human and ASR solutions to the problem of speech recognition, and suggest the potential for further studies relating complex neural computations in human speech comprehension to the rapidly evolving ASR systems that address the same problem domain.

  14. Modeling Leadership Styles in Human-Robot Team Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gerardo E.

    2005-01-01

    The recent proliferation of robotic systems in our society has placed questions regarding interaction between humans and intelligent machines at the forefront of robotics research. In response, our research attempts to understand the context in which particular types of interaction optimize efficiency in tasks undertaken by human-robot teams. It is our conjecture that applying previous research results regarding leadership paradigms in human organizations will lead us to a greater understanding of the human-robot interaction space. In doing so, we adapt four leadership styles prevalent in human organizations to human-robot teams. By noting which leadership style is more appropriately suited to what situation, as given by previous research, a mapping is created between the adapted leadership styles and human-robot interaction scenarios-a mapping which will presumably maximize efficiency in task completion for a human-robot team. In this research we test this mapping with two adapted leadership styles: directive and transactional. For testing, we have taken a virtual 3D interface and integrated it with a genetic algorithm for use in &le-operation of a physical robot. By developing team efficiency metrics, we can determine whether this mapping indeed prescribes interaction styles that will maximize efficiency in the teleoperation of a robot.

  15. Right insular damage decreases heartbeat awareness and alters cardio-visual effects on bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Roberta; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Lukowska, Marta; Herbelin, Bruno; Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that multisensory integration of bodily signals involving exteroceptive and interoceptive information modulates bodily aspects of self-consciousness such as self-identification and self-location. In the so-called Full Body Illusion subjects watch a virtual body being stroked while they perceive tactile stimulation on their own body inducing illusory self-identification with the virtual body and a change in self-location towards the virtual body. In a related illusion, it has recently been shown that similar changes in self-identification and self-location can be observed when an interoceptive signal is used in association with visual stimulation of the virtual body (i.e., participants observe a virtual body illuminated in synchrony with their heartbeat). Although brain imaging and neuropsychological evidence suggest that the insular cortex is a core region for interoceptive processing (such as cardiac perception and awareness) as well as for self-consciousness, it is currently not known whether the insula mediates cardio-visual modulation of self-consciousness. Here we tested the involvement of insular cortex in heartbeat awareness and cardio-visual manipulation of bodily self-consciousness in a patient before and after resection of a selective right neoplastic insular lesion. Cardio-visual stimulation induced an abnormally enhanced state of bodily self-consciousness; in addition, cardio-visual manipulation was associated with an experienced loss of the spatial unity of the self (illusory bi-location and duplication of his body), not observed in healthy subjects. Heartbeat awareness was found to decrease after insular resection. Based on these data we propose that the insula mediates interoceptive awareness as well as cardio-visual effects on bodily self-consciousness and that insular processing of interoceptive signals is an important mechanism for the experienced unity of the self. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral reorganisation of human hand movement following dynamic immobilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; Coert, JH; Stenekes, MW; Leenders, KL; Paans, AMJ; Nicolai, JRA

    2003-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a flexor tendon lesion of the hand is followed by a 6-week period of dynamic immobilisation. This is achieved by the elastic strings of a Kleinert splint, enabling only passive and no active flexor movements. After such immobilisation, the appearance of a temporary clumsy hand

  17. A model for the dynamics of human weight cycling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The model provides a theoretical framework that captures key facets of weight cycling and suggests ways to control the phenomenon. The view that weight cycling represents self-sustained oscillations has indeed specific implications. In dynamical terms, to bring weight cycling to an end, parameter values should change in ...

  18. Hydrological Dynamics and Human Impact on Ecosystems of Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the recent development activities at the catchment areas have negatively affected the water of the lake, and the climate of the region. This study delineated how land cover modification, climate change, population increase and development activities within the catchment have influenced the hydrological dynamics ...

  19. Characterizing dynamic changes in the human blood transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data generated systematically in a given system over multiple time points provides a source of perturbation that can be leveraged to infer causal relationships among genes explaining network changes. Previously, we showed that food intake has a large impact on blood gene expression patterns and that these responses, either in terms of gene expression level or gene-gene connectivity, are strongly associated with metabolic diseases. In this study, we explored which genes drive the changes of gene expression patterns in response to time and food intake. We applied the Granger causality test and the dynamic Bayesian network to gene expression data generated from blood samples collected at multiple time points during the course of a day. The simulation result shows that combining many short time series together is as powerful to infer Granger causality as using a single long time series. Using the Granger causality test, we identified genes that were supported as the most likely causal candidates for the coordinated temporal changes in the network. These results show that PER1 is a key regulator of the blood transcriptional network, in which multiple biological processes are under circadian rhythm regulation. The fasted and fed dynamic Bayesian networks showed that over 72% of dynamic connections are self links. Finally, we show that different processes such as inflammation and lipid metabolism, which are disconnected in the static network, become dynamically linked in response to food intake, which would suggest that increasing nutritional load leads to coordinate regulation of these biological processes. In conclusion, our results suggest that food intake has a profound impact on the dynamic co-regulation of multiple biological processes, such as metabolism, immune response, apoptosis and circadian rhythm. The results could have broader implications for the design of studies of disease association and drug response in clinical

  20. Human body capacitance: static or dynamic concept? [ESD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1998-01-01

    was determined by an AC-bridge measurement, but 200-400 pF when the traditional static charge-sharing method was used. Further experiments indicate that the two methods give the same result when the electric flux is well located in a dielectric other than air, but that the static method leads to higher values......A standing human body insulated from ground by footwear and/or floor covering is in principle an insulated conductor and has, as such, a capacitance, i.e. the ability to store a charge and possibly discharge the stored energy in a spark discharge. In the human body, the human body capacitance (HBC...... when a substantial part of the flux extends itself through badly defined stray fields. Since the concept of human body capacitance is normally used in a static (electric) context, it is suggested that the HBC be determined by a static method. No theoretical explanation of the observed differences...

  1. Remodelling of the human vitreous and vitreoretinal interface - A dynamic process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsioen, Theodorus L.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2010-01-01

    The highly hydrated, almost acellular vitreous body of the human eye consists of only 0.1% macromolecules, of which collagens are the most important for its matrix structure. During embryological development, the human vitreous body is a highly dynamic matrix, in which the primary (vascular)

  2. Interaction-Dominant Dynamics in Human Cognition: Beyond 1/f[superscript [alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlen, Espen A. F.; Vereijken, Beatrix

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that human behavior in general and cognitive performance in particular emerge from coordination between multiple temporal scales. In this article, we provide quantitative support for such a theory of interaction-dominant dynamics in human cognition by using wavelet-based multifractal analysis and accompanying multiplicative…

  3. Dynamical Representation of Dominance Relationships in the Human Rostromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligneul, R.V.A.; Obeso, I.; Ruff, C.C.; Dreher, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Humans and other primates have evolved the ability to represent their status in the group’s social hierarchy, which is essential for avoiding harm and accessing resources. Yet it remains unclear how the human brain learns dominance status and adjusts behavior accordingly during dynamic

  4. Entropy quantification of human brain spatio-temporal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezard, Laurent; Martinerie, Jacques; Müller-Gerking, Johannes; Varela, Francisco J.; Renault, Bernard

    We present a procedure to quantify spatio-temporal dynamics applied here to brain surface recordings during three distinct cognitive tasks. The method uses 19 sites of EEG recording as spatial embedding for the reconstruction of trajectories, global and local linear indices, and non-linear forecasting methods to quantify the global and local information loss of the dynamics (K-entropy). We show that K-entropy can differentiate between raw and multivariate phase random surrogate data in a significant percentage of EEG segments, and that relevant non-linear indices are best studied in time segments not longer than 4s. We also find a certain complementarity between local non-linear and linear indices for the discrimination between the three cognitive tasks. Moreover, localized projections onto electrode site of K-entropy provide a new kind of brain mapping with functional significance.

  5. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic hand movement increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the contralateral motor sensory cortex (MS1). This increase is eliminated by regional anesthesia of the working arm, indicating the importance of afferent neural input. The purpose of this study was to determine the specific...... type of afferent input required for this cerebral activation. The rCBF was measured at +5.0 and +9.0 cm above the orbitomeatal (OM) plane in 13 subjects during 1) rest; 2) dynamic left-hand contractions; 3) postcontraction ischemia (metaboreceptor afferents); and 4) biceps brachii tendon vibration...... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P neural input from muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  6. Constraint Study for a Hand Exoskeleton: Human Hand Kinematics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fai Chen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the number of projects studying the human hand from the robotic point of view has increased rapidly, due to the growing interest in academic and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the complexity of the human hand given its large number of degrees of freedom (DoF within a significantly reduced space requires an exhaustive analysis, before proposing any applications. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete summary of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the human hand as a preliminary step towards the development of hand devices such as prosthetic/robotic hands and exoskeletons imitating the human hand shape and functionality. A collection of data and constraints relevant to hand movements is presented, and the direct and inverse kinematics are solved for all the fingers as well as the dynamics; anthropometric data and dynamics equations allow performing simulations to understand the behavior of the finger.

  7. Neural population dynamics in human motor cortex during movements in people with ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H; Nuyujukian, Paul; Sarma, Anish A; Sorice, Brittany L; Eskandar, Emad N; Hochberg, Leigh R; Henderson, Jaimie M; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2015-06-23

    The prevailing view of motor cortex holds that motor cortical neural activity represents muscle or movement parameters. However, recent studies in non-human primates have shown that neural activity does not simply represent muscle or movement parameters; instead, its temporal structure is well-described by a dynamical system where activity during movement evolves lawfully from an initial pre-movement state. In this study, we analyze neuronal ensemble activity in motor cortex in two clinical trial participants diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We find that activity in human motor cortex has similar dynamical structure to that of non-human primates, indicating that human motor cortex contains a similar underlying dynamical system for movement generation.

  8. Unfolding large-scale online collaborative human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Yilong; Zhou, Changsong

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale interacting human activities underlie all social and economic phenomena, but quantitative understanding of regular patterns and mechanism is very challenging and still rare. Self-organized online collaborative activities with precise record of event timing provide unprecedented opportunity. Our empirical analysis of the history of millions of updates in Wikipedia shows a universal double power-law distribution of time intervals between consecutive updates of an article. We then propose a generic model to unfold collaborative human activities into three modules: (i) individual behavior characterized by Poissonian initiation of an action, (ii) human interaction captured by a cascading response to others with a power-law waiting time, and (iii) population growth due to increasing number of interacting individuals. This unfolding allows us to obtain analytical formula that is fully supported by the universal patterns in empirical data. Our modeling approaches reveal "simplicity" beyond complex interac...

  9. Cell diversity and network dynamics in photosensitive human brain organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrato, Giorgia; Nguyen, Tuan; Macosko, Evan Z.; Sherwood, John L.; Yang, Sung Min; Berger, Daniel; Maria, Natalie; Scholvin, Jorg; Goldman, Melissa; Kinney, Justin; Boyden, Edward S.; Lichtman, Jeff; Williams, Ziv M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Arlotta, Paola

    2017-01-01

    In vitro models of the developing brain such as 3D brain organoids offer an unprecedented opportunity to study aspects of human brain development and disease. However, it remains undefined what cells are generated within organoids and to what extent they recapitulate the regional complexity, cellular diversity, and circuit functionality of the brain. Here, we analyzed gene expression in over 80,000 individual cells isolated from 31 human brain organoids. We find that organoids can generate a broad diversity of cells, which are related to endogenous classes, including cells from the cerebral cortex and the retina. Organoids could be developed over extended periods (over 9 months) enabling unprecedented levels of maturity including the formation of dendritic spines and of spontaneously-active neuronal networks. Finally, neuronal activity within organoids could be controlled using light stimulation of photoreceptor-like cells, which may offer ways to probe the functionality of human neuronal circuits using physiological sensory stimuli. PMID:28445462

  10. An Estimation of Human Error Probability of Filtered Containment Venting System Using Dynamic HRA Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seunghyun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The human failure events (HFEs) are considered in the development of system fault trees as well as accident sequence event trees in part of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). As a method for analyzing the human error, several methods, such as Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Human Cognitive Reliability (HCR), and Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) are used and new methods for human reliability analysis (HRA) are under developing at this time. This paper presents a dynamic HRA method for assessing the human failure events and estimation of human error probability for filtered containment venting system (FCVS) is performed. The action associated with implementation of the containment venting during a station blackout sequence is used as an example. In this report, dynamic HRA method was used to analyze FCVS-related operator action. The distributions of the required time and the available time were developed by MAAP code and LHS sampling. Though the numerical calculations given here are only for illustrative purpose, the dynamic HRA method can be useful tools to estimate the human error estimation and it can be applied to any kind of the operator actions, including the severe accident management strategy.

  11. The Dynamics of Economism and Human Traffficking in Chika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unigwe's On Black Sisters' street and Chinwuba's Merchants of Flesh present an uncensored account of the evils involved in the trading of humans for any form of sexual or physical exploitation at the detriment of the victims' lives, careers and dreams. Both novels are analytically critiqued with the New Historical approach to ...

  12. Human performance at sea assessed by dynamic visual acuity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Munnoch, K.; Perrault, D.

    2008-01-01

    Human performance may, among other things, depend on the ability to visually discern (small) objects. This ability is generally quantified under static conditions by means of the visual acuity, a measure of the minimum angle resolved by the eye. However, when the subject himself, his or her eyes,

  13. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of triplet repeats (Pearson and Sinden 1998a; Sinden. 1999). Expansions or deletions can occur by simple. Table 1. Trinucleotide repeats in human genetic disease. Repeat length. Disease. Gene. Locus. Repeata. Normal. Pre- mutation. Disease. Protein/possible biological effect of expansion. Fragile X syndrome. FMR1.

  14. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Muñoz, Javier; Braam, Stefan R

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during...

  15. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during

  16. Recent human history governs global ant invasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleo Bertelsmeier; Sébastien Ollier; Andrew Liebhold; Laurent Keller

    2017-01-01

    Human trade and travel are breaking down biogeographic barriers, resulting in shifts in the geographical distribution of organisms, yet it remains largely unknown whether different alien species generally follow similar spatiotemporal colonization patterns and how such patterns are driven by trends in global trade. Here, we analyse the global distribution of 241 alien...

  17. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in

  18. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...... by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer...

  19. Detection of chaotic dynamics in human gait signals from mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelMarco, Stephen; Deng, Yunbin

    2017-05-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices offers the opportunity to exploit device-generated signal data for biometric identification, health monitoring, and activity recognition. In particular, mobile devices contain an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that produces acceleration and rotational rate information from the IMU accelerometers and gyros. These signals reflect motion properties of the human carrier. It is well-known that the complexity of bio-dynamical systems gives rise to chaotic dynamics. Knowledge of chaotic properties of these systems has shown utility, for example, in detecting abnormal medical conditions and neurological disorders. Chaotic dynamics has been found, in the lab, in bio-dynamical systems data such as electrocardiogram (heart), electroencephalogram (brain), and gait data. In this paper, we investigate the following question: can we detect chaotic dynamics in human gait as measured by IMU acceleration and gyro data from mobile phones? To detect chaotic dynamics, we perform recurrence analysis on real gyro and accelerometer signal data obtained from mobile devices. We apply the delay coordinate embedding approach from Takens' theorem to reconstruct the phase space trajectory of the multi-dimensional gait dynamical system. We use mutual information properties of the signal to estimate the appropriate delay value, and the false nearest neighbor approach to determine the phase space embedding dimension. We use a correlation dimension-based approach together with estimation of the largest Lyapunov exponent to make the chaotic dynamics detection decision. We investigate the ability to detect chaotic dynamics for the different one-dimensional IMU signals, across human subject and walking modes, and as a function of different phone locations on the human carrier.

  20. Double symbolic joint entropy in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Symbolizations, the base of symbolic dynamic analysis, are classified as global static and local dynamic approaches which are combined by joint entropy in our works for nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis. Two global static methods, symbolic transformations of Wessel N. symbolic entropy and base-scale entropy, and two local ones, namely symbolizations of permutation and differential entropy, constitute four double symbolic joint entropies that have accurate complexity detections in chaotic models, logistic and Henon map series. In nonlinear dynamical analysis of different kinds of heart rate variability, heartbeats of healthy young have higher complexity than those of the healthy elderly, and congestive heart failure (CHF) patients are lowest in heartbeats' joint entropy values. Each individual symbolic entropy is improved by double symbolic joint entropy among which the combination of base-scale and differential symbolizations have best complexity analysis. Test results prove that double symbolic joint entropy is feasible in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis.

  1. Spontaneous functional network dynamics and associated structural substrates in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuhong; Yuan, Lin; Zhao, Tengda; Dai, Zhengjia; Shu, Ni; Xia, Mingrui; Yang, Yihong; Evans, Alan; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Recent imaging connectomics studies have demonstrated that the spontaneous human brain functional networks derived from resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) include many non-trivial topological properties, such as highly efficient small-world architecture and densely connected hub regions. However, very little is known about dynamic functional connectivity (D-FC) patterns of spontaneous human brain networks during rest and about how these spontaneous brain dynamics are constrained by the underlying structural connectivity. Here, we combined sub-second multiband R-fMRI data with graph-theoretical approaches to comprehensively investigate the dynamic characteristics of the topological organization of human whole-brain functional networks, and then employed diffusion imaging data in the same participants to further explore the associated structural substrates. At the connection level, we found that human whole-brain D-FC patterns spontaneously fluctuated over time, while homotopic D-FC exhibited high connectivity strength and low temporal variability. At the network level, dynamic functional networks exhibited time-varying but evident small-world and assortativity architecture, with several regions (e.g., insula, sensorimotor cortex and medial prefrontal cortex) emerging as functionally persistent hubs (i.e., highly connected regions) while possessing large temporal variability in their degree centrality. Finally, the temporal characteristics (i.e., strength and variability) of the connectional and nodal properties of the dynamic brain networks were significantly associated with their structural counterparts. Collectively, we demonstrate the economical, efficient, and flexible characteristics of dynamic functional coordination in large-scale human brain networks during rest, and highlight their relationship with underlying structural connectivity, which deepens our understandings of spontaneous brain network dynamics in humans. PMID:26388757

  2. Spontaneous Functional Network Dynamics and Associated Structural Substrates in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhong eLiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent imaging connectomics studies have demonstrated that the spontaneous human brain functional networks derived from resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI include many non-trivial topological properties, such as highly efficient small-world architecture and densely connected hub regions. However, very little is known about dynamic functional connectivity (D-FC patterns of spontaneous human brain networks during rest and about how these spontaneous brain dynamics are constrained by the underlying structural connectivity. Here, we combined sub-second multiband R-fMRI data with graph-theoretical approaches to comprehensively investigate the dynamic characteristics of the topological organization of human whole-brain functional networks, and then employed diffusion imaging data in the same participants to further explore the associated structural substrates. At the connection level, we found that human whole-brain D-FC patterns spontaneously fluctuated over time, while homotopic D-FC exhibited high connectivity strength and low temporal variability. At the network level, dynamic functional networks exhibited time-varying but evident small-world and assortativity architecture, with several regions (e.g., insula, sensorimotor cortex and medial prefrontal cortex emerging as functionally persistent hubs (i.e., highly connected regions while possessing large temporal variability in their degree centrality. Finally, the temporal characteristics (i.e., strength and variability of the connectional and nodal properties of the dynamic brain networks were significantly associated with their structural counterparts. Collectively, we demonstrate the economical, efficient and flexible characteristics of dynamic functional coordination in large-scale human brain networks during rest, and highlight their relationship with underlying structural connectivity, which deepens our understandings of spontaneous brain network dynamics in humans.

  3. Dynamics of the human gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halfvarson, Jonas; Brislawn, Colin J.; Lamendella, Regina; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Walters, William A.; Bramer, Lisa M.; D' Amato, Mauro; Bonfiglio, Ferdinando; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; McClure, Erin E.; Dunklebarger, Mitchell F.; Knight, Rob; Jansson, Janet K.

    2017-02-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by flares of inflammation with periodic need for increased medication and sometimes even surgery. IBD etiology is partly attributed to a deregulated immune response to gut microbiome dysbiosis. Cross-sectional studies have revealed microbial signatures for different IBD diseases, including ulcerative colitis (UC), colonic Crohn’s Disease (CCD), and ileal CD (ICD). Although IBD is dynamic, microbiome studies have primarily focused on single timepoints or few individuals. Here we dissect the long-term dynamic behavior of the gut microbiome in IBD and differentiate this from normal variation. Microbiomes of IBD subjects fluctuate more than healthy individuals, based on deviation from a newly-defined healthy plane (HP). ICD subjects deviated most from the HP, especially subjects with surgical resection. Intriguingly, the microbiomes of some IBD subjects periodically visited the HP then deviated away from it. Inflammation was not directly correlated with distance to the healthy plane, but there was some correlation between observed dramatic fluctuations in the gut microbiome and intensified medication due to a flare of the disease. These results help guide therapies that will re-direct the gut microbiome towards a healthy state and maintain remission in IBD.

  4. Oscillatory dynamics track motor performance improvement in human cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dürschmid

    Full Text Available Improving performance in motor skill acquisition is proposed to be supported by tuning of neural networks. To address this issue we investigated changes of phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (paCFC in neuronal networks during motor performance improvement. We recorded intracranially from subdural electrodes (electrocorticogram; ECoG from 6 patients who learned 3 distinct motor tasks requiring coordination of finger movements with an external cue (serial response task, auditory motor coordination task, go/no-go. Performance improved in all subjects and all tasks during the first block and plateaued in subsequent blocks. Performance improvement was paralled by increasing neural changes in the trial-to-trial paCFC between theta ([Formula: see text]; 4-8 Hz phase and high gamma (HG; 80-180 Hz amplitude. Electrodes showing this covariation pattern (Pearson's r ranging up to .45 were located contralateral to the limb performing the task and were observed predominantly in motor brain regions. We observed stable paCFC when task performance asymptoted. Our results indicate that motor performance improvement is accompanied by adjustments in the dynamics and topology of neuronal network interactions in the [Formula: see text] and HG range. The location of the involved electrodes suggests that oscillatory dynamics in motor cortices support performance improvement with practice.

  5. Oscillatory Dynamics Track Motor Performance Improvement in Human Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Quandt, Fanny; Krämer, Ulrike M.; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schulz, Reinhard; Pannek, Heinz; Chang, Edward F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Improving performance in motor skill acquisition is proposed to be supported by tuning of neural networks. To address this issue we investigated changes of phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (paCFC) in neuronal networks during motor performance improvement. We recorded intracranially from subdural electrodes (electrocorticogram; ECoG) from 6 patients who learned 3 distinct motor tasks requiring coordination of finger movements with an external cue (serial response task, auditory motor coordination task, go/no-go). Performance improved in all subjects and all tasks during the first block and plateaued in subsequent blocks. Performance improvement was paralled by increasing neural changes in the trial-to-trial paCFC between theta (; 4–8 Hz) phase and high gamma (HG; 80–180 Hz) amplitude. Electrodes showing this covariation pattern (Pearson's r ranging up to .45) were located contralateral to the limb performing the task and were observed predominantly in motor brain regions. We observed stable paCFC when task performance asymptoted. Our results indicate that motor performance improvement is accompanied by adjustments in the dynamics and topology of neuronal network interactions in the and HG range. The location of the involved electrodes suggests that oscillatory dynamics in motor cortices support performance improvement with practice. PMID:24586885

  6. A molecular dynamics study of human serum albumin binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artali, Roberto; Bombieri, Gabriella; Calabi, Luisella; Del Pra, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A 2.0 ns unrestrained Molecular Dynamics was used to elucidate the geometric and dynamic properties of the HSA binding sites. The structure is not stress affected and the rmsds calculated from the published crystallographic data are almost constant for all the simulation time, with an averaged value of 2.4A. The major variability is in the C-terminus region. The trajectory analysis of the IIA binding site put in evidence fast oscillations for the Cgamma@Leu203...Cgamma@Leu275 and Cgamma@Leu219...Cgamma@Leu260 distances, with fluctuations around 250 ps, 1000 ps and over for the first, while the second is smoothly increasing with the simulation time from 7 to 10A. These variations are consistent with a volume increase up to 20% confirmed by the inter-domain contacts analysis, in particular for the pair O@Pro148...Ogamma@Ser283, representing the change of distance between IB-h9 and IIA-h6, O@Glu149...Ogamma@Ser189 for sub-domains IB-h9/IIA-h1 and N@Val339...Odelta2@Asp447 sub-domains IIB-h9/IIIA-h1. These inter-domain motions confirm the flexibility of the unfatted HSA with possible binding site pre-formation.

  7. Effects of human dynamics on epidemic spreading in C\\^{o}te d'Ivoire

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ruiqi; Di, Zengru

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and predicting outbreaks of contagious diseases are crucial to the development of society and public health, especially for underdeveloped countries. However, challenging problems are encountered because of complex epidemic spreading dynamics influenced by spatial structure and human dynamics (including both human mobility and human interaction intensity). We propose a systematical model to depict nationwide epidemic spreading in C\\^{o}te d'Ivoire, which integrates multiple factors, such as human mobility, human interaction intensity, and demographic features. We provide insights to aid in modeling and predicting the epidemic spreading process by data-driven simulation and theoretical analysis, which is otherwise beyond the scope of local evaluation and geometrical views. We show that the requirement that the average local basic reproductive number to be greater than unity is not necessary for outbreaks of epidemics. The observed spreading phenomenon can be roughly explained as a heterogeneous d...

  8. Dynamics of the cellular metabolome during human cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Munger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication requires energy and macromolecular precursors derived from the metabolic network of the host cell. Despite this reliance, the effect of viral infection on host cell metabolic composition remains poorly understood. Here we applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 63 different intracellular metabolites at multiple times after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of human fibroblasts. Parallel microarray analysis provided complementary data on transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways. As the infection progressed, the levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis markedly increased. HCMV-induced transcriptional upregulation of specific glycolytic and citric acid cycle enzymes mirrored the increases in metabolite levels. The peak levels of numerous metabolites during infection far exceeded those observed during normal fibroblast growth or quiescence, demonstrating that HCMV markedly disrupts cellular metabolic homeostasis and institutes its own specific metabolic program.

  9. Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Human Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azahari, Athirah; Siswanto, W. A.; Ngali, M. Z.; Salleh, S. Md.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    Behaviour such as gait or posture may affect a person with the physiological condition during daily activities. The characteristic of human gait cycle phase is one of the important parameter which used to described the human movement whether it is in normal gait or abnormal gait. This research investigates four types of crouch walking (upright, interpolated, crouched and severe) by simulation approach. The assessment are conducting by looking the parameters of hamstring muscle joint, knee joint and ankle joint. The analysis results show that based on gait analysis approach, the crouch walking have a weak pattern of walking and postures. Short hamstring and knee joint is the most influence factor contributing to the crouch walking due to excessive hip flexion that typically accompanies knee flexion.

  10. The human face as a dynamic tool for social communication

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Rachael E.; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2015-01-01

    As a highly social species, humans frequently exchange social information to support almost all facets of life. One of the richest and most powerful tools in social communication is the face, from which observers can quickly and easily make a number of inferences — about identity, gender, sex, age, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical health, attractiveness, emotional state, personality traits, pain or physical pleasure, deception, and even social status. With the advent of the digit...

  11. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Mira, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Background Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Results Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two dif...

  12. Social Contagion Theory: Examining Dynamic Social Networks and Human Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas A Christakis; Fowler, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we review the research we have done on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) in order to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a ...

  13. Modeling the amplification dynamics of human alu retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons have had a considerable impact on the overall architecture of the human genome. Currently, there are three lineages of retrotransposons (Alu, L1, and SVA that are believed to be actively replicating in humans. While estimates of their copy number, sequence diversity, and levels of insertion polymorphism can readily be obtained from existing genomic sequence data and population sampling, a detailed understanding of the temporal pattern of retrotransposon amplification remains elusive. Here we pose the question of whether, using genomic sequence and population frequency data from extant taxa, one can adequately reconstruct historical amplification patterns. To this end, we developed a computer simulation that incorporates several known aspects of primate Alu retrotransposon biology and accommodates sampling effects resulting from the methods by which mobile elements are typically discovered and characterized. By modeling a number of amplification scenarios and comparing simulation-generated expectations to empirical data gathered from existing Alu subfamilies, we were able to statistically reject a number of amplification scenarios for individual subfamilies, including that of a rapid expansion or explosion of Alu amplification at the time of human-chimpanzee divergence.

  14. Modeling the amplification dynamics of human Alu retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale J Hedges

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons have had a considerable impact on the overall architecture of the human genome. Currently, there are three lineages of retrotransposons (Alu, L1, and SVA that are believed to be actively replicating in humans. While estimates of their copy number, sequence diversity, and levels of insertion polymorphism can readily be obtained from existing genomic sequence data and population sampling, a detailed understanding of the temporal pattern of retrotransposon amplification remains elusive. Here we pose the question of whether, using genomic sequence and population frequency data from extant taxa, one can adequately reconstruct historical amplification patterns. To this end, we developed a computer simulation that incorporates several known aspects of primate Alu retrotransposon biology and accommodates sampling effects resulting from the methods by which mobile elements are typically discovered and characterized. By modeling a number of amplification scenarios and comparing simulation-generated expectations to empirical data gathered from existing Alu subfamilies, we were able to statistically reject a number of amplification scenarios for individual subfamilies, including that of a rapid expansion or explosion of Alu amplification at the time of human-chimpanzee divergence.

  15. Dynamic shifts of limited working memory resources in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Paul M; Husain, Masud

    2008-08-08

    Our ability to remember what we have seen is very limited. Most current views characterize this limit as a fixed number of items-only four objects-that can be held in visual working memory. We show that visual memory capacity is not fixed by the number of objects, but rather is a limited resource that is shared out dynamically between all items in the visual scene. This resource can be shifted flexibly between objects, with allocation biased by selective attention and toward targets of upcoming eye movements. The proportion of resources allocated to each item determines the precision with which it is remembered, a relation that we show is governed by a simple power law, allowing quantitative estimates of resource distribution in a scene.

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of bacteria in a human host environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lei; Jelsbak, Lars; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke

    2011-01-01

    the evolutionary dynamics of a lineage of a clinically important opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as it adapts to the airways of several individual cystic fibrosis patients over 200,000 bacterial generations, and provide estimates of mutation rates of bacteria in a natural environment....... In contrast to predictions based on in vitro evolution experiments, we document limited diversification of the evolving lineage despite a highly structured and complex host environment. Notably, the lineage went through an initial period of rapid adaptation caused by a small number of mutations...... long-term in vitro evolution experiments. The evolved phenotype of the infecting bacteria further suggests that the opportunistic pathogen has transitioned to become a primary pathogen for cystic fibrosis patients....

  17. Different dynamics and pathway of disulfide bonds reduction of two human defensins, a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liqun

    2017-04-01

    Human defensins are a class of antimicrobial peptides that are crucial components of the innate immune system. Both human α defensin type 5 (HD5) and human β defensin type 3 (hBD-3) have 6 cysteine residues which form 3 pairs of disulfide bonds in oxidizing condition. Disulfide bond linking is important to the protein structure stabilization, and the disulfide bond linking and breaking order have been shown to influence protein function. In this project, microsecond long molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the structure and dynamics of HD5 and hBD-3 wildtype and analogs which have all 3 disulfide bonds released in reducing condition. The structure of hBD-3 was found to be more dynamic and flexible than HD5, based on RMSD, RMSF, and radius of gyration calculations. The disulfide bridge breaking order of HD5 and hBD-3 in reducing condition was predicted by two kinds of methods, which gave consistent results. It was found that the disulfide bonds breaking pathways for HD5 and hBD-3 are very different. The breaking of disulfide bonds can influence the dimer interface by making the dimer structure less stable for both kinds of defensin. In order to understand the difference in dynamics and disulfide bond breaking pathway, hydrophilic and hydrophobic accessible surface areas (ASA), buried surface area between cysteine pairs, entropy of cysteine pairs, and internal energy were calculated. Comparing to the wildtype, hBD-3 analog is more hydrophobic, while HD5 is more hydrophilic. For hBD-3, the disulfide breaking is mainly entropy driven, while other factors such as the solvation effects may take the major role in controlling HD5 disulfide breaking pathway. Proteins 2017; 85:665-681. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Energy landscape and dynamics of brain activity during human bistable perception.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T; Masuda, N.; Megumi, F.; Kanai, R.; Rees, G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in the structure of parietal and prefrontal cortex predict the stability of bistable visual perception. However, the mechanisms linking such individual differences in brain structures to behaviour remain elusive. Here we demonstrate a systematic relationship between the dynamics of brain activity, cortical structure and behaviour underpinning bistable perception. Using fMRI in humans, we find that the activity dynamics during bistable perception are well described as fl...

  19. Unifying Viral Genetics and Human Transportation Data to Predict the Global Transmission Dynamics of Human Influenza H3N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemey, Philippe; Rambaut, Andrew; Bedford, Trevor; Faria, Nuno; Bielejec, Filip; Baele, Guy; Russell, Colin A.; Smith, Derek J.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Brockmann, Dirk; Suchard, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Information on global human movement patterns is central to spatial epidemiological models used to predict the behavior of influenza and other infectious diseases. Yet it remains difficult to test which modes of dispersal drive pathogen spread at various geographic scales using standard epidemiological data alone. Evolutionary analyses of pathogen genome sequences increasingly provide insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza viruses, but to date they have largely neglected the wealth of information on human mobility, mainly because no statistical framework exists within which viral gene sequences and empirical data on host movement can be combined. Here, we address this problem by applying a phylogeographic approach to elucidate the global spread of human influenza subtype H3N2 and assess its ability to predict the spatial spread of human influenza A viruses worldwide. Using a framework that estimates the migration history of human influenza while simultaneously testing and quantifying a range of potential predictive variables of spatial spread, we show that the global dynamics of influenza H3N2 are driven by air passenger flows, whereas at more local scales spread is also determined by processes that correlate with geographic distance. Our analyses further confirm a central role for mainland China and Southeast Asia in maintaining a source population for global influenza diversity. By comparing model output with the known pandemic expansion of H1N1 during 2009, we demonstrate that predictions of influenza spatial spread are most accurate when data on human mobility and viral evolution are integrated. In conclusion, the global dynamics of influenza viruses are best explained by combining human mobility data with the spatial information inherent in sampled viral genomes. The integrated approach introduced here offers great potential for epidemiological surveillance through phylogeographic reconstructions and for improving predictive models of disease control

  20. Sunspot Dynamics Are Reflected in Human Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrushesky, William J. M.; Sothern, Robert B.; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Quiton, Dinah Faith T.; Rietveld, Wop; Boon, Mathilde E.

    2011-03-01

    Periodic episodes of increased sunspot activity (solar electromagnetic storms) occur with 10-11 and 5-6 year periodicities and may be associated with measurable biological events. We investigated whether this sunspot periodicity characterized the incidence of Pap smear-determined cervical epithelial histopathologies and human physiologic functions. From January 1983 through December 2003, monthly averages were obtained for solar flux and sunspot numbers; six infectious, premalignant and malignant changes in the cervical epithelium from 1,182,421 consecutive, serially independent, screening Pap smears (59°9"N, 4°29"E); and six human physiologic functions of a healthy man (oral temperature, pulse, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiration, and peak expiratory flow), which were measured ∼5 times daily during ∼34,500 self-measurement sessions (44°56"N, 93°8"W). After determining that sunspot numbers and solar flux, which were not annually rhythmic, occurred with a prominent 10-year and a less-prominent 5.75-year periodicity during this 21-year study span, each biological data set was analyzed with the same curve-fitting procedures. All six annually rhythmic Pap smear-detected infectious, premalignant and malignant cervical epithelial pathologies showed strong 10-year and weaker 5.75-year cycles, as did all six self-measured, annually rhythmic, physiologic functions. The phases (maxima) for the six histopathologic findings and five of six physiologic measurements were very near, or within, the first two quarters following the 10-year solar maxima. These findings add to the growing evidence that solar magnetic storm periodicities are mirrored by cyclic phase-locked rhythms of similar period length or lengths in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  1. Higher Education, Human Capital, and Regional Dynamics in Southern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaia, Ricardo; Teixeira, Pedro N.; Rocha, Vera

    2017-01-01

    relevance of human capital for economic growth was also associated with the role of technology and its impact in enhancing the demand for more and better qualified workers. However, the capacity of societies to take advantage of those investments has been found to be more complex and uncertain than...... institutions at the regional level and we review the empirical findings on these issues in the context of Southern Europe (Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain). Finally we provide a brief exploratory analysis of the potential association between the education of the population and the GDP per capita...

  2. Using GPS technology to quantify human mobility, dynamic contacts and infectious disease dynamics in a resource-poor urban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M Vazquez-Prokopec

    Full Text Available Empiric quantification of human mobility patterns is paramount for better urban planning, understanding social network structure and responding to infectious disease threats, especially in light of rapid growth in urbanization and globalization. This need is of particular relevance for developing countries, since they host the majority of the global urban population and are disproportionally affected by the burden of disease. We used Global Positioning System (GPS data-loggers to track the fine-scale (within city mobility patterns of 582 residents from two neighborhoods from the city of Iquitos, Peru. We used ∼2.3 million GPS data-points to quantify age-specific mobility parameters and dynamic co-location networks among all tracked individuals. Geographic space significantly affected human mobility, giving rise to highly local mobility kernels. Most (∼80% movements occurred within 1 km of an individual's home. Potential hourly contacts among individuals were highly irregular and temporally unstructured. Only up to 38% of the tracked participants showed a regular and predictable mobility routine, a sharp contrast to the situation in the developed world. As a case study, we quantified the impact of spatially and temporally unstructured routines on the dynamics of transmission of an influenza-like pathogen within an Iquitos neighborhood. Temporally unstructured daily routines (e.g., not dominated by a single location, such as a workplace, where an individual repeatedly spent significant amount of time increased an epidemic's final size and effective reproduction number by 20% in comparison to scenarios modeling temporally structured contacts. Our findings provide a mechanistic description of the basic rules that shape human mobility within a resource-poor urban center, and contribute to the understanding of the role of fine-scale patterns of individual movement and co-location in infectious disease dynamics. More generally, this study

  3. Using GPS technology to quantify human mobility, dynamic contacts and infectious disease dynamics in a resource-poor urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Bisanzio, Donal; Stoddard, Steven T; Paz-Soldan, Valerie; Morrison, Amy C; Elder, John P; Ramirez-Paredes, Jhon; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Scott, Thomas W; Kitron, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Empiric quantification of human mobility patterns is paramount for better urban planning, understanding social network structure and responding to infectious disease threats, especially in light of rapid growth in urbanization and globalization. This need is of particular relevance for developing countries, since they host the majority of the global urban population and are disproportionally affected by the burden of disease. We used Global Positioning System (GPS) data-loggers to track the fine-scale (within city) mobility patterns of 582 residents from two neighborhoods from the city of Iquitos, Peru. We used ∼2.3 million GPS data-points to quantify age-specific mobility parameters and dynamic co-location networks among all tracked individuals. Geographic space significantly affected human mobility, giving rise to highly local mobility kernels. Most (∼80%) movements occurred within 1 km of an individual's home. Potential hourly contacts among individuals were highly irregular and temporally unstructured. Only up to 38% of the tracked participants showed a regular and predictable mobility routine, a sharp contrast to the situation in the developed world. As a case study, we quantified the impact of spatially and temporally unstructured routines on the dynamics of transmission of an influenza-like pathogen within an Iquitos neighborhood. Temporally unstructured daily routines (e.g., not dominated by a single location, such as a workplace, where an individual repeatedly spent significant amount of time) increased an epidemic's final size and effective reproduction number by 20% in comparison to scenarios modeling temporally structured contacts. Our findings provide a mechanistic description of the basic rules that shape human mobility within a resource-poor urban center, and contribute to the understanding of the role of fine-scale patterns of individual movement and co-location in infectious disease dynamics. More generally, this study emphasizes the need for

  4. Human-Structure Dynamic Interaction during Short-Distance Free Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shahabpoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interactions of falling human bodies with civil structures, regardless of their potentially critical effects, have sparsely been researched in contact biomechanics. The physical contact models suggested in the existing literature, particularly for short-distant falls in home settings, assume the human body falls on a “rigid” (not vibrating ground. A similar assumption is usually made during laboratory-based fall tests, including force platforms. Based on observations from a set of pediatric head-first free fall tests, the present paper shows that the dynamics of the grounded force plate are not always negligible when doing fall test in a laboratory setting. By using a similar analogy for lightweight floor structures, it is shown that ignoring the dynamics of floors in the contact model can result in an up to 35% overestimation of the peak force experienced by a falling human. A nonlinear contact model is suggested, featuring an agent-based modelling approach, where the dynamics of the falling human and the impact object (force plate or a floor structure here are each modelled using a single-degree-of-freedom model to simulate their dynamic interactions. The findings of this research can have wide applications in areas such as impact biomechanics and sports science.

  5. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  6. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  7. Influence of some psychological factors on temperature dynamics of human hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreneva, L. G.; Apenisheva, N. P.; Zakharov, Pavel V.; Markov, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    Temperature dynamics of the hands of human subjects was investigated by means of dynamical thermography and shown to depend on the personality and psychological conditions of the subjects. For neurotic personalities, especially under stress, the temperature is shown not to change at all in most cases. Stress resistant `independent' persons show very stable dynamics with relatively small temperature changes (about 2 degrees). The dependence of temperature patterns of `intermediate,' or `active,' personalities on the conditions of stress, mental concentration, and so on, is discussed.

  8. Human-Autonomy Teaming: Supporting Dynamically Adjustable Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is a technical update for the NATO-STO HFM-247 working group. Our progress on four goals will be discussed. For Goal 1, a conceptual model of HAT is presented. HAT looks to make automation act as more of a teammate, by having it communicate with human operators in a more human, goal-directed, manner which provides transparency into the reasoning behind automated recommendations and actions. This, in turn, permits more trust in the automation when it is appropriate, and less when it is not, allowing a more targeted supervision of automated functions. For Goal 2, we wanted to test these concepts and principles. We present findings from a recent simulation and describe two in progress. Goal 3 was to develop pattern(s) of HAT solution(s). These were originally presented at HCII 2016 and are reviewed. Goal 4 is to develop a re-usable HAT software agent. This is an ongoing effort to be delivered October 2017.

  9. In Vivo Estimation of Human Forearm and Wrist Dynamic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyungbin; Chang, Pyung-Hun; Kang, Sang Hoon

    2017-05-01

    It is important to estimate the 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) impedance of human forearm and wrist (i.e., forearm prono-supination, and wrist flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) in motor control and in the diagnosis of altered mechanical resistance following stroke. There is, however, a lack of methods to characterize 3 DOF impedance. Thus, we developed a reliable and accurate impedance estimation method, the distal internal model based impedance control (dIMBIC)-based method, to characterize the 3 DOF impedance, including cross-coupled terms between DOFs, for the first time. Its accuracy and reliability were experimentally validated using a robot with substantial nonlinear joint friction. The 3 DOF human forearm and wrist impedance of eight healthy subjects was reliably characterized, and its linear behavior was verified. Thus, the dIMBIC-based method can provide us with 3 DOF forearm and wrist impedance regardless of nonlinear robot joint friction. It is expected that, with the proposed method, the 3 DOF impedance estimation can promote motor control studies and complement the diagnosis of altered wrist and forearm resistance post-stroke by providing objective impedance estimates, including cross-coupled terms.

  10. Untold stories: the human face of poverty dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowse, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Key Points • Life histories offer an important window for policy makers, and should be brought to the policy table much more frequently. • Life histories show the human face of chronic poverty. Such vignettes provide concrete examples of poverty traps – such as insecurity, social discrimination a...... have ambivalent effects. • Whilst life histories are not representative, they highlight key themes and processes which are ‘typical’ of individuals with similar sets of sociobiographical characteristics who live in similar social, economic and political circumstances.......Key Points • Life histories offer an important window for policy makers, and should be brought to the policy table much more frequently. • Life histories show the human face of chronic poverty. Such vignettes provide concrete examples of poverty traps – such as insecurity, social discrimination...... and poor working conditions – and how poor people struggle to escape them. • The vignettes presented here illustrate how social protection measures have improved the wellbeing of four out of five selected individuals. They also show the importance of kin and social networks, and how these connections can...

  11. Dynamic photophysical processes in laser irradiated human cortical skull bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna

    2009-02-01

    Modulated luminescence (LUM) technique was applied to analyze photophysical processes in the cortical layer of human skull bones. The theoretical interpretation of the results was based on the optical excitation and decay rate equations of the fluorophore and on the molecular interaction parameter with the photon field density in the matrix of the bone. Using comparisons of the theory with the frequency response of dental LUM it was concluded that the optically active molecular species (fluorophore) in the bones is hydroxyapatite. An effective relaxation lifetime of skull cortical bone was derived theoretically and was found to depend on the intrinsic fluorophore decay lifetime, on the photon field density, and on the thickness of the bone. The experimentally measured dependencies were in excellent agreement with the theoretical model. The theory was able to yield measurements of the optical scattering coefficient, optical absorption coefficient, and mean coupling coefficient. These results show that the quantitative LUM can be used as a sensitive method to measure optical properties of the active fluorophore in cortical skull bones and the optical-field-induced molecular interaction parameter. When calibrated vs. laser intensity, the modulated luminescence can also be used to measure human skull thickness. These traits can be applied to monitor the bone mineral density (BMD) and, ultimately can be used as potential markers of bone health or disease, such as osteoporosis or bone cancer.

  12. Ligand induced conformational changes of the human serotonin transporter revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    Full Text Available The competitive inhibitor cocaine and the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine induce different conformational states of the human serotonin transporter. It has been shown from accessibility experiments that cocaine mainly induces an outward-facing conformation, while the non-competitive inhibitor ibogaine, and its active metabolite noribogaine, have been proposed to induce an inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter similar to what has been observed for the endogenous substrate, serotonin. The ligand induced conformational changes within the human serotonin transporter caused by these three different types of ligands, substrate, non-competitive and competitive inhibitors, are studied from multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations initiated from a homology model of the human serotonin transporter. The results reveal that diverse conformations of the human serotonin transporter are captured from the molecular dynamics simulations depending on the type of the ligand bound. The inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter is reached with noribogaine bound, and this state resembles a previously identified inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter obtained from molecular dynamics simulation with bound substrate, but also a recently published inward-facing conformation of a bacterial homolog, the leucine transporter from Aquifex Aoelicus. The differences observed in ligand induced behavior are found to originate from different interaction patterns between the ligands and the protein. Such atomic-level understanding of how an inhibitor can dictate the conformational response of a transporter by ligand binding may be of great importance for future drug design.

  13. Impact of human activity patterns on the dynamics of information diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, José Luis; Moro, Esteban

    2009-07-17

    We study the impact of human activity patterns on information diffusion. To this end we ran a viral email experiment involving 31,183 individuals in which we were able to track a specific piece of information through the social network. We found that, contrary to traditional models, information travels at an unexpectedly slow pace. By using a branching model which accurately describes the experiment, we show that the large heterogeneity found in the response time is responsible for the slow dynamics of information at the collective level. Given the generality of our result, we discuss the important implications of this finding while modeling human dynamical collective phenomena.

  14. Temporal dynamics of reward anticipation in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Liu, Xun; Zheng, Ya

    2017-09-01

    Reward anticipation is a complex process including cue evaluation, motor preparation, and feedback anticipation. The present study investigated whether these psychological processes were dissociable on neural dynamics in terms of incentive valence and approach motivation. We recorded EEG when participants were performing a monetary incentive delay task, and found a cue-P3 during the cue-evaluation stage, a contingent negative variation (CNV) during the motor-preparation stage, and a stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) during the feedback-anticipation stage. Critically, both the cue-P3 and SPN exhibited an enhanced sensitivity to gain versus loss anticipation, which was not observed for the CNV. Moreover, both the cue-P3 and SPN, instead of the CNV, for gain anticipation selectively predicted the participants' approach motivation as measured in a following effort expenditure for rewards task, particularly when reward uncertainty was maximal. Together, these results indicate that reward anticipation consists of several sub-stages, each with distinct functional significance, thus providing implications for neuropsychiatric diseases characterized by dysfunction in anticipatory reward processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Transmission Dynamics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. M.; Anderson, R. M.

    1988-10-01

    The paper first reviews data on HIV infections and AIDS disease among homosexual men, heterosexuals, intravenous (IV) drug abusers and children born to infected mothers, in both developed and developing countries. We survey such information as is currently available about the distribution of incubation times that elapse between HIV infection and the appearance of AIDS, about the fraction of those infected with HIV who eventually go on to develop AIDS, about time-dependent patterns of infectiousness and about distributions of rates of acquiring new sexual or needle-sharing partners. With this information, models for the transmission dynamics of HIV are developed, beginning with deliberately oversimplified models and progressing - on the basis of the understanding thus gained - to more complex ones. Where possible, estimates of the model's parameters are derived from the epidemiological data, and predictions are compared with observed trends. We also combine these epidemiological models with demographic considerations to assess the effects that heterosexually-transmitted HIV/AIDS may eventually have on rates of population growth, on age profiles and on associated economic and social indicators, in African and other countries. The degree to which sexual or other habits must change to bring the `basic reproductive rate', R_0, of HIV infections below unity is discussed. We conclude by outlining some research needs, both in the refinement and development of models and in the collection of epidemiological data.

  16. A model for the dynamics of human weight cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2006-03-01

    The resolution to lose weight by cognitive restraint of nutritional intake often leads to repeated bouts of weight loss and regain, a phenomenon known as weight cycling or "yo-yo dieting". A simple mathematical model for weight cycling is presented. The model is based on a feedback of psychological nature by which a subject decides to reduce dietary intake once a threshold weight is exceeded. The analysis of the model indicates that sustained oscillations in body weight occur in a parameter range bounded by critical values. Only outside this range can body weight reach a stable steady state. The model provides a theoretical framework that captures key facets of weight cycling and suggests ways to control the phenomenon. The view that weight cycling represents self-sustained oscillations has indeed specific implications. In dynamical terms, to bring weight cycling to an end, parameter values should change in such a way as to induce the transition of body weight from sustained oscillations around an unstable steady state to a stable steady state. Maintaining weight under a critical value should prevent weight cycling and allow body weight to stabilize below the oscillatory range.

  17. A dynamic new group within Human Resources Division

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Since 1st May CERN's training and development and personnel management teams have been fused into a new group called Personnel Management and Development. The new Personnel Management and Development Group is responsible for career advancement and management, recruitment, remuneration and for language, communication, management, academic and technical training, keys to a sense of greater well-being and to career progression. The new group was born on 1st May out of the fusion of the "Personnel Management" and "Training and Development" Groups within CERN's Human Resources Division. Its aim is to offer a practical and easily accessible service to assist the members of the personnel and supervisors to manage careers more harmoniously, to make progress and to continue to learn on the job. With Sue Foffano as its Group Leader, the Group comprises four sections: Academic and Technical Training under the guiding hand of Mick Storr; Management, Communication and Language Training headed by Sudeshna Datta-Cockeril...

  18. On the dynamics of a human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, R. L.; Passerello, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Equations of motion for a model of the human body are developed. Basically, the model consists of an elliptical cylinder representing the torso, together with a system of frustrums of elliptical cones representing the limbs. They are connected to the main body and each other by hinges and ball and socket joints. Vector, tensor, and matrix methods provide a systematic organization of the geometry. The equations of motion are developed from the principles of classical mechanics. The solution of these equations then provide the displacement and rotation of the main body when the external forces and relative limb motions are specified. Three simple example motions are studied to illustrate the method. The first is an analysis and comparison of simple lifting on the earth and the moon. The second is an elementary approach to underwater swimming, including both viscous and inertia effects. The third is an analysis of kicking motion and its effect upon a vertically suspended man such as a parachutist.

  19. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  20. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    OpenAIRE

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T

    2011-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomograp...

  1. The Virtual Teacher (VT Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Kostrubiec

    Full Text Available The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC, is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s. Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985 and Schöner-Kelso (1988 models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1 and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2. Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  2. The Virtual Teacher (VT) Paradigm: Learning New Patterns of Interpersonal Coordination Using the Human Dynamic Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Dumas, Guillaume; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Kelso, J A Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Teacher paradigm, a version of the Human Dynamic Clamp (HDC), is introduced into studies of learning patterns of inter-personal coordination. Combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we investigate how the HDC may be used as a Virtual Teacher (VT) to help humans co-produce and internalize new inter-personal coordination pattern(s). Human learners produced rhythmic finger movements whilst observing a computer-driven avatar, animated by dynamic equations stemming from the well-established Haken-Kelso-Bunz (1985) and Schöner-Kelso (1988) models of coordination. We demonstrate that the VT is successful in shifting the pattern co-produced by the VT-human system toward any value (Experiment 1) and that the VT can help humans learn unstable relative phasing patterns (Experiment 2). Using transfer entropy, we find that information flow from one partner to the other increases when VT-human coordination loses stability. This suggests that variable joint performance may actually facilitate interaction, and in the long run learning. VT appears to be a promising tool for exploring basic learning processes involved in social interaction, unraveling the dynamics of information flow between interacting partners, and providing possible rehabilitation opportunities.

  3. Relative clock verifies endogenous bursts of human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Changsong

    2012-01-01

    Temporal bursts are widely observed in many human-activated systems, which may result from both endogenous mechanisms like the highest-priority-first protocol and exogenous factors like the seasonality of activities. To distinguish the effects from different mechanisms is thus of theoretical significance. This letter reports a new timing method by using a relative clock, namely the time length between two consecutive events of an agent is counted as the number of other agents' events appeared during this interval. We propose a model, in which agents act either in a constant rate or with a power-law inter-event time distribution, and the global activity either keeps unchanged or varies periodically vs. time. Our analysis shows that the bursts caused by the heterogeneity of global activity can be eliminated by setting the relative clock, yet the bursts from real individual behaviors still exist. We perform extensive experiments on four large-scale systems, the search engine by AOL, a social bookmarking system —Delicious, a short-message communication network, and a microblogging system —Twitter. Seasonality of global activity is observed, yet the bursts cannot be eliminated by using the relative clock.

  4. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  5. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2015-01-01

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins, (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services. These include primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  6. Adaptation to fragmentation: evolutionary dynamics driven by human influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier; Hargreaves, Anna L; Bonte, Dries; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2017-01-19

    Fragmentation-the process by which habitats are transformed into smaller patches isolated from each other-has been identified as a major threat for biodiversity. Fragmentation has well-established demographic and population genetic consequences, eroding genetic diversity and hindering gene flow among patches. However, fragmentation should also select on life history, both predictably through increased isolation, demographic stochasticity and edge effects, and more idiosyncratically via altered biotic interactions. While species have adapted to natural fragmentation, adaptation to anthropogenic fragmentation has received little attention. In this review, we address how and whether organisms might adapt to anthropogenic fragmentation. Drawing on selected case studies and evolutionary ecology models, we show that anthropogenic fragmentation can generate selection on traits at both the patch and landscape scale, and affect the adaptive potential of populations. We suggest that dispersal traits are likely to experience especially strong selection, as dispersal both enables migration among patches and increases the risk of landing in the inhospitable matrix surrounding them. We highlight that suites of associated traits are likely to evolve together. Importantly, we show that adaptation will not necessarily rescue populations from the negative effects of fragmentation, and may even exacerbate them, endangering the entire metapopulation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-20

    Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a 'three degrees of influence' property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Indoor human thermal adaptation: dynamic processes and weighting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, M; Cao, B; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we explore the correlations between indoor climate change and human thermal adaptation, especially with regard to the timescale and weighting factors of physiological adaptation. A comparative experiment was conducted in China where wintertime indoor climate in the southern region (devoid of space heating) is much colder than in the northern region (with pervasive district heating). Four subject groups with different indoor thermal experiences participated in this climate chamber experiment. The results indicate that previous indoor thermal exposure is an important contributor to occupants' physiological adaptation. More specifically, subjects acclimated to neutral-warm indoors tended to have stronger physiological responses and felt more uncomfortable in moderate cold exposures than those adapted to the cold. As for the driving force of thermal adaptation, physiological acclimation is an important aspect among all the supposed adaptive layers. However, the physiological adaptation speed lags behind changes in the overall subjective perception. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Carbon dynamics of river corridors and the effects of human alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Hall, Robert O.; Lininger, Katherine B; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Walters, David

    2017-01-01

    Research in stream metabolism, gas exchange, and sediment dynamics indicates that rivers are an active component of the global carbon cycle and that river form and process can influence partitioning of terrestrially derived carbon among the atmosphere, geosphere, and ocean. Here we develop a conceptual model of carbon dynamics (inputs, outputs, and storage of organic carbon) within a river corridor, which includes the active channel and the riparian zone. The exchange of carbon from the channel to the riparian zone represents potential for storage of transported carbon not included in the “active pipe” model of organic carbon (OC) dynamics in freshwater systems. The active pipe model recognizes that river processes influence carbon dynamics, but focuses on CO2 emissions from the channel and eventual delivery to the ocean. We also review how human activities directly and indirectly alter carbon dynamics within river corridors. We propose that dams create the most significant alteration of carbon dynamics within a channel, but that alteration of riparian zones, including the reduction of lateral connectivity between the channel and riparian zone, constitutes the most substantial change of carbon dynamics in river corridors. We argue that the morphology and processes of a river corridor regulate the ability to store, transform, and transport OC, and that people are pervasive modifiers of river morphology and processes. The net effect of most human activities, with the notable exception of reservoir construction, appears to be that of reducing the ability of river corridors to store OC within biota and sediment, which effectively converts river corridors to OC sources rather than OC sinks. We conclude by summarizing knowledge gaps in OC dynamics and the implications of our findings for managing OC dynamics within river corridors.

  10. Dynamics and distribution of natural and human-caused hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Rabalais

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water masses can become undersaturated with oxygen when natural processes alone or in combination with anthropogenic processes produce enough organic carbon that is aerobically decomposed faster than the rate of oxygen re-aeration. The dominant natural processes usually involved are photosynthetic carbon production and microbial respiration. The re-supply rate is indirectly related to its isolation from the surface layer. Hypoxic water masses (<2 mg L−1, or approximately 30% saturation can form, therefore, under "natural" conditions, and are more likely to occur in marine systems when the water residence time is extended, water exchange and ventilation are minimal, stratification occurs, and where carbon production and export to the bottom layer are relatively high. Hypoxia has occurred through geological time and naturally occurs in oxygen minimum zones, deep basins, eastern boundary upwelling systems, and fjords.

    Hypoxia development and continuation in many areas of the world's coastal ocean is accelerated by human activities, especially where nutrient loading increased in the Anthropocene. This higher loading set in motion a cascading set of events related to eutrophication. The formation of hypoxic areas has been exacerbated by any combination of interactions that increase primary production and accumulation of organic carbon leading to increased respiratory demand for oxygen below a seasonal or permanent pycnocline. Nutrient loading is likely to increase further as population growth and resource intensification rises, especially with increased dependency on crops using fertilizers, burning of fossil fuels, urbanization, and waste water generation. It is likely that the occurrence and persistence of hypoxia will be even more widespread and have more impacts than presently observed.

    Global climate change will further complicate the causative factors in both natural and human-caused hypoxia. The likelihood of

  11. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Mira, Alex

    2014-04-27

    Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial community which could be

  12. A new method to consider human actions in the framework of a dynamic PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloos, M.; Peschke, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The variety of accident sequences to be considered in the framework of a PSA derives from mutual dependencies between the physical process, the behaviour of the technical system, human actions and stochastic influences along the time axis. Because the conventional PSA approach is not able to adequately account for these interactions, so-called probabilistic dynamics methods have been developed. They generally achieve a more realistic modelling of accident scenarios and a more realistic safety assessment. At GRS, the method MCDET - a combination of Monte Carlo Simulation und the Discrete Dynamic Event Tree method - was developed. The implementation of MCDET was supplemented by a so called Crew-Module which allows - together with a deterministic dynamics code - to simulate human actions as a dynamic process evolving over time in interaction with the system and process dynamics. The Crew-Module accounts for communications between crew members and for performance shaping factors like stress, knowledge or ergonomics. This paper presents the Crew- Module and gives an overview of the results which may be obtained from its combination with MCDET and a deterministic dynamics code. The emergency operating procedure 'Secondary Side Bleed and Feed' in a German PWR is selected as an illustrative application. (authors)

  13. Software tools for data modelling and processing of human body temperature circadian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena S; Afanasova, Anastasia I

    2015-01-01

    This paper is presenting a software development for simulating and processing thermometry data. The motivation of this research is the miniaturization of actuators attached to human body which allow frequent temperature measurements and improve the medical diagnosis procedures related to circadian dynamics.

  14. Toward An Integral Process Theory Of Human Dynamics: Dancing The Universal Tango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ross

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is an outline toward developing a fuller process theory of human dynamics aimed at practical applications by a diverse audience. The theory represents a transdisciplinary synthesis of a universal pattern and integrates humans’ projection dynamics with complex systems dynamics. Five premises, presented in lay language with examples, capture basic elements involved in the meta process of human development and change: reciprocity, projection, development’s structural limits, oscillations, and structural coupling. Based on a fractal dialectical pattern that shows up wherever complex systems are involved, the theory’s applications are scalable. It could be useful for personal development, public policy design, issue analysis, and systemic action on intransigent issues. It may be a complementary adjunct to developmental stage theories because it deals in an accessible way with the processes involved in stage transitions. Throughout the article, its practical relevance at some individual, social, and political scales is illustrated or mentioned. Readers interested in individual and social change may gain a sense of the human dynamics involved in it, and thus the potential usefulness of a process theory that describes what goes on in human change and development.

  15. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the still largely unknown sequential and three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated on the 30nm chromatin fiber level with Monte Carlo,

  16. Toward An Integral Process Theory Of Human Dynamics:Dancing The Universal Tango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ross

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an outline toward developing a fuller process theory of human dynamics aimed at practical applications by a diverse audience. The theory represents a transdisciplinary synthesis of a universal pattern and integrates humans’ projection dynamics with complex systems dynamics. Five premises, presented in lay language with examples, capture basic elements involved in the meta process of human development and change: reciprocity, projection, development’s structural limits, oscillations, and structural coupling. Based on a fractal dialectical pattern that shows up wherever complex systems are involved, the theory’s applications are scalable. It could be useful for personal development, public policy design, issue analysis, and systemic action on intransigent issues. It may be a complementary adjunct to developmental stage theories because it deals in an accessible way with the processes involved in stage transitions. Throughout the article, its practical relevance at some individual, social, and political scales is illustrated or mentioned. Readers interested in individual and social change may gain a sense of the human dynamics involved in it, and thus the potential usefulness of a process theory that describes what goes on in human change and development.

  17. Static vs. Dynamic Modeling of Human Nonverbal Behavior from Multiple Cues and Modalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petridis, Stavros; Gunes, Hatice; Kaltwang, Sebastian; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Human nonverbal behavior recognition from multiple cues and modalities has attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Despite the interest, many research questions, including the type of feature representation, choice of static vs. dynamic classification schemes, the number and type of cues or

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of human locomotion: effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on local dynamic stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eTerrier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been observed that times series of gait parameters (stride length (SL, stride time (ST and stride speed (SS, exhibit long-term persistence and fractal-like properties. Synchronizing steps with rhythmic auditory stimuli modifies the persistent fluctuation pattern to anti-persistence. Another nonlinear method estimates the degree of resilience of gait control to small perturbations, i.e. the local dynamic stability (LDS. The method makes use of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, which estimates how fast a nonlinear system embedded in a reconstructed state space (attractor diverges after an infinitesimal perturbation. We propose to use an instrumented treadmill to simultaneously measure basic gait parameters (time series of SL, ST and SS from which the statistical persistence among consecutive strides can be assessed, and the trajectory of the center of pressure (from which the LDS can be estimated. In 20 healthy participants, the response to rhythmic auditory cueing (RAC of LDS and of statistical persistence (assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA was compared. By analyzing the divergence curves, we observed that long-term LDS (computed as the reverse of the average logarithmic rate of divergence between the 4th and the 10th strides downstream from nearest neighbors in the reconstructed attractor was strongly enhanced (relative change +47%. That is likely the indication of a more dampened dynamics. The change in short-term LDS (divergence over one step was smaller (+3%. DFA results (scaling exponents confirmed an anti-persistent pattern in ST, SL and SS. Long-term LDS (but not short-term LDS and scaling exponents exhibited a significant correlation between them (r=0.7. Both phenomena probably result from the more conscious/voluntary gait control that is required by RAC. We suggest that LDS and statistical persistence should be used to evaluate the efficiency of cueing therapy in patients with neurological gait disorders.

  19. Exact results for the Barabási model of human dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Alexei

    2005-12-09

    Human activity patterns display a bursty dynamics with interevent times following a heavy tailed distribution. This behavior has been recently shown to be rooted in the fact that humans assign their active tasks different priorities, a process that can be modeled as a priority queueing system [A.-L. Barabási, Nature (London) 435, 207 (2005)]. In this Letter we obtain exact results for the Barabási model with two tasks, calculating the priority and waiting time distribution of active tasks. We demonstrate that the model has a singular behavior in the extremal dynamics limit, when the highest priority task is selected first. We find that independently of the selection protocol, the average waiting time is smaller or equal to the number of active tasks, and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the waiting time distribution. These results have important implications for understanding complex systems with extremal dynamics.

  20. Time Allocation in Social Networks: Correlation Between Social Structure and Human Communication Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Moro, Esteban

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  1. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  2. Time allocation in social networks: correlation between social structure and human communication dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Miritello, Giovanna; Moro, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  3. Dynamics of the Human Structural Connectome Underlying Working Memory Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Foley, Sonya; Jones, Derek K

    2016-04-06

    Brain region-specific changes have been demonstrated with a variety of cognitive training interventions. The effect of cognitive training on brain subnetworks in humans, however, remains largely unknown, with studies limited to functional networks. Here, we used a well-established working memory training program and state-of-the art neuroimaging methods in 40 healthy adults (21 females, mean age 26.5 years). Near and far-transfer training effects were assessed using computerized working memory and executive function tasks. Adaptive working memory training led to improvement on (non)trained working memory tasks and generalization to tasks of reasoning and inhibition. Graph theoretical analysis of the structural (white matter) network connectivity ("connectome") revealed increased global integration within a frontoparietal attention network following adaptive working memory training compared with the nonadaptive group. Furthermore, the impact on the outcome of graph theoretical analyses of different white matter metrics to infer "connection strength" was evaluated. Increased efficiency of the frontoparietal network was best captured when using connection strengths derived from MR metrics that are thought to be more sensitive to differences in myelination (putatively indexed by the [quantitative] longitudinal relaxation rate, R1) than previously used diffusion MRI metrics (fractional anisotropy or fiber-tracking recovered streamlines). Our findings emphasize the critical role of specific microstructural markers in providing important hints toward the mechanisms underpinning training-induced plasticity that may drive working memory improvement in clinical populations. This is the first study to explore training-induced changes in the structural connectome using a well-controlled design to examine cognitive training with up-to-date neuroimaging methods. We found changes in global integration based on white matter connectivity within a frontoparietal attention network

  4. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... of mass and muscle activation strategy also exhibit a U-shaped relationship with walking speed. We investigated the dynamics of joint angle trajectories and the centre of mass accelerations at five different speeds ranging from 20 to 180% of the predicted preferred speed (based on Froude speed) in twelve...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  5. Dynamic Multi-Coil Shimming of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Boer, Vincent O.; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    High quality magnetic field homogenization of the human brain (i.e. shimming) for MR imaging and spectroscopy is a demanding task. The susceptibility differences between air and tissue are a longstanding problem as they induce complex field distortions in the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes. To date, the theoretical gains of high field MR have only been realized partially in the human brain due to limited magnetic field homogeneity. A novel shimming technique for the human brain is presented that is based on the combination of non-orthogonal basis fields from 48 individual, circular coils. Custom-built amplifier electronics enabled the dynamic application of the multi-coil shim fields in a slice-specific fashion. Dynamic multi-coil (DMC) shimming is shown to eliminate most of the magnetic field inhomogeneity apparent in the human brain at 7 Tesla and provided improved performance compared to state-of-the-art dynamic shim updating with zero through third order spherical harmonic functions. The novel technique paves the way for high field MR applications of the human brain for which excellent magnetic field homogeneity is a prerequisite. PMID:21824794

  6. Human motion planning based on recursive dynamics and optimal control techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Janzen; Huang, Gang; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient optimal control and recursive dynamics-based computer animation system for simulating and controlling the motion of articulated figures. A quasi-Newton nonlinear programming technique (super-linear convergence) is implemented to solve minimum torque-based human motion-planning problems. The explicit analytical gradients needed in the dynamics are derived using a matrix exponential formulation and Lie algebra. Cubic spline functions are used to make the search space for an optimal solution finite. Based on our formulations, our method is well conditioned and robust, in addition to being computationally efficient. To better illustrate the efficiency of our method, we present results of natural looking and physically correct human motions for a variety of human motion tasks involving open and closed loop kinematic chains.

  7. Model Of The Human Observer and Controller Of A Dynamic System Theory and model application to ship handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.; Perdok, J.; van der Tak, C.

    1988-01-01

    The MMS model presented in ths paper describes rather detailed human control of a dynamic system. The model is an integration and extension of previously developped (validated) (sub-)models. The model describes human control of a dynamic system, involving intermittent control behavior during finite

  8. Dynamic motion planning of 3D human locomotion using gradient-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joo; Wang, Qian; Rahmatalla, Salam; Swan, Colby C; Arora, Jasbir S; Abdel-Malek, Karim; Assouline, Jose G

    2008-06-01

    Since humans can walk with an infinite variety of postures and limb movements, there is no unique solution to the modeling problem to predict human gait motions. Accordingly, we test herein the hypothesis that the redundancy of human walking mechanisms makes solving for human joint profiles and force time histories an indeterminate problem best solved by inverse dynamics and optimization methods. A new optimization-based human-modeling framework is thus described for predicting three-dimensional human gait motions on level and inclined planes. The basic unknowns in the framework are the joint motion time histories of a 25-degree-of-freedom human model and its six global degrees of freedom. The joint motion histories are calculated by minimizing an objective function such as deviation of the trunk from upright posture that relates to the human model's performance. A variety of important constraints are imposed on the optimization problem, including (1) satisfaction of dynamic equilibrium equations by requiring the model's zero moment point (ZMP) to lie within the instantaneous geometrical base of support, (2) foot collision avoidance, (3) limits on ground-foot friction, and (4) vanishing yawing moment. Analytical forms of objective and constraint functions are presented and discussed for the proposed human-modeling framework in which the resulting optimization problems are solved using gradient-based mathematical programming techniques. When the framework is applied to the modeling of bipedal locomotion on level and inclined planes, acyclic human walking motions that are smooth and realistic as opposed to less natural robotic motions are obtained. The aspects of the modeling framework requiring further investigation and refinement, as well as potential applications of the framework in biomechanics, are discussed.

  9. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application.

  10. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ricci

    Full Text Available The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application.

  11. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... of mass and muscle activation strategy also exhibit a U-shaped relationship with walking speed. We investigated the dynamics of joint angle trajectories and the centre of mass accelerations at five different speeds ranging from 20 to 180% of the predicted preferred speed (based on Froude speed) in twelve...

  12. On the dynamics of chain systems. [applications in manipulator and human body models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, R. L.; Passerello, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-oriented method for obtaining dynamical equations of motion for chain systems is presented. A chain system is defined as an arbitrarily assembled set of rigid bodies such that adjoining bodies have at least one common point and such that closed loops are not formed. The equations of motion are developed through the use of Lagrange's form of d'Alembert's principle. The method and procedure is illustrated with an elementary study of a tripod space manipulator. The method is designed for application with systems such as human body models, chains and cables, and dynamic finite-segment models.

  13. Potent Human Telomerase Inhibitors: Molecular Dynamic Simulations, Multiple Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening, and Biochemical Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirgahi Talari, Faezeh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Golestanian, Sahand; Jarstfer, Michael; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-12-28

    Telomere maintenance is a universal cancer hallmark, and small molecules that disrupt telomere maintenance generally have anticancer properties. Since the vast majority of cancer cells utilize telomerase activity for telomere maintenance, the enzyme has been considered as an anticancer drug target. Recently, rational design of telomerase inhibitors was made possible by the determination of high resolution structures of the catalytic telomerase subunit from a beetle and subsequent molecular modeling of the human telomerase complex. A hybrid strategy including docking, pharmacophore-based virtual screening, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) were used to identify new human telomerase inhibitors. Docking methodology was applied to investigate the ssDNA telomeric sequence and two well-known human telomerase inhibitors' (BIBR1532 and MST-312) modes of interactions with hTERT TEN domain. Subsequently molecular dynamic simulations were performed to monitor and compare hTERT TEN domain, TEN-ssDNA, TEN-BIBR1532, TEN-MST-312, and TEN-ssDNA-BIBR1532 behavior in a dynamic environment. Pharmacophore models were generated considering the inhibitors manner in the TEN domain anchor site. These exploratory studies identified several new potent inhibitors whose IC50 values were generated experimentally in a low micromolar range with the aid of biochemical assays, including both the direct telomerase and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays. The results suggest that the current models of human telomerase are useful templates for rational inhibitor design.

  14. Imaging mitochondrial dynamics in human skin reveals depth-dependent hypoxia and malignant potential for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouli, Dimitra; Balu, Mihaela; Alonzo, Carlo A; Liu, Zhiyi; Quinn, Kyle P; Rius-Diaz, Francisca; Harris, Ronald M; Kelly, Kristen M; Tromberg, Bruce J; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-11-30

    Active changes in mitochondrial structure and organization facilitate cellular homeostasis. Because aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are implicated in a variety of human diseases, their assessment is potentially useful for diagnosis, therapy, and disease monitoring. Because current techniques for evaluating mitochondrial morphology are invasive or necessitate mitochondria-specific dyes, their clinical translation is limited. We report that mitochondrial dynamics can be monitored in vivo, within intact human skin by relying entirely on endogenous two-photon-excited fluorescence from the reduced metabolic coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We established the sensitivity of this approach with in vivo, fast temporal studies of arterial occlusion-reperfusion, which revealed acute changes in the mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics of the lower human epidermal layers. In vitro hypoxic-reperfusion studies validated that the in vivo outcomes were a result of NADH fluorescence changes. To demonstrate the diagnostic potential of this approach, we evaluated healthy and cancerous human skin epithelia. Healthy tissues displayed consistent, depth-dependent morphological and mitochondrial organization patterns that varied with histological stratification and intraepithelial mitochondrial protein expression. In contrast, these consistent patterns were absent in cancerous skin lesions. We exploited these differences to successfully differentiate healthy from cancerous tissues using a predictive classification approach. Collectively, these results demonstrate that our label-free, automated, near real-time assessments of mitochondrial organization-relying solely on endogenous contrast-could be useful for accurate, noninvasive in vivo diagnosis. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Using experimental human influenza infections to validate a viral dynamic model and the implications for prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S C; You, S H; Liu, C Y; Chio, C P; Liao, C M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to use experimental infection data of human influenza to assess a simple viral dynamics model in epithelial cells and better understand the underlying complex factors governing the infection process. The developed study model expands on previous reports of a target cell-limited model with delayed virus production. Data from 10 published experimental infection studies of human influenza was used to validate the model. Our results elucidate, mechanistically, the associations between epithelial cells, human immune responses, and viral titres and were supported by the experimental infection data. We report that the maximum total number of free virions following infection is 10(3)-fold higher than the initial introduced titre. Our results indicated that the infection rates of unprotected epithelial cells probably play an important role in affecting viral dynamics. By simulating an advanced model of viral dynamics and applying it to experimental infection data of human influenza, we obtained important estimates of the infection rate. This work provides epidemiologically meaningful results, meriting further efforts to understand the causes and consequences of influenza A infection.

  16. Multiscale Poincar? plots for visualizing the structure of heartbeat time series

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Teresa S.; Mariani, Sara; Burykin, Anton; Rodrigues, Filipa; Silva, Tiago F.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Poincar? delay maps are widely used in the analysis of cardiac interbeat interval (RR) dynamics. To facilitate visualization of the structure of these time series, we introduce multiscale Poincar? (MSP) plots. Methods Starting with the original RR time series, the method employs a coarse-graining procedure to create a family of time series, each of which represents the system?s dynamics in a different time scale. Next, the Poincar? plots are constructed for the original and the coa...

  17. Atrial Fibrillation Dynamics and Ionic Block Effects in Six Heterogeneous Human 3D Virtual Atria with Distinct Repolarization Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sánchez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF usually manifests as reentrant circuits propagating through the whole atria creating chaotic activation patterns. Little is yet known about how differences in electrophysiological and ionic properties between patients modulate reentrant patterns in AF. The goal of this study is to quantify how variability in action potential duration (APD at different stages of repolarization determines AF dynamics and their modulation by ionic block using a set of virtual whole-atria human models. Six human whole-atria models are constructed based on the same anatomical structure and fiber orientation, but with different electrophysiological phenotypes. Membrane kinetics for each whole-atria model are selected with distinct APD characteristics at 20, 50, and 90% repolarization, from an experimentally calibrated population of human atrial action potential models, including AF remodeling and acetylcholine parasympathetic effects. Our simulations show that in all whole-atria models, reentrant circuits tend to organize around the pulmonary veins and the right atrial appendage, thus leading to higher dominant frequency (DF and more organized activation in the left atrium than in the right atrium. Differences in APD in all phases of repolarization (not only APD90 yielded quantitative differences in fibrillation patterns with long APD associated with slower and more regular dynamics. Long APD50 and APD20 were associated with increased interatrial conduction block and interatrial differences in DF and organization index, creating reentry instability and self-termination in some cases. Specific inhibitions of IK1, INaK, or INa reduce DF and organization of the arrhythmia by enlarging wave meandering, reducing the number of secondary wavelets, and promoting interatrial block in all six virtual patients, especially for the phenotypes with short APD at 20, 50, and/or 90% repolarization. This suggests that therapies aiming at prolonging the early

  18. Human health monitoring technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Hyun; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring vital signs from human body is very important to healthcare and medical diagnosis, because they contain valuable information about arterial occlusions, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, autonomous nervous system pathologies, stress level, and obstructive sleep apnea. Existing methods, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) sensor and photoplethysmogram (PPG) sensor, requires direct contact to the skin and it can causes skin irritation and the inconvenience of long-term wearing. For reducing the inconvenience in the conventional sensors, microwave and millimeter-wave sensors have been proposed since 1970s using micro-Doppler effect from one's cardiopulmonary activity. The Doppler radar sensor can remotely detect the respiration and heartbeat up to few meters away from the subject, but they have a multiple subject issue and are not suitable for an ambulatory subject. As a compromise, a noncontact proximity vital sign sensor has been recently proposed and developed. The purpose of this paper is to review the noncontact proximity vital sign sensors for detection of respiration, heartbeat rate, and/or wrist pulse. This sensor basically employs near-field perturbation of radio-frequency (RF) planar resonator due to the proximity of the one's chest or radial artery at the wrist. Various sensing systems based on the SAW filter, phase-locked loop (PLL) synthesizer, reflectometer, and interferometer have been proposed. These self-sustained systems can measure the nearfield perturbation and transform it into DC voltage variation. Consequently, they can detect the respiration and heartbeat rate near the chest of subject and pulse from radial artery at the wrist.

  19. Dynamic landscapes and human dispersal patterns: tectonics, coastlines, and the reconstruction of human habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Geoffrey N.; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2011-06-01

    Studies of the impact of physical environment on human evolution usually focus on climate as the main external forcing agent of evolutionary and cultural change. In this paper we focus on changes in the physical character of the landscape driven by geophysical processes as an equally potent factor. Most of the landscapes where finds of early human fossils and artefacts are concentrated are ones that have been subjected to high levels of geological instability, either because of especially active tectonic processes associated with faulting and volcanic activity or because of proximity to coastlines subject to dramatic changes of geographical position and physical character by changes of relative sea level. These processes can have both beneficial effects, creating ecologically attractive conditions for human settlement, and deleterious or disruptive ones, creating barriers to movement, disruption of ecological conditions, or hazards to survival. Both positive and negative factors can have powerful selective effects on human behaviour and patterns of settlement and dispersal. We consider both these aspects of the interaction, develop a framework for the reconstruction and comparison of landscapes and landscape change at a variety of scales, and illustrate this with selected examples drawn from Africa and Arabia.

  20. Isotropy of an Upper Limb Exoskeleton and the Kinematics and Dynamics of the Human Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Perry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of human and robot into a single system offers remarkable opportunities for a new generation of assistive technology. Despite the recent prominence of upper limb exoskeletons in assistive applications, the human arm kinematics and dynamics are usually described in single or multiple arm movements that are not associated with any concrete activity of daily living (ADL. Moreover, the design of an exoskeleton, which is physically linked to the human body, must have a workspace that matches as close as possible with the workspace of the human body, while at the same time avoid singular configurations of the exoskeleton within the human workspace. The aims of the research reported in this manuscript are (1 to study the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm during daily activities in a free and unconstrained environment, (2 to study the manipulability (isotropy of a 7-degree-of-freedom (DOF-powered exoskeleton arm given the kinematics and the dynamics of the human arm in ADLs. Kinematic data of the upper limb were acquired with a motion capture system while performing 24 daily activities from six subjects. Utilising a 7-DOF model of the human arm, the equations of motion were used to calculate joint torques from measured kinematics. In addition, the exoskeleton isotropy was calculated and mapped with respect to the spacial distribution of the human arm configurations during the 24 daily activities. The results indicate that the kinematic joint distributions representing all 24 actions appear normally distributed except for elbow flexion–extension with the emergence of three modal centres. Velocity and acceleration components of joint torque distributions were normally distributed about 0 Nm, whereas gravitational component distributions varied with joint. Additionally, velocity effects were found to contribute only 1/100th of the total joint torque, whereas acceleration components contribute 1/10th of the total torque at the

  1. An evaluation of Dynamic TOPMODEL in natural and human-impacted catchments for low flow simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim; Lane, Rosanna; Musuuza, Jude; Woods, Ross; Wagener, Thorsten; Howden, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Models of catchment hydrology are essential tools for drought risk management, often providing input to water resource system models, aiding our understanding of low flow processes within catchments and providing low flow simulations and predictions. However, simulating low flows is challenging as hydrological systems often demonstrate threshold effects in connectivity, non-linear groundwater contributions and a greater influence of anthropogenic modifications such as surface and ground water abstractions during low flow periods. These processes are typically not well represented in commonly used hydrological models due to knowledge, data and model limitations. Hence, a better understanding of the natural and human processes that occur during low flows, how these are represented within models and how they could be improved is required to be able to provide robust and reliable predictions of future drought events. The aim of this study is to assess the skill of dynamic TOPMODEL during low flows for both natural and human-impacted catchments. Dynamic TOPMODEL was chosen for this study as it is able to explicitly characterise connectivity and fluxes across landscapes using hydrological response units (HRU's) while still maintaining flexibility in how spatially complex the model is configured and what specific functions (i.e. abstractions or groundwater stores) are represented. We apply dynamic TOPMODEL across the River Thames catchment using daily time series of observed rainfall and potential evapotranspiration data for the period 1999 - 2014, covering two major droughts in the Thames catchment. Significantly, to assess the impact of abstractions on low flows across the Thames catchment, we incorporate functions to characterise over 3,500 monthly surface water and ground water abstractions covering the simulation period into dynamic TOPMODEL. We evaluate dynamic TOPMODEL at over 90 gauging stations across the Thames catchment against multiple signatures of catchment

  2. Unraveling dynamics of human physical activity patterns in chronic pain conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv-Ionescu, Anisoara; Buchser, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar

    2013-06-01

    Chronic pain is a complex disabling experience that negatively affects the cognitive, affective and physical functions as well as behavior. Although the interaction between chronic pain and physical functioning is a well-accepted paradigm in clinical research, the understanding of how pain affects individuals' daily life behavior remains a challenging task. Here we develop a methodological framework allowing to objectively document disruptive pain related interferences on real-life physical activity. The results reveal that meaningful information is contained in the temporal dynamics of activity patterns and an analytical model based on the theory of bivariate point processes can be used to describe physical activity behavior. The model parameters capture the dynamic interdependence between periods and events and determine a `signature' of activity pattern. The study is likely to contribute to the clinical understanding of complex pain/disease-related behaviors and establish a unified mathematical framework to quantify the complex dynamics of various human activities.

  3. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel

    2013-01-01

    -dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry...... to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.......Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  4. Experimental Study of the Structure of a Social Network and Human Dynamics in a Virtual Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Andrzej; Kruszewska, Natalia

    We study a large social network consisting of 3 × 104 individuals, who interact in a large virtual world of Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs). On the basis of the players' list of friends and the playing time received from the on-line game server, we investigate the structure of the network and human dynamics. We try to show that the structure of this friendship network is very similar to the structure of different social networks. In order to investigate the relation between networks of acquaintances in virtual and real worlds, we carried out a survey among the players. We found very interesting scaling laws concerning human dynamics. Our research has shown how long people are interested in a single task, and how much time they devote to it. It is surprising that exponent values in both cases are close to minus one.

  5. Inferring human microbial dynamics from temporal metagenomics data: Pitfalls and lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong-Tai; Gibson, Travis E; Bashan, Amir; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2017-02-01

    The human gut microbiota is a very complex and dynamic ecosystem that plays a crucial role in health and well-being. Inferring microbial community structure and dynamics directly from time-resolved metagenomics data is key to understanding the community ecology and predicting its temporal behavior. Many methods have been proposed to perform the inference. Yet, as we point out in this review, there are several pitfalls along the way. Indeed, the uninformative temporal measurements and the compositional nature of the relative abundance data raise serious challenges in inference. Moreover, the inference results can be largely distorted when only focusing on highly abundant species by ignoring or grouping low-abundance species. Finally, the implicit assumptions in various regularization methods may not reflect reality. Those issues have to be seriously considered in ecological modeling of human gut microbiota. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching Between Two DNA Bound States†

    OpenAIRE

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases DNA nick-joining and intermolecular DNA ligation. Yet, the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small angle x-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD)...

  7. Modulating reconsolidation: a link to causal systems-level dynamics of human memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, Marco; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Censor, Nitzan

    2015-01-01

    A vital property of the brain is its plasticity, which manifests as changes in behavioral performance. Invasive studies at the cellular level in animal models reveal time-restricted windows during which existing memories that are reactivated become susceptible to modification through reconsolidation, and evidence suggests similar effects in humans. In this review, we summarize recent work utilizing noninvasive brain stimulation in humans to uncover the systems-level mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation. This novel understanding of memory dynamics may have far reaching clinical implications, including the potential to modulate reconsolidation in patients with memory disorders. PMID:26170029

  8. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-21

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic (94)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((94)Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K(1) for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K(1). For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from (94)Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The

  9. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  10. Estimation of skeletal movement of human locomotion from body surface shapes using dynamic spatial video camera (DSVC) and 4D human model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toshikuni; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Otake, Yoshito

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing a DSVC (Dynamic Spatial Video Camera) system to measure and observe human locomotion quantitatively and freely. A 4D (four-dimensional) human model with detailed skeletal structure, joint, muscle, and motor functionality has been built. The purpose of our research was to estimate skeletal movements from body surface shapes using DSVC and the 4D human model. For this purpose, we constructed a body surface model of a subject and resized the standard 4D human model to match with geometrical features of the subject's body surface model. Software that integrates the DSVC system and the 4D human model, and allows dynamic skeletal state analysis from body surface movement data was also developed. We practically applied the developed system in dynamic skeletal state analysis of a lower limb in motion and were able to visualize the motion using geometrically resized standard 4D human model.

  11. Modeling the Fluid Dynamics in a Human Stomach to Gain Insight of Food Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrua, MJ; Singh, RP

    2010-01-01

    During gastric digestion, food is disintegrated by a complex interaction of chemical and mechanical effects. Although the mechanisms of chemical digestion are usually characterized by using in vitro analysis, the difficulty in reproducing the stomach geometry and motility has prevented a good understanding of the local fluid dynamics of gastric contents. The goal of this study was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to develop a 3-D model of the shape and motility pattern of the stomach wall during digestion, and use it to characterize the fluid dynamics of gastric contents of different viscosities. A geometrical model of an averaged-sized human stomach was created, and its motility was characterized by a series of antral-contraction waves of up to 80% relative occlusion. The flow field within the model (predicted using the software Fluent™) strongly depended on the viscosity of gastric contents. By increasing the viscosity, the formation of the 2 flow patterns commonly regarded as the main mechanisms driving digestion (i.e., the retropulsive jet-like motion and eddy structures) was significantly diminished, while a significant increase of the pressure field was predicted. These results were in good agreement with experimental data previously reported in the literature, and suggest that, contrary to the traditional idea of a rapid and complete homogenization of the meal, gastric contents associated with high viscous meals are poorly mixed. This study illustrates the capability of CFD to provide a unique insight into the fluid dynamics of the gastric contents, and points out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the mechanisms involved in the digestion process. Practical Application This study illustrates the capability of computational fluid dynamic techniques to provide a unique insight into the dynamics of the gastric contents, pointing out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the human

  12. The 14th Annual Conference on Manual Control. [digital simulation of human operator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Human operator dynamics during actual manual control or while monitoring the automatic control systems involved in air-to-air tracking, automobile driving, the operator of undersea vehicles, and remote handling are examined. Optimal control models and the use of mathematical theory in representing man behavior in complex man machine system tasks are discussed with emphasis on eye/head tracking and scanning; perception and attention allocation; decision making; and motion simulation and effects.

  13. Dynamics of water molecules in the active-site cavity of human cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm; Olsen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of water molecules in six crystal structures of four human cytochromes P450, 2A6, 2C8, 2C9, and 3A4, with molecular dynamics simulations. In the crystal structures, only a few water molecules are seen and the reported sizes of the active-site cavity vary a lot. In the...... molecules close to the heme iron ion in these simulations of the high-spin ferric state (the average distance to the closest water molecule is 3.3-5 A), and there are few ordered water molecules in the active sites, none of which is conserved in all proteins.......We have studied the dynamics of water molecules in six crystal structures of four human cytochromes P450, 2A6, 2C8, 2C9, and 3A4, with molecular dynamics simulations. In the crystal structures, only a few water molecules are seen and the reported sizes of the active-site cavity vary a lot....... In the simulations, the cavities are completely filled with water molecules, although with approximately 20% lower density than in bulk water. The 2A6 protein differs from the other three in that it has a very small cavity with only two water molecules and no exchange with the surroundings. The other three proteins...

  14. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T1mapping: averaging to improve precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie; Heng, Ee Ling; Nyktari, Evangelia; Asimakopoulos, George; de Souza, Anthony; Giri, Shivraman; Pierce, Iain; Jabbour, Andrew; Firmin, David; Frenneaux, Michael; Gatehouse, Peter; Pennell, Dudley J; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2018-02-01

    Our objectives involved identifying whether repeated averaging in basal and mid left ventricular myocardial levels improves precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction for 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping versus assessment at a single ventricular level. For assessment of T 1 mapping precision, a cohort of 15 healthy volunteers underwent two CMR scans on separate days using an 11 heartbeat MOLLI with a 5(3)3 beat scheme to measure native T 1 and a 4(1)3(1)2 beat post-contrast scheme to measure post-contrast T 1 , allowing calculation of partition coefficient and ECV. To assess correlation of T 1 mapping with collagen volume fraction, a separate cohort of ten aortic stenosis patients scheduled to undergo surgery underwent one CMR scan with this 11 heartbeat MOLLI scheme, followed by intraoperative tru-cut myocardial biopsy. Six models of myocardial diffuse fibrosis assessment were established with incremental inclusion of imaging by averaging of the basal and mid-myocardial left ventricular levels, and each model was assessed for precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction. A model using 11 heart beat MOLLI imaging of two basal and two mid ventricular level averaged T 1 maps provided improved precision (Intraclass correlation 0.93 vs 0.84) and correlation with histology (R 2  = 0.83 vs 0.36) for diffuse fibrosis compared to a single mid-ventricular level alone. ECV was more precise and correlated better than native T 1 mapping. T 1 mapping sequences with repeated averaging could be considered for applications of 11 heartbeat MOLLI, especially when small changes in native T 1 /ECV might affect clinical management.

  15. From Birdsong to Human Speech Recognition: Bayesian Inference on a Hierarchy of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Izzet B.; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge about the computational mechanisms underlying human learning and recognition of sound sequences, especially speech, is still very limited. One difficulty in deciphering the exact means by which humans recognize speech is that there are scarce experimental findings at a neuronal, microscopic level. Here, we show that our neuronal-computational understanding of speech learning and recognition may be vastly improved by looking at an animal model, i.e., the songbird, which faces the same challenge as humans: to learn and decode complex auditory input, in an online fashion. Motivated by striking similarities between the human and songbird neural recognition systems at the macroscopic level, we assumed that the human brain uses the same computational principles at a microscopic level and translated a birdsong model into a novel human sound learning and recognition model with an emphasis on speech. We show that the resulting Bayesian model with a hierarchy of nonlinear dynamical systems can learn speech samples such as words rapidly and recognize them robustly, even in adverse conditions. In addition, we show that recognition can be performed even when words are spoken by different speakers and with different accents—an everyday situation in which current state-of-the-art speech recognition models often fail. The model can also be used to qualitatively explain behavioral data on human speech learning and derive predictions for future experiments. PMID:24068902

  16. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding; Chen, Cai-Feng; Zhao, Bin-Bin; Gong, Lu-Lu; Jin, Wen-Jing; Liu, Jing-Jun; Wang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Tian-Tian; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; He, You-Wen

    2013-01-01

    1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs). The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs) graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs) that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation dynamics during early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okae, Hiroaki; Chiba, Hatsune; Hiura, Hitoshi; Hamada, Hirotaka; Sato, Akiko; Utsunomiya, Takafumi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Suyama, Mikita; Arima, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    DNA methylation is globally reprogrammed during mammalian preimplantation development, which is critical for normal development. Recent reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) studies suggest that the methylome dynamics are essentially conserved between human and mouse early embryos. RRBS is known to cover 5-10% of all genomic CpGs, favoring those contained within CpG-rich regions. To obtain an unbiased and more complete representation of the methylome during early human development, we performed whole genome bisulfite sequencing of human gametes and blastocysts that covered>70% of all genomic CpGs. We found that the maternal genome was demethylated to a much lesser extent in human blastocysts than in mouse blastocysts, which could contribute to an increased number of imprinted differentially methylated regions in the human genome. Global demethylation of the paternal genome was confirmed, but SINE-VNTR-Alu elements and some other tandem repeat-containing regions were found to be specifically protected from this global demethylation. Furthermore, centromeric satellite repeats were hypermethylated in human oocytes but not in mouse oocytes, which might be explained by differential expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases. These data highlight both conserved and species-specific regulation of DNA methylation during early mammalian development. Our work provides further information critical for understanding the epigenetic processes underlying differentiation and pluripotency during early human development.

  18. ATX-2, the C. elegans Ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, Regulates Centrosome Size and Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenvoll, Michael D; Medley, Jeffrey C; Irwin, Miranda; Song, Mi Hye

    2016-09-01

    Centrosomes are critical sites for orchestrating microtubule dynamics, and exhibit dynamic changes in size during the cell cycle. As cells progress to mitosis, centrosomes recruit more microtubules (MT) to form mitotic bipolar spindles that ensure proper chromosome segregation. We report a new role for ATX-2, a C. elegans ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, in regulating centrosome size and MT dynamics. ATX-2, an RNA-binding protein, forms a complex with SZY-20 in an RNA-independent fashion. Depleting ATX-2 results in embryonic lethality and cytokinesis failure, and restores centrosome duplication to zyg-1 mutants. In this pathway, SZY-20 promotes ATX-2 abundance, which inversely correlates with centrosome size. Centrosomes depleted of ATX-2 exhibit elevated levels of centrosome factors (ZYG-1, SPD-5, γ-Tubulin), increasing MT nucleating activity but impeding MT growth. We show that ATX-2 influences MT behavior through γ-Tubulin at the centrosome. Our data suggest that RNA-binding proteins play an active role in controlling MT dynamics and provide insight into the control of proper centrosome size and MT dynamics.

  19. ATX-2, the C. elegans Ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, Regulates Centrosome Size and Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Stubenvoll

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are critical sites for orchestrating microtubule dynamics, and exhibit dynamic changes in size during the cell cycle. As cells progress to mitosis, centrosomes recruit more microtubules (MT to form mitotic bipolar spindles that ensure proper chromosome segregation. We report a new role for ATX-2, a C. elegans ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, in regulating centrosome size and MT dynamics. ATX-2, an RNA-binding protein, forms a complex with SZY-20 in an RNA-independent fashion. Depleting ATX-2 results in embryonic lethality and cytokinesis failure, and restores centrosome duplication to zyg-1 mutants. In this pathway, SZY-20 promotes ATX-2 abundance, which inversely correlates with centrosome size. Centrosomes depleted of ATX-2 exhibit elevated levels of centrosome factors (ZYG-1, SPD-5, γ-Tubulin, increasing MT nucleating activity but impeding MT growth. We show that ATX-2 influences MT behavior through γ-Tubulin at the centrosome. Our data suggest that RNA-binding proteins play an active role in controlling MT dynamics and provide insight into the control of proper centrosome size and MT dynamics.

  20. Effects of national culture on human failures in container shipping: the moderating role of Confucian dynamism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chin-Shan; Lai, Kee-hung; Lun, Y H Venus; Cheng, T C E

    2012-11-01

    Recent reports on work safety in container shipping operations highlight high frequencies of human failures. In this study, we empirically examine the effects of seafarers' perceptions of national culture on the occurrence of human failures affecting work safety in shipping operations. We develop a model adopting Hofstede's national culture construct, which comprises five dimensions, namely power distance, collectivism/individualism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity/femininity, and Confucian dynamism. We then formulate research hypotheses from theory and test the hypotheses using survey data collected from 608 seafarers who work on global container carriers. Using a point scale for evaluating seafarers' perception of the five national culture dimensions, we find that Filipino seafarers score highest on collectivism, whereas Chinese and Taiwanese seafarers score highest on Confucian dynamism, followed by collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance. The results also indicate that Taiwanese seafarers have a propensity for uncertainty avoidance and masculinity, whereas Filipino seafarers lean more towards power distance, masculinity, and collectivism, which are consistent with the findings of Hofstede and Bond (1988). The results suggest that there will be fewer human failures in container shipping operations when power distance is low, and collectivism and uncertainty avoidance are high. Specifically, this study finds that Confucian dynamism plays an important moderating role as it affects the strength of associations between some national culture dimensions and human failures. Finally, we discuss our findings' contribution to the development of national culture theory and their managerial implications for reducing the occurrence of human failures in shipping operations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Biomedical Computation Revealed that an Extra-Systolic Heartbeat Exhibits a Lower Scaling Exponent: DFA as a Beneficial Biomedical Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Yazawa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We made our own DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis program. We applied it for checking characteristics for the heartbeat of various individuals. Healthy subjects showed a normal scaling exponent, which is near 1.0 (ranging 0.9 to 1.19 in our own temporary guideline. This is in agreement with the original report by Peng et al. long time ago. In the present study, we investigated the person who has an extra-systole heartbeat, and revealed that their arrhythmic heartbeat exhibited a low scaling exponent (around 0.7. Alternans, which is the heart beating in period-2 rhythms, exhibited a much low scaling exponent (around 0.6. We may conclude that if it would be possible to make a device that equips a DFA program, it might be useful to check the heart condition, and contribute not only in nonlinear physics but also in biomedical fields; especially as a device for health check, which is applicable for people who are spending an ordinary life, before they get seriously heart sick.

  2. Influence of the model's degree of freedom on human body dynamics identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maita, Daichi; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    In fields of sports and rehabilitation, opportunities of using motion analysis of the human body have dramatically increased. To analyze the motion dynamics, a number of subject specific parameters and measurements are required. For example the contact forces measurement and the inertial parameters of each segment of the human body are necessary to compute the joint torques. In this study, in order to perform accurate dynamic analysis we propose to identify the inertial parameters of the human body and to evaluate the influence of the model's number of degrees of freedom (DoF) on the results. We use a method to estimate the inertial parameters without torque sensor, using generalized coordinates of the base link, joint angles and external forces information. We consider a 34DoF model, a 58DoF model, as well as the case when the human is manipulating a tool (here a tennis racket). We compare the obtained in results in terms of contact force estimation.

  3. Human Impact on Vegetation Dynamics around Lhasa, Southern Tibetan Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human impact plays an increasing role on vegetation change even on the Tibetan Plateau, an area that is commonly regarded as an ideal place to study climate change. We evaluate the nature and extent of human impact on vegetation dynamics by the comparison of two areas: the relative highly populated Lhasa area and a nearby less populated Lhari County. Our results indicate that human impact has mainly decreased vegetation greenness within 20 km of the urban area and major constructions during 1999–2013. However, the impact of human activities in a relatively large area is still minor and does not reverse the major trends of vegetation dynamics caused by the warming temperature in recent decades. It seems that the impact of anthropogenic factors on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI trend is more apparent in the Lhasa area than in Lhari County. The major anthropogenic driving factor for vegetation browning in the Lhasa area is livestock number, while the factors, including the number of rural laborers and artificial forest areas, are positively correlated with the annual NDVI increase. The similar relationship between the annual NDVI and driving factors appeared in Lhari County, except for artificial forest areas. The warming temperature and the change in precipitation played dominant roles on vegetation greening in Lhari County than that in the Lhasa area.

  4. Ubiquitous Geo-Sensing for Context-Aware Analysis: Exploring Relationships between Environmental and Human Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagl, Günther; Blaschke, Thomas; Beinat, Euro; Resch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitous geo-sensing enables context-aware analyses of physical and social phenomena, i.e., analyzing one phenomenon in the context of another. Although such context-aware analysis can potentially enable a more holistic understanding of spatio-temporal processes, it is rarely documented in the scientific literature yet. In this paper we analyzed the collective human behavior in the context of the weather. We therefore explored the complex relationships between these two spatio-temporal phenomena to provide novel insights into the dynamics of urban systems. Aggregated mobile phone data, which served as a proxy for collective human behavior, was linked with the weather data from climate stations in the case study area, the city of Udine, Northern Italy. To identify and characterize potential patterns within the weather-human relationships, we developed a hybrid approach which integrates several spatio-temporal statistical analysis methods. Thereby we show that explanatory factor analysis, when applied to a number of meteorological variables, can be used to differentiate between normal and adverse weather conditions. Further, we measured the strength of the relationship between the ‘global’ adverse weather conditions and the spatially explicit effective variations in user-generated mobile network traffic for three distinct periods using the Maximal Information Coefficient (MIC). The analyses result in three spatially referenced maps of MICs which reveal interesting insights into collective human dynamics in the context of weather, but also initiate several new scientific challenges. PMID:23012571

  5. The dynamics of big data and human rights: the case of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayena, Effy; Tasioulas, John

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, we address the complex relationship between big data and human rights. Because this is a vast terrain, we restrict our focus in two main ways. First, we concentrate on big data applications in scientific research, mostly health-related research. And, second, we concentrate on two human rights: the familiar right to privacy and the less well-known right to science. Our contention is that human rights interact in potentially complex ways with big data, not only constraining it, but also enabling it in various ways; and that such rights are dynamic in character, rather than fixed once and for all, changing in their implications over time in line with changes in the context we inhabit, and also as they interact among themselves in jointly responding to the opportunities and risks thrown up by a changing world. Understanding this dynamic interaction of human rights is crucial for formulating an ethic tailored to the realities-the new capabilities and risks-of the rapidly evolving digital environment.This article is part of the themed issue 'The ethical impact of data science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Models of Easter Island Human-Resource Dynamics: Advances and Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Merico

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Finding solutions to the entangled problems of human population growth, resource exploitation, ecosystem degradation, and biodiversity loss is considered humanity's grand challenge. Small and isolated societies of the past, such as the Rapanui of Easter Island, constitute ideal laboratories for understanding the consequences of human-driven environmental degradation and associated crises. By integrating different processes into a coherent and quantitative framework, mathematical models can be effective tools for investigating the ecological and socioeconomic history of these ancient civilizations. Most models of Easter Island are grounded around the Malthusian theory of population growth and designed as Lotka-Volterra predator-prey systems. Within ranges of plausible parameter values, these dynamic systems models predict a population overshoot and collapse sequence, in line with the ecocidal view about the Rapanui. With new archaeological evidence coming to light, casting doubts on the classical narrative of a human-induced collapse, models have begun to incorporate the new pieces of evidence and started to describe a more complex historical ecology, in line with the view of a resilient society that suffered genocide after the contact with Europeans. Uncertainties affecting the archaeological evidence contribute to the formulation of contradictory narratives. Surprisingly, no agent-based models have been applied to Easter Island. I argue that these tools offer appealing possibilities for overcoming the limits of dynamic systems models and the uncertainties in the available archaeological data.

  7. The dynamics of big data and human rights: the case of scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasioulas, John

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the complex relationship between big data and human rights. Because this is a vast terrain, we restrict our focus in two main ways. First, we concentrate on big data applications in scientific research, mostly health-related research. And, second, we concentrate on two human rights: the familiar right to privacy and the less well-known right to science. Our contention is that human rights interact in potentially complex ways with big data, not only constraining it, but also enabling it in various ways; and that such rights are dynamic in character, rather than fixed once and for all, changing in their implications over time in line with changes in the context we inhabit, and also as they interact among themselves in jointly responding to the opportunities and risks thrown up by a changing world. Understanding this dynamic interaction of human rights is crucial for formulating an ethic tailored to the realities—the new capabilities and risks—of the rapidly evolving digital environment. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The ethical impact of data science’. PMID:28336802

  8. Manipulating the content of dynamic natural scenes to characterize response in human MT/MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Szonya; Wall, Matthew B; Zanker, Johannes M

    2011-09-09

    Optic flow is one of the most important sources of information for enabling human navigation through the world. A striking finding from single-cell studies in monkeys is the rapid saturation of response of MT/MST areas with the density of optic flow type motion information. These results are reflected psychophysically in human perception in the saturation of motion aftereffects. We began by comparing responses to natural optic flow scenes in human visual brain areas to responses to the same scenes with inverted contrast (photo negative). This changes scene familiarity while preserving local motion signals. This manipulation had no effect; however, the response was only correlated with the density of local motion (calculated by a motion correlation model) in V1, not in MT/MST. To further investigate this, we manipulated the visible proportion of natural dynamic scenes and found that areas MT and MST did not increase in response over a 16-fold increase in the amount of information presented, i.e., response had saturated. This makes sense in light of the sparseness of motion information in natural scenes, suggesting that the human brain is well adapted to exploit a small amount of dynamic signal and extract information important for survival.

  9. Ubiquitous Geo-Sensing for Context-Aware Analysis: Exploring Relationships between Environmental and Human Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Beinat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous geo-sensing enables context-aware analyses of physical and social phenomena, i.e., analyzing one phenomenon in the context of another. Although such context-aware analysis can potentially enable a more holistic understanding of spatio-temporal processes, it is rarely documented in the scientific literature yet. In this paper we analyzed the collective human behavior in the context of the weather. We therefore explored the complex relationships between these two spatio-temporal phenomena to provide novel insights into the dynamics of urban systems. Aggregated mobile phone data, which served as a proxy for collective human behavior, was linked with the weather data from climate stations in the case study area, the city of Udine, Northern Italy. To identify and characterize potential patterns within the weather-human relationships, we developed a hybrid approach which integrates several spatio-temporal statistical analysis methods. Thereby we show that explanatory factor analysis, when applied to a number of meteorological variables, can be used to differentiate between normal and adverse weather conditions. Further, we measured the strength of the relationship between the ‘global’ adverse weather conditions and the spatially explicit effective variations in user-generated mobile network traffic for three distinct periods using the Maximal Information Coefficient (MIC. The analyses result in three spatially referenced maps of MICs which reveal interesting insights into collective human dynamics in the context of weather, but also initiate several new scientific challenges.

  10. Three-dimensional data-tracking dynamic optimization simulations of human locomotion generated by direct collocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2017-07-05

    The aim of this study was to perform full-body three-dimensional (3D) dynamic optimization simulations of human locomotion by driving a neuromusculoskeletal model toward in vivo measurements of body-segmental kinematics and ground reaction forces. Gait data were recorded from 5 healthy participants who walked at their preferred speeds and ran at 2m/s. Participant-specific data-tracking dynamic optimization solutions were generated for one stride cycle using direct collocation in tandem with an OpenSim-MATLAB interface. The body was represented as a 12-segment, 21-degree-of-freedom skeleton actuated by 66 muscle-tendon units. Foot-ground interaction was simulated using six contact spheres under each foot. The dynamic optimization problem was to find the set of muscle excitations needed to reproduce 3D measurements of body-segmental motions and ground reaction forces while minimizing the time integral of muscle activations squared. Direct collocation took on average 2.7±1.0h and 2.2±1.6h of CPU time, respectively, to solve the optimization problems for walking and running. Model-computed kinematics and foot-ground forces were in good agreement with corresponding experimental data while the calculated muscle excitation patterns were consistent with measured EMG activity. The results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing direct collocation on a detailed neuromusculoskeletal model with foot-ground contact to accurately and efficiently generate 3D data-tracking dynamic optimization simulations of human locomotion. The proposed method offers a viable tool for creating feasible initial guesses needed to perform predictive simulations of movement using dynamic optimization theory. The source code for implementing the model and computational algorithm may be downloaded at http://simtk.org/home/datatracking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics Of Human Motion The Case Study of an Examination Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjo, Samuel; Ajayi, Oluwaseyi; Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Dansu, Emmanuel

    Human behaviour is difficult to characterize and generalize due to ITS complex nature. Advances in mathematical models have enabled human systems such as love interaction, alcohol abuse, admission problem to be described using models. This study investigates one of such problems, the dynamics of human motion in an examination hall with limited computer systems such that students write their examination in batches. The examination is characterized by time (t) allocated to each students and difficulty level (dl) associated with the examination. A stochastic model based on the difficulty level of the examination was developed for the prediction of student's motion around the examination hall. A good agreement was obtained between theoretical predictions and numerical simulation. The result obtained will help in better planning of examination session to maximize available resources. Furthermore, results obtained in the research can be extended to other areas such as banking hall, customer service points where available resources will be shared amongst many users.

  12. New methods for the analysis of heartbeat behavior in risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Leon; Lerma, Claudia; Shrier, Alvin

    2011-01-01

    Developing better methods for risk stratification for tachyarrhythmic sudden cardiac remains a major challenge for physicians and scientists. Since the transition from sinus rhythm to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation happens by different mechanisms in different people, it is unrealistic to think that a single measure will be adequate to provide a good index for risk stratification. We analyze the dynamical properties of ventricular premature complexes over 24 h in an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias and to better understand the arrhythmias that occur in individual patients. Two dimensional density plots, called heartprints, correlate characteristic features of the dynamics of premature ventricular complexes and the sinus rate. Heartprints show distinctive characteristics in individual patients. Based on a better understanding of the natures of transitions from sinus rhythm to sudden cardiac and the mechanisms of arrhythmia prior to cardiac arrest, it should be possible to develop better methods for risk stratification.

  13. Spatial-temporal transcriptional dynamics of long non-coding RNAs in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Ze-Lin; Poon, Ming-Wai; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2017-08-15

    The functional architecture of the human brain is greatly determined by the temporal and spatial regulation of the transcription process. However, the spatial and temporal transcriptional landscape of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) during human brain development remains poorly understood. Here, we report the genome-wide lncRNA transcriptional analysis in an extensive series of 1340 post-mortem human brain specimens collected from 16 regions spanning the period from early embryo development to late adulthood. We discovered that lncRNA transcriptome dramatically changed during fetal development, while transited to a surprisingly relatively stable state after birth till the late adulthood. We also discovered that the transcription map of lncRNAs was spatially different, and that this spatial difference was developmentally regulated. Of the 16 brain regions explored (cerebellar cortex, thalamus, striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and 11 neocortex areas), cerebellar cortex showed the most distinct lncRNA expression features from all remaining brain regions throughout the whole developmental period, reflecting its unique developmental and functional features. Furthermore, by characterizing the functional modules and cellular processes of the spatial-temporal dynamic lncRNAs, we found that they were significantly associated with the RNA processing, neuron differentiation and synaptic signal transportation processes. Furthermore, we found that many lncRNAs associated with the neurodegenerative Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases were co-expressed in the fetal development of the human brain, and affected the convergent biological processes. In summary, our study provides a comprehensive map for lncRNA transcription dynamics in human brain development, which might shed light on the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of human brain function and disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Human influence on the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of forest biomass carbon in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lu, Fei; Luo, Yunjian; Bo, Wenjing; Kong, Lingqiao; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Bojie; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Wang, Xiaoke

    2017-08-01

    Global carbon cycles are impacted by human activity primarily via fossil fuel combustion and forest carbon budget alterations. In this study, the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of forest biomass carbon (FBC) stock and density in China were analyzed to assess the large-scale effects of humans on FBC. The results indicated that from 1977 to 2013, the FBC stock increased by 62.9%, from 4,335 to 7,064 Tg C, owing to human-driven forestation and ecological restoration programs. Because of intensive human impacts, 44.2%-54.6% of the FBC stock was concentrated in four provinces (Heilongjiang, Yunnan, Inner Mongolia, and Sichuan) and the FBC density increased from the densely populated southeastern provinces to the sparsely populated northeastern and western provinces. On a spatial scale, the FBC density was significantly negatively related to population density, and the degree of the dependence of the FBC density on population density has been declining since 1998. This improvement in human-forest relations is related to economic development and programs in China that have promoted forestation and reduced deforestation. These results suggest that human impacts, including forestation, deforestation, population density, and economic development, have played significant roles in determining the temporal and spatial variations of FBC in the anthropogenic era. Moreover, our findings have implications for forest management and improvement of the forest carbon sink in China.

  15. Dynamics of DNA methylation in recent human and great ape evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Hernando-Herraez

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification involved in regulatory processes such as cell differentiation during development, X-chromosome inactivation, genomic imprinting and susceptibility to complex disease. However, the dynamics of DNA methylation changes between humans and their closest relatives are still poorly understood. We performed a comparative analysis of CpG methylation patterns between 9 humans and 23 primate samples including all species of great apes (chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla and orangutan using Illumina Methylation450 bead arrays. Our analysis identified ∼800 genes with significantly altered methylation patterns among the great apes, including ∼170 genes with a methylation pattern unique to human. Some of these are known to be involved in developmental and neurological features, suggesting that epigenetic changes have been frequent during recent human and primate evolution. We identified a significant positive relationship between the rate of coding variation and alterations of methylation at the promoter level, indicative of co-occurrence between evolution of protein sequence and gene regulation. In contrast, and supporting the idea that many phenotypic differences between humans and great apes are not due to amino acid differences, our analysis also identified 184 genes that are perfectly conserved at protein level between human and chimpanzee, yet show significant epigenetic differences between these two species. We conclude that epigenetic alterations are an important force during primate evolution and have been under-explored in evolutionary comparative genomics.

  16. The human functional brain network demonstrates structural and dynamical resilience to targeted attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E; Hayasaka, Satoru; Laurienti, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the field of network science has enabled researchers to represent the highly complex interactions in the brain in an approachable yet quantitative manner. One exciting finding since the advent of brain network research was that the brain network can withstand extensive damage, even to highly connected regions. However, these highly connected nodes may not be the most critical regions of the brain network, and it is unclear how the network dynamics are impacted by removal of these key nodes. This work seeks to further investigate the resilience of the human functional brain network. Network attack experiments were conducted on voxel-wise functional brain networks and region-of-interest (ROI) networks of 5 healthy volunteers. Networks were attacked at key nodes using several criteria for assessing node importance, and the impact on network structure and dynamics was evaluated. The findings presented here echo previous findings that the functional human brain network is highly resilient to targeted attacks, both in terms of network structure and dynamics.

  17. The human functional brain network demonstrates structural and dynamical resilience to targeted attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Joyce

    Full Text Available In recent years, the field of network science has enabled researchers to represent the highly complex interactions in the brain in an approachable yet quantitative manner. One exciting finding since the advent of brain network research was that the brain network can withstand extensive damage, even to highly connected regions. However, these highly connected nodes may not be the most critical regions of the brain network, and it is unclear how the network dynamics are impacted by removal of these key nodes. This work seeks to further investigate the resilience of the human functional brain network. Network attack experiments were conducted on voxel-wise functional brain networks and region-of-interest (ROI networks of 5 healthy volunteers. Networks were attacked at key nodes using several criteria for assessing node importance, and the impact on network structure and dynamics was evaluated. The findings presented here echo previous findings that the functional human brain network is highly resilient to targeted attacks, both in terms of network structure and dynamics.

  18. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Mizue [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Saio, Tomohide [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kumeta, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23–28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. - Highlights: • Solution structure and dynamics analysis for human Cyt c by NMR. • Structural changes responsible for the discrimination of the redox state in Cyt c. • Conformational exchange in the region outside of the interaction site for CcO. • Less flexibility and rigid structure of the interaction site on Cyt c for CcO.

  19. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms on human N-acetyltransferase 2 structure and dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is an important catalytic enzyme that metabolizes the carcinogenic arylamines, hydrazine drugs and chemicals. This enzyme is highly polymorphic in different human populations. Several polymorphisms of NAT2, including the single amino acid substitutions R64Q, I114T, D122N, L137F, Q145P, R197Q, and G286E, are classified as slow acetylators, whereas the wild-type NAT2 is classified as a fast acetylator. The slow acetylators are often associated with drug toxicity and efficacy as well as cancer susceptibility. The biological functions of these 7 mutations have previously been characterized, but the structural basis behind the reduced catalytic activity and reduced protein level is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations of these mutants as well as NAT2 to investigate the structural and dynamical effects throughout the protein structure, specifically the catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and the substrate binding pocket. None of these mutations induced unfolding; instead, their effects were confined to the inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region, where the flexibility was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type. Structural effects of these mutations propagate through space and cause a change in catalytic triad conformation, cofactor binding site, substrate binding pocket size/shape and electrostatic potential. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the dynamical properties of all the mutant structures, especially in inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region were affected in the same manner. Similarly, the electrostatic potential of all the mutants were altered and also the functionally important regions such as catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and substrate binding pocket adopted different orientation and/or conformation relative to the wild-type that may affect the functions of the mutants

  20. Extracellular Matrix Dynamics in Scar-Free Endometrial Repair: Perspectives from Mouse In Vivo and Human In Vitro Studies1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jemma Evans; Tu'uhevaha Kaitu'u-Lino; Lois A. Salamonsen

    2011-01-01

    .... Utilizing an in vivo mouse model of postmenstrual repair and an in vitro model of human endometrial re-epithelialization, we determined the dynamic changes in expression of ECM and related factors...

  1. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II.

  2. Profiling the dynamics of a human phosphorylome reveals new components in HGF/c-Met signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L Woodard

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is a dynamic and reversible event that greatly influences cellular function. Identifying the key regulatory elements that determine cellular phenotypes during development and oncogenesis requires the ability to dynamically monitor proteome-wide events. Here, we report the development of a new strategy to monitor dynamic changes of protein phosphorylation in cells and tissues using functional protein microarrays as the readout. To demonstrate this technology's ability to identify condition-dependent phosphorylation events, human protein microarrays were incubated with lysates from cells or tissues under activation or inhibition of c-Met, a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in tissue morphogenesis and malignancy. By comparing the differences between the protein phosphorylation profiles obtained using the protein microarrays, we were able to recover many of the proteins that are known to be specifically activated (i.e., phosphorylated upon c-Met activation by the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Most importantly, we discovered many proteins that were differentially phosphorylated by lysates from cells or tissues when the c-Met pathway was active. Using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, we were able to validate several candidate proteins as new downstream components of the c-Met signaling pathway in cells. We envision that this new approach, like its DNA microarray counterpart, can be further extended toward profiling dynamics of global protein phosphorylation under many different physiological conditions both in cellulo and in vivo in a high-throughput and cost-effective fashion.

  3. The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression toward Type 1 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostic, Aleksandar D.; Gevers, Dirk; Siljander, Heli; Vatanen, Tommi; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Hamalainen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Poho, Paivi; Mattila, Ismo; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Franzosa, Eric A.; Vaarala, Outi; de Goffau, Marcus; Harmsen, Hermie; Ilonen, Jorma; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Clish, Clary B.; Oresic, Matej; Huttenhower, Curtis; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the fetal and infant gut microbiome results in dynamic changes in diversity, which can impact disease susceptibility. To examine the relationship between human gut microbiome dynamics throughout infancy and type 1 diabetes (T1D), we examined a cohort of 33 infants genetically

  4. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since ~ 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  5. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  6. Antibody humanization by molecular dynamics simulations-in-silico guided selection of critical backmutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Kunert, Renate; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the fastest growing class of biotherapeutic proteins. However, as they are often initially derived from rodent organisms, there is a severe risk of immunogenic reactions, hampering their applicability. The humanization of these antibodies remains a challenging task in the context of rational drug design. "Superhumanization" describes the direct transfer of the complementarity determining regions to a human germline framework, but this humanization approach often results in loss of binding affinity. In this study, we present a new approach for predicting promising backmutation sites using molecular dynamics simulations of the model antibody Ab2/3H6. The simulation method was developed in close conjunction with novel specificity experiments. Binding properties of mAb variants were evaluated directly from crude supernatants and confirmed using established binding affinity assays for purified antibodies. Our approach provides access to the dynamical features of the actual binding sites of an antibody, based solely on the antibody sequence. Thus we do not need structural data on the antibody-antigen complex and circumvent cumbersome methods to assess binding affinities. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of Age-Related Human Lens Sutures Growth on Its Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ho-Ting D; Howse, Louisa A; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Age-related nuclear cataract is the opacification of the clear ocular lens due to oxidative damage as we age, and is the leading cause of blindness in the world. A lack of antioxidant supply to the core of ever-growing ocular lens could contribute to the cause of this condition. In this project, a computational model was developed to study the sutural fluid inflow of the aging human lens. Three different SOLIDWORKS computational fluid dynamics models of the human lens (7 years old; 28 years old; 46 years old) were created, based on available literature data. The fluid dynamics of the lens sutures were modelled using the Stokes flow equations, combined with realistic physiological boundary conditions and embedded in COMSOL Multiphysics. The flow rate, volume, and flow rate per volume of fluid entering the aging lens were examined, and all increased over the 40 years modelled. However, while the volume of the lens grew by ∼300% and the flow rate increased by ∼400%, the flow rate per volume increased only by very moderate ∼38%. Here, sutural information from humans of 7 to 46 years of age was obtained. In this modelled age range, an increase of flow rate per volume was observed, albeit at very slow rate. We hypothesize that with even further increasing age (60+ years old), the lens volume growth would outpace its flow rate increases, which would eventually lead to malnutrition of the lens nucleus and onset of cataracts.

  8. Platinum microwire for subdural electrocorticography over human neocortex: millimeter-scale spatiotemporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Spencer; Greger, Bradley; Hanrahan, Sara; House, Paul; Brown, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum microwires, terminated at regular intervals to form a grid of contacts, were used to record electric potentials at the surface of the cerebral cortex in human subjects. The microwire grids were manufactured commercially with 75 μm platinum wire and 1 mm grid spacing, and are FDA approved. Because of their small size and spacing, these grids could be used to explore the scale of spatiotemporal dynamics in cortical surface potentials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to characterize their recording properties and develop a frequency-dependent electrical model of the micro-electrodes. Data recorded from multiple sites in human cortex were analyzed to explore the relationship between linear correlation and separation distance. A model was developed to explore the impact of cerebrospinal fluid on signal spread among electrodes. Spatial variation in the per-electrode performance decoding articulated speech from face-motor and Wernicke's areas of cortex was explored to understand the scale of information processing at the cortex. We conclude that there are important dynamics at the millimeter scale in human subdural electrocorticography which may be important in maximizing the performance of neural prosthetic applications.

  9. The interplay between human population dynamics and flooding in Bangladesh: a spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. di Baldassarre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, socio-economic and hydrological processes are both extremely dynamic and inter-related. Human population patterns are often explained as a response, or adaptation strategy, to physical events, e.g. flooding, salt-water intrusion, and erosion. Meanwhile, these physical processes are exacerbated, or mitigated, by diverse human interventions, e.g. river diversion, levees and polders. In this context, this paper describes an attempt to explore the complex interplay between floods and societies in Bangladeshi floodplains. In particular, we performed a spatially-distributed analysis of the interactions between the dynamics of human settlements and flood inundation patterns. To this end, we used flooding simulation results from inundation modelling, LISFLOOD-FP, as well as global datasets of population distribution data, such as the Gridded Population of the World (20 years, from 1990 to 2010 and HYDE datasets (310 years, from 1700 to 2010. The outcomes of this work highlight the behaviour of Bangladeshi floodplains as complex human–water systems and indicate the need to go beyond the traditional narratives based on one-way cause–effects, e.g. climate change leading to migrations.

  10. Dynamical Representation of Dominance Relationships in the Human Rostromedial Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligneul, Romain; Obeso, Ignacio; Ruff, Christian C; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-05

    Humans and other primates have evolved the ability to represent their status in the group's social hierarchy, which is essential for avoiding harm and accessing resources. Yet it remains unclear how the human brain learns dominance status and adjusts behavior accordingly during dynamic social interactions. Here we address this issue with a combination of fMRI and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In a first fMRI experiment, participants learned an implicit dominance hierarchy while playing a competitive game against three opponents of different skills. Neural activity in the rostromedial PFC (rmPFC) dynamically tracked and updated the dominance status of the opponents, whereas the ventromedial PFC and ventral striatum reacted specifically to competitive victories and defeats. In a second experiment, we applied anodal tDCS over the rmPFC to enhance neural excitability while subjects performed a similar competitive task. The stimulation enhanced the relative weight of victories over defeats in learning social dominance relationships and exacerbated the influence of one's own dominance over competitive strategies. Importantly, these tDCS effects were specific to trials in which subjects learned about dominance relationships, as they were not present for control choices associated with monetary incentives but no competitive feedback. Taken together, our findings elucidate the role of rmPFC computations in dominance learning and unravel a fundamental mechanism that governs the emergence and maintenance of social dominance relationships in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Human alterations, dynamic equilibrium, and riparian ecosystem responses along selected rivers in Tuscany, Italy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, C. R.; Rinaldi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Many, if not most, streams have been mildly to severely affected by human disturbance, which complicates efforts to understand riparian ecosystems. Mediterranean regions have a long history of human influences including: dams, stream channelization, mining of sediment, and levee /canal construction. Typically these alterations reduce the ecosystem services that functioning floodplains provide and may negatively impact the natural ecology of floodplains through reductions in suitable habitats, biodiversity, and nutrient cycling. Additionally, human alterations typically shift affected streams away from a state of natural dynamic equilibrium, where net sediment deposition is approximately in balance with net erosion. Lack of equilibrium typically affects the degree to which floodplain ecosystems are connected to streamflow regime. Low connectivity, usually from human- or climate-induced incision, may result in reduced flow on floodplains and lowered water tables. High connectivity may result in severe sediment deposition. Connectivity has a direct impact on vegetation communities. Riparian vegetation distribution patterns and diversity relative to various fluvial geomorphic channel patterns, landforms, and processes are described and interpreted for selected rivers of Tuscany, Central Italy; with emphasis on channel evolution following human impacts. Multivariate analysis reveals distinct quantitative vegetation patterns related to six fluvial geomorphic surfaces. Analysis of vegetation data also shows distinct associations of plants with adjustment processes related to the stage of channel evolution. Plant distribution patterns coincide with disturbance/landform/soil moisture gradients. Species richness increases from channel bed to terrace and on heterogeneous riparian areas, while species richness decreases from moderate to intense incision and from low to intense narrowing. As a feedback mechanism, woody vegetation in particular may facilitate geomorphic recovery

  12. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation to induced blood pressure changes in human experimental and clinical sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Bailey, Damian M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that dynamic cerebral autoregulation to spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure is enhanced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion, a human experimental model of early sepsis, whereas by contrast it is impaired in patients with severe sepsis or septic......R). This was performed before and after LPS infusion in healthy volunteers, and within 72 h following clinical diagnosis of sepsis in patients. In healthy volunteers, thigh-cuff deflation caused a MAP reduction of 16 (13-20) % at baseline and 18 (16-20) % after LPS, while the MAP reduction was 12 (11-13) % in patients......(-1) ; P = 0·91 versus baseline; P = 0·14 versus LPS]. While our findings support the concept that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is enhanced during the very early stages of sepsis, they remain inconclusive with regard to more advanced stages of disease, because thigh-cuff deflation failed to induce...

  13. Ligand modulation of sidechain dynamics in a wild-type human GPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Lindsay D.; Dikiy, Igor; Chapman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    GPCRs regulate all aspects of human physiology, and biophysical studies have deepened our understanding of GPCR conformational regulation by different ligands. Yet there is no experimental evidence for how sidechain dynamics control allosteric transitions between GPCR conformations. To address...... this deficit, we generated samples of a wild-type GPCR (A2AR) that are deuterated apart from 1H/13C NMR probes at isoleucine δ1 methyl groups, which facilitated 1H/13C methyl TROSY NMR measurements with opposing ligands. Our data indicate that low [Na+] is required to allow large agonist-induced structural...... changes in A2AR, and that patterns of sidechain dynamics substantially differ between agonist (NECA) and inverse agonist (ZM241385) bound receptors, with the inverse agonist suppressing fast ps-ns timescale motions at the G protein binding site. Our approach to GPCR NMR creates a framework for exploring...

  14. A Dynamic Network Model to Explain the Development of Excellent Human Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartigh, Ruud J R; Van Dijk, Marijn W G; Steenbeek, Henderien W; Van Geert, Paul L C

    2016-01-01

    Across different domains, from sports to science, some individuals accomplish excellent levels of performance. For over 150 years, researchers have debated the roles of specific nature and nurture components to develop excellence. In this article, we argue that the key to excellence does not reside in specific underlying components, but rather in the ongoing interactions among the components. We propose that excellence emerges out of dynamic networks consisting of idiosyncratic mixtures of interacting components such as genetic endowment, motivation, practice, and coaching. Using computer simulations we demonstrate that the dynamic network model accurately predicts typical properties of excellence reported in the literature, such as the idiosyncratic developmental trajectories leading to excellence and the highly skewed distributions of productivity present in virtually any achievement domain. Based on this novel theoretical perspective on excellent human performance, this article concludes by suggesting policy implications and directions for future research.

  15. A dynamic network model to explain the development of excellent human performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud J.R. Den Hartigh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Across different domains, from sports to science, some individuals accomplish excellent levels of performance. For over 150 years, researchers have debated the roles of specific nature and nurture components to develop excellence. In this article, we argue that the key to excellence does not reside in specific underlying components, but rather in the ongoing interactions among the components. We propose that excellence emerges out of dynamic networks consisting of idiosyncratic mixtures of interacting components such as genetic endowment, motivation, practice, and coaching. Using computer simulations we demonstrate that the dynamic network model accurately predicts typical properties of excellence reported in the literature, such as the idiosyncratic developmental trajectories leading to excellence and the highly skewed distributions of productivity present in virtually any achievement domain. Based on this novel theoretical perspective on excellent human performance, this article concludes by suggesting policy implications and directions for future research.

  16. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  17. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  18. Impact of human mobility on the periodicities and mechanisms underlying measles dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguta, Ramona; Parisi, Andrea

    2015-03-06

    Three main mechanisms determining the dynamics of measles have been described in the literature: invasion in disease-free lands leading to import-dependent outbreaks, switching between annual and biennial attractors driven by seasonality, and amplification of stochastic fluctuations close to the endemic equilibrium. Here, we study the importance of the three mechanisms using a detailed geographical description of human mobility. We perform individual-based simulations of an SIR model using a gridded description of human settlements on top of which we implement human mobility according to the radiation model. Parallel computation permits detailed simulations of large areas. Focusing our research on the British Isles, we show that human mobility has an impact on the periodicity of measles outbreaks. Depending on the level of mobility, we observe at the global level multi-annual, annual or biennial cycles. The periodicity observed globally, however, differs from the local epidemic cycles: different locations show different mechanisms at work depending on both population size and mobility. As a result, the periodicities observed locally depend on the interplay between the local population size and human mobility. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of Flexible Multibody Dynamics for Simulation Applications Supporting Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, An; Brain, Thomas A.; MacLean, John R.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of transition from the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs to the Orion and Journey to Mars exploration programs, a generic flexible multibody dynamics formulation and associated software implementation has evolved to meet an ever changing set of requirements at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Challenging problems related to large transitional topologies and robotic free-flyer vehicle capture/ release, contact dynamics, and exploration missions concept evaluation through simulation (e.g., asteroid surface operations) have driven this continued development. Coupled with this need is the requirement to oftentimes support human spaceflight operations in real-time. Moreover, it has been desirable to allow even more rapid prototyping of on-orbit manipulator and spacecraft systems, to support less complex infrastructure software for massively integrated simulations, to yield further computational efficiencies, and to take advantage of recent advances and availability of multi-core computing platforms. Since engineering analysis, procedures development, and crew familiarity/training for human spaceflight is fundamental to JSC's charter, there is also a strong desire to share and reuse models in both the non-realtime and real-time domains, with the goal of retaining as much multibody dynamics fidelity as possible. Three specific enhancements are reviewed here: (1) linked list organization to address large transitional topologies, (2) body level model order reduction, and (3) parallel formulation/implementation. This paper provides a detailed overview of these primary updates to JSC's flexible multibody dynamics algorithms as well as a comparison of numerical results to previous formulations and associated software.

  20. Human Aquaporin 4 Gating Dynamics under Perpendicularly-Oriented Electric-Field Impulses: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Marracino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human aquaporin 4 has been studied using molecular dynamics (MD simulations in the absence and presence of pulses of external static electric fields. The pulses were 10 ns in duration and 0.012–0.065 V/Å in intensity acting along both directions perpendicular to the pores. Water permeability and the dipolar response of all residues of interest (including the selectivity filter within the pores have been studied. Results showed decreased levels of water osmotic permeability within aquaporin channels during orthogonally-oriented field impulses, although care must be taken with regard to statistical certainty. This can be explained observing enhanced “dipolar flipping” of certain key residues, especially serine 211, histidine 201, arginine 216, histidine 95 and cysteine 178. These residues are placed at the extracellular end of the pore (serine 211, histidine 201, and arginine 216 and at the cytoplasm end (histidine 95 and cysteine 178, with the key role in gating mechanism, hence influencing water permeability.

  1. 210 Human Sensorimotor Electrocorticography: Spectral Dynamics and Network Connectivity During a Simple Motor Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Vivek; Burke, John Frederick; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Brandon, Cameron; Hudgins, Eric; Richardson, Andrew; Lucas, Timothy H

    2016-08-01

    The "human connectome" is increasingly becoming critical in advancing our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying human behavior. The nature and characterization of these interconnected networks remains largely unknown. Using electrocorticography (ECoG) we explore the spectral dynamics and network connectivity of sensorimotor cortical regions during a motor task. 9 refractory epilepsy patients undergoing phase III monitoring. Task: (1) A cue appears designating a delay period known as the "wait" epoch; followed by (2) an instructions cue to subsequently move their right hand, left hand, or mouth and tongue known as the "instruct" epoch; and (3) a movement cue commencing the "move" epoch. We analyzed the cue-triggered power spectral density across all frequencies from 3 different nodes in the sensorimotor network (premotor, primary motor, and primary sensory cortex). We then explored the cue-triggered changes in connectivity (phase-locking value [PLV]) between these nodes. Spectral dynamics: We find that sensorimotor cortical nodes have preferential activation in high gamma band (70-100 Hz) during a motor task, with an anatomically guided cue-triggered response. In particular, instruction cue-triggered power is increased in premotor areas, while movement cue-triggered power is increased in peri-rolandic cortex. Network connectivity: The sensorimotor cortical network displays strongest phase locking in high gamma. This connectivity is consistent throughout the task and thus not affected by cue stimulus type (wait/instruct/move). However, there is a dichotomous cue-triggered response in sensorimotor network connectivity in theta band (4-8 Hz). Theta connectivity is decreased after the "wait" cue and increased after the "move" cue. These results provide evidence of cue-triggered electrocorticographic signal modulation occurring within and between sensorimotor network nodes. By analyzing ECoG spectral dynamics and sensorimotor connectomics during a motor task

  2. The ‘hit’ phenomenon: a mathematical model of human dynamics interactions as a stochastic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Arakaki, Hisashi; Matsuda, Naoya; Umemura, Sanae; Urushidani, Tamiko; Yamagata, Naoya; Yoshida, Narihiko

    2012-06-01

    A mathematical model for the ‘hit’ phenomenon in entertainment within a society is presented as a stochastic process of human dynamics interactions. The model uses only the advertisement budget time distribution as an input, and word-of-mouth (WOM), represented by posts on social network systems, is used as data to make a comparison with the calculated results. The unit of time is days. The WOM distribution in time is found to be very close to the revenue distribution in time. Calculations for the Japanese motion picture market based on the mathematical model agree well with the actual revenue distribution in time.

  3. From Brain-Environment Connections to Temporal Dynamics and Social Interaction: Principles of Human Brain Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Riitta

    2017-06-07

    Experimental data about brain function accumulate faster than does our understanding of how the brain works. To tackle some general principles at the grain level of behavior, I start from the omnipresent brain-environment connection that forces regularities of the physical world to shape the brain. Based on top-down processing, added by sparse sensory information, people are able to form individual "caricature worlds," which are similar enough to be shared among other people and which allow quick and purposeful reactions to abrupt changes. Temporal dynamics and social interaction in natural environments serve as further essential organizing principles of human brain function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. FML-based Dynamic Assessment Agent for Human-Machine Cooperative System on Game of Go

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang-Shing; Wang, Mei-Hui; Yang, Sheng-Chi; Hung, Pi-Hsia; Lin, Su-Wei; Shuo, Nan; Kubota, Naoyuki; Chou, Chun-Hsun; Chou, Ping-Chiang; Kao, Chia-Hsiu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of Fuzzy Markup Language (FML) to construct an FML-based Dynamic Assessment Agent (FDAA), and we present an FML-based Human-Machine Cooperative System (FHMCS) for the game of Go. The proposed FDAA comprises an intelligent decision-making and learning mechanism, an intelligent game bot, a proximal development agent, and an intelligent agent. The intelligent game bot is based on the open-source code of Facebook Darkforest, and it features a represen...

  5. Frequency modulated cutaneous orientation feedback from artificial arms. [dynamic control model of human arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonow, M.; Freedy, A.; Lyman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the human arm, emphasizing the neuromuscular mechanisms of feedback control, has been constructed. The various parameters and functions of physiological receptors in the feedback section have been classified into an automated category that can be incorporated in the prosthesis servo loop, and into a sensory category that should be communicated to the operator if control and dynamic performance are to be optimized. A scheme for simultaneous display of two such sensory parameters, i.e., fingertip pressure and elbow position, has been developed, implemented and evaluated. The neurophysiological mechanism of such displays, and the feasibility of sensory transformation, is discussed in this paper.

  6. Dynamic Landscapes and Sea Level Change in Human Evolution and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. C.; Devès, M. H.; Bailey, G.; Inglis, R.; Williams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris,are developing systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. These approaches use remote sensing techniques combined with archaeological and tectonic field surveys on land and underwater. Examples are shown from Europe, the Middle East and Africa to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  7. Dynamics of the transcriptome response of cultured human embryonic stem cells to ionizing radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mykyta V., E-mail: sokolovm@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Irina V., E-mail: ipanyutinv@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Panyutin, Igor G., E-mail: igorp@helix.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Neumann, Ronald D., E-mail: rneumann@mail.nih.gov [Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    One of the key consequences of exposure of human cells to genotoxic agents is the activation of DNA damage responses (DDR). While the mechanisms underpinning DDR in fully differentiated somatic human cells have been studied extensively, molecular signaling events and pathways involved in DDR in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) remain largely unexplored. We studied changes in the human genome-wide transcriptome of H9 hESC line following exposures to 1 Gy of gamma-radiation at 2 h and 16 h post-irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the expression data for a subset of genes. In parallel, the cell growth, DDR kinetics, and expression of pluripotency markers in irradiated hESC were monitored. The changes in gene expression in hESC after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are substantially different from those observed in somatic human cell lines. Gene expression patterns at 2 h post-IR showed almost an exclusively p53-dependent, predominantly pro-apoptotic, signature with a total of only 30 up-regulated genes. In contrast, the gene expression patterns at 16 h post-IR showed 354 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in pro-survival pathways, such as increased expression of metallothioneins, ubiquitin cycle, and general metabolism signaling. Cell growth data paralleled trends in gene expression changes. DDR in hESC followed the kinetics reported for human somatic differentiated cells. The expression of pluripotency markers characteristic of undifferentiated hESC was not affected by exposure to IR during the time course of our analysis. Our data on dynamics of transcriptome response of irradiated hESCs may provide a valuable tool to screen for markers of IR exposure of human cells in their most naive state; thus unmasking the key elements of DDR; at the same time, avoiding the complexity of interpreting distinct cell type-dependent genotoxic stress responses of terminally differentiated cells.

  8. A 1-D model of the nonlinear dynamics of the human lumbar intervertebral disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Giacomo; Huber, Gerd; Püschel, Klaus; Ferguson, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Lumped parameter models of the spine have been developed to investigate its response to whole body vibration. However, these models assume the behaviour of the intervertebral disc to be linear-elastic. Recently, the authors have reported on the nonlinear dynamic behaviour of the human lumbar intervertebral disc. This response was shown to be dependent on the applied preload and amplitude of the stimuli. However, the mechanical properties of a standard linear elastic model are not dependent on the current deformation state of the system. The aim of this study was therefore to develop a model that is able to describe the axial, nonlinear quasi-static response and to predict the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the disc. The ability to adapt the model to an individual disc's response was a specific focus of the study, with model validation performed against prior experimental data. The influence of the numerical parameters used in the simulations was investigated. The developed model exhibited an axial quasi-static and dynamic response, which agreed well with the corresponding experiments. However, the model needs further improvement to capture additional peculiar characteristics of the system dynamics, such as the change of mean point of oscillation exhibited by the specimens when oscillating in the region of nonlinear resonance. Reference time steps were identified for specific integration scheme. The study has demonstrated that taking into account the nonlinear-elastic behaviour typical of the intervertebral disc results in a predicted system oscillation much closer to the physiological response than that provided by linear-elastic models. For dynamic analysis, the use of standard linear-elastic models should be avoided, or restricted to study cases where the amplitude of the stimuli is relatively small.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of human serum albumin and role of disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Colina, Coray M

    2013-10-10

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of human serum albumin in the presence and absence of disulfide bonds are presented. Simulations of 70 ns duration provide information on the relevance of disulfide bonds in the dynamics and structural conformation of HSA. Significant conformational changes are observed in the absence of disulfide bonds after 35 ns that could impact the functionality and stability of the protein. Changes in the secondary structure, hydrogen bonds, B factors, and cross-correlations reveal which disulfide bonds are important for keeping the secondary and tertiary structure and dynamics of the protein (e.g., Cys168-Cys177, Cys278-Cys289) and which have little effect on the local structure and dynamics (e.g., Cys200-Cys246, Cys461-Cys477). Removing all disulfide bonds in the protein appears to be a practical prescreening tool for identifying disulfide bonds relevant to structure and dynamics. In the absence of disulfide bonds, certain hydrogen bonds and correlated motions vanish, affecting the structure of neighboring residues. The structure of the primary binding sites of HSA is partially affected when disulfide bonds are removed. For the native structure, simulations clearly reveal the conformational changes that allow the only free cysteine to be exposed on the protein surface to form intermolecular disulfide bonds; this information could not be resolved from the static crystal structure alone. The absence of specific disulfide bonds could lead to partially unfolded structures; such structures are known to be prone to protein aggregation. Removing disulfide bonds could have similar consequences in other proteins of interest, such as immunoglobulin G.

  10. Towards understanding the dynamic behaviour of floodplains as human-water systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Di Baldassarre

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a conceptual approach to explore the complex dynamics of floodplains as fully coupled human-water systems. A number of hydrologists have recently investigated the impact of human activities (such as flood control measures, land-use changes, and settlement patterns on the frequency and severity of floods. Meanwhile, social scientists have shown how interactions between society and waters in deltas and floodplain areas, including the frequency and severity of floods, have an impact on the ways in which social relations unfold (in terms of governance processes, policies, and institutions and societies are organised (spatially, politically, and socially. However, we argue that the interactions and associated feedback mechanisms between hydrological and social processes remain largely unexplored and poorly understood. Thus, there is a need to better understand how the institutions and governance processes interact with hydrological processes in deltas and floodplains to influence the frequency and severity of floods, while (in turn hydrological processes co-constitute the social realm and make a difference for how social relations unfold to shape governance processes and institutions. Our research goal, therefore, is not in identifying one or the other side of the cycle (hydrological or social, but in explaining the relationship between them: how, when, where, and why they interact, and to what result for both social relations and hydrological processes? We argue that long time series of hydrological and social data, along with remote sensing data, can be used to observe floodplain dynamics from unconventional approaches, and understand the complex interactions between water and human systems taking place in floodplain areas, across scales and levels of human impacts, and within different hydro-climatic conditions, socio-cultural settings, and modes of governance.

  11. Food webs in the human body: linking ecological theory to viral dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murall, Carmen Lía; McCann, Kevin S; Bauch, Chris T

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of in-host infections are central to predicting the progression of natural infections and the effectiveness of drugs or vaccines, however, they are not well understood. Here, we apply food web theory to in-host disease networks of the human body that are structured similarly to food web models that treat both predation and competition simultaneously. We show that in-host trade-offs, an under-studied aspect of disease ecology, are fundamental to understanding the outcomes of competing viral strains under differential immune responses. Further, and importantly, our analysis shows that the outcome of competition between virulent and non-virulent strains can be highly contingent on the abiotic conditions prevailing in the human body. These results suggest the alarming idea that even subtle behavioral changes that alter the human body (e.g. weight gain, smoking) may switch the environmental conditions in a manner that suddenly allows a virulent strain to dominate and replace less virulent strains. These ecological results therefore cast new light on the control of disease in the human body, and highlight the importance of longitudinal empirical studies across host variation gradients, as well as, of studies focused on delineating life history trade-offs within hosts.

  12. The ecology of human microbiota: dynamics and diversity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkman, Antti; Lehtimäki, Jenni; Ruokolainen, Lasse

    2017-07-01

    Social welfare, better health care, and urbanization have greatly improved human health and well-being. On the other hand, Western societies suffer from the downsides of the elevated standard of living. Among other factors, the Western diet (poor in dietary fiber), lack of contact with natural biodiversity, and excessive antibiotic use are known to be associated with the increase in chronic inflammatory disorders. Limited exposure to microbial biodiversity, in combination with severe lifestyle-related disturbances to commensal microbial communities, especially during early life, is changing the diversity and composition of human microbiota. In this review, we try to promote and apply ecological theory to understand the dynamics and diversity of human commensal microbiota. In this context, we explore the changes in the microbiota that are relevant to human health, especially in light of the rise of chronic inflammatory disorders. We try to elucidate the underlying ecological mechanisms behind these disorders and provide potential solutions for their avoidance. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Rac1 dynamics in the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchelles, Romain; Stalder, Danièle; Botton, Thomas; Arkowitz, Robert A; Bassilana, Martine

    2010-10-28

    The small Rho G-protein Rac1 is highly conserved from fungi to humans, with approximately 65% overall sequence identity in Candida albicans. As observed with human Rac1, we show that C. albicans Rac1 can accumulate in the nucleus, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) together with fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) studies indicate that this Rho G-protein undergoes nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. Analyses of different chimeras revealed that nuclear accumulation of C. albicans Rac1 requires the NLS-motifs at its carboxyl-terminus, which are blocked by prenylation of the adjacent cysteine residue. Furthermore, we show that C. albicans Rac1 dynamics, both at the plasma membrane and in the nucleus, are dependent on its activation state and in particular that the inactive form accumulates faster in the nucleus. Heterologous expression of human Rac1 in C. albicans also results in nuclear accumulation, yet accumulation is more rapid than that of C. albicans Rac1. Taken together our results indicate that Rac1 nuclear accumulation is an inherent property of this G-protein and suggest that the requirements for its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling are conserved from fungi to humans.

  14. A System Dynamics Model to Predict the Human Monocyte Response to Endotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Álvarez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available System dynamics is a powerful tool that allows modeling of complex and highly networked systems such as those found in the human immune system. We have developed a model that reproduces how the exposure of human monocytes to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs induces an inflammatory state characterized by high production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, which is rapidly modulated to enter into a tolerant state, known as endotoxin tolerance (ET. The model contains two subsystems with a total of six states, seven flows, two auxiliary variables, and 14 parameters that interact through six differential and nine algebraic equations. The parameters were estimated and optimized to obtain a model that fits the experimental data obtained from human monocytes treated with various LPS doses. In contrast to publications on other animal models, stimulation of human monocytes with super-low-dose LPSs did not alter the response to a second LPSs challenge, neither inducing ET, nor enhancing the inflammatory response. Moreover, the model confirms the low production of TNFα and increased levels of C–C motif ligand 2 when monocytes exhibit a tolerant state similar to that of patients with sepsis. At present, the model can help us better understand the ET response and might offer new insights on sepsis diagnostics and prognosis by examining the monocyte response to endotoxins in patients with sepsis.

  15. Rac1 dynamics in the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Vauchelles

    Full Text Available The small Rho G-protein Rac1 is highly conserved from fungi to humans, with approximately 65% overall sequence identity in Candida albicans. As observed with human Rac1, we show that C. albicans Rac1 can accumulate in the nucleus, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP together with fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP studies indicate that this Rho G-protein undergoes nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. Analyses of different chimeras revealed that nuclear accumulation of C. albicans Rac1 requires the NLS-motifs at its carboxyl-terminus, which are blocked by prenylation of the adjacent cysteine residue. Furthermore, we show that C. albicans Rac1 dynamics, both at the plasma membrane and in the nucleus, are dependent on its activation state and in particular that the inactive form accumulates faster in the nucleus. Heterologous expression of human Rac1 in C. albicans also results in nuclear accumulation, yet accumulation is more rapid than that of C. albicans Rac1. Taken together our results indicate that Rac1 nuclear accumulation is an inherent property of this G-protein and suggest that the requirements for its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling are conserved from fungi to humans.

  16. Methodology to Support Dynamic Function Allocation Policies Between Humans and Flight Deck Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Function allocation assigns work functions to all agents in a team, both human and automation. Efforts to guide function allocation systematically have been studied in many fields such as engineering, human factors, team and organization design, management science, cognitive systems engineering. Each field focuses on certain aspects of function allocation, but not all; thus, an independent discussion of each does not address all necessary aspects of function allocation. Four distinctive perspectives have emerged from this comprehensive review of literature on those fields: the technology-centered, human-centered, team-oriented, and work-oriented perspectives. Each perspective focuses on different aspects of function allocation: capabilities and characteristics of agents (automation or human), structure and strategy of a team, and work structure and environment. This report offers eight issues with function allocation that can be used to assess the extent to which each of issues exist on a given function allocation. A modeling framework using formal models and simulation was developed to model work as described by the environment, agents, their inherent dynamics, and relationships among them. Finally, to validate the framework and metrics, a case study modeled four different function allocations between a pilot and flight deck automation during the arrival and approach phases of flight.

  17. Automatic Human Movement Assessment With Switching Linear Dynamic System: Motion Segmentation and Motor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Baptista, Roberto; Bo, Antonio P L; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro

    2017-06-01

    Performance assessment of human movement is critical in diagnosis and motor-control rehabilitation. Recent developments in portable sensor technology enable clinicians to measure spatiotemporal aspects to aid in the neurological assessment. However, the extraction of quantitative information from such measurements is usually done manually through visual inspection. This paper presents a novel framework for automatic human movement assessment that executes segmentation and motor performance parameter extraction in time-series of measurements from a sequence of human movements. We use the elements of a Switching Linear Dynamic System model as building blocks to translate formal definitions and procedures from human movement analysis. Our approach provides a method for users with no expertise in signal processing to create models for movements using labeled dataset and later use it for automatic assessment. We validated our framework on preliminary tests involving six healthy adult subjects that executed common movements in functional tests and rehabilitation exercise sessions, such as sit-to-stand and lateral elevation of the arms and five elderly subjects, two of which with limited mobility, that executed the sit-to-stand movement. The proposed method worked on random motion sequences for the dual purpose of movement segmentation (accuracy of 72%-100%) and motor performance assessment (mean error of 0%-12%).

  18. THE FAINT 'HEARTBEATS' OF IGR J17091-3624: AN EXCEPTIONAL BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamirano, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Wijnands, R.; Kalamkar, M. [Astronomical Institute, ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belloni, T.; Stiele, H.; Motta, S.; Munoz-Darias, T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Linares, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Curran, P. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA DSM/IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Casella, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, Hampshire, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Krimm, H., E-mail: d.altamirano@uva.nl [CRESST and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We report on the first 180 days of Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer observations of the outburst of the black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624. This source exhibits a broad variety of complex light curve patterns including periods of strong flares alternating with quiet intervals. Similar patterns in the X-ray light curves have been seen in the (up to now) unique black hole system GRS 1915+105. In the context of the variability classes defined by Belloni et al. for GRS 1915+105, we find that IGR J17091-3624 shows the {nu}, {rho}, {alpha}, {lambda}, {beta}, and {mu} classes as well as quiet periods which resemble the {chi} class, all occurring at 2-60 keV count rate levels which can be 10-50 times lower than observed in GRS 1915+105. The so-called {rho} class 'heartbeats' occur as fast as every few seconds and as slow as {approx}100 s, tracing a loop in the hardness-intensity diagram which resembles that previously seen in GRS 1915+105. However, while GRS 1915+105 traverses this loop clockwise, IGR J17091-3624 does so in the opposite sense. We briefly discuss our findings in the context of the models proposed for GRS 1915+105 and find that either all models requiring near Eddington luminosities for GRS 1915+105-like variability fail, or IGR J17091-3624 lies at a distance well in excess of 20 kpc, or it harbors one of the least massive black holes known (<3 M{sub Sun }).

  19. Baseline heartbeat perception accuracy and short-term outcome of brief cognitive-behaviour therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Legaki, Emilia-Maria; Vaidakis, Nikolaos; Ploumpidis, Dimitrios; Soldatos, Constantin R; Papageorgiou, Charalambos; Papadimitriou, George N; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-07-01

    Increased heartbeat perception accuracy (HBP-accuracy) may contribute to the pathogenesis of Panic Disorder (PD) without or with Agoraphobia (PDA). Extant research suggests that HBP-accuracy is a rather stable individual characteristic, moreover predictive of worse long-term outcome in PD/PDA patients. However, it remains still unexplored whether HBP-accuracy adversely affects patients' short-term outcome after structured cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for PD/PDA. To explore the potential association between HBP-accuracy and the short-term outcome of a structured brief-CBT for the acute treatment of PDA. We assessed baseline HBP-accuracy using the "mental tracking" paradigm in 25 consecutive medication-free, CBT-naive PDA patients. Patients then underwent a structured, protocol-based, 8-session CBT by the same therapist. Outcome measures included the number of panic attacks during the past week, the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), and the Mobility Inventory-Alone subscale (MI-alone). No association emerged between baseline HBP-accuracy and posttreatment changes concerning number of panic attacks. Moreover, higher baseline HBP-accuracy was associated with significantly larger reductions in the scores of the ACQ and the MI-alone scales. Our results suggest that in PDA patients undergoing structured brief-CBT for the acute treatment of their symptoms, higher baseline HBP-accuracy is not associated with worse short-term outcome concerning panic attacks. Furthermore, higher baseline HBP-accuracy may be associated with enhanced therapeutic gains in agoraphobic cognitions and behaviours.

  20. Feasible Muscle Activation Ranges Based on Inverse Dynamics Analyses of Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Cole S.; Sohn, M. Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle’s activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. PMID:26300401

  1. Dynamic modulation of thymidylate synthase gene expression and fluorouracil sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Wakasa

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy. However, many biomarker candidates are still in debate. In addition to clinical studies, a priori experimental approaches are needed. Thymidylate synthase (TS expression is a long-standing candidate as a biomarker for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment of cancer patients. Using the Tet-OFF system and a human colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1, we first constructed an in vitro system in which TS expression is dynamically controllable. Quantitative assays have elucidated that TS expression in the transformant was widely modulated, and that the dynamic range covered 15-fold of the basal level. 5-FU sensitivity of the transformant cells significantly increased in response to downregulated TS expression, although being not examined in the full dynamic range because of the doxycycline toxicity. Intriguingly, our in vitro data suggest that there is a linear relationship between TS expression and the 5-FU sensitivity in cells. Data obtained in a mouse model using transformant xenografts were highly parallel to those obtained in vitro. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that TS expression is a determinant of 5-FU sensitivity in cells, at least in this specific genetic background, and, therefore, support the possibility of TS expression as a biomarker for 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Modeling the heterogeneity of human dynamics based on the measurements of influential users in Sina Microblog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxu; Guan, Xiaohong; Qin, Tao; Yang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Online social network has become an indispensable communication tool in the information age. The development of microblog also provides us a great opportunity to study human dynamics that play a crucial role in the design of efficient communication systems. In this paper we study the characteristics of the tweeting behavior based on the data collected from Sina Microblog. The user activity level is measured to characterize how often a user posts a tweet. We find that the user activity level follows a bimodal distribution. That is, the microblog users tend to be either active or inactive. The inter-tweeting time distribution is then measured at both the aggregate and individual levels. We find that the inter-tweeting time follows a piecewise power law distribution of two tails. Furthermore, the exponents of the two tails have different correlations with the user activity level. These findings demonstrate that the dynamics of the tweeting behavior are heterogeneous in different time scales. We then develop a dynamic model co-driven by the memory and the interest mechanism to characterize the heterogeneity. The numerical simulations validate the model and verify that the short time interval tweeting behavior is driven by the memory mechanism while the long time interval behavior by the interest mechanism.

  3. Ligand modulation of sidechain dynamics in a wild-type human GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsay D; Dikiy, Igor; Chapman, Karen; Rödström, Karin Ej; Aramini, James; LeVine, Michael V; Khelashvili, George; Rasmussen, Søren Gf; Gardner, Kevin H; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2017-10-06

    GPCRs regulate all aspects of human physiology, and biophysical studies have deepened our understanding of GPCR conformational regulation by different ligands. Yet there is no experimental evidence for how sidechain dynamics control allosteric transitions between GPCR conformations. To address this deficit, we generated samples of a wild-type GPCR (A 2A R) that are deuterated apart from 1 H/ 13 C NMR probes at isoleucine δ1 methyl groups, which facilitated 1 H/ 13 C methyl TROSY NMR measurements with opposing ligands. Our data indicate that low [Na + ] is required to allow large agonist-induced structural changes in A 2A R, and that patterns of sidechain dynamics substantially differ between agonist (NECA) and inverse agonist (ZM241385) bound receptors, with the inverse agonist suppressing fast ps-ns timescale motions at the G protein binding site. Our approach to GPCR NMR creates a framework for exploring how different regions of a receptor respond to different ligands or signaling proteins through modulation of fast ps-ns sidechain dynamics.

  4. Dynamic compressive behavior of human meniscus correlates with its extra-cellular matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursac, P; Arnoczky, S; York, A

    2009-01-01

    The menisci of the knee play a significant role in the complex biomechanics of the joint and are critically important in maintaining articular cartilage health. While a general form-function relationship has been identified for the structural orientation of the extra-cellular matrix of the meniscus, the role of individual biochemical components has yet to be fully explored. To determine if correlations exist between the dynamic and static compressive modulus of human menisci and their major extra-cellular matrix constituents (collagen, glycosoaminoglycan and water content), 12 lateral and 11 medial menisci from 13 adult donors were examined. The results showed that in dynamic compression at high loading frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) the menisci behave as a rubber-like elastic material while at lower frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz) significant viscous dissipation occurs. While regional variations in compressive moduli and extra-cellular matrix composition were observed, the magnitude of both dynamic and static compressive moduli were found to be insensitive to collagen content (p>0.4). However, this magnitude was found to significantly increase with increasing glycosaminoglycan content (pmeniscus and its extra-cellular matrix composition.

  5. Carbon fate in a large temperate human-impacted river system: Focus on benthic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Groleau, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Fluvial networks play an important role in regional and global carbon (C) budgets. The Seine River, from the Paris urban area to the entrance of its estuary (220 km), is studied here as an example of a large human-impacted river system subject to temperate climatic conditions. We assess organic C (OC) budgets upstream and downstream from one of the world's largest wastewater treatment plants and for different hydrological conditions using a hydrobiogeochemical model. The fine representation of sediment accumulation on the river bed allows for the quantification of pelagic and benthic effects on OC export toward the estuary and on river metabolism (i.e., net CO2 production). OC export is significantly affected by benthic dynamics during the driest periods, when 25% of the inputs to the system is transformed or stored in the sediment layer. Benthic processes also substantially affect river metabolism under any hydrological condition. On average, benthic respiration accounts for one third of the total river respiration along the studied stretch (0.27 out of 0.86 g C m-2 d-1). Even though the importance of benthic processes was already acknowledged by the scientific community for headwater streams, these results stress the major influence of benthic dynamics, and thus of physical processes such as sedimentation and resuspension, on C cycling in downstream river systems. It opens the door to new developments in the quantification of C emissions by global models, whereby biogeochemical processing and benthic dynamics should be taken into account.

  6. Dynamical criticality during induction of anesthesia in human ECoG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro M. Alonso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze electro-corticography (ECoG recordings in human sub- jects as they are anesthetized. We hypothesize that the decrease in responsiveness that defines anesthesia induction is concomitant with the stabilization of neuronal dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we performed a moving vector autoregressive analysis and quantified stability of neuronal dynamics using eigenmode decompo- sition of the autoregressive matrices, independently fitted to short sliding temporal windows. Consistent with the hypothesis we show that while the subject is awake, many modes of oscillations of neuronal activity are found at the edge of instabil- ity, but as the subject becomes anesthetized the fitted dynamics becomes more damped. Analysis of eigenmode distributions in the awake and anesthetized brain revealed statistically significant stabilization not present in surrogate data. Sta- bility analysis thus offer a novel way of quantifying changes in neuronal activity that characterize loss of consciousness induced by general anesthetics. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the effect of the anesthetic procedure is to damp out high frequency activity while still allowing for low frequency modes to perform a function.

  7. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chieh Kuo

    Full Text Available This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  8. Statistical comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic models in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Welch, E Brian; Chakravarthy, A Bapsi; Xu, Lei; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Farley, Jaime; Mayer, Ingrid A; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Means-Powell, Julie; Abramson, Vandana G; Grau, Ana M; Gore, John C; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-07-01

    By fitting dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data to an appropriate pharmacokinetic model, quantitative physiological parameters can be estimated. In this study, we compare four different models by applying four statistical measures to assess their ability to describe dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data obtained in 28 human breast cancer patient sets: the chi-square test (χ(2)), Durbin-Watson statistic, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion. The pharmacokinetic models include the fast exchange limit model with (FXL_v(p)) and without (FXL) a plasma component, and the fast and slow exchange regime models (FXR and SXR, respectively). The results show that the FXL_v(p) and FXR models yielded the smallest χ(2) in 45.64 and 47.53% of the voxels, respectively; they also had the smallest number of voxels showing serial correlation with 0.71 and 2.33%, respectively. The Akaike information criterion indicated that the FXL_v(p) and FXR models were preferred in 42.84 and 46.59% of the voxels, respectively. The Bayesian information criterion also indicated the FXL_v(p) and FXR models were preferred in 39.39 and 45.25% of the voxels, respectively. Thus, these four metrics indicate that the FXL_v(p) and the FXR models provide the most complete statistical description of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI time courses for the patients selected in this study. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neural dynamics of reward probability coding: a Magnetoencephalographic study in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eThomas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of future rewards and discrepancy between actual and expected outcomes (prediction error are crucial signals for adaptive behavior. In humans, a number of fMRI studies demonstrated that reward probability modulates these two signals in a large brain network. Yet, the spatio-temporal dynamics underlying the neural coding of reward probability remains unknown. Here, using magnetoencephalography, we investigated the neural dynamics of prediction and reward prediction error computations while subjects learned to associate cues of slot machines with monetary rewards with different probabilities. We showed that event-related magnetic fields (ERFs arising from the visual cortex coded the expected reward value 155 ms after the cue, demonstrating that reward value signals emerge early in the visual stream. Moreover, a prediction error was reflected in ERF peaking 300 ms after the rewarded outcome and showing decreasing amplitude with higher reward probability. This prediction error signal was generated in a network including the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. These findings pinpoint the spatio-temporal characteristics underlying reward probability coding. Together, our results provide insights into the neural dynamics underlying the ability to learn probabilistic stimuli-reward contingencies.

  10. A Human-Machine-Cooperative-Driving Controller Based on AFS and DYC for Vehicle Dynamic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a difficult and important project to coordinate active front steering (AFS and direct yaw moment control (DYC, which has great potential to improve vehicle dynamic stability. Moreover, the balance between driver’s operation and advanced technologies’ intervention is a critical problem. This paper proposes a human-machine-cooperative-driving controller (HMCDC with a hierarchical structure for vehicle dynamic stability and it consists of a supervisor, an upper coordination layer, and two lower layers (AFS and DYC. The range of AFS additional angle is constrained, with consideration of the influence of AFS on drivers’ feeling. First, in the supervisor, a nonlinear vehicle model was utilized to predict vehicle states, and the reference yaw rate, and side slip angle values were calculated. Then, the upper coordination layer decides the control object and control mode. At last, DYC and AFS calculate brake pressures and the range of active steering angle, respectively. The proposed HMCDC is evaluated by co-simulation of CarSim and MATLAB. Results show that the proposed controller could improve vehicle dynamic stability effectively for the premise of ensuring the driver’s intention.

  11. Novel Speech Motion Generation by Modeling Dynamics of Human Speech Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurima Sakai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a method to automatically generate humanlike trunk motions based on speech (i.e., the neck and waist motions involved in speech for a conversational android from its speech in real time. To generate humanlike movements, the android’s mechanical limitation (i.e., limited number of joints needs to be compensated for. By enforcing the synchronization of speech and motion in the android, the method enables us to compensate for its mechanical limitations. Moreover, motion can be modulated to express emotions by tuning the parameters in the dynamical model. This method is based on a spring-damper dynamical model driven by voice features to simulate the human trunk movements involved in speech. In contrast to the existing methods based on machine learning, our system can easily modulate the motions generated due to speech patterns because the model’s parameters correspond to muscle stiffness. The experimental results show that the android motions generated by our model can be perceived as more natural and thus motivate users to talk longer with it compared to a system that simply copies human motions. In addition, our model generates emotional speech motions by tuning its parameters.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Assessment of the Dynamical Behaviour of a Footbridge Under Human-Induced Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos da Silva José Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to perform an experimental and numerical assessment of an existing pedestrian footbridge located in the campus of the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ, Rio de Janeiro/RJ, Brazil. The structural system is based on an internal reinforced concrete footbridge spanning 24.5m, constituted by concrete beams and slabs and being currently used for pedestrian crossing. The modal testing of the structure was performed by dynamic monitoring through accelerometers installed on the structure as well as by a vibrometer device based on Laser Doppler Vibrometry using the SIMO and SISO acquisition techniques, respectively. Then, these experimental results were calibrated with a numerical model by the use of finite element method (FEM through the ANSYS program. Afterwards, a forced vibration analysis was performed on the structure based on human-induced loads considering two control groups: the first one is intended to excite the investigated footbridge to cause resonance motion with a controlled step frequency and the second one is related to freely random people crossing the footbridge as it occurs normally during its real life. Thus, the structural system dynamic response in terms of peak accelerations values were evaluated and compared to the current human comfort criteria.

  13. Prediction of closed-chain human arm dynamics in a crank-rotation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Svinin, Mikhail; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the analysis of human arm movement in a crank-rotation task that is an example of environmentally constrained movements. Opening a door, rotating a steering wheel, and pushing a carriage are other typical examples of movements where the physical constraints, imposed on the hand position/orientation, influence the joint angles of the shoulder and the elbow. To predict kinematic and kinetic patterns for human arm movement in crank-rotation tasks, we use an optimization-based technique. The method enables dynamic prediction of closed-chain movements and force exertion using inverse dynamics musculoskeletal simulation. An anatomically detailed musculoskeletal model is parameterized by means of time functions controlling selected degrees-of-freedom. Subsequently, the parameters of these functions are optimized to produce an optimal motion according to a user-defined objective function and constraints given by the anthropometry of the body and physics of the environment. In this study, we use a physiology-based objective function expressing the muscle metabolic energy expenditure and validation metrics to assess the accuracy of the computational model. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons between predicted results and experimental data from a group of four healthy males indicate that the method reproduces natural kinetic and kinematic patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic imaging in electrical impedance tomography of the human chest with online transition matrix identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Fernando Silva; Aya, Julio Cesar Ceballos; Fleury, Agenor Toledo; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez

    2010-02-01

    One of the electrical impedance tomography objectives is to estimate the electrical resistivity distribution in a domain based only on electrical potential measurements at its boundary generated by an imposed electrical current distribution into the boundary. One of the methods used in dynamic estimation is the Kalman filter. In biomedical applications, the random walk model is frequently used as evolution model and, under this conditions, poor tracking ability of the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is achieved. An analytically developed evolution model is not feasible at this moment. The paper investigates the identification of the evolution model in parallel to the EKF and updating the evolution model with certain periodicity. The evolution model transition matrix is identified using the history of the estimated resistivity distribution obtained by a sensitivity matrix based algorithm and a Newton-Raphson algorithm. To numerically identify the linear evolution model, the Ibrahim time-domain method is used. The investigation is performed by numerical simulations of a domain with time-varying resistivity and by experimental data collected from the boundary of a human chest during normal breathing. The obtained dynamic resistivity values lie within the expected values for the tissues of a human chest. The EKF results suggest that the tracking ability is significantly improved with this approach.

  15. Local DNA dynamics shape mutational patterns of mononucleotide repeats in human genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacolla, Albino; Zhu, Xiao; Chen, Hanning; Howells, Katy; Cooper, David N.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Single base substitutions (SBSs) and insertions/deletions are critical for generating population diversity and can lead both to inherited disease and cancer. Whereas on a genome-wide scale SBSs are influenced by cellular factors, on a fine scale SBSs are influenced by the local DNA sequence-context, although the role of flanking sequence is often unclear. Herein, we used bioinformatics, molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics to analyze sequence context-dependent mutagenesis at mononucleotide repeats (A-tracts and G-tracts) in human population variation and in cancer genomes. SBSs and insertions/deletions occur predominantly at the first and last base-pairs of A-tracts, whereas they are concentrated at the second and third base-pairs in G-tracts. These positions correspond to the most flexible sites along A-tracts, and to sites where a ‘hole’, generated by the loss of an electron through oxidation, is most likely to be localized in G-tracts. For A-tracts, most SBSs occur in the direction of the base-pair flanking the tracts. We conclude that intrinsic features of local DNA structure, i.e. base-pair flexibility and charge transfer, render specific nucleotides along mononucleotide runs susceptible to base modification, which then yields mutations. Thus, local DNA dynamics contributes to phenotypic variation and disease in the human population. PMID:25897114

  16. Coupled Human-Ecological Dynamics and Land Degradation in Global Drylands-A modelling approach (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helldén, U.

    2009-12-01

    Drylands comprise one-third of the Earth’s land area. They pose research, management, and policy challenges impacting the livelihoods of 2.5 billion people. Desertification is said to affect some 10-20% of the drylands and is assumed to expand with climate change and population growth. Recent paradigms stress the importance of understanding linkages between human-ecological (H-E) systems in order to achieve sustainable management policies. Understanding coupled H-E systems is difficult at local levels. It represents an even greater challenge at regional scales to guide priorities and policy decisions at national and international levels. System dynamic modelling may help facilitating the probblem. Desertification and land degradation are often modelled and mathematically defined in terms of soil erosion. The soil erosion process is usually described as a function of vegetation ground cover, rainfall characteristics, topography, soil characteristics and land management. On-going research based on system dynamic modelling, focussing on elucidating the inherent complexity of H-E systems across multiple scales, enables an assessment of the relative roles that climate, policy, management, land condition, vulnerability and human adaptation may play in desertification and dryland development. An early approach (1995) to study desertification through an H-E coupled model considered desertification to be stress beyond resilience, i.e. irreversible, using a predator-prey system approach. As most predator-prey models, it was based on two linked differential equations describing the evolution of both a human population (predator) and natural resources (prey) in terms of gains, losses and interaction. A recent effort used a model approach to assess desertification risk through system stability condition analysis. It is based on the assumption that soil erosion and the soil sub-system play an overriding final role in the desertification processes. It is stressing the role and

  17. Distinct migration and contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Erik Olofsson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells serve as one of the first lines of defense against viral infections and transformed cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is not dependent on antigen presentation by target cells, but is dependent on integration of activating and inhibitory signals triggered by receptor–ligand interactions formed at a tight intercellular contact between the NK and target cell, i.e. the immune synapse. We have studied the single-cell migration behavior and target-cell contact dynamics of resting and IL-2-activated human peripheral blood NK cells. Small populations of NK cells and target cells were confined in microwells and imaged by fluorescence microscopy for >8 h. Only the IL-2-activated population of NK cells showed efficient cytotoxicity against the human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T target cells. We found that although the average migration speeds were comparable, activated NK cells showed significantly more dynamic migration behavior, with more frequent transitions between periods of low and high motility. Resting NK cells formed fewer and weaker contacts with target cells, which manifested as shorter conjugation times and in many cases a complete lack of post-conjugation attachment to target cells. Activated NK cells were approximately twice as big as the resting cells, displayed a more migratory phenotype, and were more likely to employ motile scanning of the target cell surface during conjugation. Taken together, our experiments quantify, at the single-cell level, how activation by IL-2 leads to altered NK cell cytotoxicity, migration behavior and contact dynamics.

  18. Carbon fate in a large temperate human-impacted river system: focus on benthic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Groleau, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, several studies highlighted the important role of fluvial networks in regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Therefore, for sustainable C management, in-river C processing needs to be well understood. The Seine River from the Paris urban area to the entrance of its estuary (220 km) is studied here as a pertinent example of a large human impacted river system subject to temperate climatic conditions. We assess organic C (OC) budgets up- and downstream one of the world's largest waste water treatment plants and for different hydrological conditions through hydro-biogeochemical distributed modelling. The fine representation of sediment accumulation on the river bed allows the quantification of the effect of pelagic and benthic processes on OC export towards the estuary and on river metabolism (i.e. net CO2 emission). OC export is significantly affected by benthic dynamics during the driest periods, when 25 % of the inputs to the system is transformed or stored in the sediment layer. River metabolism is also significantly affected by benthic processes, whatever the hydrological conditions. On average, benthic respiration accounts for one third of the total ecosystem respiration along the studied stretch (0.23 out of 0.86 gC.m-2.d-1). These results stress the major influence of benthic dynamics, and thus of physical processes such as sedimentation and re-suspension on C cycling, in large human-impacted temperate river systems and on C export to the estuaries. Even though the importance of benthos processes was already acknowledged by the scientific community for headwater streams, this work highlights its importance for downstream river systems and opens the door to new developments in the quantification of C emissions by global models, in which biogeochemical processing and benthic dynamics must be taken into account.

  19. Mechanistic understanding of human-wildlife conflict through a novel application of dynamic occupancy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Varun R; Medhi, Kamal; Nichols, James D; Oli, Madan K

    2015-08-01

    Crop and livestock depredation by wildlife is a primary driver of human-wildlife conflict, a problem that threatens the coexistence of people and wildlife globally. Understanding mechanisms that underlie depredation patterns holds the key to mitigating conflicts across time and space. However, most studies do not consider imperfect detection and reporting of conflicts, which may lead to incorrect inference regarding its spatiotemporal drivers. We applied dynamic occupancy models to elephant crop depredation data from India between 2005 and 2011 to estimate crop depredation occurrence and model its underlying dynamics as a function of spatiotemporal covariates while accounting for imperfect detection of conflicts. The probability of detecting conflicts was consistently <1.0 and was negatively influenced by distance to roads and elevation gradient, averaging 0.08-0.56 across primary periods (distinct agricultural seasons within each year). The probability of crop depredation occurrence ranged from 0.29 (SE 0.09) to 0.96 (SE 0.04). The probability that sites raided by elephants in primary period t would not be raided in primary period t + 1 varied with elevation gradient in different seasons and was influenced negatively by mean rainfall and village density and positively by distance to forests. Negative effects of rainfall variation and distance to forests best explained variation in the probability that sites not raided by elephants in primary period t would be raided in primary period t + 1. With our novel application of occupancy models, we teased apart the spatiotemporal drivers of conflicts from factors that influence how they are observed, thereby allowing more reliable inference on mechanisms underlying observed conflict patterns. We found that factors associated with increased crop accessibility and availability (e.g., distance to forests and rainfall patterns) were key drivers of elephant crop depredation dynamics. Such an understanding is essential for

  20. Data Mining of Historical Human Data to Assess the Risk of Injury due to Dynamic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jesica; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, N.; Gernhardt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Occupant Protection Group is charged with ensuring crewmembers are protected during all dynamic phases of spaceflight. Previous work with outside experts has led to the development of a definition of acceptable risk (DAR) for space capsule vehicles. The DAR defines allowable probability rates for various categories of injuries. An important question is how to validate these probabilities for a given vehicle. One approach is to impact test human volunteers under projected nominal landing loads. The main drawback is the large number of subject tests required to attain a reasonable level of confidence that the injury probability rates would meet those outlined in the DAR. An alternative is to mine existing databases containing human responses to impact. Testing an anthropomorphic test device (ATD) at the same human-exposure levels could yield a range of ATD responses that would meet DAR. As one aspect of future vehicle validation, the ATD could be tested in the vehicle's seat and suit configuration at nominal landing loads and compared with the ATD responses supported by the human data set. This approach could reduce the number of human-volunteer tests NASA would need to conduct to validate that a vehicle meets occupant protection standards. METHODS: The U.S. Air Force has recorded hundreds of human responses to frontal, lateral, and spinal impacts at many acceleration levels and pulse durations. All of this data are stored on the Collaborative Biomechanics Data Network (CBDN), which is maintained by the Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). The test device for human occupant restraint (THOR) ATD was impact tested on WPAFB's horizontal impulse accelerator (HIA) matching human-volunteer exposures on the HIA to 5 frontal and 3 spinal loading conditions. No human injuries occurred as a result of these impact conditions. Peak THOR response variables for neck axial tension and compression, and thoracic-spine axial compression were collected. Maximal chest

  1. Heartbeat and economic decisions: observing mental stress among proposers and responders in the ultimatum bargaining game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Dulleck

    Full Text Available The ultimatum bargaining game (UBG, a widely used method in experimental economics, clearly demonstrates that motives other than pure monetary reward play a role in human economic decision making. In this study, we explore the behaviour and physiological reactions of both responders and proposers in an ultimatum bargaining game using heart rate variability (HRV, a small and nonintrusive technology that allows observation of both sides of an interaction in a normal experimental economics laboratory environment. We find that low offers by a proposer cause signs of mental stress in both the proposer and the responder; that is, both exhibit high ratios of low to high frequency activity in the HRV spectrum.

  2. Altered patterns of heartbeat-evoked potentials in depersonalization/derealization disorder: neurophysiological evidence for impaired cortical representation of bodily signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, André; Köster, Susann; Beutel, Manfred E; Schächinger, Hartmut; Vögele, Claus; Rost, Silke; Rauh, Manfred; Michal, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Core features of depersonalization/derealization disorder (DPD) are emotional numbing and feelings of disembodiment. Although there are several neurophysiological findings supporting subjective emotional numbing, the psychobiology of disembodiment remains unclear. Heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs), which are considered psychophysiological indicators for the cortical representation of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system, were assessed in 23 patients with DPD and 24 healthy control individuals during rest and while performing a heartbeat perception task. Absolute HEP amplitudes did not differ between groups. Nevertheless, healthy individuals showed higher HEPs during the heartbeat perception task than during rest, whereas no such effect was found in patients with DPD (p = .031). Patients with DPD had higher total levels of salivary α-amylase than did healthy individuals (9626.6 [8200.0] versus 5344.3 [3745.8] kU min/l; p = .029), but there were no group differences in cardiovascular measures (heart rate = 76.2 [10.1] versus 74.3 [7.5] beats/min, p = .60; normalized low-frequency heart rate variability = 0.63 [0.15] versus 0.56 [0.15] normalized units, p = .099; low frequency/high frequency ratio = 249.3 [242.7] versus 164.8 [108.8], p = .10), salivary cortisol (57.5 [46.7] versus 55.1 [43.6] nmol min/l, p = .86), or cortisone levels (593.2 [260.3] versus 543.8 [257.1] nmol min/l, p = .52). These results suggest altered cortical representation of afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system in patients with DPD, which may be associated with higher sympathetic tone. These findings may reflect difficulties of patients with DPD to attend to their actual bodily experiences.

  3. Dynamic compressive response of the human pelvis axial loading of the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical response of the intact human pelvis subjected to dynamic axial compressive loading. Axial compression tests were performed on a total of six fresh frozen human cadaver pelves, five male and one female. The intact pelves were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot placed around the sacrum. Special care was taken when potting the pelves in order to ensure that the orientation of the pelves was representative of that seen in normal upright seating. The pelves were then subjected to dynamic compressive loading at a rate of approximately 2 m/s using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS). The average peak force, moment, and displacement at the point of failure were 5,896 +/- 1455 N, 33.4 +/- 28.6 N-m, and 6.4 +/- 0.7 mm, respectively. The failure of the all pelvis specimens corresponded to a bilateral dislocation of the sacroiliac joint. As a general trend, strain gage data showed that the right and left superior ramus were placed in tension and the right and left ischium were placed in compression. The peak strain values ranged from 746 mstr to 5717 mstr in tension and from -356 mstr to -2677 mstr in compression. The current study will help future researchers reduce the number of incidences and severity of pelvic fractures that can result from falls from heights, ejection seat loading, or motor vehicle crash environments by providing valuable test data that quantifies biomechanical response of the human pelvis in vertical loading.

  4. Coastal Human Actions on Natural Morph-dynamics around RIA of FOZ (NW Spain). Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, J. Javier; Veiga, Efren M.; Rodriguez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    This work approaches the natural littoral processes and their changes induced by human activities around the Cantabrian RIA of FOZ (Galicia, NW Spain). Ria is a specific Spanish term for referring the estuary figured on the sea flooded mouth of a river valley. Although located in Galicia the RIA of FOZ is a Cantabrian Ria. The "Cantabrian rias" clearly differ from the "Galician rias" in their lower degree of tectonic complexity, in their smaller dimensions and in their more advanced current state of infilling (Diez, 1996). While Galician is a Pacific coast Cantabrian was generated as a mainly Atlantic coast. The sedimentary deposits of the Cantabrian rias are mainly from marine origin, being from fluvial origin (Asensio, 1979) just the finest components. The predominant Cantabrian littoral transport goes eastwards and, as consequence of it, the sedimentary littoral spits closing the mouths in coasts normally grow in the same sense. But there are many cases, like in the Ria of Foz, where the spit progresses in an apparent westwards atypical way. This work shows that it is due to combined wind wave phenomena of refraction, diffraction and reflection, which will be detailed. But the human activities interfere in these natural processes. Different port constructions have been made in the Ria of Foz from 1931 to 1977. Their final effects in the morph-dynamics obligate to introduce one construction for regenerate the spit in 1986. The performance, effectiveness and impact of all these port constructions are studied in detail and what are their influences in natural processes for finally applying this knowledge in risks management. Keywords: Rias, Littoral processes, Coastal morph-dynamics, Human induced driving, Risk management.

  5. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi, E-mail: mnavid@iust.ac.ir; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-09-01

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load. - Highlights: • The ability of PVA sponge to control the injury to the human mandible is computed. • A hexahedral FE model for gunshot wounds to the human mandible is established. • The kinetic energy and injury severity of the mandible is minimized by the sponge. • The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. • PVA suggests as an alternative

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  8. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A dynamic human water and electrolyte balance model for verification and optimization of life support systems in space flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, P.; Czupalla, M.; Walter, U.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a dynamic MATLAB SIMULINK® model for the water and electrolyte balance inside the human body. This model is part of an environmentally sensitive dynamic human model for the optimization and verification of environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) in space flight applications. An ECLSS provides all vital supplies for supporting human life on board a spacecraft. As human space flight today focuses on medium- to long-term missions, the strategy in ECLSS is shifting to closed loop systems. For these systems the dynamic stability and function over long duration are essential. However, the only evaluation and rating methods for ECLSS up to now are either expensive trial and error breadboarding strategies or static and semi-dynamic simulations. In order to overcome this mismatch the Exploration Group at Technische Universität München (TUM) is developing a dynamic environmental simulation, the "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB). The central element of this simulation is the dynamic and environmentally sensitive human model. The water subsystem simulation of the human model discussed in this paper is of vital importance for the efficiency of possible ECLSS optimizations, as an over- or under-scaled water subsystem would have an adverse effect on the overall mass budget. On the other hand water has a pivotal role in the human organism. Water accounts for about 60% of the total body mass and is educt and product of numerous metabolic reactions. It is a transport medium for solutes and, due to its high evaporation enthalpy, provides the most potent medium for heat load dissipation. In a system engineering approach the human water balance was worked out by simulating the human body's subsystems and their interactions. The body fluids were assumed to reside in three compartments: blood plasma, interstitial fluid and intracellular fluid. In addition, the active and passive transport of water and solutes between those

  10. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Latella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications.

  11. HTJoinSolver: Human immunoglobulin VDJ partitioning using approximate dynamic programming constrained by conserved motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Longo, Nancy S

    2015-05-23

    Partitioning the human immunoglobulin variable region into variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments is a common sequence analysis step. We introduce a novel approximate dynamic programming method that uses conserved immunoglobulin gene motifs to improve performance of aligning V-segments of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Our new algorithm enhances the former JOINSOLVER algorithm by processing sequences with insertions and/or deletions (indels) and improves the efficiency for large datasets provided by high throughput sequencing. In our simulations, which include rearrangements with indels, the V-matching success rate improved from 61% for partial alignments of sequences with indels in the original algorithm to over 99% in the approximate algorithm. An improvement in the alignment of human VDJ rearrangements over the initial JOINSOLVER algorithm was also seen when compared to the Stanford.S22 human Ig dataset with an online VDJ partitioning software evaluation tool. HTJoinSolver can rapidly identify V- and J-segments with indels to high accuracy for mutated sequences when the mutation probability is around 30% and 20% respectively. The D-segment is much harder to fit even at 20% mutation probability. For all segments, the probability of correctly matching V, D, and J increases with our alignment score.

  12. Integrating verbal and nonverbal communication in a dynamic neural field architecture for human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Bicho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available How do humans coordinate their intentions, goals and motor behaviors when performing joint action tasks? Recent experimental evidence suggests that resonance processes in the observer's motor system are crucially involved in our ability to understand actions of others', to infer their goals and even to comprehend their action-related language. In this paper, we present a control architecture for human-robot collaboration that exploits this close perception-action linkage as a means to achieve more natural and efficient communication grounded in sensorimotor experiences. The architecture is formalized by a coupled system of dynamic neural fields representing a distributed network of neural populations that encode in their activation patterns goals, actions and shared task knowledge. We validate the verbal and non-verbal communication skills of the robot in a joint assembly task in which the human-robot team has to construct toy objects from their components. The experiments focus on the robot’s capacity to anticipate the user’s needs and to detect and communicate unexpected events that may occur during joint task execution.

  13. Beech Fructification and Bank Vole Population Dynamics--Combined Analyses of Promoters of Human Puumala Virus Infections in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Reil

    Full Text Available The transmission of wildlife zoonoses to humans depends, amongst others, on complex interactions of host population ecology and pathogen dynamics within host populations. In Europe, the Puumala virus (PUUV causes nephropathia epidemica in humans. In this study we investigated complex interrelations within the epidemic system of PUUV and its rodent host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus. We suggest that beech fructification and bank vole abundance are both decisive factors affecting human PUUV infections. While rodent host dynamics are expected to be directly linked to human PUUV infections, beech fructification is a rather indirect predictor by serving as food source for PUUV rodent hosts. Furthermore, we examined the dependence of bank vole abundance on beech fructification. We analysed a 12-year (2001-2012 time series of the parameters: beech fructification (as food resource for the PUUV host, bank vole abundance and human incidences from 7 Federal States of Germany. For the first time, we could show the direct interrelation between these three parameters involved in human PUUV epidemics and we were able to demonstrate on a large scale that human PUUV infections are highly correlated with bank vole abundance in the present year, as well as beech fructification in the previous year. By using beech fructification and bank vole abundance as predictors in one model we significantly improved the degree of explanation of human PUUV incidence. Federal State was included as random factor because human PUUV incidence varies considerably among states. Surprisingly, the effect of rodent abundance on human PUUV infections is less strong compared to the indirect effect of beech fructification. Our findings are useful to facilitate the development of predictive models for host population dynamics and the related PUUV infection risk for humans and can be used for plant protection and human health protection purposes.

  14. A model-experiment comparison of system dynamics for human walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipfert, Susanne W; Günther, Michael; Renjewski, Daniel; Grimmer, Sten; Seyfarth, Andre

    2012-01-07

    The human musculo-skeletal system comprises high complexity which makes it difficult to identify underlying basic principles of bipedal locomotion. To tackle this challenge, a common approach is to strip away complexity and formulate a reductive model. With utter simplicity a bipedal spring-mass model gives good predictions of the human gait dynamics, however, it has not been fully investigated whether center of mass motion over time of walking and running is comparable between the model and the human body over a wide range of speed. To test the model's ability in this respect, we compare sagittal center of mass trajectories of model and human data for speeds ranging from 0.5 m/s to 4 m/s. For simulations, system parameters and initial conditions are extracted from experimental observations of 28 subjects. The leg parameters stiffness and length are extracted from functional fitting to the subjects' leg force-length curves. With small variations of the touch-down angle of the leg and the vertical position of the center of mass at apex, we find successful spring-mass simulations for moderate walking and medium running speeds. Predictions of the sagittal center of mass trajectories and ground reaction forces are good, but their amplitudes are overestimated, while contact time is underestimated. At faster walking speeds and slower running speeds we do not find successful model locomotion with the extent of allowed parameter variation. We conclude that the existing limitations may be improved by adding complexity to the model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral blood flow during submaximal and maximal dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, S N; Schroeder, T; Secher, N H

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans was measured at rest and during dynamic exercise on a cycle ergometer corresponding to 56% (range 27-85) of maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Exercise bouts were performed by 16 male and female subjects, lasted 15 min each, and were carried out in a semisupine position....... CBF (133Xe clearance) was expressed as the initial slope index (ISI) and as the first compartment flow (F1). CBF at rest [ISI, 58 (range 45-73); F1, 76 (range 55-98) ml.100 g-1.min-1] increased during exercise [ISI to 79 (57-94) and F1 to 118 (75-164) ml.100 g-1.min-1, P less than 0.01]. CBF did...

  16. Numerical simulation of deformation of dynamic mesh in the human vocal tract model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řidký Václav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of the acoustic signal generation in the human vocal tract is a very complex problem. The computational mesh is not static; it is deformed due to vibration of vocal folds. Movement of vocal folds is in this case prescribed as function of translation and rotation. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the vocal folds was implemented in OpenFOAM, an open-source software package based on finite volume method Work is focused on the dynamic mesh and deformation of structured meshes in the computation a package OpenFOAM. These methods are compared with focus onquality of the mesh (non-orthogonality, aspect ratio and skewness.

  17. Numerical simulation of deformation of dynamic mesh in the human vocal tract model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řidký, Václav; Šidlof, Petr

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic signal generation in the human vocal tract is a very complex problem. The computational mesh is not static; it is deformed due to vibration of vocal folds. Movement of vocal folds is in this case prescribed as function of translation and rotation. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the vocal folds was implemented in OpenFOAM, an open-source software package based on finite volume method Work is focused on the dynamic mesh and deformation of structured meshes in the computation a package OpenFOAM. These methods are compared with focus onquality of the mesh (non-orthogonality, aspect ratio and skewness).

  18. Transcriptional dynamics during human adipogenesis and its link to adipose morphology and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlund, Anna; Mejhert, Niklas; Björk, Christel

    2017-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) can develop into several phenotypes with different pathophysiological impact on type 2 diabetes. To better understand the adipogenic process, the transcriptional events that occur during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes were investigated and the findings...... linked to WAT phenotypes. Single molecule transcriptional profiling provided a detailed map of the expressional changes of genes, enhancers, and long non-coding RNAs, where different types of transcripts share common dynamics during differentiation. Common signatures include early down......-regulated, transient, and late induced transcripts, all of which are linked to distinct developmental processes during adipogenesis. Enhancers expressed during adipogenesis overlap significantly with genetic variants associated with WAT distribution. Transiently and late-induced expressed genes are associated...

  19. Human movement variability, nonlinear dynamics, and pathology: is there a connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Nicholas; Decker, Leslie M

    2011-10-01

    Fields studying movement generation, including robotics, psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience utilize concepts and tools related to the pervasiveness of variability in biological systems. The concept of variability and the measures for nonlinear dynamics used to evaluate this concept open new vistas for research in movement dysfunction of many types. This review describes innovations in the exploration of variability and their potential importance in understanding human movement. Far from being a source of error, evidence supports the presence of an optimal state of variability for healthy and functional movement. This variability has a particular organization and is characterized by a chaotic structure. Deviations from this state can lead to biological systems that are either overly rigid and robotic or noisy and unstable. Both situations result in systems that are less adaptable to perturbations, such as those associated with unhealthy pathological states or absence of skillfulness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Solid-state NMR, electrophysiology and molecular dynamics characterization of human VDAC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gattin, Zrinka; Schneider, Robert; Laukat, Yvonne; Giller, Karin [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Maier, Elke [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Benz, Roland [Theodor-Boveri-Institut (Biozentrum) der Universität Würzburg, Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie (Germany); Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: alange@fmp-berlin.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the most abundant protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane and constitutes the major pathway for the transport of ADP, ATP, and other metabolites. In this multidisciplinary study we combined solid-state NMR, electrophysiology, and molecular dynamics simulations, to study the structure of the human VDAC isoform 2 in a lipid bilayer environment. We find that the structure of hVDAC2 is similar to the structure of hVDAC1, in line with recent investigations on zfVDAC2. However, hVDAC2 appears to exhibit an increased conformational heterogeneity compared to hVDAC1 which is reflected in broader solid-state NMR spectra and less defined electrophysiological profiles.

  1. Semiparametric Identification of Human Arm Dynamics for Flexible Control of a Functional Electrical Stimulation Neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schearer, Eric M; Liao, Yu-Wei; Perreault, Eric J; Tresch, Matthew C; Memberg, William D; Kirsch, Robert F; Lynch, Kevin M

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to identify the dynamics of a human arm controlled by an implanted functional electrical stimulation neuroprosthesis. The method uses Gaussian process regression to predict shoulder and elbow torques given the shoulder and elbow joint positions and velocities and the electrical stimulation inputs to muscles. We compare the accuracy of torque predictions of nonparametric, semiparametric, and parametric model types. The most accurate of the three model types is a semiparametric Gaussian process model that combines the flexibility of a black box function approximator with the generalization power of a parameterized model. The semiparametric model predicted torques during stimulation of multiple muscles with errors less than 20% of the total muscle torque and passive torque needed to drive the arm. The identified model allows us to define an arbitrary reaching trajectory and approximately determine the muscle stimulations required to drive the arm along that trajectory.

  2. Monitoring of endogenous carbon monoxide dynamics in human breath by tunable diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Daraselia, Mikhail V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Skrupskii, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    High sensitive CO gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as a real time monitor of endogenous carbon monoxide in a set of breath physiology experiments. The measurements of the CO content dynamics in exhaled air with 10 ppb sensitivity were attended with detection of carbon dioxide and O2 in breath, lung ventilation parameters, heart rate and blood analysis using conventional techniques. Temporal variations of endogenous CO in human breath caused by hyperoxia, hypoxia, hyperventilation and sport loading were first studied in real time. Scattering of the CO variation time constants was observed for different tested persons. Possible reasons for this scattering related with the organisms' physiology peculiarities are discussed.

  3. Vegetation dynamics and responses to climate change and human activities in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liangliang; Guli Jiapaer; Bao, Anming; Guo, Hao; Ndayisaba, Felix

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of the current changes and dynamics of different types of vegetation in relation to climatic changes and anthropogenic activities is critical for developing adaptation strategies to address the challenges posed by climate change and human activities for ecosystems. Based on a regression analysis and the Hurst exponent index method, this research investigated the spatial and temporal characteristics and relationships between vegetation greenness and climatic factors in Central Asia using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and gridded high-resolution station (land) data for the period 1984-2013. Further analysis distinguished between the effects of climatic change and those of human activities on vegetation dynamics by means of a residual analysis trend method. The results show that vegetation pixels significantly decreased for shrubs and sparse vegetation compared with those for the other vegetation types and that the degradation of sparse vegetation was more serious in the Karakum and Kyzylkum Deserts, the Ustyurt Plateau and the wetland delta of the Large Aral Sea than in other regions. The Hurst exponent results indicated that forests are more sustainable than grasslands, shrubs and sparse vegetation. Precipitation is the main factor affecting vegetation growth in the Kazakhskiy Melkosopochnik. Moreover, temperature is a controlling factor that influences the seasonal variation of vegetation greenness in the mountains and the Aral Sea basin. Drought is the main factor affecting vegetation degradation as a result of both increased temperature and decreased precipitation in the Kyzylkum Desert and the northern Ustyurt Plateau. The residual analysis highlighted that sparse vegetation and the degradation of some shrubs in the southern part of the Karakum Desert, the southern Ustyurt Plateau and the wetland delta of the Large Aral Sea were mainly triggered by human activities: the excessive exploitation of water resources in the upstream areas

  4. Impact loading and locomotor-respiratory coordination significantly influence breathing dynamics in running humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A Daley

    Full Text Available Locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC, phase-locking between breathing and stepping rhythms, occurs in many vertebrates. When quadrupedal mammals gallop, 1∶1 stride per breath coupling is necessitated by pronounced mechanical interactions between locomotion and ventilation. Humans show more flexibility in breathing patterns during locomotion, using LRC ratios of 2∶1, 2.5∶1, 3∶1, or 4∶1 and sometimes no coupling. Previous studies provide conflicting evidence on the mechanical significance of LRC in running humans. Some studies suggest LRC improves breathing efficiency, but others suggest LRC is mechanically insignificant because 'step-driven flows' (ventilatory flows attributable to step-induced forces contribute a negligible fraction of tidal volume. Yet, although step-driven flows are brief, they cause large fluctuations in ventilatory flow. Here we test the hypothesis that running humans use LRC to minimize antagonistic effects of step-driven flows on breathing. We measured locomotor-ventilatory dynamics in 14 subjects running at a self-selected speed (2.6±0.1 ms(-1 and compared breathing dynamics in their naturally 'preferred' and 'avoided' entrainment patterns. Step-driven flows occurred at 1-2X step frequency with peak magnitudes of 0.97±0.45 Ls(-1 (mean ±S.D. Step-driven flows varied depending on ventilatory state (high versus low lung volume, suggesting state-dependent changes in compliance and damping of thoraco-abdominal tissues. Subjects naturally preferred LRC patterns that minimized antagonistic interactions and aligned ventilatory transitions with assistive phases of the step. Ventilatory transitions initiated in 'preferred' phases within the step cycle occurred 2x faster than those in 'avoided' phases. We hypothesize that humans coordinate breathing and locomotion to minimize antagonistic loading of respiratory muscles, reduce work of breathing and minimize rate of fatigue. Future work could address the potential

  5. Impact loading and locomotor-respiratory coordination significantly influence breathing dynamics in running humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Bramble, Dennis M; Carrier, David R

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC), phase-locking between breathing and stepping rhythms, occurs in many vertebrates. When quadrupedal mammals gallop, 1∶1 stride per breath coupling is necessitated by pronounced mechanical interactions between locomotion and ventilation. Humans show more flexibility in breathing patterns during locomotion, using LRC ratios of 2∶1, 2.5∶1, 3∶1, or 4∶1 and sometimes no coupling. Previous studies provide conflicting evidence on the mechanical significance of LRC in running humans. Some studies suggest LRC improves breathing efficiency, but others suggest LRC is mechanically insignificant because 'step-driven flows' (ventilatory flows attributable to step-induced forces) contribute a negligible fraction of tidal volume. Yet, although step-driven flows are brief, they cause large fluctuations in ventilatory flow. Here we test the hypothesis that running humans use LRC to minimize antagonistic effects of step-driven flows on breathing. We measured locomotor-ventilatory dynamics in 14 subjects running at a self-selected speed (2.6±0.1 ms(-1)) and compared breathing dynamics in their naturally 'preferred' and 'avoided' entrainment patterns. Step-driven flows occurred at 1-2X step frequency with peak magnitudes of 0.97±0.45 Ls(-1) (mean ±S.D). Step-driven flows varied depending on ventilatory state (high versus low lung volume), suggesting state-dependent changes in compliance and damping of thoraco-abdominal tissues. Subjects naturally preferred LRC patterns that minimized antagonistic interactions and aligned ventilatory transitions with assistive phases of the step. Ventilatory transitions initiated in 'preferred' phases within the step cycle occurred 2x faster than those in 'avoided' phases. We hypothesize that humans coordinate breathing and locomotion to minimize antagonistic loading of respiratory muscles, reduce work of breathing and minimize rate of fatigue. Future work could address the potential consequences of

  6. Feasible muscle activation ranges based on inverse dynamics analyses of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Cole S; Sohn, M Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2015-09-18

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle's activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Human neutrophil cytoskeletal dynamics and contractility actively contribute to trans-endothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Hayenga, Heather N; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2013-01-01

    Transmigration through the endothelium is a key step in the immune response. In our recent work, the mechanical properties of the subendothelial matrix and biophysical state of the endothelium have been identified as key modulators of leukocyte trans-endothelial migration. Here, we demonstrated that neutrophil contractile forces and cytoskeletal dynamics also play an active biophysical role during transmigration through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Using our previously-established model for leukocyte transmigration, we first discovered that >93% of human neutrophils preferentially exploit the paracellular mode of transmigration in our in vitro model, and that is independent of subendothelial matrix stiffness. We demonstrated that inhibition of actin polymerization or depolymerization completely blocks transmigration, thus establishing a critical role for neutrophil actin dynamics in transmigration. Next, inhibition of neutrophil myosin II-mediated contractile forces renders 44% of neutrophils incapable of retracting their trailing edge under the endothelium for several minutes after the majority of the neutrophil transmigrates. Meanwhile, inhibition of neutrophil contractile forces or stabilization of microtubules doubles the time to complete transmigration for the first neutrophils to cross the endothelium. Notably, the time to complete transmigration is significantly reduced for subsequent neutrophils that cross through the same path as a previous neutrophil and is less dependent on neutrophil contractile forces and microtubule dynamics. These results suggest that the first neutrophil induces a gap in endothelial cell-cell adhesions, which "opens the door" in the endothelium and facilitates transmigration of subsequent neutrophils through the same hole. Collectively, this work demonstrates that neutrophils play an active biophysical role during the transmigration step of the immune response.

  8. Human neutrophil cytoskeletal dynamics and contractility actively contribute to trans-endothelial migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Stroka

    Full Text Available Transmigration through the endothelium is a key step in the immune response. In our recent work, the mechanical properties of the subendothelial matrix and biophysical state of the endothelium have been identified as key modulators of leukocyte trans-endothelial migration. Here, we demonstrated that neutrophil contractile forces and cytoskeletal dynamics also play an active biophysical role during transmigration through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Using our previously-established model for leukocyte transmigration, we first discovered that >93% of human neutrophils preferentially exploit the paracellular mode of transmigration in our in vitro model, and that is independent of subendothelial matrix stiffness. We demonstrated that inhibition of actin polymerization or depolymerization completely blocks transmigration, thus establishing a critical role for neutrophil actin dynamics in transmigration. Next, inhibition of neutrophil myosin II-mediated contractile forces renders 44% of neutrophils incapable of retracting their trailing edge under the endothelium for several minutes after the majority of the neutrophil transmigrates. Meanwhile, inhibition of neutrophil contractile forces or stabilization of microtubules doubles the time to complete transmigration for the first neutrophils to cross the endothelium. Notably, the time to complete transmigration is significantly reduced for subsequent neutrophils that cross through the same path as a previous neutrophil and is less dependent on neutrophil contractile forces and microtubule dynamics. These results suggest that the first neutrophil induces a gap in endothelial cell-cell adhesions, which "opens the door" in the endothelium and facilitates transmigration of subsequent neutrophils through the same hole. Collectively, this work demonstrates that neutrophils play an active biophysical role during the transmigration step of the immune response.

  9. Modeling Regional Dynamics of Human-Rangifer Systems: a Framework for Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Berman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical models of interaction between wild and domestic reindeer (Rangifer tarandus; caribou in North America can help explain observed social-ecological dynamics of arctic hunting and husbandry systems. Different modes of hunting and husbandry incorporate strategies to mitigate effects of differing patterns of environmental uncertainty. Simulations of simple models of harvested wild and domestic herds with density-dependent recruitment show that random environmental variation produces cycles and crashes in populations that would quickly stabilize at a steady state with nonrandom parameters. Different husbandry goals lead to radically different long-term domestic herd sizes. Wild and domestic herds are typically ecological competitors but social complements. Hypothesized differences in ecological competition and diverse human livelihoods are explored in dynamic social-ecological models in which domestic herds competitively interact with wild herds. These models generate a framework for considering issues in the evolution of Human-Rangifer Systems, such as state-subsidized herding and the use of domestic herds for transportation support in hunting systems. Issues considered include the role of geographic factors, markets for Rangifer products, state-subsidized herding, effects of changes in husbandry goals on fate of wild herds, and how environmental shocks, herd population cycles, and policy shifts might lead to system state changes. The models also suggest speculation on the role of geographic factors in the failure of reindeer husbandry to take hold in the North American Arctic. The analysis concludes with suggested empirical strategies for estimating parameters of the model for use in comparative studies across regions of the Arctic.

  10. The dynamic changes of X chromosome inactivation during early culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pingyuan; Ouyang, Qi; Leng, Lizhi; Hu, Liang; Cheng, Dehua; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2016-07-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is required for dosage compensation of X-linked genes in human female cells. Several previous reports have described the promiscuous XCI status in long-term cultured female human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and the majority of them exhibit non-random XCI. However, when and how such female hESCs acquire the aberrant XCI states during culture is unknown. Herein, through comparing the XCI states in 18 paired hES cell lines throughout early culture, we revealed a uniform dynamic change during this culture period under a widely used culture condition. The female initial hESCs (ihESCs, P4-P9) expressed XIST RNA, H3K27me3 punctate enrichment and displayed random XCI pattern. By further culturing, the female early hESCs (ehESCs, P20-P30) lost the expression of XIST RNA, H3K27me3 punctate enrichment and exhibited a completely skewed XCI pattern. Importantly, a subset of X-linked genes was up-regulated in ehESCs, including some cancer-related genes. At last, we found 5% physiological oxygen was beneficial for the expression of XIST and H3K27me3 punctate enrichment, but not for the XCI pattern. We conclude that the XCI dynamic change is a frequent epigenetic instability event during early culture, which is accompanied by the up-regulation of some X-linked genes. Furthermore, we emphasize that physiological oxygen is beneficial for XCI fidelity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gait ataxia in humans: vestibular and cerebellar control of dynamic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Roman; Möhwald, Ken; Wuehr, Max

    2017-10-01

    During human locomotion, vestibular feedback control is fundamental for maintaining dynamic stability and adapting the gait pattern to external circumstances. Within the supraspinal locomotor network, the cerebellum represents the key site for the integration of vestibular feedback information. The cerebellum is further important for the fine-tuning and coordination of limb movements during walking. The aim of this review article is to highlight the shared structural and functional sensorimotor principles in vestibular and cerebellar locomotion control. Vestibular feedback for the maintenance of dynamic stability is integrated into the locomotor pattern via midline, caudal cerebellar structures (vermis, flocculonodular lobe). Hemispheric regions of the cerebellum facilitate feed-forward control of multi-joint coordination and higher locomotor functions. Characteristic features of the gait disorder in patients with vestibular deficits or cerebellar ataxia are increased levels of spatiotemporal gait variability in the fore-aft and the medio-lateral gait dimension. In the fore-aft dimension, pathologic increases of gait fluctuations critically depend on the locomotion speed and predominantly manifest during slow walking velocities. This feature is associated with an increased risk of falls in both patients with vestibular hypofunction as well as patients with cerebellar ataxia. Pharmacological approaches for the treatment of vestibular or cerebellar gait ataxia are currently not available. However, new promising options are currently tested in randomized, controlled trials (fampridine/FACEG; acetyl-DL-leucine/ALCAT).

  12. Manganese induces mitochondrial dynamics impairment and apoptotic cell death: a study in human Gli36 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Agustina; Gorojod, Roxana M; Miglietta, Esteban A; Villarreal, Alejandro; Ramos, Alberto J; Kotler, Mónica L

    2013-10-25

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element due to its participation in many physiological processes. However, overexposure to this metal leads to a neurological disorder known as Manganism whose clinical manifestations and molecular mechanisms resemble Parkinson's disease. Several lines of evidence implicate astrocytes as an early target of Mn neurotoxicity being the mitochondria the most affected organelles. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible mitochondrial dynamics alterations in Mn-exposed human astrocytes. Therefore, we employed Gli36 cells which express the astrocytic markers GFAP and S100B. We demonstrated that Mn triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway revealed by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and by caspase-9 activation. This apoptotic program may be in turn responsible of caspase-3/7 activation, PARP-1 cleavage, chromatin condensation and fragmentation. In addition, we determined that Mn induces deregulation in mitochondria-shaping proteins (Opa-1, Mfn-2 and Drp-1) expression levels in parallel with the disruption of the mitochondrial network toward to an exacerbated fragmentation. Since mitochondrial dynamics is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases, these proteins could become future targets to be considered in Manganism treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A system dynamic simulation model for managing the human error in power tools industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Shaharanee, Izwan Nizal Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In the era of modern and competitive life of today, every organization will face the situations in which the work does not proceed as planned when there is problems occur in which it had to be delay. However, human error is often cited as the culprit. The error that made by the employees would cause them have to spend additional time to identify and check for the error which in turn could affect the normal operations of the company as well as the company's reputation. Employee is a key element of the organization in running all of the activities of organization. Hence, work performance of the employees is a crucial factor in organizational success. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that cause the increasing errors make by employees in the organization by using system dynamics approach. The broadly defined targets in this study are employees in the Regional Material Field team from purchasing department in power tools industries. Questionnaires were distributed to the respondents to obtain their perceptions on the root cause of errors make by employees in the company. The system dynamics model was developed to simulate the factor of the increasing errors make by employees and its impact. The findings of this study showed that the increasing of error make by employees was generally caused by the factors of workload, work capacity, job stress, motivation and performance of employees. However, this problem could be solve by increased the number of employees in the organization.

  14. Potential human cholesterol esterase inhibitor design: benefits from the molecular dynamics simulations and pharmacophore modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Shalini; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Lee, Keun Woo

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cholesterol esterase (hCEase) is one of the lipases found to involve in the digestion of large and broad spectrum of substrates including triglycerides, phospholipids, cholesteryl esters, etc. The presence of bile salts is found to be very important for the activation of hCEase. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for the apoform and bile salt complexed form of hCEase using the co-ordinates of two bile salts from bovine CEase. The stability of the systems throughout the simulation time was checked and two representative structures from the highly populated regions were selected using cluster analysis. These two representative structures were used in pharmacophore model generation. The generated pharmacophore models were validated and used in database screening. The screened hits were refined for their drug-like properties based on Lipinski's rule of five and ADMET properties. The drug-like compounds were further refined by molecular docking simulation using GOLD program based on the GOLD fitness score, mode of binding, and molecular interactions with the active site amino acids. Finally, three hits of novel scaffolds were selected as potential leads to be used in novel and potent hCEase inhibitor design. The stability of binding modes and molecular interactions of these final hits were re-assured by molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Conformational relaxations of human serum albumin studied by molecular dynamics simulations with pressure jumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesylevskyy S. O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In this work we developed a novel technique of obtaining the spectrum of conformational relaxations in a solvated protein using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. Methods. Structural relaxations in the protein are initiated by the abrupt jump of pressure in the NPT simulations. The change of the protein volume after the jump is monitored and the Maximum Entropy Method is used for spectral decomposition of the volume relaxation curve. The human serum albumin (HSA is used as a test case. Results. The obtained relaxation spectrum of HSA contains one component attributed to the bulk water and five components caused by the relaxations of the protein globule and its hydration shell. All relaxation components are in good agreement with the available experimental data obtained by the time-resolved spectroscopy and the broadband acoustic spectroscopy of HSA. Conclusions. The developed technique allows obtaining spectra of conformational relaxations of soluble proteins in a range of time scales from ~0.1 ps to ~50 ns utilizing single non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation.

  16. Effect of arm swing strategy on local dynamic stability of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Wittink, Harriet; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-02-01

    Falling causes long term disability and can even lead to death. Most falls occur during gait. Therefore improving gait stability might be beneficial for people at risk of falling. Recently arm swing has been shown to influence gait stability. However at present it remains unknown which mode of arm swing creates the most stable gait. To examine how different modes of arm swing affect gait stability. Ten healthy young male subjects volunteered for this study. All subjects walked with four different arm swing instructions at seven different gait speeds. The Xsens motion capture suit was used to capture gait kinematics. Basic gait parameters, variability and stability measures were calculated. We found an increased stability in the medio-lateral direction with excessive arm swing in comparison to normal arm swing at all gait speeds. Moreover, excessive arm swing increased stability in the anterior-posterior and vertical direction at low gait speeds. Ipsilateral and inphase arm swing did not differ compared to a normal arm swing. Excessive arm swing is a promising gait manipulation to improve local dynamic stability. For excessive arm swing in the ML direction there appears to be converging evidence. The effect of excessive arm swing on more clinically relevant groups like the more fall prone elderly or stroke survivors is worth further investigating. Excessive arm swing significantly increases local dynamic stability of human gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  18. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sontag

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation.

  19. Role of the Subunits Interactions in the Conformational Transitions in Adult Human Hemoglobin: an Explicit Solvent Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    Yusuff, Olaniyi K; Bussi, Giovanni; Raugei, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin exhibits allosteric structural changes upon ligand binding due to the dynamic interactions between the ligand binding sites, the amino acids residues and some other solutes present under physiological conditions. In the present study, the dynamical and quaternary structural changes occurring in two unligated (deoxy-) T structures, and two fully ligated (oxy-) R, R2 structures of adult human hemoglobin were investigated with molecular dynamics. It is shown that, in the sub-microsecond time scale, there is no marked difference in the global dynamics of the amino acids residues in both the oxy- and the deoxy- forms of the individual structures. In addition, the R, R2 are relatively stable and do not present quaternary conformational changes within the time scale of our simulations while the T structure is dynamically more flexible and exhibited the T\\rightarrow R quaternary conformational transition, which is propagated by the relative rotation of the residues at the {\\alpha}1{\\beta}2 and {\\alpha}2{\\b...

  20. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  1. Human Skeleton Model Based Dynamic Features for Walking Speed Invariant Gait Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Kovač

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to recognize small number of people they know well by the way they walk. This ability represents basic motivation for using human gait as the means for biometric identification. Such biometrics can be captured at public places from a distance without subject's collaboration, awareness, and even consent. Although current approaches give encouraging results, we are still far from effective use in real-life applications. In general, methods set various constraints to circumvent the influence of covariate factors like changes of walking speed, view, clothing, footwear, and object carrying, that have negative impact on recognition performance. In this paper we propose a skeleton model based gait recognition system focusing on modelling gait dynamics and eliminating the influence of subjects appearance on recognition. Furthermore, we tackle the problem of walking speed variation and propose space transformation and feature fusion that mitigates its influence on recognition performance. With the evaluation on OU-ISIR gait dataset, we demonstrate state of the art performance of proposed methods.

  2. Modelling human behaviour in a bumper car ride using molecular dynamics tools: a student project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendía, Jorge J.; Lopez, Hector; Sanchis, Guillem; Pardo, Luis Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Amusement parks are excellent laboratories of physics, not only to check physical laws, but also to investigate if those physical laws might also be applied to human behaviour. A group of Physics Engineering students from Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya has investigated if human behaviour, when driving bumper cars, can be modelled using tools borrowed from the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations, such as the radial and angular distribution functions. After acquiring several clips and obtaining the coordinates of the cars, those magnitudes are computed and analysed. Additionally, an analogous hard disks system is simulated to compare its distribution functions to those obtained from the cars’ coordinates. Despite the clear difference between bumper cars and a hard disk-like particle system, the obtained distribution functions are very similar. This suggests that there is no important effect of the individuals in the collective behaviour of the system in terms of structure. The research, performed by the students, has been undertaken in the frame of a motivational project designed to approach the scientific method for university students named FISIDABO. This project offers both the logistical and technical support to undertake the experiments designed by students at the amusement park of Barcelona TIBIDABO and accompanies them all along the scientific process.

  3. The effect of shoe gear on human tibial strains recorded during dynamic loading: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, C; Burr, D; Fyhrie, D; Forwood, M; Finestone, A; Nyska, M; Giladi, M; Liebergall, M; Simkin, A

    1996-11-01

    The study was conducted to test the hypothesis that alterations in shoe gear can affect tibial strains in the human during dynamic loading. Rosette strain gauges were mounted on the medial border of the mid-diaphysis in two human subjects with a new strain gauge bonding technique using methyl methacrylate. Strain measurements were made at this site, the most frequent location for stress fractures in the Israeli Army during treadmill walking and free running while wearing various sport shoes (Rockport ProWalkers and New Balance NBX 900) and army boots (light Israeli infantry, double layered sole Israeli infantry, and Zohar infantry boots). Data were analyzed for only one of the subjects because strain gauge bonding was found to be inadequate at the time of surgical removal in the other subject. No single shoe lowered both the principal tibial compression and tensile strains, and the shear strains. The Zohar boot had the lowest principal compression strains during treadmill walking and mobile running, despite its relatively higher weight and sole durometry.

  4. Identification of Capacitive MEMS Accelerometer Structure Parameters for Human Body Dynamics Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincas Benevicius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their small size, low weight, low cost and low energy consumption, MEMS accelerometers have achieved great commercial success in recent decades. The aim of this research work is to identify a MEMS accelerometer structure for human body dynamics measurements. Photogrammetry was used in order to measure possible maximum accelerations of human body parts and the bandwidth of the digital acceleration signal. As the primary structure the capacitive accelerometer configuration is chosen in such a way that sensing part measures on all three axes as it is 3D accelerometer and sensitivity on each axis is equal. Hill climbing optimization was used to find the structure parameters. Proof-mass displacements were simulated for all the acceleration range that was given by the optimization problem constraints. The final model was constructed in Comsol Multiphysics. Eigenfrequencies were calculated and model’s response was found, when vibration stand displacement data was fed into the model as the base excitation law. Model output comparison with experimental data was conducted for all excitation frequencies used during the experiments.

  5. Identification of capacitive MEMS accelerometer structure parameters for human body dynamics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevicius, Vincas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Gaidys, Rimvydas

    2013-08-22

    Due to their small size, low weight, low cost and low energy consumption, MEMS accelerometers have achieved great commercial success in recent decades. The aim of this research work is to identify a MEMS accelerometer structure for human body dynamics measurements. Photogrammetry was used in order to measure possible maximum accelerations of human body parts and the bandwidth of the digital acceleration signal. As the primary structure the capacitive accelerometer configuration is chosen in such a way that sensing part measures on all three axes as it is 3D accelerometer and sensitivity on each axis is equal. Hill climbing optimization was used to find the structure parameters. Proof-mass displacements were simulated for all the acceleration range that was given by the optimization problem constraints. The final model was constructed in Comsol Multiphysics. Eigenfrequencies were calculated and model's response was found, when vibration stand displacement data was fed into the model as the base excitation law. Model output comparison with experimental data was conducted for all excitation frequencies used during the experiments.

  6. Natural and Human-Induced Dynamics on Big Hickory Island, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Roberts Briggs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Big Hickory Island, located in Lee County along the mixed-energy west Florida coast, experiences high long-term rates of shoreline recession, with much of the erosion concentrated along the central and southern portions of the island. In 2013, approximately 86,300 cubic meters of sand from an adjacent tidal inlet to the north were placed along 457 m to restore the beach and dune system. In an effort to combat erosion, seven concrete king-pile groins with adjustable panels were constructed subsequent to the completion of the beach nourishment. Natural and human-induced dynamics of Big Hickory Island are discussed through analysis of shoreline and morphologic change using historic aerial photographs and topographic and bathymetric field surveys of the recent beach erosion mitigation project. Although much of the long-term anomalously high rates of erosion for the area are related to natural interchanges between the sand resources of the barrier islands and adjacent ebb tidal shoals, additional reduction in sand supply is a result of human-interventions updrift of Big Hickory over the last several decades. The coupled natural and anthropogenic influences are driving the coastal processes toward a different morphodynamic state than would have occurred under natural processes alone.

  7. The gating mechanism of the human aquaporin 5 revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorant Janosi

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are protein channels located across the cell membrane with the role of conducting water or other small sugar alcohol molecules (aquaglyceroporins. The high-resolution X-ray structure of the human aquaporin 5 (HsAQP5 shows that HsAQP5, as all the other known aquaporins, exhibits tetrameric structure. By means of molecular dynamics simulations we analyzed the role of spontaneous fluctuations on the structural behavior of the human AQP5. We found that different conformations within the tetramer lead to a distribution of monomeric channel structures, which can be characterized as open or closed. The switch between the two states of a channel is a tap-like mechanism at the cytoplasmic end which regulates the water passage through the pore. The channel is closed by a translation of the His67 residue inside the pore. Moreover, water permeation rate calculations revealed that the selectivity filter, located at the other end of the channel, regulates the flow rate of water molecules when the channel is open, by locally modifying the orientation of His173. Furthermore, the calculated permeation rates of a fully open channel are in good agreement with the reported experimental value.

  8. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lai

    Full Text Available Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  9. In-vivo Dynamics of the Human Hippocampus across the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Claudia; Steele, Christopher J; Mueller, Karsten; Rekkas, Vivien P; Arélin, Katrin; Pampel, Andre; Burmann, Inga; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2016-10-07

    Sex hormones fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. Evidence from animal studies suggests similar subtle fluctuations in hippocampal structure, predominantly linked to estrogen. Hippocampal abnormalities have been observed in several neuropsychiatric pathologies with prominent sexual dimorphism. Yet, the potential impact of subtle sex-hormonal fluctuations on human hippocampal structure in health is unclear. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal neuroimaging in conjunction with rigorous menstrual cycle monitoring to evaluate potential changes in hippocampal microstructure associated with physiological sex-hormonal changes. Thirty longitudinal diffusion weighted imaging scans of a single healthy female subject were acquired across two full menstrual cycles. We calculated hippocampal fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure sensitive to changes in microstructural integrity, and investigated potential correlations with estrogen. We observed a significant positive correlation between FA values and estrogen in the hippocampus bilaterally, revealing a peak in FA closely paralleling ovulation. This exploratory, single-subject study demonstrates the feasibility of a longitudinal DWI scanning protocol across the menstrual cycle and is the first to link subtle endogenous hormonal fluctuations to changes in FA in vivo. In light of recent attempts to neurally phenotype single humans, our findings highlight menstrual cycle monitoring in parallel with highly sampled individual neuroimaging data to address fundamental questions about the dynamics of plasticity in the adult brain.

  10. Dynamics of quiet human stance: computer simulations of a triple inverted pendulum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Michael; Wagner, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    For decades, the biomechanical description of quiet human stance has been dominated by the single inverted pendulum (SIP) paradigm. However, in the past few years, the SIP model family has been falsified as an explanatory approach. Double inverted pendulum models have recently proven to be inappropriate. Human topology with three major leg joints suggests in a natural way to examine triple inverted pendulum (TIP) models as an appropriate approach. In this study, we focused on formulating a TIP model that can synthesise stable balancing attractors based on minimalistic sensor information and actuation complexity. The simulated TIP oscillation amplitudes are realistic in vertical direction. Along with the horizontal ankle, knee and hip positions, though, all simulated joint angle amplitudes still exceed the measured ones about threefold. It is likely that they could be eventually brought down to the physiological range by using more sensor information. The TIP systems' eigenfrequency spectra come out as another major result. The eigenfrequencies spread across about 0.1 Hz...20 Hz. Our main result is that joint stiffnesses can be reduced even below statically required values by using an active hip torque balancing strategy. When reducing mono- and bi-articular stiffnesses further down to levels threatening dynamic stability, the spectra indicate a change from torus-like (stable) to strange (chaotic) attractors. Spectra of measured ground reaction forces appear to be strange-attractor-like. We would conclude that TIP models are a suitable starting point to examine more deeply the dynamic character of and the essential structural properties behind quiet human stance. Abbreviations and technical terms Inverted pendulum body exposed to gravity and pivoting in a joint around position of unstable equilibrium (operating point) SIP single inverted pendulum: one rigid body pivoting around fixation to the ground (external joint) DIP double inverted pendulum: two bodies

  11. A review of current and possible future human-water dynamics in Myanmar's river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Linda; Evers, Mariele

    2016-12-01

    Rivers provide a large number of ecosystem services and riparian people depend directly and indirectly on water availability and quality and quantity of the river waters. The country's economy and the people's well-being and income, particularly in agriculturally dominated countries, are strongly determined by the availability of sufficient water. This is particularly true for the country of Myanmar in South-east Asia, where more than 65 % of the population live in rural areas, working in the agricultural sector. Only a few studies exist on river basins in Myanmar at all and detailed knowledge providing the basis for human-water research is very limited. A deeper understanding of human-water system dynamics in the country is required because Myanmar's society, economy, ecosystems and water resources are facing major challenges due to political and economic reforms and massive and rapid investments from neighbouring countries. However, not only policy and economy modify the need for water. Climate variability and change are other essential drivers within human-water systems. Myanmar's climate is influenced by the Indian Monsoon circulation which is subject to interannual and also regional variability. Particularly the central dry zone and the Ayeyarwady delta are prone to extreme events such as serious drought periods and extreme floods. On the one hand, the farmers depend on the natural fertiliser brought by regular river inundations and high groundwater levels for irrigation; on the other hand, they suffer from these water-related extreme events. It is expected that theses climatic extreme events will likely increase in frequency and magnitude in the future as a result of global climate change. Different national and international interests in the abundant water resources may provide opportunities and risks at the same time for Myanmar. Several dam projects along the main courses of the rivers are currently in the planning phase. Dams will most likely modify the

  12. Mutational dynamics of the SARS coronavirus in cell culture and human populations isolated in 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooi Eng

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SARS coronavirus is the etiologic agent for the epidemic of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. The recent emergence of this new pathogen, the careful tracing of its transmission patterns, and the ability to propagate in culture allows the exploration of the mutational dynamics of the SARS-CoV in human populations. Methods We sequenced complete SARS-CoV genomes taken from primary human tissues (SIN3408, SIN3725V, SIN3765V, cultured isolates (SIN848, SIN846, SIN842, SIN845, SIN847, SIN849, SIN850, SIN852, SIN3408L, and five consecutive Vero cell passages (SIN2774_P1, SIN2774_P2, SIN2774_P3, SIN2774_P4, SIN2774_P5 arising from SIN2774 isolate. These represented individual patient samples, serial in vitro passages in cell culture, and paired human and cell culture isolates. Employing a refined mutation filtering scheme and constant mutation rate model, the mutation rates were estimated and the possible date of emergence was calculated. Phylogenetic analysis was used to uncover molecular relationships between the isolates. Results Close examination of whole genome sequence of 54 SARS-CoV isolates identified before 14th October 2003, including 22 from patients in Singapore, revealed the mutations engendered during human-to-Vero and Vero-to-human transmission as well as in multiple Vero cell passages in order to refine our analysis of human-to-human transmission. Though co-infection by different quasipecies in individual tissue samples is observed, the in vitro mutation rate of the SARS-CoV in Vero cell passage is negligible. The in vivo mutation rate, however, is consistent with estimates of other RNA viruses at approximately 5.7 × 10-6 nucleotide substitutions per site per day (0.17 mutations per genome per day, or two mutations per human passage (adjusted R-square = 0.4014. Using the immediate Hotel M contact isolates as roots, we observed that the SARS epidemic has generated four major genetic groups that are

  13. Dynamics of Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Activity in Human Temporal and Frontal Cortical Areas During Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-14

    REPORT Dynamics of electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...information about the sound intensity of music . ECoG activity in the high gamma band recorded from the posterior part of the superior temporal 1. REPORT...ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening Report Title ABSTRACT Previous studies demonstrated that brain

  14. Role of demographic dynamics and conflict in the population-area relationship for human languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrubia, Susanna C; Axelsen, Jacob B; Zanette, Damián H

    2012-01-01

    Many patterns displayed by the distribution of human linguistic groups are similar to the ecological organization described for biological species. It remains a challenge to identify simple and meaningful processes that describe these patterns. The population size distribution of human linguistic groups, for example, is well fitted by a log-normal distribution that may arise from stochastic demographic processes. As we show in this contribution, the distribution of the area size of home ranges of those groups also agrees with a log-normal function. Further, size and area are significantly correlated: the number of speakers p and the area a spanned by linguistic groups follow the allometric relation a proportional to p2, with an exponent z varying accross different world regions. The empirical evidence presented leads to the hypothesis that the distributions of p and a, and their mutual dependence, rely on demographic dynamics and on the result of conflicts over territory due to group growth. To substantiate this point, we introduce a two-variable stochastic multiplicative model whose analytical solution recovers the empirical observations. Applied to different world regions, the model reveals that the retreat in home range is sublinear with respect to the decrease in population size, and that the population-area exponent z grows with the typical strength of conflicts. While the shape of the population size and area distributions, and their allometric relation, seem unavoidable outcomes of demography and inter-group contact, the precise value of z could give insight on the cultural organization of those human groups in the last thousand years.

  15. Walking through Architectural Spaces: The Impact of Interior Forms on Human Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Banaei

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroarchitecture uses neuroscientific tools to better understand architectural design and its impact on human perception and subjective experience. The form or shape of the built environment is fundamental to architectural design, but not many studies have shown the impact of different forms on the inhabitants’ emotions. This study investigated the neurophysiological correlates of different interior forms on the perceivers’ affective state and the accompanying brain activity. To understand the impact of naturalistic three-dimensional (3D architectural forms, it is essential to perceive forms from different perspectives. We computed clusters of form features extracted from pictures of residential interiors and constructed exemplary 3D room models based on and representing different formal clusters. To investigate human brain activity during 3D perception of architectural spaces, we used a mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI approach recording the electroencephalogram (EEG of participants while they naturally walk through different interior forms in virtual reality (VR. The results revealed a strong impact of curvature geometries on activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. Theta band activity in ACC correlated with specific feature types (rs (14 = 0.525, p = 0.037 and geometry (rs (14 = −0.579, p = 0.019, providing evidence for a role of this structure in processing architectural features beyond their emotional impact. The posterior cingulate cortex and the occipital lobe were involved in the perception of different room perspectives during the stroll through the rooms. This study sheds new light on the use of mobile EEG and VR in architectural studies and provides the opportunity to study human brain dynamics in participants that actively explore and realistically experience architectural spaces.

  16. Walking through Architectural Spaces: The Impact of Interior Forms on Human Brain Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaei, Maryam; Hatami, Javad; Yazdanfar, Abbas; Gramann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Neuroarchitecture uses neuroscientific tools to better understand architectural design and its impact on human perception and subjective experience. The form or shape of the built environment is fundamental to architectural design, but not many studies have shown the impact of different forms on the inhabitants' emotions. This study investigated the neurophysiological correlates of different interior forms on the perceivers' affective state and the accompanying brain activity. To understand the impact of naturalistic three-dimensional (3D) architectural forms, it is essential to perceive forms from different perspectives. We computed clusters of form features extracted from pictures of residential interiors and constructed exemplary 3D room models based on and representing different formal clusters. To investigate human brain activity during 3D perception of architectural spaces, we used a mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) approach recording the electroencephalogram (EEG) of participants while they naturally walk through different interior forms in virtual reality (VR). The results revealed a strong impact of curvature geometries on activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Theta band activity in ACC correlated with specific feature types (rs (14) = 0.525, p = 0.037) and geometry (rs (14) = -0.579, p = 0.019), providing evidence for a role of this structure in processing architectural features beyond their emotional impact. The posterior cingulate cortex and the occipital lobe were involved in the perception of different room perspectives during the stroll through the rooms. This study sheds new light on the use of mobile EEG and VR in architectural studies and provides the opportunity to study human brain dynamics in participants that actively explore and realistically experience architectural spaces.

  17. Mechanics of a heartbeat

    National Science Foundation

    2017-05-31

    Full Text Available Microtubule network in a heart cell at rest and microtubules decorated with a fluorescent protein so they can be visualized with high-resolution microscopy. (Bottom) Compressed microtubules buckle and provide a spring-like resistance to contraction.

  18. Heartbeat Optical Coherence Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Wang (Tianshi)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a manifestation of atherosclerosis, a systemic inflammatory disease of the arteries that causes the formation of plaques in the artery walls. Different plaques may give rise to different symptoms: a gradual narrowing (stenosis) of

  19. Modeling Zika plasma viral dynamics in non-human primates: insights into viral pathogenesis and antiviral strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Katharine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guedj, Jeremie [Univ. of Paris (France). IAME; Madelain, Vincent [Univ. of Paris (France); de Lamballerie, Xavier [Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); L, So-Yonim [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Osuna, Christa E [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Whitney, James [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological complications, prompting global concern. Here we present the first mathematical analysis of the within-host dynamics of plasma ZiKV burden in a non-human primate model, allowing for characterization of the growth and clearance of ZIKV within an individual macaque.

  20. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Boekhorst, te J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus

  1. Effect of dynamic 3-D culture on proliferation, distribution, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette

    2009-01-01

    Ex vivo engineering of autologous bone tissue as an alternative to bone grafting is a major clinical need. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 3-D dynamic spinner flask culture on the proliferation, distribution, and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Immortalize...

  2. Dynamic transcriptional signatures and network responses for clinical symptoms in influenza-infected human subjects using systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linel, Patrice; Wu, Shuang; Deng, Nan; Wu, Hulin

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that human blood transcriptional signatures may be used to support diagnosis and clinical decisions for acute respiratory viral infections such as influenza. In this article, we propose to use a newly developed systems biology approach for time course gene expression data to identify significant dynamically response genes and dynamic gene network responses to viral infection. We illustrate the methodological pipeline by reanalyzing the time course gene expression data from a study with healthy human subjects challenged by live influenza virus. We observed clear differences in the number of significant dynamic response genes (DRGs) between the symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects and also identified DRG signatures for symptomatic subjects with influenza infection. The 505 common DRGs shared by the symptomatic subjects have high consistency with the signature genes for predicting viral infection identified in previous works. The temporal response patterns and network response features were carefully analyzed and investigated.

  3. Dynamic Connectivity in the Middle Ganga Reaches Impacted by Human Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, H.; Carbonneau, P.; Sinha, R.

    2014-12-01

    River systems are often perturbed by human impacts that can be difficult to quantify. In the middle Ganga, Lav Kush barrage at Kanpur was constructed in 2004 for augmenting drinking water supply for Kanpur city. Following this perturbation, the main flow of the river was diverted to the right bank downstream of this barrage. The left bank of the river is now almost dry in the pre-monsoon period. This complex change of flow pattern is difficult to quantify and characterize. However, the resulting changes in flow pathways do broadly fall under the concepts of connectivity. Here we start with a quantitative framework of connectivity based on the Graph Theory. In order to develop a new index of dynamic connectivity in a river network, we examine the channel structure in the vicinity of Lav Kush barrage over a period of 24 years (1990-2014). Based on the graph theory nodes and links, the idea was to extract the channel network from Landsat imagery, and then to construct the nodal structure with connecting links. The results were then used to compute the Hararry index, characteristic path length and the effective path length. Finally, the connectivity indices were analyzed in a multi-scalar framework by using hyperscale graphs which display connectivity indices as a function of both scale and position in the reach (Figure 1). Fig-1a shows undisturbed connectivity with a more heterogeneous nodal structure in the pre-barrage era. Fig-1b indicates a significant loss in connectivity after Lav Kush barrage construction. In the upstream reaches, the channel is almost uniform showing very less nodal density. This lesser nodal density signifies a uniform channel belt thatleads to a homogeneous geomorphic condition. This type of analysis was repeated at seasonal intervals in order to track changes in graph theoretic properties in an attempt to infer changes to the dynamic connectivity structure and their potential relevance to the geomorphic evolution of this river reach.

  4. A Novel Kalman Filter for Human Motion Tracking With an Inertial-Based Dynamic Inclinometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligorio, Gabriele; Sabatini, Angelo M

    2015-08-01

    Design and development of a linear Kalman filter to create an inertial-based inclinometer targeted to dynamic conditions of motion. The estimation of the body attitude (i.e., the inclination with respect to the vertical) was treated as a source separation problem to discriminate the gravity and the body acceleration from the specific force measured by a triaxial accelerometer. The sensor fusion between triaxial gyroscope and triaxial accelerometer data was performed using a linear Kalman filter. Wrist-worn inertial measurement unit data from ten participants were acquired while performing two dynamic tasks: 60-s sequence of seven manual activities and 90 s of walking at natural speed. Stereophotogrammetric data were used as a reference. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the significance of the accuracy improvement over state-of-the-art approaches. The proposed method achieved, on an average, a root mean square attitude error of 3.6° and 1.8° in manual activities and locomotion tasks (respectively). The statistical analysis showed that, when compared to few competing methods, the proposed method improved the attitude estimation accuracy. A novel Kalman filter for inertial-based attitude estimation was presented in this study. A significant accuracy improvement was achieved over state-of-the-art approaches, due to a filter design that better matched the basic optimality assumptions of Kalman filtering. Human motion tracking is the main application field of the proposed method. Accurately discriminating the two components present in the triaxial accelerometer signal is well suited for studying both the rotational and the linear body kinematics.

  5. Processes driving short-term temporal dynamics of small mammal distribution in human-disturbed environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Julie; Pothier, David; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    As the impact of anthropogenic activities intensifies worldwide, an increasing proportion of landscape is converted to early successional stages every year. To understand and anticipate the global effects of the human footprint on wildlife, assessing short-term changes in animal populations in response to disturbance events is becoming increasingly important. We used isodar habitat selection theory to reveal the consequences of timber harvesting on the ecological processes that control the distribution dynamics of a small mammal, the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi). The abundance of voles was estimated in pairs of cut and uncut forest stands, prior to logging and up to 2 years afterwards. A week after logging, voles did not display any preference between cut and uncut stands, and a non-significant isodar indicated that their distribution was not driven by density-dependent habitat selection. One month after harvesting, however, juvenile abundance increased in cut stands, whereas the highest proportions of reproductive females were observed in uncut stands. This distribution pattern appears to result from interference competition, with juveniles moving into cuts where there was weaker competition with adults. In fact, the emergence of source-sink dynamics between uncut and cut stands, driven by interference competition, could explain why the abundance of red-backed voles became lower in cut (the sink) than uncut (the source) stands 1-2 years after logging. Our study demonstrates that the influences of density-dependent habitat selection and interference competition in shaping animal distribution can vary frequently, and for several months, following anthropogenic disturbance.

  6. Dynamic contact mechanics on the tibial plateau of the human knee during activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Susannah; Chen, Tony; Hutchinson, Ian D; Choi, Dan; Voigt, Clifford; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-06-27

    Despite significant advances in scaffold design, manufacture, and development, it remains unclear what forces these scaffolds must withstand when implanted into the heavily loaded environment of the knee joint. The objective of this study was to fully quantify the dynamic contact mechanics across the tibial plateau of the human knee joint during gait and stair climbing. Our model consisted of a modified Stanmore knee simulator (to apply multi-directional dynamic forces), a two-camera motion capture system (to record joint kinematics), an electronic sensor (to record contact stresses on the tibial plateau), and a suite of post-processing algorithms. During gait, peak contact stresses on the medial plateau occurred in areas of cartilage-cartilage contact; while during stair climb, peak contact stresses were located in the posterior aspect of the plateau, under the meniscus. On the lateral plateau, during gait and in early stair-climb, peak contact stresses occurred under the meniscus, while in late stair-climb, peak contact stresses were experienced in the zone of cartilage-cartilage contact. At 45% of the gait cycle, and 20% and 48% of the stair-climb cycle, peak stresses were simultaneously experienced on both the medial and lateral compartment, suggesting that these phases of loading warrant particular consideration in any simulation intended to evaluate scaffold performance. Our study suggests that in order to design a scaffold capable of restoring 'normal' contact mechanics to the injured knees, the mechanics of the intended site of implantation should be taken into account in any pre-clinical testing regime. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of G-CSF derivatives in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Markus

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF is routinely applied to support recovery of granulopoiesis during the course of cytotoxic chemotherapies. However, optimal use of the drug is largely unknown. We showed in the past that a biomathematical compartment model of human granulopoiesis can be used to make clinically relevant predictions regarding new, yet untested chemotherapy regimen. In the present paper, we aim to extend this model by a detailed pharmacokinetic and -dynamic modelling of two commonly used G-CSF derivatives Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim. Results Model equations are based on our physiological understanding of the drugs which are delayed absorption of G-CSF when applied to the subcutaneous tissue, dose-dependent bioavailability, unspecific first order elimination, specific elimination in dependence on granulocyte counts and reversible protein binding. Pharmacokinetic differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim were modelled as different parameter sets. Our former cell-kinetic model of granulopoiesis was essentially preserved, except for a few additional assumptions and simplifications. We assumed a delayed action of G-CSF on the bone marrow, a delayed action of chemotherapy and differences between Filgrastim and Pegfilgrastim with respect to stimulation potency of the bone marrow. Additionally, we incorporated a model of combined action of Pegfilgrastim and Filgrastim or endogenous G-CSF which interact via concurrent receptor binding. Unknown pharmacokinetic or cell-kinetic parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to available datasets of G-CSF applications, chemotherapy applications or combinations of it. Data were either extracted from the literature or were received from cooperating clinical study groups. Model predictions fitted well to both, datasets used for parameter estimation and validation scenarios as well. A unique set of parameters was identified which

  8. Ancient DNA analyses exclude humans as the driving force behind late Pleistocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Paula; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    The causes of the late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions are poorly understood. Different lines of evidence point to climate change, the arrival of humans, or a combination of these events as the trigger. Although many species went extinct, others, such as caribou and bison, survived...... in the middle Holocene. The arrival of humans into relevant areas of the musk ox range did not affect their mitochondrial diversity, and both musk ox and humans expanded into Greenland concomitantly. Thus, their population dynamics are better explained by a nonanthropogenic cause (for example, environmental...... change), a hypothesis supported by historic observations on the sensitivity of the species to both climatic warming and fluctuations....

  9. Age-Dependent Decline in the Coordinated [Ca2+] and Insulin Secretory Dynamics in Human Pancreatic Islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westacott, Matthew J; Farnsworth, Nikki L; St Clair, Joshua R; Poffenberger, Greg; Heintz, Audrey; Ludin, Nurin W; Hart, Nathaniel J; Powers, Alvin C; Benninger, Richard K P

    2017-09-01

    Aging is associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes, resulting from reduced insulin sensitivity and secretion. Reduced insulin secretion can result from reduced proliferative capacity and reduced islet function. Mechanisms underlying altered β-cell function in aging are poorly understood in mouse and human islets, and the impact of aging on intraislet communication has not been characterized. Here, we examine how β-cell [Ca2+] and electrical communication are impacted during aging in mouse and human islets. Islets from human donors and from mice were studied using [Ca2+] imaging, static and perifusion insulin secretion assays, and gap junction permeability measurements. In human islets, [Ca2+] dynamics were coordinated within distinct subregions of the islet, invariant with islet size. There was a marked decline in the coordination of [Ca2+] dynamics, gap junction coupling, and insulin secretion dynamics with age. These age-dependent declines were reversed by pharmacological gap junction activation. These results show that human islet function declines with aging, which can reduce insulin action and may contribute to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. A muscle-reflex model that encodes principles of legged mechanics produces human walking dynamics and muscle activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Hartmut; Herr, Hugh

    2010-06-01

    While neuroscientists identify increasingly complex neural circuits that control animal and human gait, biomechanists find that locomotion requires little control if principles of legged mechanics are heeded that shape and exploit the dynamics of legged systems. Here, we show that muscle reflexes could be vital to link these two observations. We develop a model of human locomotion that is controlled by muscle reflexes which encode principles of legged mechanics. Equipped with this reflex control, we find this model to stabilize into a walking gait from its dynamic interplay with the ground, reproduce human walking dynamics and leg kinematics, tolerate ground disturbances, and adapt to slopes without parameter interventions. In addition, we find this model to predict some individual muscle activation patterns known from walking experiments. The results suggest not only that the interplay between mechanics and motor control is essential to human locomotion, but also that human motor output could for some muscles be dominated by neural circuits that encode principles of legged mechanics.

  11. Image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography: A comparison between patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation and subjects in normal sinus rhythm by propensity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gennarelli, Antonio; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Gravina, Giovanni Luca [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiotherapy, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Division of Radiology, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Atrial Fibrillation (AF) may affect CCTA image quality. •We compare the results of single heartbeat CCTA in subjects with chronic AF and in sinus rhythm. •Single heartbeat CCTA may be feasible also in subjects with cAF and HR <72 bpm. •In cAF patients with heart rate higher than 72 bpm, CCTA has more movement-associated artefacts. •Mean effective dose of single heartbeat CCTA in cAF group was higher than in sinus rhythm one. -- Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of single heartbeat 640-slice coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with chronic Atrial Fibrillation (cAF) in comparison with subjects in normal sinus rhythm. Methods: A cohort of 71 patients with cAF was matched with 71 subjects in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and HR ≤ 65 bpm using a matched by propensity analysis. All subjects underwent a single heartbeat CCTA with prospective gating. In subjects with cAF, we manually established the acquisition of data only from a single heartbeat. Mean effective dose and image quality, with both objective and subjective measures, were assessed. Results: 96.4% of all segments in the cAF group had diagnostic image quality. The rate of subjects with at least one non-diagnostic segment was 14% and 2.8% (p = 0.031) in the cAF and NRS groups, respectively. In the cAF group, the percentage of patients with at least one non-diagnostic segment for acquisition HR ≤ 72 was 1.8% (1/55), and it did not significantly differ from the NSR group (2.8%; 2/71) (p = 1.0). Objective quality parameters did not show a statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean effective dose was 4.24 ± 1.24 mSv in the cAF group and 2.67 ± 0.5 mSv in the sinus rhythm group (p < 0.0001) with an increase by 59% in the cAF group with respect to the SNR group. Conclusions: A single heartbeat acquisition protocol with a 640-slice prospectively ECG-triggered CT angiography may be feasible in patients with cAF and HR below 72

  12. Mu opioid receptor in the human endometrium: dynamics of its expression and localization during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totorikaguena, Lide; Olabarrieta, Estibaliz; Matorras, Roberto; Alonso, Edurne; Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Agirregoitia, Naiara

    2017-04-01

    To study the dynamics of the expression and localization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle. Analysis of human endometrial samples from different menstrual cycle phases (menstrual, early/midproliferative, late proliferative/early secretory, midsecretory, and late secretory) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Academic research laboratory. Women from the Human Reproduction Unit of the Cruces University Hospital, fulfilling the following criteria: normal uterine vaginal ultrasound; absence of endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, implantation failure, or recurrent miscarriage; and no history of opioid drug use. Endometrial samples of 86 women categorized into groups for the menstrual cycle phases: 12 menstrual, 21 early/midproliferative, 16 late proliferative/early secretory, 17 midsecretory, and 20 late secretory. MOR gene and protein expression and localization in the different compartments of the human endometrium at different stages of the menstrual cycle. The expression of MOR mRNA and protein changed throughout the cycle in human endometrium. MOR expression increased during the proliferative phase and decreased during the secretory one. Lower values were found at menstruation, and maximum values around the time of ovulation. Small variations for each endometrial compartment were found. The presence of MOR in human endometrium and the dynamic changes during the menstrual cycle suggest a possible role for opioids in reproduction events related to the human endometrium or endometriosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The neural dynamics of reward value and risk coding in the human orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansong; Vanni-Mercier, Giovanna; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex is known to carry information regarding expected reward, risk and experienced outcome. Yet, due to inherent limitations in lesion and neuroimaging methods, the neural dynamics of these computations has remained elusive in humans. Here, taking advantage of the high temporal definition of intracranial recordings, we characterize the neurophysiological signatures of the intact orbitofrontal cortex in processing information relevant for risky decisions. Local field potentials were recorded from the intact orbitofrontal cort