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Sample records for human heart samples

  1. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

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    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm{sup 3} blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  2. Simultaneous determination of selected eicosanoids by reversed-phase HPLC method using fluorescence detection and application to rat and human plasma, and rat heart and kidney samples.

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    Aghazadeh-Habashi, Ali; Asghar, Waheed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2015-06-10

    Eicosanoids are biologically active lipid-derived oxidative metabolites of arachidonic acid. We, herein, present an improved sensitive, selective and robust high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence assay for simultaneous quantification of eicosanoids in human plasma and rat tissues. Aliquots of 200 μL of plasma or 30 mg of heart or kidney tissues were spiked with 16-hydroxydecanoic acid as internal standard, and extracted with anhydrous acetonitrile using solid phase cartridges. The eluted samples were dried, reconstituted in anhydrous acetonitrile and labeled with 2-(2,3-naphthalimino)ethyl-trifluoromethanesulphonate in the presence of saturated potassium fluoride solution in anhydrous acetonitrile and N,N-diiospropylethylamine as catalyst. The derivatized eicosanoids were extracted with anhydrous acetonitrile using solid phase cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 reversed phase column using gradient mobile phase of 0.05% of formic acid:acetonitrile:water at 0.8 mL/min flow rate. The analytes were detected at excitation and emission wavelength of 260 and 396 nm, respectively. The assay was linear (r(2)≥ 0.98) in the concentration range of 0.01-2.5 μg/mL. The intra-day and inter-day coefficients variation was less than 19.8%. Using this assay, we were able to quantify arachidonic acid metabolites simultaneously in human and rat biological samples.

  3. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

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    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Morphology and biomechanics of human heart

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    Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Polienko, Asel V.; Ivanov, Dmitry V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: A study of the biomechanical characteristics of the human heart ventricles was performed. 80 hearts were extracted during autopsy of 80 corpses of adults (40 women and 40 men) aged 31-70 years. The samples were investigated in compliance with the recommendations of the ethics committee. Methods: Tension and compression tests were performed with help of the uniaxial testing machine Instron 5944. Cardiometry was also performed. Results: In this work, techniques for human heart ventricle wall biomechanical properties estimation were developed. Regularities of age and gender variability in deformative and strength properties of the right and left ventricle walls were found. These properties were characterized by a smooth growth of myocardial tissue stiffness and resistivity at a relatively low strain against reduction in their strength and elasticity from 31-40 to 61-70 years. It was found that tissue of the left ventricle at 61-70 years had a lower stretchability and strength compared with tissues of the right ventricle and septum. These data expands understanding of the morphological organization of the heart ventricles, which is very important for the development of personalized medicine. Taking into account individual, age and gender differences of the heart ventricle tissue biomechanical characteristics allows to rationally choosing the type of patching materials during reconstructive operations on heart.

  5. Pathogenic Mineralization of Calcium Phosphate on Human Heart Valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    When calcium phosphate forms in soft tissues such as blood vessels and heart valves, it causes disease. The abnormal formation of calcium phosphate is called pathogenic mineralization or pathogenic calcification. Cases of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) always occur with fibrotic and calcified tissue of heart valve. In this article, samples taken from calcified human heart valves were studied. The characterization was performed by scanning electronic micrascope, X-ray Diffraction and transmission electron microscopy with selective diffraction patterns. It is found for the first time that calcium phosphate grains existing in the calcified human heart valves contain octacalcium phosphate (OCP).

  6. Computer Simulation of the Beating Human Heart

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    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    2001-06-01

    The mechanical function of the human heart couples together the fluid mechanics of blood and the soft tissue mechanics of the muscular heart walls and flexible heart valve leaflets. We discuss a unified mathematical formulation of this problem in which the soft tissue looks like a specialized part of the fluid in which additional forces are applied. This leads to a computational scheme known as the Immersed Boundary (IB) method for solving the coupled equations of motion of the whole system. The IB method is used to construct a three-dimensional Virtual Heart, including representations of all four chambers of the heart and all four valves, in addition to the large arteries and veins that connect the heart to the rest of the circulation. The chambers, valves, and vessels are all modeled as collections of elastic (and where appropriate, actively contractile) fibers immersed in viscous incompressible fluid. Results are shown as a computer-generated video animation of the beating heart.

  7. Data from acellular human heart matrix

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    Pedro L Sánchez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Perfusion decellularization of cadaveric hearts removes cells and generates a cell-free extracellular matrix scaffold containing acellular vascular conduits, which are theoretically sufficient to perfuse and support tissue-engineered heart constructs. This article contains additional data of our experience decellularizing and testing structural integrity and composition of a large series of human hearts, “Acellular human heart matrix: a critical step toward whole heat grafts” (Sanchez et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide the information about the heart decellularization technique, the valve competence evaluation of the decellularized scaffolds, the integrity evaluation of epicardial and myocardial coronary circulation, the pressure volume measurements, the primers used to assess cardiac muscle gene expression and, the characteristics of donors, donor hearts, scaffolds and perfusion decellularization process.

  8. Isolation and characterization of cardiogenic, stem-like cardiac precursors from heart samples of patients with congenital heart disease.

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    Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Vahdat, Sadaf; Fattahi, Faranak; Fonoudi, Hananeh; Omrani, Gholamreza; Gholampour, Maziar; Aghdami, Nasser

    2015-09-15

    Regenerative therapies based on resident human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising alternative to medical treatments for patients with myocardial infarction. However, hCPCs are rare in human heart and finding efficient source and proper surface marker for isolation of these cells would make them a good candidate for therapy. We have isolated 5.34∗10(6)±2.04∗10(5)/g viable cells from 35 heart tissue samples of 23 patients with congenital heart disease obtained during their heart surgery along with 6 samples from 3 normal subjects during cardiac biopsy. According to FACS analysis, younger ages, atrial specimen and disease with increased pulmonary vascular resistance were associated with higher percentage of c-kit(+) (CD117) hCPCs. Analysis for other stemness markers revealed increased CD133(+) cells in the hearts of patients with congenital heart disease. By using both immune-labeling and PCR, we demonstrated that these cells express key cardiac lineage and endothelial transcription factors and structural proteins during in vitro differentiation and do express stemness transcription factors in undifferentiated state. Another novel datum of potentially relevant interest is their ability in promoting greater myocardial regeneration and better survival in rat model of myocardial infarction following transplantation. Our results could provide evidence for conditions associated with enriched hCPCs in patients with congenital heart disease. Moreover, we showed presence of a significant number of CD133 expressing cardiogenic stem-like cardiac precursors in the heart of patients with congenital heart disease, which could be isolated and stored for future regenerative therapies in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Sydney Heart Bank: improving translational research while eliminating or reducing the use of animal models of human heart disease.

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    Dos Remedios, C G; Lal, S P; Li, A; McNamara, J; Keogh, A; Macdonald, P S; Cooke, R; Ehler, E; Knöll, R; Marston, S B; Stelzer, J; Granzier, H; Bezzina, C; van Dijk, S; De Man, F; Stienen, G J M; Odeberg, J; Pontén, F; Linke, W; van der Velden, J

    2017-08-14

    The Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) is one of the largest human heart tissue banks in existence. Its mission is to provide high-quality human heart tissue for research into the molecular basis of human heart failure by working collaboratively with experts in this field. We argue that, by comparing tissues from failing human hearts with age-matched non-failing healthy donor hearts, the results will be more relevant than research using animal models, particularly if their physiology is very different from humans. Tissue from heart surgery must generally be used soon after collection or it significantly deteriorates. Freezing is an option but it raises concerns that freezing causes substantial damage at the cellular and molecular level. The SHB contains failing samples from heart transplant patients and others who provided informed consent for the use of their tissue for research. All samples are cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen within 40 min of their removal from the patient, and in less than 5-10 min in the case of coronary arteries and left ventricle samples. To date, the SHB has collected tissue from about 450 failing hearts (>15,000 samples) from patients with a wide range of etiologies as well as increasing numbers of cardiomyectomy samples from patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The Bank also has hearts from over 120 healthy organ donors whose hearts, for a variety of reasons (mainly tissue-type incompatibility with waiting heart transplant recipients), could not be used for transplantation. Donor hearts were collected by the St Vincent's Hospital Heart and Lung transplantation team from local hospitals or within a 4-h jet flight from Sydney. They were flushed with chilled cardioplegic solution and transported to Sydney where they were quickly cryopreserved in small samples. Failing and/or donor samples have been used by more than 60 research teams around the world, and have resulted in more than 100 research papers. The tissues most commonly requested are

  10. Total excitation of the isolated human heart

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    Durrer, D.; Dam, R.Th. van; Freud, G.E.; Janse, M.J.; Meijler, F.L.; Arzbaecher, R.C.

    1970-01-01

    To obtain information conceming the time course and instantaneous distribution of the excitatory process of the normal human healt, studies were made on isolated human hearts from seven individuals who died from various cerebral conditions, but who had no history of cardiac disease. Measurements wer

  11. Cryodissection of vessels of the human heart

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    Okolokulak E.S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the most actual problems of applied morphology is the problem of demonstrativeness. In the educational process it is important to demonstrate the organs taken from the human body with all features of their structure preserved. The basic method of normal anatomy is a dissection of cadaveric material. It gives anatomical preparations demonstrating the structure of the human body. But classical dissection has certain difficulties: the complexity of layer-by-layer tissue separation and extraction of important anatomical structures. Currently for the manufacture of anatomical preparations a number of other methods are used: method of corrosion and polymeric embalming. However these techniques are time consuming, expensive, and also can cause damage to the structures of the heart during their extraction out of adipose tissue. Objective. To create a new method for the dissection of the human heart, allowing to reduce the time and to improve the quality of the preparations. Methods. We have prepared two solutions with different freezing temperature. Tissue which needed to be preserved (myocardium was impregnated with solution №1. Tissue that need to be deleted (adipose tissue, impregnated with solution №2. After freezing the heart myocardium frizzes, but unfrozen adipose tissue could be easily separated. We examined 30 human hearts: 15 preparations by the classical dissection, 15 preparations with the help of cryodissection. Results. Preparation of hearts by the classical method took about 180 minutes, with the help of cryodissection – 30 minutes. Visualization of the coronary arteries and their branches after our method is better, myocardium is smooth, also preserve the natural color of the drug. Additionally, there is no contact of the researcher with harmful conservatives (for example formaldehyde. Conclusion. We have developed a method for dissection of cadaveric material, which improves the quality of anatomical

  12. Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166826.html Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility? Study finds ... 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, ...

  13. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

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    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    1994-01-01

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  14. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  15. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

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    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI.

  16. Model human heart or brain signals

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    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  17. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

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    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development. PMID:27752099

  18. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing during human heart development

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    Wang, He; Chen, Yanmei; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; Zhong, Lintao; Chen, Gangbing; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun; Bin, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) drives determinative changes during mouse heart development. Recent high-throughput technological advancements have facilitated genome-wide AS, while its analysis in human foetal heart transition to the adult stage has not been reported. Here, we present a high-resolution global analysis of AS transitions between human foetal and adult hearts. RNA-sequencing data showed extensive AS transitions occurred between human foetal and adult hearts, and AS events occurred more frequently in protein-coding genes than in long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). A significant difference of AS patterns was found between foetal and adult hearts. The predicted difference in AS events was further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of human heart samples. Functional foetal-specific AS event analysis showed enrichment associated with cell proliferation-related pathways including cell cycle, whereas adult-specific AS events were associated with protein synthesis. Furthermore, 42.6% of foetal-specific AS events showed significant changes in gene expression levels between foetal and adult hearts. Genes exhibiting both foetal-specific AS and differential expression were highly enriched in cell cycle-associated functions. In conclusion, we provided a genome-wide profiling of AS transitions between foetal and adult hearts and proposed that AS transitions and deferential gene expression may play determinative roles in human heart development.

  19. ILK induces cardiomyogenesis in the human heart.

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    Alexandra Traister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is a widely conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates diverse signal transduction pathways implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and contractility. In this study we explored whether experimental overexpression of ILK would up-regulate morphogenesis in the human fetal heart. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary cultures of human fetal myocardial cells (19-22 weeks gestation yielded scattered aggregates of cardioblasts positive for the early cardiac lineage marker nk × 2.5 and containing nascent sarcomeres. Cardiac cells in colonies uniformly expressed the gap junction protein connexin 43 (C × 43 and displayed a spectrum of differentiation with only a subset of cells exhibiting the late cardiomyogenic marker troponin T (cTnT and evidence of electrical excitability. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ILK potently increased the number of new aggregates of primitive cardioblasts (p<0.001. The number of cardioblast colonies was significantly decreased (p<0.05 when ILK expression was knocked down with ILK targeted siRNA. Interestingly, overexpression of the activation resistant ILK mutant (ILK(R211A resulted in much greater increase in the number of new cell aggregates as compared to overexpression of wild-type ILK (ILK(WT. The cardiomyogenic effects of ILK(R211A and ILK(WT were accompanied by concurrent activation of β-catenin (p<0.001 and increase expression of progenitor cell marker islet-1, which was also observed in lysates of transgenic mice with cardiac-specific over-expression of ILK(R211A and ILK(WT. Finally, endogenous ILK expression was shown to increase in concert with those of cardiomyogenic markers during directed cardiomyogenic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the human fetal heart ILK activation is instructive to the specification of mesodermal precursor cells towards a cardiomyogenic lineage. Induction of cardiomyogenesis by ILK

  20. Characteristic of c-Kit+ progenitor cells in explanted human hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszczak, Sybilla; Czapla, Justyna; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Wiśniewska, Ewa; Cichoń, Tomasz; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Kobusińska, Magdalena; Gajda, Karolina; Wilczek, Piotr; Śliwka, Joanna; Zembala, Michał; Zembala, Marian; Szala, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    According to literature data, self-renewing, multipotent, and clonogenic cardiac c-Kit+ progenitor cells occur within human myocardium. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize c-Kit+ progenitor cells from explanted human hearts. Experimental material was obtained from 19 adult and 7 pediatric patients. Successful isolation and culture was achieved for 95 samples (84.1 %) derived from five different regions of the heart: right and left ventricles, atrium, intraventricular septum,...

  1. Rodent heart failure models do not reflect the human circulating microRNA signature in heart failure.

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    Vegter, Eline L; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Silljé, Herman H W; Meems, Laura M G; van der Pol, Atze; van der Velde, A Rogier; Berezikov, Eugene; Voors, Adriaan A; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Meer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a set of plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) that are downregulated in patients with heart failure in comparison with control subjects. To better understand their meaning and function, we sought to validate these circulating miRNAs in 3 different well-established rat and mouse heart failure models, and correlated the miRNAs to parameters of cardiac function. The previously identified let-7i-5p, miR-16-5p, miR-18a-5p, miR-26b-5p, miR-27a-3p, miR-30e-5p, miR-199a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-423-3p, miR-423-5p and miR-652-3p were measured by means of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in plasma samples of 8 homozygous TGR(mREN2)27 (Ren2) transgenic rats and 8 (control) Sprague-Dawley rats, 6 mice with angiotensin II-induced heart failure (AngII) and 6 control mice, and 8 mice with ischemic heart failure and 6 controls. Circulating miRNA levels were compared between the heart failure animals and healthy controls. Ren2 rats, AngII mice and mice with ischemic heart failure showed clear signs of heart failure, exemplified by increased left ventricular and lung weights, elevated end-diastolic left ventricular pressures, increased expression of cardiac stress markers and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. All miRNAs were detectable in plasma from rats and mice. No significant differences were observed between the circulating miRNAs in heart failure animals when compared to the healthy controls (all P>0.05) and no robust associations with cardiac function could be found. The previous observation that miRNAs circulate in lower levels in human patients with heart failure could not be validated in well-established rat and mouse heart failure models. These results question the translation of data on human circulating miRNA levels to experimental models, and vice versa the validity of experimental miRNA data for human heart failure.

  2. MicroRNA profiling of pericardial fluid samples from patients with heart failure.

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    Kuosmanen, Suvi M; Hartikainen, Juha; Hippeläinen, Mikko; Kokki, Hannu; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Tavi, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms maintain vital functions through intercellular communication. Release of extracellular vesicles that carry signals to even distant target organs is one way of accomplishing this communication. MicroRNAs can also be secreted from the cells in exosomes and act as paracrine signalling molecules. In addition, microRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, and are considered as promising candidate biomarkers due to their relative stability and easy quantification from clinical samples. Pericardial fluid contains hormones secreted by the heart and is known to reflect the cardiac function. In this study, we sought to investigate whether pericardial fluid contains microRNAs and if so, whether they could be used to distinguish between different cardiovascular pathologies and disease stages. Pericardial fluid was collected from heart failure patients during open-heart surgery. MicroRNA profiles of altogether 51 patients were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using Exiqon human panels I and II. On the average, 256 microRNAs were detected per sample, and 70 microRNAs out of 742 profiled microRNAs were detected in every sample. The five most abundant microRNAs in pericardial fluid were miR-21-5p, miR-451a, miR-125b-5p, let-7b-5p and miR-16-5p. No specific signatures for cardiovascular pathologies or clinically assessed heart failure stages could be detected from the profiles and, overall, microRNA profiles of the samples were found to be very similar despite the heterogeneity in the study population. Measured microRNA profiles did not separate the samples according to the clinical features of the patients. However, several previously identified heart failure marker microRNAs were detected. The pericardial fluid microRNA profile appeared to be a result of an active and selective secretory process indicating that microRNAs may act as paracrine signalling factors by mediating

  3. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shi-Min; PENG Hu; YANG Hui-Jie; ZHOU Tao; ZHOU Pei-Ling; WANG Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  4. How Live Performance Moves the Human Heart.

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    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi; Umeda, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how the audience member's physiological reactions differ as a function of listening context (i.e., live versus recorded music contexts). Thirty-seven audience members were assigned to one of seven pianists' performances and listened to his/her live performances of six pieces (fast and slow pieces by Bach, Schumann, and Debussy). Approximately 10 weeks after the live performance, each of the audience members returned to the same room and listened to the recorded performances of the same pianists' via speakers. We recorded the audience members' electrocardiograms in listening to the performances in both conditions, and analyzed their heart rates and the spectral features of the heart-rate variability (i.e., HF/TF, LF/HF). Results showed that the audience's heart rate was higher for the faster than the slower piece only in the live condition. As compared with the recorded condition, the audience's sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was less while their vagal nervous system (HF/TF) was activated more in the live condition, which appears to suggest that sharing the ongoing musical moments with the pianist reduces the audience's physiological stress. The results are discussed in terms of the audience's superior attention and temporal entrainment to live performance.

  5. Signaling pathways in failing human heart muscle cells.

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    Drexler, H; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1997-07-01

    Experimental studies have delineated important signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes and their alterations in heart failure; however, there is now evidence that these observations are not necessarily applicable to human cardiac muscle cells. For example, angiotensin II (A II) does not exert positive inotropic effects in human ventricular muscle cells, in contrast to observation in rats. Thus, it is important to elucidate cardiac signaling pathways in humans in order to appreciate the functional role of neurohumoral or mechanical stimulation in human myocardium in health and disease. In the present article, we review signal pathways in the failing human heart based on studies in human cardiac tissues and in vivo physiological studies related to A II, nitric oxide, and β-adrenergic stimulation. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997; 7:151-160). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  6. Organization of ventricular fibrillation in the human heart.

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    Ten Tusscher, Kirsten H W J; Hren, Rok; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2007-06-22

    Sudden cardiac death is a major cause of death in the industrialized world, claiming approximately 300,000 victims annually in the United States alone. In most cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by ventricular fibrillation (VF). Experimental studies in large animal hearts have shown that the uncoordinated contractions during VF are caused by large numbers of chaotically wandering reentrant waves of electrical activity. However, recent clinical data on VF in the human heart seem to suggest that human VF may have a markedly different organization. Here, we use a detailed model of the human ventricles, including a detailed description of cell electrophysiology, ventricular anatomy, and fiber direction anisotropy, to study the organization of human VF. We show that characteristics of our simulated VF are qualitatively similar to the clinical data. Furthermore, we find that human VF is driven by only approximately 10 reentrant sources and thus is much more organized than VF in animal hearts of comparable size, where VF is driven by approximately 50 sources. We investigate the influence of anisotropy ratio, tissue excitability, and restitution properties on the number of reentrant sources driving VF. We find that the number of rotors depends strongest on minimum action potential duration, a property that differs significantly between human and large animal hearts. Based on these findings, we suggest that the simpler spatial organization of human VF relative to VF in large animal hearts may be caused by differences in minimum action potential duration. Both the simpler spatial organization of human VF and its suggested cause may have important implications for treating and preventing this dangerous arrhythmia in humans.

  7. Analysis of necroptotic proteins in failing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szobi, Adrián; Gonçalvesová, Eva; Varga, Zoltán V; Leszek, Przemyslaw; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Hulman, Michal; Kyselovič, Ján; Ferdinandy, Péter; Adameová, Adriana

    2017-04-28

    Cell loss and subsequent deterioration of contractile function are hallmarks of chronic heart failure (HF). While apoptosis has been investigated as a participant in the progression of HF, it is unlikely that it accounts for the total amount of non-functional tissue. In addition, there is evidence for the presence of necrotic cardiomyocytes in HF. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the necroptotic proteins regulating necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis, and thereby assess its potential role in human end-stage HF. Left ventricular samples of healthy controls (C) and patients with end-stage HF due to myocardial infarction (CAD) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were studied. Immunoblotting for necroptotic and apoptotic markers was performed. Triton X-114 fractionated samples were analyzed to study differences in subcellular localization. Elevated expression of RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein), pSer(227)-RIP3 and its total levels were observed in HF groups compared to controls. On the other hand, caspase-8 expression, a proapoptotic protease negatively regulating necroptosis, was downregulated suggesting activation of necroptosis signaling. Total mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) expression did not differ among the groups; however, active cytotoxic forms of MLKL were present in all HF samples while they were expressed at almost undetectable levels in controls. Interestingly, pThr(357)-MLKL unlike pSer(358)-MLKL, was higher in DCM than CAD. In HF, the subcellular localization of both RIP3 and pThr(357)-MLKL was consistent with activation of necroptosis signaling. Expression of main apoptotic markers has not indicated importance of apoptosis. This is the first evidence showing that human HF of CAD or DCM etiology is positive for markers of necroptosis which may be involved in the development of HF.

  8. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1α, Il-1β, IL-6 and TNFα in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol

  9. Reorganized PKA-AKAP associations in the failing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Thin-Thin; Soni, Siddarth; van Veen, Toon A B; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Cappadona, Salvatore; Varro, Andras; de Weger, Roel A; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Vos, Marc A; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2012-02-01

    Here we reveal that the characterization of large-scale re-arrangements of signaling scaffolds induced by heart failure can serve as a novel concept to identify more specific therapeutic targets. In the mammalian heart, the cAMP pathway, with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a central role, acts directly downstream of adrenergic receptors to mediate cardiac contractility and rhythm. Heart failure, characterized by severe alterations in adrenergic stimulation is, amongst other interventions, often treated with β-blockers. Contrasting results, however, have shown both beneficial and detrimental effects of decreased cAMP levels in failing hearts. We hypothesize that the origin of this behavior lies in the complex spatiotemporal organization of the regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-R), which associates tightly with various A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) to specifically localize PKA's activity. Using chemical proteomics directly applied to human patient and control heart tissue we demonstrate that the association profile of PKA-R with several AKAPs is severely altered in the failing heart, for instance effecting the interaction between PKA and the novel AKAP SPHKAP was 6-fold upregulated upon failing heart conditions. Also a significant increase in captured cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) was observed. The observed altered profiles can already explain many aspects of the aberrant cAMP-response in the failing human heart, validating that this dataset may provide a resource for several novel, more specific, treatment options. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes".

  10. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  11. Spectroscopic fluorescence measurements of lamb and human heart tissue in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidis, George; Zacharakis, Giannis; Kochiadakis, G. E.; Chrysostomakis, S. I.; Vardas, P. E.; Fotakis, Costas; Papazoglou, Theodore G.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra were obtained during the exposure of lamb heart (n=20) tissue to Argon-ion radiation (457.9nm). Fluorescence spectra from different heart compartments (the left and right atria and ventricles, the myocardium, the epicardium, and the aorta) were recorded. Simple algebraic algorithms based on the spectral intensity variation were constructed in order to detect spectral features and characterize the different cardiac compartments. Additionally, it was investigated whether each chamber exhibited constant spectral response. After the end of each experiment the lamb hearts were stored in formalin (10%). The samples were irradiated again after forty eight (48) hours in order to investigate the spectral differences that appear due to formalin conservation. Similar fluorescence measurements were taken from a limited number of human heart tissues (n=2) ex vivo.

  12. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  13. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel [Cardiocirculatory Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Azorin, Inmaculada [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Sirera, Rafael [Biotechnology Department, Universidad Politecnica, Valencia (Spain); Martinez-Dolz, Luis [Cardiology Unit, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan [Cardiology Unit, Hospital San Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R. [Cardiology Unit, Institute of Biomedical Research, Hospital Clinicode Santiagode Compostela (Spain); Salvador, Antonio [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Portoles, Manuel, E-mail: portoles_man@gva.es [Cell Biology and Pathology Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  14. Establishing human heart chromium, cobalt and vanadium concentrations by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Patrick L; Eckdahl, Steven J; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Wright, Thomas C; Murray, David L

    2017-05-01

    Chromium, cobalt, and vanadium are used in metallic joint prosthesis. Case studies have associated elevated heart tissue cobalt concentrations with myocardial injury. To document the long term heart metal ion concentrations, a validated inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) method was needed. The method utilized a closed-vessel microwave digestion system to digest the samples. An ICP-MS method utilizing Universal Cell Technology was used to determine our target analyte concentrations. Accuracy was verified using reference materials. Precision, sensitivity, recovery and linearity studies were performed. This method was used to establish a reference range for a non-implant containing cohort of 80 autopsy human heart tissues RESULTS: This method demonstrated an analytic measurement range of 0.5-100ng/mL for each element. Accuracy was within ±10% of target value for each element. Within-run precision for each element was below 20% CV. The chromium, vanadium and cobalt concentrations (mean±SD) were 0.1523±0.2157μg/g, 0.0094±0.0211μg/g and 0.1039±0.1305μg/g respectively in 80 non-implant containing human heart tissue samples. This method provides acceptable recovery of the chromium, cobalt and vanadium in heart tissue; allowing assessment of the effects of metallic joint prosthesis on myocardial health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  16. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem cell markers in the heart of the human newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Faa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of cardiac progenitor cells in mammals raises the possibility that the human heart contains a population of stem cells capable of generating cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. Several recent studies now show that the different cell types that characterize the adult human heart arise from a common ancestor. Human cardiac stem cells differentiate into cardiomyocytes, and, in lesser extent, into smooth muscle and endothelial cells. The characterization of human cardiac stem cells (CSCs has important clinical implications. In recent years, CD117 (c-kit has been reported to mark a subtype of stem/progenitor cells in the human heart, with stem cell-like properties, including the ability to self-renewal and clonogenicity multipotentiality. Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  18. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  19. DNA extraction methods and multiple sampling to improve molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräunig, Patrícia; Portella, Luiza Pires; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Libardoni, Felipe; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-10-01

    Molecular detection of Sarcocystis spp. in tissue samples can be useful for experimental and diagnostic purposes. However, the parasite spreads unevenly through tissues, forming tissue cysts, and the cystic wall is an obstacle in DNA extraction protocols. Therefore, adequate sampling and effective disruption of the cysts are essential to improve the accuracy of DNA detection by PCR. The aims of this study were to evaluate the suitability of four protocols for DNA extraction from cysts of Sarcocystis spp. present in bovine myocardium samples or after their harvest in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution as well as determine the effects of single or multiple sampling on the accuracy of molecular diagnosis of sarcocystosis in cattle hearts. Cysts and myocardium samples from nine bovine hearts were randomly distributed to four DNA extraction protocols: kit, kit with modification, DNAzol, and cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Samples were submitted to DNA extraction and PCR as replicates of each heart (simplicate, duplicate, and triplicate), and the probability of a true positive diagnostic was calculated. Among the protocols tested, the kit with modification was determined to be the most suitable for DNA extraction from cysts in PBS solution (92.6 % of DNA detection by PCR); DNAzol resulted in higher DNA detection frequency from bovine myocardium samples (48.1 %). Multiple sampling improved the molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. infection in cattle hearts, increasing at 22.2 % the rate of true positive diagnostic.

  20. Quantification of carbonic anhydrase gene expression in ventricle of hypertrophic and failing human heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Bernardo V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase enzymes (CA catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate in mammalian cells. Trans-membrane transport of CA-produced bicarbonate contributes significantly to cellular pH regulation. A body of evidence implicates pH-regulatory processes in the hypertrophic growth pathway characteristic of hearts as they fail. In particular, Na+/H+ exchange (NHE activation is pro-hypertrophic and CA activity activates NHE. Recently Cardrase (6-ethoxyzolamide, a CA inhibitor, was found to prevent and revert agonist-stimulated cardiac hypertrophy (CH in cultured cardiomyocytes. Our goal thus was to determine whether hypertrophied human hearts have altered expression of CA isoforms. Methods We measured CA expression in hypertrophied human hearts to begin to examine the role of carbonic anhydrase in progression of human heart failure. Ventricular biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery (CS, n = 14, or heart transplantation (HT, n = 13. CS patients presented mild/moderate concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and normal right ventricles, with preserved ventricular function; ejection fractions were ~60%. Conversely, HT patients with failing hearts presented CH or ventricular dilation accompanied by ventricular dysfunction and EF values of 20%. Non-hypertrophic, non-dilated ventricular samples served as controls. Results Expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP were markers of CH. Hypertrophic ventricles presented increased expression of CAII, CAIV, ANP, and BNP, mRNA levels, which increased in failing hearts, measured by quantitative real-time PCR. CAII, CAIV, and ANP protein expression also increased approximately two-fold in hypertrophic/dilated ventricles. Conclusions These results, combined with in vitro data that CA inhibition prevents and reverts CH, suggest that increased carbonic anhydrase expression is a prognostic molecular marker of cardiac

  1. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  2. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, A.; Barat, P.

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation ...

  3. Effect of meditation on scaling behavior and complexity of human heart rate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, A

    2006-01-01

    The heart beat data recorded from samples before and during meditation are analyzed using two different scaling analysis methods. These analyses revealed that mediation severely affects the long range correlation of heart beat of a normal heart. Moreover, it is found that meditation induces periodic behavior in the heart beat. The complexity of the heart rate variability is quantified using multiscale entropy analysis and recurrence analysis. The complexity of the heart beat during mediation is found to be more.

  4. Proteomic analysis of effluents from perfused human heart for transplantation: identification of potential biomarkers for ischemic heart damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers released from the heart at early stage of ischemia are very important to diagnosis of ischemic heart disease and salvage myocytes from death. Known specific markers for blood tests including CK-MB, cardiac troponin T (cTnT and cardiac troponin I (cTnI are released after the onset of significant necrosis instead of early ischemia. Thus, they are not good biomarkers to diagnose myocardial injury before necrosis happens. Therefore, in this study, we performed proteomic analysis on effluents from perfused human hearts of donors at different ischemic time. Results After global ischemia for 0 min, 30 min and 60 min at 4°C, effluents from five perfused hearts were analyzed respectively, by High performance liquid chromatography-Chip-Mass spectrometry (HPLC-Chip-MS system. Total 196 highly reliable proteins were identified. 107 proteins were identified at the beginning of ischemia, 174 and 175 proteins at ischemic 30 min and ischemic 60 min, respectively. With the exception of cardiac troponin I and T, all known biomarkers for myocardial ischemia were detected in our study. However, there were four glycolytic enzymes and two targets of matrix metalloproteinase released significantly from the heart when ischemic time was increasing. These proteins were L-lactate dehydrogenase B(LDHB, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI, phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (PGAM2, gelsolin and isoform 8 of titin. PGAM2, LDHB and titin were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays kits. The mean concentrations of LDHB and PGAM2 in samples showed an increasing trend when ischemic time was extending. In addition, 33% identified proteins are involved in metabolism. Protein to protein interaction network analysis showed glycolytic enzymes, such as isoform alpha-enolase of alpha-enolase, isoform 1 of triosephosphate isomerase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, had more connections than other

  5. Second heart field and the development of the outflow tract in human embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Ping; Li, Hai-Rong; Cao, Xi-Mei; Wang, Qin-Xue; Qiao, Cong-Jin; Ya, Jing

    2013-04-01

    The second heart field (SHF) is indicated to contribute to the embryonic heart development. However, less knowledge is available about SHF development of human embryo due to the difficulty of collecting embryos. In this study, serial sections of human embryos from Carnegie stage 10 (CS10) to CS16 were stained with antibodies against Islet-1 (Isl-1), Nkx2.5, GATA4, myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) to observe spatiotemporal distribution of SHF and its contribution to the development of the arterial pole of cardiac tube. Our findings suggest that during CS10 to CS12, SHF of the human embryo is composed of the bilateral pharyngeal mesenchyme, the central mesenchyme of the branchial arch and splanchnic mesoderm of the pericardial cavity dorsal wall. With development, SHF translocates and consists of ventral pharyngeal mesenchyme and dorsal wall of the pericardial cavity. Hence, the SHF of human embryo shows a dynamic spatiotemporal distribution pattern. The formation of the Isl-1 positive condense cell prongs provides an explanation for the saddle structure formation at the distal pole of the outflow tract. In human embryo, the Isl-1 positive cells of SHF may contribute to the formation of myocardial outflow tract (OFT) and the septum during different development stages.

  6. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  7. The human heart: application of the golden ratio and angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henein, Michael Y; Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; Sun, Lin; Khir, Ashraf W; Franklin, Karl; Lindqvist, Per

    2011-08-04

    The golden ratio, or golden mean, of 1.618 is a proportion known since antiquity to be the most aesthetically pleasing and has been used repeatedly in art and architecture. Both the golden ratio and the allied golden angle of 137.5° have been found within the proportions and angles of the human body and plants. In the human heart we found many applications of the golden ratio and angle, in addition to those previously described. In healthy hearts, vertical and transverse dimensions accord with the golden ratio, irrespective of different absolute dimensions due to ethnicity. In mild heart failure, the ratio of 1.618 was maintained but in end-stage heart failure the ratio significantly reduced. Similarly, in healthy ventricles mitral annulus dimensions accorded with the golden ratio, while in dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral regurgitation patients the ratio had significantly reduced. In healthy patients, both the angles between the mid-luminal axes of the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta continuation and between the outflow tract axis and continuation of the inflow tract axis of the right ventricle approximate to the golden angle, although in severe pulmonary hypertension, the angle is significantly increased. Hence the overall cardiac and ventricular dimensions in a normal heart are consistent with the golden ratio and angle, representing optimum pump structure and function efficiency, whereas there is significant deviation in the disease state. These findings could have anatomical, functional and prognostic value as markers of early deviation from normality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Na+,K+-ATPase concentration in rodent and human heart and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K; Bjerregaard, P; Richter, Erik

    1988-01-01

    rats, cardiomyopathic hamsters, and human subjects. These methods have earlier been shown to quantify the Na+,K+-ATPase concentration in muscle tissue with high accuracy. When rats were swim trained for six weeks the heart ventricular muscle Na+,K+-ATPase concentration was increased by 20% (p less than......To investigate whether the sodium-potassium pump or Na+,K+-ATPase concentration in muscles is related to the capacity for muscle performance, the 3H-ouabain binding site concentration or 3-O-methylflourescein phosphatase activity was determined in samples of heart ventricular muscles from trained...... was increased by up to 46% (p less than 0.001) and decreased by up to 30% (p less than 0.005) after training and immobilisation respectively. Cardiomyopathic hamsters showed a reduction of 33% (p less than 0.005) in the heart ventricular Na+,K+-ATPase concentration compared with normal hamsters. This decrease...

  9. Heart rate variability, overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol in apparently healthy human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Julian F; Fischer, Joachim E

    2013-01-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between autonomic nervous system activity as indexed by measures of heart rate variability and overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol levels in a large sample of working adults. The study population comprised 611 apparently healthy employees of an airplane manufacturing plant in Southern Germany. Heart rate variability was calculated as beat-to-beat intervals over the course of one 24-hour weekday measured with an ambulatory ECG recorder. Overnight urine collection and blood samples were also obtained. We found an inverse association between indices of vagally-mediated heart rate variability and plasma levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the ratio of LDL to high density lipoprotein (HDL) that remained significant in multivariate models after controlling for relevant covariates including norepinephrine. Urinary norepinephrine was not significantly related to any measure of cholesterol in multivariate models. We report here for the first time, in a large sample of healthy human adults, evidence supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant inverse relationship between measures of plasma cholesterol and vagally-mediated heart rate variability after controlling for sympathetic nervous system activity. This suggests an important role for the vagal control of plasma cholesterol levels in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Arrhythmogenic remodelling of activation and repolarization in the failing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-11-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of disability and death worldwide, and approximately half of heart failure-related deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular arrhythmias. Patients with heart failure have been shown to be at 6- to 9-fold increased risk of sudden cardiac death compared to the general population. (AHA. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2003 Update. Heart and Stroke Facts. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association; 2002) Thus, electrophysiological remodelling associated with heart failure is a leading cause of disease mortality and has been a major investigational focus examined using many animal models of heart failure. While these studies have provided an important foundation for understanding the arrhythmogenic pathophysiology of heart failure, the need for corroborating studies conducted on human heart tissue has been increasingly recognized. Many human heart studies of conduction and repolarization remodelling have now been published and shed some light on important, potentially arrhythmogenic, changes in human heart failure. These studies are being conducted at multiple experimental scales from isolated cells to whole-tissue preparations and have provided insight into regulatory mechanisms such as decreased protein expression, alternative mRNA splicing of ion channel genes, and defective cellular trafficking. Further investigations of heart failure in the human myocardium will be essential for determining possible therapeutic targets to prevent arrhythmia in heart failure and for facilitating the translation of basic research findings to the clinical realm.

  11. A point-process model of human heartbeat intervals: new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Matten, Eric C; Alabi, Abdulrasheed A; Brown, Emery N

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate is a vital sign, whereas heart rate variability is an important quantitative measure of cardiovascular regulation by the autonomic nervous system. Although the design of algorithms to compute heart rate and assess heart rate variability is an active area of research, none of the approaches considers the natural point-process structure of human heartbeats, and none gives instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability. We model the stochastic structure of heartbeat intervals as a history-dependent inverse Gaussian process and derive from it an explicit probability density that gives new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability: instantaneous R-R interval and heart rate standard deviations. We estimate the time-varying parameters of the inverse Gaussian model by local maximum likelihood and assess model goodness-of-fit by Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests based on the time-rescaling theorem. We illustrate our new definitions in an analysis of human heartbeat intervals from 10 healthy subjects undergoing a tilt-table experiment. Although several studies have identified deterministic, nonlinear dynamical features in human heartbeat intervals, our analysis shows that a highly accurate description of these series at rest and in extreme physiological conditions may be given by an elementary, physiologically based, stochastic model.

  12. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production......, and finally to assess myocardial antioxidant levels. Mitochondrial respiration in biopsies from ischemic and nonischemic regions from the left ventricle of the same heart was compared in nine human subjects. Maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity in fresh muscle fibers was lower in ischemic compared...

  13. Changes in the organization of excitation-contraction coupling structures in failing human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Crossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cardiac myocyte t-tubular system ensures rapid, uniform cell activation and several experimental lines of evidence suggest changes in the t-tubular system and associated excitation-contraction coupling proteins may occur in heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: The organization of t-tubules, L-type calcium channels (DHPRs, ryanodine receptors (RyRs and contractile machinery were examined in fixed ventricular tissue samples from both normal and failing hearts (idiopathic (non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy using high resolution fluorescent imaging. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, Na-Ca exchanger, DHPR and caveolin-3 labels revealed a shift from a predominantly transverse orientation to oblique and axial directions in failing myocytes. In failure, dilation of peripheral t-tubules occurred and a change in the extent of protein glycosylation was evident. There was no change in the fractional area occupied by myofilaments (labeled with phalloidin but there was a small reduction in the number of RyR clusters per unit area. The general relationship between DHPRs and RyR was not changed and RyR labeling overlapped with 51±3% of DHPR labeling in normal hearts. In longitudinal (but not transverse sections there was an ∼30% reduction in the degree of colocalization between DHPRs and RyRs as measured by Pearson's correlation coefficient in failing hearts. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that extensive remodelling of the t-tubular network and associated excitation-contraction coupling proteins occurs in failing human heart. These changes may contribute to abnormal calcium handling in heart failure. The general organization of the t-system and changes observed in failure samples have subtle differences to some animal models although the general direction of changes are generally similar.

  14. Myocardial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells: Rapid production of human heart grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreta, Elena; de Oñate, Lorena; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Oria, Roger; Tarantino, Carolina; Climent, Andreu M; Marco, Andrés; Samitier, Mireia; Martínez, Elena; Valls-Margarit, Maria; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Montserrat, Nuria

    2016-08-01

    Genome editing on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) together with the development of protocols for organ decellularization opens the door to the generation of autologous bioartificial hearts. Here we sought to generate for the first time a fluorescent reporter human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line by means of Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to efficiently produce cardiomyocyte-like cells (CLCs) from hPSCs and repopulate decellularized human heart ventricles for heart engineering. In our hands, targeting myosin heavy chain locus (MYH6) with mCherry fluorescent reporter by TALEN technology in hESCs did not alter major pluripotent-related features, and allowed for the definition of a robust protocol for CLCs production also from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in 14 days. hPSCs-derived CLCs (hPSCs-CLCs) were next used to recellularize acellular cardiac scaffolds. Electrophysiological responses encountered when hPSCs-CLCs were cultured on ventricular decellularized extracellular matrix (vdECM) correlated with significant increases in the levels of expression of different ion channels determinant for calcium homeostasis and heart contractile function. Overall, the approach described here allows for the rapid generation of human cardiac grafts from hPSCs, in a total of 24 days, providing a suitable platform for cardiac engineering and disease modeling in the human setting.

  15. Activation of calcineurin in human failing heart ventricle by endothelin-1, angiotensin II and urotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Joan; Wang, Jianchun; Russell, Fraser D; Molenaar, Peter

    2005-06-01

    1 The calcineurin (CaN) enzyme-transcriptional pathway is critically involved in hypertrophy of heart muscle in some animal models. Currently there is no information concerning the regulation of CaN activation by endogenous agonists in human heart. 2 Human right ventricular trabeculae from explanted human (14 male/2 female) failing hearts were set up in a tissue bath and electrically paced at 1 Hz and incubated with or without 100 nM endothelin-1 (ET-1), 10 M, angiotensin-II (Ang II) or 20 nM human urotensin-II (hUII) for 30 min. Tissues from four patients were incubated with 200 nM tacrolimus (FK506) for 30 min and then incubated in the presence or absence of ET-1 for a further 30 min. 3 ET-1 increased contractile force in all 13 patients (P0.1). FK506 had no effect on contractile force (P=0.12). 4 ET-1, Ang II and hUII increased calcineurin activity by 32, 71 and 15%, respectively, while FK506 reduced activity by 34%. ET-1 in the presence of FK506 did not restore calcineurin activity (P=0.1). 5 There was no relationship between basal CaN activity and expression levels in the right ventricle. Increased levels of free phosphate were detected in ventricular homogenates that were incubated with PKC(epsilon) compared to samples incubated without PKC(epsilon). 6 Endogenous cardiostimulants which activate G(alpha)q-coupled receptors increase the activity of calcineurin in human heart following acute (30 min) exposure. PKC may contribute to this effect by increasing levels of phosphorylated calcineurin substrate.

  16. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs in human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara T Koopmann

    Full Text Available In recent years genome-wide association studies (GWAS have uncovered numerous chromosomal loci associated with various electrocardiographic traits and cardiac arrhythmia predisposition. A considerable fraction of these loci lie within inter-genic regions. The underlying trait-associated variants likely reside in regulatory regions and exert their effect by modulating gene expression. Hence, the key to unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying these cardiac traits is to interrogate variants for association with differential transcript abundance by expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis. In this study we conducted an eQTL analysis of human heart. For a total of 129 left ventricular samples that were collected from non-diseased human donor hearts, genome-wide transcript abundance and genotyping was determined using microarrays. Each of the 18,402 transcripts and 897,683 SNP genotypes that remained after pre-processing and stringent quality control were tested for eQTL effects. We identified 771 eQTLs, regulating 429 unique transcripts. Overlaying these eQTLs with cardiac GWAS loci identified novel candidates for studies aimed at elucidating the functional and transcriptional impact of these loci. Thus, this work provides for the first time a comprehensive eQTL map of human heart: a powerful and unique resource that enables systems genetics approaches for the study of cardiac traits.

  17. Adherence to Heart-Healthy Behaviors in a Sample of the U.S. Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan D. Fihn, MD, MPH

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Following national recommendations for physical activity, diet, and nonsmoking can reduce both incident and recurrent coronary heart disease. Prevalence data about combinations of behaviors are lacking. This study describes the prevalence of full adherence to national recommendations for physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and nonsmoking among individuals with and without coronary heart disease and examines characteristics associated with full adherence. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a national population-based survey. We included respondents to the cardiovascular disease module and excluded individuals with poor physical health or activity limitations. Results Subjects were most adherent to smoking recommendations (approximately 80% and less adherent to fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity (approximately 20% for both. Only 5% of those without coronary heart disease and 7% of those with coronary heart disease were adherent to all three behaviors (P < .01. Among those without a history of coronary heart disease, female sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–1.76, highest age quintile (OR 1.67; 95% CI, 1.28–2.19, more education (OR 2.48; 95% CI, 1.69–3.64, and more income (OR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.04–1.36 were associated with full adherence. Among those with coronary heart disease, mid-age quintile (OR 3.79; 95% CI, 1.35–10.68, good general health (OR 2.05; 95% CI, 1.07–3.94, and more income (OR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.06–2.16 were associated with full adherence. Conclusions These data demonstrate the lack of a heart-healthy lifestyle among a sample of U.S. adults with and without coronary heart disease. Full adherence to combined behaviors is far below adherence to any of the individual behaviors.

  18. Activation and inhibition of the endogenous opioid system in human heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Oldroyd, K. G.; Gray, C E; Carter, R.; Harvey, K.; Borland, W; BEASTALL, G; Cobbe, S M

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--In a canine model of congestive heart failure beta endorphin concentrations were high and opioid receptor antagonists exerted beneficial haemodynamic effects. In humans previous studies have suggested that opioid peptides may modify the perception of breathlessness and fatigue in heart failure. METHODS--Plasma concentrations of beta endorphin were measured in patients with acute and chronic heart failure and cardiogenic shock. A subgroup of eight patients with New York Heart Assoc...

  19. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  20. Reference gene alternatives to Gapdh in rodent and human heart failure gene expression studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Finn Olav

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR is a highly sensitive method for mRNA quantification, but requires invariant expression of the chosen reference gene(s. In pathological myocardium, there is limited information on suitable reference genes other than the commonly used Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA. Our aim was to evaluate and identify suitable reference genes in human failing myocardium, in rat and mouse post-myocardial infarction (post-MI heart failure and across developmental stages in fetal and neonatal rat myocardium. Results The abundance of Arbp, Rpl32, Rpl4, Tbp, Polr2a, Hprt1, Pgk1, Ppia and Gapdh mRNA and 18S ribosomal RNA in myocardial samples was quantified by RT-qPCR. The expression variability of these transcripts was evaluated by the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms and by a variance component analysis method. Biological variability was a greater contributor to sample variability than either repeated reverse transcription or PCR reactions. Conclusions The most stable reference genes were Rpl32, Gapdh and Polr2a in mouse post-infarction heart failure, Polr2a, Rpl32 and Tbp in rat post-infarction heart failure and Rpl32 and Pgk1 in human heart failure (ischemic disease and cardiomyopathy. The overall most stable reference genes across all three species was Rpl32 and Polr2a. In rat myocardium, all reference genes tested showed substantial variation with developmental stage, with Rpl4 as was most stable among the tested genes.

  1. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  2. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Quality within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error.This presentation will provide a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the sodium channel gene (SCN5A) by GATA4 in human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarradas, Anna; Pinsach-Abuin, Mel Lina; Mackintosh, Carlos; Llorà-Batlle, Oriol; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Batlle, Montserrat; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Zimmer, Thomas; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Brugada, Ramon; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro; Pagans, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the sodium channel gene (SCN5A) has been proposed to disrupt cardiac action potential and cause human cardiac arrhythmias, but the mechanisms of SCN5A gene regulation and dysregulation still remain largely unexplored. To gain insight into the transcriptional regulatory networks of SCN5A, we surveyed the promoter and first intronic regions of the SCN5A gene, predicting the presence of several binding sites for GATA transcription factors (TFs). Consistent with this prediction, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and sequential ChIP (Re-ChIP) assays show co-occupancy of cardiac GATA TFs GATA4 and GATA5 on promoter and intron 1 SCN5A regions in fresh-frozen human left ventricle samples. Gene reporter experiments show GATA4 and GATA5 synergism in the activation of the SCN5A promoter, and its dependence on predicted GATA binding sites. GATA4 and GATA6 mRNAs are robustly expressed in fresh-frozen human left ventricle samples as measured by highly sensitive droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). GATA5 mRNA is marginally but still clearly detected in the same samples. Importantly, GATA4 mRNA levels are strongly and positively correlated with SCN5A transcript levels in the human heart. Together, our findings uncover a novel mechanism of GATA TFs in the regulation of the SCN5A gene in human heart tissue. Our studies suggest that GATA5 but especially GATA4 are main contributors to SCN5A gene expression, thus providing a new paradigm of SCN5A expression regulation that may shed new light into the understanding of cardiac disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  5. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  6. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  7. Altered expression of mitochondrial and extracellular matrix genes in the heart of human fetuses with chromosome 21 trisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olla Carlo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Down syndrome phenotype has been attributed to overexpression of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes. However, the expression profile of Hsa21 genes in trisomic human subjects as well as their effects on genes located on different chromosomes are largely unknown. Using oligonucleotide microarrays we compared the gene expression profiles of hearts of human fetuses with and without Hsa21 trisomy. Results Approximately half of the 15,000 genes examined (87 of the 168 genes on Hsa21 were expressed in the heart at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Hsa21 gene expression was globally upregulated 1.5 fold in trisomic samples. However, not all genes were equally dysregulated and 25 genes were not upregulated at all. Genes located on other chromosomes were also significantly dysregulated. Functional class scoring and gene set enrichment analyses of 473 genes, differentially expressed between trisomic and non-trisomic hearts, revealed downregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes and upregulation of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins. There were no significant differences between trisomic fetuses with and without heart defects. Conclusion We conclude that dosage-dependent upregulation of Hsa21 genes causes dysregulation of the genes responsible for mitochondrial function and for the extracellular matrix organization in the fetal heart of trisomic subjects. These alterations might be harbingers of the heart defects associated with Hsa21 trisomy, which could be based on elusive mechanisms involving genetic variability, environmental factors and/or stochastic events.

  8. Rapid manufacturing techniques for the tissue engineering of human heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Cora; Jastram, Ben; Hetzer, Roland; Schwandt, Hartmut

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have reached a level of quality that justifies considering rapid manufacturing for medical applications. Herein, we introduce a new approach using 3D printing to simplify and improve the fabrication of human heart valve scaffolds by tissue engineering (TE). Custom-made human heart valve scaffolds are to be fabricated on a selective laser-sintering 3D printer for subsequent seeding with vascular cells from human umbilical cords. The scaffolds will be produced from resorbable polymers that must feature a number of specific properties: the structure, i.e. particle granularity and shape, and thermic properties must be feasible for the printing process. They must be suitable for the cell-seeding process and at the same time should be resorbable. They must be applicable for implementation in the human body and flexible enough to support the full functionality of the valve. The research focuses mainly on the search for a suitable scaffold material that allows the implementation of both the printing process to produce the scaffolds and the cell-seeding process, while meeting all of the above requirements. Computer tomographic data from patients were transformed into a 3D data model suitable for the 3D printer. Our current activities involve various aspects of the printing process, material research and the implementation of the cell-seeding process. Different resorbable polymeric materials have been examined and used to fabricate heart valve scaffolds by rapid manufacturing. Human vascular cells attached to the scaffold surface should migrate additionally into the inner structure of the polymeric samples. The ultimate intention of our approach is to establish a heart valve fabrication process based on 3D rapid manufacturing and TE. Based on the computer tomographic data of a patient, a custom-made scaffold for a valve will be produced on a 3D printer and populated preferably by autologous cells. The long-term goal is to support

  9. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  10. Dielectric characterisation of human tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Nennie, F.; Deiana, D.; Veen, A.J. van der; Monni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues samples are required for investigation and simulation purposes in biomedical applications of EM sensors. While available open literature mostly deals with ex-vivo characterization of isolated tissues, knowledge on dielectric properties of these tissues in their o

  11. Pattern designation of PCBs in human samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, M.S.; Fischbein, A.; Rosenman, K.D.; Levin, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    In order to asses the nature of PCB exposures in humans, statistical measures of PCB patterns in blood serum (as Aroclor 1254 or 1260) were made in 348 cases, representing several exposed and non-exposed groups. Although the cases were not representative of any population, most (252/348) had an Arcolor 1260 pattern, with evidence that PCB congeners in blood serum were usually derived from both Aroclor 1254 and 1260. The method is readily applied to routine packed column gc analysis.

  12. Polonium (210)Po activities in human blood of patients with ischaemic heart disease from Gdańsk in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryło, Alicja; Skwarzec, Bogdan; Romańczyk, Grzegorz; Siebert, Janusz

    The determination of polonium (210)Po in human blood samples is presented and discussed in this paper. The human blood samples were collected from patients of Medical University of Gdańsk with ischaemic heart disease (morbus ischaemicus cordis, MIC). The polonium concentrations in analyzed human blood samples are very differentiated. (210)Po is of particular interest in public health and although is present in the environment in extremely low amounts, it is easily bioaccumulated to the human body. The study shows that the amount of (210)Po that is incorporated into the human body depends on the food habits and some difference in its levels could be observed between smokers and non-smokers.

  13. Bioartificial heart: a human-sized porcine model--the way ahead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Weymann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bioartificial heart is a theoretical alternative to transplantation or mechanical left ventricular support. Native hearts decellularized with preserved architecture and vasculature may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. We sought to develop a tissue-engineered whole-heart neoscaffold in human-sized porcine hearts. METHODS: We decellularized porcine hearts (n = 10 by coronary perfusion with ionic detergents in a modified Langendorff circuit. We confirmed decellularization by histology, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, quantified residual DNA by spectrophotometry, and evaluated biomechanical stability with ex-vivo left-ventricular pressure/volume studies, all compared to controls. We then mounted the decellularized porcine hearts in a bioreactor and reseeded them with murine neonatal cardiac cells and human umbilical cord derived endothelial cells (HUVEC under simulated physiological conditions. RESULTS: Decellularized hearts lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers, proteoglycan, elastin and mechanical integrity; quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared to controls (82.6±3.2 ng DNA/mg tissue vs. 473.2±13.4 ng DNA/mg tissue, p<0.05. Recellularized porcine whole-heart neoscaffolds demonstrated re-endothelialization of coronary vasculature and measurable intrinsic myocardial electrical activity at 10 days, with perfused organ culture maintained for up to 3 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Human-sized decellularized porcine hearts provide a promising tissue-engineering platform that may lead to future clinical strategies in the treatment of heart failure.

  14. Muscarinic M3 receptor subtype gene expression in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, I; Mustafa, A; Riazi, M; Suliman, I; Sylvén, C; Adem, A

    2000-01-20

    The heart is an important target organ for cholinergic function. In this study, muscarinic receptor subtype(s) in the human heart were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrated muscarinic receptor M2 and M3 subtype RNA in left/right atria/ventricles of donor hearts. Receptor autoradiography analysis using selective muscarinic ligands indicated an absence of M1 receptor subtype in the human heart. The level of muscarinic receptor binding in atria was two to three times greater than in ventricles. Our results suggest that muscarinic receptors in the human heart are of the M2 and M3 subtypes. This is the first report of M3 receptors in the human myocardium.

  15. Developing a novel comprehensive framework for the investigation of cellular and whole heart electrophysiology in the in situ human heart: historical perspectives, current progress and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Peter; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Clayton, Richard; Dobrzynski, Halina; Yanni, Joseph; Boyett, Mark; Lambiase, Pier D

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of fatal ventricular arrhythmias is of great importance. In view of the many electrophysiological differences that exist between animal species and humans, the acquisition of basic electrophysiological data in the intact human heart is essential to drive and complement experimental work in animal and in-silico models. Over the years techniques have been developed to obtain basic electrophysiological signals directly from the patients by incorporating these measurements into routine clinical procedures which access the heart such as cardiac catheterisation and cardiac surgery. Early recordings with monophasic action potentials provided valuable information including normal values for the in vivo human heart, cycle length dependent properties, the effect of ischaemia, autonomic nervous system activity, and mechano-electric interaction. Transmural recordings addressed the controversial issue of the mid myocardial "M" cell. More recently, the technique of multielectrode mapping (256 electrodes) developed in animal models has been extended to humans, enabling mapping of activation and repolarisation on the entire left and right ventricular epicardium in patients during cardiac surgery. Studies have examined the issue of whether ventricular fibrillation was driven by a "mother" rotor with inhomogeneous and fragmented conduction as in some animal models, or by multiple wavelets as in other animal studies; results showed that both mechanisms are operative in humans. The simpler spatial organisation of human VF has important implications for treatment and prevention. To link in-vivo human electrophysiological mapping with cellular biophysics, multielectrode mapping is now being combined with myocardial biopsies. This technique enables region-specific electrophysiology changes to be related to underlying cellular biology, for example: APD alternans, which is a precursor of VF and sudden death. The mechanism is incompletely understood but related

  16. Gender differences in electrophysiological gene expression in failing and non-failing human hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Ambrosi

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of human cardiac tissues for study are critically important in increasing our understanding of the impact of gender, age, and other parameters, such as medications and cardiac disease, on arrhythmia susceptibility. In this study, we aimed to compare the mRNA expression of 89 ion channel subunits, calcium handling proteins, and transcription factors important in cardiac conduction and arrhythmogenesis in the left atria (LA and ventricles (LV of failing and nonfailing human hearts of both genders. Total RNA samples, prepared from failing male (n = 9 and female (n = 7, and from nonfailing male (n = 9 and female (n = 9 hearts, were probed using custom-designed Taqman gene arrays. Analyses were performed to explore the relationships between gender, failure state, and chamber expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed chamber specific expression patterns, but failed to identify disease- or gender-dependent clustering. Gender-specific analysis showed lower expression levels in transcripts encoding for K(v4.3, KChIP2, K(v1.5, and K(ir3.1 in the failing female as compared with the male LA. Analysis of LV transcripts, however, did not reveal significant differences based on gender. Overall, our data highlight the differential expression and transcriptional remodeling of ion channel subunits in the human heart as a function of gender and cardiac disease. Furthermore, the availability of such data sets will allow for the development of disease-, gender-, and, most importantly, patient-specific cardiac models, with the ability to utilize such information as mRNA expression to predict cardiac phenotype.

  17. Characteristic parameters of electromagnetic signals from a human heart system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xin-Yuan; Pei Liu-Qing; Wang Yin; Zhang Su-Ming; Gao Hong-Lei; Dai Yuan-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic field of a human heart system is a bioelectromagnetic field. Electrocardiography (ECG)and magnetocardiography (MCG)are both carriers of electromagnetic information about the cardiac system, and they are nonstationary signals. In this study, ECG and MCG data from healthy subjects are acquired;the MCG data are captured using a high-T, radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUIDs)and the QRS complexes in these data are analysed by the evolutionary spectrum analysis method. The results show that the quality factor Q and the central frequency fz of the QRS complex evolutionary spectrum are the characteristic parameters (CHPs)of ECG and MCG in the time-frequency domain. The confidence intervals of the mean values of the CHPs are estimated by the Student t distribution method in mathematical statistics. We believe that there are threshold ranges of the mean values of Q and fz for healthy subjects. We have postulated the following criterion:if the mean values of CHPs are in the proper ranges, the cardiac system is in a normal condition and it possesses the capability of homeostasis. In contrast, if the mean values of the CHPs do not lie in the proper ranges, the homeostasis of the cardiac system is lacking and some cardiac disease may follow. The results and procedure of MCG CHPs in the study afford a technological route for the application of HTc rf SQUIDs in cardiology.

  18. Cyclooxygenase products sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors in humans with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Chiu, Josephine; Hamilton, Michele A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maclellan, W Robb; Hage, Antoine; Moriguchi, Jaime; Patel, Jignesh

    2008-04-01

    Prior work in animals and humans suggests that muscle mechanoreceptor control of sympathetic activation [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] during exercise in heart failure (HF) patients is heightened compared with that of healthy humans and that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by metabolic by-products. We sought to determine whether cyclooxygenase products and/or endogenous adenosine, two metabolites of ischemic exercise, sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors during rhythmic handgrip (RHG) exercise in HF patients. Indomethacin, which inhibits the production of prostaglandins, and saline control were infused in 12 HF patients. In a different protocol, aminophylline, which inhibits adenosine receptors, and saline control were infused in 12 different HF patients. MSNA was recorded (microneurography). During exercise following saline, MSNA increased in the first minute of exercise, consistent with baseline heightened mechanoreceptor sensitivity. MSNA continued to increase during 3 min of RHG, indicative that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by ischemia metabolites. Indomethacin, but not aminophylline, markedly attenuated the increase in MSNA during the entire 3 min of low-level rhythmic exercise, consistent with the sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors by cyclooxygenase products. Interestingly, even the early increase in MSNA was abolished by indomethacin infusion, indicative of the very early generation of cyclooxygenase products after the onset of exercise in HF patients. In conclusion, muscle mechanoreceptors mediate the increase in MSNA during low-level RHG exercise in HF. Cyclooxygenase products, but not endogenous adenosine, play a central role in muscle mechanoreceptor sensitization. Finally, muscle mechanoreceptors in patients with HF have heightened basal sensitivity to mechanical stimuli, which also appears to be mediated by the early generation of cyclooxygenase products, resulting in exaggerated early increases in MSNA.

  19. Cardiac protein kinases: the cardiomyocyte kinome and differential kinase expression in human failing hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Stephen J.; Osborne, Sally A.; Leonard, Sam J.; Hardyman, Michelle A.; Vaniotis, George; Allen, Bruce G.; Sugden, Peter H.; Clerk, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Protein kinases are potential therapeutic targets for heart failure, but most studies of cardiac protein kinases derive from other systems, an approach that fails to account for specific kinases expressed in the heart and the contractile cardiomyocytes. We aimed to define the cardiomyocyte kinome (i.e. the protein kinases expressed in cardiomyocytes) and identify kinases with altered expression in human failing hearts. Methods and Results. Expression profiling (Affymetrix microarrays) d...

  20. Transmural Heterogeneity and Remodeling of Ventricular Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Human Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qing; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Moazami, Nader; Fast, Vladimir G.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling is altered in the end-stage heart failure (HF). However, spatial heterogeneity of this remodeling has not been established at the tissue level in failing human heart. The objective is to study functional remodeling of EC coupling and calcium handling in failing and nonfailing human hearts. Methods and Results We simultaneously optically mapped action potentials (AP) and calcium transients (CaT) in coronary-perfused left ventricular wedge preparations from nonfailing (n = 6) and failing (n = 5) human hearts. Our major findings are: (1) CaT duration minus AP duration was longer at sub-endocardium in failing compared to nonfailing hearts during bradycardia (40 beats/min). (2) The transmural gradient of CaT duration was significantly smaller in failing hearts compared with nonfailing hearts at fast pacing rates (100 beats/min). (3) CaT in failing hearts had a flattened plateau at the midmyocardium; and exhibited a “two-component” slow rise at sub-endocardium in three failing hearts. (4) CaT relaxation was slower at sub-endocardium than that at sub-epicardium in both groups. Protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) was lower at sub-endocardium than that at sub-epicardium in both nonfailing and failing hearts. SERCA2a protein expression at sub-endocardium was lower in hearts with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions For the first time, we present direct experimental evidence of transmural heterogeneity of EC coupling and calcium handling in human hearts. End-stage HF is associated with the heterogeneous remodeling of EC coupling and calcium handling. PMID:21502574

  1. Resonance of about-weekly human heart rate rhythm with solar activity change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, G; Halberg, F; Wendt, H W; Bingham, C; Sothern, R B; Haus, E; Kleitman, E; Kleitman, N; Revilla, M A; Revilla, M; Breus, T K; Pimenov, K; Grigoriev, A E; Mitish, M D; Yatsyk, G V; Syutkina, E V

    1996-12-01

    In several human adults, certain solar activity rhythms may influence an about 7-day rhythm in heart rate. When no about-weekly feature was found in the rate of change in sunspot area, a measure of solar activity, the double amplitude of a circadian heart rate rhythm, approximated by the fit of a 7-day cosine curve, was lower, as was heart rate corresponds to about-weekly features in solar activity and/or relates to a sunspot cycle.

  2. Isolation of Campylobacter from human stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Salim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Campylobacter is an undetected cause of diarrhoea especially under 5 years of age in most of the countries. Isolation of this organism is difficult, expensive and cumbersome. Aims: Our objective of this study was to isolate this pathogen from the stool specimens on routinely available blood containing laboratory media using the candle jar for creating the microaerophilic atmosphere in our setup. Settings and Designs: A descriptive study. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 stool samples were inoculated onto selective and non-selective media with and without filtration using a 0.45 μm membrane. The inoculated media were simultaneously incubated in microaerophilic conditions using the Anoxomat as well as in candle jars at temperatures 37°C and 42°C. The culture isolates were confirmed by standard phenotypic tests. A simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of Campylobacter was performed on the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of the culture isolates as well as on the DNA extracted from the stool filtrates. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as a proportion. Results: Campylobacter could be isolated in 5 out of 50 stool samples using both the Anoxomat as well as the candle jar. Furthermore, we did not find any difference between the isolation using the selective and blood containing media as well as the different incubation temperatures. All the five were confirmed phenotypically and genotypically to be Campylobacter jejuni. The PCR results corroborated with that of the culture. Conclusions: Isolation by culture was as sensitive as that of the PCR.

  3. Human heart conjugate cooling simulation: unsteady thermo-fluid-stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Abas; Dulikravich, George S; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Stowe, David F; Jahania, M Salik

    2014-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to demonstrate computationally that realistic human hearts can be cooled much faster by performing conjugate heat transfer consisting of pumping a cold liquid through the cardiac chambers and major veins while keeping the heart submerged in cold gelatin filling a cooling container. The human heart geometry used for simulations was obtained from three-dimensional, high resolution CT-angio scans. Two fluid flow domains for the right (pulmonic) and left (systemic) heart circulations, and two solid domains for the heart tissue and gelatin solution were defined for multi-domain numerical simulation. Detailed unsteady temperature fields within the heart tissue were calculated during the conjugate cooling process. A linear thermoelasticity analysis was performed to assess the stresses applied on the heart due to the coolant fluid shear and normal forces and to examine the thermal stress caused by temperature variation inside the heart. It was demonstrated that a conjugate cooling effort with coolant temperature at +4°C is capable of reducing the average heart temperature from +37°C to +8°C in 25 minutes for cases in which the coolant was steadily pumped only through major heart inlet veins and cavities. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The Visible Heart® project and free-access website 'Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaizzo, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Pre- and post-evaluations of implantable cardiac devices require innovative and critical testing in all phases of the design process. The Visible Heart(®) Project was successfully launched in 1997 and 3 years later the Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy website was online. The Visible Heart(®) methodologies and Atlas website can be used to better understand human cardiac anatomy, disease states and/or to improve cardiac device design throughout the development process. To date, Visible(®) Heart methodologies have been used to reanimate 75 human hearts, all considered non-viable for transplantation. The Atlas is a unique free-access website featuring novel images of functional and fixed human cardiac anatomies from >400 human heart specimens. Furthermore, this website includes education tutorials on anatomy, physiology, congenital heart disease and various imaging modalities. For instance, the Device Tutorial provides examples of commonly deployed devices that were present at the time of in vitro reanimation or were subsequently delivered, including: leads, catheters, valves, annuloplasty rings, leadless pacemakers and stents. Another section of the website displays 3D models of vasculature, blood volumes, and/or tissue volumes reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) of various heart specimens. A new section allows the user to interact with various heart models. Visible Heart(®) methodologies have enabled our laboratory to reanimate 75 human hearts and visualize functional cardiac anatomies and device/tissue interfaces. The website freely shares all images, video clips and CT/MRI DICOM files in honour of the generous gifts received from donors and their families. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Electrical admittance for filling of the heart during lower body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yujia; Holm, S; Jenstrup, M;

    2000-01-01

    lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in humans. Changes in Thorax(ICW) were compared with positron emission tomography-determined C(15)O-labeled erythrocytes over the heart. During -40 mmHg LBNP, the blood volume of the heart decreased by 21 +/- 3% as the erythrocyte volume was reduced by 20 +/- 2...

  6. Evidence for differential sympathetic and parasympathetic reinnervation after heart transplantation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, RA; Reyners, AKL; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van den Berg, MP; Brouwer, RMHJ; Haaksma, J; Smit, AJ; Crijns, HJGM

    1997-01-01

    During heart transplantation (HTX) all neural connections are severed, Ln humans, signs of autonomic reinnervation have been found, in this study non-invasive tests were used to compare signs of sympathetic and parasympathetic reinnervation. Non-invasive autonomic function tests and heart rate varia

  7. Prospective isolation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors that integrate into human fetal heart tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardehali, Reza; Ali, Shah R; Inlay, Matthew A; Abilez, Oscar J; Chen, Michael Q; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Yazawa, Masayuki; Gong, Yongquan; Nusse, Roeland; Drukker, Micha; Weissman, Irving L

    2013-02-26

    A goal of regenerative medicine is to identify cardiovascular progenitors from human ES cells (hESCs) that can functionally integrate into the human heart. Previous studies to evaluate the developmental potential of candidate hESC-derived progenitors have delivered these cells into murine and porcine cardiac tissue, with inconclusive evidence regarding the capacity of these human cells to physiologically engraft in xenotransplantation assays. Further, the potential of hESC-derived cardiovascular lineage cells to functionally couple to human myocardium remains untested and unknown. Here, we have prospectively identified a population of hESC-derived ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells that give rise to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro at a clonal level. We observed rare clusters of ROR2(+) cells and diffuse expression of KDR and PDGFRα in first-trimester human fetal hearts. We then developed an in vivo transplantation model by transplanting second-trimester human fetal heart tissues s.c. into the ear pinna of a SCID mouse. ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells were delivered into these functioning fetal heart tissues: in contrast to traditional murine heart models for cell transplantation, we show structural and functional integration of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors into human heart.

  8. Ischemic heart disease induces upregulation of endothelin receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    and controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). In addition, the suitability of organ culture as a model mimicking endothelin receptor changes in cardiovascular disease was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. Endothelin ETA and ETB receptor mRNA levels were......Endothelin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. The aims were to quantify endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptor mRNA levels in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure...

  9. DIETARY SODIUM INTAKE IN A SAMPLE OF ADULT MALE POPULATION IN SOUTHERN ITALY.Results of the Olivetti Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Strazzullo, P; Venezia, Antonella; Barba, Gianvincenzo; Russo, Ornella; Capasso, Clemente; De Luca, Viviana; Farinaro, Eduardo; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Galletti, Ferruccio; Rossi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess dietary habitual sodium intake, the association between daily sodium intake and anthropometric indices, food habits and hypertension in the sample of adult male population participating in the Olivetti Heart Study. Design, Setting and Participants: The study population was composed of 940 men participating in the 2002-04 follow-up examination of the Olivetti Heart Study. Blood pressure, anthropometric indices, biochemical parameters and sodium excre...

  10. Cardiac spheroids as promising in vitro models to study the human heart microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polonchuk, Liudmila; Chabria, Mamta; Badi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    and fibroblasts at ratios approximating those present in vivo. The cellular organisation, extracellular matrix and microvascular network mimic human heart tissue. These spheroids have been employed to investigate the dose-limiting cardiotoxicity of the common anti-cancer drug doxorubicin. Viability......, biochemistry and pharmacology in vitro, offering a promising alternative to animals and standard cell cultures with regard to mechanistic insights and prediction of toxic effects in human heart tissue....

  11. Myocardial bridges of the coronary arteries in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Yusuf Ozgür; Cavdar, Safiye; Yalin, Aymelek; Yener, Nuran; Ozdogmus, Omer

    2010-09-01

    During the last century, many investigators reported on myocardial bridges in the adult human heart. In the present study, 39 human fetal hearts (the mean gestastional age was 30 weeks) were studied for myocardial bridging, and the results were correlated with adult data. Among the 39 (27 male and 12 female) fetal hearts studied, 26 bridges were observed on 18 fetal hearts (46.2%). Ten of the bridges had one myocardial bridge, whereas double myocardial bridges were observed in eight fetal hearts. The most frequent myocardial bridges were observed on the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which had 13 bridges (50%). Eight (30.7%) myocardial bridges were on the diagonal artery, and on the posterior descending artery there were five (19.3%). Myocardial bridges were not observed on the circumflex artery. The data presented in this study may provide potentially useful information for the preoperative evaluation of the newborn and may have a clinical implication for sudden fetal death.

  12. Minimal changes in heart rate of incubating American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in response to human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Tracy E.; Rose, Eli T.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    An organism's heart rate is commonly used as an indicator of physiological stress due to environmental stimuli. We used heart rate to monitor the physiological response of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) to human activity in their nesting environment. We placed artificial eggs with embedded microphones in 42 oystercatcher nests to record the heart rate of incubating oystercatchers continuously for up to 27 days. We used continuous video and audio recordings collected simultaneously at the nests to relate physiological response of birds (heart rate) to various types of human activity. We observed military and civilian aircraft, off-road vehicles, and pedestrians around nests. With the exception of high-speed, low-altitude military overflights, we found little evidence that oystercatcher heart rates were influenced by most types of human activity. The low-altitude flights were the only human activity to significantly increase average heart rates of incubating oystercatchers (12% above baseline). Although statistically significant, we do not consider the increase in heart rate during high-speed, low-altitude military overflights to be of biological significance. This noninvasive technique may be appropriate for other studies of stress in nesting birds.

  13. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  14. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem.

  15. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  16. Right ventricular arrhythmogenesis in failing human heart: the role of conduction and repolarization remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qing; Janks, Deborah L.; Holzem, Katherine M.; Lang, Di; Onal, Birce; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Wang, I-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Increased dispersion of repolarization has been suggested to underlie increased arrhythmogenesis in human heart failure (HF). However, no detailed repolarization mapping data were available to support the presence of increased dispersion of repolarization in failing human heart. In the present study, we aimed to determine the existence of enhanced repolarization dispersion in the right ventricular (RV) endocardium from failing human heart and examine its association with arrhythmia inducibility. RV free wall preparations were dissected from five failing and five nonfailing human hearts, cannulated and coronary perfused. RV endocardium was optically mapped from an ∼6.3 × 6.3 cm2 field of view. Action potential duration (APD), dispersion of APD, and conduction velocity (CV) were quantified for basic cycle lengths (BCL) ranging from 2,000 ms to the functional refractory period. We found that RV APD was significantly prolonged within the failing group compared with the nonfailing group (560 ± 44 vs. 448 ± 39 ms, at BCL = 2,000 ms, P < 0.05). Dispersion of APD was increased in three failing hearts (161 ± 5 vs. 86 ± 19 ms, at BCL = 2,000 ms). APD alternans were induced by rapid pacing in these same three failing hearts. CV was significantly reduced in the failing group compared with the nonfailing group (81 ± 11 vs. 98 ± 8 cm/s, at BCL = 2,000 ms). Arrhythmias could be induced in two failing hearts exhibiting an abnormally steep CV restitution and increased dispersion of repolarization due to APD alternans. Dispersion of repolarization is enhanced across the RV endocardium in the failing human heart. This dispersion, together with APD alternans and abnormal CV restitution, could be responsible for the arrhythmia susceptibility in human HF. PMID:23042951

  17. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Duicu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM. Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1 Control (CTRL, valvular patients without CHD; (2 CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3 CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM.

  18. Coefficient of Variation of Coarsely Sampled Heart Rate is Associated With Early Vasopressor Independence in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samuel M; Tate, M Quinn; Jones, Jason P; Kuttler, Kathryn G; Lanspa, Michael J; Rondina, Matthew T; Grissom, Colin K; Mathews, V J

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether variability of coarsely sampled heart rate and blood pressure early in the course of severe sepsis and septic shock predicts successful resuscitation, defined as vasopressor independence at 24 hours after admission. In an observational study of patients admitted with severe sepsis or septic shock from 2009 to 2011 to either of 2 intensive care units (ICUs) at a tertiary-care hospital, in whom blood pressure was measured via an arterial catheter, we sampled heart rate and blood pressure every 30 seconds over the first 6 hours of ICU admission and calculated the coefficient of variability of those measurements. Primary outcome was vasopressor independence at 24 hours; and secondary outcome was 28-day mortality. We studied 165 patients, of which 97 (59%) achieved vasopressor independence at 24 hours. Overall, 28-day mortality was 15%. Significant predictors of vasopressor independence at 24 hours included the coefficient of variation of heart rate, age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, the number of increases in vasopressor dose, mean vasopressin dose, mean blood pressure, and time-pressure integral of mean blood pressure less than 60 mm Hg. Lower sampling frequencies (up to once every 5 minutes) did not affect the findings. Increased variability of coarsely sampled heart rate was associated with vasopressor independence at 24 hours after controlling for possible confounders. Sampling frequencies of once in 5 minutes may be similar to once in 30 seconds. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Muscle metaboreflex and autonomic regulation of heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Adlan, Ahmed M; Shantsila, Alena

    2013-01-01

    We elucidated the autonomic mechanisms whereby heart rate (HR) is regulated by the muscle metaboreflex. Eight male participants (22 ± 3 years) performed three exercise protocols: (1) enhanced metaboreflex activation with partial flow restriction (bi-lateral thigh cuff inflation) during leg cycling...

  20. Encounters with the Human Heart: An Interview with John Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Dale Bachman

    1995-01-01

    Interviews Dale Bachman Flynn, professor of cardiology and dean of admissions and student affairs at Emory University School of Medicine, about his "In the Country of Hearts," a collection of stories about his medical practice. Discusses Flynn's personal life; his life-long practice of writing; and his interest in the intersections among medicine,…

  1. Proteomic analysis of membrane microdomains derived from both failing and non-failing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Cristina; Brioschi, Maura; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Fratto, Pasquale; Polvani, Gianluca; Vitali, Ettore; Parolari, Alessandro; Mussoni, Luciana; Tremoli, Elena

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells plasma membranes are organized into microdomains of specialized function such as lipid rafts and caveolae, with a specific lipid composition highly enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. In addition to their role in regulating signal transduction, multiple functions have been proposed, such as anchorage of receptors, trafficking of cholesterol, and regulation of permeability. However, an extensive understanding of their protein composition in human heart, both in failing and non-failing conditions, is not yet available. Membrane microdomains were isolated from left ventricular tissue of both failing (n = 15) and non-failing (n = 15) human hearts. Protein composition and differential protein expression was explored by comparing series of 2-D maps and subsequent identification by LC-MS/MS analysis. Data indicated that heart membrane microdomains are enriched in chaperones, cytoskeletal-associated proteins, enzymes and protein involved in signal transduction pathway. In addition, differential protein expression profile revealed that 30 proteins were specifically up- or down-regulated in human heart failure membrane microdomains. This study resulted in the identification of human heart membrane microdomain protein composition, which was not previously available. Moreover, it allowed the identification of multiple proteins whose expression is altered in heart failure, thus opening new perspectives to determine which role they may play in this disease.

  2. Severe pneumonia after heart transplantation as a result of human parvovirus B19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, D; Bork, J; Baum, M; Chinnock, R

    1994-01-01

    The diverse manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection have been well established. Erythema infectiosum, fetal hydrops, adult arthropathy, and aplastic anemia in patients with hemoglobinopathies or underlying immunocompromise have been described. Recently we successfully treated a patient who, after heart transplantation, had fever, rash, and pneumonia with respiratory failure caused by human parovirus B19. Human parovirus B19 has not been reported previously as a pathogen causing pulmonary disease after pediatric heart transplantation, and we wish to report it at this time.

  3. Effect of contractile protein alterations on cardiac myofilament function in human heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narolska, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to elucidate the effect of translational and post-translational alterations in contractile proteins occurring during heart failure on contractile function in human cardiac tissue. Isometric force and ATPase activity measurements were performed in skinned human

  4. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  5. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Asp, Julia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Synnergren, Jane [Systems Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, Skoevde (Sweden); Johansson, Cecilia Thalen [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jeppsson, Anders [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson, E-mail: Lillemor.Mattsson@wlab.gu.se [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  6. Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect the fate of glucose in the human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Linda R.; Herrero, Pilar; Coggan, Andrew R.; Kisrieva-Ware, Zulia; Saeed, Ibrahim; Dence, Carmen; Koudelis, Deborah; McGill, Janet B.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Novak, Eric; Dávila-Román, Víctor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and sex difference affect myocardial glucose uptake and utilization. However, their effect on the intramyocellular fate of glucose in humans has been unknown. How the heart uses glucose is important, because it affects energy production and oxygen efficiency, which in turn affect heart function and adaptability. We hypothesized that type 2 diabetes, sex difference, and obesity affect myocardial glucose oxidation, glycolysis, and glycogen production. In a first-in-hum...

  7. Approach-Induced Biases in Human Information Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Laurence T.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Malalasekera, W. M. Nishantha; Kennerley, Steven W.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Information sampling is often biased towards seeking evidence that confirms one’s prior beliefs. Despite such biases being a pervasive feature of human behavior, their underlying causes remain unclear. Many accounts of these biases appeal to limitations of human hypothesis testing and cognition, de facto evoking notions of bounded rationality, but neglect more basic aspects of behavioral control. Here, we investigated a potential role for Pavlovian approach in biasing which information humans will choose to sample. We collected a large novel dataset from 32,445 human subjects, making over 3 million decisions, who played a gambling task designed to measure the latent causes and extent of information-sampling biases. We identified three novel approach-related biases, formalized by comparing subject behavior to a dynamic programming model of optimal information gathering. These biases reflected the amount of information sampled (“positive evidence approach”), the selection of which information to sample (“sampling the favorite”), and the interaction between information sampling and subsequent choices (“rejecting unsampled options”). The prevalence of all three biases was related to a Pavlovian approach-avoid parameter quantified within an entirely independent economic decision task. Our large dataset also revealed that individual differences in the amount of information gathered are a stable trait across multiple gameplays and can be related to demographic measures, including age and educational attainment. As well as revealing limitations in cognitive processing, our findings suggest information sampling biases reflect the expression of primitive, yet potentially ecologically adaptive, behavioral repertoires. One such behavior is sampling from options that will eventually be chosen, even when other sources of information are more pertinent for guiding future action. PMID:27832071

  8. Fetal reprogramming and senescence in hypoplastic left heart syndrome and in human pluripotent stem cells during cardiac differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Naila; Gagliardi, Mark; Patel, Pranali; Kinnear, Caroline; Zhang, Cindy; Chitayat, David; Shannon, Patrick; Jaeggi, Edgar; Tabori, Uri; Keller, Gordon; Mital, Seema

    2013-09-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe cardiac malformation characterized by left ventricle (LV) hypoplasia and abnormal LV perfusion and oxygenation. We studied hypoxia-associated injury in fetal HLHS and human pluripotent stem cells during cardiac differentiation to assess the effect of microenvironmental perturbations on fetal cardiac reprogramming. We studied LV myocardial samples from 32 HLHS and 17 structurally normal midgestation fetuses. Compared with controls, the LV in fetal HLHS samples had higher nuclear expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α but lower angiogenic growth factor expression, higher expression of oncogenes and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, more DNA damage and senescence with cell cycle arrest, fewer cardiac progenitors, myocytes and endothelial lineages, and increased myofibroblast population (P cells (SMCs) had less DNA damage compared with endothelial cells and myocytes. We recapitulated the fetal phenotype by subjecting human pluripotent stem cells to hypoxia during cardiac differentiation. DNA damage was prevented by treatment with a TGF-β1 inhibitor (P cells). The hypoplastic LV in fetal HLHS samples demonstrates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation, oncogene-associated cellular senescence, TGF-β1-associated fibrosis and impaired vasculogenesis. The phenotype is recapitulated by subjecting human pluripotent stem cells to hypoxia during cardiac differentiation and rescued by inhibition of TGF-β1. This finding suggests that hypoxia may reprogram the immature heart and affect differentiation and development.

  9. THREE DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN HEART SURFACE FROM SINGLE IMAGE- VIEW UNDER DIFFERENT ILLUMINATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Al-Surmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction from a single-view image is a longstanding issue in computer vision literature, especially in the medical field. Traditional medical imaging techniques that provide information about the heart and which are used to reconstruct the heart model, include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT images. However, in some cases, they are not available and the applications that use these techniques to model the human heart only produce acceptable results after a long process, which involves acquiring the input data, as well as the segmentation process, the matching process, effort and cost. Therefore, it would be useful to be able to use a 2D single image to reconstruct the 3D heart surface model. We introduce an image-based human heart surface reconstruction from a single image as input. To model the surface of the heart, the proposed method, first, detects and corrects the specular reflection from the heart’s surface, which causes deformation of the surface in the R3. Second, it extrudes the three axes for each image pixel (e.g., x, y and z axes from the input image, in which the z-axis is calculated using the intensity value. Finally, a 3D reconstruction of the heart surface is created to help the novice cardiac surgeon to reduce the period of time in learning cardiac surgery and to enhance their perception of the operating theatre. The experimental results for images of the heart show the efficiency of the proposed method compared to the existing methods.

  10. Human-Robot Site Survey and Sampling for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Edwards, Laurence; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Kunz, Clayton; Lee, Susan Y.; Park, Eric; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Ackner, Nir

    2006-01-01

    NASA is planning to send humans and robots back to the Moon before 2020. In order for extended missions to be productive, high quality maps of lunar terrain and resources are required. Although orbital images can provide much information, many features (local topography, resources, etc) will have to be characterized directly on the surface. To address this need, we are developing a system to perform site survey and sampling. The system includes multiple robots and humans operating in a variety of team configurations, coordinated via peer-to-peer human-robot interaction. In this paper, we present our system design and describe planned field tests.

  11. Popeye domain-containing 1 is down-regulated in failing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Bergman, Michael; Alcalay, Yifat; Schlesinger, Hadassa; Aravot, Dan; Berman, Marius; Salman, Hertzel; Brand, Thomas; Kessler-Icekson, Gania

    2011-01-01

    Congestive heart failure, a complex disease of heterogeneous etiology, involves alterations in the expression of multiple genes. The Popeye domain-containing (POPDC) family of three novel muscle-restricted genes (POPDC1-3) is evolutionarily conserved and developmentally regulated. In mice, POPDC1 has been shown to play an important role in skeletal and cardiac muscles subjected to injury or stress. However, it has never been explored in human hearts. In biopsies from non-failing and failing human hearts, we examined the cellular distribution of POPDC1 as well as the expression patterns of POPDC1-3 mRNAs. POPDC1 was visualized by immunohistochemistry and estimated by Western immunoblotting. The mRNA levels of POPDC1-3 and ß myosin heavy chain (MYHC7) were assessed using reverse transcription/quantitative polymerase chain reaction. POPDC1 was predominantly localized in the sarcolemma with an enhanced expression in the intercalated discs. In failing hearts, many cardiomyocytes appeared deformed and POPDC1 labeling was deranged. The three POPDC mRNAs were expressed in the four heart chambers with higher transcript levels in the ventricles compared to the atria. Heart failure concurred with reduced levels of POPDC1 mRNA and protein in the left ventricle. Correlation analyses of mRNA levels among the failing heart specimens indicated the coordinated regulation of POPDC1 with POPDC3 and of POPDC2 with MYHC7. It can be concluded that POPDC gene expression is modified in end-stage heart failure in humans in a manner suggesting regulatory and/or functional differences between the three family members and that POPDC1 is particularly susceptible to this condition.

  12. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten

    2015-01-01

    a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  13. Triboelectric Nanogenerator Enabled Body Sensor Network for Self-Powered Human Heart-Rate Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiming; Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoshi; Zhou, Zhihao; Meng, Keyu; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jin; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-09-26

    Heart-rate monitoring plays a critical role in personal healthcare management. A low-cost, noninvasive, and user-friendly heart-rate monitoring system is highly desirable. Here, a self-powered wireless body sensor network (BSN) system is developed for heart-rate monitoring via integration of a downy-structure-based triboelectric nanogenerator (D-TENG), a power management circuit, a heart-rate sensor, a signal processing unit, and Bluetooth module for wireless data transmission. By converting the inertia energy of human walking into electric power, a maximum power of 2.28 mW with total conversion efficiency of 57.9% was delivered at low operation frequency, which is capable of immediately and sustainably driving the highly integrated BSN system. The acquired heart-rate signal by the sensor would be processed in the signal process circuit, sent to an external device via the Bluetooth module, and displayed on a personal cell phone in a real-time manner. Moreover, by combining a TENG-based generator and a TENG-based sensor, an all-TENG-based wireless BSN system was developed, realizing continuous and self-powered heart-rate monitoring. This work presents a potential method for personal heart-rate monitoring, featured as being self-powered, cost-effective, noninvasive, and user-friendly.

  14. Integrated Transcriptome Map Highlights Structural and Functional Aspects of the Normal Human Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2017-04-01

    A systematic meta-analysis of the available gene expression profiling datasets for the whole normal human heart generated a quantitative transcriptome reference map of this organ. Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM) software integrated 32 gene expression profile datasets from different sources returning a reference value of expression for each of the 43,360 known, mapped transcripts assayed by any of the experimental platforms used in this regard. Main findings include the visualization at the gene and chromosomal levels of the classical description of the basic histology and physiology of the heart, the identification of suitable housekeeping reference genes, the analysis of stoichiometry of gene products, and the focusing on chromosome 21 genes, which are present in one excess copy in Down syndrome subjects, presenting cardiovascular defects in 30-40% of cases. Independent in vitro validation showed an excellent correlation coefficient (r = 0.98) with the in silico data. Remarkably, heart/non-cardiac tissue expression ratio may also be used to anticipate that effects of mutations will most probably affect or not the heart. The quantitative reference global portrait of gene expression in the whole normal human heart illustrates the structural and functional aspects of the whole organ and is a general model to understand the mechanisms underlying heart pathophysiology. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 759-770, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  16. Autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans: role of skeletal muscle afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, James P

    2014-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in bringing about the cardiovascular responses to exercise necessitated by the increased metabolic requirements of the active skeletal muscle. The complex interaction of central and peripheral neural control mechanisms evokes a decrease in parasympathetic activity and an increase sympathetic activity to the heart during exercise. What advances does it highlight? This review presents some of the recent insights provided by human studies into the role of mechanically and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in the regulation of cardiac autonomic control during exercise. The autonomic responses to exercise are orchestrated by the interactions of several central and peripheral neural mechanisms. This report focuses on the role of peripheral feedback from skeletal muscle afferents in the autonomic control of the heart during exercise in humans. Heart rate responses to passive calf stretch are abolished with cardiac parasympathetic blockade, indicating that the activation of mechanically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle mechanoreceptors) can inhibit cardiac parasympathetic activity and is likely to contribute to the increase in heart rate at the onset of exercise. Recent experiments show that the partial restriction of blood flow to the exercising skeletal muscles, to augment the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreceptors) in humans, evokes an increase in heart rate that is attenuated with β1-adrenergic blockade, thus suggesting that this response is principally mediated via an increase in cardiac sympathetic activity. Heart rate remains at resting levels during isolated activation of muscle metaboreceptors with postexercise ischaemia following hand grip, unless cardiac parasympathetic activity is inhibited, whereupon a sympathetically mediated increase in heart rate is unmasked. During postexercise ischaemia following leg

  17. Linking the Heart and the Head: Humanism and Professionalism in Medical Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Lynda; Loue, Sana; Stange, Kurt C

    2017-05-01

    This paper articulates a practical interpretive framework for understanding humanism in medicine through the lens of how it is taught and learned. Beginning with a search for key tensions and relevant insights in the literature on humanism in health professions education, we synthesized a conceptual model designed to foster reflection and action to realize humanistic principles in medical education and practice. The resulting model centers on the interaction between the heart and the head. The heart represents the emotive domains of empathy, compassion, and connectedness. The head represents the cognitive domains of knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. The cognitive domains often are associated with professionalism, and the emotive domains with humanism, but it is the connection between the two that is vital to humanistic education and practice. The connection between the heart and the head is nurtured by critical reflection and conscious awareness. Four provinces of experience nurture humanism: (1) personal reflection, (2) action, (3) system support, and (4) collective reflection. These domains represent potential levers for developing humanism. Critical reflection and conscious awareness between the heart and head through personal reflection, individual and collective behavior, and supportive systems has potential to foster humanistic development toward healing and health.

  18. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. (Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  19. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into damaged rabbit heart to improve heart function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-an; FAN You-qi; LI Chang-ling; HE Hong; SUN Yong; LV Bin-jian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to test whether transplantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in New Zealand rabbits with myocardial infarction can improve heart function; and whether engrafted donor cells can survive and transdifferentiated into cardiomyocytes. Methods: Twenty milliliters bone marrow was obtained from healthy men by bone biopsy. A gradient centrifugation method was used to separate bone marrow cells (BMCs) and red blood cells.BMCs were incubated for 48 h and then washed with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The culture medium was changed twice a week for 28 d. Finally, hematopoietic cells were washed away to leave only MSCs. Human MSCs (hMSCs) were premarked by BrdU 72 h before the transplantation. Thirty-four New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into myocardial infarction (MI)control group and cell treated group, which received hMSCs (MI+MSCs) through intramyocardial injection, while the control group received the same volume of PBS. Myocardial infarction was induced by ligation of the left coronary artery. Cell treated rabbits were treated with 5× 106 MSCs transplanted into the infarcted region after ligation of the coronary artery for 1 h, and the control group received the same volume of PBS. Cyclosporin A (oral solution; 10 mg/kg) was provided alone, 24 h before surgery and once a day after MI for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was measured in each group before the surgery and 4 weeks after the surgery to test heart function change. The hearts were harvested for HE staining and immunohistochemical studies after MI and cell transplantation for 4 weeks. Results: Our data showed that cardiac function was significantly improved by hMSC transplantation in rabbit infarcted hearts 4 weeks after MI (ejection fraction: 0.695±0.038 in the cell treated group (n=12) versus0.554±0.065 in the control group (n=13) (P<0.05). Surviving hMSCs were identified by BrdU positive spots in infarcted region and

  20. MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF CORONARY SINUS IN HUMAN CADAVERIC HEARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manoranjitham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The coronary sinus is a dilated venous channel opening into the right atrium of the heart. The coronary venous system has gained importance in recent years for electrophysiological procedures like arrhythmia ablation, biventricular pacing and implantation of cardiac pacemakers. The present study aims to study the formation and tributaries of coronary sinus and also the morphology of thebesian valve. Materials and Methods: 30 formalin fixed cadaveric hearts available in the department of Anatomy, Dhanalakshmi Srinivasan Medical College and Hospital, Perambalur, Tamil nadu, was used for the study. The formation and tributaries of coronary sinus were noted. The length of coronary sinus in millimeters was measured from the union of great cardiac vein and left marginal vein upto the opening of the coronary sinus in the right atrium with vernier calipers. The width of the coronary ostium in the right atrium was measured in millimeters with vernier calipers. Results: In 93.33% specimens the coronary sinus was formed by the union of great cardiac vein and left marginal vein. In 3.33% specimens it was formed by the union of great cardiac vein and posterior vein of left ventricle, and in 3.33% specimens it was formed by the union of great cardiac vein and oblique vein of left atrium. The left marginal vein was absent in 2 specimens and small cardiac vein was absent in 1 specimen. The mean length of coronary sinus was 54.98 + 12.2mm. The mean width of coronary sinus ostium was 9.35 + 3.24mm. The Thebesian valve was present in 93.33% specimens and it was semilunar in shape. Conclusion: The knowledge of coronary sinus anatomy will be helpful during electrophysiological procedures.

  1. Hypertrophy of neurons within cardiac ganglia in human, canine, and rat heart failure: the potential role of nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S; Nee, Lisa M; Wurster, Robert D

    2013-08-19

    Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm(2); Phypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia.

  2. Sleep Stage Dependence of Invariance Characteristics in Fluctuations of Healthy Human Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, Fumiharu; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-08-01

    The outstanding feature of healthy human heart rate is the robust scale invariance in the non-Gaussian probability density function (PDF), which is preserved not only in a quiescent condition, but also in a dynamic state during waking hours [K. Kiyono et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004)]. Together with 1/f like scaling, this characteristic is a strong indication of far-from-equilibrium, critical-like dynamics of heart rate regulation. Our results suggest that healthy human heart rate departs from a critical state-like operation during sleeping hours, at a rate which is heterogeneous with respect to sleep stages annotated according to traditional techniques. We study specific contributions of sleep stages to the relative departure from criticality through the analysis of sleep stage dependence of the root mean square of multiscale local energy and the multiscale PDF. There is a possibility that the involvement of cortical activity may be important for a critical state-like operation.

  3. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-01-01

    .... In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database...

  4. Heart rate responses provide an objective evaluation of human disturbance stimuli in breeding birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Ursula; Mattern, Thomas; Seddon, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Intuition is a poor guide for evaluating the effects of human disturbance on wildlife. Using the endangered Yellow-eyed penguin, Megadyptes antipodes, as an example, we show that heart rate responses provide an objective tool to evaluate human disturbance stimuli and encourage the wider use of this simple and low-impact approach. Yellow-eyed penguins are a flagship species for New Zealand's wildlife tourism; however, unregulated visitor access has recently been associated with reduced breeding success and lower first year survival. We measured heart rate responses of Yellow-eyed penguins via artificial eggs to evaluate a range of human stimuli regularly occurring at their breeding sites. We found the duration of a stimulus to be the most important factor, with elevated heart rate being sustained while a person remained within sight. Human activity was the next important component; a simulated wildlife photographer, crawling slowly around during his stay, elicited a significantly higher heart rate response than an entirely motionless human spending the same time at the same distance. Stimuli we subjectively might perceive as low impact, such as the careful approach of a 'wildlife photographer', resulted in a stronger response than a routine nest-check that involved lifting a bird up to view nest contents. A single, slow-moving human spending 20 min within 2 m from the nest may provoke a response comparable to that of 10 min handling a bird for logger deployment. To reduce cumulative impact of disturbance, any human presence in the proximity of Yellow-eyed penguins needs to be kept at a minimum. Our results highlight the need for objective quantification of the effects of human disturbance in order to provide a sound basis for guidelines to manage human activity around breeding birds.

  5. Interactions between heart rate variability and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Peter Y W; Webber, Matthew R; Galletly, Duncan C; Ainslie, Philip N; Brown, Stephen J; Willie, Chris K; Sasse, Alexander; Larsen, Peter D; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2010-07-01

    The respiratory component of heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) has been associated with improved pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans via the apparent clustering and scattering of heart beats in time with the inspiratory and expiratory phases of alveolar ventilation, respectively. However, since human RSA causes only marginal redistribution of heart beats to inspiration, we tested the hypothesis that any association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be indirect. In 11 patients with fixed-rate cardiac pacemakers and 10 healthy control subjects, we recorded R-R intervals, respiratory flow, end-tidal gas tension and the ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide and oxygen during 'fast' (0.25 Hz) and 'slow' paced breathing (0.10 Hz). Mean heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure fluctuations, tidal volume, end-tidal CO(2), and were similar between pacemaker and control groups in both the fast and slow breathing conditions. Although pacemaker patients had no RSA and slow breathing was associated with a 2.5-fold RSA amplitude increase in control subjects (39 +/- 21 versus 97 +/- 45 ms, P exchange efficiency during variable-frequency paced breathing observed in prior human work is not contingent on RSA being present. Therefore, whether RSA serves an intrinsic physiological function in optimizing pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans requires further experimental validation.

  6. Groundbreaking Mars Sample Return for Science and Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara; Draper, David; Eppler, Dean; Treiman, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Partnerships between science and human exploration have recent heritage for the Moon (Lunar Precursor Robotics Program, LPRP) and nearearth objects (Exploration Precursor Robotics Program, xPRP). Both programs spent appreciable time and effort determining measurements needed or desired before human missions to these destinations. These measurements may be crucial to human health or spacecraft design, or may be desired to better optimize systems designs such as spacesuits or operations. Both LPRP and xPRP recommended measurements from orbit, by landed missions and by sample return. LPRP conducted the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) missions, providing high-resolution visible imagery, surface and subsurface temperatures, global topography, mapping of possible water ice deposits, and the biological effects of radiation [1]. LPRP also initiated a landed mission to provide dust and regolith properties, local lighting conditions, assessment of resources, and demonstration of precision landing [2]. This mission was canceled in 2006 due to funding shortfalls. For the Moon, adequate samples of rocks and regolith were returned by the Apollo and Luna programs to conduct needed investigations. Many near-earth asteroids (NEAs) have been observed from the Earth and several have been more extensively characterized by close-flying missions and landings (NEAR, Hayabusa, Rosetta). The current Joint Robotic Precursor Activity program is considering activities such as partnering with the New Frontiers mission OSIRIS-Rex to visit a NEA and return a sample to the Earth. However, a strong consensus of the NEO User Team within xPRP was that a dedicated mission to the asteroid targeted by humans is required [3], ideally including regolith sample return for more extensive characterization and testing on the Earth.

  7. Heart rate responses provide an objective evaluation of human disturbance stimuli in breeding birds

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenberg, Ursula; Mattern, Thomas; Seddon, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Intuition is a poor guide for evaluating the effects of human disturbance on wildlife. Using the endangered Yellow-eyed penguin, Megadyptes antipodes, as an example, we show that heart rate responses provide an objective tool to evaluate human disturbance stimuli and encourage the wider use of this simple and low-impact approach. Yellow-eyed penguins are a flagship species for New Zealand's wildlife tourism; however, unregulated visitor access has recently been associated with reduced breedin...

  8. Sampling strategy for estimating human exposure pathways to consumer chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadopoulou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to consumer chemicals has become a worldwide concern. In this work, a comprehensive sampling strategy is presented, to our knowledge being the first to study all relevant exposure pathways in a single cohort using multiple methods for assessment of exposure from each exposure pathway. The selected groups of chemicals to be studied are consumer chemicals whose production and use are currently in a state of transition and are; per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs, traditional and “emerging” brominated flame retardants (BFRs and EBFRs, organophosphate esters (OPEs and phthalate esters (PEs. Information about human exposure to these contaminants is needed due to existing data gaps on human exposure intakes from multiple exposure pathways and relationships between internal and external exposure. Indoor environment, food and biological samples were collected from 61 participants and their households in the Oslo area (Norway on two consecutive days, during winter 2013-14. Air, dust, hand wipes, and duplicate diet (food and drink samples were collected as indicators of external exposure, and blood, urine, blood spots, hair, nails and saliva as indicators of internal exposure. A food diary, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and indoor environment questionnaire were also implemented. Approximately 2000 samples were collected in total and participant views on their experiences of this campaign were collected via questionnaire. While 91% of our participants were positive about future participation in a similar project, some tasks were viewed as problematic. Completing the food diary and collection of duplicate food/drink portions were the tasks most frequent reported as “hard”/”very hard”. Nevertheless, a strong positive correlation between the reported total mass of food/drinks in the food record and the total weight of the food/drinks in the collection bottles was observed, being an indication of accurate performance

  9. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  10. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida eSalameh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatically within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx, might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses potential role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  11. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Blanke, Katja; Daehnert, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart, but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently, these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatic within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade, there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx), might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart, mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45) are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions have often been supposed to transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses the potentional role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  12. [Fusarium graminearum presence in wheat samples for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mauro; Castañares, Eliana; Dinolfo, María I; Pacheco, Walter G; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastián A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important diseases in cereal crops is Fusarium head blight, being Fusarium graminearum the main etiological agent. This fungus has the ability to produce a wide spectrum and quantity of toxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON). During the last crop season (2012-2013) the climatic conditions favored Fusarium colonization. The objective of this work was to determine the presence of this fungus as well as the DON content in 50 wheat grain samples. Our results showed that 80% of the samples were contaminated with Fusarium graminearum. Twenty four percent (24%) of the samples contained ≥ 1μg/g DON, 26% ranged from 0,5 and 0,99μg/g, and the remaining 50% had values lower than 0,5μg/g. Correlation was found between the presence of Fusarium graminearum and DON. It is necessary to establish DON limit values in wheat grains for human consumption.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Polymorphisms Association With Cancer Post-Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Goldraich, Livia; Manlhiot, Cedric; Kozuszko, Stella; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Post transplantation, a major complication is the development of malignancies. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is a molecule that inhibits the immune system and it is utilized by malignant cells to hide from the immune system. Expression of HLA-G from the donor and recipient cells in transplant patients is regulated by gene variations however, the association between genotype and cancer remains unknown. Our objective was to determine the association between genotype and outcome. Heart transplant recipients (251) and available corresponding donors (196) samples were genotyped for polymorphisms and the association of polymorphisms to outcome was evaluated with parametric hazard regression models. Risk of cancer was 22% at 10years post-transplantation. The mean follow-up was of 4.9±3.6years. In a multivariable analysis, donor-recipient SNP 3187 matching was identified as a protective factor for cancer (hazard ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.93; p=0.03). While coding region allele (haplotype 6) was identified as an independent risk factor (hazard ratio 3.7; 95% confidence interval 1.36-10.06; p=0.01). In this investigation, we identified an association between cancer post-transplantation and HLA-G polymorphisms, which may reveal a pathway for potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer post-transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2010-06-01

    The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found, where the transition towards increased (decreased) HRV multifractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker) multifractal correlation between the central and autonomic nervous systems.

  15. Human thoracic anatomy relevant to implantable artificial hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, G.B.; Kiraly, R.J.; Nose, Y.

    1976-10-01

    The objective of the study is to define the human thorax in a quantitative statistical manner such that the information will be useful to the designers of cardiac prostheses, both total replacement and assist devices. This report pertains specifically to anatomical parameters relevant to the total cardiac prosthesis. This information will also be clinically useful in that the proposed recipient of a cardiac prosthesis can by simple radiography be assured of an adequate fit with the prosthesis prior to the implantation.

  16. Estimating Sampling Selection Bias in Human Genetics: A Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide; Taglioli, Luca; De Iasio, Sergio; Gueresi, Paola; Alfani, Guido; Nelli, Sergio; Rossi, Paolo; Paoli, Giorgio; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This research is the first empirical attempt to calculate the various components of the hidden bias associated with the sampling strategies routinely-used in human genetics, with special reference to surname-based strategies. We reconstructed surname distributions of 26 Italian communities with different demographic features across the last six centuries (years 1447–2001). The degree of overlapping between "reference founding core" distributions and the distributions obtained from sampling the present day communities by probabilistic and selective methods was quantified under different conditions and models. When taking into account only one individual per surname (low kinship model), the average discrepancy was 59.5%, with a peak of 84% by random sampling. When multiple individuals per surname were considered (high kinship model), the discrepancy decreased by 8–30% at the cost of a larger variance. Criteria aimed at maximizing locally-spread patrilineages and long-term residency appeared to be affected by recent gene flows much more than expected. Selection of the more frequent family names following low kinship criteria proved to be a suitable approach only for historically stable communities. In any other case true random sampling, despite its high variance, did not return more biased estimates than other selective methods. Our results indicate that the sampling of individuals bearing historically documented surnames (founders' method) should be applied, especially when studying the male-specific genome, to prevent an over-stratification of ancient and recent genetic components that heavily biases inferences and statistics. PMID:26452043

  17. Guided Tissue Regeneration in Heart Valve Replacement: From Preclinical Research to First-in-Human Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Iop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart valve tissue-guided regeneration aims to offer a functional and viable alternative to current prosthetic replacements. Not requiring previous cell seeding and conditioning in bioreactors, such exceptional tissue engineering approach is a very fascinating translational regenerative strategy. After in vivo implantation, decellularized heart valve scaffolds drive their same repopulation by recipient’s cells for a prospective autologous-like tissue reconstruction, remodeling, and adaptation to the somatic growth of the patient. With such a viability, tissue-guided regenerated conduits can be delivered as off-the-shelf biodevices and possess all the potentialities for a long-lasting resolution of the dramatic inconvenience of heart valve diseases, both in children and in the elderly. A review on preclinical and clinical investigations of this therapeutic concept is provided with evaluation of the issues still to be well deliberated for an effective and safe in-human application.

  18. Guided tissue regeneration in heart valve replacement: from preclinical research to first-in-human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iop, L; Gerosa, G

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve tissue-guided regeneration aims to offer a functional and viable alternative to current prosthetic replacements. Not requiring previous cell seeding and conditioning in bioreactors, such exceptional tissue engineering approach is a very fascinating translational regenerative strategy. After in vivo implantation, decellularized heart valve scaffolds drive their same repopulation by recipient's cells for a prospective autologous-like tissue reconstruction, remodeling, and adaptation to the somatic growth of the patient. With such a viability, tissue-guided regenerated conduits can be delivered as off-the-shelf biodevices and possess all the potentialities for a long-lasting resolution of the dramatic inconvenience of heart valve diseases, both in children and in the elderly. A review on preclinical and clinical investigations of this therapeutic concept is provided with evaluation of the issues still to be well deliberated for an effective and safe in-human application.

  19. Transmural expression of ion channels and transporters in human nondiseased and end-stage failing hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltysinska, Ewa; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Christ, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    The cardiac action potential is primarily shaped by the orchestrated function of several different types of ion channels and transporters. One of the regional differences believed to play a major role in the progression and stability of the action potential is the transmural gradient of electrical...... activity across the ventricular wall. An altered balance in the ionic currents across the free wall is assumed to be a substrate for arrhythmia. A large fraction of patients with heart failure experience ventricular arrhythmia. However, the underlying substrate of these functional changes is not well......-established as expression analyses of human heart failure (HF) are sparse. We have investigated steady-state RNA levels by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of ion channels, transporters, connexin 43, and miR-1 in 11 end-stage HF and seven nonfailing (NF) hearts. The quantifications were performed on endo-, mid...

  20. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    was associated with a 30-40% increase in blood flow rate and a highly significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (P less than 0.001 for all). Approximately 100 min after the subjects went to sleep an additional blood flow rate increment (mean 56%) and a simultaneous significant decrease......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...... were used for measurement of blood flow rates. An automatic portable blood pressure recorder and processor unit was used for measurement of systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate every 15 min. The change from upright to supine position at the beginning of the night period...

  1. Influence of heart rate in nonlinear HRV indices as a sampling rate effect evaluated on supine and standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bolea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize and attenuate the influence of mean heart rate (HR on nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV indices (correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropy as a consequence of being the HR the intrinsic sampling rate of HRV signal. This influence can notably alter nonlinear HRV indices and lead to biased information regarding autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation.First, a simulation study was carried out to characterize the dependence of nonlinear HRV indices on HR assuming similar ANS modulation. Second, two HR-correction approaches were proposed: one based on regression formulas and another one based on interpolating RR time series. Finally, standard and HR-corrected HRV indices were studied in a body position change database.The simulation study showed the HR-dependence of non-linear indices as a sampling rate effect, as well as the ability of the proposed HR-corrections to attenuate mean HR influence. Analysis in a body position changes database shows that correlation dimension was reduced around 21% in median values in standing with respect to supine position (p < 0.05, concomitant with a 28% increase in mean HR (p < 0.05. After HR-correction, correlation dimension decreased around 18% in standing with respect to supine position, being the decrease still significant. Sample and approximate entropy showed similar trends.HR-corrected nonlinear HRV indices could represent an improvement in their applicability as markers of ANS modulation when mean HR changes.

  2. Fractionated magnetic-resonance elastography on the human heart; Fraktionierte Magnetresonanzelastographie am menschlichen Herzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rump, Jens

    2008-07-28

    Imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging, belong to the most important tools in modern medical diagnostics. Another diagnostic aid is palpation, which is suitable for the qualitative characterization of pathological changes in organs near the surface. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a combination of these techniques. In principle, MRE uses motionsensitive MR-imaging to depict tissue deformation caused by externally induced shear waves. The type of deformation supply useful information about the elasticity of the tissue. Cardiac disorders are among the most common diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a method of applying in-vivo MRE to the human heart. The development of the mechanical stimulus, ultimately resulting in the introduction of an audio speaker as the source of vibration, provided the necessary means to introduce vibrations into inner organs. A crucial factor in applying MRE to the heart is the speed of the recording, which led to the development of 'fractional MRE'. The currently conventional fast heart imaging techniques were used as a starting point. The use of an unbalanced phase preparation gradient in the balanced steady-state imaging technique resulted in an improved phase-to-noise ratio. Along with the spoiled steady-state MRE imaging technique, initial MRE-studies on the human heart were performed. For the first time, externally induced mechanical vibrations were successfully introduced into the heart and were detected using fractional MRE with a high temporal resolution. The modulation of the shear wave amplitudes observed in the myocard of 6 healthy subjects correlated with the phases of the cardiac cycle. The techniques and methods developed here are a step toward routine clinical application of MRE of the heart and indicate high potential in the area of early diagnosis of cardiac disease. (orig.)

  3. Can stem cells really regenerate the human heart? Use your noggin, dickkopf! Lessons from developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Paula

    2013-06-01

    The human heart is the first organ to develop and its development is fairly well characterised. In theory, the heart has the capacity to regenerate, as its cardiomyocytes may be capable of cell division and the adult heart contains a cardiac stem cell niche, presumably capable of differentiating into cardiomyocytes and other cardiac-associated cell types. However, as with most other organs, these mechanisms are not activated upon serious injury. Several experimental options to induce regeneration of the damaged heart tissue are available: activate the endogenous cardiomyocytes to divide, coax the endogenous population of stem cells to divide and differentiate, or add exogenous cell-based therapy to replace the lost cardiac tissue. This review is a summary of the recent research into all these avenues, discussing the reasons for the limited successes of clinical trials using stem cells after cardiac injury and explaining new advances in basic science. It concludes with a reiteration that chances of successful regeneration would be improved by understanding and implementing the basics of heart development and stem cell biology.

  4. Parallel computing simulation of electrical excitation and conduction in the 3D human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Yu; Dongping Du; Hui Yang; Yicheng Tu

    2014-01-01

    A correctly beating heart is important to ensure adequate circulation of blood throughout the body. Normal heart rhythm is produced by the orchestrated conduction of electrical signals throughout the heart. Cardiac electrical activity is the resulted function of a series of complex biochemical-mechanical reactions, which involves transportation and bio-distribution of ionic flows through a variety of biological ion channels. Cardiac arrhythmias are caused by the direct alteration of ion channel activity that results in changes in the AP waveform. In this work, we developed a whole-heart simulation model with the use of massive parallel computing with GPGPU and OpenGL. The simulation algorithm was implemented under several different versions for the purpose of comparisons, including one conventional CPU version and two GPU versions based on Nvidia CUDA platform. OpenGL was utilized for the visualization / interaction platform because it is open source, light weight and universally supported by various operating systems. The experimental results show that the GPU-based simulation outperforms the conventional CPU-based approach and significantly improves the speed of simulation. By adopting modern computer architecture, this present investigation enables real-time simulation and visualization of electrical excitation and conduction in the large and complicated 3D geometry of a real-world human heart.

  5. Stretchable, multiplexed pH sensors with demonstrations on rabbit and human hearts undergoing ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Joong; Sulkin, Matthew S; Kim, Jong-Seon; Goudeseune, Camille; Chao, Hsin-Yun; Song, Joseph W; Yang, Sang Yoon; Hsu, Yung-Yu; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Efimov, Igor R; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    Stable pH is an established biomarker of health, relevant to all tissues of the body, including the heart. Clinical monitoring of pH in a practical manner, with high spatiotemporal resolution, is particularly difficult in organs such as the heart due to its soft mechanics, curvilinear geometry, heterogeneous surfaces, and continuous, complex rhythmic motion. The results presented here illustrate that advanced strategies in materials assembly and electrochemical growth can yield interconnected arrays of miniaturized IrOx pH sensors encapsulated in thin, low-modulus elastomers to yield conformal monitoring systems capable of noninvasive measurements on the surface of the beating heart. A thirty channel custom data acquisition system enables spatiotemporal pH mapping with a single potentiostat. In vitro testing reveals super-Nernstian sensitivity with excellent uniformity (69.9 ± 2.2 mV/pH), linear response to temperature (-1.6 mV °C(-1) ), and minimal influence of extracellular ions (sensor arrays on balloon catheters and on skin-like stretchable membranes. Real-time measurement of pH on the surfaces of explanted rabbit hearts and a donated human heart during protocols of ischemia-reperfusion illustrate some of the capabilities. Envisioned applications range from devices for biological research, to surgical tools and long-term implants.

  6. Recognition of human face based on improved multi-sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xia; LI Lei-lei; LI Ting-jun; LIU Lu; ZHANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to solve the problem caused by variation illumination in human face recognition, we bring forward a face recognition algorithm based on the improved muhi-sample. In this algorithm, the face image is processed with Retinex theory, meanwhile, the Gabor filter is adopted to perform the feature extraction. The experimental results show that the application of Retinex theory improves the recognition accuracy, and makes the algorithm more robust to the variation illumination. The Gabor filter is more effective and accurate for extracting more useable facial local features. It is proved that the proposed algorithm has good recognition accuracy and it is stable under variation illumination.

  7. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure.

  8. Substrate-specific derangements in mitochondrial metabolism and redox balance in the atrium of the type 2 diabetic human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ethan J; Kypson, Alan P; Rodriguez, Evelio; Anderson, Curtis A; Lehr, Eric J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2009-11-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of diabetes on oxidant balance and mitochondrial metabolism of carbohydrate- and lipid-based substrates in myocardium of type 2 diabetic patients. Heart failure represents a major cause of death among diabetic patients. It has been proposed that derangements in cardiac metabolism and oxidative stress may underlie the progression of this comorbidity, but scarce evidence exists in support of this mechanism in humans. Mitochondrial oxygen (O(2)) consumption and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) emission were measured in permeabilized myofibers prepared from samples of the right atrial appendage obtained from nondiabetic (n = 13) and diabetic (n = 11) patients undergoing nonemergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Mitochondria in atrial tissue of type 2 diabetic individuals show a sharply decreased capacity for glutamate and fatty acid-supported respiration, in addition to an increased content of myocardial triglycerides, as compared to nondiabetic patients. Furthermore, diabetic patients show an increased mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission during oxidation of carbohydrate- and lipid-based substrates, depleted glutathione, and evidence of persistent oxidative stress in their atrial tissue. These findings are the first to directly investigate the effects of type 2 diabetes on a panoply of mitochondrial functions in the human myocardium using cellular and molecular approaches, and they show that mitochondria in diabetic human hearts have specific impairments in maximal capacity to oxidize fatty acids and glutamate, yet increased mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission, providing insight into the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of heart failure in diabetic patients. 2009 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation

  9. Substrate-Specific Derangements in Mitochondrial Metabolism and Redox Balance in Atrium of Type 2 Diabetic Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ethan J.; Kypson, Alan P.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Anderson, Curtis A.; Lehr, Eric J.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2009-01-01

    Objective This aim of this study was to determine the impact of diabetes on oxidant balance and mitochondrial metabolism of carbohydrate- and lipid-based substrates in myocardium of type 2 diabetic patients. Background Heart failure represents a major cause of death among diabetics, and it has been proposed that derangements in cardiac metabolism and oxidative stress may underlie the progression of this co-morbidity, but scarce evidence exists in support of this mechanism in humans. Methods Mitochondrial O2 consumption and H2O2 emission were measured in permeabilized myofibers prepared from samples of right atrial appendage obtained from non-diabetic (n=13) and diabetic (n=11) patients undergoing non-emergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Results Mitochondria in atrial tissue of type 2 diabetic individuals display a sharply decreased capacity for glutamate and fatty acid-supported respiration, in addition to an increased content of myocardial triglycerides, as compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, diabetics display an increased mitochondrial H2O2 emission during oxidation of carbohydrate- and lipid-based substrates, depleted glutathione, and evidence of persistent oxidative stress in their atrial tissue. Conclusions These findings are the first to directly investigate the effects of type 2 diabetes on a panoply of mitochondrial functions in the human myocardium using cellular and molecular approaches, and they demonstrate that mitochondria in diabetic human heart have specific impairments in maximal capacity to oxidize fatty acids and glutamate, yet increased mitochondrial H2O2 emission, providing insight into the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of heart failure in diabetic patients. PMID:19892241

  10. Enhanced Electrical Integration of Engineered Human Myocardium via Intramyocardial versus Epicardial Delivery in Infarcted Rat Hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaytlyn A Gerbin

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide large-scale tissues for transplantation to regenerate the heart after ischemic injury, however, integration with the host myocardium will be required to achieve electromechanical benefits. To test the ability of engineered heart tissues to electrically integrate with the host, 10 million human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived cardiomyocytes were used to form either scaffold-free tissue patches implanted on the epicardium or micro-tissue particles (~1000 cells/particle delivered by intramyocardial injection into the left ventricular wall of the ischemia/reperfusion injured athymic rat heart. Results were compared to intramyocardial injection of 10 million dispersed hESC-cardiomyocytes. Graft size was not significantly different between treatment groups and correlated inversely with infarct size. After implantation on the epicardial surface, hESC-cardiac tissue patches were electromechanically active, but they beat slowly and were not electrically coupled to the host at 4 weeks based on ex vivo fluorescent imaging of their graft-autonomous GCaMP3 calcium reporter. Histologically, scar tissue physically separated the patch graft and host myocardium. In contrast, following intramyocardial injection of micro-tissue particles and suspended cardiomyocytes, 100% of the grafts detected by fluorescent GCaMP3 imaging were electrically coupled to the host heart at spontaneous rate and could follow host pacing up to a maximum of 300-390 beats per minute (5-6.5 Hz. Gap junctions between intramyocardial graft and host tissue were identified histologically. The extensive coupling and rapid response rate of the human myocardial grafts after intramyocardial delivery suggest electrophysiological adaptation of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to the rat heart's pacemaking activity. These data support the use of the rat model for studying electromechanical integration of human cardiomyocytes, and they

  11. Successful Orthotopic Heart Transplantation and Immunosuppressive Management in 2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Seropositive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Antonio Hernandez; Kittleson, Michelle M; Dilibero, Deanna; Hardy, W David; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Esmailian, Fardad

    2016-02-01

    Few orthotopic heart transplantations have been performed in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus since the first such case was reported in 2001. Since that time, advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy have resulted in potent and durable suppression of the causative human immunodeficiency virus-accompanied by robust immune reconstitution, reversal of previous immunodeficiency, a marked decrease in opportunistic and other infections, and near-normal long-term survival. Although human immunodeficiency virus infection is not an absolute contraindication, few centers in the United States and Canada have performed heart transplantations in this patient population; these patients have been de facto excluded from this procedure in North America. Re-evaluation of the reasons for excluding these patients from cardiac transplantation is warranted in light of such significant advances in antiretroviral therapy. This case report documents successful orthotopic heart transplantation in 2 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and we describe their antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive management challenges. Both patients were doing well without sequelae 43 and 38 months after transplantation.

  12. Successful Orthotopic Heart Transplantation and Immunosuppressive Management in 2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Seropositive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittleson, Michelle M.; Dilibero, Deanna; Hardy, W. David; Kobashigawa, Jon A.; Esmailian, Fardad

    2016-01-01

    Few orthotopic heart transplantations have been performed in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus since the first such case was reported in 2001. Since that time, advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy have resulted in potent and durable suppression of the causative human immunodeficiency virus—accompanied by robust immune reconstitution, reversal of previous immunodeficiency, a marked decrease in opportunistic and other infections, and near-normal long-term survival. Although human immunodeficiency virus infection is not an absolute contraindication, few centers in the United States and Canada have performed heart transplantations in this patient population; these patients have been de facto excluded from this procedure in North America. Re-evaluation of the reasons for excluding these patients from cardiac transplantation is warranted in light of such significant advances in antiretroviral therapy. This case report documents successful orthotopic heart transplantation in 2 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and we describe their antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive management challenges. Both patients were doing well without sequelae 43 and 38 months after transplantation. PMID:27047290

  13. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  14. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Munoz

    Full Text Available Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204 were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R. HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58 and two low-risk (LR-HPV (HPV-6/11 types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine followed by HPV-31(47.2% in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7% in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  15. Heart mitochondrial proteome study elucidates changes in cardiac energy metabolism and antioxidant PRDX3 in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Roselló-Lletí

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a public health problem with no available curative treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in its development. The present study is the first to analyze the mitochondrial proteome in cardiac tissue of patients with DCM to identify potential molecular targets for its therapeutic intervention.16 left ventricular (LV samples obtained from explanted human hearts with DCM (n = 8 and control donors (n = 8 were extracted to perform a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. The proteome of the samples was analyzed by quantitative differential electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry. These changes were validated by classical techniques and by novel and precise selected reaction monitoring analysis and RNA sequencing approach increasing the total heart samples up to 25. We found significant alterations in energy metabolism, especially in molecules involved in substrate utilization (ODPA, ETFD, DLDH, energy production (ATPA, other metabolic pathways (AL4A1 and protein synthesis (EFTU, obtaining considerable and specific relationships between the alterations detected in these processes. Importantly, we observed that the antioxidant PRDX3 overexpression is associated with impaired ventricular function. PRDX3 is significantly related to LV end systolic and diastolic diameter (r = 0.73, p value<0.01; r = 0.71, p value<0.01, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (r = -0.61, p value<0.05; and r = -0.62, p value<0.05, respectively.This work could be a pivotal study to gain more knowledge on the cellular mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of this disease and may lead to the development of etiology-specific heart failure therapies. We suggest new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions, something that up to now has been lacking.

  16. Spectrophotometric assay of creatinine in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Krishnegowda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new spectrophotometric method for the analysis of creatinine concentration in human serum samples is developed. The method explores the oxidation of p-methylamino phenol sulfate (Metol in the presence of copper sulfate and creatinine which yields an intense violet colored species with maximum absorbance at 530 nm. The calibration graph of creatinine by fixed time assay ranged from 4.4 to 620 μM. Recovery of creatinine in human serum samples varied from 101% to 106%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.145 μM and 0.487 μM respectively. Sandell’s sensitivity was 0.112 μg cm−2 and molar absorptivity was 0.101 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Within day precision was 2.5–4.8% and day-to-day precision range was 3.2–7.8%. The robustness and ruggedness of the method expressed in RSD values ranged from 0.78% to 2.12% and 1.32% to 3.46% respectively, suggesting that the developed method was rugged. This method provides good sensitivity and is comparable to standard Jaffe’s method with comparatively less interference from foreign substances.

  17. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  18. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei

    2017-08-29

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  19. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli strains isolated from human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Derakhshandeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates, including humans. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D. Group A and B1 are generally associated with commensals, whereas group B2 is associated with extra-intestinal pathotypes. Most enteropathogenic isolates, however, are assigned to group D. In the present study, a total of 102 E. coli strains, isolated from human samples, were used. Phylogenetic grouping was done based on the Clermont triplex PCR method using primers targeted at three genetic markers, chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2. Group A contained the majority of the collected isolates (69 isolates, 67.64%, followed by group B2 (18 isolates, 17.64% and D (15 isolates, 14.7% and no strains were found to belong to group B1. The distribution of phylogenetic groups in our study suggests that although the majority of strains were commensals, the prevalence of enteropathogenic and extra-intestinal pathotypes was noteworthy. Therefore, the role of E. coli in human infections including diarrhea, urinary tract infections and meningitis should be considered.

  1. Improvement of Heart Failure by Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Taghi Razavi Tousi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, stem cells have been considered for the treatment of heart diseases, but no marked improvement has been recorded. This is the first study to examine the functional and histological effects of the transplantation of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs in rats with heart failure (HF.Methods: This study was conducted in the years 2014 and 2015. 35 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 5 equal experimental groups (7 rats each as 1- Control 2- Heart Failure (HF 3- Sham 4- Culture media 5- Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT. Heart failure was induced using 170 mg/kg/d of isoproterenol subcutaneously injection in 4 consecutive days. The failure confirmed by the rat cardiac echocardiography on day 28. In SCT group, 3×106 cells in 150 µl of culture media were transplanted to the myocardium. At the end, echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters together with histological evaluation were done.Results: Echocardiography results showed that cardiac ejection fraction in HF group increased from 58/73 ± 9% to 81/25 ± 6/05% in SCT group (p value < 0.001. Fraction shortening in HF group was increased from 27/53 ± 8/58% into 45/55 ± 6/91% in SCT group (p value < 0.001. Furthermore, hAMSCs therapy significantly improved mean diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, rate pressure product, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure compared to those in the HF group, with the values reaching the normal levels in the control group. A marked reduction in fibrosis tissue was also found in the SCT group (p value < 0.001 compared with the animals in the HF group.Conclusion: The transplantation of hAMSCs in rats with heart failure not only decreased the level of fibrosis but also conferred significant improvement in heart performance in terms of echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters.

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Heart Failure in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Alenezi, Fawaz; Barasa, Felix A; Lumsden, Rebecca; Mayosi, Bongani M; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    Successful combination therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed this disease from a short-lived infection with high mortality to a chronic disease associated with increasing life expectancy. This is true for high- as well as low- and middle-income countries. As a result of this increased life expectancy, people living with HIV are now at risk of developing other chronic diseases associated with aging. Heart failure has been common among people living with HIV in the eras of pre- and post- availability of antiretroviral therapy; however, our current understanding of the pathogenesis and approaches to management have not been systematically addressed. HIV may cause heart failure through direct (e.g., viral replication, mitochondrial dysfunction, cardiac autoimmunity, autonomic dysfunction) and indirect (e.g., opportunistic infections, antiretroviral therapy, alcohol abuse, micronutrient deficiency, tobacco use) pathways. In low- and middle-income countries, 2 large observational studies have recently reported clinical characteristics and outcomes in these patients. HIV-associated heart failure remains a common cardiac diagnosis in people living with heart failure, yet a unifying set of diagnostic criteria is lacking. Treatment patterns for heart failure fall short of society guidelines. Although there may be promise in cardiac glycosides for treating heart failure in people living with HIV, clinical studies are needed to validate in vitro findings. Owing to the burden of HIV in low- and middle-income countries and the concurrent rise of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, strategic and concerted efforts in this area are likely to impact the care of people living with HIV around the globe. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2013-03-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been proposed as potential treatments for human heart failure. The cardioprotective effects of n-3 PUFA are supported by extensive cell culture, animal and human studies. Animal studies with n-3 PUFA have shown marked improvements in many independent risk factors for heart failure, including obesity, type II diabetes, insulin resistance, hypertension and inflammation. However, the evidence from observational studies, randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses that these benefits on risk factors lead to improvements in the symptoms of heart failure in patients is much less convincing. Further, most studies have used marine n-3 PUFA; the role of the plant-derived PUFA, α-linolenic acid (ALA), is even less clear. This discontinuity of scientific evidence from animal to human studies suggests that future studies should focus on defining the optimal dosage range and the efficacy of n-3 PUFA compared to standard treatments using standardised study designs. Further studies on ALA would seem justified.

  4. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in heart failure: prevalence and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Wallaschek, Nina; Gross, Ulrich M; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Seeberg, Bettina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Escher, Felicitas; Poller, Wolfgang; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) A and B are two betaherpesviruses that are associated with many conditions including roseola, drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, limbic encephalitis, and myocarditis. HHV-6 is integrated in the germline [chromosomically integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6)] in ∼0.8% of the human population. To date, the prevalence, species distribution, and treatment responses of ciHHV-6 are unknown for cardiac patients. We determined the prevalence of HHV-6 and ciHHV-6 genotypes in 1656 endomyocardial biopsies of patients with persisting unexplained symptoms of heart failure. Infection of cardiac tissue was identified by nested PCR, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Virus load and mRNA levels were followed in ciHHV-6 patients treated with ganciclovir. HHV-6 was detected in 273 of 1656 cardiac tissues (16.5%; HHV-6B, 98.2%, HHV-6A, 1.8%) by PCR. Nineteen of the 1656 patients (1.1%) presented with persistently high HHV-6 copy numbers indicative of ciHHV-6. Sequencing confirmed ciHHV-6A in seven patients (36.8%) which was considerably higher than detected in non-ciHHV-6 patients. Inheritance was demonstrated in three selected families, confirming ciHHV-6 chromosomal integration by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization. HHV-6 reactivation and chromosomal integration were confirmed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and heart tissue. Virus particles were identified in degenerating myocytes and interstitial cells. Antiviral treatment abolished viral mRNA and ameliorated cardiac symptoms. Virus replication in cardiac tissue of ciHHV-6 heart failure patients suggests that ciHHV-6 reactivation causes persistence of unexplained heart failure symptoms. We demonstrated that antiviral treatment, effective in decreasing viral transcripts and clinical complaints of cardiomyopathies, is a new therapeutic option for ciHHV-6-associated diseases. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Coexpression Analysis Reveals Key Gene Modules and Pathway of Human Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Ke, Zun-Ping; Peng, Yi-Gen; Cai, Ping-Tai

    2017-08-31

    Coronary heart disease is a kind of disease which causes great injury to people world-widely. Although gene expression analyses had been performed previously, to our best knowledge, systemic co-expression analysis for this disease is still lacking to date. Microarray data of coronary heart disease was downloaded from NCBI with the accession number of GSE20681. Co-expression modules were constructed by WGCNA. Besides, the connectivity degree of eigengenes was analyzed. Furthermore, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis was performed on these eigengenes in these constructed modules. A total of 11 co-expression modules were constructed by the 3,000 up-regulated genes from the 99 samples with coronary heart disease. The average number of genes in these modules was 270. The interaction analysis indicated the relative independence of gene expression in these modules. The functional enrichment analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the enriched terms and degree among these 11 modules. The results showed that module 9 and module 10 played critical roles in the occurrence of coronary disease. Pathways of hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation)and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) were thought to be closely related to the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease. Our result demonstrated that module 9 and module 10 were the most critical modules in the occurrence of coronary heart disease. Pathways as hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation) and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) had the potential to serve as the prognostic and predictive marker of coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Organization of ventricular fibrillation in the human heart: experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Tusscher, K H W J; Mourad, A; Nash, M P; Clayton, R H; Bradley, C P; Paterson, D J; Hren, R; Hayward, M; Panfilov, A V; Taggart, P

    2009-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a major health problem in the industrialized world. The lethal event is typically ventricular fibrillation (VF), during which the co-ordinated regular contraction of the heart is overthrown by a state of mechanical and electrical anarchy. Understanding the excitation patterns that sustain VF is important in order to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this paper, we studied the organization of human VF by combining clinical recordings of electrical excitation patterns on the epicardial surface during in vivo human VF with simulations of VF in an anatomically and electrophysiologically detailed computational model of the human ventricles. We find both in the computational studies and in the clinical recordings that epicardial surface excitation patterns during VF contain around six rotors. Based on results from the simulated three-dimensional excitation patterns during VF, which show that the total number of electrical sources is 1.4 +/- 0.12 times greater than the number of epicardial rotors, we estimate that the total number of sources present during clinically recorded VF is 9.0 +/- 2.6. This number is approximately fivefold fewer compared with that observed during VF in dog and pig hearts, which are of comparable size to human hearts. We explain this difference by considering differences in action potential duration dynamics across these species. The simpler spatial organization of human VF has important implications for treatment and prevention of this dangerous arrhythmia. Moreover, our findings underline the need for integrated research, in which human-based clinical and computational studies complement animal research.

  7. Human Cardiac Tissue Engineering: From Pluripotent Stem Cells to Heart Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Christopher P.; Shadrin, Ilya Y.; Carlson, Aaron L.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues hold great promise for use in drug and toxicology screening, in vitro studies of human physiology and disease, and as transplantable tissue grafts for myocardial repair. In this review, we discuss recent progress in cell-based therapy and functional tissue engineering using pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and we describe methods for delivery of cells into the injured heart. While significant hurdles remain, notable advances have been made in the methods to derive large numbers of pure human cardiomyocytes, mature their phenotype, and produce and implant functional cardiac tissues, bringing the field a step closer to widespread in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25599018

  8. Mouse heart rate in a human: diagnostic mystery of an extreme tachyarrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Lovely; Goel, Narender; Prajapat, Laxman; Spodick, David H; Goyal, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    We report telemetry recording of an extreme non-fatal tachyarrhythmia noted in a hospitalized quadriplegic male with history of atrial fibrillation where the average ventricular conduction rate was found to be about 600 beats per minute and was associated with transient syncope. A medical literature review suggests that the fastest human ventricular conduction rate reported to date in a tachyarrhythmia is 480 beats per minute. We therefore report the fastest human heart rate noted in a tachyarrhythmia and the most probable mechanism of this arrhythmia being a rapid atrial fibrillation with 1:1 conduction in the setting of probable co-existing multiple bypass tracts.

  9. [Heart rhythm in humans with different processing levels of acoustic information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, M V; Lyzohub, V S; Iukhymenko, L I; Khomenko, S M

    2011-01-01

    The peculiarities of the heart rhythm regulation were investigated in humans during the processing of acoustic information. Statistically significant differences were found in individuals with different levels of auditory-motor reactions according to the heart rhythm characteristics. Individuals with the high level of reactions were characterized by significantly lower total power spectrum (TP=1276.2 ms2), by the power spectrum of high (HL=280.1 ms12) and very low frequencies (VLF-469.8 ms2), as well as by low indexes of standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDNN=37.4 ms), when compared with the persons with the low level of reactions (5248.8; 866.7; 1937.0; 69.8 ms2). The correlation analysis confirmed the dif- ferences between the groups ol persons with adtierent number of processed information and variable (r=0.41, P<0.05) and spectral characteristics of heart rate (r=-0.49--0.56, P<0.05). Different strategies of activation of non-specific brain systems in formation of psycho-physiological reactions and participation of heart rhythm regulatory mechanisms in vegetative support of auditory information processing are discussed.

  10. Impact of space weather on human heart rate during the years 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galata, E.; Ioannidou, S.; Papailiou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Paravolidakis, K.; Kouremeti, M.; Rentifis, L.; Simantirakis, E.; Trachanas, K.

    2017-08-01

    During the last years a possible link between different levels of solar and geomagnetic disturbances and human physiological parameters is suggested by several published studies. In this work the examination of the potential association between heart rate variations and specific space weather activities was performed. A total of 482 individuals treated at Hippocratio General Hospital in Athens, the Cardiology clinics of Nikaia General Hospital in Piraeus and the Heraklion University Hospital in Crete, Greece, were assessed from July 2011 to April 2013. The heart rate of the individuals was recorded by a Holter monitor on a n hourly basis, while the hourly variations of the cosmic ray intensity measured by the Neutron Monitor Station of the Athens University and of the geomagnetic index Dst provided by the Kyoto Observatory were used. The ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) and the Multiple Linear Regression analysis were used for analysis of these data. A statistically significant effect of both cosmic rays and geomagnetic activity on heart rate was observed, which may indicate that changes in space weather could be linked to heart rate variations.

  11. Human heart failure with preserved ejection versus feline cardiomyopathy: what can we learn from both veterinary and human medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Valentine; Rozec, Bertrand; Gauthier, Chantal; Lauzier, Benjamin

    2017-08-14

    Cardiovascular affections are a growing health burden in human populations. Recent advances in cardiology have improved treatments and outcomes for myocardial infarction and arrhythmias, but other conditions still remain poorly understood. To date, the classical approach to study cardiovascular diseases involves rodent models, despite their strong differences with human cardiac physiology. In this context, this review will focus on the common traits between human and feline cardiac diseases, namely heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and feline cardiomyopathies, respectively. These two affections share similar pathological patterns and epidemiological characteristics. An improved knowledge would be of interest for both human and feline patients and could lead to the establishment of a more accurate treatment and therapeutic strategy for medical doctors and veterinary practitioners.

  12. Human engineered heart tissue as a versatile tool in basic research and preclinical toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaaf

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC progenies hold great promise as surrogates for human primary cells, particularly if the latter are not available as in the case of cardiomyocytes. However, high content experimental platforms are lacking that allow the function of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to be studied under relatively physiological and standardized conditions. Here we describe a simple and robust protocol for the generation of fibrin-based human engineered heart tissue (hEHT in a 24-well format using an unselected population of differentiated human embryonic stem cells containing 30-40% α-actinin-positive cardiac myocytes. Human EHTs started to show coherent contractions 5-10 days after casting, reached regular (mean 0.5 Hz and strong (mean 100 µN contractions for up to 8 weeks. They displayed a dense network of longitudinally oriented, interconnected and cross-striated cardiomyocytes. Spontaneous hEHT contractions were analyzed by automated video-optical recording and showed chronotropic responses to calcium and the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline. The proarrhythmic compounds E-4031, quinidine, procainamide, cisapride, and sertindole exerted robust, concentration-dependent and reversible decreases in relaxation velocity and irregular beating at concentrations that recapitulate findings in hERG channel assays. In conclusion this study establishes hEHT as a simple in vitro model for heart research.

  13. Observations and modeling of deterministic properties of human heart rate variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J J Zebrowski; R Baranowski

    2005-04-01

    Simple models show that in Type-I intermittency a characteristic U-shaped probability distribution is obtained for the laminar phase length. The laminar phase length distribution characteristic for Type-I intermittency may be obtained in human heart rate variability data for some cases of pathology. The heart and its regulatory systems are presumed to be both noisy and non-stationary. Although the effect of additive noise on the laminar phase distribution in Type-I intermittency is well-known, the effect of neither multiplicative noise nor non-stationarity have been studied. We first discuss the properties of two classes of models of Type-I intermittency: (a) the control parameter of the logistic map is changed dichotomously from a value within the intermittency range to just below the bifurcation point and back; (b) the control parameter is changed randomly within the same parameter range as in the model class (a). We show that the properties of both models are different from those obtained for Type-I intermittency in the presence of additive noise. The two models help to explain some of the features seen in the intermittency in human heart rate variability.

  14. Posttranslational modifications and dysfunction of mitochondrial enzymes in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Freya L; Pepe, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of energy supply is a major complication contributing to the syndrome of heart failure (HF). Because the concurrent activity profile of mitochondrial bioenergetic enzymes has not been studied collectively in human HF, our aim was to examine the mitochondrial enzyme defects in left ventricular myocardium obtained from explanted end-stage failing hearts. Compared with nonfailing donor hearts, activity rates of complexes I and IV and the Krebs cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and aconitase were lower in HF, as determined spectrophotometrically. However, activity rates of complexes II and III and citrate synthase did not differ significantly between the two groups. Protein expression, determined by Western blotting, did not differ between the groups, implying posttranslational perturbation. In the face of diminished total glutathione and coenzyme Q10 levels, oxidative modification was explored as an underlying cause of enzyme dysfunction. Of the three oxidative modifications measured, protein carbonylation was increased significantly by 31% in HF (P transport chain and Krebs cycle enzymes without altered expression of protein levels. Augmented oxidative modification of crucial enzyme subunit structures implicates dysfunction due to diminished capacity for management of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, thus contributing further to reduced bioenergetics in human HF.

  15. Differential DNA methylation correlates with differential expression of angiogenic factors in human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehregan Movassagh

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms such as microRNA and histone modification are crucially responsible for dysregulated gene expression in heart failure. In contrast, the role of DNA methylation, another well-characterized epigenetic mark, is unknown. In order to examine whether human cardiomyopathy of different etiologies are connected by a unifying pattern of DNA methylation pattern, we undertook profiling with ischaemic and idiopathic end-stage cardiomyopathic left ventricular (LV explants from patients who had undergone cardiac transplantation compared to normal control. We performed a preliminary analysis using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation-chip (MeDIP-chip, validated differential methylation loci by bisulfite-(BS PCR and high throughput sequencing, and identified 3 angiogenesis-related genetic loci that were differentially methylated. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that the expression of these genes differed significantly between CM hearts and normal control (p<0.01. Moreover, for each individual LV tissue, differential methylation showed a predicted correlation to differential expression of the corresponding gene. Thus, differential DNA methylation exists in human cardiomyopathy. In this series of heterogeneous cardiomyopathic LV explants, differential DNA methylation was found in at least 3 angiogenesis-related genes. While in other systems, changes in DNA methylation at specific genomic loci usually precede changes in the expression of corresponding genes, our current findings in cardiomyopathy merit further investigation to determine whether DNA methylation changes play a causative role in the progression of heart failure.

  16. The impact of human rhinovirus infection in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Corcoran, Claudia; Witte, Madolin K; Ampofo, Krow; Castillo, Ramon; Bodily, Stephanie; Bratton, Susan L

    2014-12-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV), the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in children, can present as bronchiolitis, pneumonia, or asthma exacerbations. The impact of HRV in infants and toddlers with congenital heart disease is poorly defined. A case-control study was performed to compare the clinical course for 19 young children with respiratory symptoms who tested positive for rhinovirus after heart surgery with that of 56 matched control subjects. The control subjects were matched by surgical repair, age, weight, and time of the year. Patients with known HRVs before surgery and control subjects with respiratory symptoms or positive test results for viruses were excluded from the study. Human rhinovirus infection was associated with more than a tenfold increase in the odds of noninvasive ventilation after extubation (odds ratio [OR] 11.45; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.97-38.67), a 12-fold increase in the probability of extubation failure (OR 12.84; 95 % CI 2.93-56.29), and increased use of pulmonary medications including bronchodilator and nitric oxide (p rhinovirus increases resource use and prolongs postoperative recovery after pediatric heart surgery. Surgery timing should be delayed for patients with rhinovirus if possible.

  17. Combined use of autogenic therapy and biofeedback in training effective control of heart rate by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed on 24 men and women (aged 20-27 yr) in three equal groups who were taught to control their own heart rates by autogenic training and biofeedback under dark and sound-isolated conditions. Group I was parasympathetic dominant, group II was sympathetic dominant, and group III consisted of parasympathetic-dominant subjects and controls who received only biofeedback of their own heart rates. The results corroborate three hypotheses: (1) subjects with para-sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles perform in a way that is both qualitatively and quantitatively different from subjects with sympathetic-dominant autonomic profiles; (2) tests of interindividual variability yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; and (3) the combined use of autogenic training, biofeedback, and verbal feedback is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans.

  18. The roadmap of WT1 protein expression in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Goumans, Marie-José

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT1) is essential for cardiac development. Deletion of Wt1 in mice results in disturbed epicardial and myocardial formation and lack of cardiac vasculature, causing embryonic lethality. Little is known about the role of WT1 in the human fetal heart. Therefore, as a first step, we analyzed the expression pattern of WT1 protein during human cardiac development from week 4 till week 20. WT1 expression was apparent in epicardial, endothelial and endocardial cells in a spatiotemporal manner. The expression of WT1 follows a pattern starting at the epicardium and extending towards the lumen of the heart, with differences in timing and expression levels between the atria and ventricles. The expression of WT1 in cardiac arterial endothelial cells reduces in time, whereas WT1 expression in the endothelial cells of cardiac veins and capillaries remains present at all stages studied. This study provides for the first time a detailed description of the expression of WT1 protein during human cardiac development, which indicates an important role for WT1 also in human cardiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heart rate variability of human in hypoxic oxygen-argon environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayrullina, Rezeda; Smoleevskiy, Alexandr; Bubeev, Yuri

    Human adaptive capacity, reliability and stability in extreme environments depend primarily on the individual resistance to stresses, includes both innate and acquired components. We have conducted studies in six healthy subjects - men aged between 24 to 42 years who psychophysiological indicators acterizing the severity of stress reactions studied directly during an emergency situation, before and after it. The subjects were in a hypoxic oxygen-argon atmosphere 10 days. Cardiovascular system is one of the first to respond to stressful reaction. The method of heart rate variability (HRV) allows us to estimate balance of sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of vegetative nervous system. In the course of the baseline study it was found that resting heart rate (HR) in the examined individuals is within normal limits. During the experiment in all subjects there was a trend towards more frequent heartbeat. Each subject at one stage or another stay in a hypoxic oxygen-argon environment heart rate go beyond the group norm, but the extent and duration of these abnormalities were significantly different. Marked increase in middle heart rate during of subjects experiment, fluctuating within a wide range (from 2.3% to 29.1%). Marked increase in middle heart rate during of subjects experiment, fluctuating within a wide range (from 2.3% to 29.1%). This suggests that the ability to adapt to living in the investigated gas environment have marked individual differences. SDNN (mean square deviation of all R-R intervals) is the integral indicator of the total effect of the sinus node to the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of vegetative nervous system, as well as indicating the higher functional reserves of the cardiovascular systems. Increase in heart rate in the majority of subject was accompanied by an increase in individual SDNN. This suggests that the parasympathetic system is able to balance the increase in activity of the sympathetic system, and functional reserves are

  20. 3D engineered cardiac tissue models of human heart disease: learning more from our mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphe, J Carter; de Lange, Willem J

    2013-02-01

    Mouse engineered cardiac tissue constructs (mECTs) are a new tool available to study human forms of genetic heart disease within the laboratory. The cultured strips of cardiac cells generate physiologic calcium transients and twitch force, and respond to electrical pacing and adrenergic stimulation. The mECT can be made using cells from existing mouse models of cardiac disease, providing a robust readout of contractile performance and allowing a rapid assessment of genotype-phenotype correlations and responses to therapies. mECT represents an efficient and economical extension to the existing tools for studying cardiac physiology. Human ECTs generated from iPSCMs represent the next logical step for this technology and offer significant promise of an integrated, fully human, cardiac tissue model.

  1. Climate Wrongs and Human Rights. Putting people at the heart of climate-change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raworth, K. (ed.) (and others)

    2008-09-15

    In failing to tackle climate change with urgency, rich countries are effectively violating the human rights of millions of the world's poorest people. Continued excessive greenhouse-gas emissions primarily from industrialised nations are - with scientific certainty - creating floods, droughts, hurricanes, sea-level rise, and seasonal unpredictability. The result is failed harvests, disappearing islands, destroyed homes, water scarcity, and deepening health crises, which are undermining millions of peoples' rights to life, security, food, water, health, shelter, and culture. Such rights violations could never truly be remedied in courts of law. Human-rights principles must be put at the heart of international climate-change policy making now, in order to stop this irreversible damage to humanity's future.

  2. Reproducibility of creatine kinase reaction kinetics in human heart: a (31) P time-dependent saturation transfer spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Adil; Gropler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) is essential for the buffering and rapid regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in heart tissue. Herein, we demonstrate a (31) P MRS protocol to quantify CK reaction kinetics in human myocardium at 3 T. Furthermore, we sought to quantify the test-retest reliability of the measured metabolic parameters. The method localizes the (31) P signal from the heart using modified one-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS), and a time-dependent saturation transfer (TDST) approach was used to measure CK reaction parameters. Fifteen healthy volunteers (22 measurements in total) were tested. The CK reaction rate constant (kf ) was 0.32 ± 0.05 s(-1) and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 15.62%. The intrinsic T1 for phosphocreatine (PCr) was 7.36 ± 1.79 s with CV = 24.32%. These values are consistent with those reported previously. The PCr/ATP ratio was equal to 1.94 ± 0.15 with CV = 7.73%, which is within the range of healthy subjects. The reproducibility of the technique was tested in seven subjects and inferred parameters, such as kf and T1 , exhibited good reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 and 0.79 for kf and T1 , respectively). The reproducibility data provided in this study will enable the calculation of the power and sample sizes required for clinical and research studies. The technique will allow for the examination of cardiac energy metabolism in clinical and research studies, providing insight into the relationship between energy deficit and functional deficiency in the heart.

  3. Do lambs perceive regular human stroking as pleasant? Behavior and heart rate variability analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Coulon

    Full Text Available Stroking by humans is beneficial to the human-animal relationship and improves welfare in many species that express intraspecific allogrooming, but very few studies have looked at species like sheep that do not express such contact except around parturition. This study investigated the way lambs perceive regular human tactile contact using behavioral and physiological responses. Twenty-four lambs were reared and bucket-fed in groups of four. All were stroked daily by their familiar caregiver. At 8 weeks of age, the lambs were individually tested in their home pen but in a 1×1m open-barred pen after a 15 h period of habituation to physical separation from peers while remaining in visual and auditory contact. Half of the lambs received stroking by their caregiver for 8 min and half were exposed to their caregiver's immobile presence. Heart rate and heart rate variability were recorded and analyzed by 2-min slots over the same interval based on three measures: mean heart rate value (HR, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD and standard deviation of all intervals measured between consecutive sinus beats (SDNN. Behavioral responses (ear postures of the lamb and time spent in contact with the familiar caregiver, on the knees of the familiar caregiver, and moving were recorded throughout the test. Lamb HR decreased continuously while in the presence of their caregiver. Lambs being stroked showed slower HR and higher RMSSD which reflected positive emotional states compared to lambs left unstroked. All behavioral variables were highly correlated with the main component axis of the PCA analyses: the more the animals stayed in contact with their caregiver, the less they moved and the more their ears were hanging. This first component clearly differentiates lambs being stroked or not. Behavioral and physiological observations support the hypothesis that gentle physical contact with the caregiver is perceived positively by lambs.

  4. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles H; Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Geraghty, Benjamin J; Perks, William J; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A; Connelly, Kim A

    2016-11-11

    Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by (13)C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1-(13)C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed (13)C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1-(13)C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean (13)C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1-(13)C]pyruvate, 56 for (13)C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1-(13)C]lactate. These results represent the first (13)C images of the human heart. The appearance of (13)C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. © 2016 The Authors.

  5. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Brioschi

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF. The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14 and non-failing human hearts (n = 13 were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01. We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK, whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  6. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  7. Sex differences in healthy human heart rate variability: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Thayer, Julian F

    2016-05-01

    The present meta-analysis aimed to quantify current evidence on sex differences in the autonomic control of the heart, indexed by measures of heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy human subjects. An extensive search of the literature yielded 2020 titles and abstracts, of which 172 provided sufficient reporting of sex difference in HRV. Data from 63,612 participants (31,970 females) were available for analysis. Meta-analysis yielded a total of 1154 effect size estimates (k) across 50 different measures of HRV in a cumulated total of 296,247 participants. Females showed a significantly lower mean RR interval and standard deviation of RR intervals (SDNN). The power spectral density of HRV in females is characterized by significantly less total power that contains significantly greater high- (HF) and less low-frequency (LF) power. This is further reflected by a lower LF/HF ratio. Meta-regression revealed significant effects of age, respiration control and the length of recording available for analysis. Although women showed greater mean heart rate, they showed greater vagal activity indexed by HF power of HRV. Underlying mechanisms of these findings are discussed.

  8. Enhanced engraftment, proliferation, and therapeutic potential in heart using optimized human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Shunsuke; Miki, Kenji; Takaki, Tadashi; Okubo, Chikako; Hatani, Takeshi; Chonabayashi, Kazuhisa; Nishikawa, Misato; Takei, Ikue; Oishi, Akiko; Narita, Megumi; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Yoshida, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) are a promising tool for cardiac cell therapy. Although transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived CMs have been reported in several animal models, the treatment effect was limited, probably due to poor optimization of the injected cells. To optimize graft cells for cardiac reconstruction, we compared the engraftment efficiency of intramyocardially-injected undifferentiated-iPSCs, day4 mesodermal cells, and day8, day20, and day30 purified iPSC-CMs after initial differentiation by tracing the engraftment ratio (ER) using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. This analysis revealed the ER of day20 CMs was significantly higher compared to other cells. Transplantation of day20 CMs into the infarcted hearts of immunodeficient mice showed good engraftment, and echocardiography showed significant functional improvement by cell therapy. Moreover, the imaging signal and ratio of Ki67-positive CMs at 3 months post injection indicated engrafted CMs proliferated in the host heart. Although this graft growth reached a plateau at 3 months, histological analysis confirmed progressive maturation from 3 to 6 months. These results suggested that day20 CMs had very high engraftment, proliferation, and therapeutic potential in host mouse hearts. They also demonstrate this model can be used to track the fate of transplanted cells over a long time. PMID:26743035

  9. Viscoelastic behaviour of human blood and polyacrylamide model fluids for heart valve testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Dietmar; Vlastos, Georgios; Koch, Brigitte; Pohl, Manfred; Affeld, Klaus

    1993-06-01

    New heart valves and other cardiovascular assist systems have to be tested for hydrodynamic performance. In place of human blood simple model fluids like glycerol solutions are employed often due to ethical and practical reasons. But blood exhibits complex non-Newtonian and viscoelastic behaviour. Rheological blood properties are reviewed based on literature and own experimental results. Furthermore we studied polymer solutions with respect to blood-like flow behaviour. Rheology was assessed by means of the low shear rotational viscometer (LS 40, Mettler-Toledo, Switzerland) under stationary and dynamic shear conditions (variation of frequency and angular displacement).

  10. Electrical admittance for filling of the heart during lower body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yan; Holm, Søren; Jenstrup, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    cardiac output, electrical impedance, heart rate, positron emission tomography, technetium-labeled erythrocytes......cardiac output, electrical impedance, heart rate, positron emission tomography, technetium-labeled erythrocytes...

  11. Evidence for Intramyocardial Disruption of Lipid Metabolism and Increased Myocardial Ketone Utilization in Advanced Human Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Kenneth C; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Aziz, Moez; Mesaros, Clementina; Worth, Andrew J; Wang, Linda L; Javaheri, Ali; Blair, Ian A; Margulies, Kenneth B; Rame, J Eduardo

    2016-02-23

    The failing human heart is characterized by metabolic abnormalities, but these defects remains incompletely understood. In animal models of heart failure there is a switch from a predominance of fatty acid utilization to the more oxygen-sparing carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies have reported decreases in myocardial lipid content, but the inclusion of diabetic and nondiabetic patients obscures the distinction of adaptations to metabolic derangements from adaptations to heart failure per se. We performed both unbiased and targeted myocardial lipid surveys using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy in nondiabetic, lean, predominantly nonischemic, advanced heart failure patients at the time of heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation. We identified significantly decreased concentrations of the majority of myocardial lipid intermediates, including long-chain acylcarnitines, the primary subset of energetic lipid substrate for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report for the first time significantly reduced levels of intermediate and anaplerotic acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) species incorporated into the Krebs cycle, whereas the myocardial concentration of acetyl-CoA was significantly increased in end-stage heart failure. In contrast, we observed an increased abundance of ketogenic β-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, in association with increased myocardial utilization of β-hydroxybutyrate. We observed a significant increase in the expression of the gene encoding succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid-CoA transferase, the rate-limiting enzyme for myocardial oxidation of β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate. These findings indicate increased ketone utilization in the severely failing human heart independent of diabetes mellitus, and they support the role of ketone bodies as an alternative fuel and myocardial ketone oxidation as a key metabolic adaptation in the failing human heart. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Metabolic Characteristics of Human Hearts Preserved for 12 Hours by Static Storage, Antegrade Perfusion or Retrograde Coronary Sinus Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobert, Michael L.; Merritt, Matthew E.; West, LaShondra M.; Ayers, Colby; Jessen, Michael E.; Peltz, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Machine perfusion of donor hearts is a promising strategy to increase the donor pool. Antegrade perfusion is effective but can lead to aortic valve incompetence and non-nutrient flow. Experience with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion of donor hearts has been limited. We tested the hypothesis that retrograde perfusion could support myocardial metabolism over an extended donor ischemic interval. Methods Human hearts from donors rejected or not offered for transplantation were preserved for 12 hours in University of Wisconsin Machine Perfusion Solution by: 1. Static hypothermic storage 2. Hypothermic antegrade machine perfusion or 3. Hypothermic retrograde machine perfusion. Myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), and lactate accumulation were measured. Ventricular tissue was collected for proton (1H) and phosphorus-31 (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to evaluate the metabolic state of the myocardium. Myocardial water content was determined at end-experiment. Results Stable perfusion parameters were maintained throughout the perfusion period with both perfusion techniques. Lactate/alanine ratios were lower in perfused hearts compared to static hearts (pperfused groups. High energy phosphates were better preserved in both perfused groups (pperfused (80.2±.8%) compared to both antegrade perfused (76.6±.8%, p=.02) and static storage hearts (76.7±1%, p=.02). Conclusions In conclusion, machine perfusion by either the antegrade or the retrograde technique can support myocardial metabolism over long intervals. Machine perfusion appears promising for long term preservation of human donor hearts. PMID:24642559

  13. Assembly of the cardiac intercalated disk during pre- and postnatal development of the human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Vreeker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In cardiac muscle, the intercalated disk (ID at the longitudinal cell-edges of cardiomyocytes provides as a macromolecular infrastructure that integrates mechanical and electrical coupling within the heart. Pathophysiological disturbance in composition of this complex is well known to trigger cardiac arrhythmias and pump failure. The mechanisms underlying assembly of this important cellular domain in human heart is currently unknown. METHODS: We collected 18 specimens from individuals that died from non-cardiovascular causes. Age of the specimens ranged from a gestational age of 15 weeks through 11 years postnatal. Immunohistochemical labeling was performed against proteins comprising desmosomes, adherens junctions, the cardiac sodium channel and gap junctions to visualize spatiotemporal alterations in subcellular location of the proteins. RESULTS: Changes in spatiotemporal localization of the adherens junction proteins (N-cadherin and ZO-1 and desmosomal proteins (plakoglobin, desmoplakin and plakophilin-2 were identical in all subsequent ages studied. After an initial period of diffuse and lateral labelling, all proteins were fully localized in the ID at approximately 1 year after birth. Nav1.5 that composes the cardiac sodium channel and the gap junction protein Cx43 follow a similar pattern but their arrival in the ID is detected at (much later stages (two years for Nav1.5 and seven years for Cx43, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our data on developmental maturation of the ID in human heart indicate that generation of the mechanical junctions at the ID precedes that of the electrical junctions with a significant difference in time. In addition arrival of the electrical junctions (Nav1.5 and Cx43 is not uniform since sodium channels localize much earlier than gap junction channels.

  14. Functional improvement and maturation of rat and human engineered heart tissue by chronic electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Marc N; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Mitchell, Alice; Schaaf, Sebastian; Börnchen, Christian; Müller, Christian; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Stenzig, Justus; Stoehr, Andrea; Neuber, Christiane; Eder, Alexandra; Luther, Pradeep K; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Spontaneously beating engineered heart tissue (EHT) represents an advanced in vitro model for drug testing and disease modeling, but cardiomyocytes in EHTs are less mature and generate lower forces than in the adult heart. We devised a novel pacing system integrated in a setup for videooptical recording of EHT contractile function over time and investigated whether sustained electrical field stimulation improved EHT properties. EHTs were generated from neonatal rat heart cells (rEHT, n=96) or human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hEHT, n=19). Pacing with biphasic pulses was initiated on day 4 of culture. REHT continuously paced for 16-18 days at 0.5Hz developed 2.2× higher forces than nonstimulated rEHT. This was reflected by higher cardiomyocyte density in the center of EHTs, increased connexin-43 abundance as investigated by two-photon microscopy and remarkably improved sarcomere ultrastructure including regular M-bands. Further signs of tissue maturation include a rightward shift (to more physiological values) of the Ca(2+)-response curve, increased force response to isoprenaline and decreased spontaneous beating activity. Human EHTs stimulated at 2Hz in the first week and 1.5Hz thereafter developed 1.5× higher forces than nonstimulated hEHT on day 14, an ameliorated muscular network of longitudinally oriented cardiomyocytes and a higher cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio. Taken together, continuous pacing improved structural and functional properties of rEHTs and hEHTs to an unprecedented level. Electrical stimulation appears to be an important step toward the generation of fully mature EHT.

  15. Ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody based nanohybrid sensor for rapid detection of human heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-01

    An ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody conjugated with graphene quantum dots (GQD) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) nanohybrid modified gold electrode based sensor was developed for the rapid detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in human. Screen printed gold (Au) electrode was decorated with 4-aminothiophenol for amine functionalization of the Au surface. These amino groups were further coupled with carboxyl functionalities of GQD with EDC-NHS reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor, PAMAM dendrimer was successively embedded on GQD through carbodiimide coupling to provide ultra-high surface area for antibody immobilization. The activated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) monoclonal antibody was immobilized on PAMAM to form nanoprobe for sensing specific heart attack marker cTnI. Various concentrations of cardiac marker, cTnI were electrochemically measured using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in human blood serum. The modifications on sensor surface were characterized by FTIR and AFM techniques. The sensor is highly specific to cTnI and showed negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensitivity of the sensor was 109.23μAcm(-2)μg(-1) and lower limit of detection of cTnI was found 20fgmL(-1).

  16. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function...... and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax...... and RAP (P exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy...

  17. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Piasecki, Angelika; Richter, Florian; Diering, Simon; van der Velden, Jolanda; Buck, Friedrich; Donzelli, Sonia; Schröder, Ewald; Wijnker, Paul J M; Voigt, Niels; Dobrev, Dobromir; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie; Eaton, Philip; Cuello, Friederike

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) regulates actin-myosin interaction and thereby cardiac myocyte contraction and relaxation. This physiologic function is regulated by cMyBP-C phosphorylation. In our study, reduced site-specific cMyBP-C phosphorylation coincided with increased S-glutathiolation in ventricular tissue from patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonfailing donors. We used redox proteomics, to identify constitutive and disease-specific S-glutathiolation sites in cMyBP-C in donor and patient samples, respectively. Among those, a cysteine cluster in the vicinity of the regulatory phosphorylation sites within the myosin S2 interaction domain C1-M-C2 was identified and showed enhanced S-glutathiolation in patients. In vitro S-glutathiolation of recombinant cMyBP-C C1-M-C2 occurred predominantly at Cys(249), which attenuated phosphorylation by protein kinases. Exposure to glutathione disulfide induced cMyBP-C S-glutathiolation, which functionally decelerated the kinetics of Ca(2+)-activated force development in ventricular myocytes from wild-type, but not those from Mybpc3-targeted knockout mice. These oxidation events abrogate protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and therefore potentially contribute to the reduction of its phosphorylation and the contractile dysfunction observed in human heart failure.-Stathopoulou, K., Wittig, I., Heidler, J., Piasecki, A., Richter, F., Diering, S., van der Velden, J., Buck, F., Donzelli, S., Schröder, E., Wijnker, P. J. M., Voigt, N., Dobrev, D., Sadayappan, S., Eschenhagen, T., Carrier, L., Eaton, P., Cuello, F. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure. © FASEB.

  18. In vitro cultured progenitors and precursors of cardiac cell lineages from human normal and post-ischemic hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Di Meglio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The demonstration of the presence of dividing primitive cells in damaged hearts has sparked increased interest about myocardium regenerative processes. We examined the rate and the differentiation of in vitro cultured resident cardiac primitive cells obtained from pathological and normal human hearts in order to evaluate the activation of progenitors and precursors of cardiac cell lineages in post-ischemic human hearts. The precursors and progenitors of cardiomyocyte, smooth muscle and endothelial lineage were identified by immunocytochemistry and the expression of characteristic markers was studied by western blot and RT-PCR. The amount of proteins characteristic for cardiac cells (a-SA and MHC, VEGFR-2 and FVIII, SMA for the precursors of cardiomyocytes, endothelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively inclines toward an increase in both a-SA and MHC. The increased levels of FVIII and VEGFR2 are statistically significant, suggesting an important re-activation of neoangiogenesis. At the same time, the augmented expression of mRNA for Nkx 2.5, the trascriptional factor for cardiomyocyte differentiation, confirms the persistence of differentiative processes in terminally injured hearts. Our study would appear to confirm the activation of human heart regeneration potential in pathological conditions and the ability of its primitive cells to maintain their proliferative capability in vitro. The cardiac cell isolation method we used could be useful in the future for studying modifications to the microenvironment that positively influence cardiac primitive cell differentiation or inhibit, or retard, the pathological remodeling and functional degradation of the heart.

  19. Anatomic Localization and Autonomic Modulation of AV Junctional Rhythm in Failing Human Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Hucker, William J.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Moazami, Nader; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The structure-function relationship in the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) of various animal species has been investigated in detail, however less is known about the human AVJ. In this study, we performed high-resolution optical mapping of the human AVJ (n=6) to define its pacemaker properties and response to autonomic stimulation. Methods and Results Isolated, coronary-perfused AVJ preparations from failing human hearts (n=6, 53±6 years) were optically mapped using the near-infrared, voltage-sensitive dye, di-4-ANBDQBS, with isoproterenol (Iso, 1 μM) and acetylcholine (ACh, 1μM). An algorithm detecting multiple components of optical action potentials was used to reconstruct multi-layered intramural AVJ activation and to identify specialized slow and fast conduction pathways (SP and FP). The anatomical origin and propagation of pacemaker activity was verified via histology. Spontaneous AVJ rhythms of 29±11 bpm (n=6) originated in the nodal-His region (NH, n=3) and/or the proximal His bundle (H, n=4). Iso accelerated the AVJ rhythm to 69±12 bpm (n=5); shifted the leading pacemaker to the transitional cell (TC) regions near the FP and SP (n=4) and/or coronary sinus (n=2); and triggered reentrant arrhythmias (n=2). ACh (n=4) decreased the AVJ rhythm to 18±4 bpm; slowed FP/SP conduction leading to block between the AVJ and atrium; and shifted the pacemaker to either the TC or TC/NH (bifocal activation). Conclusions We have demonstrated that the AVJ pacemaker in failing human hearts is located in the NH or H-regions and can be modified with autonomic stimulation. Moreover, we found that both the FP and SP are involved in anterograde and retrograde conduction. PMID:21646375

  20. Human care system for heart-rate and human-movement trajectory in home and its application to detect mental disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yutaka; Kanazawa, Seigo; Endo, Maki; Tsuchiya, Naoki; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a heart rate monitoring system for detecting autonomic nervous system by the heart rate variability using an air pressure sensor to diagnose mental disease. Moreover, we propose a human behavior monitoring system for detecting the human trajectory in home by an infrared camera. In day and night times, the human behavior monitoring system detects the human movement in home. The heart rate monitoring system detects the heart rate in bed in night time. The air pressure sensor consists of a rubber tube, cushion cover and pressure sensor, and it detects the heart rate by setting it to bed. It unconstraintly detects the RR-intervals; thereby the autonomic nervous system can be assessed. The autonomic nervous system analysis can examine the mental disease. While, the human behavior monitoring system obtains distance distribution image by an infrared camera. It classifies adult, child and the other object from distance distribution obtained by the camera, and records their trajectories. This behavior, i.e., trajectory in home, strongly corresponds to cognitive disorders. Thus, the total system can detect mental disease and cognitive disorders by uncontacted sensors to human body.

  1. Correlation between endogenous polyamines in human cardiac tissues and clinical parameters in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meana, Clara; Rubín, José Manuel; Bordallo, Carmen; Suárez, Lorena; Bordallo, Javier; Sánchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Polyamines contribute to several physiological and pathological processes, including cardiac hypertrophy in experimental animals. This involves an increase in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and intracellular polyamines associated with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases. The aim of the study was to establish the role of these in the human heart in living patients. For this, polyamines (by high performance liquid chromatography) and the activity of ODC and N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidases (APAO) were determined in the right atrial appendage of 17 patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation to correlate with clinical parameters. There existed enzymatic activity associated with the homeostasis of polyamines. Left atria size was positively associated with ODC (r = 0.661, P = 0.027) and negatively with APAO-N(1) -acetylspermine (r = -0.769, P = 0.026), suggesting that increased levels of polyamines are associated with left atrial hemodynamic overload. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and heart rate were positively associated with spermidine (r = 0.690, P = 0.003; r = 0.590, P = 0.021) and negatively with N(1)-acetylspermidine (r = -0.554, P = 0.032; r = -0.644, P = 0.018). LVEF was negatively correlated with cAMP levels (r = -0.835, P = 0.001) and with cAMP/ODC (r = -0.794, P = 0.011), cAMP/spermidine (r = -0.813, P = 0.001) and cAMP/spermine (r = -0.747, P = 0.003) ratios. Abnormal LVEF patients showed decreased ODC activity and spermidine, and increased N(1) -acetylspermidine, and cAMP. Spermine decreased in congestive heart failure patients. The trace amine isoamylamine negatively correlated with septal wall thickness (r = -0.634, P = 0.008) and was increased in cardiac heart failure. The results indicated that modifications in polyamine homeostasis might be associated with cardiac function and remodelling. Increased cAMP might have a deleterious effect on function. Further studies should confirm these findings and the involvement of

  2. Using intramyocardial electrograms combined with other noninvasive methods for monitoring acute rejection following human heart transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yi-xin; MENG Xu; SUN Ling-bo; HAN Jie; CHEN Yang-tian

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute allograft rejection in heart transplantation remains as one of the major complications. Obligatory graft surveillance is still achieved with the invasive and expensive endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). Our study aimed to study the use of intramyocardial electrograms combined with other noninvasive methods for the monitoring of acute rejection after human heart transplantation. Methods Permanent pacemakers were implanted in 58 patients undergoing heart transplantations. Intramyocardial electrograms (IMEG) were recorded periodically and the results were compared with those from EMBs. The R wave amplitude of the IMEG was used as the index value, the average R wave amplitude at the third week following transplantation was considered as the baseline, and a reduction of >20% compared with the baseline was regarded as a positive result. EMB was performed in cases of positive IMEG results and also at other times. Other noninvasive methods were used to help the diagnosis. Acute rejection (AR) was defined as international Society of Heart-Lung Transplantation grade Ilia or higher.Results We obtained 1231 IMEG records and 127 EMBs. Of the total 127 EMBs, 53 were positive, in which there were 42 IMEG positive results and 11 negative, while in the rest 74 negative EMBs, there were 9 IMEG positive results and 65 negative. The sensitivity of IMEG for the diagnosis of AR was 79.2%, and the specificity was 87.8%. The positive predictive value was 82.4% and the negative predictive value was 85.5%. Of the total of 1231 IMEG records, 51 were positive and 1180 were negative. Excluding 11 proved by EMB to be false negative, if the other 1169 were considered as no evidence of rejection, through the other noninvasive methods, AR diagnosed by this noninvasive monitoring strategy, the sensitivity was 79.2%, and the specificity was 99.2%. The positive predictive value was 82.4% and the negative predictive value was 99.1%. Conclusions IMEG can be used as a noninvasive method for

  3. Haematospirillum jordaniae gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humrighouse, B W; Emery, B D; Kelly, A J; Metcalfe, M G; Mbizo, J; McQuiston, J R

    2016-04-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, spiral-shaped bacterium, strain H5569(T), was isolated from a human blood sample. Phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the isolate were investigated. Optimal growth was found to occur at 35 °C under aerobic conditions on Heart Infusion Agar supplemented with 5 % rabbit blood. The major fatty acids present in the cells were identified as C16:0, C16:1ω7c and C18:1ω7c. The predominant respiratory quinone was found to be ubiquinone-Q10. The G+C content of genomic DNA for strain H5569(T) was found to be 49.9 %. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis results, 13 additional isolates were also analysed in this study. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the organism, represented by strain H5569(T), forms a distinct lineage within the family Rhodospirillaceae, closely related to two Novispirillum itersonii subspecies (93.9-94.1 %) and two Caenispirillum sp. (91.2-91.6 %). Based on these results, the isolate H5569(T) is concluded to represent a new genus and species for which the name Haematospirillum jordaniae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H5569(T) (=DSM(T) 28903 = CCUG 66838(T)).

  4. Study of myocardial cell inhomogeneity of the human heart: Simulation and validation using polarized light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Paul Audain; Michalowicz, Gabrielle; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Usson, Yves; Zhu, Yuemin

    2016-05-01

    The arrangement or architecture of myocardial cells plays a fundamental role in the heart's function and its change was shown to be directly linked to heart diseases. Inhomogeneity level is an important index of myocardial cell arrangements in the human heart. The authors propose to investigate the inhomogeneity level of myocardial cells using polarized light imaging simulations and experiments. The idea is based on the fact that the myosin filaments in myocardial cells have the same properties as those of a uniaxial birefringent crystal. The method then consists in modeling the myosin filaments of myocardial cells as uniaxial birefringent crystal, simulating the behavior of the latter by means of the Mueller matrix, and measuring the final intensity of polarized light and consequently the inhomogeneity level of myocardial cells in each voxel through the use of crossed polarizers. The method was evaluated on both simulated and real tissues and under various myocardial cell configurations including parallel cells, crossed cells, and cells with random orientations. When myocardial cells run perfectly parallel to each other, all the polarized light was blocked by those parallel myocardial cells, and a high homogeneity level was observed. However, if myocardial cells were not parallel to each other, some leakage of the polarized light was observed, thus causing the decrease of the polarized light amplitude and homogeneity level. The greater the crossing angle between myocardial cells, the smaller the amplitude of the polarized light and the greater the inhomogeneity level. For two populations of myocardial cell crossing at an angle, the resulting azimuth angle of the voxel was the bisector of this angle. Moreover, the value of the inhomogeneity level began to decrease from a nonzero value when the voxel was not totally homogeneous, containing for example cell crossing. The proposed method enables the physical information of myocardial tissues to be estimated and the

  5. Mitochondrial structure and function are not different between nonfailing donor and end-stage failing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Ravikumar, Vinod K; Madden, Eli J; Ewald, Gregory A; Dikranian, Krikor; Beard, Daniel A; Efimov, Igor R

    2016-08-01

    During human heart failure, the balance of cardiac energy use switches from predominantly fatty acids (FAs) to glucose. We hypothesized that this substrate shift was the result of mitochondrial degeneration; therefore, we examined mitochondrial oxidation and ultrastructure in the failing human heart by using respirometry, transmission electron microscopy, and gene expression studies of demographically matched donor and failing human heart left ventricular (LV) tissues. Surprisingly, respiratory capacities for failing LV isolated mitochondria (n = 9) were not significantly diminished compared with donor LV isolated mitochondria (n = 7) for glycolysis (pyruvate + malate)- or FA (palmitoylcarnitine)-derived substrates, and mitochondrial densities, assessed via citrate synthase activity, were consistent between groups. Transmission electron microscopy images also showed no ultrastructural remodeling for failing vs. donor mitochondria; however, the fraction of lipid droplets (LDs) in direct contact with a mitochondrion was reduced, and the average distance between an LD and its nearest neighboring mitochondrion was increased. Analysis of FA processing gene expression between donor and failing LVs revealed 0.64-fold reduced transcript levels for the mitochondrial-LD tether, perilipin 5, in the failing myocardium (P = 0.003). Thus, reduced FA use in heart failure may result from improper delivery, potentially via decreased perilipin 5 expression and mitochondrial-LD tethering, and not from intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction.-Holzem, K. M., Vinnakota, K. C., Ravikumar, V. K., Madden, E. J., Ewald, G. A., Dikranian, K., Beard, D. A., Efimov, I. R. Mitochondrial structure and function are not different between nonfailing donor and end-stage failing human hearts.

  6. Improved Cardiac Contractility of Human Recombinant Growth Hormone on the Congestive Heart Failure of Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ping; He Yu-quan; Zeng Hong; Ni Jin-song; Yun Qing-jun; Huang Xiao-ping; Li Shu-mei

    2005-01-01

    The enhanced cardiac contractility effect of human recombinant growth hormone (hr-GH) on the congestive heart failure (CHF) was studied on the pig. To build a pig model of congestive heart failure, a temporary artificial cardiac pacemaker was implanted in the pig's body and paced at 220 beats to 240 beats per minute for 1 week. After the model of congestive heart failure was successfully set up, the frequency of the pacemaker was changed to 150 beats to 180 beats per minute to maintain the CHF model stable. Pigs were divided into three groups: The hr-GH group in which 0.5 mg/kg per day of hr-GH was administrated intramuscularly for 15 days, the injection control group in which an equal amount of physiological saline was injected intramuscularly, and a normal control group. The left ventricular diastolic end pressure was (10.60±2.41 ) mmHg in the hr-GH group, but (19.00±3.81) mmHg in the saline control group (P<0.01); Cardiac output was (1.86±0.13) L/min in the hr-GH group, but (1.56 ±0.18) L/min in the saline control group (P<0.05); Peripheral min) -1 in the saline control group (P<0.05); ± dp/dtmax was (2900 ±316.23) and (2280 ±286.36) in the hr-HG group and the saline control group respectively (P<0.05). The results show that hr-GH enhances myocardial contractility of CHF, and the CHF model built by a temporary artificial cardiac pacemaker at a high rate of stimulation is reasonable and applicable.

  7. Rhythminotropic Reactions of Human Myocardium in Ischemic and Rheumatic Heart Diseases against the Background of Amiodarone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris N. Kozlov, PhD, ScD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In human heart failure, Ca2+ homeostasis gets disturbed due to a decrease in the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. We studied the differences in the SR function in patients with rheumatic and coronary heart disease, against the background of amiodarone. Cardiac preparations from the atrium of 21 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD and 14 patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD were used in this study. Myocardial strips perfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henzelait solution without and with amiodarone (1 mM/l at 37°C. The steady state stimulation rate of the muscle strips was 0.5 Hz. The single extraordinary impulse was given as 0.2-1.5 sec after the steady state beat. Then, the first beat after a 4- to 60-sec rest period was evaluated. The extrasystoles of the myocardium in both groups, after long intervals, were decreased after amiodarone treatment. The amplitude of post extrasystoles of amiodarone-treated myocardium showed differences only after long intervals in both groups. Two types of inotropic responses of a failing myocardium after rest periods were observed. Type I post-rest contractions maintained the steady state amplitude after all rests. However, type II was characterized by a reduction in the amplitude of the contractions. Amiodarone treatment of the myocardium showing type I reactions led to an increase in the potentiation after rests, but showed no effect on the reaction of the muscle with the type II response. The results suggested that SR dysfunction was different in CAD and RHD. The realization of the therapeutic effect of amiodarone was found to be dependent on the functional activity of the SR.

  8. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, Claus

    2000-01-01

    by column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring...... of variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  9. Ischemic heart disease down-regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease and controls. Furthermore......, the suitability of artery culture for studying angiotensin receptor changes was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. The angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA levels were down-regulated in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease as compared to controls (P

  10. Soluble Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 in Human Heart Failure: Relation with Myocardial Function and Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Slava; Shrestha, Kevin; Troughton, Richard W.; Francis, Gary S.; Sen, Subha; Klein, Allan L.; Tang, W .H. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an endogenous counter-regulator of the renin-angiotensin system. The relationship between soluble ACE2 (sACE2), myocardial function, and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic systolic heart failure is not well established. Methods We measured sACE2 activity in 113 patients with chronic systolic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤ 35%, NYHA class II-IV). Comprehensive echocardiography was performed at the time of blood sampling. We prospectively examined adverse clinical events (death, cardiac transplant, and heart failure hospitalizations) over 34 ± 17 months. Results Patients who had higher sACE2 plasma activity were more likely to have a lower LVEF (Spearman’s r= −0.36, p <0.001), greater RV systolic dysfunction (r=0.33, p<0.001), higher estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r=0.35, p=0.002), larger LV end diastolic diameter (r=0.23, p=0.02), and higher plasma NT-proBNP levels (r=0.35, p<0.001). sACE2 was less associated with diastolic dysfunction (r=0.19, p=0.05), and was similar between patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. There was no relationship between sACE2 activity and markers of systemic inflammation. After adjusting for NT-proBNP and LVEF, sACE2 activity remained an independent predictor of adverse clinical events (HR=1.7 [95% CI: 1.1 – 2.6], p=0.018). Conclusions Elevated plasma sACE2 activity was associated with greater severity of myocardial dysfunction and was an independent predictor of adverse clinical events. PMID:19700132

  11. Cardiomyocyte Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Share Similarities with Human Heart Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julia Asp; Daniella Steel; Marianne Jonsson; Caroline Améen; Kerstin Dahlenborg; Anders Jeppsson; Anders Lindahl; Peter Sartipy

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cardiotoxicity testing is a key activity in the pharmaceutical industry in order to detect detrimental effects of new drugs.A reliable human in vitro model would both be beneficial in selection of lead compounds and be important for reducing animal experimentation.

  12. [The function of the heart changes in implementation of the diving reactions in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, T I; Berlov, D N; Zavarina, L B; Minigalin, A D; Smith, N Y; Xu, S; Yanvareva, I N

    2015-03-01

    The changes of chronotropic function of the heart and of the myocardium in the implementation of the diving response in humans were studied by the electrocardiographic method. The study involved 80 students aged 18-20 years. Diving simulation was performed by immersing the face in cold water during breath-hold exhale. When the water temperature was 12.3 +/- 2.3 degrees C, average duration of apnea was 31 +/- 11 s. The oxygen content in the exhaled air after apnea was 98.8 +/- 8.7 mm Hg, carbon dioxide--49.1 +/- 3.5 mm Hg. It was observed slowing of the heart rate, mainly due to the increasing of diastole in 41 of the 80 surveyed during simulating diving. But it also can be observed symptoms of conduction deterioration: atrioventricular block type I (22% of reactive type and 29% of the highly reactive type subjects), and exceeds standards QTc-interval prolongation (at 7.5% of the subjects). These responses are adaptive in nature and disappear in the recovery process. But the fact abnormalities of conduction in the myocardium must be considered when using the diving reflex in medical practice, as may be due to a predisposition to a certain pathology of the cardiovascular system.

  13. AN ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CORONARY ARTERY DOMINANCE IN HUMAN CADAVERIC HEARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: With ever increasing incidence of coronary heart disease, a thorough study of the coronary arteries is the need of time. AIM: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the coronary dominance pattern which will help the cardiac physicians and surgeons for better diagnosis and management of coronary arte ry disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study undertaken in the Department of Anatomy, Assam Medical College included 75 perinatal and 15 adult cadaveric human hearts which were preserved in 10% formaldehyde solution after simple dissecting procedure and the dominance was noted. RESULTS: In the present study, out of total of 90 cases the right coronary dominance was found to be present in 58 cases (64.44%.This included 34(60.71% males and 24(70.59% females. Total cases of left coronary dominance were fo und to be 22(24.45%. Among these, 15(26.79% were males and 7(20.59% were females. Finally 10(11.11% co - dominant cases were found, of which 7 cases (12.50% were males and 3 cases (8.82% were females. CONCLUSION : Thus the study revealed that most of th e cases were having right coronary predominance. KEYWORDS : Coronary arteries, Dominance .

  14. P2 receptors in human heart: upregulation of P2X6 in patients undergoing heart transplantation, interaction with TNFalpha and potential role in myocardial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Cristina; Ferrario, Silvia; De Vincenti, Ombretta; Ceruti, Stefania; Fumagalli, Marta; Mazzola, Alessia; D' Ambrosi, Nadia; Volontè, Cinzia; Fratto, Pasquale; Vitali, Ettore; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Beltrami, Elena; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, GianLuca; Biglioli, Paolo; Tremoli, Elena; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2005-12-01

    ATP acts as a neurotransmitter via seven P2X receptor-channels for Na(+) and Ca(2+), and eight G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Despite evidence suggesting roles in human heart, the map of myocardial P2 receptors is incomplete, and their involvement in chronic heart failure (CHF) has never received adequate attention. In left myocardia from five to nine control and 5-12 CHF subjects undergoing heart transplantation, we analyzed the full repertoire of P2 receptors and of 10 "orphan" P2Y-like receptors. All known P2Y receptors (i.e. P2Y(1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14)) and two P2Y-like receptors (GPR91 and GPR17) were detected in all subjects. All known P2X(1-7) receptors were also detected; of these, only P2X(6) was upregulated in CHF, as confirmed by quantitative real time-PCR. The potential significance of this change was studied in primary cardiac fibroblasts freshly isolated from young pigs. Exposure of cardiac fibroblasts to ATP or its hydrolysis-resistant-analog benzoylATP induced apoptosis. TNFalpha (a cytokine implicated in CHF progression) exacerbated cell death. Similar effects were induced by ATP and TNFalpha in a murine cardiomyocytic cell line. In cardiac fibroblasts, TNFalpha inhibited the downregulation of P2X(6) mRNA associated to prolonged agonist exposure, suggesting that, by preventing ATP-induced P2X(6) desensitization, TNFalpha may abolish a defense mechanism meant at avoiding Ca(2+) overload and, ultimately, Ca(2+)-dependent cell death. This may provide a basis for P2X(6) upregulation in CHF. In conclusion, we provide the first characterization of P2 receptors in the human heart and suggest that the interaction between TNFalpha and the upregulated P2X(6) receptor may represent a novel pathogenic mechanism in CHF.

  15. Direct hydrogel encapsulation of pluripotent stem cells enables ontomimetic differentiation and growth of engineered human heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. We demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue.

  16. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    limited by the lack of experimental models. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental tissue culture model to maintain normal and malignant germ cells within their niche and allow investigation of treatment effects. METHODS: Human testis and testis cancer specimens from orchidectomies were...

  17. 3D reconstruction of a human heart fascicle using SurfDriver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Robert J.; Phillips, Steven J.; LaFollette, Paul S., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    The Temple University Medical School has a sequence of over 400 serial sections of adult normal ventricular human heart tissue, cut at 25 micrometer thickness. We used a Zeiss Ultraphot with a 4x planapo objective and a Pixera digital camera to make a series of 45 sequential montages to use in the 3D reconstruction of a fascicle (muscle bundle). We wrote custom software to merge 4 smaller image fields from each section into one composite image. We used SurfDriver software, developed by Scott Lozanoff of the University of Hawaii and David Moody of the University of Alberta, for registration, object boundary identification, and 3D surface reconstruction. We used an Epson Stylus Color 900 printer to get photo-quality prints. We describe the challenge and our solution to the following problems: image acquisition and digitization, image merge, alignment and registration, boundary identification, 3D surface reconstruction, 3D visualization and orientation, snapshot, and photo-quality prints.

  18. [The pattern of Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation algorithm for recognition of coronary heart disease patients based on microamount of elements in human blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Xiao-ming

    2004-11-01

    The contents of four microamount elements (Sr, Cu, Mg and Zn) in human blood were chosen as recognition index of coronary heart disease patients and normal persons. The recognition pattern of Levenberg-Marquardt Backpropagation algorithm has been established. The first-layer transfer function is Tansig function; the second-layer transfer function is linear Purelin function. There are four input vectors, eight neurons on hidden layer, and one neuron of output vector. Four samples were chosen as a teat group and 22 samples as a training group. The weights and biases of the neural network were given. The given data could be completely identified, which predicted that this method could be a supplementary tool to diagnose this kind of disease with the determined contents of microamount of elements in human blood.

  19. Characterizing healthy samples for studies of human cognitive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Geldmacher, David S.; Levin, Bonnie E.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the cognitive declines associated with aging, and differentiating them from the effects of disease in older adults, are important goals for human neuroscience researchers. This is also an issue of public health urgency in countries with rapidly aging populations. Progress toward understanding cognitive aging is complicated by numerous factors. Researchers interested in cognitive changes in healthy older adults need to consider these complexities when they design and interpre...

  20. Associations of four circulating chemokines with multiple atherosclerosis phenotypes in a large population-based sample: results from the dallas heart study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Leticia; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R; Owens, Andrew W; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2010-05-01

    Specific chemokines contribute to vascular inflammation and may be useful biomarkers to detect atherosclerosis. The chemokines CXCL1 and CCL11 have previously been studied in animal or human models of atherosclerosis, while CXCL2 and CCL23 have not. Among 2,454 subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, a multi-ethnic population-based sample, we measured plasma CCL11, CCL23, CXCL1, and CXCL2, and associated levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC) by computed tomography, and aortic wall thickness, plaque burden, and compliance by magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated chemokine levels were defined as greater than or equal to the median for CCL11 and CCL23 and greater than or equal to the upper detection limit for CXCL1 and CXCL2. Elevated CCL23 (P < 0.01) and CXCL1 (P = 0.01), but not CCL11 and CXCL2, associated with CAC in univariable analyses. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, elevated CCL23 remained associated with CAC (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7; P = 0.02), while the association with CXCL1 was modestly attenuated (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1; P = 0.06). CCL23 also associated with aortic wall thickness, plaque, and compliance in univariable analyses (P < 0.05 for each), but these associations were attenuated after multivariable adjustment. The novel chemotactic protein, CCL23, which has not been previously studied in atherosclerosis, is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis, suggesting that this chemokine merits further study in animal and human models.

  1. Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, for treatment of acute heart failure (RELAX-AHF) : a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Dorobantu, Maria I.; Grinfeld, Liliana R.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Marmor, Alon; Masip, Josep; Pang, Peter S.; Werdan, Karl; Teichman, Sam L.; Trapani, Angelo; Bush, Christopher A.; Saini, Rajnish; Schumacher, Christoph; Severin, Thomas M.; Metra, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, is a vasoactive peptide hormone with many biological and haemodynamic effects. In a pilot study, serelaxin was safe and well tolerated with positive clinical outcome signals in patients with acute heart failure. The RELAX-AHF trial tested the hypoth

  2. The acute effects of intravenously administered mibefradil, a new calcium antagonist, on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenquist, M; BrembillaPerrot, B; Meinertz, T; Neugebauer, A; Crijns, HJMG; Smeets, JLRM; vanderVring, JAFM; Fromer, M; Kobrin, [No Value

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was designed to assess the acute effects of intravenous mibefradil on the electrophysiologic characteristics of the human heart. Methods: Seventy-one patients referred for routine electrophysiologic testing were rand

  3. Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, for treatment of acute heart failure (RELAX-AHF) : a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Felker, G. Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greenberg, Barry H.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Dorobantu, Maria I.; Grinfeld, Liliana R.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Marmor, Alon; Masip, Josep; Pang, Peter S.; Werdan, Karl; Teichman, Sam L.; Trapani, Angelo; Bush, Christopher A.; Saini, Rajnish; Schumacher, Christoph; Severin, Thomas M.; Metra, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background Serelaxin, recombinant human relaxin-2, is a vasoactive peptide hormone with many biological and haemodynamic effects. In a pilot study, serelaxin was safe and well tolerated with positive clinical outcome signals in patients with acute heart failure. The RELAX-AHF trial tested the hypoth

  4. Sampling Based Trajectory Planning for Robots in Dynamic Human Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Open-ended human environments, such as pedestrian streets, hospital corridors, train stations etc., are places where robots start to emerge. Hence, being able to plan safe and natural trajectories in these dynamic environments is an important skill for future generations of robots. In this work...... method for selecting the best trajectory in the RRT, according to the cost of traversing a potential field. Furthermore the RRT expansion is enhanced to direct the search and account for the kinodynamic robot constraints. A model predictive control (MPC) approach is taken to accommodate...

  5. Cardiac remodeling as a consequence of atrial fibrillation: An anatomical study of perfusion-fixed human heart specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher D Rolfes; Stephen A Howard; Ryan P Goff; Paul A Iaizzo

    2011-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation(AF)causes a continuum of atrial anatomical remodeling.Methods Using a library of perfusion-fixed human hearts,specimens with AF were compared to controls.During this preliminary assessment study,direct measurements were taken of atrial volume,pulmonary vein(PV)circumference,and left atrial(LA)wall thicknesses.Results Hearts with AF typically had larger atrial volumes,as well as a much larger variation in volume compared to controls(range of 59.6-227.1 mL in AF hearts compared to 65.1-115.9 mL in controls).For all hearts,right PVs were larger than left PVs(mean: 171.4±84.6 mm' for right and 118.2±50.1 mm2 for left P<0.005).LA wall thicknesses ranged from 0.7 mm to 3.1 min for both AF and control hearts.Conclusions Hearts with AF had a large range of sizes which is consistent with the progression of atrial remodeling during AF.The large range of thicknesses will influence the amount of energy needed to create transmural lesions during ablation procedures.

  6. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  7. Optimized Heart Sampling and Systematic Evaluation of Cardiac Therapies in Mouse Models of Ischemic Injury: Assessment of Cardiac Remodeling and Semi-Automated Quantification of Myocardial Infarct Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Mariana; Araújo, Ana; Esteves, Tiago; Laundos, Tiago L; Freire, Ana G; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Nascimento, Diana S

    2015-12-02

    Cardiac therapies are commonly tested preclinically in small-animal models of myocardial infarction. Following functional evaluation, post-mortem histological analysis is essential to assess morphological and molecular alterations underlying the effectiveness of treatment. However, non-methodical and inadequate sampling of the left ventricle often leads to misinterpretations and variability, making direct study comparisons unreliable. Protocols are provided for representative sampling of the ischemic mouse heart followed by morphometric analysis of the left ventricle. Extending the use of this sampling to other types of in situ analysis is also illustrated through the assessment of neovascularization and cellular engraftment in a cell-based therapy setting. This is of interest to the general cardiovascular research community as it details methods for standardization and simplification of histo-morphometric evaluation of emergent heart therapies. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Vital exhaustion as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality in a community sample. A prospective study of 4084 men and 5479 women in the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Holst, Claus; Grønbaek, Morten

    2003-01-01

    for biological, behavioural, and socioeconomic risk factors did not substantially affect the association for IHD but attenuated the association with all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Measures of fatigue and depression were common symptoms in this population sample and convey increased risk of IHD and of all-cause......BACKGROUND: Vital exhaustion, a psychological measure characterized by fatigue and depressive symptoms, has been suggested to be an independent risk factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) but the generality of the phenomenon remains in question. The aim of this study is to describe prevalence...... of these symptoms in a community sample and determine whether they prospectively predict increased risk of IHD and all-cause mortality in men and women. METHODS: The study base was 4084 men and 5479 women aged 20-98 free of IHD examined in 1991-1993 in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Events were ascertained...

  9. Profile of Heart Donors from the Human Valve Bank of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Curitiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Renata Maria; Costa, Marise Teresinha Brenner Affonso da; Canciglieri Junior, Osiris; Sant'Anna, Ângelo Márcio Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Human heart valves are used as replacement valves and have satisfactory functional results compared with conventional prostheses. Characterize the profile of effective heart donors from the human valve bank of the santa casa de misericórdia de curitiba and analyze the association between the profile variables. It consists of a retrospective and quantitative study of electronic medical records from heart donors for heart valves. every heart donation made to the bank between january 2004 and december 2014 was studied. 2,149 donations were analyzed, from donors aged 0 to 71 years old, with an average of 34.9 ± 15.03 years old. most donors were male 65.7% (n=1,411) and 34.3% (n=738) were female. among the most frequent causes of the donors' death are trauma at 53% (n=1,139) and cerebral vascular accident at 34.2% (n=735). there was significant statistical association between the analyzed variables. There has been an improvement in brazil's donation rate, being essential that the tissue banks work together with the state and federal district centers for notification, procurement and distribution of organs in order to increase the number of donors.

  10. CONSUMPTION OF SATURATED ANIMAL FATS IN THE DIET OF HUMANS MAY DECREASE THE RATE OF HEART DISEASE IN THE FUTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Soroush Niknamian; Mehrandokht Nekavand

    2017-01-01

    Fats, as part of the human dietary regime are a concentrated source of energy. Animals contain saturated and plants contain unsaturated type of fatty acids. In this prospective research, the role of animal saturated fatty acids is highlighted and is proven to be a rational dietary source for the human diet. Saturated fats consumption is a wise choice in order to reduce the coronary heart disease risk, although it is believed in an opposite way. Researching through the healthiest tribes and kn...

  11. Simulation and mechanistic investigation of the arrhythmogenic role of the late sodium current in human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Trenor

    Full Text Available Heart failure constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts sets the stage for malignant arrhythmias, in which the role of the late Na(+ current (I(NaL is relevant and is currently under investigation. In this study we examined the role of I(NaL in the electrophysiological phenotype of ventricular myocytes, and its proarrhythmic effects in the failing heart. A model for cellular heart failure was proposed using a modified version of Grandi et al. model for human ventricular action potential that incorporates the formulation of I(NaL. A sensitivity analysis of the model was performed and simulations of the pathological electrical activity of the cell were conducted. The proposed model for the human I(NaL and the electrophysiological remodeling of myocytes from failing hearts accurately reproduce experimental observations. The sensitivity analysis of the modulation of electrophysiological parameters of myocytes from failing hearts due to ion channels remodeling, revealed a role for I(NaL in the prolongation of action potential duration (APD, triangulation of the shape of the AP, and changes in Ca(2+ transient. A mechanistic investigation of intracellular Na(+ accumulation and APD shortening with increasing frequency of stimulation of failing myocytes revealed a role for the Na(+/K(+ pump, the Na(+/Ca(2+ exchanger and I(NaL. The results of the simulations also showed that in failing myocytes, the enhancement of I(NaL increased the reverse rate-dependent APD prolongation and the probability of initiating early afterdepolarizations. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts and especially the enhancement of the I(NaL prolong APD and alter Ca(2+ transient facilitating the development of early afterdepolarizations. An enhanced I(NaL appears to be an important contributor to the electrophysiological phenotype and to the dysregulation of [Ca(2+](i homeostasis of failing myocytes.

  12. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  13. The failing human heart is unable to use the Frank-Starling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, R H; Böhm, M; Koch, A; Schmidt, U; Morano, I; Eissner, H J; Uberfuhr, P; Reichart, B; Erdmann, E

    1994-05-01

    There is evidence that the failing human left ventricle in vivo subjected to additional preload is unable to use the Frank-Starling mechanism. The present study compared the force-tension relation in human nonfailing and terminally failing (heart transplants required because of dilated cardiomyopathy) myocardium. Isometric force of contraction of electrically driven left ventricular papillary muscle strips was studied under various preload conditions (2 to 20 mN). To investigate the influence of inotropic stimulation, the force-tension relation was studied in the presence of the cardiac glycoside ouabain. In skinned-fiber preparations of the left ventricle, developed tension was measured after stretching the preparations to 150% of the resting length. To evaluate the length-dependent activation of cardiac myofibrils by Ca2+ in failing and nonfailing myocardium, the tension-Ca2+ relations were also measured. After an increase of preload, the force of contraction gradually increased in nonfailing myocardium but was unchanged in failing myocardium. There were no differences in resting tension, muscle length, or cross-sectional area of the muscles between both groups. Pretreatment with ouabain (0.02 mumol/L) restored the force-tension relation in failing myocardium and preserved the force-tension relation in nonfailing tissue. In skinned-fiber preparations of the same hearts, developed tension increased significantly after stretching only in preparations from nonfailing but not from failing myocardium. The Ca2+ sensitivity of skinned fibers was significantly higher in failing myocardium (EC50, 1.0; 95% confidence limit, 0.88 to 1.21 mumol/L) compared with nonfailing myocardium (EC50, 1.7; 95% confidence limit, 1.55 to 1.86 mumol/L). After increasing the fiber length by stretching, a significant increase in the sensitivity of the myofibrils to Ca2+ was observed in nonfailing but not in failing myocardium. These experiments provide evidence for an impaired force

  14. Human engineered heart tissue as a model system for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Alexandra; Vollert, Ingra; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Drug development is time- and cost-intensive and, despite extensive efforts, still hampered by the limited value of current preclinical test systems to predict side effects, including proarrhythmic and cardiotoxic effects in clinical practice. Part of the problem may be related to species-dependent differences in cardiomyocyte biology. Therefore, the event of readily available human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) has raised hopes that this human test bed could improve preclinical safety pharmacology as well as drug discovery approaches. However, hiPSC-CM are immature and exhibit peculiarities in terms of ion channel function, gene expression, structural organization and functional responses to drugs that limit their present usefulness. Current efforts are thus directed towards improving hiPSC-CM maturity and high-content readouts. Culturing hiPSC-CM as 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue (EHT) improves CM maturity and anisotropy and, in a 24-well format using silicone racks, enables automated, multiplexed high content readout of contractile function. This review summarizes the principal technology and focuses on advantages and disadvantages of this technology and its potential for preclinical drug screening.

  15. Recellularization of biological heart valves with human vascular cells: in vitro hemocompatibility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopka, Simon; Schmid, Franz-Xaver; Hirt, Stephan; Birnbaum, Dietrich E; Schmid, Christof; Lehle, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Coverage of cardiovascular bioprostheses with autologous endothelium is used for the purpose of improving blood compatibility. The aim of our study was to analyze endothelialization potential of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves, cellular functions of seeded endothelial cells (EC), and the impact of a two-stage seeding protocol using human vascular fibroblasts (FB) and EC from saphenous veins (HSVEC) on cellular functional properties in vitro. Adherence and morphology of adhered cells were assessed by scanning electronic microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Reproducible, complete surface coverage with EC was established on decellularized and glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium. Analyzing functional properties of cells directly adhered to biomaterial revealed nonproliferative cells, which were capable of inflammatory stimulation in terms of TNF-induced increase in interleukin-6 secretion and adhesion of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, EC showed sustained antithrombotic properties quantified by platelet adhesion onto EC and prostacyclin secretion by EC. Preseeding with vascular fibroblasts using a two-stage seeding protocol induced EC proliferation and improved inflammatory and anti-thrombotic functions. Cardiovascular biomaterials differ significantly in their potential to allow for adhesion of human EC. Successfully endothelialized biomaterial, however, revealed cellular properties which are likely to be favorable to improving performance of biomaterials. Two-stage seeding adds regenerative potential and improves cell functions of adherent EC.

  16. Increased expression of fatty-acid and calcium metabolism genes in failing human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa García-Rúa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF involves alterations in metabolism, but little is known about cardiomyopathy-(CM-specific or diabetes-independent alterations in gene expression of proteins involved in fatty-acid (FA uptake and oxidation or in calcium-(Ca(2+-handling in the human heart. METHODS: RT-qPCR was used to quantify mRNA expression and immunoblotting to confirm protein expression in left-ventricular myocardium from patients with HF (n = 36 without diabetes mellitus of ischaemic (ICM, n = 16 or dilated (DCM, n = 20 cardiomyopathy aetiology, and non-diseased donors (CTL, n = 6. RESULTS: Significant increases in mRNA of genes regulating FA uptake (CD36 and intracellular transport (Heart-FA-Binding Protein (HFABP were observed in HF patients vs CTL. Significance was maintained in DCM and confirmed at protein level, but not in ICM. mRNA was higher in DCM than ICM for peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-alpha (PPARA, PPAR-gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC1A and CD36, and confirmed at the protein level for PPARA and CD36. Transcript and protein expression of Ca(2+-handling genes (Two-Pore-Channel 1 (TPCN1, Two-Pore-Channel 2 (TPCN2, and Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate Receptor type-1 (IP3R1 increased in HF patients relative to CTL. Increases remained significant for TPCN2 in all groups but for TPCN1 only in DCM. There were correlations between FA metabolism and Ca(2+-handling genes expression. In ICM there were six correlations, all distinct from those found in CTL. In DCM there were also six (all also different from those found in CTL: three were common to and three distinct from ICM. CONCLUSION: DCM-specific increases were found in expression of several genes that regulate FA metabolism, which might help in the design of aetiology-specific metabolic therapies in HF. Ca(2+-handling genes TPCN1 and TPCN2 also showed increased expression in HF, while HF- and CM-specific positive correlations were found among several FA and Ca(2

  17. Elasticity-based determination of isovolumetric phases in the human heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Motivation To directly determine isovolumetric cardiac time intervals by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE using the magnitude of the complex signal for deducing morphological information combined with the phase of the complex signal for tension-relaxation measurements. Methods Thirty-five healthy volunteers and 11 patients with relaxation abnormalities were subjected to transthoracic wave stimulation using vibrations of approximately 25 Hz. A k-space-segmented, ECG-gated gradient-recalled echo steady-state sequence with a 500-Hz bipolar motion-encoding gradient was used for acquiring a series of 360 complex images of a short-axis view of the heart at a frame rate of less than 5.2 ms. Magnitude images were employed for measuring the cross-sectional area of the left ventricle, while phase images were used for analyzing the amplitudes of the externally induced waves. The delay between the decrease in amplitude and onset of ventricular contraction was determined in all subjects and assigned to the time of isovolumetric tension. Conversely, the delay between the increase in wave amplitude and ventricular dilatation was used for measuring the time of isovolumetric elasticity relaxation. Results Wave amplitudes decreased during systole and increased during diastole. The variation in wave amplitude occurred ahead of morphological changes. In healthy volunteers the time of isovolumetric elasticity relaxation was 75 ± 31 ms, which is significantly shorter than the time of isovolumetric tension of 136 ± 36 ms (P n = 11 isovolumetric elasticity relaxation was significantly prolonged, with 133 ± 57 ms (P P = 0.053. Conclusion The complex MRE signal conveys complementary information on cardiac morphology and elasticity, which can be combined for directly measuring isovolumetric tension and elasticity relaxation in the human heart.

  18. Human papillomavirus self-sampling for screening nonattenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2017-01-01

    In organized cervical screening programs, typically 25% of the invited women do not attend. The Copenhagen Self-sampling Initiative (CSi) aimed to gain experiences on participation among screening nonattenders in the Capital Region of Denmark. Here, we report on the effectiveness of different...... region of Denmark were identified via the organized national invitation module. Screening history was obtained via the nationwide pathology registry. Twenty-four thousand women were invited, and as an alternative to the regular communication platforms (letter and phone), women could request a home test...... via a mobile-friendly webpage. Instruction material and video-animation in several languages were made available online. Chi-square test was used to test differences. Out of all invited, 31.7% requested a home test, and 20% returned it to the laboratory. In addition, 10% were screened at the physician...

  19. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, C.

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS) method is described for the determination and quantification of 12 dietary flavonoid glycosides and aglycons in human urine samples. Chromatographic separation of the analytes of interest was achieved...... by column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring...... with high and low flavonoid content was analyzed, and the results are reported....

  20. Reducing sample complexity of polyclonal human autoantibodies by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Sascha; Faude, Alexander; Rabenstein, Monika; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Nölker, Carmen; Bacher, Michael; Dodel, Richard

    2010-08-15

    Chromatofocusing was performed in order to separate a polyclonal antigen-specific mixture of human immunoglobulins (IgGs) that would then allow for further analyses of as few different IgGs as possible. Because polyclonal IgGs only differ by amino acid sequence and possible post-translational modifications but not by molecular weight, we chose chromatofocusing for protein separation by different isoelectric points. We isolated antigen-specific IgGs from commercially available intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) using a combination of affinity- and size exclusion-chromatography and in order to reduce the complexity of the starting material IVIG was then replaced by single-donor plasmapheresis material. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), we observed a clear decrease in the number of different light and heavy chains in the chromatofocusing peak as compared to the starting material. In parallel, we monitored slight problems with the selected peak in isoelectric focusing as the first dimension of 2-DE, displayed in by the less proper focusing of the spots. When we tested whether IgGs were binding to their specific antigen after chromatofocusing, we were able to show that they were still in native conformation. In conclusion, we showed that chromatofocusing can be used as a first step in the analysis of mixtures of very similar proteins, e.g. polyclonal IgG preparations, in order to minimize the amount of different proteins in separated fractions in a reproducible way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A simulation study of the reaction of human heart to biphasic electrical shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seemann Gunnar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article presents a study, which examines the effects of biphasic electrical shocks on human ventricular tissue. The effects of this type of shock are not yet fully understood. Animal experiments showed the superiority of biphasic shocks over monophasic ones in defibrillation. A mathematical computer simulation can increase the knowledge of human heart behavior. Methods The research presented in this article was done with different models representing a three-dimensional wedge of ventricular myocardium. The electrophysiology was described with Priebe-Beuckelmann model. The realistic fiber twist, which is specific to human myocardium was included. Planar electrodes were placed at the ends of the longest side of the virtual cardiac wedge, in a bath medium. They were sources of electrical shocks, which varied in magnitude from 0.1 to 5 V. In a second arrangement ring electrodes were placed directly on myocardium for getting a better view on secondary electrical sources. The electrical reaction of the tissue was generated with a bidomain model. Results The reaction of the tissue to the electrical shock was specific to the initial imposed characteristics. Depolarization appeared in the first 5 ms in different locations. A further study of the cardiac tissue behavior revealed, which features influence the response of the considered muscle. It was shown that the time needed by the tissue to be totally depolarized is much shorter when a biphasic shock is applied. Each simulation ended only after complete repolarization was achieved. This created the possibility of gathering information from all states corresponding to one cycle of the cardiac rhythm. Conclusions The differences between the reaction of the homogeneous tissue and a tissue, which contains cleavage planes, reveals important aspects of superiority of biphasic pulses. ...

  2. Assessment of human exposure to airborne fungi in agricultural confinements: personal inhalable sampling versus stationary sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Atin; Reponen, Tiina; Lee, Shu-An; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2004-01-01

    Accurate exposure assessment to airborne fungi in agricultural environments is essential for estimating the associated occupational health hazards of workers. The objective of this pilot study was to compare personal and stationary sampling for assessing farmers' exposure to airborne fungi in 3 different agricultural confinements located in Ohio, USA (hog farm, dairy farm, and grain farm), using Button Personal Inhalable Samplers. Personal exposures were measured with samplers worn by 3 subjects (each carrying 2 samplers) during 3 types of activities, including animal feeding in the hog farm, cleaning and animal handling in the dairy farm, and soybean unloading and handling in the grain farm. Simultaneously, the stationary measurements were performed using 5 static Button Samplers and 1 revolving Button Sampler. The study showed that the total concentration of airborne fungi ranged from 1.4 x 10(4)-1.2 x 10(5) spores m(-3) in 3 confinements. Grain unloading and handling activity generated highest concentrations of airborne fungi compared to the other 2 activities. Prevalent airborne fungi belonged to Cladosporium, Aspergillus/Penicillium, Ascospores, smut spores, Epicoccum, Alternaria, and Basidiospores. Lower coefficients of variations were observed for the fungal concentrations measured by personal samplers (7-12%) compared to the concentrations measured by stationary samplers (27-37%). No statistically significant difference was observed between the stationary and personal measurement data for the total concentrations of airborne fungi (p > 0.05). Revolving stationary and static stationary Button Samplers demonstrated similar performance characteristics for the collection of airborne fungi. This reflects the low sensitivity of the sampler's efficiency to the wind speed and direction. The results indicate that personal exposure of agricultural workers in confinements may be adequately assessed by placing several Button Samplers simultaneously operating in a

  3. Prostacyclins have no direct inotropic effect on isolated atrial strips from the normal and pressure-overloaded human right heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmboe, Sarah; Andersen, Asger; Vibjerg Jensen, Rebekka

    2017-01-01

    mimetics in the normal and the pressure-overloaded human right atrium. Trabeculae from the right atrium were collected during surgery from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients with pressure-overloaded right hearts, undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (n = 10) and from...... to elicit a reference inotropic response. The force of contraction was measured continuously. The expression of prostanoid receptors was explored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Iloprost, treprostinil, epoprostenol, or MRE-269 did not alter force of contraction in any...... expression of the different prostanoid receptors in the human atrium. In conclusion, prostacyclin mimetics did not increase the force of contraction of human atrial trabeculae from the normal or the pressure-overloaded right heart. These data suggest that prostacyclin mimetics have no direct inotropic...

  4. Determination of Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Measure Entropy Parameters for Distinguishing Congestive Heart Failure from Normal Sinus Rhythm Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Entropy provides a valuable tool for quantifying the regularity of physiological time series and provides important insights for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the cardiovascular system. Before any entropy calculation, certain common parameters need to be initialized: embedding dimension m, tolerance threshold r and time series length N. However, no specific guideline exists on how to determine the appropriate parameter values for distinguishing congestive heart failure (CHF from normal sinus rhythm (NSR subjects in clinical application. In the present study, a thorough analysis on the selection of appropriate values of m, r and N for sample entropy (SampEn and recently proposed fuzzy measure entropy (FuzzyMEn is presented for distinguishing two group subjects. 44 long-term NRS and 29 long-term CHF RR interval recordings from http://www.physionet.org were used as the non-pathological and pathological data respectively. Extreme (>2 s and abnormal heartbeat RR intervals were firstly removed from each RR recording and then the recording was segmented with a non-overlapping segment length N of 300 and 1000, respectively. SampEn and FuzzyMEn were performed for each RR segment under different parameter combinations: m of 1, 2, 3 and 4, and r of 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 respectively. The statistical significance between NSR and CHF groups under each combination of m, r and N was observed. The results demonstrated that the selection of m, r and N plays a critical role in determining the SampEn and FuzzyMEn outputs. Compared with SampEn, FuzzyMEn shows a better regularity when selecting the parameters m and r. In addition, FuzzyMEn shows a better relative consistency for distinguishing the two groups, that is, the results of FuzzyMEn in the NSR group were consistently lower than those in the CHF group while SampEn were not. The selections of m of 2 and 3 and r of 0.10 and 0.15 for SampEn and the selections of m of 1 and 2 whenever r (herein

  5. Optimization of techniques for multiple platform testing in small, precious samples such as human chorionic villus sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Margareta D; Akhlaghpour, Marzieh; Lee, Bora; Barlow, Gillian M; Xu, Ning; Wang, Erica T; Mackey, Aaron J; Farber, Charles R; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-der I; Goodarzi, Mark O; Guller, Seth; Williams, John

    2016-11-01

    Multiple testing to understand global changes in gene expression based on genetic and epigenetic modifications is evolving. Chorionic villi, obtained for prenatal testing, is limited, but can be used to understand ongoing human pregnancies. However, optimal storage, processing and utilization of CVS for multiple platform testing have not been established. Leftover CVS samples were flash-frozen or preserved in RNAlater. Modifications to standard isolation kits were performed to isolate quality DNA and RNA from samples as small as 2-5 mg. RNAlater samples had significantly higher RNA yields and quality and were successfully used in microarray and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq libraries generated using 200 versus 800-ng RNA showed similar biological coefficients of variation. RNAlater samples had lower DNA yields and quality, which improved by heating the elution buffer to 70 °C. Purification of DNA was not necessary for bisulfite-conversion and genome-wide methylation profiling. CVS cells were propagated and continue to express genes found in freshly isolated chorionic villi. CVS samples preserved in RNAlater are superior. Our optimized techniques provide specimens for genetic, epigenetic and gene expression studies from a single small sample which can be used to develop diagnostics and treatments using a systems biology approach in the prenatal period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Distinct down-regulation of cardiac beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in different human heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfath, M; Geertz, B; Schmitz, W; Scholz, H; Haverich, A; Breil, I; Hanrath, P; Reupcke, C; Sigmund, M; Lo, H B

    1991-02-01

    Cardiac beta-adrenoceptor density and beta 1- and beta 2-subtype distribution were examined in human left ventricular myocardium from transplant donors serving as controls and from patients with mitral valve stenosis, aortic valve stenosis, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, and ischaemic cardiomyopathy respectively. The total beta-adrenoceptor density was similar in transplant donors and patients with moderate heart failure (NYHA II-III) due to mitral valve stenosis, but was markedly reduced in all forms of severe heart failure (NYHA III-IV) studied. A reduction of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors was found in patients with severe heart failure due to mitral valve stenosis or ischaemic cardiomyopathy. In contrast, a selective down-regulation of beta 1-adrenoceptors with unchanged beta 2-adrenoceptors and hence a relative increase in the latter was observed in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and aortic valve stenosis. It is concluded that the extent of total beta-adrenoceptor down-regulation is related to the degree of heart failure. Selective loss of beta 1-adrenoceptors is not specific for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy but also occurs in aortic valve stenosis. Changes in beta 1- and beta 2-subtype distribution are rather related to the aetiology than to the clinical degree of heart failure.

  7. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P regulation of HR within the high-frequency range (from 1.04 +/- 0.06 to 0.54 +/- 0.6 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P body heating reduced high-frequency dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR associated with spontaneous changes in blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of the flow inside the left ventricle of the human heart

    CERN Document Server

    Fortini, S; Espa, S; Cenedese, A

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory models of the human heart left ventricle developed in the last decades gave a valuable contribution to the comprehension of the role of the fluid dynamics in the cardiac function and to support the interpretation of the data obtained in vivo. Nevertheless, some questions are still open and new ones stem from the continuous improvements in the diagnostic imaging techniques. Many of these unresolved issues are related to the three-dimensional structure of the left-ventricular flow during the cardiac cycle. In this paper we investigated in detail this aspect using a laboratory model. The ventricle was simulated by a flexible sack varying its volume in time according to a physiologically shaped law. Velocities measured during several cycles on series of parallel planes, taken from two orthogonal points of view, were combined together in order to reconstruct the phase averaged, three-dimensional velocity field. During the diastole, three main steps are recognized in the evolution of the vortical str...

  9. Sex-dependent alterations of Ca2+ cycling in human cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas H; Herting, Jonas; Eiringhaus, Jörg; Pabel, Steffen; Hartmann, Nico H; Ellenberger, David; Friedrich, Martin; Renner, André; Gummert, Jan; Maier, Lars S; Zabel, Markus; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Sossalla, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Clinical studies have shown differences in the propensity for malignant ventricular arrhythmias between women and men suffering from cardiomyopathies and heart failure (HF). This is clinically relevant as it impacts therapies like prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation but the pathomechanisms are unknown. As an increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) leak is arrhythmogenic, it could represent a cellular basis for this paradox. We evaluated the SR Ca(2+) leak with respect to sex differences in (i) afterload-induced cardiac hypertrophy (Hy) with preserved left ventricular (LV) function and (ii) end-stage HF. Cardiac function did not differ between sexes in both cardiac pathologies. Human cardiomyocytes isolated from female patients with Hy showed a significantly lower Ca(2+) spark frequency (CaSpF, confocal microscopy, Fluo3-AM) compared with men (P cardiac impairment. Since the SR Ca(2+) leak triggers delayed afterdepolarizations, our findings may explain why women are less prone to ventricular arrhythmias and confirm the rationale of therapeutic measures reducing the SR Ca(2+) leak. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. mRNA expression levels in failing human hearts predict cellular electrophysiological remodeling: a population-based simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Walmsley

    Full Text Available Differences in mRNA expression levels have been observed in failing versus non-failing human hearts for several membrane channel proteins and accessory subunits. These differences may play a causal role in electrophysiological changes observed in human heart failure and atrial fibrillation, such as action potential (AP prolongation, increased AP triangulation, decreased intracellular calcium transient (CaT magnitude and decreased CaT triangulation. Our goal is to investigate whether the information contained in mRNA measurements can be used to predict cardiac electrophysiological remodeling in heart failure using computational modeling. Using mRNA data recently obtained from failing and non-failing human hearts, we construct failing and non-failing cell populations incorporating natural variability and up/down regulation of channel conductivities. Six biomarkers are calculated for each cell in each population, at cycle lengths between 1500 ms and 300 ms. Regression analysis is performed to determine which ion channels drive biomarker variability in failing versus non-failing cardiomyocytes. Our models suggest that reported mRNA expression changes are consistent with AP prolongation, increased AP triangulation, increased CaT duration, decreased CaT triangulation and amplitude, and increased delay between AP and CaT upstrokes in the failing population. Regression analysis reveals that changes in AP biomarkers are driven primarily by reduction in I[Formula: see text], and changes in CaT biomarkers are driven predominantly by reduction in I(Kr and SERCA. In particular, the role of I(CaL is pacing rate dependent. Additionally, alternans developed at fast pacing rates for both failing and non-failing cardiomyocytes, but the underlying mechanisms are different in control and heart failure.

  11. Leu-7 immunoreactivity in human and rat embryonic hearts, with special reference to the development of the conduction tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, T; Iwasaki, K; Shimokawa, I; Sakai, H; Ito, H; Matsuo, T

    1990-01-01

    The distribution pattern of Leu-7 (HNK-1) in developing human embryonic hearts and rat hearts was studied by immunohistochemistry. Human and rat embryos at Streeter's stages XIII approximately XX and fetus stage I were used. Leu-7, which is absent in the newborn rat heart, is expressed transiently in the embryo and fetus I stages. The earliest embryonic heart shows two incomplete circular structures with immunoreactivity in the myocardium along the primitive atrioventricular cushion and bulboventricular canal. These two structures become localized topographically in the definitive atrioventricular node and atrioventricular bundle after rearrangement and partial disappearance during embryonic development. At Streeter's stages XVIII approximately XX, Leu-7 immunoreactivity appears to localize topographically in almost all the pathways of the conduction system, although some discontinuities are observed in the atrioventricular junction and atrial internodal tracts. Thereafter, immunoreactivity decreases gradually and differentially by site and stage. The precise nature of Leu-7 immunoreactive cells, that is, whether or not they are neurogenic or myogenic, is not revealed by this study. The present observations are discussed in connection with the hypothesis that specialized ring tissue is the primordium of the conduction system.

  12. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. (Servizio di Endocrinologia, Milano, (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  13. Can the skull-spine length predict heart size in human embryos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aimée Vila Bormey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: embryo´s length is a global measure, relatively easy to estimate by trained personnel, and it is interesting to investigate its use as a predictor of the size reached by developing internal organs. Objective: To characterize cardiac development and its relationship to the length in human embryos. Methods: A descriptive, correlational and cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Medical Sciences of Villa Clara, which included five specimens belonging to the Embrioteca of the Medicine School. The specimens were measured, processed trough paraffin method, transversally sectioned and digitalized with aesteroscopy-attached camera. 3.0 SCOPE PHOTO software was used for the study of the six cardiac variables. With SPSS 13,0 descriptive statistics was performed as well as correlation analysis and lineal regression. Results: In the weeks 6, 7 and 8, cardiac area was of 5,19; 4,66 and 8,02 mm2 and pericardiac area was of 7,11; 6,37 and 10,07 mm2. Anteroposterior cardiac diameter was of 2,33; 2,90 and 3,44 mm and transversally measured it was of 3,03; 2,52 and 3,65 mm. Anteroposterior pericardiac diameter was of 2,66; 3,37 and 3,61 mm and transversally measured it was of 3,35; 2,64 and 3,79 mm. Anteroposterior diameters of the heart and their cavity were significantly correlated to craneo-raquis length and lineal regression equations were obtained, thus allowing the calculation of these variables. Conclusions: The present study provides both, cardiac and pericardiac morphometrical values in human embryos between six and eight weeks. Craneo-raquis length in embryos can predict their cardiac and pericardiac size.

  14. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p Ledesma M, Leon M, Laclaustra M, Pollak J, Guallar E, Cole SA, Fallin MD, Navas-Acien A. 2014. Association of global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation with metals and other exposures in human blood DNA samples. Environ Health Perspect 122:946–954; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306674 PMID:24769358

  15. Human heart sarcolemmal sheath antibodies in children with non-suppurative sequelae of group A streptococcal infections: a follow up study.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of the human heart sarcolemmal sheath antibody were studied in children with acute rheumatic fever who had no carditis, children with acute rheumatic fever who had carditis and developed rheumatic heart disease, and in children with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. The children with rheumatic fever and those who developed valvular heart disease were given continuous secondary antistreptococcal prophylaxis. The titre of antibody at onset was significantly higher than th...

  16. Theoretical analysis of the magnetocardiographic pattern for reentry wave propagation in a three-dimensional human heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Uk Bin; Kwon, Soon Sung; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Yong Ho; Park, Yong Ki; Youn, Chan Hyun; Shim, Eun Bo

    2008-01-01

    We present a computational study of reentry wave propagation using electrophysiological models of human cardiac cells and the associated magnetic field map of a human heart. We examined the details of magnetic field variation and related physiological parameters for reentry waves in two-dimensional (2-D) human atrial tissue and a three-dimensional (3-D) human ventricle model. A 3-D mesh system representing the human ventricle was reconstructed from the surface geometry of a human heart. We used existing human cardiac cell models to simulate action potential (AP) propagation in atrial tissue and 3-D ventricular geometry, and a finite element method and the Galerkin approximation to discretize the 3-D domain spatially. The reentry wave was generated using an S1-S2 protocol. The calculations of the magnetic field pattern assumed a horizontally layered conductor for reentry wave propagation in the 3-D ventricle. We also compared the AP and magnetocardiograph (MCG) magnitudes during reentry wave propagation to those during normal wave propagation. The temporal changes in the reentry wave motion and magnetic field map patterns were also analyzed using two well-known MCG parameters: the current dipole direction and strength. The current vector in a reentry wave forms a rotating spiral. We delineated the magnetic field using the changes in the vector angle during a reentry wave, demonstrating that the MCG pattern can be helpful for theoretical analysis of reentry waves.

  17. ATP synthase subunit alpha and LV mass in ischaemic human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Barderas, María G; Ortega, Ana; Molina-Navarro, Maria Micaela; Martínez, Alba; Lago, Francisca; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2015-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). In this study, the mitochondrial proteome in the cardiac tissue of ICM patients was analysed by quantitative differential electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) for the first time to provide new insights into cardiac dysfunction in this cardiomyopathy. We isolated mitochondria from LV samples of explanted hearts of ICM patients (n = 8) and control donors (n = 8) and used a proteomic approach to investigate the variations in mitochondrial protein expression. We found that most of the altered proteins were involved in cardiac energy metabolism (82%). We focused on ATPA, which is involved in energy production, and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, implicated in substrate utilization, and observed that these molecules were overexpressed and that the changes detected in the processes mediated by these proteins were closely related. Notably, we found that ATPA overexpression was associated with reduction in LV mass (r = -0.74, P ATPA could serve as a molecular target suitable for new therapeutic interventions.

  18. Dissecting spatio-temporal protein networks driving human heart development and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Mølgård, Kjeld; Greenway, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant organ development is associated with a wide spectrum of disorders, from schizophrenia to congenital heart disease, but systems-level insight into the underlying processes is very limited. Using heart morphogenesis as general model for dissecting the functional architecture of organ devel...

  19. External physical stimulation of the human-fetus during episodes of low heart-rate variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G. H. A.; ZEELENBERG, HJ; DEVRIES, JIP; DAWES, GS

    1983-01-01

    The effect of shaking the fetus through the maternal abdomen during episodes of low (nonreactive) fetal heart rate variation was studied in 10 healthy nulliparous women near term. Heart rate monitoring from an abdominal electrocardiogram was combined with real-time scanning for body movements and

  20. Discrete Scale Invariance in the Cascade Heart Rate Variability Of Healthy Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D C

    2004-01-01

    Evidence of discrete scale invariance (DSI) in daytime healthy heart rate variability (HRV) is presented based on the log-periodic power law scaling of the heart beat interval increment. Our analysis suggests multiple DSI groups and a dynamic cascading process. A cascade model is presented to simulate such a property.

  1. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation.

  2. A medical student elective promoting humanism, communication skills, complementary and alternative medicine and physician self-care: an evaluation of the HEART program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, Michelle L; Kohatsu, Wendy; Nunley, William; Mehta, Darshan; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S; Yeh, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    In 2002 the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) created a fourth-year medical student elective known as the Humanistic Elective in alternative medicine, Activism, and Reflective Transformation (HEART) that provided the opportunity for students to explore humanism in medicine, self-care, complementary and alternative medicine modalities, communication, activism, and community building in a four-week immersion experience. The educational effects of this elective, and whether it has met its stated goals, are unknown. The authors conducted a web-based, cross-sectional survey of the first eight cohorts of HEART graduates in 2010. Survey questions assessed respondents' demographics and perspectives on the educational impact of the elective. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and qualitative analyses were guided by grounded theory. Of 168 eligible alumni, 122 (73%) completed the survey. The majority were female (70%), age ≤35 (77%) years, and trained in primary care specialties (66%). Half were attendings in practice. The majority of respondents felt the elective taught professionalism (89%) and communication skills (92%) well or very well. The majority highly agreed that the elective helped them better cope with stress during residency training (80%), taught them self-care skills (75%), and improved their ability to empathize and connect with patients (71%). Qualitative analysis of the personal and professional impact of the elective identified twelve common themes with self-discovery, self-care, and collegial development/community most frequently cited. The majority of HEART graduates endorse learning important skills and benefiting from the experience both personally and professionally. Aspects of the HEART curriculum may help training programs teach professionalism and improve trainee well-being. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Hunted Wild Boars (Sus scrofa): Heart Meat Juice as an Alternative Sample to Serum for the Detection of Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catarina; Lopes, Ana Patrícia; Mesquita, João Rodrigo; Cardoso, Luís; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a global zoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Detection of antibodies to T. gondii in serum samples from hunted animals may represent a key step for public health protection. It is also important to assess the circulation of this parasite in wild boar population. However, in hunted animals, collection of blood is not feasible and meat juice may represent an alternative sample. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate heart meat juice of hunted wild boars as an alternative sample for post-mortem detection of antibodies to T. gondii by modified agglutination test (MAT). The agreement beyond chance between results from meat juice assessed with Cohen's kappa coefficient revealed that the 1:20 meat juice dilution provided the highest agreement. McNemars's test further revealed 1:10 as the most suitable meat juice dilution, as the proportion of positive paired samples (serum and meat juice from the same animal) did not differ at this dilution. All together, these results suggest a reasonable accuracy of heart meat juice to detect antibodies to T. gondii by MAT and support it as an alternative sample in post-mortem analysis in hunted wild boars.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Heart Failure in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A State-of-the-Art Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald S Bloomfield; Alenezi, Fawaz; Barasa, Felix A.; Lumsden, Rebecca; Mayosi, Bongani M; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful combination therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed this disease from a short-lived infection with high mortality to a chronic disease associated with increasing life expectancy. This is true for high- as well as low- and middle-income countries. As a result of this increased life expectancy, people living with HIV are now at risk of developing other chronic diseases associated with aging. Heart failure has been common among people living with HIV in the eras...

  5. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  6. Prostacyclins have no direct inotropic effect on isolated atrial strips from the normal and pressure-overloaded human right heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Sarah; Andersen, Asger; Jensen, Rebekka V; Kimose, Hans Henrik; Ilkjær, Lars B; Shen, Lei; Clapp, Lucie H; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-01-01

    Prostacyclins are vasodilatory agents used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The direct effects of prostacyclins on right heart function are still not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible direct inotropic properties of clinical available prostacyclin mimetics in the normal and the pressure-overloaded human right atrium. Trabeculae from the right atrium were collected during surgery from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients with pressure-overloaded right hearts, undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (n = 10) and from patients with normal right hearts operated by valve replacement or coronary bypass surgery (n = 9). The trabeculae were placed in an organ bath, continuously paced at 1 Hz. They were subjected to increasing concentrations of iloprost, treprostinil, epoprostenol, or MRE-269, followed by isoprenaline to elicit a reference inotropic response. The force of contraction was measured continuously. The expression of prostanoid receptors was explored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Iloprost, treprostinil, epoprostenol, or MRE-269 did not alter force of contraction in any of the trabeculae. Isoprenaline showed a direct inotropic response in both trabeculae from the pressure-overloaded right atrium and from the normal right atrium. Control experiments on ventricular trabeculae from the pig failed to show an inotropic response to the prostacyclin mimetics. qPCR demonstrated varying expression of the different prostanoid receptors in the human atrium. In conclusion, prostacyclin mimetics did not increase the force of contraction of human atrial trabeculae from the normal or the pressure-overloaded right heart. These data suggest that prostacyclin mimetics have no direct inotropic effects in the human right atrium.

  7. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne van Geemen

    Full Text Available There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  8. The cardiac cycle time effect revisited: Temporal dynamics of the central-vagal modulation of heart rate in human reaction time tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, R.J.M.; Jennings, J.R.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Lacey and Lacey (1974) suggested that during reaction time tasks higher brain centers dynamically adjust efferent vagal nerve pulses to the sino-atrial node of the heart, inducing phase-dependent heart rate changes. Since then, animal and human neuro-physiological results have provided evidence for

  9. The cardiac cycle time effect revisited: Temporal dynamics of the central-vagal modulation of heart rate in human reaction time tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. Somsen; J.R. Jennings; M.W. van der Molen

    2004-01-01

    Lacey and Lacey (1974) suggested that during reaction time tasks higher brain centers dynamically adjust efferent vagal nerve pulses to the sino-atrial node of the heart, inducing phase-dependent heart rate changes. Since then, animal and human neuro-physiological results have provided evidence for

  10. A Systematic Review to Investigate Whether Angiotensin-(1-7 Is a Promising Therapeutic Target in Human Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Heart failure (HF is a common condition causing much morbidity and mortality despite major advances in pharmacological and device therapies. Preclinical data suggest a cardioprotective role of Angiotensin-(1-7 in animal models of HF. Objective. Perform a systematic review on the effects of Angiotensin-(1-7 on humans, focusing on HF. Results. 39 studies were included in the review (4 in human HF and (35 in non-HF patients. There is only one intervention study on 8 patients with human HF, using Angiotensin-(1-7, with forearm blood flow (FBF as the endpoint. Angiotensin-(1-7 caused no significant effect on FBF in this HF study but caused vasodilation in 3 out of 4 non-HF studies. In one other non-HF study, Angiotensin-(1-7 infusion led to a significant increase in blood pressure in normal men; however, effects were <0.03% that of angiotensin II. Cardioprotective effects seen in non-HF studies include for instance beneficial actions against atherosclerosis and myocardial fibrosis. Conclusions. The main finding of our systematic review is that Angiotensin-(1-7 plays an important cardioprotective role in HF in animals and in patients without heart failure. More research is required to test the hypothesis that Angiotensin-(1-7 benefits patients with heart failure.

  11. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  12. Bacteria-human somatic cell lateral gene transfer is enriched in cancer samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Riley

    Full Text Available There are 10× more bacterial cells in our bodies from the microbiome than human cells. Viral DNA is known to integrate in the human genome, but the integration of bacterial DNA has not been described. Using publicly available sequence data from the human genome project, the 1000 Genomes Project, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we examined bacterial DNA integration into the human somatic genome. Here we present evidence that bacterial DNA integrates into the human somatic genome through an RNA intermediate, and that such integrations are detected more frequently in (a tumors than normal samples, (b RNA than DNA samples, and (c the mitochondrial genome than the nuclear genome. Hundreds of thousands of paired reads support random integration of Acinetobacter-like DNA in the human mitochondrial genome in acute myeloid leukemia samples. Numerous read pairs across multiple stomach adenocarcinoma samples support specific integration of Pseudomonas-like DNA in the 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR of four proto-oncogenes that are up-regulated in their transcription, consistent with conversion to an oncogene. These data support our hypothesis that bacterial integrations occur in the human somatic genome and may play a role in carcinogenesis. We anticipate that the application of our approach to additional cancer genome projects will lead to the more frequent detection of bacterial DNA integrations in tumors that are in close proximity to the human microbiome.

  13. What does the correlation dimension of the human heart rate measure?

    CERN Document Server

    Sakki, M; Vainu, M; Laan, M

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that for the heart rate variability, finite values of the correlation dimension D (calculated by the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm) cannot be considered as an evidence for a deterministic chaos inside the heart. Finiteness of D is explained by finite resolving power of the recording apparatus. The correlation dimension depends both on the short-time variability of the heart rhythm, and on the resolving power of the electrocardiogram. In principle, it can be used as a certain measure of short-time variability of the signal, but its diagnostic value on test groups was negligible.

  14. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  15. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  16. Hybrid mathematical model of cardiomyocyte turnover in the adult human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A Elser

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%. OBJECTIVE: Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4-6% increasing to 15-22% with age that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. CONCLUSIONS: Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of

  17. Reflections on human Pavlovian decelerative heart-rate conditioning with negative tilt as US: alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, J J

    1992-01-01

    The negative-tilt preparation that has been reported since the late seventies is a specific form of Pavlovian conditioning that is of scientific interest and has potential applications. In this paper I reflect on the usefulness, to the development of this preparation, of two approaches to Pavlovian conditioning. One approach is the older S-R learning, stimulus-substitution paradigm exemplified by learning texts of the sixties. The other is the modern, Tolman-like view, according to which the phenomenon of Pavlovian conditioning is "now described as the learning of relations among events so as to allow the organism to represent its environment." The three assumptions encapsulated by this approach are: (a) that only CS-US contingency relations are learned; (b) that teleological modes of explanations are adequate; (c) that the representational theory of knowledge is sound. Concerning Pavlovian conditioning in general, questions been raised in the literature for all three assumptions; they have not been adequately answered. Regarding the specific problem of developing the human Pavlovian heart-rate decelerative conditioning with negative tilt as the US, I suggest that the cognitive approach has been much less helpful than the older, S-R, stimulus-substitution paradigm. Nevertheless, other literature clearly indicates that the cognitive, S-S approach has generated considerable interest and research, especially in preparations like the conditioned emotional response (CER), which are CS-IR ones in the sense that the effects on the CR are assessed indirectly through measuring an indicator or instrumental response (IR).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella spp. in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnejad, Reza; Mohamadi, Mozafar; Piranfar, Vahbeh; Mortazavi, Seied Mojtaba; Kachuei, Reza

    2013-06-01

    To design a duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella species. in human blood samples. Fifty-two peripheral bloods samples were collected from suspicious patients with brucellosis. Following DNA extraction, PCR assay were performed, using three primers that could simultaneously identify and differentiate three major species of pathogenic Brucella in humans and animals. Of the 52 peripheral bloods samples tested, 25 sample (48%) showed positive reactions in PCR. Twelve samples were positive for Brucella abortus 39 (B. abortus 39) (23%), 13 for Brucella melitensis 39 (B. melitensis 39) (25%) and 0 for Brucella ovis 39 (B. ovis 39) (0%). This work demonstrates that in case where specific primers were utilized, duplex PCR has proved to be a simple, fast, and relatively inexpensive method for simultaneous detection of important species of Brucella in clinical samples. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A duplex PCR for the rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella spp. in human blood samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mirnejad; Mozafar mohamadi; Vahbeh Piranfar; Seied Mojtaba Mortazavi; Reza Kachuei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To design a duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella species. in human blood samples. Methods: Fifty-two peripheral bloods samples were collected from suspicious patients with brucellosis. Following DNA extraction, PCR assay were performed, using three primers that could simultaneously identify and differentiate three major species of pathogenic Brucella in humans and animals. Results: Of the 52 peripheral bloods samples tested, 25 sample (48%) showed positive reactions in PCR. Twelve samples were positive for Brucella abortus (B. abortus) (23%), 13 for Brucella melitensis (B. melitensis) (25%) and 0 for Brucella ovis (B. ovis) (0%). Conclusions: This work de=monstrates that in case where specific primers were utilized, duplex PCR has proved to be a simple, fast, and relatively inexpensive method for simultaneous detection of important species of Brucella in clinical samples.

  20. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  1. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  2. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  3. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  4. Guided Tissue Regeneration in Heart Valve Replacement: From Preclinical Research to First-in-Human Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Iop, L.; Gerosa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve tissue-guided regeneration aims to offer a functional and viable alternative to current prosthetic replacements. Not requiring previous cell seeding and conditioning in bioreactors, such exceptional tissue engineering approach is a very fascinating translational regenerative strategy. After in vivo implantation, decellularized heart valve scaffolds drive their same repopulation by recipient’s cells for a prospective autologous-like tissue reconstruction, remodeling, and adaptation...

  5. ALDH1A2 (RALDH2 genetic variation in human congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesquita Sonia MF

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling by the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA is required at multiple steps of cardiac development. Since conversion of retinaldehyde to RA by retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type II (ALDH1A2, a.k.a RALDH2 is critical for cardiac development, we screened patients with congenital heart disease (CHDs for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus. Methods One-hundred and thirty-three CHD patients were screened for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus through bi-directional sequencing. In addition, six SNPs (rs2704188, rs1441815, rs3784259, rs1530293, rs1899430 at the same locus were studied using a TDT-based association approach in 101 CHD trios. Observed mutations were modeled through molecular mechanics (MM simulations using the AMBER 9 package, Sander and Pmemd programs. Sequence conservation of observed mutations was evaluated through phylogenetic tree construction from ungapped alignments containing ALDH8 s, ALDH1Ls, ALDH1 s and ALDH2 s. Trees were generated by the Neighbor Joining method. Variations potentially affecting splicing mechanisms were cloned and functional assays were designed to test splicing alterations using the pSPL3 splicing assay. Results We describe in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF the mutations Ala151Ser and Ile157Thr that change non-polar to polar residues at exon 4. Exon 4 encodes part of the highly-conserved tetramerization domain, a structural motif required for ALDH oligomerization. Molecular mechanics simulation studies of the two mutations indicate that they hinder tetramerization. We determined that the SNP rs16939660, previously associated with spina bifida and observed in patients with TOF, does not affect splicing. Moreover, association studies performed with classical models and with the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT design using single marker genotype, or haplotype information do not show differences between cases and controls. Conclusion In summary, our screen indicates that

  6. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Matthew A; Hsieh, Michael K H; Njoroge, Linda W; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Feger, Bryan J; Troupes, Constantine D; Hershberger, Kathleen A; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Nagel, Whitney L; Landinez, Gina P; Shah, Kishan M; Burns, Virginia A; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D; Foster, Matthew W; Milano, Carmelo A; Moseley, M Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (pfailure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  7. Localizations of Na(+)-D-glucose cotransporters SGLT1 and SGLT2 in human kidney and of SGLT1 in human small intestine, liver, lung, and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovac, Ivana; Balen Eror, Daniela; Klessen, Dirk; Burger, Christa; Breljak, Davorka; Kraus, Ognjen; Radović, Nikola; Jadrijević, Stipe; Aleksic, Ivan; Walles, Thorsten; Sauvant, Christoph; Sabolić, Ivan; Koepsell, Hermann

    2015-09-01

    Novel affinity-purified antibodies against human SGLT1 (hSGLT1) and SGLT2 (hSGLT2) were used to localize hSGLT2 in human kidney and hSGLT1 in human kidney, small intestine, liver, lung, and heart. The renal locations of both transporters largely resembled those in rats and mice; hSGLT2 and SGLT1 were localized to the brush border membrane (BBM) of proximal tubule S1/S2 and S3 segments, respectively. Different to rodents, the renal expression of hSGLT1 was absent in thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) and macula densa, and the expression of both hSGLTs was sex-independent. In small intestinal enterocytes, hSGLT1 was localized to the BBM and subapical vesicles. Performing double labeling with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), hSGLT1 was localized to GLP-1-secreting L cells and GIP-secreting K cells as has been shown in mice. In liver, hSGLT1 was localized to biliary duct cells as has been shown in rats. In lung, hSGLT1 was localized to alveolar epithelial type 2 cells and to bronchiolar Clara cells. Expression of hSGLT1 in Clara cells was verified by double labeling with the Clara cell secretory protein CC10. Double labeling of human heart with aquaporin 1 immunolocalized the hSGLT1 protein in heart capillaries rather than in previously assumed myocyte sarcolemma. The newly identified locations of hSGLT1 implicate several extra renal functions of this transporter, such as fluid absorption in the lung, energy supply to Clara cells, regulation of enteroendocrine cells secretion, and release of glucose from heart capillaries. These functions may be blocked by reversible SGLT1 inhibitors which are under development.

  8. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  9. The human heart and the circulatory system as an interesting interdisciplinary topic in lessons of physics and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volná, M.; Látal, F.; Kubínek, R.; Richterek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Many topics which are closely related can be found in the national curriculum of the Czech Republic for physics and biology. One of them is the heart and the circulatory system in the human body. This topic was examined cross curriculum, a teaching module was created and the topic was chosen for our research. The task was to determine if the students of bachelor study are aware of connections between physics and biology within this topic and whether we can help them effectively to describe the corresponding physics phenomena in the human body connected, for example, with a heart attack or with the measurement of blood pressure. In this paper, the heart and the circulatory system are presented as suitable topics for an interdisciplinary teaching module which includes both theoretical and experimental parts. The module was evaluated by a group of first-year undergraduate students of physics at the Faculty of Science, Palacký University. The acquired knowledge was compared with another control group through a test. The highest efficiency of the module was evaluated on the basis of questions that covered the calculation problems.

  10. Human Cardiosphere-Derived Cells From Advanced Heart Failure Patients Exhibit Augmented Functional Potency in Myocardial Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Deliang; Sun, Baiming; Blusztajn, Agnieszka; Xie, Yucai; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aminzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Liu, Weixin; Li, Tao-Sheng; De Robertis, Michele A.; Marbán, Linda; Czer, Lawrence S. C.; Trento, Alfredo; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to compare the regenerative potency of cells derived from healthy and diseased human hearts. Background Results from pre-clinical studies and the CADUCEUS (CArdiosphere-Derived aUtologous stem CElls to reverse ventricUlar dySfunction) trial support the notion that cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) from normal and recently infarcted hearts are capable of regenerating healthy heart tissue after myocardial infarction (MI). It is unknown whether CDCs derived from advanced heart failure (HF) patients retain the same regenerative potency. Methods In a mouse model of acute MI, we compared the regenerative potential and functional benefits of CDCs derived from 3 groups: 1) non-failing (NF) donor: healthy donor hearts post-transplantation; 2) MI: patients who had an MI 9 to 35 days before biopsy; and 3) HF: advanced cardiomyopathy tissue explanted at cardiac transplantation. Results Cell growth and phenotype were identical in all 3 groups. Injection of HF CDCs led to the greatest therapeutic benefit in mice, with the highest left ventricular ejection fraction, thickest infarct wall, most viable tissue, and least scar 3 weeks after treatment. In vitro assays revealed that HF CDCs secreted higher levels of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), which may contribute to the cells’ augmented resistance to oxidative stress, enhanced angiogenesis, and improved myocyte survival. Histological analysis indicated that HF CDCs engrafted better, recruited more endogenous stem cells, and induced greater angiogenesis and cardiomyocyte cell-cycle re-entry. CDC-secreted SDF-1 levels correlated with decreases in scar mass over time in CADUCEUS patients treated with autologous CDCs. Conclusions CDCs from advanced HF patients exhibit augmented potency in ameliorating ventricular dysfunction post-MI, possibly through SDF-1–mediated mechanisms. PMID:24511463

  11. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Schechter

    Full Text Available The molecular differences between ischemic (IF and non-ischemic (NIF heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05 when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the NVT Allegra transcatheter heart valve system: first-in-human experience with a novel self-expanding transcatheter heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenaweser, Peter; Stortecky, Stefan; Schütz, Torsten; Praz, Fabien; Gloekler, Steffen; Windecker, Stephan; Elsässer, Albrecht

    2016-05-17

    We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and investigate the safety of a novel, self-expanding trans-catheter heart valve in a selected patient population with severe aortic stenosis. Between January and September 2013, a total of 21 patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were eligible for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with the self-expanding NVT Allegra bioprosthesis (New Valve Technology, Hechingen, Germany) at two cardiovascular centres. Patients were elderly (age 83.8±4 years), predominantly female (95.2%), and all were considered to be at prohibitive risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (logistic EuroSCORE 30.4±11%). Procedural and device success was achieved in 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively. Echocardiographic assessment at discharge showed favourable haemodynamic results with a reduction of the mean transvalvular aortic gradient from 48.0±21 mmHg to 8.9±3 mmHg. In the majority of patients (90.5%), none or trace aortic regurgitation was recorded. Permanent pacemaker implantation was required in 23.8% of patients within the first 30 days of follow-up. Apart from one procedural death, no other serious adverse events were observed during the periprocedural period. TAVI with the NVT Allegra system was highly effective in alleviating symptoms and reducing NYHA functional class at 30-day follow-up. The first-in-human experience with the NVT Allegra transcatheter heart valve prosthesis was associated with a high rate of procedural success. Furthermore, the NVT Allegra bioprosthesis was able to achieve favourable haemodynamic results and effectively alleviate symptoms at 30-day follow-up. The larger, multicentre NAUTILUS study will provide further information on the safety and efficacy of this novel, second-generation transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis.

  13. Genotyping of cystic echinococcosis isolates from clinical samples of human and domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Fadhil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic hydatid disease is a cosmopolitan important disease in both human and animals. Many strains were investigated in this parasite. The aim of study was to characterize genotype variations of Echinococcus granulosus isolates collected from human and domestic animals in Al-Qadisiyah province/ Iraq based on sequencing of nad1 mitochondrial gene. Eighty hydatid cysts of human (12, sheep (15, cattle (36, and camels (17 were collected from hospital and slaughter house of the province, during October 2014 to June 2015; microscopic examination was made for cysts fluid to determine the fertility. DNAs extraction was done for each sample in addition to purify and concentrate of extracted DNA samples was performed to determine nad1 (400bp gene used conventional PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using NCBI-Blast Alignment identification and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean. Twenty five (10 from human and 5 from each studied animals samples were chosen due to their fertility and high DNA purity, in which three strains (genotypes were investigated including sheep strain (G1 40%, buffalo strain (G3 48% and camel strain (G6 12%, where human samples related to G1(20% and G3(80%; sheep samples related to G1(80% and G3(20%; cattle samples related to G1(60%, G3 (20% and G6 (20%; camels samples related to G1(20%, G3(40% and G6(40%. The dominant strain is a buffalo strain (G3; both of buffalo strain (G3 and sheep strain (G1 represented the actual source of human infection. There is no host specificity of detected genotypes.

  14. Simulation of the contraction of the ventricles in a human heart model including atria and pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Thomas; Wieners, Christian; Seemann, Gunnar; Steen, Henning; Dössel, Olaf

    2014-06-01

    During the contraction of the ventricles, the ventricles interact with the atria as well as with the pericardium and the surrounding tissue in which the heart is embedded. The atria are stretched, and the atrioventricular plane moves toward the apex. The atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD) is considered to be a major contributor to the ventricular function, and a reduced AVPD is strongly related to heart failure. At the same time, the epicardium slides almost frictionlessly on the pericardium with permanent contact. Although the interaction between the ventricles, the atria and the pericardium plays an important role for the deformation of the heart, this aspect is usually not considered in computational models. In this work, we present an electromechanical model of the heart, which takes into account the interaction between ventricles, pericardium and atria and allows to reproduce the AVPD. To solve the contact problem of epicardium and pericardium, a contact handling algorithm based on penalty formulation was developed, which ensures frictionless and permanent contact. Two simulations of the ventricular contraction were conducted, one with contact handling of pericardium and heart and one without. In the simulation with contact handling, the atria were stretched during the contraction of the ventricles, while, due to the permanent contact with the pericardium, their volume increased. In contrast to that, in the simulations without pericardium, the atria were also stretched, but the change in the atrial volume was much smaller. Furthermore, the pericardium reduced the radial contraction of the ventricles and at the same time increased the AVPD.

  15. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  16. Phase-dependent chronotropic response of the heart during running in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kunihiko; Takei, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Masaki; Yanagida, Yasuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    Heartbeat modulation by muscle contraction during rhythmic exercise involving a small muscle mass is phase-dependent, reflecting the timing of the muscle contraction within the cardiac cycle, but it remains unclear whether such modulation occurs during whole body exercise. To determine whether phase-dependent chronotropic changes in the heart would occur during running, we investigated the relationship between R-R interval (RRI) and the timing of vastus lateralis muscle contractions within the cardiac cycle. Seven healthy subjects were examined during high intensity running where the target heart rate was 160 beats . min(-1). The running pitch was made to wax and wane periodically in the neighborhood of the target heart rate to scan the effect of footfall timing within the cardiac cycle on heart period. We found that when muscle contraction occurred early in the cardiac cycle, RRI was reduced from the mean RRI (Pincrease (P>0.05). Thus, the curve reflecting this phase-dependent relationship between heart period and timing of muscle contraction showed a positive slope within the first one-quarter to three-quarters of the cardiac cycle. Our results suggest the existence of a mechanism that provides beat-by-beat regulation of RRI even when it is very short (approximately 375 ms), i.e., a cardio-locomotor synchronization develops during running, when the frequencies of the two rhythms approach one another.

  17. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina J. Hansen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI; however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW and systolic area of contraction (SAC and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6 significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011 and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015 when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6 (p  0.05; however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%, where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6% and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8% suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area was significantly decreased in the unseeded group compared with that in the hMSC-seeded group (p < 0.05. This study demonstrated that hMSC-seeded biological sutures are a method to deliver cells to the infarcted myocardium and have treatment potential.

  18. Lack of prognostic value of type D personality for mortality in a large sample of heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, James C; Jaarsma, Tiny; Luttik, Marie-Louise; van Sonderen, Eric; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Sanderman, Robbert

    2011-09-01

    Type D personality has been proposed as a prognostic indicator for mortality in cardiovascular disease. Most research examining this construct originates from one research group, and it is critical that the predictive value of Type D personality for adverse outcomes is independently cross-validated. This study examined its prognostic value in heart failure, relative to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and depressive symptoms. We studied 706 patients with complete BNP, depressive symptom, and Type D personality and mortality data from 958 patients with heart failure enrolled after hospitalization for a multisite study of a disease management program. Multivariable models were adjusted for BNP and depression. At 18 months, there were 192 deaths (27.2%). No evidence was found for a prognostic value of Type D personality in the unadjusted model (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.893, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.582-1.370). In contrast, BNP was significantly predictive of mortality (HR = 1.588, 95% CI = 1.391-1.812), whereas depression was not (HR = 1.011, 95% CI = 0.998-1.024). Type D was also not predictive in covariate-adjusted models (HR = 0.779, 95% CI = 0.489-1.242). Similar results were obtained when analyzing Type D as the interaction between continuous z scores of its two components, negative affectivity and social inhibition (p = .144). In the largest study to date, Type D does not predict mortality. Future research should construe Type D as the interaction of continuous negative affectivity and social inhibition z scores, rather than as a typology, and consider analyses replacing negative affectivity with depression.

  19. Bleeding-Heart Liberals and Hard-Hearted Conservatives: Subtle Political Dehumanization Through Differential Attributions of Human Nature and Human Uniqueness Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarret T. Crawford

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research demonstrated that human nature (HN and human uniqueness (HU traits capture the content of Americans’ stereotypes about liberals and conservatives, respectively. Consistent with expectations derived from dehumanization theory, people more strongly associated HN traits with liberals than with conservatives, and more strongly associated HU traits with conservatives than with liberals. A trait × target ideology × perceiver ideology × trait valence interaction suggested that both liberals and conservatives more strongly associated their ingroup with stereotype-consistent positive traits, and their outgroup with stereotype-consistent negative traits. Mediation analyses revealed that outgroup antipathy, but not ingroup liking, explained the relationship between ideology and political outgroup dehumanization. Finally, humanness traits captured subtle differences in political stereotype content not captured with the warmth and competence dimensions derived from the stereotype content model. Together, these results indicate that differential attributions of HN and HU traits capture political stereotype content and function to subtly dehumanize one’s political opponents.

  20. Reduced response to IKr blockade and altered hERG1a/1b stoichiometry in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Gomez, Juan F; Glukhov, Alexey V; Madden, Eli J; Koppel, Aaron C; Ewald, Gregory A; Trenor, Beatriz; Efimov, Igor R

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) claims 250,000 lives per year in the US, and nearly half of these deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. QT interval and action potential (AP) prolongation are hallmark proarrhythmic changes in the failing myocardium, which potentially result from alterations in repolarizing potassium currents. Thus, we aimed to examine whether decreased expression of the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr, contributes to repolarization abnormalities in human HF. To map functional IKr expression across the left ventricle (LV), we optically imaged coronary-perfused LV free wall from donor and end-stage failing human hearts. The LV wedge preparation was used to examine transmural AP durations at 80% repolarization (APD80), and treatment with the IKr-blocking drug, E-4031, was utilized to interrogate functional expression. We assessed the percent change in APD80 post-IKr blockade relative to baseline APD80 (∆APD80) and found that ∆APD80s are reduced in failing versus donor hearts in each transmural region, with 0.35-, 0.43-, and 0.41-fold reductions in endo-, mid-, and epicardium, respectively (p=0.008, 0.037, and 0.022). We then assessed hERG1 isoform gene and protein expression levels using qPCR and Western blot. While we did not observe differences in hERG1a or hERG1b gene expression between donor and failing hearts, we found a shift in the hERG1a:hERG1b isoform stoichiometry at the protein level. Computer simulations were then conducted to assess IKr block under E-4031 influence in failing and nonfailing conditions. Our results confirmed the experimental observations and E-4031-induced relative APD80 prolongation was greater in normal conditions than in failing conditions, provided that the cellular model of HF included a significant downregulation of IKr. In human HF, the response to IKr blockade is reduced, suggesting decreased functional IKr expression. This attenuated functional response is associated with

  1. Determination of cadmium and lead in human biological samples by spectrometric techniques: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; de Carvalho, Anaildes Lago

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of human biological samples, such as blood, urine, nails, and hair, is generally used for the verification of human exposure to toxic metals. In this review, various spectrometric methods for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples are discussed and compared. Several spectrometric techniques are presented and discussed with respect to various characteristics such as sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Special attention is drawn to the procedures for digestion prior to the determination of cadmium and lead in hair, nails, blood, and urine.

  2. Detection of Campylobacter in human and animal field samples in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbjer, Kristina; Tano, Eva; Chhayheng, Leang; Mac-Kwashie, Akofa Olivia; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Ellström, Patrik; Sokerya, Seng; Sokheng, Choup; Mom, Veng; Chheng, Kannarath; San, Sorn; Davun, Holl; Boqvist, Sofia; Rautelin, Hilpi; Magnusson, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter are zoonotic bacteria and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide with Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli being the most commonly detected species. The aim of this study was to detect Campylobacter in humans and livestock (chickens, ducks, pigs, cattle, water buffalo, quail, pigeons and geese) in rural households by routine culturing and multiplex PCR in faecal samples frozen before analysis. Of 681 human samples, 82 (12%) tested positive by PCR (C. jejuni in 66 samples and C. coli in 16), but none by routine culture. Children were more commonly Campylobacter positive (19%) than adult males (8%) and females (7%). Of 853 livestock samples, 106 (12%) tested positive by routine culture and 352 (41%) by PCR. Campylobacter jejuni was more frequent in chickens and ducks and C. coli in pigs. In conclusion, Campylobacter proved to be highly prevalent by PCR in children (19%), ducks (24%), chickens (56%) and pigs (72%). Routine culturing was insufficiently sensitive in detecting Campylobacter in field samples frozen before analysis. These findings suggest that PCR should be the preferred diagnostic method for detection of Campylobacter in humans and livestock where timely culture is not feasible. © 2016 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Societies for Medical Microbiology and Pathology.

  3. Proteomic biomarker discovery in 1000 human plasma samples with mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John

    2016-01-01

    the quality of the MS data and provided descriptive statistics. The data set was interrogated for proteins with most stable expression levels in that set of plasma samples. We evaluated standard clinical variables that typically impact forthcoming results and assessed body mass index-associated and gender......-specific proteins at two time points. We demonstrate that analyzing a large number of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery with MS using isobaric tagging is feasible, providing robust and consistent biological results....

  4. MicroRNA deep sequencing reveals chamber-specific miR-208 family expression patterns in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tanaka, Masayuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideki; Ochiai, Eriko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-05-15

    Heart chamber-specific mRNA expression patterns have been extensively studied, and dynamic changes have been reported in many cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are also important regulators of normal cardiac development and functions that generally suppress gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent focus has been placed on circulating miRNAs as potential biomarkers for cardiac disorders. However, miRNA expression levels in human normal hearts have not been thoroughly studied, and chamber-specific miRNA expression signatures in particular remain unclear. We performed miRNA deep sequencing on human paired left atria (LA) and ventricles (LV) under normal physiologic conditions. Among 438 miRNAs, miR-1 was the most abundant in both chambers, representing 21% of the miRNAs in LA and 26% in LV. A total of 25 miRNAs were differentially expressed between LA and LV; 14 were upregulated in LA, and 11 were highly expressed in LV. Notably, the miR-208 family in particular showed prominent chamber specificity; miR-208a-3p and miR-208a-5p were abundant in LA, whereas miR-208b-3p and miR-208b-5p were preferentially expressed in LV. Subsequent real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis validated the predominant expression of miR-208a in LA and miR-208b in LV. Human atrial and ventricular tissues display characteristic miRNA expression signatures under physiological conditions. Notably, miR-208a and miR-208b show significant chamber-specificity as do their host genes, α-MHC and β-MHC, which are mainly expressed in the atria and ventricles, respectively. These findings might also serve to enhance our understanding of cardiac miRNAs and various heart diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal superoxide overproduction and endothelial activation in guinea-pig heart; seasonal oxidative stress in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konior, Anna; Klemenska, Emilia; Brudek, Magdalena; Podolecka, Ewa; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    Seasonality in endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress was noted in humans and rats, suggesting it is a common phenomenon of a potential clinical relevance. We aimed at studying (i) seasonal variations in cardiac superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in rodents and in 8-isoprostane urinary excretion in humans, (ii) the mechanism of cardiac O(2)(-) overproduction occurring in late spring/summer months in rodents, (iii) whether this seasonal O(2)(-)-overproduction is associated with a pro-inflammatory endothelial activation, and (iv) how the summer-associated changes compare to those caused by diabetes, a classical cardiovascular risk factor. Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig and rat hearts generated ~100% more O(2)(-), and human subjects excreted 65% more 8-isoprostane in the summer vs. other seasons. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and NO synthase inhibited the seasonal O(2)(-)-overproduction. In the summer vs. other seasons, cardiac NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, and protein expression were increased, the endothelial NO synthase and superoxide dismutases were downregulated, and, in guinea-pig hearts, adhesion molecules upregulation and the endothelial glycocalyx destruction associated these changes. In guinea-pig hearts, the summer and a streptozotocin-induced diabetes mediated similar changes, yet, more severe endothelial activation associated the diabetes. These findings suggest that the seasonal oxidative stress is a common phenomenon, associated, at least in guinea-pigs, with the endothelial activation. Nonetheless, its biological meaning (regulatory vs. deleterious) remains unclear. Upregulated NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase are the sources of the seasonal O(2)(-)-overproduction.

  6. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, Melanie A; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (voltage alternans (APV-ALT), the cellular driver of MTWA. Our goal was to uncover the mechanisms linking APV-ALT and FORCE-ALT in failing human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (<110 bpm), where APV-ALT was smallest. We found that the magnitudes of FORCE-ALT, CA-ALT and APV-ALT were altered by heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart-failure-induced electrical and mechanical alternans and how they are altered by physiological conditions at near-resting heart rates.

  7. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  8. Modeling the Human Scarred Heart In Vitro : Toward New Tissue Engineered Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deddens, Janine C.; Sadeghi, Amir Hossein; Hjortnaes, Jesper; van Laake, Linda W.; Buijsrogge, Marc; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is critical for effective tissue healing, however, excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix components contribute to scarring and failing of the heart. Despite the fact that novel therapies have emerged, there are still no lifelong solutions for this problem. An

  9. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were dete

  10. Reconstruction and Visualization of Fiber and Laminar Structure inthe Normal Human Heart from Ex Vivo DTMRI Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohmer, Damien; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-12-18

    Background - The human heart is composed of a helicalnetwork of muscle fibers. These fibers are organized to form sheets thatare separated by cleavage surfaces. This complex structure of fibers andsheets is responsible for the orthotropic mechanical properties ofcardiac muscle. The understanding of the configuration of the 3D fiberand sheet structure is important for modeling the mechanical andelectrical properties of the heart and changes in this configuration maybe of significant importance to understand the remodeling aftermyocardial infarction.Methods - Anisotropic least square filteringfollowed by fiber and sheet tracking techniques were applied to DiffusionTensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DTMRI) data of the excised humanheart. The fiber configuration was visualized by using thin tubes toincrease 3-dimensional visual perception of the complex structure. Thesheet structures were reconstructed from the DTMRI data, obtainingsurfaces that span the wall from the endo- to the epicardium. Allvisualizations were performed using the high-quality ray-tracing softwarePOV-Ray. Results - The fibers are shown to lie in sheets that haveconcave or convex transmural structure which correspond to histologicalstudies published in the literature. The fiber angles varied depending onthe position between the epi- and endocardium. The sheets had a complexstructure that depended on the location within the myocardium. In theapex region the sheets had more curvature. Conclusions - A high-qualityvisualization algorithm applied to demonstrated high quality DTMRI datais able to elicit the comprehension of the complex 3 dimensionalstructure of the fibers and sheets in the heart.

  11. [Application of the immunohistochemical detection of PGP 9.5 protein for the study of rat and human heart innervation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhevskiy, D E; Sukhorukova, Ye G; Petrova, Ye S; Tzukanova, A F; Chumasov, Ye I

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe the modern immunohistochemical method detecting the neuronal marker PGP 9.5. The application of this method for the study of the innervation of rat and human heart, the detailed examination of the topography of the cardiac nervous apparatus, as well as their changes in pathological states, is demonstrated. Structural organization and the nature of the terminal branches of nerve apparatus suggest that they have afferent function. Protocol of the reaction demonstrating PGP 9.5 on paraffin sections is presented.

  12. Propagation of vibration caused by electrical excitation in the normal human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively detect regional dynamic myocardial damage related to action potentials and mechanical properties affected by heart disease is of great clinical importance. Though there are invaluable clinical tools for diagnosis of a broad range of cardiac conditions, such myocardial properties cannot be evaluated. We have previously shown that pulsive vibration occurs on the myocardium after electrical stimulation of an isolated heart. In this study, using a novel technique for ultrasonic measurement of the myocardial motion, we detected pulsive vibrations spontaneously caused by electrical excitation and by valve closure. Using a sparse sector scan, the vibrations were measured almost simultaneously at about 10,000 points set in the heart wall at a high temporal resolution. The consecutive spatial distributions of the phase of the vibrations revealed wave propagation along the wall in healthy subjects for the first time in vivo. At around the time of the Q-wave of the electrocardiogram, the propagation started from the interventricular septum and extended to both the base and apical sides of the heart with a speed of 1 m/s, which corresponds to the propagation of electrical excitation from the Purkinje fiber-myocyte junction in the interventricular septum. Other vibrations then propagated from the base at several m/s, although some of them had dispersion properties. These are shear waves caused by the mitral-valve closure, corresponding to the first heart sound. These phenomena have potential for detection of regional myocardial tissue damage related to propagation of the action potentials and regional myocardial viscoelasticity.

  13. Heart rate variability, overnight urinary norepinephrine and C-reactive protein: evidence for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in healthy human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, J F; Fischer, J E

    2009-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been identified as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in population-based studies. Recent advances have suggested a prominent role for the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in the regulation of inflammation. However, no in vivo human studies have examined indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity simultaneously in relationship to inflammatory markers in apparently healthy adults. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the immunomodulatory effects of the ANS. The study population comprised 611 apparently healthy employees of an airplane manufacturing plant in southern Germany. Urinary NE was positively associated with white blood cell count (WBC) in the total sample. We found an inverse association between indices of vagally mediated heart rate variability and plasma levels of (CRP), which was significantly larger in females than in males after controlling for relevant covariates including NE. Similar results were found using the percentage of interbeat interval differences >50 ms and WBC. We report here for the first time, in a large sample of healthy human adults, evidence supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway after controlling for sympathetic nervous system activity. This suggests an important role for the vagal control of systemic inflammatory activity in cardiovascular disease.

  14. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  15. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  16. Implantable Heart Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  17. China's human resources for maternal and child health: a national sampling survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenghong; Song, Peige; Theodoratou, Evropi; Guo, Sufang; An, Lin

    2015-12-16

    In order to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5, the Chinese Government has invested greatly in improving maternal and child health (MCH) with impressive results. However, one of the most important barriers for further improvement is the uneven distribution of MCH human resources. There is little information about the distribution, quantity and capacity of the Chinese MCH human resources and we sought to investigate this. Cities at prefectural level were selected by random cluster sampling. All medical and health institutions providing MCH-related services in the sampled areas were investigated using a structured questionnaire. The data were weighted based on the proportion of the sampled districts/cities. Amount, proportions and numbers per 10,000 population of MCH human resources were estimated in order to reveal the quantity of the Chinese MCH human resources. The capacity of MCH human resources was evaluated by analyzing data on the education level and professional skills of the staff. There were 77,248 MCH workers in China in 2010. In general, 67.6% and 71.9% of the women's and children's health care professionals had an associate degree or higher, whereas around 30% had only high-school or lower degrees. More than 40% of the women's health workers were capable of providing skilled birth attendance, but these proportions varied between different institutions and locations. Evidence from this study highlights that Chinese MCH human resources are not in shortage in the national level. However, the quantity and capacity of MCH human resources are not evenly distributed among different institutions and locations. Finally there is a need in the improvement of the MCH services by improving the quality of MCH human resources.

  18. Efficient discrimination and removal of phospholipids during electromembrane extraction from human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vårdal, Linda; Gjelstad, Astrid; Huang, Chuixiu

    2017-01-01

    AIM: For the first time, extracts obtained from human plasma samples by electromembrane extraction (EME) were investigated comprehensively with particular respect to phospholipids using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Thhe purpose was to invest...

  19. Imitation of Tongue Protrusion in Human Neonates: Specificity of the Response in a Large Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Emese; Pilling, Karen; Orvos, Hajnalka; Molnar, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence has accumulated on the young human infant's ability to imitate, the phenomenon has failed to gain unanimous acceptance. Imitation of tongue protrusion, the most tested gesture to date, was examined in a sample of 115 newborns in the first 5 days of life in 3 seating positions. An ethologically based…

  20. Analyses of human colonic mucus obtained by an in vivo sampling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Loof, A.; Houtvin, S.A.L.W. van; Troost, F.J.; Venema, K.; Kodde, A.; Koek, G.H.; Schipper, R.G.; Heerde, W.L. van; Brummer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The mucus layer is an important dynamic component of the epithelial barrier. It contains mucin glycoproteins and other compounds secreted by the intestinal epithelium, such as secretory IgA. However, a standardized in vivo sampling technique of mucus in humans is not yet available. Aim:

  1. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  2. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling.

  3. Long-term performance and stability of molecular shotgun lipidomic analysis of human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Laura A; Suoniemi, Matti; Ta, Hung Xuan; Tarasov, Kirill; Ekroos, Kim

    2013-09-17

    The stability of the lipid concentration levels in shotgun lipidomics analysis was tracked over a period of 3.5 years. Concentration levels in several lipid classes, such as phospholipids, were determined in human plasma lipid extracts. Impact of the following factors on the analysis was investigated: sample amount, internal standard amount, and sample dilution factor. Moreover, the reproducibility of lipid profiles obtained in both polarity modes was evaluated. Total number of samples analyzed was approximately 6800 and 7300 samples in negative and positive ion modes, respectively, out of which 610 and 639 instrument control samples were used in stability calculations. The assessed shotgun lipidomics approach showed to be remarkably robust and reproducible, requiring no batch corrections. Coefficients of variation (CVs) of lipid mean concentration measured with optimized analytical parameters were typically less than 15%. The high reproducibility indicated that no lipid degradation occurred during the monitored time period.

  4. Type D personality is not associated with coronary heart disease risk in a North American sample of retirement-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Noel C; Barger, Steven D; Sydeman, Sumner J

    2013-06-01

    Type D personality is associated with recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD) risk but there is limited and inconsistent evidence regarding incident risk among persons free of clinical CHD. We examined the association between Type D personality and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in apparently healthy adults. We also explored the association of these traits with waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), and inhibited physician consultation behavior. Cross-sectional study of North American retirement-aged residents (N = 303). The primary outcome variable was a modified 10-year absolute CHD risk score from the Framingham Heart Study. Secondary outcomes included adiposity and a 5-item measure of patient/provider interaction inhibition. We regressed CHD risk on negative affect (NA), social inhibition (SI), and the NAxSI interaction (i.e., the Type D personality) and repeated these analyses for adiposity and for patient/provider interaction inhibition. We also contrasted CHD risk across Type D and non-Type D categories. None of the personality variables were associated with CHD risk for the whole sample (regression coefficients from −0.11 to .10, Ps > 0.29) or in gender-specific analyses. For adiposity, NA was positively associated and SI was negatively associated with BMI in women (Ps personality associations. Patient/provider interaction inhibition was associated with SI (P interaction (P = 0.42). The contrast between Type D and non-Type D personality revealed no differences in CHD risk (P = 0.93). Neither Type D nor its constituent NA and SI traits were associated with absolute incident CHD risk in retirement-aged adults free of reported CHD. Optimal analytic practices and attention to patient/provider interaction behavior will improve our understanding of the association between Type D personality traits and health.

  5. A tool kit for quantifying eukaryotic rRNA gene sequences from human microbiome samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollive, Serena; Peterfreund, Gregory L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Bittinger, Kyle; Sinha, Rohini; Hoffmann, Christian; Nabel, Christopher S; Hill, David A; Artis, David; Bachman, Michael A; Custers-Allen, Rebecca; Grunberg, Stephanie; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2012-07-03

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are important but understudied components of the human microbiome. Here we present a pipeline for analysis of deep sequencing data on single cell eukaryotes. We designed a new 18S rRNA gene-specific PCR primer set and compared a published rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene primer set. Amplicons were tested against 24 specimens from defined eukaryotes and eight well-characterized human stool samples. A software pipeline https://sourceforge.net/projects/brocc/ was developed for taxonomic attribution, validated against simulated data, and tested on pyrosequence data. This study provides a well-characterized tool kit for sequence-based enumeration of eukaryotic organisms in human microbiome samples.

  6. A human gut metaproteomic dataset from stool samples pretreated or not by differential centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tanca

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a human gut metaproteomic dataset deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD001573. Ten aliquots of a single stool sample collected from a healthy human volunteer were either pretreated by differential centrifugation (DC; N=5 or not centrifuged (NC; N=5. Protein extracts were then processed by filter-aided sample preparation, single-run liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry, and peptide identification was carried out using Sequest-HT as search engine within the Proteome Discoverer informatic platform. The dataset described here is also related to the research article entitled “Enrichment or depletion? The impact of stool pretreatment on metaproteomic characterization of the human gut microbiota” published in Proteomics (Tanca et al., 2015, [1].

  7. Easily-handled method to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from coagulated human bone marrow samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Xiang; Wang; Zhi-Yong; Li; Zhi-Kun; Guo; Zi-Kuan; Guo

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To establish an easily-handled method to isolate mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) from coagulated human bone marrow samples. METHODS: Thrombin was added to aliquots of seven heparinized human bone marrow samples to mimic marrow coagulation. The clots were untreated,treated with urokinase or mechanically cut into pieces before culture for MSCs. The un-coagulated samples and the clots were also stored at 4 ℃ for 8 or 16 h before the treatment. The numbers of colony-forming unit-fibroblast(CFU-F) in the different samples were determined. The adherent cells from different groups were passaged and their surface profile was analyzed with flow cytometry. Their capacities of in vitro osteogenesis and adipogenesis were observed after the cells were exposed to specific inductive agents.RESULTS: The average CFU-F number of urokinasetreated samples(16.85 ± 11.77/106) was comparable to that of un-coagulated control samples(20.22 ± 10.65/106,P = 0.293),which was significantly higher than those of mechanically-cut clots(6.5 ± 5.32/106,P < 0.01) and untreated clots(1.95 ± 1.86/106,P < 0.01). The CFU-F numbers decreased after samples were stored,but those of control and urokinase-treated clots remained higher than the other two groups. Consistently,the numbers of the attached cells at passage 0 were higher in control and urokinase-treated clots than those of mechanically-cut clots and untreated clots.The attached cells were fibroblast-like in morphology and homogenously positive for CD44,CD73 and CD90,and negative for CD31 and CD45. Also,they could be induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. CONCLUSION: Urokinase pretreatment is an optimal strategy to isolate MSCs from human bone marrow samples that are poorly aspirated and clotted.

  8. Rigorous Training of Dogs Leads to High Accuracy in Human Scent Matching-To-Sample Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Marchal

    Full Text Available Human scent identification is based on a matching-to-sample task in which trained dogs are required to compare a scent sample collected from an object found at a crime scene to that of a suspect. Based on dogs' greater olfactory ability to detect and process odours, this method has been used in forensic investigations to identify the odour of a suspect at a crime scene. The excellent reliability and reproducibility of the method largely depend on rigor in dog training. The present study describes the various steps of training that lead to high sensitivity scores, with dogs matching samples with 90% efficiency when the complexity of the scents presented during the task in the sample is similar to that presented in the in lineups, and specificity reaching a ceiling, with no false alarms in human scent matching-to-sample tasks. This high level of accuracy ensures reliable results in judicial human scent identification tests. Also, our data should convince law enforcement authorities to use these results as official forensic evidence when dogs are trained appropriately.

  9. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  10. Preseeding of human vascular cells in decellularized bovine pericardium scaffold for tissue-engineered heart valve : An in vitro and in vivo feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Min; Chen, Chang-Zhi; Shu, Yu-Sheng; Shi, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Shao-Fei; Gu, Y. John

    Human vascular cells from saphenous veins have been used for cell seeding on the synthetic scaffolds for constructing tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV). However, little is known about the seeding of human vascular cells on bovine pericardium, a potential natural scaffold for TEHV. This study was

  11. Preseeding of human vascular cells in decellularized bovine pericardium scaffold for tissue-engineered heart valve : An in vitro and in vivo feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Min; Chen, Chang-Zhi; Shu, Yu-Sheng; Shi, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Shao-Fei; Gu, Y. John

    2012-01-01

    Human vascular cells from saphenous veins have been used for cell seeding on the synthetic scaffolds for constructing tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV). However, little is known about the seeding of human vascular cells on bovine pericardium, a potential natural scaffold for TEHV. This study was

  12. SAMPLING INTENSITY WITH FIXED PRECISION WHEN ESTIMATING VOLUME OF HUMAN BRAIN COMPARTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Maudsley

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cavalieri sampling and point counting are frequently applied in combination with magnetic resonance (MR imaging to estimate the volume of human brain compartments. Current practice involves arbitrarily choosing the number of sections and sampling intensity within each section, and subsequently applying error prediction formulae to estimate the precision. The aim of this study is to derive a reference table for researchers who are interested in estimating the volume of brain regions, namely grey matter, white matter, and their union, to a given precision. In particular, this table, which is based on subsampling of a large brain data set obtained from coronal MR images, offers a recommendation for the minimum number of sections and mean number of points per section that are required to achieve a pre-defined coefficient of error of the volume estimator. Further analysis onMR brain data from a second human brain shows that the sampling intensity recommended is appropriate.

  13. Determination of cholesterol concentration in human milk samples using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamelska, A. M.; Pietrzak-Fiećko, R.; Bryl, K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of an inexpensive and rapid evaluation of the cholesterol concentration in human milk using ATR-FTIR techniques are presented. The FTIR spectrum of pure cholesterol was characterized and quantitatively estimated in the region between 2800 and 3200 cm-1. 125 samples at different stages of lactation were analyzed. There were no differences between the cholesterol concentrations in the samples of early (1-3 months), medium (4-6 months), and late (> 6 months) lactation stages ( p = 0.096968). The cholesterol concentration ranged from 4.30 to 21.77 mg/100 cm3. Such a broad range was due to the differences between the samples from different women ( p = 0.000184). The results indicate that ATR-FTIR has potential for rapid estimation of cholesterol concentration in human milk.

  14. Long-Time Autocorrelation Function of ECG Signal for Healthy versus Diseased Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulessa, B.; Srokowski, T.; Drozdz, S.

    2003-01-01

    Long-time ECG time series for healthy subjects and diseased patients are analysed. In the first case, the power spectrum has the 1/f shape in a broad frequency range. However, its behaviour for very low and very high frequency is different and the entire spectrum is integrable. For patients with post-ictal heart rate oscillation in partial epilepsy the 1/f noise is not present. We determine the power spectrum by evaluating the Fourier transform of the signal in both cases and calculate the signal autocorrelation function. It falls with time faster for diseased patients then for healthy people. The presented method can serve as a diagnostic tool of some heart diseases.

  15. Mechanism of synchronized change in ultrasonic integrated backscatter across human heart wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobinai, Yumi; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic integrated backscatter (IB) from the heart wall, which has been employed for quantitative tissue characterization of the myocardium, is known to have cyclic variation-a decrease in systole and an increase in diastole. In the present study, by tracking the measurement position of the myocardium and compensating for the movement due to the heartbeat, IB and its temporal variation were obtained from the same site with a high temporal resolution of 1.73 ms. In an in vivo study on a healthy subject, the temporal variation of IB values homogeneously changed across the heart wall, especially during the slow filling and the atrial systole phases. This new finding shows that the IB value reflects a small movement of the myocardium of about 5 mm/s. Thus, the proposed measurement has a potential for quantitative and accurate evaluation of the contraction and relaxation of the myocardium.

  16. Coping with continuous human disturbance in the wild: insights from penguin heart rate response to various stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viblanc Vincent A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central question for ecologists is the extent to which anthropogenic disturbances (e.g. tourism might impact wildlife and affect the systems under study. From a research perspective, identifying the effects of human disturbance caused by research-related activities is crucial in order to understand and account for potential biases and derive appropriate conclusions from the data. Results Here, we document a case of biological adjustment to chronic human disturbance in a colonial seabird, the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus, breeding on remote and protected islands of the Southern ocean. Using heart rate (HR as a measure of the stress response, we show that, in a colony with areas exposed to the continuous presence of humans (including scientists for over 50 years, penguins have adjusted to human disturbance and habituated to certain, but not all, types of stressors. When compared to birds breeding in relatively undisturbed areas, birds in areas of high chronic human disturbance were found to exhibit attenuated HR responses to acute anthropogenic stressors of low-intensity (i.e. sounds or human approaches to which they had been subjected intensely over the years. However, such attenuation was not apparent for high-intensity stressors (i.e. captures for scientific research which only a few individuals experience each year. Conclusions Habituation to anthropogenic sounds/approaches could be an adaptation to deal with chronic innocuous stressors, and beneficial from a research perspective. Alternately, whether penguins have actually habituated to anthropogenic disturbances over time or whether human presence has driven the directional selection of human-tolerant phenotypes, remains an open question with profound ecological and conservation implications, and emphasizes the need for more knowledge on the effects of human disturbance on long-term studied populations.

  17. Decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity in the human heart with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) is associated with a shift in substrate utilization and a compromised energetic state. Whether these changes are connected with mitochondrial dysfunction is not known. We hypothesized that the cardiac phenotype in LVSD could...... be caused by reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity and reduced mitochondrial creatine kinase (miCK) capacity. The study aim was to test mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity in LVSD myocardium compared with OXPHOS capacity in a comparable patient group without LVSD....

  18. Morphological study of human heart and placenta in the first trimester of prenatal period of ontogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Ogly L.V.

    2008-01-01

    Probability of abnormal development is high in certain periods when the increased sensitiveness of embryo and fetus takes place. Influence of damaging factors as maternal infection and, consequently, fetal infection is a reason of abnormal development. Morphological characteristics of heart and placenta were studied during the first trimester of prenatal period of ontogenesis. 17 embryos, fetuses and placenta of 4-12 weeks were used. Abortions were made according to medical statements or mate...

  19. Interplay between the acute inflammatory response and heart rate variability in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Matthijs; Ramakers, Bart P; Pompe, Jan C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system and the inflammatory response are intimately linked. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a widely used method to assess cardiac autonomic nervous system activity, and changes in HRV indices may correlate with inflammatory markers. Here, we investigated whether baseline HRV predicts the acute inflammatory response to endotoxin. Second, we investigated whether the magnitude of the inflammatory response correlated with HRV alterations. Forty healthy volunteers received a single intravenous bolus of 2 ng/kg endotoxin (LPS, derived from Escherichia coli O:113). Of these, 12 healthy volunteers were administered LPS again 2 weeks later. Heart rate variability was determined at baseline (just before LPS administration) and hourly thereafter until 8 h after LPS administration. Plasma cytokine levels were determined at various time points. Baseline HRV indices did not correlate with the magnitude of the LPS-induced inflammatory response. Despite large alterations in HRV after LPS administration, the extent of the inflammatory response did not correlate with the magnitude of HRV changes. In subjects who were administered LPS twice, inflammatory cytokines were markedly attenuated after the second LPS administration, whereas LPS-induced HRV alterations were similar. Heart rate variability indices do not predict the acute inflammatory response in a standardized model of systemic inflammation. Although the acute inflammatory response results in HRV changes, no correlations with inflammatory cytokines were observed. Therefore, the magnitude of endotoxemia-related HRV changes does not reflect the extent of the inflammatory response.

  20. Patterns of evolution of myocyte damage after human heart transplantation detected by indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester-Rodes, M.; Carrio-Gasset, I.; Abadal-Berini, L.; Obrador-Mayol, D.; Berna-Roqueta, L.; Caralps-Riera, J.M.

    1988-09-15

    The indium-111 labeled Fab fragment of antimyosin monoclonal antibody was used to study cardiac rejection and the time course of myocyte damage after transplantation. Fifty-three studies were performed in 21 patients, 17 men and 4 women, aged 19 to 54 years (mean 37 +/- 8), from 7 to 40 months after transplantation. Repeat studies were available in 8, and 10 were studied after the first year of transplantation. A heart-to-lung ratio was used for quantitation of uptake (normal 1.46 +/- 0.04). Differences between absent (1.69 +/- 0.29) and moderate (1.90 +/- 0.36) rejection were significant (p less than 0.03). Antimyosin ratio at 1 to 3 months (1.89 +/- 0.35) differed from that at greater than 12 months (1.65 +/- 0.2) (p less than 0.01). Repeat studies revealed a decrease in antimyosin ratio in 5 patients with uneventful clinical course; 2 had persistent activity after transplantation and suffered heart failure from rejection. After 1 year of transplantation uptake was within normal limits in 7 of 10 patients, and high uptake was associated with vascular rejection in 1. Because they can define evolving patterns of myocardial lesion activity, antimyosin studies could be useful both in patient management and in concentrating resources for those patients who most require them. The heart-to-lung ratio is suggested to monitor sequentially the degree of myocyte damage after transplantation.

  1. Gallium-67 imaging in human heart transplantation: correlation with endomyocardial biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneguetti, J.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Soares, J. Jr.; Bellotti, G.; Bocchi, E.; Higuchi, M.L.; Stolff, N.; Hironaka, F.H.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Pileggi, F.

    1987-05-01

    Endomyocardial biopsy seems to be the most accurate method to use for diagnosis and follow-up of acute rejection of the transplanted heart. This investigation compared a noninvasive procedure, gallium-67 imaging, with endomyocardial biopsy in the detection of acute rejection in heart transplantation. Seven male patients (aged 41 to 54 years) sequentially had 46 gallium-67 scintigrams and 46 endomyocardial biopsies between 1 week and 8 months after transplantation. Both studies were obtained in the same day, 48 hours after the administration of an intravenous injection of gallium-67 citrate. Cardiac uptake was graded as negative, mild, moderate, and marked according to an increasing count ratio with rib and sternal uptakes. Histologic findings were graded as negative, mild acute rejection, moderate acute rejection, severe acute rejection, resolving rejection, and nonspecific reaction. Negative biopsies were not found with moderate uptake, and neither moderate nor severe acute rejection were found with negative scintigrams. Imaging sensitivity was 83% with 17% false negatives and 9% false positives. Of seven studies with moderate uptake, five showed moderate acute rejection, and the patients had specific therapy with a decline in uptake, which correlated with resolving rejection. It is conceivable that in the future this technique may be used as a screening procedure for sequential endomyocardial biopsies in the follow-up of heart transplant patients.

  2. A Model for Measured Traveling Waves at End-Diastole in Human Heart Wall by Ultrasonic Imaging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Shintani, Seine A.; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We observe traveling waves, measured by the ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, in a longitudinal beam direction from the apex to the base side on the interventricular septum (IVS) during the period from the end-diastole to the beginning of systole for a healthy human heart wall. We present a possible phenomenological model to explain part of one-dimensional cardiac behaviors for the observed traveling waves around the time of R-wave of echocardiography (ECG) in the human heart. Although the observed two-dimensional patterns of traveling waves are extremely complex and no one knows yet the exact solutions for the traveling homoclinic plane wave in the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE), we numerically find that part of the one-dimensional homoclinic dynamics of the phase and amplitude patterns in the observed traveling waves is similar to that of the numerical homoclinic plane-wave solutions in the CGLE with periodic boundary condition in a certain parameter space. It is suggested that part of the cardiac dynamics of the traveling waves on the IVS can be qualitatively described by the CGLE model as a paradigm for understanding biophysical nonlinear phenomena.

  3. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-15

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P rate pressure product and RAP (P heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict Q close to VO2 max .

  4. Effect of recombinant human erythropoietin on mitomycin C-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in rat kidney and heart tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjiba-Touati, K; Ayed-Boussema, I; Guedri, Y; Achour, A; Bacha, H; Abid-Essefi, S

    2016-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is an antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the prolonged use of the drug may result in a serious heart and kidney injuries. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has recently been shown to exert an important cytoprotective effect in experimental brain injury and ischemic acute renal failure. The aim of the present work is to investigate the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of rhEPO against MMC-induced oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that MMC induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. rhEPO administration in any treatment conditions decreased oxidative damage induced by MMC. It reduced malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. rhEPO ameliorated reduced glutathione plus oxidized glutathione modulation and the increased catalase activity after MMC treatment. Furthermore, rhEPO restored DNA damage caused by MMC. We concluded that rhEPO administration especially in pretreatment condition protected rats against MMC-induced heart and renal oxidative stress and genotoxicity.

  5. Inherited heart disease - what can we expect from the second decade of human iPS cell research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Milena; Mummery, Christine L

    2016-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were first generated 10 years ago. Their ability to differentiate into any somatic cell type of the body including cardiomyocytes has already made them a valuable resource for modelling cardiac disease and drug screening. Initially human iPSCs were used mostly to model known disease phenotypes; more recently, and despite a number of recognised shortcomings, they have proven valuable in providing fundamental insights into the mechanisms of inherited heart disease with unknown genetic cause using surprisingly small cohorts. In this review, we summarise the progress made with human iPSCs as cardiac disease models with special focus on the latest mechanistic insights and related challenges. Furthermore, we suggest emerging solutions that will likely move the field forward.

  6. Identification of human Norovirus (HNoV in domestic pig stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Gutiérrez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of NoVs as a possible causal zoonotic agent of acute diarrhea in pigs and humans. Materialsand methods. We collected a total of 77 samples from diarrheal children under 5 years and pigs under 2 months from La Chambatown in Tolima, Colombia. These samples were transported to the Laboratory of Virology of the Pontificia Universidad Javerianain Bogotá, and extraction with Trizol-reagent was done following the manufacturer’s instructions. After obtaining the RNA, thenext step was to perform RT-PCR for obtaining the expected amplification product of 213- bp NoVs. Finally, the positive samplesobtained in the RT-PCR were sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics methods. Results. Six positive diarrheic samples fromchildren and a positive diarrheic sample from pigs were detected by a band of 231 bp. Five of the six positive samples in childrenand the positive pig sample were sequenced and analyzed. Conclusion. Given the close genetic relationship between pig andhuman sequences, this could be an indication of the potential existence of a common animal acting as a reservoir for human orother animal strains.

  7. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a fast multielemental technique for human placenta sample analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, E.; Ricketts, P.; Fletcher, H.; Karydas, A. G.; Migliori, A.; Leani, J. J.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.; Voutchkov, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present contribution, benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been evaluated as a cost-effective multielemental analytical technique for human placenta analysis. An easy and rapid sample preparation consisting of suspending 50 mg of sample in 1 mL of a Triton 1% solution in deionized water showed to be the most suitable for this kind of samples. However, for comparison purposes, an acidic microwave acidic digestion procedure was also applied. For both sample treatment methodologies, limits of detection for most elements were in the low mg/kg level. Accurate and precise results were obtained using internal standardization as quantification approach and applying a correction factor to compensate for absorption effects. The correction factor was based on the proportional ratio between the slurry preparation results and those obtained for the analysis of a set of human placenta samples analysed by microwave acidic digestion and ICP-AES analysis. As a study case, the developed TXRF methodology was applied for multielemental analysis (K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr) of several healthy women's placenta samples from two regions in Jamaica.

  8. Residues of PCDDs and PCDFs in human milk samples in Ahmedabad, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Sadhu, H.; Jhamb, N.; Karanjkar, R.; Saiyed, H. [National Inst. of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad (India)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and Polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs) represent a class of organic environmental pollutants. They are unwanted byproduct of incineration, uncontrolled burning and certain industrial processes. They are persistent in nature and bioaccumulates through food chain. These are hazardous to human health and environment. The residues of these toxicants have been detected in human adipose tissue, blood and milk. WHO has coordinated two rounds of follow up studies on levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in human milk and the data shows a decreasing trend during the last 30 years. However, in India there is no data available on the exposure and residues of these contaminants. This study presents first time the levels of dioxin and furans in human milk samples collected from the Ahmedabad city in India.

  9. Altered heart rate control in transgenic mice carrying the KCNJ6 gene of the human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignon, Jacques M; Bichler, Zoë; Hivert, Bruno; Gannier, François E; Cosnay, Pierre; del Rio, José A; Migliore-Samour, Danièle; Malécot, Claire O

    2008-04-22

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are common in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Recently, cardiac sympathetic-parasympathetic imbalance has also been documented in DS adults free of any CHD. The KCNJ6 gene located on human chromosome 21 encodes for the Kir3.2/GIRK2 protein subunits of G protein-regulated K(+) (K(G)) channels and could contribute to this altered cardiac regulation. To elucidate the role of its overexpression, we used homozygous transgenic (Tg(+/+)) mice carrying copies of human KCNJ6. These mice showed human Kir3.2 mRNA expression in the heart and a 2.5-fold increased translation in the atria. Phenotypic alterations were assessed by recording electrocardiogram of urethane anesthetized mice. Chronotropic responses to direct (carbachol) and indirect (methoxamine) muscarinic stimulation were enhanced in Tg(+/+) mice with respect to wild-type (WT) mice. Alternating periods of slow and fast rhythm induced by CCPA (2-chloro-N-cyclopentyl-adenosine) were amplified in Tg(+/+) mice, resulting in a reduced negative chronotropic effect. These drugs reduced the atrial P wave amplitude and area. P wave variations induced by methoxamine and CCPA were respectively increased and reduced in the Tg(+/+) mice, while PR interval and ventricular wave showed no difference between Tg(+/+) and WT. These results indicate that Tg(+/+) mice incorporating the human KCNJ6 exhibit altered Kir3.2 expression and responses to drugs that would activate K(G) channels. Moreover, these altered expression and responses are limited to sino-atrial node and atria that normally express large amounts of K(G) channels. These data suggest that KCNJ6 could play an important role in altered cardiac regulation in DS patients.

  10. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  11. Preseeding of human vascular cells in decellularized bovine pericardium scaffold for tissue-engineered heart valve: an in vitro and in vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Chen, Chang-Zhi; Shu, Yu-Sheng; Shi, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Shao-Fei; Gu, Y John

    2012-08-01

    Human vascular cells from saphenous veins have been used for cell seeding on the synthetic scaffolds for constructing tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV). However, little is known about the seeding of human vascular cells on bovine pericardium, a potential natural scaffold for TEHV. This study was aimed to assess the basic in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the human vascular cells seeded on decellularized bovine pericardium. In vitro, bovine pericardium samples with cell seeding were inspected on day 7, 14, and 21 by histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. In vivo, experiments were performed in nude mice by bilateral dorsal incision for the implantation of decellularized bovine pericardium with and without cell seeding. Results demonstrated that a total of 8-10 × 10(6) cells were obtained within 4-5 wk by the primary co-culture, which were detected positive for von Willebrand factor, α-smooth muscle actin antibodies, and fibronectin, indicating the presence of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts, respectively. In vitro, the seeded cells showed a steady increase of endothelial activity from day 1 to day 7 and remained stable until day 21. After 30 days of implantation in vivo, the cells on the decellularized bovine pericardium could differentiate directionally and show all the identities of human endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. These results indicate that the human vascular cells from the saphenous vein are an optional cell source for seeding on decellularized bovine pericardium scaffold for constructing TEHV. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sensitive Procedure for Rapid Detection of Human Brucellosis, Based on PCR Method in Contaminated Serum Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ghezelsofla

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and objective: Brucellosis is a zoonosis transmittable to humans poses a significant public health problem in many developing countries and requires rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Here, our aim was to develop a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay in artificially contaminated serum samples as a model for rapid and accurate laboratory confirmation of human brucellosis. Material and methods: In this study, initially the standard Brucella abortus strain (2308 were cultured on Brucella agar medium and then colonies were inactivated by formalin 10 %. Genomic DNA was extracted from inactivated bacterial colonies. Serial dilutions of bacterial-DNA were prepared in fetal bovine serum (FBS and water and subsequently DNA extraction were repeated on these artificially contaminated samples. The two pairs of primers amplified two different fragments included in: a gene encoding an outer membrane protein (omp-2 (primers JPF/JPR and a sequence 16S rRNA of B. abortus (primers F4/R2. Results: The two primers assayed showed a difference in sensitivity for detecting Brucella DNA, ranging between 5 pg and 50 pg for artificially contaminated serum samples and 50Fg and 5 pg for contaminated control samples. Therefore, the sensitivity of PCR using F4/R2 primers was greater than the PCR using JPF/JPR primers.Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of PCR using these primers was affected by serum inhibitors, they are still the most sensitive and they could provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

  13. Stroke volume of the heart and thoracic fluid content during head-up and head-down tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lieshout, J J; Harms, M P M; Pott, F

    2005-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart.......The stroke volume (SV) of the heart depends on the diastolic volume but, for the intact organism, central pressures are applied widely to express the filling of the heart....

  14. Experimental and Human Evidence for Lipocalin-2 (Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin [NGAL]) in the Development of Cardiac Hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Prestes, Priscilla R; Byars, Sean G; Ritchie, Scott C; Würtz, Peter; Patel, Sheila K; Booth, Scott A; Rana, Indrajeetsinh; Minoda, Yosuke; Berzins, Stuart P; Curl, Claire L; Bell, James R; Wai, Bryan; Srivastava, Piyush M; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ruohonen, Saku; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitoharju, Emma; Havulinna, Aki; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; McGlynn, Maree; Kelly, Jason; Wlodek, Mary E; Lewandowski, Paul A; Delbridge, Lea M; Burrell, Louise M; Inouye, Michael; Harrap, Stephen B; Charchar, Fadi J

    2017-06-14

    Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of developing heart failure and cardiovascular death. The neutrophil inflammatory protein, lipocalin-2 (LCN2/NGAL), is elevated in certain forms of cardiac hypertrophy and acute heart failure. However, a specific role for LCN2 in predisposition and etiology of hypertrophy and the relevant genetic determinants are unclear. Here, we defined the role of LCN2 in concentric cardiac hypertrophy in terms of pathophysiology, inflammatory expression networks, and genomic determinants. We used 3 experimental models: a polygenic model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, a model of intrauterine growth restriction and Lcn2-knockout mouse; cultured cardiomyocytes; and 2 human cohorts: 114 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 2064 healthy subjects of the YFS (Young Finns Study). In hypertrophic heart rats, cardiac and circulating Lcn2 was significantly overexpressed before, during, and after development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Lcn2 expression was increased in hypertrophic hearts in a model of intrauterine growth restriction, whereas Lcn2-knockout mice had smaller hearts. In cultured cardiomyocytes, Lcn2 activated molecular hypertrophic pathways and increased cell size, but reduced proliferation and cell numbers. Increased LCN2 was associated with cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. In the YFS, LCN2 expression was associated with body mass index and cardiac mass and with levels of inflammatory markers. The single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs13297295, located near LCN2 defined a significant cis-eQTL for LCN2 expression. Direct effects of LCN2 on cardiomyocyte size and number and the consistent associations in experimental and human analyses reveal a central role for LCN2 in the ontogeny of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondronikola, M; Annamalai, P; Chao, T; Porter, C; Saraf, M K; Cesani, F; Sidossis, L S

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a few studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT.

  16. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  17. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cell culture, a total of 330 rabies virus samples were isolated from dogs, cats, cattle, horses, bats, sheep, goat, swine, foxes, marmosets, coati and humans. Six antigenic variants that were compatible with the pre-established monoclonal antibodies panel were defined: numbers 2 (dog, 3 (Desmodus rotundus, 4 (Tadarida brasiliensis, 5 (vampire bat from Venezuela, 6 (Lasiurus cinereus and Lab (reacted to all used antibodies. Six unknown profiles, not compatible with the panel, were also found. Samples isolated from insectivore bats showed the greatest variability and the most commonly isolated variant was variant-3 (Desmodus rotundus. These findings may be related to the existence of multiple independent transmission cycles, involving different bat species.

  18. Comparison of chlorzoxazone one-sample methods to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Iza; Dalhoff, Kim; Clemmesen, Jens O

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comparison of a one-sample with a multi-sample method (the metabolic fractional clearance) to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans. METHODS: Healthy, male Caucasians ( n=19) were included. The multi-sample fractional clearance (Cl(fe)) of chlorzoxazone was compared with one...... estimates, Cl(est) at 3 h or 6 h, and MR at 3 h, can serve as reliable markers of CYP2E1 activity. The one-sample clearance method is an accurate, renal function-independent measure of the intrinsic activity; it is simple to use and easily applicable to humans.......-time-point clearance estimation (Cl(est)) at 3, 4, 5 and 6 h. Furthermore, the metabolite/drug ratios (MRs) estimated from one-time-point samples at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h were compared with Cl(fe). RESULTS: The concordance between Cl(est) and Cl(fe) was highest at 6 h. The minimal mean prediction error (MPE) of Cl...

  19. Selection of Candidate Housekeeping Genes for Normalization in Human Postmortem Brain Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pagano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The most frequently used technique to study the expression profile of genes involved in common neurological disorders is quantitative real-time RT-PCR, which allows the indirect detection of very low amounts of selected mRNAs in tissue samples. Expression analysis by RT-qPCR requires an appropriate normalization to the expression level of genes characterized by a stable, constitutive transcription. However, the identification of a gene transcribed at a very stable level is difficult if not impossible, since significant fluctuations of the level of mRNA synthesis often accompanies changes of cell behavior. The aim of this study is to identify the most stable genes in postmortem human brain samples of patients affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD suitable as reference genes. The experiments analyzed 12 commonly used reference genes in brain samples from eight individuals with AD and seven controls. After a careful analysis of the results calculated by geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, we found that CYC1 and EIF4A2 are the best reference genes. We remark on the importance of the determination of the best reference genes for each sample to be analyzed and suggest a practical combination of reference genes to be used in the analysis of human postmortem samples.

  20. Carotid Catheterization and Automated Blood Sampling Induce Systemic IL-6 Secretion and Local Tissue Damage and Inflammation in the Heart, Kidneys, Liver and Salivary Glands in NMRI Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Anne Charlotte; Rozell, Björn; Kalliokoski, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Automated blood sampling through a vascular catheter is a frequently utilized technique in laboratory mice. The potential immunological and physiological implications associated with this technique have, however, not been investigated in detail. The present study compared plasma levels of the cyt......Automated blood sampling through a vascular catheter is a frequently utilized technique in laboratory mice. The potential immunological and physiological implications associated with this technique have, however, not been investigated in detail. The present study compared plasma levels...... of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α in male NMRI mice that had been subjected to carotid artery catheterization and subsequent automated blood sampling with age-matched control mice. Body weight and histopathological changes in the surgical area, including the salivary glands......, the heart, brain, spleen, liver, kidneys and lungs were compared. Catheterized mice had higher levels of IL-6 than did control mice, but other cytokine levels did not differ between the groups. No significant difference in body weight was found. The histology revealed inflammatory and regenerative (healing...

  1. Human Identity Verification based on Heart Sounds: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Beritelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Identity verification is an increasingly important process in our daily lives, and biometric recognition is a natural solution to the authentication problem. One of the most important research directions in the field of biometrics is the characterization of novel biometric traits that can be used in conjunction with other traits, to limit their shortcomings or to enhance their performance. The aim of this work is to introduce the reader to the usage of heart sounds for biometric recognition, describing the strengths and the weaknesses of this novel trait and analyzing in detail the methods developed so far by different research groups and their performance.

  2. Quality assesment for the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F. [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Ecotechnologies, Lab. of Dioxins; Abad, E.; Llerena, J.J.; Caixach, J.; Rivera, J.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work was to optimise a relevant methodology for the ultratrace analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples. In order to carry out the study, different strategies including the elaboration of quality control samples, parallel sample analysis, control blanks and a number of quality assurance measures were implemented as analytical current practices. Some of the main drawbacks in the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in these kind of samples come from two conflicting aspects: the small sample size and the low levels expected to be found. Taking this into account, an unavoidable compromise between the sample amount and the minimum analytical requirements, mainly the detection limit (LOD), is mandatory. To reach this goal C{sub 18} solid phase extraction was used to remove the analytes from the matrix. Clean up was performed by solid-liquid adsorption chromatography using a variety of adsorbents. Instrumental analysis was achieved by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Finally, the optimised methodology was applied to evaluate the potential impact in general population living in the surroundings of an obsolete municipal waste incinerator plant (MWI). Thus, more than 400 individuals serum samples potentially exposed to the emission of the incinerator and people not exposed were considered in this study.

  3. Barriers to acceptance of self-sampling for human papillomavirus across ethnolinguistic groups of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Lytwyn, Alice; Lohfeld, Lynne; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Fowler, Nancy; Karwalajtys, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Immigrant and low socio-economic (SES) women in North America underutilize Papanicolaou screening. Vaginal swab self-sampling for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has the potential to increase cervical cancer screening participation. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the perceptions of lower SES and immigrant women regarding self-sampling for HPV. Eleven focus-group interviews were conducted: one with Canadian-born English-speaking lower SES women, and two groups each with Arabic, Cantonese, Dari (Afghani), Somali and Spanish (Latino)-speaking women (one group conducted in English, the other in the native language) recently immigrated to Canada. Five to nine women aged 35 to 65 years and married with children participated in each group. Themes included 1) who might use self-sampling and why; 2) aversion to self-sampling and reasons to prefer physician; 3) ways to improve the appeal of self-sampling. Women generally perceived benefits of self-sampling and a small number felt they might use the method, but all groups had some reservations. Reasons included: uncertainty over performing the sampling correctly; fear of hurting themselves; concern about obtaining appropriate material; and concerns about test accuracy. Women preferred testing by a health care professional because they were accustomed to pelvic examinations, it was more convenient, or they trusted the results. Perceptions of self-sampling for HPV were similar across cultures and pertained to issues of confidence in self-sampling and need for physician involvement in care. These findings can inform programs and studies planning to employ self-sampling as a screening modality for cervical cancer.

  4. [Heart rate measurement algorithm based on artificial intelligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengxian, Cai; Wei, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the heart rate measurement method using time-lapse image of human cheek, this paper proposes a novel measurement algorithm based on Artificial Intelligence. The algorithm combining with fuzzy logic theory acquires the heart beat point by using the defined fuzzy membership function of each sampled point. As a result, it calculates the heart rate by counting the heart beat points in a certain time period. Experiment shows said algorithm satisfies in operability, accuracy and robustness, which leads to constant practical value.

  5. Genomic studies of envelope gene sequences from mosquito and human samples from Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Son, Hyun Ngoc; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Ramasoota, Pongrama

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA virus showing a high degree of genetic variation as a consequence of its proofreading inability. This variation plays an important role in virus evolution and pathogenesis. Although levels of within-host genetic variation are similar following equilibrium, variation among different hosts is frequently different. To identify dengue quasispecies present among two hosts, we collected patient samples from six acute DENV cases and two pools of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and analyzed the genetic variation of regions of the viral envelope gene. Among human and mosquito samples, we found three major clusters originating from two subpopulations. Although several shared lineages were observed in the two hosts, only one lineage showing evidence of neutral selection was observed among two hosts. Taken together, our data provide evidence for the existence of a DENV quasispecies, with less genetic variation observed in mosquitoes than humans and with circulating lineages found in both host types.

  6. A careful look at ECG sampling frequency and R-peak interpolation on short-term measures of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert J; Zhu, Bilei; Koenig, Julian; Thayer, Julian F; Wang, Ye

    2015-09-01

    As the literature on heart rate variability (HRV) continues to burgeon, so too do the challenges faced with comparing results across studies conducted under different recording conditions and analysis options. Two important methodological considerations are (1) what sampling frequency (SF) to use when digitizing the electrocardiogram (ECG), and (2) whether to interpolate an ECG to enhance the accuracy of R-peak detection. Although specific recommendations have been offered on both points, the evidence used to support them can be seen to possess a number of methodological limitations. The present study takes a new and careful look at how SF influences 24 widely used time- and frequency-domain measures of HRV through the use of a Monte Carlo-based analysis of false positive rates (FPRs) associated with two-sample tests on independent sets of healthy subjects. HRV values from the first sample were calculated at 1000 Hz, and HRV values from the second sample were calculated at progressively lower SFs (and either with or without R-peak interpolation). When R-peak interpolation was applied prior to HRV calculation, FPRs for all HRV measures remained very close to 0.05 (i.e. the theoretically expected value), even when the second sample had an SF well below 100 Hz. Without R-peak interpolation, all HRV measures held their expected FPR down to 125 Hz (and far lower, in the case of some measures). These results provide concrete insights into the statistical validity of comparing datasets obtained at (potentially) very different SFs; comparisons which are particularly relevant for the domains of meta-analysis and mobile health.

  7. Human heart-type fatty acid-binding protein as an early diagnostic marker of doxorubicin cardiac toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. ElGhandour

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Progressive cardiotoxicity following treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL may lead to late onset cardiomyopathy. So, early prediction of toxicity can lead to prevention of heart failure in these patients. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of H-FABP as an early diagnostic marker of anthracycline-induced cardiac toxicity together with brain natriuretic peptide (BNP as an indication of ventricular dysfunction in such patients. Our study was conducted on 40 NHL patients who received 6 cycles of a doxorubicin containing chemotherapy protocol (CHOP, not exceeding the total allowed dose of doxorubicin (500 mg/m2. Ten healthy controls were included in our study. Human heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP was assessed 24 hours after the first cycle of CHOP. Plasma levels of BNP were estimated both before starting chemotherapy and after the last cycle of CHOP. Resting echocardiography was also performed before and at the end of chemotherapy cycles. The ejection fraction (EF of 8 of our patients decreased below 50% at the end of the sixth cycle. Elevated levels of both H-FABP and BNP were found in all patients wth EF below 50% and both markers showed a positive correlation with each other. We concluded that H-FABP may serve as a reliable early marker for prediction of cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin. Thus, in patients with elevated H-FABP, alternative treatment modalities with no cardiac toxicity may be considered in order to prevent subsequent heart failure in these patients.

  8. Load and failure behavior of human muscle samples in the context of proximal femur replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael; Möbius, Robert; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Grunert, Ronny; Hammer, Niels; Prietzel, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Background: To ensure adequate function after orthopedic tumor reconstruction, it is important to reattach the remaining soft tissue to the implant. This study aimed at obtaining mechanical properties of textile muscle-implant and muscle-bone connections in a preliminary test. Methods: Two groups of soft-tissue attachment were mechanically tested and compared: Native bone-muscle samples obtained from human femora and muscles attached to a prosthetic implant by means of Trevira® attachment tu...

  9. Dioxin-like activity of environmental compounds in human blood and environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    R transactivation bioassay is utilized in an array of projects to study the AhR-mediated activities of individual chemicals and mixtures and for epidemiological purposes. This review summarizes a series of studies regarding the DL-activity of single compounds and complex compound mixtures in the environment...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  10. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    OpenAIRE

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2012-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in se...

  11. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors for severe heart failure treatment: first clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menasché, Philippe; Vanneaux, Valérie; Hagège, Albert; Bel, Alain; Cholley, Bernard; Cacciapuoti, Isabelle; Parouchev, Alexandre; Benhamouda, Nadine; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tosca, Lucie; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues; Fabreguettes, Jean-Roch; Bellamy, Valérie; Guillemain, Romain; Suberbielle Boissel, Caroline; Tartour, Eric; Desnos, Michel; Larghero, Jérôme

    2015-08-07

    Comparative studies suggest that stem cells committed to a cardiac lineage are more effective for improving heart function than those featuring an extra-cardiac phenotype. We have therefore developed a population of human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived cardiac progenitor cells. Undifferentiated human ESCs (I6 line) were amplified and cardiac-committed by exposure to bone morphogenetic protein-2 and a fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor. Cells responding to these cardio-instructive cues express the cardiac transcription factor Isl-1 and the stage-specific embryonic antigen SSEA-1 which was then used to purify them by immunomagnetic sorting. The Isl-1(+) SSEA-1(+) cells were then embedded into a fibrin scaffold which was surgically delivered onto the infarct area in a 68-year-old patient suffering from severe heart failure [New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional Class III; left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): 26%]. A coronary artery bypass was performed concomitantly in a non-infarcted area. The implanted cells featured a high degree of purity (99% were SSEA-1(+)), had lost the expression of Sox-2 and Nanog, taken as markers for pluripotency, and strongly expressed Isl-1. The intraoperative delivery of the patch was expeditious. The post-operative course was uncomplicated either. After 3 months, the patient is symptomatically improved (NYHA functional Class I; LVEF: 36%) and a new-onset contractility is echocardiographically evident in the previously akinetic cell/patch-treated, non-revascularized area. There have been no complications such as arrhythmias, tumour formation, or immunosuppression-related adverse events. This observation demonstrates the feasibility of generating a clinical-grade population of human ESC-derived cardiac progenitors and combining it within a tissue-engineered construct. While any conclusion pertaining to efficacy would be meaningless, the patient's functional outcome yet provides an encouraging hint. Beyond this

  12. Dioxin-like activity of environmental compounds in human blood and environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  13. Dioxin-like activity in environmental and human samples from Greenland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  14. Vital exhaustion as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality in a community sample. A prospective study of 4084 men and 5479 women in the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Eva; Holst, Claus; Grønbaek, Morten; Schnohr, Peter; Jensen, Gorm; Barefoot, John

    2003-12-01

    Vital exhaustion, a psychological measure characterized by fatigue and depressive symptoms, has been suggested to be an independent risk factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) but the generality of the phenomenon remains in question. The aim of this study is to describe prevalence of these symptoms in a community sample and determine whether they prospectively predict increased risk of IHD and all-cause mortality in men and women. The study base was 4084 men and 5479 women aged 20-98 free of IHD examined in 1991-1993 in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Events were ascertained through record linkage until 1998 for IHD and September 2000 for all-cause mortality. There were 483 first hospital admissions and deaths caused by IHD and 1559 deaths from all causes during follow-up. The 17 items on the vital exhaustion questionnaire were frequently endorsed with prevalence ranging from 6 to 47 per cent, higher in women. All but 4 of the 17 items were significantly associated with IHD with significant relative risks (RR) ranging between 1.36 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.72) and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.63, 2.71). Associations with all-cause mortality were also observed, but were weaker. RR of both IHD and all-cause mortality increased with increasing item sum score and were similar in men and women. For IHD, RR reached a maximum of 2.57 (95% CI: 1.65, 4.00) for subjects endorsing >9 items. The similar RR for all-cause mortality was 2.50 (95% CI: 2.09, 2.99). Multivariate adjustment for biological, behavioural, and socioeconomic risk factors did not substantially affect the association for IHD but attenuated the association with all-cause mortality. Measures of fatigue and depression were common symptoms in this population sample and convey increased risk of IHD and of all-cause mortality. We propose this knowledge begin to be implemented in risk assessment in clinical practice.

  15. Transcutaneous communication system using the human body as conductive medium: influence of transmission data current on the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Miura, Hidekazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new transcutaneous communication system (TCS) that uses the human body as a conductive medium for monitoring and controlling artificial hearts and other artificial organs in the body.In this study, the physiological effect of data current discharged into the body during data transmission was evaluated by an animal experiment using a goat. The external and internal units of the new TCS each mainly consist of a data transmitter and a data receiver. The data transmitter has an amplitude shift keying (ASK) modulator (carrier frequencies: 4 and 10 MHz) and an electrode.The internal unit of the TCS was fixed on the pericardium and the external unit was placed on the left ear, and each transmitter discharged an ASK-modulated current of 7 mA (RMS) into the conscious goat. The TCS was able to transmit data for 4 weeks under full duplex communication with a transmission rate of 115 kbps. On the 28th postoperative day, an electrocardiogram was measured during data transmission. Cardiac rhythm and waveform of the electrocardiogram were not changed before and during bidirectional data transmission. Also, no adverse effect on the heart was observed by autopsy.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Hypomethylation Is a Biomarker Associated with Induced Senescence in Human Fetal Heart Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehai Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fetal heart can regenerate to restore its normal anatomy and function in response to injury, but this regenerative capacity is lost within the first week of postnatal life. Although the specific molecular mechanisms remain to be defined, it is presumed that aging of cardiac stem or progenitor cells may contribute to the loss of regenerative potential. Methods. To study this aging-related dysfunction, we cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human fetal heart tissues. Senescence was induced by exposing cells to chronic oxidative stress/low serum. Mitochondrial DNA methylation was examined during the period of senescence. Results. Senescent MSCs exhibited flattened and enlarged morphology and were positive for the senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal. By scanning the entire mitochondrial genome, we found that four CpG islands were hypomethylated in close association with senescence in MSCs. The mitochondrial COX1 gene, which encodes the main subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex and contains the differentially methylated CpG island 4, was upregulated in MSCs in parallel with the onset of senescence. Knockdown of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3B also upregulated COX1 expression and induced cellular senescence in MSCs. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that mitochondrial CpG hypomethylation may serve as a critical biomarker associated with cellular senescence induced by chronic oxidative stress.

  17. Least destructive sampling of human remains using laser drilling for Sr isotope analysis by TIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmes, Malte; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer; Armstrong, Richard; Kinsley, Les; McMorrow, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) measured in ancient human remains can be used to reconstruct migration patterns of ancient human populations. This application is based on the fact that different geologic regions have distinct Sr isotope signatures that are cycled through the soils, plants and rivers, and eventually enter the food cycle. Sr isotope ratios measured in skeletal remains (bones and teeth) reflect the average of dietary Sr that was consumed when the tissue was formed, allowing the investigation of human migration between geologically distinct terrains. The analysis of human remains is always a sensitive topic requiring minimal damage to the sample, while at the same time providing highly precise and accurate results. Samples can be analysed either by solution methods like thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), or by in-situ laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. For TIMS a drill is used to extract a small amount of sample, which is then digested in acid and Sr is separated out using ion exchange chromatography. This technique provides highly precise and accurate results, because any isobaric interferences are removed during chemical separation. The drawback is that drilling may cause visible damage to the sample, restricting access to precious human remains. LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis is very fast and nearly destruction free. However, the accuracy and precision of LA-MC-ICP-MS is limited by a number of factors including large instrumental mass discrimination, laser-induced isotopic and elemental fractionations and molecular interferences on 87Sr. Its application thus requires rigorous data reduction, which can introduce significant uncertainties into the analysis. This is especially true for samples with relatively low Sr concentrations such as human teeth (e.g., Woodhead et al., 2005; Horstwood et al., 2008; Vroon et al., 2008). In addition, LA-MC-ICP-MS has traditionally required a flat sample surface, thus an unbroken tooth needs to be cut, which is rather

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of human liver samples with Wilson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Horňáčková, Michaela; Plavčan, Jozef; Kopáni, Martin; Babál, Pavel; Veis, Pavel

    2013-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an elemental analytical technique with various applications. The paper demonstrates the first LIBS measurements of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the higher copper content related with the advanced stage of Wilson's disease. These measurements were implemented using a Nd:YAG laser working at the wavelength of 532 nm and an echelle type spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera allowing for a wide spectral range coverage (200-950 nm) and rapid camera gating (minimum gating time of 5 ns). Seven liver samples with suspected Wilson's disease and five reference samples were investigated. The main parameter of interest was the Cu/C ratio obtained at first from spectra and secondly directly from an iCCD image. Our experiment is a pilot study, which shows LIBS analysis of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the normal and higher copper content for the first time. The method proved to be a quick and a low-cost approach for the detection of pathological accumulation of copper in the affected tissue.

  19. DNA purification from crude samples for human identification using gradient elution isotachophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Konek, Christopher; Butts, Erica L R; Vallone, Peter M; Henry, Alyssa C; Ross, David

    2013-09-01

    Gradient elution isotachophoresis (GEITP) was demonstrated for DNA purification, concentration, and quantification from crude samples, represented here by soiled buccal swabs, with minimal sample preparation prior to human identification using STR analysis. During GEITP, an electric field applied across leading and trailing electrolyte solutions resulted in isotachophoretic focusing of DNA at the interface between these solutions, while a pressure-driven counterflow controlled the movement of the interface from the sample reservoir into a microfluidic capillary. This counterflow also prevented particulates from fouling or clogging the capillary and reduced or eliminated contamination of the delivered DNA by PCR inhibitors. On-line DNA quantification using laser-induced fluorescence compared favorably with quantitative PCR measurements and potentially eliminates the need for quantitative PCR prior to STR analysis. GEITP promises to address the need for a rapid and robust method to deliver DNA from crude samples to aid the forensic community in human identification. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  1. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America.

  2. Pathogenic Vibrio Strains Isolated from Human Stool and Water Samples from Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselida Achieng Owuor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate the type of pathogenic Vibrio strains from water and stool samples collected from Migori, SonduMiriu, Nyando and Yala regions in Western Kenya. Methods: A total of 811 samples (596 water and 215 stool samples were collected during the study periods of May to December 2013 and August to September 2014. Pathogenic Vibrio strains were identified through culturing in TCBS Agar, followed by oxidation, string and serological (polyvalent tests, respectively. The PCR analysis was done using combined primers targeting Vibrionaceae 16SrRNA and species specific primers for V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. Results: The results showed the presence of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. However, V. parahaemolyticus was not found in any of the samples. The PCR results for 16SrRNA, Vib 1, and Vib 2 showed polymorphism in the genes, this was an indication of cross combination of genes from more than one strain in one isolate. Conclusion: The study showed the presence of V. cholerae (Ogawa and Inaba in water and human stool samples. Type B V. vulnificus was detected in the water sample collected from River Migori. This information is of essence in controlling and managing cholera in the western part of Kenya. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 1-7

  3. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients.

  4. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  5. Effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy on hemodynamics and cardiac in patients with acute decompensated heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Li Xing; Xian-Hong Ma; Lu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy on hemodynamics and cardiac function levels in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.Methods:A total of 118 patients with acute decompensated heart failure were randomly divided into observation group and the control group (n=59). Control group received clinical conventional therapy for heart failure, observation group received recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy, and the differences in hemodynamics, cardiac function and circulation factor levels were compared between two groups after 12 hours of treatment. Results: After 12 hours of treatment, central venous pressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure values as well as circulating blood IL-6, hsCRP, ST2, NT-proBNP and cTnⅠlevels of observation group were lower than those of control group, and left heart GLS, GCS, GSRs, GSRe, GSRa, ROT and ROTR levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure has significant advantages in optimizing hemodynamics, cardiac function and other aspects.

  6. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2011-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: Several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various literatures which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the...

  7. Multiscale model of the human cardiovascular system: Description of heart failure and comparison of contractility indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, S; Negroni, J; Lascano, E; Dauby, P C

    2017-02-01

    A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An electrophysiological model and a mechanical model were coupled and adjusted so that the pressure and volume of both ventricles are linked to the force and length of a half-sarcomere. Particular attention was paid to the extreme values of the sarcomere length, which must keep physiological values. This model is able to reproduce healthy behavior, preload variations experiments, and ventricular failure. It also allows to compare the relevance of standard cardiac contractility indices. This study shows that the theoretical gold standard for assessing cardiac contractility, namely the end-systolic elastance, is actually load-dependent and therefore not a reliable index of cardiac contractility.

  8. Circadian aspects of apparent correlation dimension in human heart rate dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, P; Bettermann, H; An der Heiden, U; Kümmell, H C

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in complexity of cardiac dynamics over 24 h. With use of Holter monitoring, 27 24-h electrocardiogram recordings were obtained from 15 healthy subjects. For each recording, the apparent dimension (DA) was calculated for consecutive sections of 500 heartbeats. These were used to determine nighttime and daytime dimension (D(An) and D(Ad), respectively) as well as the difference between D(An) and D(Ad) (delta DA). Mean 24-h DA, D(An), and D(Ad) were 5.9 +/- 0.3, 6.3 +/- 0.5, and 5.6 +/- 0.6, respectively. D(An) was significantly higher than D(Ad) (P heart rate complexity. We suggest that the decreased complexity during daytime may result from the synchronization of physiological functions. The increase in complexity at night would then correspond to an uncoupling of these functions during the regenerative period.

  9. Heart transplant survival in non-human primates : T cell-directed immunosuppressive therapy and regulatory T cells for promotion of heart transplant survival in non-human primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Dons (Eefje)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHeart transplantation significantly enhances the life expectancy of adult patients suffering heart failure, and infants born with malformations of their heart. However, there are many hurdles such as rejection of the transplanted organ, or side effects of the immunosuppressive drugs, tha

  10. Effect of Acute Administration of an Herbal Preparation on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, John G.; Nelson, Aaron; Devonish, Julia; Burke, Edmund R.; Stohs, Sidney J.

    2011-01-01

    Confusion and controversy exist regarding the cardiovascular effects of dietary supplements containing caffeine and Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract. The primary protoalkaloidal ingredient in bitter orange extract is p-synephrine which has some structural similarities to ephedrine and nor-epinehrine, but exhibits markedly different pharmacokinetic and receptor binding properties. The goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of a product containing caffeine, bitter orange extract (p-synephrine) and green tea extract in mildly overweight individuals. Fourteen female and nine male subjects (age 24.7 ±7.4 yrs, BMI: 26.6 ±3.8) volunteered in this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind designed study. On day one, subjects entered the laboratory following an overnight fast. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at 60 min. Expired air was analyzed for the next 10 min of the session. At each of three meals, subjects ingested one capsule that was either a non-caloric placebo or a dietary supplement that contained 13 mg p-synephrine and 176 mg caffeine. On the following day, the subjects returned and repeated the protocol for data collection beginning 60 min after consuming one capsule of the placebo or the dietary supplement. No effects of the dietary supplement on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure or mean arterial pressure were observed. No between or within group differences were observed when data were analyzed for gender and caffeine usage. A small but significant decrease in resting respiratory exchange ratio was observed for the low caffeine user group in response to the product containing caffeine and p-synephrine. The results of this study indicate that ingestion of a product containing bitter orange extract, caffeine and green tea extract does not lead to increased cardiovascular stress and that fat oxidation may increase in certain populations. PMID:21448304

  11. Effect of Acute Administration of an Herbal Preparation on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Seifert, Aaron Nelson, Julia Devonish, Edmund R. Burke, Sidney J. Stohs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Confusion and controversy exist regarding the cardiovascular effects of dietary supplements containing caffeine and Citrus aurantium (bitter orange extract. The primary protoalkaloidal ingredient in bitter orange extract is p-synephrine which has some structural similarities to ephedrine and nor-epinehrine, but exhibits markedly different pharmacokinetic and receptor binding properties. The goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of a product containing caffeine, bitter orange extract (p-synephrine and green tea extract in mildly overweight individuals. Fourteen female and nine male subjects (age 24.7 ±7.4 yrs, BMI: 26.6 ±3.8 volunteered in this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind designed study. On day one, subjects entered the laboratory following an overnight fast. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at 60 min. Expired air was analyzed for the next 10 min of the session. At each of three meals, subjects ingested one capsule that was either a non-caloric placebo or a dietary supplement that contained 13 mg p-synephrine and 176 mg caffeine. On the following day, the subjects returned and repeated the protocol for data collection beginning 60 min after consuming one capsule of the placebo or the dietary supplement. No effects of the dietary supplement on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure or mean arterial pressure were observed. No between or within group differences were observed when data were analyzed for gender and caffeine usage. A small but significant decrease in resting respiratory exchange ratio was observed for the low caffeine user group in response to the product containing caffeine and p-synephrine. The results of this study indicate that ingestion of a product containing bitter orange extract, caffeine and green tea extract does not lead to increased cardiovascular stress and that fat oxidation may increase in certain populations.

  12. The human sympathetic nervous system: its relevance in hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Esler, Murray

    2012-05-01

    Evidence assembled in this review indicates that sympathetic nervous system dysfunction is crucial in the development of heart failure and essential hypertension. This takes the form of persistent and adverse activation of sympathetic outflows to the heart and kidneys in both conditions. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of the knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. The achievement of this 'mechanisms to management' transition is at different stages of development with regard to the two disorders. Clinical translation is mature in cardiac failure, knowledge of cardiac neural pathophysiology having led to the introduction of beta-adrenergic blockers, an effective therapy. With essential hypertension perhaps we are on the cusp of effective translation, with recent successful testing of selective catheter-based renal sympathetic nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension, an intervention firmly based on the demonstration of activation of the renal sympathetic outflow. Additional evidence in this regard is provided by the results of pilot studies exploring the possibility to reduce blood pressure in resistant hypertensives through electrical stimulation of the area of carotid baroreceptors. Despite the general importance of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure regulation, and the specific demonstration that the blood pressure elevation in essential hypertension is commonly initiated and sustained by sympathetic nervous activation, drugs antagonizing this system are currently underutilized in the care of patients with hypertension. Use of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs is waning, given the propensity of this drug class to have adverse metabolic effects, including predisposition to diabetes development. The blood pressure lowering achieved with carotid baroreceptor stimulation and with the renal denervation device affirms the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in

  13. Different Factors Affecting Human ANP Amyloid Aggregation and Their Implications in Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millucci, Lia; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Laschi, Marcella; Consumi, Marco; Spreafico, Adriano; Tanganelli, Piero; Lupetti, Pietro; Magnani, Agnese; Santucci, Annalisa

    2011-01-01

    Aims Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP)-containing amyloid is frequently found in the elderly heart. No data exist regarding ANP aggregation process and its link to pathologies. Our aims were: i) to experimentally prove the presumptive association of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) and Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis (IAA); ii) to characterize ANP aggregation, thereby elucidating IAA implication in the CHF pathogenesis. Methods and Results A significant prevalence (85%) of IAA was immunohistochemically proven ex vivo in biopsies from CHF patients. We investigated in vitro (using Congo Red, Thioflavin T, SDS-PAGE, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy) ANP fibrillogenesis, starting from α-ANP as well as the ability of dimeric β-ANP to promote amyloid formation. Different conditions were adopted, including those reproducing β-ANP prevalence in CHF. Our results defined the uncommon rapidity of α-ANP self-assembly at acidic pH supporting the hypothesis that such aggregates constitute the onset of a fibrillization process subsequently proceeding at physiological pH. Interestingly, CHF-like conditions induced the production of the most stable and time-resistant ANP fibrils suggesting that CHF affected people may be prone to develop IAA. Conclusions We established a link between IAA and CHF by ex vivo examination and assessed that β-ANP is, in vitro, the seed of ANP fibrils. Our results indicate that β-ANP plays a crucial role in ANP amyloid deposition under physiopathological CHF conditions. Overall, our findings indicate that early IAA-related ANP deposition may occur in CHF and suggest that these latter patients should be monitored for the development of cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:21814559

  14. Blood pressure and heart rate variability analysis of orthostatic challenge in normal human pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Nonna; Saarelainen, Heli; Valtonen, Pirjo; Lyyra-Laitinen, Tiina; Laitinen, Tomi; Vanninen, Esko; Heinonen, Seppo

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate pregnancy-related changes in autonomic regulatory functions in healthy subjects. We studied cardiovascular autonomic responses to head-up tilt (HUT) in 28 pregnant women during the third trimester of pregnancy and 3 months after parturition. The maternal ECG and non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure were recorded in the horizontal position (left-lateral position) and during HUT in the upright position. Stroke volume was assessed from blood pressure signal by using the arterial pulse contour method. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analysed in frequency domain, and baroreflex sensitivity by the cross-spectral and the sequence methods. In the horizontal position, all frequency components of HRV were lower during pregnancy than 3 months after parturition (P < 0.01 to <0.001), while pregnancy had no influence on normalized low frequency and high frequency powers. During pregnancy haemodynamics was well balanced with only minor changes in response to postural change while haemodynamic responses to HUT were more remarkable after parturition. In pregnant women HRV and especially its very low frequency component increased in response to HUT, whereas at 3 months after parturition the direction of these changes was opposite. Parasympathetic deactivation towards term is likely to contribute to increased heart rate and cardiac output at rest, whereas restored sympathetic modulation with modest responses may contribute stable peripheral resistance and sufficient placental blood supply under stimulated conditions. It is important to understand cardiovascular autonomic nervous system and haemodynamic control in normal pregnancy before being able to judge whether they are dysregulated in complicated pregnancies.

  15. Application of fractionized sampling and stacking for construction of an interface for online heart-cutting two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baocheng; Xia, Bing; Liu, Jie; Gao, Yuanji; Ding, Lisheng; Zhou, Yan

    2016-09-30

    In this study, an efficient interface, based on a fractionized sampling and stacking (FSS) strategy, was developed for online heart-cutting two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC). This interface consisted of a two-position 4-port valve, a two-position 6-port valve and a two-position 10-port valve equipped with two 450-μL stainless steel loops. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP LC) were used in the first and second dimensions, respectively. The peak compression efficiency of this interface was investigated by analysis of ten standards. Good peak shapes of the ten standards were observed when the dilution ratio was over five and the co-eluate plug volume was less than 10μL. The 2D LC system was further applied to analysis of a crude extract of Panax ginseng leaves. Seventeen major constituents in the extract were monitored, which could not be well separated by one-dimensional (1D) HILIC or RP LC method in a long separation gradient. The FSS interface successfully achieved the efficient combination of HILIC and RP LC, and the 17 constituents in ginseng extract got well separated under the optimized conditions. The FSS interface has shown great potential for 2D LC analysis of complex natural product samples.

  16. Fetal scalp stimulation (FSS) versus fetal blood sampling (FBS) for women with abnormal fetal heart rate monitoring in labor: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir Mahmood, Uzma; O'Gorman, Catherine; Marchocki, Zibi; O'Brien, Yvonne; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate the performance of fetal scalp stimulation (FSS) compared to fetal blood sampling (FBS) as a second line test of fetal wellbeing in labor. A prospective cohort study was conducted including 298 fetal blood sampling procedures performed due to abnormal fetal cardiotocography (CTG). Two independent observers interpreted the CTG following stimulation. The FSS test was classified as normal when an elicited acceleration and/or provoked fetal heart rate variability was recorded. The FBS was classified as normal (pH ≥7.25), borderline (pH 7.21-7.24), and abnormal (pH ≤7.20). Of the 298 procedures, 249 (84%) had a normal scalp pH result, 199 (67%) had an acceleration in response to FSS and 255 (86%) had an acceleration or normal variability in response to FSS. All 11 of the neonates classified as normal by FSS, but abnormal by FBS were born with normal Apgar scores and cord pH results. The consistency between FSS and FBS was "fair" (kappa 0.28) while the consistency between either test and cord arterial pH was "poor". This study suggests that FSS has the potential to be a reliable alternative to FBS. The findings require evaluation in a well-designed randomized controlled trial.

  17. Effects of KATP channel openers diazoxide and pinacidil in coronary-perfused atria and ventricles from failing and non-failing human hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim V.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Kostecki, Geran; Chang, Roger; Janks, Deborah; Schuessler, Richard B.; Moazami, Nader; Nichols, Colin G.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study compared the effects of ATP-regulated potassium channel (KATP) openers, diazoxide and pinacidil, on diseased and normal human atria and ventricles. METHODS We optically mapped the endocardium of coronary-perfused right (n=11) or left (n=2) posterior atrial-ventricular free wall preparations from human hearts with congestive heart failure (CHF, n=8) and non-failing human hearts without (NF, n=3) or with (INF, n=2) infarction. We also analyzed the mRNA expression of the KATP targets Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, and SUR2 in the left atria and ventricles of NF (n=8) and CHF (n=4) hearts. RESULTS In both CHF and INF hearts, diazoxide significantly decreased action potential durations (APDs) in atria (by −21±3% and −27±13%, p<0.01) and ventricles (by −28±7% and −28±4%, p<0.01). Diazoxide did not change APD (0±5%) in NF atria. Pinacidil significantly decreased APDs in both atria (−46 to - 80%, p<0.01) and ventricles (−65 to −93%, p<0.01) in all hearts studied. The effect of pinacidil on APD was significantly higher than that of diazoxide in both atria and ventricles of all groups (p<0.05). During pinacidil perfusion, burst pacing induced flutter/fibrillation in all atrial and ventricular preparations with dominant frequencies of 14.4±6.1 Hz and 17.5 ±5.1 Hz, respectively. Glibenclamide (10 μM) terminated these arrhythmias and restored APDs to control values. Relative mRNA expression levels of KATP targets were correlated to functional observations. CONCLUSION Remodeling in response to CHF and/or previous infarct potentiated diazoxide-induced APD shortening. The activation of atrial and ventricular KATP channels enhances arrhythmogenicity, suggesting that such activation may contribute to reentrant arrhythmias in ischemic hearts. PMID:21586291

  18. An integrative analysis of DNA methylation and RNA-Seq data for human heart, kidney and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Linglin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many groups, including our own, have proposed the use of DNA methylation profiles as biomarkers for various disease states. While much research has been done identifying DNA methylation signatures in cancer vs. normal etc., we still lack sufficient knowledge of the role that differential methylation plays during normal cellular differentiation and tissue specification. We also need thorough, genome level studies to determine the meaning of methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in terms of gene expression. Results In this study, we have used (insert statistical method here to compile unique DNA methylation signatures from normal human heart, lung, and kidney using the Illumina Infinium 27 K methylation arraysand compared those to gene expression by RNA sequencing. We have identified unique signatures of global DNA methylation for human heart, kidney and liver, and showed that DNA methylation data can be used to correctly classify various tissues. It indicates that DNA methylation reflects tissue specificity and may play an important role in tissue differentiation. The integrative analysis of methylation and RNA-Seq data showed that gene methylation and its transcriptional levels were comprehensively correlated. The location of methylation markers in terms of distance to transcription start site and CpG island showed no effects on the regulation of gene expression by DNA methylation in normal tissues. Conclusions This study showed that an integrative analysis of methylation array and RNA-Seq data can be utilized to discover the global regulation of gene expression by DNA methylation and suggests that DNA methylation plays an important role in normal tissue differentiation via modulation of gene expression.

  19. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  20. Dioxin and PCB levels in human samples from the Greek population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leondiadis, L.; Vassiliadou, I.; Costopoulou, D.; Papadopoulos, A. [Mass Spectrometry and Dioxin Analysis Lab. - NCSR Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are commercial chemical substances produced in a large scale since 1930, with a wide range of applications in industry, such as for coolant fluids in transformers and dielectric fluids in capacitors. After their health effects became apparent, PCB production was banned in the late 1970s. However, humans are still exposed through PCB leakage of old capacitors and transformers and disposal of contaminated materials. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs)), are formed as undesirable by-products mainly during the production of chlorinated chemicals and during the combustion of municipal and hazardous waste. Due to potential health hazard (dermal toxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive effects, teratogenicity, endocrine disruption and carcinogenicity), their monitoring in humans is of high general concern. Enough information on POP presence in human tissues from industrialized countries is available to suggest that the concentration of these compounds has decreased during the last 10 years. Monitoring of human exposure to PCBs and dioxins, contaminants that accumulate in lipid tissue, is most conveniently performed by analysis of blood plasma or blood serum. Monitoring of dioxins in human milk is of also great importance, since it is especially feared that lactational exposure to dioxins and related compounds may adversely affect brain development and the immune system of infants and children. The present study includes the analyses of non-ortho, mono-ortho, indicator PCBs, and PCDD/Fs in human blood and human milk samples collected between November 2002 and February 2004 and is the first study of this kind to be undertaken in Greece.

  1. Comprehensive metabolomics identified lipid peroxidation as a prominent feature in human plasma of patients with coronary heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a complex human disease associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers for the different types of CHD remain poorly defined. Metabolomics has been increasingly recognized as an enabling technique with the potential to identify key metabolomic features in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology and differentiate different stages of CHD. We performed comprehensive metabolomic analysis in human plasma from 28 human subjects with stable angina (SA, myocardial infarction (MI, and healthy control (HC. Subsequent analysis demonstrated a uniquely altered metabolic profile in these CHD: a total of 18, 37 and 36 differential metabolites were identified to distinguish SA from HC, MI from SA, and MI from HC groups respectively. Among these metabolites, glycerophospholipid (GPL metabolism emerged as the most significantly disturbed pathway. Next, we used a targeted metabolomic approach to systematically analyze GPL, oxidized phospholipid (oxPL, and downstream metabolites derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid and linoleic acid. Surprisingly, lipids associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO pathways including oxidized PL and isoprostanes, isomers of prostaglandins, were significantly elevated in plasma of MI patients comparing to HC and SA, consistent with the notion that oxidative stress-induced LPO is a prominent feature in CHD. Our studies using the state-of-the-art metabolomics help to understand the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CHD; LPO metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers to differentiation MI from SA and HC.

  2. Genetic identification of missing persons: DNA analysis of human remains and compromised samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cubero, M J; Saiz, M; Martinez-Gonzalez, L J; Alvarez, J C; Eisenberg, A J; Budowle, B; Lorente, J A

    2012-01-01

    Human identification has made great strides over the past 2 decades due to the advent of DNA typing. Forensic DNA typing provides genetic data from a variety of materials and individuals, and is applied to many important issues that confront society. Part of the success of DNA typing is the generation of DNA databases to help identify missing persons and to develop investigative leads to assist law enforcement. DNA databases house DNA profiles from convicted felons (and in some jurisdictions arrestees), forensic evidence, human remains, and direct and family reference samples of missing persons. These databases are essential tools, which are becoming quite large (for example the US Database contains 10 million profiles). The scientific, governmental and private communities continue to work together to standardize genetic markers for more effective worldwide data sharing, to develop and validate robust DNA typing kits that contain the reagents necessary to type core identity genetic markers, to develop technologies that facilitate a number of analytical processes and to develop policies to make human identity testing more effective. Indeed, DNA typing is integral to resolving a number of serious criminal and civil concerns, such as solving missing person cases and identifying victims of mass disasters and children who may have been victims of human trafficking, and provides information for historical studies. As more refined capabilities are still required, novel approaches are being sought, such as genetic testing by next-generation sequencing, mass spectrometry, chip arrays and pyrosequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms offer the potential to analyze severely compromised biological samples, to determine the facial phenotype of decomposed human remains and to predict the bioancestry of individuals, a new focus in analyzing this type of markers.

  3. High molecular weight fibroblast growth factor-2 in the human heart is a potential target for prevention of cardiac remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon-Jon Santiago

    deleterious (pro-fibrotic, pro-inflammatory, and pro-hypertrophic responses in vitro. Selective targeting of Hi-FGF-2 production may, therefore, reduce pathological remodelling in the human heart.

  4. A simple sample preparation method for measuring amoxicillin in human plasma by hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei-Chong; Hou, Zi-Li; Jiang, Xin-Hui; Jiang, Ye

    2013-02-01

    A simple sample preparation method has been developed for the determination of amoxicillin in human plasma by hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration (HF-CF-UF). A 400-μL plasma sample was placed directly into the HF-CF-UF device, which consisited of a slim glass tube and a U-shaped hollow fiber. After centrifugation at 1.25 × 10(3) g for 10 min, the filtrate was withdrawn from the hollow fiber and 20 µL was directly injected into the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for analysis. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.1-20 µg/mL (r = 0.9996) and the limit of detection was as low as 0.025 µg/mL. The average recovery and absolute recovery were 99.9% and 84.5%, respectively. Both the intra-day and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviation) were less than 3.1% for three concentrations (0.25, 2.5 and 10 µg/mL). The sample preparation process was simplified. Only after a single centrifugal ultrafiltration can the filtrate be injected directly into HPLC. The present method is simple, sensitive and accurate. It could be effective for the analysis of biological samples with high protein contents, especially for the biopharmaceutical analysis of drugs that use traditional isolation techniques for sample preparation such as the protein precipitation method.

  5. Small Sample Kernel Association Tests for Human Genetic and Microbiome Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Wenan; Zhao, Ni; Wu, Michael C; Schaid, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Kernel machine based association tests (KAT) have been increasingly used in testing the association between an outcome and a set of biological measurements due to its power to combine multiple weak signals of complex relationship with the outcome through the specification of a relevant kernel. Human genetic and microbiome association studies are two important applications of KAT. However, the classic KAT framework relies on large sample theory, and conservativeness has been observed for small sample studies, especially for microbiome association studies. The common approach for addressing the small sample problem relies on computationally intensive resampling methods. Here, we derive an exact test for KAT with continuous traits, which resolve the small sample conservatism of KAT without the need for resampling. The exact test has significantly improved power to detect association for microbiome studies. For binary traits, we propose a similar approximate test, and we show that the approximate test is very powerful for a wide range of kernels including common variant- and microbiome-based kernels, and the approximate test controls the type I error well for these kernels. In contrast, the sequence kernel association tests have slightly inflated genomic inflation factors after small sample adjustment. Extensive simulations and application to a real microbiome association study are used to demonstrate the utility of our method. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. A salting out and resin procedure for extracting Schistosoma mansoni DNA from human urine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Nilton B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a simple and cheap salting out and resin (InstaGene matrix® resin - BioRad DNA extraction method from urine for PCR assays is introduced. The DNA of the fluke Schistosoma mansoni was chosen as the target since schistosomiasis lacks a suitable diagnostic tool which is sensitive enough to detect low worm burden. It is well known that the PCR technique provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA. Therefore it is of paramount importance to take advantage of its excellent performance by providing a simple to handle and reliable DNA extraction procedure, which permits the diagnosis of the disease in easily obtainable urine samples. Findings The description of the extraction procedure is given. This extraction procedure was tested for reproducibility and efficiency in artificially contaminated human urine samples. The reproducibility reached 100%, showing positive results in 5 assay repetitions of 5 tested samples each containing 20 ng DNA/5 ml. The efficiency of the extraction procedure was also evaluated in a serial dilution of the original 20 ng DNA/5 ml sample. Detectable DNA was extracted when it was at a concentration of 1.28 pg DNA/mL, revealing the high efficiency of this procedure. Conclusions This methodology represents a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnosis utilizing a bio-molecular technique in urine samples which is now ready to be tested under field conditions and may be applicable to the diagnosis of other parasitic diseases.

  7. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Almeida, Diogo B.; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG/THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium/stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  8. Exploring the acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha K; Vahabi, Mandana; Fardad, Mitra; Raza, Afrah

    2017-01-01

    With appropriate screening (ie, the Papanicolaou [Pap] test), cervical cancer is highly preventable, and high-income countries, including Canada, have observed significant decreases in cervical cancer mortality. However, certain subgroups, including immigrants from countries with large Muslim populations, experience disparities in cervical cancer screening. Little is known about the acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as a screening strategy among Muslim immigrant women in Canada. This study assessed cervical cancer screening practices, knowledge and attitudes, and acceptability of HPV self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women. A convenience sample of 30 women was recruited over a 3-month period (June-August 2015) in the Greater Toronto Area. All women were between 21 and 69 years old, foreign-born, and self-identified as Muslim, and had good knowledge of English. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire. More than half of the participants falsely indicated that Pap tests may cause cervical infection, and 46.7% indicated that the test is an intrusion on privacy. The majority of women reported that they would be willing to try HPV self-sampling, and more than half would prefer this method to provider-administered sampling methods. Barriers to self-sampling included confidence in the ability to perform the test and perceived cost, and facilitators included convenience and privacy being preserved. The results demonstrate that HPV self-sampling may provide a favorable alternative model of care to the traditional provider-administered Pap testing. These findings add important information to the literature related to promoting cancer screening among women who are under or never screened for cervical cancer.

  9. Human-parathormone assay for use in dogs: validation, sample handling studies, and parathyroid function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, A G; Nachreiner, R

    1989-07-01

    Ten commercially available parathormone (PTH) assays were competitively validated, using dilutional parallelism, intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation, and sensitivity and measured responses of 2 dogs to calcium and EDTA infusions. A 2-site immunoradiometric assay for intact human-PTH was superior to the others for estimating canine-PTH, met the criteria for validity, and was further investigated. A series of sample-handling studies was performed. Serum and plasma samples stored at 24 C lost 15% (n = 5; P less than 0.05) of PTH between 2 and 24 hours. This did not occur at 6 C. The mean PTH concentration of sera from blood samples clotted at 24 C was 6% (P less than 0.05) higher than equivalent EDTA samples. Serum samples stored at 6 and 37 C deteriorated 35% and 100% (n = 5; P less than 0.05), respectively, after 1 week, whereas samples stored at -20 and -70 C for 4 weeks did not deteriorate. There was no significant deterioration of PTH in samples frozen (-40 C) and thawed up to 7 times (n = 5). Parathyroid function testing was investigated by use of 2-hour infusions of disodium EDTA (25 mg/kg/h), 10-minute infusions of calcium gluconate (3 mg of elemental calcium/kg/10 min), and physiologic saline controls (n = 8). Renal function was monitored before and after EDTA infusion by exogenous creatinine clearance. Infusion of disodium EDTA increased mean PTH concentration from 67 (time 0) to 317 and 235 pg/ml at 90 and 180 minutes, respectively (P less than 0.001). Infusion of calcium gluconate decreased mean PTH concentration from 84 (time 0) to 14 and 12 pg/ml at 15 and 60 minutes, respectively (P less than 0.005). There were no observable side effects of the infusions in normal conscious dogs and no differences in exogenous creatinine clearance after EDTA infusion.

  10. Freezing adversely affects measurement of vascular endothelial growth factor levels in human aqueous samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarathi Balaiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sankarathi Balaiya Sandeep Grover Ravi K Murthy Kakarla V ChalamDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAPurpose: Aqueous levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF can be a surrogate marker of intraocular VEGF activity and a measure of efficacy of anti-VEGF treatment in a variety of vasoproliferative retinal disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and central retinal vein occlusion. Measurement of the VEGF level may be adversely affected by premeasurement variables, such as freezing and delay, in sample analysis. We aim to evaluate the effect of storage and delayed measurement of human aqueous VEGF levels in these conditions.Methods: Aqueous samples collected from patients receiving intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for various retinal diseases were divided into two groups. In Group 1, the VEGF levels were analyzed on the same day; in Group 2, the VEGF levels were analyzed after 21 days of freezer storage (-80°C using immunobead assay. Statistical comparison using a paired t-test was performed between the two groups.Results: Thirty-one aqueous humor samples were collected, and the VEGF concentration for fresh samples was 7.8 ± 5.9 pg/mL (mean ± SD compared to 6.5 ± 6.0 pg/mL in frozen samples, resulting in a statistically significant difference (P = 0.03.Conclusions: Accurate measurement of the VEGF level is a vital component of clinical decision-making. Delayed analysis of VEGF levels in aqueous samples may result in significant sample degradation and lower levels of measured VEGF.Keywords: VEGF level, aqueous humor, immunobead assay, VEGF storage

  11. Effect of global cardiac ischemia on human ventricular fibrillation: insights from a multi-scale mechanistic model of the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazbanov, Ivan V; Clayton, Richard H; Nash, Martyn P; Bradley, Chris P; Paterson, David J; Hayward, Martin P; Taggart, Peter; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2014-11-01

    Acute regional ischemia in the heart can lead to cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF), which in turn compromise cardiac output and result in secondary global cardiac ischemia. The secondary ischemia may influence the underlying arrhythmia mechanism. A recent clinical study documents the effect of global cardiac ischaemia on the mechanisms of VF. During 150 seconds of global ischemia the dominant frequency of activation decreased, while after reperfusion it increased rapidly. At the same time the complexity of epicardial excitation, measured as the number of epicardical phase singularity points, remained approximately constant during ischemia. Here we perform numerical studies based on these clinical data and propose explanations for the observed dynamics of the period and complexity of activation patterns. In particular, we study the effects on ischemia in pseudo-1D and 2D cardiac tissue models as well as in an anatomically accurate model of human heart ventricles. We demonstrate that the fall of dominant frequency in VF during secondary ischemia can be explained by an increase in extracellular potassium, while the increase during reperfusion is consistent with washout of potassium and continued activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels. We also suggest that memory effects are responsible for the observed complexity dynamics. In addition, we present unpublished clinical results of individual patient recordings and propose a way of estimating extracellular potassium and activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels from these measurements.

  12. The role of collagen cross-links in biomechanical behavior of human aortic heart valve leaflets - Relevance for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balguid, A.; Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Bank, R.A.; Bogers, A.J.J.C.; Kats, J.P. van; Mol, B.A.J.M. de; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge in tissue engineering of functional heart valves is to determine and mimic the dominant tissue structures that regulate heart valve function and in vivo survival. In native heart valves, the anisotropic matrix architecture assures sustained and adequate functioning under

  13. The content and distribution of troponin I, troponin T, myoglobin, and alpha-hydroxybutyric acid dehydrogenase in the human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaanenburg, JCJM; Visser-VanBrummen, PJ; DeJongste, MJL; Tiebosch, ATHM

    2001-01-01

    We studied the content and distribution of heart-specific markers troponin I and troponin T in relation to conventional non-heart specific myoglobin and alpha-hydroxybutyric acid dehydrogenase (HBD) in the hearts of 34 patients who died of various causes. Tissue was obtained from the right and left

  14. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  15. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from t

  16. Paenibacillus spp. isolated from human and environmental samples in Spain: detection of 11 new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Sáez-Nieto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One hundred thirty-six isolates, 88 human and 48 environmental, that met the requirements to belong to the genus Paenibacillus were identified using a polyphasic taxonomic approach known as 16S rRNA plus phenotypic traits. Thirty-seven Paenibacillus species were identified; some had not been previously reported from clinical samples. The main species were P. pabuli (13 isolates, P. provencensis (11, P. phoenicis (9 and P. lautus (8. P. pabuli (11/13 and P. provencensis (8/11 were mainly environmental isolates, while P. phoenicis (9/9 and P. lautus (6/8 were mainly human isolates. Despite the difficulties in assigning to human Paenibacillus isolates a role as a pathogen or contaminant, here 25% of the isolates were involved in true infections, especially in those cases that affected abscesses, wound exudates, ocular infections and diverse fluids. In addition, 15 isolates were identified as 11 ‘Candidatus’ to a new species, all of them from human specimens except one that was obtained from laboratory air. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed 95.6% of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, 44% were resistant to cotrimoxazole, 20 to 30% were resistant to cefotaxime and vancomycin and 13% were resistant to rifampicin and erythromycin.

  17. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian;

    2003-01-01

    . The results obtained with the bioassay when testing milk extracts fractionated into dioxins/furans, non-ortho PCB and mono/di-ortho PCB fractions indicated that the correlation between the bioassay and the chemical analyses depends primarily on the A receptor activity observed in the mono/di-ortho PCB......The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized...... and applied for monitoring levels of dioxins in human milk samples. Combination effects of dioxin-like compounds were evaluated by testing potential mechanisms of interaction between seven of the major dioxin-like compounds in human milk using the isobole method. Results showed that the compounds acted...

  18. Dioxin-like activity in environmental and human samples from Greenland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... degradation of the high potent dioxin and/or the inhibitory effect of the high level of non-DL POPs. Selective bioaccumulation of PCBs in the food chain may contribute to the negative correlation between serum POPs and DL-activity observed in Greenlandic Inuit. Hence the AhR transactivation bioassay provides...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  19. Nondestructive sampling of human skeletal remains yields ancient nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Deborah A; Bonine, Holly M; Mata-Míguez, Jaime; Kemp, Brian M; Snow, Meradeth H; LeBlanc, Steven A

    2012-02-01

    Museum curators and living communities are sometimes reluctant to permit ancient DNA (aDNA) studies of human skeletal remains because the extraction of aDNA usually requires the destruction of at least some skeletal material. Whether these views stem from a desire to conserve precious materials or an objection to destroying ancestral remains, they limit the potential of aDNA research. To help address concerns about destructive analysis and to minimize damage to valuable specimens, we describe a nondestructive method for extracting DNA from ancient human remains. This method can be used with both teeth and bone, but it preserves the structural integrity of teeth much more effectively than that of bone. Using this method, we demonstrate that it is possible to extract both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from human remains dating between 300 BC and 1600 AD. Importantly, the method does not expose the remains to hazardous chemicals, allowing them to be safely returned to curators, custodians, and/or owners of the samples. We successfully amplified mitochondrial DNA from 90% of the individuals tested, and we were able to analyze 1-9 nuclear loci in 70% of individuals. We also show that repeated nondestructive extractions from the same tooth can yield amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. The high success rate of this method and its ability to yield DNA from samples spanning a wide geographic and temporal range without destroying the structural integrity of the sampled material may make possible the genetic study of skeletal collections that are not available for destructive analysis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Solid Dynamic Models for Analysis of Stress and Strain in Human Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Guan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a solid model based on four-dimensional trivariate B-spline for strain and stress analysis of ventricular myocardium. With a series of processing steps in the four-dimensional medical images, the feature points of ventricular inner and outer wall are obtained. A B-spline surface is then used to build the dynamic deformation model of the myocardial walls. With such a surface model, a hexahedron control mesh can be constructed by sweeping the cloud data, and the ventricular solid model is built by fitting the trivariate B-spline parameters. Based on these models, a method of isogeometric analysis can be applied to calculate the stress and strain continuously distributed in the ventricle. The model is represented smoothly in the cylindrical coordinate system and is easy to measure myocardium dynamics for finding abnormal motion. Experiments are carried out for comparing the stress and strain distribution. It is found that the solid model can determine ventricular dynamics which can well reflect the deformation distribution in the heart and imply early clues of cardiac diseases.

  1. Graphene quantum dots FRET based sensor for early detection of heart attack in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kumar, Vanish; Kumar, Ashok; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2016-05-15

    Cardiac immunosensor for early detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) was developed using amine functionalized graphene quantum dots (afGQDs) conjugated with antibody anti-cardiac Troponin I (anti-cTnI) to detect cardiac marker antigen Troponin I (cTnI) in blood based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between conjugate and graphene (quencher) only in 10 min. The anti-cTnI was covalently conjugated to afGQDs through carbodiimide coupling reaction. The conjugate was characterized by zeta potential UV-vis spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in the photon count and photoluminescence of GQDs based on interaction of target cTnI with its specific anti-cTnI antibody. The sensor is highly specific and shows negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensor displayed a linear response to cTnI from 0.001 to 1000 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.192 pg mL(-1).

  2. Expression and Characterization of Human Heart Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein in Pichia Pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    H-FABP is regarded as a tissue-specific protein existing only in myocardial cells. It is released from the cardiac tissue and gets into the plasma when a heart attack occurs; the myocardial infarction is a good case in point. As a result, the detection of H-FABP will be an early and important biomarker for the disease concerned. The objective of the study is to prepare the recombinant H-FABP by aeukaryotic expression system, pichia, to produce the protein mimicking natural H-FABP, as an immunogen for the production of the specific antibody. A gene fragment encoding H-FABP was cloned in the expressing vector pPICZα, after sequencing. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into the competent cells of the X-33 strain by means of electroporation. The expression of the target peptide indueed by methanol was screened by means of Western blotting, with the available MAb( Clone 6B6 ). Highly expressive engineer strains were obtained. The production of recombinant H-FABP under induction was about 0.7 g/L, with an Mr of 14.5 kDa and recognized by a commercially available MAb (Clone 6B6). The recombinant vector was successfully constructed. Following this, H-FABP was expressed in X-33, and it would become the source of the preparation of specific antibodies, to develop diagnostic kits.

  3. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction in the left ventricle of the human heart coupled with mitral valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschini, Valentina; de Tullio, Marco Donato; Querzoli, Giorgio; Verzicco, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In this paper Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), implemented using a fully fluid-structure interaction model for the left ventricle, the mitral valve and the flowing blood, and laboratory experiments are performed in order to cross validate the results. Moreover a parameter affecting the flow dynamics is the presence of a mitral valve. We model two cases, one with a natural mitral valve and another with a prosthetic mechanical one. Our aim is to understand their different effects on the flow inside the left ventricle in order to better investigate the process of valve replacement. We simulate two situations, one of a healthy left ventricle and another of a failing one. While in the first case the flow reaches the apex of the left ventricle and washout the stagnant fluid with both mechanical and natural valve, in the second case the disturbance generated by the mechanical leaflets destabilizes the mitral jet, thus further decreasing its capability to penetrate the ventricular region and originating heart attack or cardiac pathologies in general.

  5. An Improved Method for High Quality Metagenomics DNA Extraction from Human and Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bag, Satyabrata; Saha, Bipasa; Mehta, Ojasvi

    2016-01-01

    and human origin samples. We introduced a combination of physical, chemical and mechanical lysis methods for proper lysis of microbial inhabitants. The community microbial DNA was precipitated by using salt and organic solvent. Both the quality and quantity of isolated DNA was compared with the existing...... methodologies and the supremacy of our method was confirmed. Maximum recovery of genomic DNA in the absence of substantial amount of impurities made the method convenient for nucleic acid extraction. The nucleic acids obtained using this method are suitable for different downstream applications. This improved...

  6. Modular Sampling and Analysis Techniques for the Real-Time Analysis of Human Breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M; Farquar, G; Adams, K; Bogan, M; Martin, A; Benner, H; Spadaccini, C; Steele, P; Davis, C; Loyola, B; Morgan, J; Sankaran, S

    2007-07-09

    At LLNL and UC Davis, we are developing several techniques for the real-time sampling and analysis of trace gases, aerosols and exhaled breath that could be useful for a modular, integrated system for breath analysis. Those techniques include single-particle bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) for the analysis of exhaled aerosol particles or droplets as well as breath samplers integrated with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or MEMS-based differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). We describe these techniques and present recent data obtained from human breath or breath condensate, in particular, addressing the question of how environmental exposure influences the composition of breath.

  7. Genetic Characterization of Atypical Mansonella (Mansonella) ozzardi Microfilariae in Human Blood Samples from Northeastern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis A.; Arrospide, Nancy; Recuenco, Sergio; Cabezas, Cesar; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence comparisons are useful for characterizing proposed new parasite species or strains. Microfilariae with an atypical arrangement of nuclei behind the cephalic space have been recently described in human blood samples from the Amazon region of Peru. Three blood specimens containing atypical microfilariae were genetically characterized using three DNA markers (5S ribosomal DNA, 12S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase I). All atypical microfilariae were clustered into the Mansonella group and indistinguishable from M. ozzardi based on these DNA markers. PMID:22826497

  8. [The quality control of preanalytical variations for the determination of lead in samples of human origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kun; Wang, Wei; He, Falin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this article was to provide the quality control requirements of preanalytical variation for the determination of lead in samples of human origin, reduce the influence of preanalytical variation on the test results. According to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents, control of preanalytical variation in trace element determinations, analytical procedures for the determination of lead in blood and urine and other references and guidelines, the methods of quality control of lead determination had been made, including: the factors needed to be considered before collection, preservation, transportation and other preanalytical factors, the abilities and considerations of laboratory staff, etc.

  9. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of human fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Pablo; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; Miró, Elisenda; Argente, Marc; Jofre, Juan; Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-01-01

    A group of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1, mecA, armA, qnrA, and qnrS) were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from feces from 80 healthy humans. Seventy-seven percent of the samples were positive in phage DNA for one or more ARGs. blaTEM, qnrA, and, blaCTX-M-1 were the most abundant, and armA, qnrS, and mecA were less prevalent. Free bacteriophages carrying ARGs may contribute to the mobilization of ARGs in intra- and extraintestinal environments.

  10. Calcium isolation from large-volume human urine samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-08-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for (41)Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after (41)Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide (41)Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background.

  11. Calcium Isolation from Large-Volume Human Urine Samples for 41Ca Analysis by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after 41Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide 41Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background. PMID:23672965

  12. Human Cytomegalovirus and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Restriction of Primary Isolation to Blood Samples and Susceptibilities of Clinical Isolates from Other Sources to Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients with disseminated infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the microvascular endothelium of multiple organs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in parallel to human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to recover HCMV from blood samples of immunocompromised patients. Using the shell vial technique, comparable median numbers of p72-positive HUVEC and HELF cells were found with the 26 HCMV-positive buffy coat samples out of 150 ex...

  13. Optimization of a Pre-MEKC Separation SPE Procedure for Steroid Molecules in Human Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Olędzka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many steroid hormones can be considered as potential biomarkers and their determination in body fluids can create opportunities for the rapid diagnosis of many diseases and disorders of the human body. Most existing methods for the determination of steroids are usually time- and labor-consuming and quite costly. Therefore, the aim of analytical laboratories is to develop a new, relatively low-cost and rapid implementation methodology for their determination in biological samples. Due to the fact that there is little literature data on concentrations of steroid hormones in urine samples, we have made attempts at the electrophoretic determination of these compounds. For this purpose, an extraction procedure for the optimized separation and simultaneous determination of seven steroid hormones in urine samples has been investigated. The isolation of analytes from biological samples was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE with dichloromethane and compared to solid phase extraction (SPE with C18 and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB columns. To separate all the analytes a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECK technique was employed. For full separation of all the analytes a running buffer (pH 9.2, composed of 10 mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax, 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, and 10% methanol was selected. The methodology developed in this work for the determination of steroid hormones meets all the requirements of analytical methods. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of urine samples collected from volunteers—both men and women (students, amateur bodybuilders, using and not applying steroid doping. The data obtained during this work can be successfully used for further research on the determination of steroid hormones in urine samples.

  14. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  15. High-throughput miRNA profiling of human melanoma blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rass Knuth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA signatures are not only found in cancer tissue but also in blood of cancer patients. Specifically, miRNA detection in blood offers the prospect of a non-invasive analysis tool. Methods Using a microarray based approach we screened almost 900 human miRNAs to detect miRNAs that are deregulated in their expression in blood cells of melanoma patients. We analyzed 55 blood samples, including 20 samples of healthy individuals, 24 samples of melanoma patients as test set, and 11 samples of melanoma patients as independent validation set. Results A hypothesis test based approch detected 51 differentially regulated miRNAs, including 21 miRNAs that were downregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients and 30 miRNAs that were upregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients as compared to blood cells of healthy controls. The tets set and the independent validation set of the melanoma samples showed a high correlation of fold changes (0.81. Applying hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis we found that blood samples of melanoma patients and healthy individuals can be well differentiated from each other based on miRNA expression analysis. Using a subset of 16 significant deregulated miRNAs, we were able to reach a classification accuracy of 97.4%, a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 98.9% by supervised analysis. MiRNA microarray data were validated by qRT-PCR. Conclusions Our study provides strong evidence for miRNA expression signatures of blood cells as useful biomarkers for melanoma.

  16. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 18 in Cervical Cancer Samples Using PCR-ELISA (DIAPOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KN Tafreshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is a major risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the cervix. The high-risk types of the virus such as HPV16 and HPV18, which possess the E6 and E7 oncogenes, are responsible for approximately 50% of all cervical cancers. A rapid, sensitive and specific test has been proposed for detection of HPV to improve cervical cancer screening programs.Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a fast PCR-ELISA assay designated as DIAPOPS (Detection of Immobilized Amplified Products in a One Phase Systemfor detection of HPV16 and HPV18 types in SCC samples and Pap smears. The type specific primers and probes were designed for PCR and PCR-ELISA. The amplified products were hybridized with a specific biotin-labeled probe for HPV18 inner amplicons. The hybrids were detected with peroxidase conjugated avidin. The test was performed on the paraffin block and Pap smear samples from the cervical cancer patients, and the results of DIAPOPS were compared with conventional PCR assay.Results: The 70 samples (SCC and Pap smear samples were collected from Imam Khomeini and Mirzakoochak Khan Hospitals in Tehran. The PCR-based method detected six HPV16 positive, three HPV18 positive and Two HPV33 positive samples. DIAPOPS results were compared with the conventional PCR results and they showed an increase in sensitivity of the DIAPOPS test. Not only all of them were confirmed by PCR-ELISA but also three samples that conventional PCR showed negative for HPV18, were demonstrated positive by the PCR-ELISA method.Conclusion: The results of the study show that modified PCR-ELISA assay is more sensitive to detect HPV types and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  17. Development of a CART Model to Predict the Synthesis of Cardiotoxic Daunorubicinol in Heart Tissue Samples From Donors With and Without Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Carrie C; Blair, Rachael Hageman; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-06-01

    Daunorubicin (DAUN) and doxorubicin (DOX) are used to treat a variety of cancers. The use of DAUN and DOX is hampered by the development of cardiotoxicity. Clinical evidence suggests that patients with leukemia and Down syndrome are at increased risk for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity. Carbonyl reductases and aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) catalyze the reduction of DAUN and DOX into cardiotoxic C-13 alcohol metabolites. Anthracyclines also exert cardiotoxicity by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent studies, a collection of heart samples from donors with and without Down syndrome was used to investigate determinants for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity including cardiac daunorubicin reductase activity (DA), carbonyl reductase/AKRs protein expression, mitochondrial DNA content (mtDNA), and AKR7A2 DNA methylation status. In this study, the available demographic, biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic data were integrated through classification and regression trees analysis with the aim of pinpointing the most relevant variables for the synthesis of cardiotoxic daunorubicinol (i.e., DA). Seventeen variables were considered as potential predictors. Leave-one-out-cross-validation was performed for model selection and to estimate the generalization error. The classification and regression trees analysis model and variable importance measures suggest that cardiac mtDNA content, mtDNA(4977) deletion frequency, and AKR7A2 protein content are the most important variables in determining DA.

  18. Enhanced store-operated Ca2+ influx and ORAI1 expression in ventricular fibroblasts from human failing heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracious R. Ross

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive cardiac fibrosis, characterized by increased collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM deposition, is a major predisposing factor for mechanical and electrical dysfunction in heart failure (HF. The human ventricular fibroblast (hVF remodeling mechanisms that cause excessive collagen deposition in HF are unclear, although reports suggest a role for intracellular free Ca2+ in fibrosis. Therefore, we determined the association of differences in cellular Ca2+ dynamics and collagen secretion/deposition between hVFs from failing and normal (control hearts. Histology of left ventricle sections (Masson trichrome confirmed excessive fibrosis in HF versus normal. In vitro, hVFs from HF showed increased secretion/deposition of soluble collagen in 48 h of culture compared with control [85.9±7.4 µg/106 cells vs 58.5±8.8 µg/106 cells, P<0.05; (Sircol™ assay]. However, collagen gene expressions (COL1A1 and COL1A2; RT-PCR were not different. Ca2+ imaging (fluo-3 of isolated hVFs showed no difference in the thapsigargin-induced intracellular Ca2+ release capacity (control 16±1.4% vs HF 17±1.1%; however, Ca2+ influx via store-operated Ca2+ entry/Ca2+ release-activated channels (SOCE/CRAC was significantly (P≤0.05 greater in HF-hVFs (47±3% compared with non-failing (35±5%. Immunoblotting for ICRAC channel components showed increased ORAI1 expression in HF-hVFs compared with normal without any difference in STIM1 expression. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for co-localization of STIM1/ORAI1 was significantly (P<0.01 greater in HF (0.5±0.01 than control (0.4±0.01 hVFs. The increase in collagen secretion of HF versus control hVFs was eliminated by incubation of hVFs with YM58483 (10 µM, a selective ICRAC inhibitor, for 48 h (66.78±5.87 µg/106 cells vs 55.81±7.09 µg/106 cells, P=0.27. In conclusion, hVFs from HF have increased collagen secretion capacity versus non-failing hearts and this is related to increase in Ca2

  19. Simulated Microgravity Exerts an Age-Dependent Effect on the Differentiation of Cardiovascular Progenitors Isolated from the Human Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I Fuentes

    Full Text Available Microgravity has a profound effect on cardiovascular function, however, little is known about the impact of microgravity on progenitors that reside within the heart. We investigated the effect of simulated microgravity exposure on progenitors isolated from the neonatal and adult human heart by quantifying changes in functional parameters, gene expression and protein levels after 6-7 days of 2D clinorotation. Utilization of neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors in ground-based studies has provided novel insight into how microgravity may affect cells differently depending on age. Simulated microgravity exposure did not impact AKT or ERK phosphorylation levels and did not influence cell migration, but elevated transcripts for paracrine factors were identified in neonatal and adult cardiovascular progenitors. Age-dependent responses surfaced when comparing the impact of microgravity on differentiation. Endothelial cell tube formation was unchanged or increased in progenitors from adults whereas neonatal cardiovascular progenitors showed a decline in tube formation (p<0.05. Von Willebrand Factor, an endothelial differentiation marker, and MLC2v and Troponin T, markers for cardiomyogenic differentiation, were elevated in expression in adult progenitors after simulated microgravity. DNA repair genes and telomerase reverse transcriptase which are highly expressed in early stem cells were increased in expression in neonatal but not adult cardiac progenitors after growth under simulated microgravity conditions. Neonatal cardiac progenitors demonstrated higher levels of MESP1, OCT4, and brachyury, markers for early stem cells. MicroRNA profiling was used to further investigate the impact of simulated microgravity on cardiovascular progenitors. Fifteen microRNAs were significantly altered in expression, including microRNAs-99a and 100 (which play a critical role in cell dedifferentiation. These microRNAs were unchanged in adult cardiac progenitors

  20. Multi-elemental imaging of paraffin-embedded human samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Trichard, F.; Busser, B.; Sabatier-Vincent, M.; Pelascini, F.; Pinel, N.; Templier, I.; Charles, J.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical elements play central roles for physiological homeostasis in human cells, and their dysregulation might lead to a certain number of pathologies. Novel imaging techniques that improve the work of pathologists for tissue analysis and diagnostics are continuously sought. We report the use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to perform multi-elemental images of human paraffin-embedded skin samples on the entire biopsy scale in a complementary and compatible way with microscope histopathological examination. A specific instrumental configuration is proposed in order to detect most of the elements of medical interest (i.e. P, Al, Mg, Na, Zn, Si, Fe, and Cu). As an example of medical application, we selected and analysed skin biopsies, including healthy skin tissue, cutaneous metastasis of melanoma, Merkel-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Clear distinctions in the distribution of chemical elements are observed from the different samples investigated. This study demonstrates the high complementarity of LIBS elemental imaging with conventional histopathology, opening new opportunities for any medical application involving metals.

  1. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  2. Goblet cells of the normal human bulbar conjunctiva and their assessment by impression cytology sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Goblet cells of the conjunctiva are the main source of mucus for the ocular surface. The objectives of this review are to consider the goblet cells as assessed by various histological, cytological and electron microscopy methods, and to assess the consistency of published reports (over more than 25 years) of goblet cell density (GCD) from impression cytology specimens from nominally healthy human subjects. Reported GCD values have been notably variable, with a range from 24 to 2226 cells/mm² for average values. Data analysis suggests that a high density of goblet cells should be expected for the healthy human conjunctiva, with a tendency toward higher values in samples taken from normally covered locations (inferior and superior bulbar conjunctiva) of the open eye (at 973 +/- 789 cells/ mm²) than in samples taken from exposed (interpalpebral) locations (at 427 +/- 376 cells/mm²). No obvious change in GCD was found with respect to age, perhaps because the variability of the data did not allow detection of any age-related decline in GCD. Analyses of published data from 33 other sources indicated a trend for GCD to be lower than normal across a spectrum of ocular surface diseases.

  3. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  4. Exploring the acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aisha K Lofters,1–4 Mandana Vahabi,5,6 Mitra Fardad,7 Afrah Raza8 1Centre for Urban Health Solutions, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael’s Hospital, 4Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, 5Faculty of Community Services, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, 6Graduate Program in Immigration and Settlement Studies, Ryerson University, 7Faculty of Community Service, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 8University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background: With appropriate screening (ie, the Papanicolaou [Pap] test, cervical cancer is highly preventable, and high-income countries, including Canada, have observed significant decreases in cervical cancer mortality. However, certain subgroups, including immigrants from countries with large Muslim populations, experience disparities in cervical cancer screening. Little is known about the acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV self-sampling as a screening strategy among Muslim immigrant women in Canada. This study assessed cervical cancer screening practices, knowledge and attitudes, and acceptability of HPV self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women. Methods: A convenience sample of 30 women was recruited over a 3-month period (June–August 2015 in the Greater Toronto Area. All women were between 21 and 69 years old, foreign-born, and self-identified as Muslim, and had good knowledge of English. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire. Results: More than half of the participants falsely indicated that Pap tests may cause cervical infection, and 46.7% indicated that the test is an intrusion on privacy. The majority of women reported that they would be willing to try HPV self-sampling, and more than half would prefer this method to provider-administered sampling methods

  5. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in a clinic sample of transsexuals in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loverro, Giuseppe; Di Naro, Edoardo; Caringella, Anna Maria; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Loconsole, Daniela; Chironna, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Reports on the prevalence of detectable HPV DNA among transsexuals (not sex workers) are scarce. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of detectable HPV DNA in a clinic sample of transsexuals and to assess the relationship between detectable HPV DNA and cytological outcomes. Clinical samples (oral, anal, vaginal, cervicovaginal and penile scraped cells) from 35 transsexuals (surgically treated and surgically untreated) who attended the outpatient Clinic of Gender Identity Dysphoria of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Policlinico Hospital (Bari, Italy) were collected for cytological analysis and HPV DNA detection and typing. All enrolled subjects answered an anonymous structured questionnaire about their sexual habits. Serological status for other sexually transmitted diseases (hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV and syphilis) was also evaluated. HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 35 patients (40.0%). The prevalence of detectable HPV DNA was 38.2% (13/34) in tested anal samples, 9.1% (2/22) in vaginal samples and 8.3% (1/12) in penile samples. Oncogenic HPV genotypes have been detected in 93% of HPV-positive transsexuals. More than one-third (35.7%) of HPV-positive transsexuals were infected with at least one of the four vaccine-preventable genotypes, 6, 11, 16 and 18. The high rate of detectable HPV DNA by oncogenic types suggests that periodic cytological screening and clinical evaluation may be necessary since transsexuals are at high risk of anogenital cancer. Also promoting HPV vaccination in younger subjects may be advisable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Comparison of sequencing platforms for single nucleotide variant calls in a human sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Aakrosh; Miller, Webb; Guillory, Joseph; Stinson, Jeremy; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Schuster, Stephan C

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencings platforms coupled with advanced bioinformatic tools enable re-sequencing of the human genome at high-speed and large cost savings. We compare sequencing platforms from Roche/454(GS FLX), Illumina/HiSeq (HiSeq 2000), and Life Technologies/SOLiD (SOLiD 3 ECC) for their ability to identify single nucleotide substitutions in whole genome sequences from the same human sample. We report on significant GC-related bias observed in the data sequenced on Illumina and SOLiD platforms. The differences in the variant calls were investigated with regards to coverage, and sequencing error. Some of the variants called by only one or two of the platforms were experimentally tested using mass spectrometry; a method that is independent of DNA sequencing. We establish several causes why variants remained unreported, specific to each platform. We report the indel called using the three sequencing technologies and from the obtained results we conclude that sequencing human genomes with more than a single platform and multiple libraries is beneficial when high level of accuracy is required.

  7. Accumulation levels and characteristics of some pesticides in human adipose tissue samples from Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Shi, Lili; Kong, Deyang; Cai, Daoji; Cao, Yanzhong; Liu, Yongming; Pang, Guofang; Yu, Rongbin

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of pesticide levels and bio-accumulation characteristics in human adipose tissues among residents of Southeast China. A large number of adipose samples (n=633) were selected for 58 pesticides and were analyzed by high sensitive Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The results showed that POPs pesticides were frequently detected, including 2,4'-DDD, 2,4'-DDE, 2,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDT, α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and mirex. Other detected pesticide species were dicofol, methamidophos and chlordimeform, which have rarely been reported. Comparing to different countries, the concentrations of total DDT and HCH in these three Chinese southeastern sites were in the middle range, whereas the HCB and mirex were in the lower end. A significant correlation was observed between region as well as age and POPs pesticide levels. Some pesticide residue levels were also found significantly correlated to occupation. However, there was no significant correlation between gender and pesticides. Meanwhile, it is interesting to find that mortality of malignant tumors tends to associate with the pesticides levels in human adipose tissue. More importantly, the measured data presented in this study provide realistic information which is useful for assessing human exposure to pesticides in the general population of Southeast China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tracking human footprints in Antarctica through passive sampling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wang, Feng; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-06-01

    Freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in seven inland lakes of Antarctica by a polyethylene (PE)-based passive sampling technique, with the objective of tracking human footprints. The measured concentrations of PAHs were in the range of 14-360 ng L(-1) with the highest values concentrated around the Russian Progress II Station, indicating the significance of human activities to the loading of PAHs in Antarctica. The concentrations of PAHs in the inland lakes were in the upper part of the PAHs levels in aquatic environments from remote and background regions across the globe. The composition profiles of PAHs indicated that PAHs in the inland lakes were derived mainly from local oil spills, which was corroborated by a large number of fuel spillage reports from ship and plane crash incidents in Antarctica during recent years. Clearly, local human activities, rather than long-range transport, are the dominant sources of PAH contamination to the inland lakes. Finally, the present study demonstrates the efficacy of PE-based passive samplers for investigating PAHs in the aquatic environment of Antarctica under complex field conditions.

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis from human sputum samples through multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Khan, Jafar; Ullah, Aman; Rehman, Hazir; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has a long history and being present even before the start of recording history. It has left detrimental effects on all aspect of the life and geared the developments in the science of health. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) including five species M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. canetti, and M. microti. M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infect both animals and humans. Therefore, differentiation of these two closely related species is very important for epidemiological and management purpose. We undertook the present study to characterize mycobacteria isolated from sputum of known TB patients by conventional methods and further, by multiplex PCR (mPCR) to detect the prevalence of Zoonotic TB (TB caused by M. bovis). Sputum samples from TB patient were collected from two tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar i.e. Lady Reading Hospital and Hayatabad Medical Complex. All the samples were subjected to Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) stain, culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) and Stone Brink medium, Nitrate reduction test and multiplex PCR. A total of hundred mycobacterial strains were isolated from these samples on the basis of ZN staining, cultural and biochemical methods. Later on, these isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR by using pncATB-1.2 and pncAMT-2 primers specific to M. tuberculosis and JB21, JB22 primers specific to M. bovis. By means of conventional method, these hundred cultures isolates were differentiated into M. tuberculosis (ninety six) and M. bovis (four). Furthermore, by mPCR, it was determined that out of hundred isolates, ninety-eight were identified as M. tuberculosis and two isolates as M. bovis. This molecular method enables to differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis in human sputum.

  10. A short form of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-6): Development, psychometric properties and validity in an intercultural non-clinical sample and a sample of patients at risk for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romppel, Matthias; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Wachter, Rolf; Edelmann, Frank; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Pieske, Burkert; Grande, Gesine

    2013-01-01

    Objective: General self-efficacy has been found to be an influential variable related to the adaptation to stress and chronic illness, with the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale by Jerusalem and Schwarzer being a reliable and valid instrument to assess this disposition. The aim of this study was to construct and test a short form of this scale to allow for a more economical assessment of the construct. Methods: The item characteristics of the original scale were assessed using an intercultural non-clinical sample (n=19,719). Six items with the highest coefficient of variation and good discrimination along the range of the trait were selected to build a short form of the instrument (GSE-6). Subsequently, the psychometric properties and the concurrent and predictive validity of the GSE-6 were tested in a longitudinal design with three measurements using a sample of patients with risk factors for heart failure (n=1,460). Results: Cronbach’s alpha for the GSE-6 was between .79 and .88. We found negative associations with symptoms of depression (–.35 and –.45), anxiety (–.35), and vital exhaustion (–.38) and positive associations with social support (.30), and mental health (.36). In addition, the GSE-6 score was positively associated with active problem-focused coping (.26) and distraction/self-encouragement (.25) and negatively associated with depressive coping (–.34). The baseline GSE-6 score predicted mental health and physical health after 28 months, even after controlling for the respective baseline score. The relative stability over twelve and 28 months was r=.50 and r=.60, respectively, while the mean self-efficacy score did not change over time. Conclusions: The six item short form of the GSE scale is a reliable and valid instrument that is useful for the economical assessment of general self-efficacy in large multivariate studies and for screening purposes. PMID:23429426

  11. Distribution of normal human left ventricular myofiber stress at end diastole and end systole: a target for in silico design of heart failure treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Martin; Lee, Lik Chuan; Nguyen, Rebecca; Haraldsson, Henrik; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Zhang, Zhihong; Ge, Liang; Ordovas, Karen; Kozerke, Sebastian; Guccione, Julius M

    2014-07-15

    Ventricular wall stress is believed to be responsible for many physical mechanisms taking place in the human heart, including ventricular remodeling, which is frequently associated with heart failure. Therefore, normalization of ventricular wall stress is the cornerstone of many existing and new treatments for heart failure. In this paper, we sought to construct reference maps of normal ventricular wall stress in humans that could be used as a target for in silico optimization studies of existing and potential new treatments for heart failure. To do so, we constructed personalized computational models of the left ventricles of five normal human subjects using magnetic resonance images and the finite-element method. These models were calibrated using left ventricular volume data extracted from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated through comparison with strain measurements from tagged MRI (950 ± 170 strain comparisons/subject). The calibrated passive material parameter values were C0 = 0.115 ± 0.008 kPa and B0 = 14.4 ± 3.18; the active material parameter value was Tmax = 143 ± 11.1 kPa. These values could serve as a reference for future construction of normal human left ventricular computational models. The differences between the predicted and the measured circumferential and longitudinal strains in each subject were 3.4 ± 6.3 and 0.5 ± 5.9%, respectively. The predicted end-diastolic and end-systolic myofiber stress fields for the five subjects were 2.21 ± 0.58 and 16.54 ± 4.73 kPa, respectively. Thus these stresses could serve as targets for in silico design of heart failure treatments.

  12. Human genomic DNA analysis using a semi-automated sample preparation, amplification, and electrophoresis separation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisi, Fariba; Blizard, Benjamin A; Raissi Shabari, Akbar; Ching, Jesus; Kintz, Gregory J; Mitchell, Jim; Lemoff, Asuncion; Taylor, Mike T; Weir, Fred; Western, Linda; Wong, Wendy; Joshi, Rekha; Howland, Pamela; Chauhan, Avinash; Nguyen, Peter; Petersen, Kurt E

    2004-03-01

    The growing importance of analyzing the human genome to detect hereditary and infectious diseases associated with specific DNA sequences has motivated us to develop automated devices to integrate sample preparation, real-time PCR, and microchannel electrophoresis (MCE). In this report, we present results from an optimized compact system capable of processing a raw sample of blood, extracting the DNA, and performing a multiplexed PCR reaction. Finally, an innovative electrophoretic separation was performed on the post-PCR products using a unique MCE system. The sample preparation system extracted and lysed white blood cells (WBC) from whole blood, producing DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Separation of multiple amplicons was achieved in a microfabricated channel 30 microm x 100 microm in cross section and 85 mm in length filled with a replaceable methyl cellulose matrix operated under denaturing conditions at 50 degrees C. By incorporating fluorescent-labeled primers in the PCR, the amplicons were identified by a two-color (multiplexed) fluorescence detection system. Two base-pair resolution of single-stranded DNA (PCR products) was achieved. We believe that this integrated system provides a unique solution for DNA analysis.

  13. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  14. [Detection and typing by molecular biology of human papillomavirus in genital samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Moya, A; Esquivias Gómez, J I; Vidart Aragón, J A; Picazo de la Garza, J J

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the etiological relationship between some HPV genotypes and genital cancer has been confirmed. Therefore, we used current molecular biology techniques to evaluate the prevalence of these viruses and their genotype in genital samples. We processed 401 genital samples from 281 women and 120 men, all with a diagnosis compatible with HPV infection. Virus was detected using PCR, and positive samples were typed using an array technique which enabled us to detect the 35 most common types of mucous-associated HPV. Of the 401 patients studied, 185 (46.1%) were positive, and only one type of HPV was detected in 133 cases. We found that 41.6% of the women and 56.7% of the men were positive. A total of 260 HPVs were typed; 154 were high oncogenic risk. They infected 16 men (23.5%) and 88 women (75.2%). The difference was statistically significant (pHVP 16 in 52 cases. We found a 46% prevalence of HPV infection. More than half of these patients were infected by high-risk HPV. The presence of high-risk HPV was significantly higher in women.

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human milk samples from two regions in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinčić, D; Herceg Romanić, S; Matek Sarić, M; Grzunov, J; Dukić, B

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and seven organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in milk samples collected during 2009-2011 from primiparae living in two different regions in Croatia. p,p'-DDE is the dominant organochlorine pesticide. α-HCH/γ-HCH and p,p'-DDE/p,p'-DDT ratios indicate that there is fresh input of γ-HCH in investigated population on both locations, while this is not applicable to p,p'-DDT. The PCB profile was dominated by higher chlorinated congeners. Non-ortho PCB congeners which have the highest TEF values were not detected in any of individual samples. Toxic equivalents for mono-ortho substituted PCB congeners indicated higher exposure to toxic PCBs in Zadar, but estimated daily intakes for both locations indicate that infants consuming mother's milk are not at risk of adverse effects caused by PCBs and OCPs. Our study builds on the previous research of human milk samples collected in Zagreb and reveals that over 10-year period, levels of investigated organochlorine compounds decreased significantly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of inflammatory response in human plasma samples by an automated multicapillary electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Hansson, Lars-Olof

    2004-01-01

    A new automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument with a new high-resolution (HR) buffer (Capillarys with HR buffer) for analysis of human plasma proteins was evaluated. Albumin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG and IgM were determined nephelometrically in 200 patient plasma samples. The same samples were then analyzed on the Capillarys system (Sebia, Paris, France). The albumin concentration from the nephelometric determination was used for quantification of the individual peaks in the capillary electrophoresis (CE) electropherogram. There was strong linear correlation between the nephelometric and electrophoretic determination of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (R(2) = 0.906), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (R(2) =0.894) and haptoglobin (R(2) = 0.913). There was also good correlation between the two determinations of gamma-globulins (R(2) = 0.883), while the correlation was weaker for fibrinogen (R(2) = 0.377). The Capillarys instrument is a reliable system for plasma protein analysis, combining the advantages of full automation, good analytical performance and high throughput. The HR buffer in combination with albumin quantification allows the simultaneous quantification of inflammatory markers in plasma samples without the need for nephelometric determination of these proteins.

  17. PERT: a method for expression deconvolution of human blood samples from varied microenvironmental and developmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlian Qiao

    Full Text Available The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells. Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity.

  18. PERT: a method for expression deconvolution of human blood samples from varied microenvironmental and developmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wenlian; Quon, Gerald; Csaszar, Elizabeth; Yu, Mei; Morris, Quaid; Zandstra, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells). Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity.

  19. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Czapla

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI. The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation.MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO. Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb. MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed.In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart.

  20. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  1. Humanism at heart: preserving empathy in third-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Susan; Howard, Brian; Schlussel, Yvette R; Herrigel, Dana; Smolarz, B Gabriel; Gable, Brian; Vasquez, Jennifer; Grigo, Heather; Kaufman, Margit

    2011-03-01

    Research suggests that medical student empathy erodes during undergraduate medical education. The authors evaluated the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy Medical Student Version (JSPE-MS) scores of two consecutive medical school classes to assess the impact of an educational intervention on the preservation of empathy. The authors conducted a before-and-after study of 209 Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS) students enrolled in the classes of 2009 and 2010. Students' clerkships included a mandatory, longitudinal "Humanism and Professionalism" (H&P) component, which included blogging about clerkship experiences, debriefing after significant events, and discussing journal articles, fiction, and film. Students completed the JSPE-MS during their first and last clerkships. The results showed that (1) contrary to previous studies' findings, third-year students did not show significant decline in empathy as measured by the JSPE-MS (these students, from two consecutive RWJMS classes, experienced the H&P intervention), (2) students selected for the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) were significantly different from their peers in empathy scores as measured by JSPE-MS, and (3) knowledge of selection for the GHHS seems to positively influence students' JSPE-MS scores. Maintaining empathy during the third year of medical school is possible through educational intervention. A curriculum that includes safe, protected time for third-year students to discuss their reactions to patient care situations during clerkships may have contributed to the preservation of empathy. Programs designed to validate humanism in medicine (such as the GHHS) may reverse the decline in empathy as measured by the JSPE-MS.

  2. Autonomic control of heart rate by metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Hartwich, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    moderate (PEI-M) and high (PEI-H) intensity isometric handgrip performed at 25% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction, under control (no drug), parasympathetic blockade (glycopyrrolate) and beta-adrenergic blockade (metoprolol or propranalol) conditions, while beat-to-beat HR and BP were continuously...... was similarly increased from rest during PEI-M and further elevated during PEI-H (P Collectively, these findings suggest that the muscle metaboreflex increases cardiac SNA during PEI in humans; however, it requires a robust muscle metaboreflex activation to offset the influence...

  3. Heart imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  4. Analysis of persistence of human papillomavirus infection in men evaluated by sampling multiple genital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, G; Nyitray, A G; Lu, B; Perino, A; Marci, R; Schillaci, R; Matranga, D; Firenze, A; Caleca, M; Bellavia, C; Guarneri, F; Giuliano, A; Giovannelli, L

    2015-11-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been studied extensively in women, data on male infection are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate persistence of HPV infection at multiple genital sites in men and to define potential associations with socio-behavioural characteristics. Penile, urethral and seminal specimens were tested by the INNO-LiPA HPV system (Innogenetics) and a PCR assay. Persistence was defined as the detection of same HPV type at ≥ 2 consecutive visits. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were applied to estimate the likelihood of persistence. A total of 50 men (median age: 33 years) were followed for a median of 14.7 months. Altogether, 49%, 36%, 26% and 11% of baseline HPV-positive men had 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month persistent infection with any HPV type, respectively. The 6-, 12- and 18- month persistence was more common for oncogenic HPV infections; 24-month persistence was similar. The median duration of persistence was 21.7 months for any HPV. The median duration of persistence for any HPV type was significantly longer in the penile sample (22.5 months, 95% CI: 18.3-26.7) than the semen sample (15.3 months, 95% CI: 14.5-16.1). Over a third of type-specific HPV infections in men remained persistent over a 24-month period. The median duration of HPV infection was longer in penile samples compared to seminal samples. As being increasing the attention of HPV vaccination as a potential preventive approach also for men, it is imperative to obtain additional insight on natural history of HPV infection in men, particularly as far as incidence and duration are concerned.

  5. Comparison of two adult mosquito sampling methods with human landing catches in south-central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenea, Oljira; Balkew, Meshesha; Tekie, Habte; Gebre-Michael, Teshome; Deressa, Wakgari; Loha, Eskindir; Lindtjørn, Bernt; Overgaard, Hans J

    2017-01-13

    The human landing catch (HLC) is the standard reference method for measuring human exposure to mosquito bites. However, HLC is labour-intensive, exposes collectors to infectious mosquito bites and is subjected to collector bias. These necessitate local calibration and application of alternative methods. This study was undertaken to determine the relative sampling efficiency (RSE) of light traps with or without yeast-produced carbon dioxide bait vs. HLC in south-central Ethiopia. The experiment was conducted for 39 nights in a 3 × 3 Latin square randomized design with Anopheles arabiensis as the target species in the period between July and November 2014 in Edo Kontola village, south-central Ethiopia. Center for Disease Control and Prevention light trap catches (LTC) and yeast-generated carbon dioxide-baited light trap catches (CB-LTC) were each evaluated against HLC. The total nightly mosquito catches for each Anopheles species in either method was compared with HLC by Pearson correlation and simple linear regression analysis on log-transformed [log10(x + 1)] values. To test if the RSE of each alternative method was affected by mosquito density, the ratio of the number of mosquitoes in each method to the number of mosquitoes in HLC was plotted against the average mosquito abundance. Overall, 7606 Anopheles females were collected by the three sampling methods. Among these 5228 (68.7%) were Anopheles ziemanni, 1153 (15.2%) An. arabiensis, 883 (11.6%) Anopheles funestus s.l., and 342 (4.5%) Anopheles pharoensis. HLC yielded 3392 (44.6%), CB-LTC 2150 (28.3%), and LTC 2064 (27.1%) Anopheles females. The RSEs of LTC and HLC for An. arabiensis were significantly correlated (p method for sampling An. arabiensis. LTC can be used for large-scale indoor An. arabiensis surveillance and monitoring when it is difficult to use HLC. CB-LTC does not substantially improve sampling of this major vector compared to LTC in this setting. Trial registration PACTR201411000882128

  6. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  7. Determination of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Postmortem Samples in Ectopic Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiere, Cristian; Lesta, Maria del Mar; Fanton, Laurent; Ventura, Francesco; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Increased human chorionic gonadotropin levels (HCG) can be detected in femoral blood, bile, and vitreous humor collected during autopsy of pregnant women using a standard kit designed for living patients. In the study herein, the concentrations of HCG were measured in postmortem serum, vitreous, bile, cerebrospinal, and pericardial fluids in 4 cases of fatal ectopic pregnancy and 40 controls using a quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay designed for living patients. No false-negative cases were identified in any of the analyzed samples in any of the ectopic pregnancy cases. No correlations were found between total HCG levels in postmortem serum and the other tested specimens. The results of this study would suggest that higher HCG in bile, vitreous, pericardial, and cerebrospinal fluids may confirm the existence of ectopic pregnancy and therefore identify other situations in which this hormone is increased, although gestational age cannot be reliably estimated using these values. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Ultrasensitive PCR and real-time detection from human genomic samples using a bidirectional flow microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; West, Jonathan; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; Manz, Andreas; Day, Philip J R

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we present a reliable bidirectional flow DNA amplification microreactor for processing real-world genomic samples. This system shares the low-power thermal responsiveness of a continuous flow reactor with the low surface area to volume ratio character of stationary reactors for reducing surface inhibitory effects. Silanization with dimethyldichlorosilane in combination with dynamic surface passivation was used to enhance PCR compatibility and enable efficient amplification. For real-time fragment amplification monitoring we have implemented an epimodal fluorescent detection capability. The passivated bidirectional flow system was ultrasensitive, achieving an RNase P gene detection limit of 24 human genome copies with a reaction efficiency of 77%. This starts to rival the performance of a conventional real-time PCR instrument with a reaction efficiency of 93% and revitalizes flow-through PCR as a viable component of lab on a chip DNA analysis formats.

  9. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daily aspirin to prevent heart attack? Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Does using ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Taking birth ...

  10. Analyses of robotic traverses and sample sites in the Schrödinger basin for the HERACLES human-assisted sample return mission concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, Edgar S.; Martin, Dayl J. P.; McDonald, Francesca E.; Paisarnsombat, Sarinya; Venturino, Christian; O'Hara, Sean; Calzada-Diaz, Abigail; Bottoms, Shelby; Leader, Mark K.; Klaus, Kurt K.; van Westrenen, Wim; Needham, Debra H.; Kring, David A.

    2016-09-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) developed an integrated Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) that outlines plans for human-assisted sample return from the lunar surface in ∼2024 and for human presence on the lunar surface in ∼2028. Previous studies have identified the Schrödinger basin, situated on the far side of the Moon, as a prime target for lunar science and exploration where a significant number of the scientific concepts reviewed by the National Research Council (NRC, 2007) can be addressed. In this study, two robotic mission traverses within the Schrödinger basin are proposed based on a 3 year mission plan in support of the HERACLES human-assisted sample return mission concept. A comprehensive set of modern remote sensing data (LROC imagery, LOLA topography, M3 and Clementine spectral data) has been integrated to provide high-resolution coverage of the traverses and to facilitate identification of specific sample localities. We also present a preliminary Concept of Operations (ConOps) study based on a set of notional rover capabilities and instrumental payload. An extended robotic mission to the Schrödinger basin will allow for significant sample return opportunities from multiple distinct geologic terrains and will address multiple high-priority NRC (2007) scientific objectives. Both traverses will offer the first opportunity to (i) sample pyroclastic material from the lunar farside, (ii) sample Schrödinger impact melt and test the lunar cataclysm hypothesis, (iii) sample deep crustal lithologies in an uplifted peak ring and test the lunar magma ocean hypothesis and (iv) explore the top of an impact melt sheet, enhancing our ability to interpret Apollo samples. The shorter traverse will provide the first opportunity to sample farside mare deposits, whereas the longer traverse has significant potential to collect SPA impact melt, which can be used to constrain the basin-forming epoch. These robotic missions will revalidate

  11. Psychological Resources are Associated with Reduced Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease. An 8-Year Follow-up of a Community-Based Swedish Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Oskar; Garvin, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Andersson, Gerhard; Kristenson, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of studies have provided clear evidence for a link between the risk of coronary heart disease and psychological risk factors. Much less attention has been given to the potential protective effect of psychological resources. Purpose The major aim of this study was to investigate the independent association between psychological resources and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in an 8-year follow-up study of a Swedish community-based cohort. Methods The cohort c...

  12. Trace samples of human blood in mosquitoes as a forensic investigation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Oliveira, N C L; Crovella, S

    2015-11-23

    Investigations of any type of crime invariably starts at the crime scene by collecting evidence. Thus, the purpose of this research was to collect and analyze an entomological trace from an environment that is similar to those of indoor crime scenes. Hematophagous mosquitoes were collected from two residential units; saliva of volunteers that were residents in the units was also collected for genetic analysis as reference samples. We examined the allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) and amelogenin. A total of 26 female hematophagous mosquitoes were identified as Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus; we were able to obtain 11 forensically valid genetic profiles, with a minimum of 0.028203 ng/μL of human DNA. Thus, the results of this study showed that it was possible to correlate human genetic information from mosquitoes with the volunteer reference samples, which validates the use of this information as forensic evidence. Furthermore, we observed mixed genetic profiles from one mosquito. Therefore, it is clearly important to collect these insects indoors where crimes were committed, because it may be possible to find intact genetic profiles of suspects in the blood found in the digestive tract of hematophagous mosquitoes for later comparison to identify an offender and/or exclude suspects.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specif