WorldWideScience

Sample records for human head impact

  1. Dynamic biomechanics of the human head in lateral impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical responses of human head (translational head CG accelerations, rotational head accelerations, and HIC) under lateral impact to the parietal-temporal region were investigated in the current study. Free drop tests were conducted at impact velocities ranging from 2.44 to 7.70 m/s with a 40 durometer, a 90 durometer flat padding, and a 90 durometer cylinder. Specimens were isolated from PMHS subjects at the level of occipital condyles, and the intracranial substance was replaced ...

  2. Dynamic biomechanics of the human head in lateral impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A

    2009-10-01

    The biomechanical responses of human head (translational head CG accelerations, rotational head accelerations, and HIC) under lateral impact to the parietal-temporal region were investigated in the current study. Free drop tests were conducted at impact velocities ranging from 2.44 to 7.70 m/s with a 40 durometer, a 90 durometer flat padding, and a 90 durometer cylinder. Specimens were isolated from PMHS subjects at the level of occipital condyles, and the intracranial substance was replaced with brain simulant (Sylgard 527). Three tri-axial accelerometers were instrumented at the anterior, posterior, and vertex of the specimen, and a pyramid nine accelerometer package (pNAP) was used at the contra-lateral site. Biomechanical responses were computed by transforming accelerations measured at each location to the head CG. The results indicated significant "hoop effect" from skull deformation. Translational head CG accelerations were accurately measured by transforming the pNAP, the vertex accelerations, or the average of anterior/posterior acceleration to the CG. The material stiffness and structural rigidity of the padding changed the biomechanical responses of the head with stiffer padding resulting in higher head accelerations. At the skull fracture, HIC values were more than 2-3x higher than the frontal skull fracture threshold (HIC=1000), emphasizing the differences between frontal and lateral impact. Rotational head accelerations up to 42.1 krad/s(2) were observed before skull fracture, indicating possible severe brain injury without skull fracture in lateral head impact. These data will help to establish injury criteria and threshold in lateral impacts for improved automotive protection and help clinicians understand the biomechanics of lateral head impact from improved diagnosis.

  3. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  5. Development of a Human Head FE Model and Impact Simulation on the Focal Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Dai; Yuge, Kohei; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Murakami, Shigeyuki; Takao, Hiroyuki

    In this paper, a three-dimensional digital human-head model was developed and several dynamic analyses on the head trauma were conducted. This model was built up by the VOXEL approach using 433 slice CT images (512×512 pixels) and made of 1.22 million parallelepiped finite elements with 10 anatomical tissue properties such as scalp, CSF, skull, brain, dura mater and so on. The numerical analyses were conducted using a finite element code the authors have developed. The main features of the code are 1) it is based on the explicit time integration method and 2) it uses the one point integration method to evaluate the equivalent nodal forces with the hourglass control proposed by Flanagan and Belytschko(1) and 3) it utilizes the parallel computation system based on MPI. In order to verify the developed model, the head impact experiment for a cadaver by Nahum et al.(2) was simulated. The calculated results showed good agreement with the experimental ones. A front and rear impact analyses were also performed to discuss on the characteristic measure of the brain injury, in which the von-Mises stress was high in the frontal lobe in both of the analyses because of the large deformations of a frontal cranial base. This result suggests that the von-Mises stress can be a good measure of the brain injury since it is empirically well known that the frontal lobe tends to get injured regardless of the impact positions.

  6. Head Start Impact Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  7. Maneuvering impact boring head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  8. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  9. Impact of head modeling and sensor types in localizing human gamma-band oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2014-01-01

    An effective mechanism in neuronal communication is oscillatory neuronal synchronization. The neuronal gamma-band (30-100 Hz) synchronization is associated with attention which is induced by a certain visual stimuli. Numerous studies have shown that the gamma-band activity is observed in the visual cortex. However, impact of different head modeling techniques and sensor types to localize gamma-band activity have not yet been reported. To do this, the brain activity was recorded using 306 magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensors, consisting of 102 magnetometers and 102 pairs of planar gradiometers (one measuring the derivative of the magnetic field along the latitude and the other along the longitude), and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head models with a single-shell and overlapping spheres (local sphere) have been used as a forward model for calculating the external magnetic fields generated from the gamma-band activity. For each sensor type, the subject-specific frequency range of the gamma-band activity was obtained from the spectral analysis. The identified frequency range of interest with the highest gamma-band activity is then localized using a spatial-filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). The source analysis for all the subjects revealed that the gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed sources close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to the other gradiometer sensors which measure the derivative along the latitude. However, using the magnetometer sensors, it was not possible to localize the sources in the region of interest. When comparing the two head models, the local-sphere model helps in localizing the source more focally as compared to the single-shell head model.

  10. Investigating the impact of performance management on human resource performance across head offices of Agricultural bank branches in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hamid Reza Torabi Shahidi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human resource is one of the most precious assets across contemporary organizations and companies. For this reason, enterprises have to invest on them to promote and improve their employees’ performance. An effective mechanism to develop corporate and human performance is to design and establish a system of performance management so that it improves employees’ performance by determining explicit organizational objectives and coordinating them with individual goals.Current work aims to determine the impact of performance management on human resource performance across head offices of Agricultural Bank branches in Tehran (the main goal and prioritize among performance management components and human resource performance components and also present some procedures to improve human performance using performance management components (sub-goals.

  11. Human head-neck response during low-speed rear end impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroonenberg, A.J. van den; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Cappon, H.J.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Hell, W.; Langwieder, K.

    1998-01-01

    Neck injuries resulting from rear-end collisions rank among the top car safety problems and have serious implications for society. Many rear impact sled experiments with volunteers and PMHSs have been performed in the past. However, in most of these studies, T1 kinematics were not obtained so that t

  12. Head-Neck Biomechanics in Simulated Rear Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A.; Cusick, Joseph F.; Kleinberger, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to present an overview of the human cadaver studies aimed to determine the biomechanics of the head-neck in a simulated rear crash. The need for kinematic studies to better understand the mechanisms of load transfer to the human head-neck complex is emphasized. Based on this need, a methodology is developed to delineate the dynamic kinematics of the human head-neck complex. Intact human cadaver head-neck complexes were subjected to postero-anterior impact ...

  13. Tracking of human head with particle filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Chao

    2009-01-01

    To cope with the problem of tracking a human head in a complicated scene, we propose a method that adopts human skin color and hair color integrated with a kind of particle filter named condensation algorithm. Firstly, a novel method is presented to set up human head color model using skin color and hair color separately based on region growing. Compared with traditional human face model, this method is more precise and works well when human turns around and the face disappears in the image. Then a novel method is presented to use color model in condensation algorithm more effectively. In this method, a combination of edge detection result, color segmentation result and color edge detection result in an Omega window is used to measure the scale and position of human head in condensation. Experiments show that this approach can track human head in complicated scene even when human turns around or the distance of tracking a human head changes quickly.

  14. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  15. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan A. Patton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion.

  16. Quantifying Head Impact Exposure in Collegiate Women's Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Jaclyn N; Rowson, Steven

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify head impact exposure for a collegiate women's soccer team over the course of the 2014 season. Observational and prospective study. Virginia Tech women's soccer games and practices. Twenty-six collegiate level women's soccer players with a mean player age of 19 ± 1. Participating players were instrumented with head impact sensors for biomechanical analysis. Video recordings of each event were used to manually verify each impact sustained. Head impact counts by player position and impact situation. The sensors collected data from a total of 17 865 accelerative events, 8999 of which were classified as head impacts. Of these, a total of 1703 impacts were positively identified (19% of total real impacts recorded by sensor), 90% of which were associated with heading the ball. The average number of impacts per player per practice or game was 1.86 ± 1.42. Exposure to head impact varied by player position. Head impact exposure was quantified through 2 different methods, which illustrated the challenges associated with autonomously collecting acceleration data with head impact sensors. Users of head impact data must exercise caution when interpreting on-field head impact sensor data.

  17. Multiscale Analysis of Head Impacts in Contact Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, Mark; Sett, Subham; Franck, Jennifer; McNamara, Kyle; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Crisco, Joseph; Blume, Janet; Franck, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the world's major causes of death and disability. To aid companies in designing safer and improved protective gear and to aid the medical community in producing improved quantitative TBI diagnosis and assessment tools, a multiscale finite element model of the human brain, head and neck is being developed. Recorded impact data from football and hockey helmets instrumented with accelerometers are compared to simulated impact data in the laboratory. Using data from these carefully constructed laboratory experiments, we can quantify impact location, magnitude, and linear and angular accelerations of the head. The resultant forces and accelerations are applied to a fully meshed head-form created from MRI data by Simpleware. With appropriate material properties for each region of the head-form, the Abaqus finite element model can determine the stresses, strains, and deformations in the brain. Simultaneously, an in-vitro cellular TBI criterion is being developed to be incorporated into Abaqus models for the brain. The cell-based injury criterion functions the same way that damage criteria for metals and other materials are used to predict failure in structural materials.

  18. Atlas injury mechanisms during head-first impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2012-05-20

    An in vitro biomechanical study. To investigate atlas injury mechanisms due to horizontally aligned head-first impacts of a cadaveric neck model and to document atlas fracture patterns and associated injuries. Experimental atlas injuries have been created by applying compression or radial forces to isolated C1 vertebrae, dropping weight or applying sagittal moments to the upper cervical spine segments, or vertical drop testing of head-neck specimens or whole cadavers. Atlas injuries that commonly occur due to horizontally aligned head-first impacts have not been previously investigated. Horizontally aligned head-first impacts into a padded barrier were simulated at 4.1 m/s, using a human cadaver neck model mounted horizontally to a torso-equivalent mass on a sled and carrying a surrogate head. Atlantal radial force was computed using head and neck load cell data. Postimpact dissection documented atlas and associated injuries. Average atlantal radial force peaks and their occurrence times were statistically compared (P Atlas injuries consisted of either 3- or 4-part burst fractures or incomplete lateral mass fracture unilaterally. Associated injuries included bony avulsion of the transverse ligament unilaterally and fractures of the occipital condyles, superior facets of the axis, or odontoid. The results indicated that the varied atlas fracture patterns were due primarily to radial forces causing outward lateral expansion of its lateral masses. Anterior and posterior arch fracture locations are dependent, in part, upon the cross-sectional arch dimensions. Transverse ligament rupture or bony avulsion is likely associated with real-life atlantal burst fractures.

  19. Human Extensive Head Skin Myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soleimani Ahmadi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nChrysomya bezziana Villeneuve is the most important fly, which produces myiasis, exists as an obligate ectoparasite in the ani­mals, and afflicts human. Poor hygiene and working in contaminated areas particularly during warm seasons provide a situa­tion to infest by this parasite. Infestation in human and livestock are often observed in wounds, normal body orifices such as eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. The manifestations include pruritus, pain, inflammation, redness, eosinophilia, and secon­dary bacterial infections and rarely death. A 5-year-old boy with severe headache and agitation symptoms was fol­lowed up. After physical examination and endoscopy, larvae of third instar fly were obtained from his scalp. Our precise identifica­tion indicated that the flies were the C. bezziana. This is the second report of the human scalp myiasis caused by C. bezziana in Iran. This study confirmed that the old world screwworm fly was distributed in the southern of Iran and proba­bly could be one of the most important agents of myiasis in this area.

  20. METHOD OF MODEL ANALYSIS FOR FLEXIBLE HEAD IMPACTING WITH ELASTIC PLANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵桂范; 谭惠丰; 杜星文

    2003-01-01

    To consider the head is a flexible multi-layer structure and the contact-impact is flexible, the Hertz Contact Law is unsuitable for analyzing the dynamic response of human head impacts elastic plane with initial speed. In this paper, the process of head impacting with elastic plane is modeled as a response of vibrant system, and methods like mechanical network figure and mechanical impedance is taken to resolve this dynamic response problem. Based on the actual head structure, head is modeled as a vibrant model, which concludes the masses of scalp and bone in the impact area, the masses in the other part of the head and the brain, the stiffness of the head, and the damp coefficient of the scalp and brain. At the same time, the elastic plane is simplified as a vibrant model including mass, stiffness and damp. These two vibrant models are linked into one vibrant systematic model. In order to calculate the elastic deformation and the impact acceleration of the head, the models are transformed into mechanical girding figure at violent vibration point. The dynamic impact force of the system, the impact acceleration of the head, the elastic deformation of the plane and the fixed frequency of the system can be worked out by calculating the velocity impedance at the violent vibration point when the initial impact speed is known. The results fit the test data well, which proves that this method is available for the analysis of the dynamic response of the system under impact.

  1. In Vivo Evaluation of Wearable Head Impact Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lyndia C; Nangia, Vaibhav; Bui, Kevin; Hammoor, Bradley; Kurt, Mehmet; Hernandez, Fidel; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David B

    2016-04-01

    Inertial sensors are commonly used to measure human head motion. Some sensors have been tested with dummy or cadaver experiments with mixed results, and methods to evaluate sensors in vivo are lacking. Here we present an in vivo method using high speed video to test teeth-mounted (mouthguard), soft tissue-mounted (skin patch), and headgear-mounted (skull cap) sensors during 6-13 g sagittal soccer head impacts. Sensor coupling to the skull was quantified by displacement from an ear-canal reference. Mouthguard displacements were within video measurement error (sensor error, we found that in-plane skin patch linear acceleration in the anterior-posterior direction could be modeled by an underdamped viscoelastic system. In summary, the mouthguard showed tighter skull coupling than the other sensor mounting approaches. Furthermore, the in vivo methods presented are valuable for investigating skull acceleration sensor technologies.

  2. Rotational head kinematics in football impacts: an injury risk function for concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Greenwald, Richard M; Crisco, Joseph J; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; McAllister, Thomas W; Maerlender, Arthur C

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has suggested a possible link between sports-related concussions and neurodegenerative processes, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify head impact tolerance. The use of kinematic parameters of the head to predict brain injury has been suggested because they are indicative of the inertial response of the brain. The objective of this study is to characterize the rotational kinematics of the head associated with concussive impacts using a large head acceleration dataset collected from human subjects. The helmets of 335 football players were instrumented with accelerometer arrays that measured head acceleration following head impacts sustained during play, resulting in data for 300,977 sub-concussive and 57 concussive head impacts. The average sub-concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 1230 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 5.5 rad/s, while the average concussive impact had a rotational acceleration of 5022 rad/s(2) and a rotational velocity of 22.3 rad/s. An injury risk curve was developed and a nominal injury value of 6383 rad/s(2) associated with 28.3 rad/s represents 50% risk of concussion. These data provide an increased understanding of the biomechanics associated with concussion and they provide critical insight into injury mechanisms, human tolerance to mechanical stimuli, and injury prevention techniques.

  3. Optimal Impact Isolation for Injury Prevention Evaluated by the Head Injury Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Balandin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal control of the deceleration of a particle moving along a straight line after an impact against an isolated surface is considered. The force applied to the particle by the surface is treated as the control variable. The deceleration distance is minimized subject to a constraint on the Head Injury Criterion functional. This functional is an integral criterion that is utilized in engineering biomechanics to evaluate the expected severity of impact-induced head injury of a human being. The solution obtained provides characteristics of the limiting capabilities for the prevention of head injuries by means of an impact isolator, such as a coating of the surface against which the impacts occur. The head injuries can be due to impact occurrences, including traffic crashes, falling, and contacts with ballistic objects.

  4. Head Impact Exposure During a Weekend Youth Soccer Tournament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisman, Sara P D; Mac Donald, Christine L; Friedman, Seth; Andre, Jalal; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Drescher, Sara; Stein, Elizabeth; Holm, Matthew; Evans, Nicole; Poliakov, Andrew V; Ching, Randal P; Schwien, Christina C; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2016-07-01

    Concussion is a known risk in youth soccer, but little is known about subconcussive head impacts. The authors provided a prospective cohort study measuring frequency and magnitude of subconcussive head impacts using accelerometry in a middle school-age soccer tournament, and association between head impacts and changes in (1) symptoms, (2) cognitive testing, and (3) advanced neuroimaging. A total of 17 youth completed the study (41% female, mean 12.6 years). There were 73 head impacts >15g measured (45% headers) and only 2 had a maximum peak linear acceleration >50g No youth reported symptoms consistent with concussion. After correction for multiple comparisons and a sensitivity analysis excluding clear outliers, no significant associations were found between head impact exposure and neuropsychological testing or advanced neuroimaging. The authors conclude that head impacts were relatively uncommon and low in acceleration in youth playing a weekend soccer tournament. This study adds to the limited data regarding head impacts in youth soccer. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Scaling head-neck response data and derivation of 5th percentile female side-impact dummy head-neck response requirements in NBDL test conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Wisgerhof, R.P.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Been, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    The head-neck biofidelity of side-impact dummies can be assessed according to the response requirements for the head-neck system based on mid-size male human subjects as published in ISO TR9790. These criteria are largely based on volunteer tests performed at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL)

  6. Scaling head-neck response data and derivation of 5th percentile female side-impact dummy head-neck response requirements in NBDL test conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Wisgerhof, R.P.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Been, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    The head-neck biofidelity of side-impact dummies can be assessed according to the response requirements for the head-neck system based on mid-size male human subjects as published in ISO TR9790. These criteria are largely based on volunteer tests performed at the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL)

  7. Head linear and rotational accelerations and craniocervical loads in lateral impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.; Phillippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine lateral impact-induced three-dimensional temporal head center of gravity linear and angular accelerations, and craniocervical forces and moments from post mortem human subject (PMHS) sled tests and compare with the European side impact dummy, ES-II, respon

  8. Practice type effects on head impact in collegiate football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Bryson B; Patrie, James; Henry, Erich J; Goodkin, Howard P; Broshek, Donna K; Wintermark, Max; Druzgal, T Jason

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT IVE: This study directly compares the number and severity of subconcussive head impacts sustained during helmet-only practices, shell practices, full-pad practices, and competitive games in a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A football team. The goal of the study was to determine whether subconcussive head impact in collegiate athletes varies with practice type, which is currently unregulated by the NCAA. Over an entire season, a cohort of 20 collegiate football players wore impact-sensing mastoid patches that measured the linear and rotational acceleration of all head impacts during a total of 890 athletic exposures. Data were analyzed to compare the number of head impacts, head impact burden, and average impact severity during helmet-only, shell, and full-pad practices, and games. Helmet-only, shell, and full-pad practices and games all significantly differed from each other (p ≤ 0.05) in the mean number of impacts for each event, with the number of impacts being greatest for games, then full-pad practices, then shell practices, and then helmet-only practices. The cumulative distributions for both linear and rotational acceleration differed between all event types (p football players.

  9. Head Impact Exposure and Neurologic Function of Youth Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munce, Thayne A; Dorman, Jason C; Thompson, Paul A; Valentine, Verle D; Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    Football players are subjected to repetitive impacts that may lead to brain injury and neurologic dysfunction. Knowledge about head impact exposure (HIE) and consequent neurologic function among youth football players is limited. This study aimed to measure and characterize HIE of youth football players throughout one season and explore associations between HIE and changes in selected clinical measures of neurologic function. Twenty-two youth football players (11-13 yr) wore helmets outfitted with a head impact telemetry (HIT) system to quantify head impact frequency, magnitude, duration, and location. Impact data were collected for each practice (27) and game (9) in a single season. Selected clinical measures of balance, oculomotor performance, reaction time, and self-reported symptoms were assessed before and after the season. The median individual head impacts per practice, per game, and throughout the entire season were 9, 12, and 252, respectively. Approximately 50% of all head impacts (6183) had a linear acceleration between 10g and 20g, but nearly 2% were greater than 80g. Overall, the head impact frequency distributions in this study population were similar in magnitude and location as in high school and collegiate football, but total impact frequency was lower. Individual changes in neurologic function were not associated with cumulative HIE. This study provides a novel examination of HIE and associations with short-term neurologic function in youth football and notably contributes to the limited HIE data currently available for this population. Whereas youth football players can experience remarkably similar head impact forces as high school players, cumulative subconcussive HIE throughout one youth football season may not be detrimental to short-term clinical measures of neurologic function.

  10. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  11. On Impact: Students with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Angela I.; Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Students with head injuries may not be as "low incidence" as previously believed. Recent efforts from the American Academy of Pediatrics (2010), the National Football League, and other agencies are attempting to raise awareness of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among students. Along with awareness, there has been an increased publicity effort via…

  12. Head injuries: a study evaluating the impact of the NICE head injury guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Z; Smith, M; Littlewood, S; Bouamra, O; Hughes, D; Biggin, C; Amos, K; Mendelow, A; Lecky, F

    2005-01-01

    Background: The NICE head injury guidelines recommend a different approach in the management of head injury patients. It suggests that CT head scan should replace skull x ray (SXR) and observation/admission as the first investigation. We wished to determine the impact of NICE on SXR, CT scan, and admission on all patients with head injury presenting to the ED setting and estimate the cost effectiveness of these guidelines, which has not been quantified to date. Design: Study of head injury patients presenting to two EDs before and after implementation of NICE guidelines Methods: The rate of SXR, CT scan, and admission were determined six months before and one month after NICE implementation in both centres. The before study also looked at predicted rates had NICE been applied. This enabled predicted and actual cost effectiveness to be determined. Result: 1130 patients with head injury were studied in four 1 month periods (two in each centre). At the teaching hospital, the CT head scan rate more than doubled (3% to 7%), the SXR declined (37% to 4%), while the admission rate more than halved (9% to 4%). This represented a saving of £3381 per 100 head injury patients: greater than predicted with no adverse events. At the District General Hospital, the CT head scan rate more than quadrupled (1.4% to 9%), the SXR dropped (19 to 0.57%), while the admission rate declined (7% to 5%). This represented a saving of £290 per 100 head injury patients: less than predicted. Conclusion: The implementation of the NICE guidelines led to a two to fivefold increase in the CT head scan rate depending on the cases and baseline departmental practice. However, the reduction in SXR and admission appears to more than offset these costs without compromising patient outcomes. PMID:16299190

  13. Drill-specific head impact exposure in youth football practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolettano, Eamon T; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Although 70% of football players in the United States are youth players (6-14 years old), most research on head impacts in football has focused on high school, collegiate, or professional populations. The objective of this study was to identify the specific activities associated with high-magnitude (acceleration > 40g) head impacts in youth football practices. METHODS A total of 34 players (mean age 9.9 ± 0.6 years) on 2 youth teams were equipped with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays that recorded head accelerations associated with impacts in practices and games. Videos of practices and games were used to verify all head impacts and identify specific drills associated with each head impact. RESULTS A total of 6813 impacts were recorded, of which 408 had accelerations exceeding 40g (6.0%). For each type of practice drill, impact rates were computed that accounted for the length of time that teams spent on each drill. The tackling drill King of the Circle had the highest impact rate (95% CI 25.6-68.3 impacts/hr). Impact rates for tackling drills (those conducted without a blocker [95% CI 14.7-21.9 impacts/hr] and those with a blocker [95% CI 10.5-23.1 impacts/hr]) did not differ from game impact rates (95% CI 14.2-21.6 impacts/hr). Tackling drills were observed to have a greater proportion (between 40% and 50%) of impacts exceeding 60g than games (25%). The teams in this study participated in tackling or blocking drills for only 22% of their overall practice times, but these drills were responsible for 86% of all practice impacts exceeding 40g. CONCLUSIONS In youth football, high-magnitude impacts occur more often in practices than games, and some practice drills are associated with higher impact rates and accelerations than others. To mitigate high-magnitude head impact exposure in youth football, practices should be modified to decrease the time spent in drills with high impact rates, potentially eliminating a drill such as King of the Circle

  14. Plume head - trench interaction: impact on subduction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, P. G.; Moresi, L. N.; Mason, W. G.; Willis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The geologic record provides numerous examples where plumes and their associated buoyancy swell have disrupted convergent plate margins. These interactions have produced a variety of responses in the overriding plate including transient episodes of arc amagmatism, transient episodes of crustal shortening followed by plume-related magmatism in the overriding plate. The latter observation implies the plume must have transitioned from the subducting plate to the overriding plate. We present several 3D Underworld numerical models of plume heads of variable dimension and buoyancy interacting with a subduction trench. The models indicate that plume heads impact enormously on trench geometry. Arcuate trenches are created as the trench retreats around the edges of the plume head, whereas trench advance occurs in front of the plume resulting in transient crustal shortening in the overriding plate. Stalling of subduction when the plume head impacts the trench causes slab windowing. The size of the slab window is dependent on the size and buoyancy of the plume. The creation of the slab window provides a potential conduit for plume migration to the overriding plate. Alternatively, the plume head may be transferred to the overriding plate as subduction is re-established behind the plume. Models with "strong" slabs, characterized by high yield strengths, display different behavior. Plume-heads are entrained in the slab and are subducted without the development of a slab window.

  15. Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Anne-Sylvie Catherin has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department with effect from 1 August 2009. Mrs Catherin is a lawyer specialized in International Administration and joined CERN in 1996 as legal advisor within the Office of the HR Department Head. After having been promoted to the position of Group Leader responsible for social and statutory conditions in 2000, Mrs Catherin was appointed Deputy of the Head of the Human Resources Department and Group Leader responsible for Strategy, Management and Development from 2005 to date. Since 2005, she has also served as a member of CCP and TREF. In the execution of her mandate as Deputy HR Department Head, Mrs Catherin closely assisted the HR Department Head in the organization of the Department and in devising new HR policies and strategies. She played an instrumental role in the last five-yearly review and in the revision of the Staff Rules and Regulations.

  16. The impact of gravity during head-up tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Smith, Brittany; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The impact of gravity during head-up tilt, a test often used in the clinic to diagnose patients who suffer from dizziness or frequent episodes of syncope, is not well described. This study uses mathematical modeling to analyze experimental blood pressure data measured at the level of the aorta...

  17. Neck forces and moments and head accelerations in side impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoganandan, N.; Pintar, F.A.; Maiman, D.J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Although side-impact sled studies have investigated chest, abdomen, and pelvic injury mechanics, determination of head accelerations and the associated neck forces and moments is very limited. The purpose of the present study was therefore to determine the temporal forces and moments at

  18. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal loading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveen Kumar Pinnoji; Puneet Mahajan

    2007-08-01

    Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam liner. The foam is taken as elasto-plastic, the brain is assumed to be viscoelastic and all other components are taken as elastic. The contact forces and coup pressures with helmet on the head are much lower than in the absence of the helmet. A parametric study was performed to investigate the effect of liner thickness and density on the contact forces, pressures and energy absorption during impact. For 4 ms-1 velocity, expanded poly styrene (EPS) foam of density 24 kg m-3 gave the lowest contact forces and for the velocities considered, thickness of the foam did not affect the contact forces.

  19. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripton, Peter A; Dressler, Daniel M; Stuart, Cameron A; Dennison, Christopher R; Richards, Darrin

    2014-09-01

    Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5m and 3.0m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2m (6.3m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824g (unhelmeted) to 181g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4m/s (1.5m drop) and 6.3m/s (2.0m drop), bicycle helmets changed the

  20. Effects of Sex and Event Type on Head Impact in Collegiate Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Bryson B.; Patrie, James; Henry, Erich J.; Goodkin, Howard P.; Broshek, Donna K.; Wintermark, Max; Druzgal, T. Jason

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of head impact in sports are of growing interest for clinicians, scientists, and athletes. Soccer is the most popular sport worldwide, but the burden of head impact in collegiate soccer is still unknown. Purpose: To quantify head impact associated with practicing and playing collegiate soccer using wearable accelerometers. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Mastoid patch accelerometers were used to quantify head impact in soccer, examining differences in head impact as a function of sex and event type (practice vs game). Seven female and 14 male collegiate soccer players wore mastoid patch accelerometers that measured head impacts during team events. Data were summarized for each athletic exposure, and statistical analyses evaluated the mean number of impacts, mean peak linear acceleration, mean peak rotational acceleration, and cumulative linear and rotational acceleration, each grouped by sex and event type. Results: There were no differences in the frequency or severity of head impacts between men’s and women’s soccer practices. For men’s soccer, games resulted in 285% more head impacts than practices, but there were no event-type differences in mean impact severity. Men’s soccer games resulted in more head impacts than practices across nearly all measured impact severities, which also resulted in men’s soccer games producing a greater cumulative impact burden. Conclusion: Similar to other sports, men’s soccer games have a greater impact burden when compared with practices, and this effect is driven by the quantity rather than severity of head impacts. In contrast, there were no differences in the quantity or severity of head impacts in men’s and women’s soccer practices. These data could prompt discussions of practical concern to collegiate soccer, such as understanding sex differences in head impact and whether games disproportionately contribute to an athlete’s head impact burden. PMID:28491885

  1. Simulative investigation on head injuries of electric self-balancing scooter riders subject to ground impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Shang, Shi; Qi, Hongsheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The safety performance of an electric self-balancing scooter (ESS) has recently become a main concern in preventing its further wide application as a major candidate for green transportation. Scooter riders may suffer severe brain injuries in possible vehicle crash accidents not only from contact with a windshield or bonnet but also from secondary contact with the ground. In this paper, virtual vehicle-ESS crash scenarios combined with finite element (FE) car models and multi-body scooter/human models are set up. Post-impact kinematic gestures of scooter riders under various contact conditions, such as different vehicle impact speeds, ESS moving speeds, impact angles or positions, and different human sizes, are classified and analyzed. Furthermore, head-ground impact processes are reconstructed using validated FE head models, and important parameters of contusion and laceration (e.g., coup or contrecoup pressures and Von Mises stress and the maximum shear stress) are extracted and analyzed to assess the severity of regional contusion from head-ground contact. Results show that the brain injury risk increases with vehicle speeds and ESS moving speeds and may provide fundamental knowledge to popularize the use of a helmet and the vehicle-fitted safety systems, and lay a strong foundation for the reconstruction of ESS-involved accidents. There is scope to improve safety for the use of ESS in public roads according to the analysis and conclusions.

  2. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  3. Head impacts in a junior rugby league team measured with a wireless head impact sensor: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts sustained by players in a junior rugby league over a season of matches. METHODS The authors performed a prospective cohort analysis of impact magnitude, frequency, and distribution on data collected with instrumented XPatches worn behind the ear of players in an "under-11" junior rugby league team (players under 11 years old). RESULTS A total of 1977 impacts were recorded. Over the course of the study, players sustained an average of 116 impacts (average of 13 impacts per player per match). The measured linear acceleration ranged from 10g to 123g (mean 22g, median 16g, and 95th percentile 57g). The rotational acceleration ranged from 89 rad/sec(2) to 22,928 rad/sec(2) (mean 4041 rad/sec(2), median 2773 rad/sec(2), and 95th percentile 11,384 rad/sec(2)). CONCLUSIONS The level of impact severity based on the magnitude of impacts for linear and rotational accelerations recorded was similar to the impacts reported in studies of American junior and high school football, collegiate football, and youth ice hockey players, but the players in the rugby league cohort were younger, had less body mass, and played at a slower speed than the American players. Junior rugby league players are required to tackle the player to the ground and use a different tackle technique than that used in American football, likely increasing the rotational accelerations recorded at the head.

  4. Enrico Chiaveri, new Head of the Human Resources Department

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Enrico Chiaveri has been appointed Head of the Human Resources Department of with effect from 1st April 2005. A senior physicist, Dr Chiaveri joined CERN in 1973. During his career, he has performed various management roles, including that of Deputy Leader of the SPS/LEP Division, and has acquired extensive experience in human resources matters. Over the transition period up to 1st August 2005 he will gradually relinquish his current functions as Group Leader within the AB Department.

  5. A Modified Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Dummy Head Model for Lateral Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rafukka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid III six-year-old (6YO child dummy head model was developed and validated for frontal impact assessment according to the specifications contained in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 572.122, Subpart N by Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC. This work is aimed at improving biofidelity of the head for frontal impact and also extending its application to lateral impact assessment by modifying the head skin viscoelastic properties and validating the head response using the scaled nine-year-old (9YO child cadaver head response recently published in the literature. The modified head model was validated for two drop heights for frontal, right, and left parietal impact locations. Peak resultant acceleration of the modified head model appeared to have good correlation with scaled 9YO child cadaver head response for frontal impact on dropping from 302 mm height and fair correlation with 12.3% difference for 151 mm drop height. Right parietal peak resultant acceleration values correlate well with scaled 9YO head experimental data for 153 mm drop height, while fair correlation with 16.4% difference was noticed for 302 mm drop height. Left parietal, however, shows low biofidelity for the two drop heights as the difference in head acceleration response was within 30%. The modified head model could therefore be used to estimate injuries in vehicle crash for head parietal impact locations which cannot be measured by the current hybrid III dummy head model.

  6. The impact of gravity during head-up tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette; Smith, Brittany

    The impact of gravity during head-up tilt, a test often used in the clinic to diagnose patients who suffer from dizziness or frequent episodes of syncope, is not well described. This study uses mathematical modeling to analyze experimental blood pressure data measured at the level of the aorta...... a model predicting hydrostatic height between the two locations. Results from this model were compared with measurements. Furthermore, we show, using a differential equations model predicting blood pressure, that it is possible to predict blood pressure measured at the level of the carotid sinuses using...

  7. Theoretical study of the effect of ball properties on impact force in soccer heading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Robin M; Weinhold, Paul S; Kirkendall, Donald T; Yu, Bing

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to theoretically model, based on the Hertz contact theory, the impact force and contact time, as well as the linear and angular head accelerations during heading in children using two neck stiffness conditions (infinite and negligible stiffness). The following mathematical model inputs were obtained: elastic modulus and mass of size three, four, and five balls at inflation pressures of 10, 12, and 14 psi, head modulus, head mass, head length, head and trunk moment of inertia, and the precontact ball velocity. The model outputs consisted of linear and angular head acceleration, impact force, contact time between the ball and head, and head impact criteria (HIC) all at the point of impact. Head mass and length were obtained as a percentage of body weight and height, respectively, based on age. With an increase in head mass, there is a decrease in the linear and angular head acceleration. With an increase in ball size, for the same head mass, there is an increase in the contact time between the head and the ball. Changing ball inflation pressure has little effect on the impact characteristics. Infinite neck stiffness decreased linear and angular head acceleration and HIC. Head mass and ball size have an effect on linear and angular head acceleration and contact time, respectively, whereas ball inflation pressure has a minimal effect on the impact characteristics. These results indicate that children should be restricted to using the appropriate ball for their age. Smaller head size within an age group is an underemphasized though important identifier of a player's injury risk.

  8. Physical properties of the human head: mass, center of gravity and moment of inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Zhang, Jiangyue; Baisden, Jamie L

    2009-06-19

    This paper presents a synthesis of biomedical investigations of the human head with specific reference to certain aspects of physical properties and development of anthropometry data, leading to the advancement of dummies used in crashworthiness research. As a significant majority of the studies have been summarized as reports, an effort has been made to chronologically review the literature with the above objectives. The first part is devoted to early studies wherein the mass, center of gravity (CG), and moment of inertia (MOI) properties are obtained from human cadaver experiments. Unembalmed and preserved whole-body and isolated head and head-neck experiments are discussed. Acknowledging that the current version of the Hybrid III dummy is the most widely used anthropomorphic test device in motor vehicle crashworthiness research for frontal impact applications for over 30 years, bases for the mass and MOI-related data used in the dummy are discussed. Since the development and federalization of the dummy in the United States, description of methods used to arrive at these properties form a part of the manuscript. Studies subsequent to the development of this dummy including those from the US Military are also discussed. As the head and neck are coupled in any impact, and increasing improvements in technology such as advanced airbags, and pre-tensioners and load limiters in manual seatbelts affect the kinetics of the head-neck complex, the manuscript underscores the need to pursue studies to precisely determine all the physical properties of the head. Because the most critical parameters (locations of CG and occipital condyles (OC), mass, and MOI) have not been determined on a specimen-by-specimen basis in any single study, it is important to gather these data in future experiments. These critical data will be of value for improving occupant safety, designing advanced restraint systems, developing second generation dummies, and assessing the injury mitigating

  9. Detection of Human Head Direction Based on Facial Normal Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Thanh Hien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many scholars worldwide have paid special efforts in searching for advance approaches to efficiently estimate human head direction which has been successfully applied in numerous applications such as human-computer interaction, teleconferencing, virtual reality, and 3D audio rendering. However, one of the existing shortcomings in the current literature is the violation of some ideal assumptions in practice. Hence, this paper aims at proposing a novel algorithm based on the normal of human face to recognize human head direction by optimizing a 3D face model combined with the facial normal model. In our experiments, a computational program was also developed based on the proposed algorithm and integrated with the surveillance system to alert the driver drowsiness. The program intakes data from either video or webcam, and then automatically identify the critical points of facial features based on the analysis of major components on the faces; and it keeps monitoring the slant angle of the head closely and makes alarming signal whenever the driver dozes off. From our empirical experiments, we found that our proposed algorithm effectively works in real-time basis and provides highly accurate results

  10. Real-time, whole-brain, temporally resolved pressure responses in translational head impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ji, Songbai

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical debate still exists on the role of linear acceleration ( a lin) on the risk of brain injury. Recent injury metrics only consider head rotational acceleration ( a rot) but not a lin, despite that real-world on-field head impacts suggesting a lin significantly improves a concussion risk function. These controversial findings suggest a practical challenge in integrating theory and real-world experiment. Focusing on tissue-level mechanical responses estimated from finite-element (FE) models of the human head, rather than impact kinematics alone, may help address this debate. However, the substantial computational cost incurred (runtime and hardware) poses a significant barrier for their practical use. In this study, we established a real-time technique to estimate whole-brain a lin-induced pressures. Three hydrostatic atlas pressures corresponding to translational impacts (referred to as 'brain print') along the three major axes were pre-computed. For an arbitrary a lin profile at any instance in time, the atlas pressures were linearly scaled and then superimposed to estimate whole-brain responses. Using 12 publically available, independently measured or reconstructed real-world a lin profiles representative of a range of impact/injury scenarios, the technique was successfully validated (except for one case with an extremely short impulse of approx. 1 ms). The computational cost to estimate whole-brain pressure responses for an entire a lin profile was less than 0.1 s on a laptop versus typically hours on a high-end multicore computer. These findings suggest the potential of the simple, yet effective technique to enable future studies to focus on tissue-level brain responses, rather than solely relying on global head impact kinematics that have plagued early and contemporary brain injury research to date.

  11. Animation of 3D Model of Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new algorithm of animation of 3D model of the human head in combination with its global motion. The designed algorithm is very fast and with low calculation requirements, because it does not need the synthesis of the input videosequence for estimation of the animation parameters as well as the parameters of global motion. The used 3D model Candide generates different expressions using its animation units which are controlled by the animation parameters. These ones are estimated on the basis of optical flow without the need of extracting of the feature points in the frames of the input videosequence because they are given by the selected vertices of the animation units of the calibrated 3D model Candide. The established multiple iterations inside the designed animation algorithm of 3D model of the human head between two successive frames significantly improved its accuracy above all for the large motion.

  12. Subchondral bone density distribution in the human femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, David A.; Meguid, Michael; Lubovsky, Omri; Whyne, Cari M. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    This study aims to quantitatively characterize the distribution of subchondral bone density across the human femoral head using a computed tomography derived measurement of bone density and a common reference coordinate system. Femoral head surfaces were created bilaterally for 30 patients (14 males, 16 females, mean age 67.2 years) through semi-automatic segmentation of reconstructed CT data and used to map bone density, by shrinking them into the subchondral bone and averaging the greyscale values (linearly related to bone density) within 5 mm of the articular surface. Density maps were then oriented with the center of the head at the origin, the femoral mechanical axis (FMA) aligned with the vertical, and the posterior condylar axis (PCA) aligned with the horizontal. Twelve regions were created by dividing the density maps into three concentric rings at increments of 30 from the horizontal, then splitting into four quadrants along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Mean values for each region were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and a Bonferroni post hoc test, and side-to-side correlations were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation. The regions representing the medial side of the femoral head's superior portion were found to have significantly higher densities compared to other regions (p < 0.05). Significant side-to-side correlations were found for all regions (r {sup 2} = 0.81 to r {sup 2} = 0.16), with strong correlations for the highest density regions. Side-to-side differences in measured bone density were seen for two regions in the anterio-lateral portion of the femoral head (p < 0.05). The high correlation found between the left and right sides indicates that this tool may be useful for understanding 'normal' density patterns in hips affected by unilateral pathologies such as avascular necrosis, fracture, developmental dysplasia of the hip, Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral head epiphysis. (orig.)

  13. Symptoms from repeated intentional and unintentional head impact in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Walter F; Kim, Namhee; Ifrah, Chloe S; Lipton, Richard B; Bachrach, Tamar A; Zimmerman, Molly E; Kim, Mimi; Lipton, Michael L

    2017-02-28

    To determine the rate and differential contribution of heading vs unintentional head impacts (e.g., head to head, goal post) to CNS symptoms in adult amateur soccer players. Amateur soccer players completed baseline and serial on-line 2-week recall questionnaires (HeadCount) and reported (1) soccer practice and games, (2) heading and unintentional soccer head trauma, and (3) frequency and severity (mild to very severe) of CNS symptoms. For analysis, CNS symptoms were affirmed if one or more moderate, severe, or very severe episodes were reported in a 2-week period. Repeated measures logistic regression was used to assess if 2-week heading exposure (i.e., 4 quartiles) or unintentional head impacts (i.e., 0, 1, 2+) were associated with CNS symptoms. A total of 222 soccer players (79% male) completed 470 HeadCount questionnaires. Mean (median) heading/2 weeks was 44 (18) for men and 27 (9.5) for women. One or more unintentional head impacts were reported by 37% of men and 43% of women. Heading-related symptoms were reported in 20% (93 out of 470) of the HeadCounts. Heading in the highest quartile was significantly associated with CNS symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-6.37) when controlling for unintentional exposure. Those with 2+ unintentional exposures were at increased risk for CNS symptoms (OR 6.09, 95% CI 3.33-11.17) as were those with a single exposure (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.69-5.26) when controlling for heading. Intentional (i.e., heading) and unintentional head impacts are each independently associated with moderate to very severe CNS symptoms. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Modulation of head movement control in humans during treadmill walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/s (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2 m from their eyes. The net and relative angular motions of the head about the three axes of rotations, as well as the corresponding values for the moments acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were quantified and used as measures of coordination. The average net moment, as well as the average moments about the different axes were significantly different (Plow/no impact phases of the gait cycle. However, the average net angular displacement as well as the average angular displacement about the axial rotation axis of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (P>0.01) throughout the gait cycle. The average angular displacement about the lateral bending axis was significantly increased (Phead relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixation of targets during walking.

  15. External foam layers to football helmets reduce head impact severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Austin S; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    Current American football helmet design has a rigid exterior with a padded interior. Softening the hard external layer of the helmet may reduce the impact potential of the helmet, providing extra head protection and reducing its use as an offensive device. The objective of this study is to measure the impact reduction potential provided by external foam. We obtained a football helmet with built-in accelerometer-based sensors, placed it on a boxing mannequin and struck it with a weighted swinging pendulum helmet to mimic the forces sustained during a helmet-to-helmet strike. We then applied layers of 1.3 cm thick polyolefin foam to the exterior surface of the helmets and repeated the process. All impact severity measures were significantly reduced with the application of the external foam. These results support the hypothesis that adding a soft exterior layer reduces the force of impact which may be applicable to the football field. Redesigning football helmets could reduce the injury potential of the sport.

  16. Interior Head Impact Protective Components and Materials for Use in US Army Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    project is to reduce potential head impact related mounted crew injuries and deaths which may occur during underbody blast, crash and rollover events...effort identified solutions which may potentially meet the needs of the Army to reduce head impact related injuries which may occur during crash ...effort centers on reducing potential head impact related injuries and deaths of mounted crew which may occur during blast, crash and rollover events

  17. Effect of soccer heading ball speed on S100B, sideline concussion assessments and head impact kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorminy, Millie; Hoogeveen, Ashley; Tierney, Ryan T; Higgins, Michael; McDevitt, Jane K; Kretzschmar, Jan

    2015-05-25

    To examine the effect of soccer heading ball speed on S-100B serum concentration, concussion sideline assessments and linear head impact acceleration. Sixteen division I soccer players participated in this pre-test post-test design study. Athletes performed five standing headers over a 10 minute period at 30 (n = 5), 40 (n = 5) or 50 (n = 6) miles per hour (mph) (randomized). S-100B serum concentration (ng mL(-1)) and sideline concussion assessments were measured prior to and post-heading. Peak resultant linear head acceleration (gravitational units; g) was measured during soccer heading. No statistically significant interaction effects were identified between ball velocity groups over time on S100B (effect sizes ranged from 0.03-0.23) or concussion assessments tests. There was a non-significant increase (p = 0.06) in head impact acceleration from the 30 (30.6; SD = 6.2 g) to 50 mph (50.7; SD = 7.7 g) ball speed. In this controlled setting, an acute bout of soccer heading across various ball velocities did not affect S100B or concussion assessment test scores. These findings are preliminary, as the small sample size in each group may have played a role in the lack of significant findings.

  18. Blood flow and microdialysis in the human femoral head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If it would be possible to detect lack of flow and/or the development of ischemia in bone, we might have a way of predicting whether a broken bone will heal. We established microdialysis (MD) and laser Doppler (LD) flow measurement in the human femoral head in order to be able to detect...... ischemia and measure changes in blood flow. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 9 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty for primary osteoarthrosis, two MD catheters were inserted into the femoral head through two drill holes after the blood flow had been visualized by LD. Then primary samples were collected...... detected within 2 h of cessation of blood flow in most patients....

  19. Estimating Impacts of Treatment Random Assignment on Classroom Quality in the Head Start Impact Study: The Problem of Missing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Connors, Maia C.; Morris, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the 1998 reauthorization of Head Start, the Department of Health and Human Services conducted a national evaluation of the Head Start program. The goal of Head Start is to improve the school readiness skills of low-income children in the United States. There is a substantial body of experimental and correlational research that has…

  20. Frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts in Pop Warner football: the cumulative burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ricky H; Wong, Andrew K; Bailes, Julian E

    2014-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that subconcussive head impacts or repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) can have cumulative and deleterious effects. Several studies have investigated head impacts in football at the professional, collegiate, and high school levels, in an attempt to elucidate the biomechanics of head impacts among football players. Youth football players, generally from 7 to 14 years of age, constitute 70% of all football players, yet burden of, and susceptibility to, head injury in this population is not well known. A novel impact sensor utilizing binary force switches (Shockbox(®)) was used to follow an entire Pop Warner football team consisting of twenty-two players for six games and five practices. The impact sensor was designed to record impacts with linear accelerations over 30g. In addition, video recording of games and practices were used to further characterize the head impacts by type of position (skilled versus unskilled), field location of impact (open field versus line of scrimmage), type of hit (tackling, tackled, or hold/push), and whether the impact was a head-to-head impact or not. We recorded a total of 480 head impacts. An average of 21.8 head impacts occurred per practice, while 61.8 occurred per game. Players had an average of 3.7 head impacts per game and 1.5 impacts per practice (p80g) was 11. Two concussions were diagnosed over the course of the season. However, due to technical reasons the biomechanics of those hits resulting in concussions were not captured. Despite smaller players and slower play when compared to high school, collegiate or professional players, those involved in youth football sustain a moderate number of head impacts per season with several high magnitude impacts. Our results suggest that players involved in open-field, tackling plays that have head-to-head contact sustain impacts with the highest linear accelerations. Our data supports previously published data that suggests changes to the

  1. Head Start Impact on Social-Emotional Outcomes for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee; Calkins, Andrea; Shin, Tae Seob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using the Head Start Impact Study data, this study examines Head Start's impacts on social-emotional outcomes for children with disabilities. Method: Among 4,442 children, 570 children were reported to have disabilities. Ordinary least squares regression was used to determine whether the number of disabilities, having an individualized…

  2. Effect of Repetitive Sub-concussive Head Impacts on Ocular Near Point of Convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, K; Tierney, R; Phillips, J; Jeka, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study intended to examine effects of repetitive sub-concussive head impacts on ocular near point of convergence (NPC). 20 healthy young adult soccer players were assigned to either a heading or control group. Heading subjects completed 10 headers of soccer balls projected at a speed of 11.2 m/s. Control subjects did not perform heading. Linear head acceleration was measured with a triaxial accelerometer. The NPC assessment was performed at pre-, 0 h post-, and 24 h post-heading. During the NPC assessment participants were seated and a visual target was moved towards the eyes at 1cm/sec. The participant signaled when he/she experienced diplopia or deviation of the eye was observed, and the distance was recorded. The assessment was repeated twice and average NPC scores were used for further analysis. Soccer heading induced mean group head accelerations of 14.49±5.4 g. Mild head impacts led to an increased NPC distance, which was supported by a significant Group x Time interaction. In the heading group, 0 h post- and 24 h post-heading NPC scores were significantly receded compared to baseline. Conversely, NPC scores for the control group showed no difference over time. Our findings indicate that mild frontal head impacts affekt NPC for a minimum of 24 h-post heading, suggesting that oculomotor processes are disrupted, at least transiently, by repetitive mild head impact. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The relationship between impact force, neck strength, and neurocognitive performance in soccer heading in adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Conte, Catherine; Lightbourne, Kristian

    2014-02-01

    Head impacts are common in contact sports, but only recently has there been a rising awareness of the effects of subconcussive impacts in adolescent athletes. A better understanding of how to attenuate head impacts is needed and therefore, this study investigated the relationship between neck strength, impact, and neurocognitive function in an acute bout of soccer heading in a sample of female high school varsity soccer players. Seventeen participants completed the ImPACT neurocognitive test and had their isometric neck strength tested (flexion, extension, and bilateral flexion) before heading drills. Each participant was outfitted with custom headgear with timing switches and a three-dimensional accelerometer affixed to the back of the head, which allowed for measurement of impact during heading. Participants performed a series of 15 directional headers, including 5 forward, 5 left and 5 right headers in a random order, then completed the ImPACT test again. Neurocognitive tests revealed no significant changes following heading. However, there were statistically significant, moderate, negative correlations (r = -0.500:-0.757, p head injury prevention/reduction program.

  4. Biofidelic neck influences head kinematics of parietal and occipital impacts following short falls in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Coats, Brittany; Margulies, Susan S

    2015-09-01

    Falls are a major cause of traumatic head injury in children. Understanding head kinematics during low height falls is essential for evaluating injury risk and designing mitigating strategies. Typically, these measurements are made with commercial anthropomorphic infant surrogates, but these surrogates are designed based on adult biomechanical data. In this study, we improve upon the state-of-the-art anthropomorphic testing devices by incorporating new infant cadaver neck bending and tensile data. We then measure head kinematics following head-first falls onto 4 impact surfaces from 3 fall heights with occipital and parietal head impact locations. The biofidelic skull compliance and neck properties of the improved infant surrogate significantly influenced the measured kinematic loads, decreasing the measured impact force and peak angular accelerations, lowering the expected injury risk. Occipital and parietal impacts exhibited distinct kinematic responses in primary head rotation direction and the magnitude of the rotational velocities and accelerations, with larger angular velocities as the head rebounded after occipital impacts. Further evaluations of injury risk due to short falls should take into account the impact surface and head impact location, in addition to the fall height.

  5. Muecas: A Multi-Sensor Robotic Head for Affective Human Robot Interaction and Imitation

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Cid; Jose Moreno; Pablo Bustos; Pedro Núñez

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, inclu...

  6. Evaluation of Head and Brain Injury Risk Functions Using Sub-Injurious Human Volunteer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Erin J; Gabler, Lee F; McGhee, James S; Olszko, Ardyn V; Chancey, V Carol; Crandall, Jeff R; Panzer, Matthew B

    2017-08-15

    Risk assessment models are developed to estimate the probability of brain injury during head impact using mechanical response variables such as head kinematics and brain tissue deformation. Existing injury risk functions have been developed using different datasets based on human volunteer and scaled animal injury responses to impact. However, many of these functions have not been independently evaluated with respect to laboratory-controlled human response data. In this study, the specificity of 14 existing brain injury risk functions was assessed by evaluating their ability to correctly predict non-injurious response using previously conducted sled tests with well-instrumented human research volunteers. Six degrees-of-freedom head kinematics data were obtained for 335 sled tests involving subjects in frontal, lateral, and oblique sled conditions up to 16 Gs peak sled acceleration. A review of the medical reports associated with each individual test indicated no clinical diagnosis of mild or moderate brain injury in any of the cases evaluated. Kinematic-based head and brain injury risk probabilities were calculated directly from the kinematic data, while strain-based risks were determined through finite element model simulation of the 335 tests. Several injury risk functions substantially over predict the likelihood of concussion and diffuse axonal injury; proposed maximum principal strain-based injury risk functions predicted nearly 80 concussions and 14 cases of severe diffuse axonal injury out of the 335 non-injurious cases. This work is an important first step in assessing the efficacy of existing brain risk functions and highlights the need for more predictive injury assessment models.

  7. Comparison of head impact location during games and practices in Division III men's lacrosse players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Kathleen M; Koehling, Elizabeth M; Vollavanh, Lydia R; Bradney, Debbie; May, James M; Breedlove, Katherine M; Breedlove, Evan L; Blair, Price; Nauman, Eric A; Bowman, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Head impacts have been studied extensively in football, but little similar research has been conducted in men's lacrosse. It is important to understand the location and magnitude of head impacts during men's lacrosse to recognize the risk of head injury. Descriptive epidemiology study set on collegiate lacrosse fields. Eleven men's lacrosse players (age=20.9±1.13years, mass=83.91±9.04kg, height=179.88±5.99cm) volunteered to participate. We applied X2 sensors behind the right ear of participants for games and practices. Sensors recorded data on linear and rotational accelerations and the location of head impacts. We calculated incidence rates per 1000 exposures with 95% confidence intervals for impact locations and compared the effect of impact location on linear and rotational accelerations with Kruskal-Wallis tests. We verified 167 head impacts (games=112; practices=55). During games, the incidence rate was 651.16 (95% confidence interval=530.57-771.76). The high and low incidence rates for head impact locations during games were: side=410.7 (95% confidence interval=292.02-529.41) and top=26.79 (95% confidence interval=3.53-57.10). For games and practices combined, the impact locations did not significantly affect linear (χ(2)3=6.69, P=0.08) or rotational acceleration (χ(2)3=6.34, P=0.10). We suggest further research into the location of head impacts during games and practices. We also suggest player and coach education on head impacts as well as behavior modification in men's lacrosse athletes to reduce the incidence of impacts to the side of the head in an effort to reduce potential injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A head impact detection system using SVM classification and proximity sensing in an instrumented mouthguard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lyndia C; Zarnescu, Livia; Nangia, Vaibhav; Cam, Bruce; Camarillo, David B

    2014-11-01

    Injury from blunt head impacts causes acute neurological deficits and may lead to chronic neurodegeneration. A head impact detection device can serve both as a research tool for studying head injury mechanisms and a clinical tool for real-time trauma screening. The simplest approach is an acceleration thresholding algorithm, which may falsely detect high-acceleration spurious events such as manual manipulation of the device. We designed a head impact detection system that distinguishes head impacts from nonimpacts through two subsystems. First, we use infrared proximity sensing to determine if the mouthguard is worn on the teeth to filter out all off-teeth events. Second, on-teeth, nonimpact events are rejected using a support vector machine classifier trained on frequency domain features of linear acceleration and rotational velocity. The remaining events are classified as head impacts. In a controlled laboratory evaluation, the present system performed substantially better than a 10-g acceleration threshold in head impact detection (98% sensitivity, 99.99% specificity, 99% accuracy, and 99.98% precision, compared to 92% sensitivity, 58% specificity, 65% accuracy, and 37% precision). Once adapted for field deployment by training and validation with field data, this system has the potential to effectively detect head trauma in sports, military service, and other high-risk activities.

  9. Injuries of the head from backface deformation of ballistic protective helmets under ballistic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaels, Karin A; Cutcliffe, Hattie C; Salzar, Robert S; Davis, Martin; Boggess, Brian; Bush, Bryan; Harris, Robert; Rountree, Mark Steve; Sanderson, Ellory; Campman, Steven; Koch, Spencer; Dale Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Modern ballistic helmets defeat penetrating bullets by energy transfer from the projectile to the helmet, producing helmet deformation. This deformation may cause severe injuries without completely perforating the helmet, termed "behind armor blunt trauma" (BABT). As helmets become lighter, the likelihood of larger helmet backface deformation under ballistic impact increases. To characterize the potential for BABT, seven postmortem human head/neck specimens wearing a ballistic protective helmet were exposed to nonperforating impact, using a 9 mm, full metal jacket, 124 grain bullet with velocities of 400-460 m/s. An increasing trend of injury severity was observed, ranging from simple linear fractures to combinations of linear and depressed fractures. Overall, the ability to identify skull fractures resulting from BABT can be used in forensic investigations. Our results demonstrate a high risk of skull fracture due to BABT and necessitate the prevention of BABT as a design factor in future generations of protective gear.

  10. The effect of visual and sensory performance on head impact biomechanics in college football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Jacqueline A; Mihalik, Jason P; Littleton, Ashley C; Frank, Barnett S; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The development of prevention strategies is critical to address the rising prevalence of sport-related concussions. Visual and sensory performance may influence an individual's ability to interpret environmental cues, anticipate opponents' actions, and create appropriate motor responses limiting the severity of an impending head impact. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between traditional and visual sensory reaction time measures, and the association between visual and sensory performance and head impact severity in college football players. Thirty-eight collegiate football players participated in the study. We used real-time data collection instrumentation to record head impact biomechanics during games and practices. Our findings reveal no significant correlations between reaction time on traditional and visual sensory measures. We found a significant association between head impact severity and level of visual and sensory performance for multiple assessments, with low visual and sensory performers sustaining a higher number of severe head impacts. Our findings reveal a link between level of visual and sensory performance and head impact biomechanics. Future research will allow clinicians to have the most appropriate testing batteries to identify at-risk athletes and create interventions to decrease their risk of injurious head impacts.

  11. Growth trajectories of the human embryonic head and periconceptional maternal conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, I V; Baken, L; Groenenberg, I A L; Husen, S C; Dudink, J; Willemsen, S P; Gijtenbeek, M; Koning, A H J; Reiss, I K M; Steegers, E A P; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Can growth trajectories of the human embryonic head be created using 3D ultrasound (3D-US) and virtual reality (VR) technology, and be associated with second trimester fetal head size and periconceptional maternal conditions? SUMMARY ANSWER: Serial first trimester head circumference

  12. The impact of gravity during head-up tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette; Smith, Brittany

    and the carotid sinuses in a healthy volunteer. During head-up tilt the head is lifted above the heart stimulating gravitational pooling of blood in the lower extremities. This shift in volume is followed by an increase in blood pressure in the lower body, while the pressure in the head decreases, while...... a model predicting hydrostatic height between the two locations. Results from this model were compared with measurements. Furthermore, we show, using a differential equations model predicting blood pressure, that it is possible to predict blood pressure measured at the level of the carotid sinuses using...

  13. Effect of vehicle front end profiles leading to pedestrian secondary head impact to ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of pedestrian injuries focus on reducing traumatic injuries due to the primary impact between the vehicle and the pedestrian. However, based on the Pedestrian Crash Data Study (PCDS), some researchers concluded that one of the leading causes of head injury for pedestrian crashes can be attributed to the secondary impact, defined as the impact of the pedestrian with the ground after the primary impact of the pedestrian with the vehicle. The purpose of this study is to understand if different vehicle front-end profiles can affect the risk of pedestrian secondary head impact with the ground and thus help in reducing the risk of head injury during secondary head impact with ground. Pedestrian responses were studied using several front-end profiles based off a mid-size vehicle and a SUV that have been validated previously along with several MADYMO pedestrian models. Mesh morphing is used to explore changes to the bumper height, bonnet leading-edge height, and bonnet rear reference-line height. Simulations leading up to pedestrian secondary impact with ground are conducted at impact speeds of 40 and 30 km/h. In addition, three pedestrian sizes (50th, 5th and 6yr old child) are used to enable us to search for a front-end profile that performs well for multiple sizes of pedestrians, not just one particular size. In most of the simulations, secondary ground impact with pedestrian head/neck/shoulder region occurred. However, there were some front-end profiles that promoted secondary ground impact with pedestrian lower extremities, thus avoiding pedestrian secondary head impact with ground. Previous pedestrian safety research work has suggested the use of active safety methods, such as 'pop up hood', to reduce pedestrian head injury during primary impact. Accordingly, we also conducted simulations using a model with the hood raised to capture the effect of a pop-up hood. These simulations indicated that even though pop-up hood helped reducing the head injury

  14. Head impact exposure sustained by football players on days of diagnosed concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Chu, Jeffrey J; Crisco, Joseph J; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Broglio, Steven P; McAllister, Thomas W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Mihalik, Jason P; Anderson, Scott; Schnebel, Brock; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Collins, Michael W

    2013-04-01

    This study compares the frequency and severity of head impacts sustained by football players on days with and without diagnosed concussion and to identify the sensitivity and specificity of single-impact severity measures to diagnosed injury. One thousand two hundred eight players from eight collegiate football teams and six high school football teams wore instrumented helmets to measure head impacts during all team sessions, of which 95 players were diagnosed with concussion. Eight players sustained two injuries and one sustained three, providing 105 injury cases. Measures of head kinematics (peak linear and rotational acceleration, Gadd severity index, head injury criteria (HIC15), and change in head velocity (Δv)) and the number of head impacts sustained by individual players were compared between days with and without diagnosed concussion. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of each kinematic measure to diagnosed concussion using only those impacts that directly preceded diagnosis. Players sustained a higher frequency of impacts and impacts with more severe kinematic properties on days of diagnosed concussion than on days without diagnosed concussion. Forty-five injury cases were immediately diagnosed after head impact. For these cases, peak linear acceleration and HIC15 were most sensitive to immediately diagnosed concussion (area under the curve = 0.983). Peak rotational acceleration was less sensitive to diagnosed injury than all other kinematic measures (P = 0.01), which are derived from linear acceleration (peak linear, HIC15, Gadd severity index, and Δv). Players sustained more impacts and impacts of higher severity on days of diagnosed concussion than on days without diagnosed concussion. In addition, of historical measures of impact severity, those associated with peak linear acceleration are the best predictors of immediately diagnosed concussion.

  15. Changes in Parents’ Spanking and Reading as Mechanisms for Head Start Impacts on Children

    OpenAIRE

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T.; Ansari, Arya; Purtell, Kelly M.; Sexton, Holly R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether Head Start, the nation’s main two-generation program for low-income families, benefits children in part through positive changes in parents’ use of spanking and reading to children. Data were drawn from the 3-year-old cohort of the national evaluation of the Head Start program known as the Head Start Impact Study (N = 2,063). Results indicated that Head Start had small indirect effects on children’s spelling ability at age 4 and their aggression at age 4 through an...

  16. Biomechanical head impact characteristics during sparring practice sessions in high school taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, David M; Fife, Gabriel P

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to monitor head impact magnitude and characteristics, such as impact location and frequency, at high school taekwondo sparring sessions. METHODS Eight male high school taekwondo athletes participated in this study. The head impact characteristics were recorded by X-Patch, a wireless accelerometer and gyroscope, during 6 taekwondo sparring sessions. The outcome measures were the peak linear acceleration ( g = 9.81 msec(2)), peak rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, and Head Injury Criterion. RESULTS A total of 689 impacts occurred over 6 sessions involving the 8 athletes. There was an average of 24 impacts per 100 minutes, and there were significant differences in the frequency of impacts among both the sessions and individual athletes. In order of frequency, the most commonly hit locations were the side (38.2%), back (35.7%), and front (23.8%) of the head. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is a relatively high number of head impacts experienced by taekwondo athletes during sparring practice. According to the rotational acceleration predicting impact severity published in previous research, 17.1% of the impacts were deemed to be a moderate and 15.5% were deemed to be severe.

  17. Head impact exposure in youth football: middle school ages 12-14 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ray W; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2014-09-01

    The head impact exposure experienced by football players at the college and high school levels has been well documented; however, there are limited data regarding youth football despite its dramatically larger population. The objective of this study was to investigate head impact exposure in middle school football. Impacts were monitored using a commercially available accelerometer array installed inside the helmets of 17 players aged 12-14 years. A total of 4678 impacts were measured, with an average (±standard deviation) of 275 ± 190 impacts per player. The average of impact distributions for each player had a median impact of 22 ± 2 g and 954 ± 122 rad/s², and a 95th percentile impact of 54 ± 9 g and 2525 ± 450 rad/s². Similar to the head impact exposure experienced by high school and collegiate players, these data show that middle school football players experience a greater number of head impacts during games than practices. There were no significant differences between median and 95th percentile head acceleration magnitudes experienced during games and practices; however, a larger number of impacts greater than 80 g occurred during games than during practices. Impacts to the front and back of the helmet were most common. Overall, these data are similar to high school and college data that have been collected using similar methods. These data have applications toward youth football helmet design, the development of strategies designed to limit head impact exposure, and child-specific brain injury criteria.

  18. Clinical Risk Factors for Head Impact During Falls in Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study in Long-Term Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yijian; Mackey, Dawn C; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Leung, Pet-Ming; Feldman, Fabio; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    To examine risk factors associated with head impact during falls in older adults in long-term care (LTC). Two LTC facilities in British Columbia, Canada. 160 LTC residents. Prospective cohort study. Between 2007 and 2014, we video captured 520 falls experienced by participants. Each fall video was analyzed to determine whether impact occurred to the head. Using generalized estimating equation models, we examined how head impact was associated with other fall characteristics and health status prior to the fall. Head impact occurred in 33% of falls. Individuals with mild cognitive impairment were at higher risk for head impact (odds ratio = 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-5.0) than those with more severe cognitive impairment. Impaired vision was associated with 2.0-fold (1.3-3.0) higher odds of head impact. Women were 2.2 times (1.4-3.3) more likely than men to impact their head during a fall. Head impact is common during falls in LTC, with less cognitively impaired, female residents who suffered from visual impairment, being most likely to impact their head. Future research should focus on improving our ability to detect neural consequences of head impact and evaluating the effect of interventions for reducing the risk for fall-related head injuries in LTC.

  19. On Impact: A Case of a Student with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Valerie A.; Chesire, David J.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of a student with head injuries. While the symptom presentation for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be vastly different, this case represents common symptoms seen in students who are recovering from a concussion. The authors suggest that school psychologists query the teacher and parents about their…

  20. On Impact: A Case of a Student with Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Valerie A.; Chesire, David J.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a case of a student with head injuries. While the symptom presentation for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be vastly different, this case represents common symptoms seen in students who are recovering from a concussion. The authors suggest that school psychologists query the teacher and parents about their…

  1. Modular use of human body models of varying levels of complexity: Validation of head kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, William; Koya, Bharath; Davis, Matthew L; Gayzik, F Scott

    2017-05-29

    The significant computational resources required to execute detailed human body finite-element models has motivated the development of faster running, simplified models (e.g., GHBMC M50-OS). Previous studies have demonstrated the ability to modularly incorporate the validated GHBMC M50-O brain model into the simplified model (GHBMC M50-OS+B), which allows for localized analysis of the brain in a fraction of the computation time required for the detailed model. The objective of this study is to validate the head and neck kinematics of the GHBMC M50-O and M50-OS (detailed and simplified versions of the same model) against human volunteer test data in frontal and lateral loading. Furthermore, the effect of modular insertion of the detailed brain model into the M50-OS is quantified. Data from the Navy Biodynamics Laboratory (NBDL) human volunteer studies, including a 15g frontal, 8g frontal, and 7g lateral impact, were reconstructed and simulated using LS-DYNA. A five-point restraint system was used for all simulations, and initial positions of the models were matched with volunteer data using settling and positioning techniques. Both the frontal and lateral simulations were run with the M50-O, M50-OS, and M50-OS+B with active musculature for a total of nine runs. Normalized run times for the various models used in this study were 8.4 min/ms for the M50-O, 0.26 min/ms for the M50-OS, and 0.97 min/ms for the M50-OS+B, a 32- and 9-fold reduction in run time, respectively. Corridors were reanalyzed for head and T1 kinematics from the NBDL studies. Qualitative evaluation of head rotational accelerations and linear resultant acceleration, as well as linear resultant T1 acceleration, showed reasonable results between all models and the experimental data. Objective evaluation of the results for head center of gravity (CG) accelerations was completed via ISO TS 18571, and indicated scores of 0.673 (M50-O), 0.638 (M50-OS), and 0.656 (M50-OS+B) for the 15g frontal impact

  2. Measurement of Head Impact Due to Standing Fall in Adults Using Anthropomorphic Test Dummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghamemar, Marzieh; Seidi, Morteza; Ferguson, James R; Caccese, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    The kinematics and kinetics of head impact due to a standing fall onto a hard surface are summarized. Head injury due to impact from falls represents a significant problem, especially for older individuals. When the head is left unprotected during a fall, the impact severity can be high enough to cause significant injury or even death. To ascertain the range of head impact parameters, the dynamic response was captured for the pedestrian version of the 5th percentile female and 50th percentile male Hybrid III anthropomorphic test dummies as they were dropped from a standing position with different initial postures. Five scenarios of falls were considered including backward falls with/without hip flexion, forward falls with/without knee flexion and lateral falls. The results show that the head impact parameters are dependent on the fall scenario. A wide range of impact parameters was observed in 107 trials. The 95% prediction interval for the peak translational acceleration, peak angular acceleration, peak force, impact translational velocity and peak angular velocity are 146-502 g, 8.8-43.3 krad/s(2), 3.9-24.5 kN, 2.02-7.41 m/s, and 12.9-70.3 rad/s, respectively.

  3. The impact of virus in N3 node dissection for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Gian Luca; Su, Chih-Ying; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Fang, Fu-Min; Chen, Ching-Mei; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2008-11-01

    This study is to determine the impact of virus in surgical outcomes among patients of head and neck cancer with N3 lymph node metastasis. A retrospective analysis was conducted for 32 patients with operable N3 neck metastasis undergoing surgical treatment between January 1987 and October 2006. The nuclei of the tumor cells were investigated for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAs and were taken into account as the variable for survival analysis. The primary sites were oropharynx in 11 patients, tongue in 3, buccal mucosa in 1, hypopharynx in 8 and unknown primary in 9. The five-year cumulative overall survival rate was 40.7% and 5-year cumulative regional control rate was 55.8%. The 5-year cumulative overall survival rate of patients with unknown primary site (72.9%) and HPV or EBV positive in the tumor (77.8%) were significantly higher than those patients with known primary site (31.3%) and HPV or EBV negative in the tumor (27.4%), respectively (P = 0.0335 and P = 0.0348, log rank test). In conclusion, surgery with adjuvant therapy offers reasonable outcomes for operable N3 node in head and neck cancer in our cohort. In addition, patients with HPV or EBV positive in the tumor have a better survival.

  4. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenzhi Wang

    Full Text Available Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  5. Head Position Preference in the Human Newborn: A New Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnqvist, Louise; Hopkins, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Studied head position preference in 20 newborns differing by Cesarean or vaginal delivery and sex. Found that neither factor accounted for differences. The head turned right more often and was maintained longer in this position during quiet wakefulness, regardless of scoring method. When using global scoring, duration of midline position was…

  6. Does aquatic foraging impact head shape evolution in snakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Marion; Cornette, Raphaël; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Herrel, Anthony

    2016-08-31

    Evolutionary trajectories are often biased by developmental and historical factors. However, environmental factors can also impose constraints on the evolutionary trajectories of organisms leading to convergence of morphology in similar ecological contexts. The physical properties of water impose strong constraints on aquatic feeding animals by generating pressure waves that can alert prey and potentially push them away from the mouth. These hydrodynamic constraints have resulted in the independent evolution of suction feeding in most groups of secondarily aquatic tetrapods. Despite the fact that snakes cannot use suction, they have invaded the aquatic milieu many times independently. Here, we test whether the aquatic environment has constrained head shape evolution in snakes and whether shape converges on that predicted by biomechanical models. To do so, we used three-dimensional geometric morphometrics and comparative, phylogenetically informed analyses on a large sample of aquatic snake species. Our results show that aquatic snakes partially conform to our predictions and have a narrower anterior part of the head and dorsally positioned eyes and nostrils. This morphology is observed, irrespective of the phylogenetic relationships among species, suggesting that the aquatic environment does indeed drive the evolution of head shape in snakes, thus biasing the evolutionary trajectory of this group of animals.

  7. Detection of head-to-tail DNA sequences of human bocavirus in clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lüsebrink

    Full Text Available Parvoviruses are single stranded DNA viruses that replicate in a so called "rolling-hairpin" mechanism, a variant of the rolling circle replication known for bacteriophages like φX174. The replication intermediates of parvoviruses thus are concatemers of head-to-head or tail-to-tail structure. Surprisingly, in case of the novel human bocavirus, neither head-to-head nor tail-to-tail DNA sequences were detected in clinical isolates; in contrast head-to-tail DNA sequences were identified by PCR and sequencing. Thereby, the head-to-tail sequences were linked by a novel sequence of 54 bp of which 20 bp also occur as conserved structures of the palindromic ends of parvovirus MVC which in turn is a close relative to human bocavirus.

  8. Changes in parents' spanking and reading as mechanisms for Head Start impacts on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Ansari, Arya; Purtell, Kelly M; Sexton, Holly R

    2016-06-01

    This study examined whether Head Start, the nation's main two-generation program for low-income families, benefits children in part through positive changes in parents' use of spanking and reading to children. Data were drawn from the 3-year-old cohort of the national evaluation of the Head Start program known as the Head Start Impact Study (N = 2,063). Results indicated that Head Start had small, indirect effects on children's spelling ability at Age 4 and their aggression at Age 4 through an increase in parents' reading to their children. Taken together, the results suggest that parents play a role in sustaining positive benefits of the Head Start program for children's behavior and literacy skills, one that could be enhanced with a greater emphasis on parent involvement and education. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Feasibility and Implementation of a Literature Information Management System for Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancers with Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  10. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain.

  11. Impact forces and neck muscle activity in heading by collegiate female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J A; Thomas, T S; Cauraugh, J H; Kaminski, T W; Hass, C J

    2001-03-01

    Three soccer header types (shooting, clearing and passing) and two heading approaches (standing and jumping) were manipulated to quantify impact forces and neck muscle activity in elite female soccer players. The 15 participants were Division I intercollegiate soccer players. Impact forces were measured by a 15-sensor pressure array secured on the forehead. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the left and right sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles was recorded using surface electrodes. Maximum impact forces and impulses as well as the EMG data were analysed with separate repeated-measures analyses of variance. Impact forces and impulses did not differ among the header types or approaches. Higher values were found for jumping versus standing headers in the mean normalized EMG for the right sternocleidomastoid. In addition, the integrated EMG was greater for the right sternocleidomastoid and right and left trapezius (P head and body, thereby increasing the stability of the head-neck complex.

  12. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Gerard J Nuovo; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V.; Burk, Robert D.; Prystowsky, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas to a “gold standard” human papillomavirus PCR assay. One hundred-and-ten prospectively collected, formalin fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarr...

  14. Head impact exposure in youth football: high school ages 14 to 18 years and cumulative impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Jillian E; Davenport, Elizabeth M; Golman, Adam J; Maldjian, Joseph A; Whitlow, Christopher T; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D

    2013-12-01

    Sports-related concussion is the most common athletic head injury with football having the highest rate among high school athletes. Traditionally, research on the biomechanics of football-related head impact has been focused at the collegiate level. Less research has been performed at the high school level, despite the incidence of concussion among high school football players. The objective of this study is to twofold: to quantify the head impact exposure in high school football, and to develop a cumulative impact analysis method. Head impact exposure was measured by instrumenting the helmets of 40 high school football players with helmet mounted accelerometer arrays to measure linear and rotational acceleration. A total of 16,502 head impacts were collected over the course of the season. Biomechanical data were analyzed by team and by player. The median impact for each player ranged from 15.2 to 27.0 g with an average value of 21.7 (±2.4) g. The 95th percentile impact for each player ranged from 38.8 to 72.9 g with an average value of 56.4 (±10.5) g. Next, an impact exposure metric utilizing concussion injury risk curves was created to quantify cumulative exposure for each participating player over the course of the season. Impacts were weighted according to the associated risk due to linear acceleration and rotational acceleration alone, as well as the combined probability (CP) of injury associated with both. These risks were summed over the course of a season to generate risk weighted cumulative exposure. The impact frequency was found to be greater during games compared to practices with an average number of impacts per session of 15.5 and 9.4, respectively. However, the median cumulative risk weighted exposure based on combined probability was found to be greater for practices vs. games. These data will provide a metric that may be used to better understand the cumulative effects of repetitive head impacts, injury mechanisms, and head impact exposure of

  15. Quantifying Variation in Head Start Effects on Young Children's Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Skills Using Data from the National Head Start Impact Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Howard S.; Weiland, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), a nationally representative multisite randomized trial, to quantify variation in effects of Head Start during 2002-2003 on children's cognitive and socio-emotional outcomes relative to the effects of other local alternatives, including parent care. We find that (1) treatment and control…

  16. Football Players' Head-Impact Exposure After Limiting of Full-Contact Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, Steven P; Williams, Richelle M; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Goldstick, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Sporting organizations limit full-contact football practices to reduce concussion risk and based on speculation that repeated head impacts may result in long-term neurodegeneration. To directly compare head-impact exposure in high school football players before and after a statewide restriction on full-contact practices. Cross-sectional study. High school football field. Participants were varsity football athletes from a single high school. Before the rule change, 26 athletes (age = 16.2 ± 0.8 years, height = 179.6 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 81.9 ± 13.1 kg) participated. After the rule change, 24 athletes (age = 15.9 ± 0.8 years, height = 178.3 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 76.2 ± 11.6 kg) participated. Nine athletes participated in both years of the investigation. Head-impact exposure was monitored using the Head Impact Telemetry System while the athletes participated in football games and practices in the seasons before and after the rule change. Head-impact frequency, location, and magnitude (ie, linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, and Head Impact Telemetry severity profile [HITsp], respectively) were measured. A total of 15 398 impacts (592 impacts per player per season) were captured before the rule change and 8269 impacts (345 impacts per player per season) after the change. An average 42% decline in impact exposure occurred across all players, with practice-exposure declines occurring among linemen (46% decline); receivers, cornerbacks, and safeties (41% decline); and tight ends, running backs (including fullbacks), and linebackers (39% decline). Impact magnitudes remained largely unchanged between the years. A rule change limiting full-contact high school football practices appears to have been effective in reducing head-impact exposure across all players, with the largest reduction occurring among linemen. This finding is likely associated with the rule modification, particularly because the coaching staff and offensive scheme remained consistent, yet how

  17. Evaluation of military helmets and roof padding on head injury potential from vertical impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Laing, Sheridan

    2016-10-02

    Soldiers in military vehicles subjected to underbelly blasts can sustain traumatic head and neck injuries due to a head impact with the roof. The severity of head and neck trauma can be influenced by the amount of head clearance available to the occupant as well as factors such as wearing a military helmet or the presence of padding on the interior roof. The aim of the current study was to examine the interaction between a Hybrid III headform, the helmet system, and the interior roof of the vehicle under vertical loading. Using a head impact machine and a Hybrid III headform, tests were conducted on a rigid steel plate in a number of different configurations and velocities to assess helmet shell and padding performance, to evaluate different vehicle roof padding materials, and to determine the relative injury mitigating contributions of both the helmet and the roof padding. The resultant translational head acceleration was measured and the head injury criterion (HIC) was calculated for each impact. For impacts with a helmeted headform hitting the steel plate only, which represented a common scenario in an underbelly blast event, velocities of ≤6 m/s resulted in HIC values below the FMVSS 201U threshold of 1,000, and a velocity of 7 m/s resulted in HIC values well over the threshold. Roof padding was found to reduce the peak translational head acceleration and the HIC, with rigid IMPAXX foams performing better than semirigid ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam. However, the head injury potential was reduced considerably more by wearing a helmet than by the addition of roof padding. The results of this study provide initial quantitative findings that provide a better understanding of helmet-roof interactions in vertical impacts and the contributions of the military helmet and roof padding to mitigating head injury potential. Findings from this study will be used to inform further testing with the future aim of developing a new minimum head clearance standard for

  18. Long-Term Cognitive and Neuropsychiatric Consequences of Repetitive Concussion and Head-Impact Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Thomas; McCrea, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Initially, interest in sport-related concussion arose from the premise that the study of athletes engaged in sports associated with high rates of concussion could provide insight into the mechanisms, phenomenology, and recovery from mild traumatic brain injury. Over the last decade, concerns have focused on the possibility that, for some athletes, repetitive concussions may raise the long-term risk for cognitive decline, neurobehavioral changes, and neurodegenerative disease. First conceptualized as a discrete event with variable recovery trajectories, concussion is now viewed by some as a trigger of neurobiological events that may influence neurobehavioral function over the course of the life span. Furthermore, advances in technology now permit us to gain a detailed understanding of the frequency and intensity of repetitive head impacts associated with contact sports (eg, football, ice hockey). Helmet-based sensors can be used to characterize the kinematic features of concussive impacts, as well as the profiles of typical head-impact exposures experienced by athletes in routine sport participation. Many large-magnitude impacts are not associated with diagnosed concussions, whereas many diagnosed concussions are associated with more modest impacts. Therefore, a full understanding of this topic requires attention to not only the effects of repetitive concussions but also overall exposure to repetitive head impacts. This article is a review of the current state of the science on the long-term neurocognitive and neurobehavioral effects of repetitive concussion and head-impact exposure in contact sports.

  19. Head excursion of restrained human volunteers and hybrid III dummies in steady state rollover tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Edward; Hare, Barry; Hughes, Raymond; Lewis, Lance; Iiyama, Hiroshi; Curzon, Anne; Cooper, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    Seatbelts provide substantial benefits in rollover crashes, yet occupants still receive head and neck injuries from contacting the vehicle roof interior when the roof exterior strikes the ground. Prior research has evaluated rollover restraint performance utilizing anthropomorphic test devices (dummies), but little dynamic testing has been done with human volunteers to learn how they move during rollovers. In this study, the vertical excursion of the head of restrained dummies and human subjects was measured in a vehicle being rotated about its longitudinal roll axis at roll rates from 180-to-360 deg/sec and under static inversion conditions. The vehicle's restraint design was the commonly used 3-point seatbelt with continuous loop webbing and a sliding latch plate. This paper presents an analysis of the observed occupant motion and provides a comparison of dummy and human motion under similar test conditions. Thirty-five tests (eighteen static and seventeen dynamic) were completed using two different sizes of dummies and human subjects in both near and far-side roll directions. The research indicates that far-side rollovers cause the restrained test subjects to have greater head excursion than near-side rollovers, and that static inversion testing underestimates head excursion for far-side occupants. Human vertical head excursion of up to 200 mm was found at a roll rate of 220 deg/sec. Humans exhibit greater variability in head excursion in comparison to dummies. Transfer of seatbelt webbing through the latch plate did not correlate directly with differences in head excursion.

  20. Concussion in professional football: comparison with boxing head impacts--part 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Casson, Ira R; Pellman, Elliot J; Bir, Cynthia A; Zhang, Liying; Sherman, Donald C; Boitano, Marilyn A

    2005-12-01

    This study addresses impact biomechanics from boxing punches causing translational and rotational head acceleration. Olympic boxers threw four different punches at an instrumented Hybrid III dummy and responses were compared with laboratory-reconstructed NFL concussions. Eleven Olympic boxers weighing 51 to 130 kg (112-285 lb) delivered 78 blows to the head of the Hybrid III dummy, including hooks, uppercuts and straight punches to the forehead and jaw. Instrumentation included translational and rotational head acceleration and neck loads in the dummy. Biaxial acceleration was measured in the boxer's hand to determine punch force. High-speed video recorded each blow. Hybrid III head responses and finite element (FE) brain modeling were compared to similarly determined responses from reconstructed NFL concussions. The hook produced the highest change in hand velocity (11.0 +/- 3.4 m/s) and greatest punch force (4405 +/- 2318 N) with average neck load of 855 +/- 537 N. It caused head translational and rotational accelerations of 71.2 +/- 32.2 g and 9306 +/- 4485 r/s. These levels are consistent with those causing concussion in NFL impacts. However, the head injury criterion (HIC) for boxing punches was lower than for NFL concussions because of shorter duration acceleration. Boxers deliver punches with proportionately more rotational than translational acceleration than in football concussion. Boxing punches have a 65 mm effective radius from the head cg, which is almost double the 34 mm in football. A smaller radius in football prevents the helmets from sliding off each other in a tackle. Olympic boxers deliver punches with high impact velocity but lower HIC and translational acceleration than in football impacts because of a lower effective punch mass. They cause proportionately more rotational acceleration than in football. Modeling shows that the greatest strain is in the midbrain late in the exposure, after the primary impact acceleration in boxing and football.

  1. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  2. Post-heading heat stress and yield impact in winter wheat of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Liu, Leilei; Tian, Liying; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Asseng, Senthold

    2014-02-01

    Wheat is sensitive to high temperatures, but the spatial and temporal variability of high temperature and its impact on yield are often not known. An analysis of historical climate and yield data was undertaken to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of heat stress between heading and maturity and its impact on wheat grain yield in China. Several heat stress indices were developed to quantify heat intensity, frequency, and duration between heading and maturity based on measured maximum temperature records of the last 50 years from 166 stations in the main wheat-growing region of China. Surprisingly, heat stress between heading and maturity was more severe in the generally cooler northern wheat-growing regions than the generally warmer southern regions of China, because of the delayed time of heading with low temperatures during the earlier growing season and the exposure of the post-heading phase into the warmer part of the year. Heat stress between heading and maturity has increased in the last decades in most of the main winter wheat production areas of China, but the rate was higher in the south than in the north. The correlation between measured grain yields and post-heading heat stress and average temperature were statistically significant in the entire wheat-producing region, and explained about 29% of the observed spatial and temporal yield variability. A heat stress index considering the duration and intensity of heat between heading and maturity was required to describe the correlation of heat stress and yield variability. Because heat stress is a major cause of yield loss and the number of heat events is projected to increase in the future, quantifying the future impact of heat stress on wheat production and developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies are critical for developing food security policies in China and elsewhere.

  3. Head Pose Estimation Using Multilinear Subspace Analysis for Robot Human Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Tonislav; Matthies, Larry; Vasilescu, M. Alex O.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile robots, operating in unconstrained indoor and outdoor environments, would benefit in many ways from perception of the human awareness around them. Knowledge of people's head pose and gaze directions would enable the robot to deduce which people are aware of the its presence, and to predict future motions of the people for better path planning. To make such inferences, requires estimating head pose on facial images that are combination of multiple varying factors, such as identity, appearance, head pose, and illumination. By applying multilinear algebra, the algebra of higher-order tensors, we can separate these factors and estimate head pose regardless of subject's identity or image conditions. Furthermore, we can automatically handle uncertainty in the size of the face and its location. We demonstrate a pipeline of on-the-move detection of pedestrians with a robot stereo vision system, segmentation of the head, and head pose estimation in cluttered urban street scenes.

  4. Head Pose Estimation Using Multilinear Subspace Analysis for Robot Human Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Tonislav; Matthies, Larry; Vasilescu, M. Alex O.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile robots, operating in unconstrained indoor and outdoor environments, would benefit in many ways from perception of the human awareness around them. Knowledge of people's head pose and gaze directions would enable the robot to deduce which people are aware of the its presence, and to predict future motions of the people for better path planning. To make such inferences, requires estimating head pose on facial images that are combination of multiple varying factors, such as identity, appearance, head pose, and illumination. By applying multilinear algebra, the algebra of higher-order tensors, we can separate these factors and estimate head pose regardless of subject's identity or image conditions. Furthermore, we can automatically handle uncertainty in the size of the face and its location. We demonstrate a pipeline of on-the-move detection of pedestrians with a robot stereo vision system, segmentation of the head, and head pose estimation in cluttered urban street scenes.

  5. Modulation of head movement control in humans during treadmill walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/s (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2 m from their eyes. The net and relative angular motions of the head about the three axes of rotations, as well as the corresponding values for the moments acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were quantified and used as measures of coordination. The average net moment, as well as the average moments about the different axes were significantly different (Pphases of the gait cycle. However, the average net angular displacement as well as the average angular displacement about the axial rotation axis of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (P>0.01) throughout the gait cycle. The average angular displacement about the lateral bending axis was significantly increased (Pphase while that about the flexion-extension axis was significantly decreased (Pgait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixation of targets during walking.

  6. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  7. Human body and head characteristics as a communication medium for Body Area Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifle, Yonatan; Hun-Seok Kim; Yoo, Jerald

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth investigation of the Body Channel Communication (BCC) under the environment set according to the IEEE 802.15.6 Body Area Network (BAN) standard is conducted to observe and characterize the human body as a communication medium. A thorough measurement of the human head as part of the human channel is also carried out. Human forehead, head to limb, and ear to ear channel is characterized. The channel gain of the human head follows the same bandpass profile of the human torso and limbs with the maximum channel gain occurring at 35MHz. The human body channel gain distribution histogram at given frequencies, while all the other parameters are held constant, exhibits a maximum variation of 2.2dB in the channel gain at the center frequency of the bandpass channel gain profile.

  8. THREE DIMENSIONAL DIGITIZATION OF HUMAN HEAD BY FUSING STRUCTURED LIGHT AND CONTOURS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Gang; Li Dehua; Hu Hanping; Hu Bing

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional digitization of human head is desired in many applications. In this paper, an information fusion based scheme is presented to obtain 3-D information of human head. Structured light technology is employed to measure depth. For the special reflection areas,in which the structured light stripe can not be detected directly, the shape of the structured light stripe can be calculated from the corresponding contour. By fusing the information of structured light and the contours, the problem of reflectance influence is solved, and the whole shape of head,including hair area, can be obtained. Some good results are obtained.

  9. THREE DIMENSIONAL DIGITIZATION OF HUMAN HEAD BY FUSING STRUCTURED LIGHT AND CONTOURS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinGang; LiDehua; 等

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional digitization of human head is desired in many applications.In this paper, an information fusion based scheme is presented to obtain 3-D information of human head, Structured light technology is employed to measure depth.For the special reflection areas, in which the structured light stripe can not be detected directly, the shape of the structured light stripe can be calculated from the corresponding contour.By fusing the information of structured light and the contours, the problem of reflectance influence is solved, and the whole shape of head ,including hair area, can be obtained.Some good results are obtained.

  10. Safe-Play Knowledge, Aggression, and Head-Impact Biomechanics in Adolescent Ice Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julianne D; Pierce, Alice F; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Pamukoff, Derek N; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-05-01

    Addressing safe-play knowledge and player aggression could potentially improve ice hockey sport safety. To compare (1) safe-play knowledge and aggression between male and female adolescent ice hockey players and (2) head-impact frequency and severity between players with high and low levels of safe-play knowledge and aggression during practices and games. Cohort study. On field. Forty-one male (n = 29) and female (n = 12) adolescent ice hockey players. Players completed the Safe Play Questionnaire (0 = less knowledge, 7 = most knowledge) and Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale (12 = less aggressive, 60 = most aggressive) at midseason. Aggressive penalty minutes were recorded throughout the season. The Head Impact Telemetry System was used to capture head-impact frequency and severity (linear acceleration [g], rotational acceleration [rad/s(2)], Head Impact Technology severity profile) at practices and games. One-way analyses of variance were used to compare safe play knowledge and aggression between sexes. Players were categorized as having high or low safe-play knowledge and aggression using a median split. A 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare head-impact frequency, and random-intercept general linear models were used to compare head-impact severity between groups (high, low) and event types (practice, game). Boys (5.8 of 7 total; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3, 6.3) had a trend toward better safe-play knowledge compared with girls (4.9 of 7 total; 95% CI = 3.9, 5.9; F1,36 = 3.40, P = .073). Less aggressive male players sustained significantly lower head rotational accelerations during practices (1512.8 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1397.3, 1637.6 rad/s(2)) versus games (1754.8 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1623.9, 1896.2 rad/s(2)) and versus high-aggression players during practices (1773.5 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1607.9, 1956.3 rad/s (2) ; F1,26 = 6.04, P = .021). Coaches and sports medicine professionals should ensure that athletes of all levels

  11. Cold-Water Corals and Anthropogenic Impacts in La Fonera Submarine Canyon Head, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galderic Lastras

    Full Text Available We assess the occurrence and extent of cold-water coral (CWC species Madrepora oculata and Dendrophyllia cornigera, as well as gorgonian red coral Corallium rubrum, in La Fonera canyon head (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, as well as human impacts taking place in their habitats. Occurrence is assessed based on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV video imaging. Terrain classification techniques are applied to high-resolution swath bathymetric data to obtain semi-automatic interpretative maps to identify the relationship between coral distribution patterns and canyon environments. A total of 21 ROV immersions were carried out in different canyon environments at depths ranging between 79 and 401 m. Large, healthy colonies of M. oculata occur on abrupt, protected, often overhanging, rocky sections of the canyon walls, especially in Illa Negra branch. D. cornigera is sparser and evenly distributed at depth, on relatively low sloping areas, in rocky but also partially sedimented areas. C. rubrum is most frequent between 100 and 160 m on highly sloping rocky areas. The probable extent of CWC habitats is quantified by applying a maximum entropy model to predict habitat suitability: 0.36 km2 yield M. oculata occurrence probabilities over 70%. Similar predictive models have been produced for D. cornigera and C. rubrum. All ROV transects document either the presence of litter on the seafloor or pervasive trawling marks. Nets and longlines are imaged entangled on coral colonies. Coral rubble is observed at the foot of impacted colonies. Some colonies are partially covered by sediment that could be the result of the resuspension generated by bottom trawling on neighbouring fishing grounds, which has been demonstrated to be responsible of daily increases in sediment fluxes within the canyon. The characteristics of the CWC community in La Fonera canyon are indicative that it withstands high environmental stress of both natural and human origin.

  12. Cleveland Clinic intelligent mouthguard: a new technology to accurately measure head impact in athletes and soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey

    2013-05-01

    Nearly 2 million Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) occur in the U.S. each year, with societal costs approaching $60 billion. Including mild TBI and concussion, TBI's are prevalent in soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as in domestic athletes. Long-term risks of single and cumulative head impact dosage may present in the form of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, suicide, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Quantifying head impact dosage and understanding associated risk factors for the development of long-term sequelae is critical toward developing guidelines for TBI exposure and post-exposure management. The current knowledge gap between head impact exposure and clinical outcomes limits the understanding of underlying TBI mechanisms, including effective treatment protocols and prevention methods for soldiers and athletes. In order to begin addressing this knowledge gap, Cleveland Clinic is developing the "Intelligent Mouthguard" head impact dosimeter. Current testing indicates the Intelligent Mouthguard can quantify linear acceleration with 3% error and angular acceleration with 17% error during impacts ranging from 10g to 174g and 850rad/s2 to 10000rad/s2, respectively. Correlation was high (R2 > 0.99, R2 = 0.98, respectively). Near-term development will be geared towards quantifying head impact dosages in vitro, longitudinally in athletes and to test new sensors for possible improved accuracy and reduced bias. Long-term, the IMG may be useful to soldiers to be paired with neurocognitive clinical data quantifying resultant TBI functional deficits.

  13. Impact of Terrorism on Managerial Efficiency of Heads of Secondary Schools in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Usman Ghani; Iqba, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Terrorism has adversely affected the educational environment in Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa Province. This study was conducted to know the impact of Terrorism on managerial efficiency of heads of secondary schools in Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa that included Malakand, Mangawara, Dir, Hangu , Bannu and D I Khan which are the highly affected areas of terrorism.…

  14. Effect of head impacts on diffusivity measures in a cohort of collegiate contact sport athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James C.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur; Greenwald, Richard M.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Bolander, Richard P.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Turco, John H.; Raman, Rema; Jain, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether exposure to repetitive head impacts over a single season affects white matter diffusion measures in collegiate contact sport athletes. Methods: A prospective cohort study at a Division I NCAA athletic program of 80 nonconcussed varsity football and ice hockey players who wore instrumented helmets that recorded the acceleration-time history of the head following impact, and 79 non–contact sport athletes. Assessment occurred preseason and shortly after the season with diffusion tensor imaging and neurocognitive measures. Results: There was a significant (p = 0.011) athlete-group difference for mean diffusivity (MD) in the corpus callosum. Postseason fractional anisotropy (FA) differed (p = 0.001) in the amygdala (0.238 vs 0.233). Measures of head impact exposure correlated with white matter diffusivity measures in several brain regions, including the corpus callosum, amygdala, cerebellar white matter, hippocampus, and thalamus. The magnitude of change in corpus callosum MD postseason was associated with poorer performance on a measure of verbal learning and memory. Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between head impact exposure, white matter diffusion measures, and cognition over the course of a single season, even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, in a cohort of college athletes. Further work is needed to assess whether such effects are short term or persistent. PMID:24336143

  15. Impact of Terrorism on Managerial Efficiency of Heads of Secondary Schools in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Usman Ghani; Iqba, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Terrorism has adversely affected the educational environment in Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa Province. This study was conducted to know the impact of Terrorism on managerial efficiency of heads of secondary schools in Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa that included Malakand, Mangawara, Dir, Hangu , Bannu and D I Khan which are the highly affected areas of terrorism.…

  16. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    synaptophysin, and synaptophilin are three proteins crucial for maintaining functional synapses. Immunoblot measurements of these proteins revealed a...energy test- ing of small projectiles, ranging in shape and size, showed the steel sphere produced the highest impact energy and the most consistent...impact characteristics. Additional tests confirmed the steel sphere produced linear and rotational motions on the rat’s head while remaining within a

  17. A transient finite element study reveals the importance of the bycicle helmet material properties on head protection during an impact

    OpenAIRE

    Asiminei, Aida Georgeta; Van der Perre, Georges; Verpoest, Ignace; Goffin, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This paper is focused on understanding the mechanism that gives the bicycle helmet the role of protecting the head during an impact. The finite element method is used here as a first step in the helmet optimisation and improvement process. The relation between different helmet mechanical parameters and the risk of head injury during the impact is described using MSC Marc Mentat finite element software. The reduction in resulting head linear acceleration by more than 80% and in resulting stres...

  18. Human eye-head gaze shifts in a distractor task. II. Reduced threshold for initiation of early head movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneil, B D; Munoz, D P

    1999-09-01

    This study was motivated by the observation of early head movements (EHMs) occasionally generated before gaze shifts. Human subjects were presented with a visual or auditory target, along with an accompanying stimulus of the other modality, that either appeared at the same location as the target (enhancer condition) or at the diametrically opposite location (distractor condition). Gaze shifts generated to the target in the distractor condition sometimes were preceded by EHMs directed either to the side of the target (correct EHMs) or the side of the distractor (incorrect EHMs). During EHMs, the eyes performed compensatory eye movements to keep gaze stable. Incorrect EHMs were usually between 1 and 5 degrees in amplitude and reached peak velocities generally EHMs initially followed a trajectory typical of much larger head movements. These results suggest that incorrect EHMs are head movements that initially were planned to orient to the peripheral distractor. Furthermore gaze shifts preceded by incorrect EHMs had longer reaction latencies than gaze shifts not preceded by incorrect EHMs, suggesting that the processes leading to incorrect EHMs also serve to delay gaze-shift initiation. These results demonstrate a form of distraction analogous to the incorrect gaze shifts (IGSs) described in the previous paper and suggest that a motor program encoding a gaze shift to a distractor is capable of initiating either an IGS or an incorrect EHM. A neural program not strong enough to initiate an IGS nevertheless can initiate an incorrect EHM.

  19. Human impacts to mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the stream, or aquatic and riparian communities. Examples include channelization, construction of grade-control structures or check dams, removal of beavers, and placer mining. Human effects can also result from activities within the watershed that indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water, sediment, and contaminants into the channel. Deforestation, cropping, grazing, land drainage, and urbanization are among the land uses that indirectly alter stream processes. An overview of the relative intensity of human impacts to mountain streams is provided by a table summarizing human effects on each of the major mountainous regions with respect to five categories: flow regulation, biotic integrity, water pollution, channel alteration, and land use. This table indicates that very few mountains have streams not at least moderately affected by land use. The least affected mountainous regions are those at very high or very low latitudes, although our scientific ignorance of conditions in low-latitude mountains in particular means that streams in these mountains might be more altered than is widely recognized. Four case studies from northern Sweden (arctic region), Colorado Front Range (semiarid temperate region), Swiss Alps (humid temperate region), and Papua New Guinea (humid tropics) are also used to explore in detail the history and effects on rivers of human activities in mountainous regions. The overview and case studies indicate that mountain streams must be managed with particular attention to upstream/downstream connections, hillslope

  20. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (pbicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required.

  1. Comparison of SAR Analysis on Self Developed Human Head Model with Three Different Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadullah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human brain is the most sensitive part of Human body and SAR analysis is required for every type of antenna close to human body especially near head. Modeling human brain for SAR analysis is dealt in this research work. Various antennas for different frequencies are designed and then SAR is analyzed for each antenna. SAR analysis is compared for FCC standard and ICNIRP Standard for each of the antenna.

  2. Early Results of a Helmetless-Tackling Intervention to Decrease Head Impacts in Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Erik E; Broglio, Steven P; Cook, Summer B; Cantu, Robert C; Ferrara, Michael S; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Myers, Jay L

    2015-12-01

    To test a helmetless-tackling behavioral intervention for reducing head impacts in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football players. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Football field. Fifty collegiate football players (intervention = 25, control = 25). The intervention group participated in a 5-minute tackling drill without their helmets and shoulder pads twice per week in the preseason and once per week through the season. During this time, the control group performed noncontact football skills. Frequency of head impacts was recorded by an impact sensor for each athlete-exposure (AE). Data were tested with a 2 × 3 (group and time) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significant interactions and main effects (P football players within 1 season.

  3. Measurement of head impacts in collegiate football players: clinical measures of concussion after high- and low-magnitude impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Meghan A; Mihalik, Jason P; Crowell, Dean H; Shields, Edgar W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2007-12-01

    It has been speculated that a theoretical injury threshold of 70 to 75 g may exist for concussions in football players. We aimed to investigate acute balance and neurocognitive performance after head impacts exceeding a theoretical injury threshold in the absence of both self-reported symptoms and a concussion diagnosis 24 hours before testing. Forty-three Division I collegiate football players participated in this double-blind, repeated-measures study. Subjects participated in three test sessions (baseline, low impact, and high impact) separated by at least 2 weeks. The Head Impact Telemetry System (Simbex, Lebanon, NH) recorded real-time head impacts sustained during practices and games. The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics assessed neurocognitive performance. The NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test (NeuroCom International Inc., Clackamas, OR) assessed postural stability. The Graded Symptom Checklist evaluated symptom presence and severity in our participants. After the low-impact test session (90 g) with improvements in Math Processing (F(1, 22) = 16.629; P < 0.001), Procedural Reaction Time (F(1, 22) = 14.668; P < 0.001), and the total number of symptoms reported (F(1, 22) = 10.267; P = 0.004). Neurocognitive improvements were likely attributed to a learning effect. Our findings suggest that sustaining an impact greater than 90 g does not result in acute observable balance and neurocognitive deficits within 24 hours of sustaining the impact. Although previous studies have suggested a theoretical injury threshold, none have been founded on empirical data collected on the playing field in real-time. Future studies should consider the cumulative effects of impacts of varying magnitudes.

  4. Analysis of rear-end impact response using mathematical human modeling and volunteer tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Ono, K.; Kaneoka, K.

    2001-01-01

    At TNO multi-directional mathematical human body models have been developed. The objective of this study was to simulate the rigid seat and standard seat JARI rear-impact sled tests using the MADYMO 50th percentile male model. The head and neck response of this human model and the volunteers were co

  5. Head impact accelerations for brain strain-related responses in contact sports: a model-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songbai; Zhao, Wei; Li, Zhigang; McAllister, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Both linear [Formula: see text] and rotational [Formula: see text] accelerations contribute to head impacts on the field in contact sports; however, they are often isolated in injury studies. It is critical to evaluate the feasibility of estimating brain responses using isolated instead of full degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) accelerations. In this study, we investigated the sensitivities of regional brain strain-related responses to resultant [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as well as the relative contributions of these acceleration components to the responses via random sampling and linear regression using parameterized, triangulated head impacts with kinematic variable values based on on-field measurements. Two independently established and validated finite element models of the human head were employed to evaluate model-consistency and dependency in results: the Dartmouth Head Injury Model and Simulated Injury Monitor. For the majority of the brain, volume-weighted regional peak strain, strain rate, and von Mises stress accumulated from the simulation significantly correlated with the product of the magnitude and duration of [Formula: see text], or effectively, the rotational velocity, but not to [Formula: see text]. Responses from [Formula: see text]-only were comparable to the full-DOF counterparts especially when normalized by injury-causing thresholds (e.g., volume fractions of large differences virtually diminished (i.e., [Formula: see text]1 %) at typical difference percentage levels of 1-4 % on average). These model-consistent results support the inclusion of both rotational acceleration magnitude and duration into kinematics-based injury metrics and demonstrate the feasibility of estimating strain-related responses from isolated [Formula: see text] for analyses of strain-induced injury relevant to contact sports without significant loss of accuracy, especially for the cerebrum.

  6. Persistent, Long-term Cerebral White Matter Changes after Sports-Related Repetitive Head Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Janigro, Damir; Rozen, Eric; Roberts, Andrew; Javien, Hannah; Merchant-Borna, Kian; Abar, Beau; Blackman, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Repetitive head impacts (RHI) sustained in contact sports are thought to be necessary for the long-term development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Our objectives were to: 1) characterize the magnitude and persistence of RHI-induced white matter (WM) changes; 2) determine their relationship to kinematic measures of RHI; and 3) explore their clinical relevance. Methods Prospective, observational study of 10 Division III college football players and 5 non-athlete controls during the 2011-12 season. All subjects underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), physiologic, cognitive, and balance testing at pre-season (Time 1), post-season (Time 2), and after 6-months of no-contact rest (Time 3). Head impact measures were recorded using helmet-mounted accelerometers. The percentage of whole-brain WM voxels with significant changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) from Time 1 to 2, and Time 1 to 3 was determined for each subject and correlated to head impacts and clinical measures. Results Total head impacts for the season ranged from 431–1,850. No athlete suffered a clinically evident concussion. Compared to controls, athletes experienced greater changes in FA and MD from Time 1 to 2 as well as Time 1 to 3; most differences at Time 2 persisted to Time 3. Among athletes, the percentage of voxels with decreased FA from Time 1 to 2 was positively correlated with several helmet impact measures. The persistence of WM changes from Time 1 to 3 was also associated with changes in serum ApoA1 and S100B autoantibodies. WM changes were not consistently associated with cognition or balance. Conclusions A single football season of RHIs without clinically-evident concussion resulted in WM changes that correlated with multiple helmet impact measures and persisted following 6 months of no-contact rest. This lack of WM recovery could potentially contribute to cumulative WM changes with subsequent RHI exposures. PMID:24740265

  7. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Andrew; Lee, Daniel J; McMullen, Caitlin; de Almeida, John; Muhanna, Nidal; Gama, Ricardo Ribeiro; Giuliani, Meredith; Liu, Geoffrey; Bratman, Scott V; Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Song, Yuyao; Xu, Wei; Goldstein, David P

    2017-08-01

    Objective To identify any association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and survival outcomes for mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An association has been demonstrated between T2DM and cancer outcomes at numerous sites, but data for the head and neck are limited. Improving our understanding of the impact that diabetes has on head and neck cancer survival is relevant for making treatment decisions and counseling patients regarding prognosis. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic tertiary referral head and neck cancer center. Subjects and Methods By accessing data retrospectively from prospectively collected databases at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, patients were studied who were treated for mucosal head and neck squamous cell cancer between January 2005 and December 2011. Collection of clinical, pathologic, and survival data was completed with an emphasis on T2DM. Results Of 2498 patients identified in the study period, 319 (12.8%) had T2DM. Five-year overall survival was not different between the diabetic (64%, 95% CI = 58%-71%) and nondiabetic (67%, 95% CI = 65%-69%; P = .078) groups. Furthermore, cause-specific survival did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference between groups (diabetic: 84%, 95% CI = 79%-88%, vs nondiabetic: 84%, 95% CI = 82%-86%; P = .67). Conclusion Despite contradictory evidence at other cancer sites, the presence of T2DM alone does not appear to adversely affect cancer survival outcomes in head and neck squamous cell cancer. This is encouraging for the diabetic patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, and it provides guidance for the multidisciplinary team that treats them.

  8. Fall Protection Characteristics of Safety Belts and Human Impact Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yasumichi; Ohdo, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2014-08-23

    Many fatal accidents due to falls from heights have occurred at construction sites not only in Japan but also in other countries. This study aims to determine the fall prevention performance of two types of safety belts: a body belt(1)), which has been used for more than 40 yr in the Japanese construction industry as a general type of safety equipment for fall accident prevention, and a full harness(2, 3)), which has been used in many other countries. To determine human tolerance for impact trauma, this study discusses features of safety belts with reference(4-9)) to relevant studies in the medical science, automobile crash safety, and aircrew safety. For this purpose, simple drop tests were carried out in a virtual workplace to measure impact load, head acceleration, and posture in the experiments, the Hybrid-III pedestrian model(10)) was used as a human dummy. Hybrid-III is typically employed in official automobile crash tests (New Car Assessment Program: NCAP) and is currently recognized as a model that faithfully reproduces dynamic responses. Experimental results shows that safety performance strongly depends on both the variety of safety belts used and the shock absorbers attached onto lanyards. These findings indicate that fall prevention equipment, such as safety belts, lanyards, and shock absorbers, must be improved to reduce impact injuries to the human head and body during falls.

  9. Frequency of head-impact-related outcomes by position in NCAA division I collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Kiernan, Patrick T; Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Montenigro, Philip H; McKee, Ann C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Concussions and subconcussive impacts sustained in American football have been associated with short- and long-term neurological impairment, but differences in head impact outcomes across playing positions are not well understood. The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine has identified playing position as a key risk factor for concussion in football and one for which additional research is needed. This study examined variation in head impact outcomes across primary football playing positions in a group of 730 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Series athletes, using a self-report questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences between position groups in the number of diagnosed concussions during the 2012 football season, there were significant differences between groups in undiagnosed concussions (p=0.008) and "dings" (pfootball season, with offensive linemen reporting significantly more symptoms compared to most other groups. There were also positional differences in frequency of returning to play while symptomatic (p<0.001) and frequency of participating in full-contact practice (p<0.001). Offensive linemen reported having returned to play while experiencing symptoms more frequently and participating in more full-contact practices than other groups. These findings suggest that offensive linemen, a position group that experiences frequent, but low-magnitude, head impacts, develop more postimpact symptoms than other playing positions, but do not report these symptoms as a concussion.

  10. Does soccer headgear attenuate the impact when heading a soccer ball?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naunheim, Rosanne S; Ryden, Amanda; Standeven, John; Genin, Guy; Lewis, Larry; Thompson, Paul; Bayly, Phil

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing concern that repetitive blows to the head, such as those from heading a soccer ball, can cause measurable cognitive impairment. Reducing acceleration of impact could reduce neurologic sequelae. To measure the effectiveness of four different types of soccer headgear in reducing the acceleration of impact. A standard magnesium headform was instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer. A soccer ball was propelled at the headform at three different speeds known to occur in soccer play: 9, 12, and 15 m/sec (20, 26, and 34 mph). The main outcome was the peak acceleration of the headform associated with these impacts with and without protective headgear. Peak accelerations were found in a range from 144 m/s(2) to 289 m/s(2) (14.67-29.5 G, G = 9.81 m/s(2)). Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) methods to compare the headbands and controls, there was no significant difference in the measured accelerations at the center of gravity with or without headgear (p = 0.50). However, the interaction term of headbands, pressure, and speed was significant at F = 5.51 and p = 0.00001. Using contrasts within conditions, some headbands were found to cause a decrease in peak acceleration at the highest speed and pressure. Currently available headgear for soccer heading shows little ability to attenuate impact during simulated soccer heading. However, statistically significant decreases are present at the highest speeds and pressures tested, suggesting the headbands may play a role in decreasing impact for more forceful blows.

  11. The role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Christel Braemer; Buchwald, Christian von

    2010-01-01

    of tobacco and alcohol. Distinct molecular profiles separate them from HPV-negative cancers and show similarities with HPV-positive cervical SCC. There is evidence that HPV-positive HNSCC is a sexually transmitted disease. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC are often diagnosed at a late stage with large cystic......-negative HNSCC, and this seems to be related to the immune system. Whether the new vaccines for HPV will protect not only against cervical cancer but also against HPV-positive HNSCC remains unknown.......Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing awareness of a subset of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC), i.e. HPV-positive HNSCC. These cancers seem to differ somewhat from HPV-negative HNSCC. Patients with HPV-positive HNSCC tend to be younger and have a lower intake...

  12. The nature of human sperm head vacuoles: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitrelle, Florence; Guthauser, Bruno; Alter, Laura; Bailly, Marc; Wainer, Robert; Vialard, François; Albert, Martine; Selva, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) involves the use of differential interference contrast microscopy (also called Nomarski contrast) at high magnification (at least 6300x) to improve the observation of live human spermatozoa. In fact, this technique evidences sperm head vacuoles that are not necessarily seen at lower magnifications - particularly if the vacuoles are small (i.e. occupying nature. In an attempt to clarify this debate, we performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed database was searched from 2001 onwards with the terms "MSOME", "human sperm vacuoles", "high-magnification, sperm". Out of 180 search results, 21 relevant English-language publications on the nature of human sperm head vacuoles were finally selected and reviewed. Our review of the literature prompted us to conclude that sperm-head vacuoles are nuclear in nature and are related to chromatin condensation failure and (in some cases) sperm DNA damage.

  13. The effect of motorcycle helmet fit on estimating head impact kinematics from residual liner crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Stephanie J; Gardiner, John C; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Asfour, Shihab S; Siegmund, Gunter P

    2017-09-01

    Proper helmet fit is important for optimizing head protection during an impact, yet many motorcyclists wear helmets that do not properly fit their heads. The goals of this study are i) to quantify how a mismatch in headform size and motorcycle helmet size affects headform peak acceleration and head injury criteria (HIC), and ii) to determine if peak acceleration, HIC, and impact speed can be estimated from the foam liner's maximum residual crush depth or residual crush volume. Shorty-style helmets (4 sizes of a single model) were tested on instrumented headforms (4 sizes) during linear impacts between 2.0 and 10.5m/s to the forehead region. Helmets were CT scanned to quantify residual crush depth and volume. Separate linear regression models were used to quantify how the response variables (peak acceleration (g), HIC, and impact speed (m/s)) were related to the predictor variables (maximum crush depth (mm), crush volume (cm(3)), and the difference in circumference between the helmet and headform (cm)). Overall, we found that increasingly oversized helmets reduced peak headform acceleration and HIC for a given impact speed for maximum residual crush depths less than 7.9mm and residual crush volume less than 40cm(3). Below these levels of residual crush, we found that peak headform acceleration, HIC, and impact speed can be estimated from a helmet's residual crush. Above these crush thresholds, large variations in headform kinematics are present, possibly related to densification of the foam liner during the impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Human head orientation and eye visibility as indicators of attention for goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; McElligott, Alan G

    2017-01-01

    Animals domesticated for working closely with humans (e.g. dogs) have been shown to be remarkable in adjusting their behaviour to human attentional stance. However, there is little evidence for this form of information perception in species domesticated for production rather than companionship. We tested domestic ungulates (goats) for their ability to differentiate attentional states of humans. In the first experiment, we investigated the effect of body and head orientation of one human experimenter on approach behaviour by goats. Test subjects (N = 24) significantly changed their behaviour when the experimenter turned its back to the subjects, but did not take into account head orientation alone. In the second experiment, goats (N = 24) could choose to approach one of two experimenters, while only one was paying attention to them. Goats preferred to approach humans that oriented their body and head towards the subject, whereas head orientation alone had no effect on choice behaviour. In the third experiment, goats (N = 32) were transferred to a separate test arena and were rewarded for approaching two experimenters providing a food reward during training trials. In subsequent probe test trials, goats had to choose between the two experimenters differing in their attentional states. Like in Experiments 1 and 2, goats did not show a preference for the attentive person when the inattentive person turned her head away from the subject. In this last experiment, goats preferred to approach the attentive person compared to a person who closed their eyes or covered the whole face with a blind. However, goats showed no preference when one person covered only the eyes. Our results show that animals bred for production rather than companionship show differences in their approach and choice behaviour depending on human attentive state. However, our results contrast with previous findings regarding the use of the head orientation to attribute attention and show the importance

  15. Ice hockey shoulder pad design and the effect on head response during shoulder-to-head impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Darrin; Ivarsson, B Johan; Scher, Irving; Hoover, Ryan; Rodowicz, Kathleen; Cripton, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Ice hockey body checks involving direct shoulder-to-head contact frequently result in head injury. In the current study, we examined the effect of shoulder pad style on the likelihood of head injury from a shoulder-to-head check. Shoulder-to-head body checks were simulated by swinging a modified Hybrid-III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) with and without shoulder pads into a stationary Hybrid-III ATD at 21 km/h. Tests were conducted with three different styles of shoulder pads (traditional, integrated and tethered) and without shoulder pads for the purpose of control. Head response kinematics for the stationary ATD were measured. Compared to the case of no shoulder pads, the three different pad styles significantly (p shoulder pads reduced linear head accelerations by an additional 18-21% beyond the other two styles of shoulder pads. The data presented here suggest that shoulder pads can be designed to help protect the head of the struck player in a shoulder-to-head check.

  16. Post-mortem cooling of the human head: an infrared thermology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, A; Williams, R W

    1991-01-01

    The post-mortem cooling of the human head, over the first fifteen hours after death, was measured by infrared thermology. A detailed temperature map of the head and face was obtained by the use of image processing techniques and the cooling behaviour of twelve preselected facial features was observed. The two main findings of the study were a difference in cooling pattern between the upper and the lower part of the head, and a consistency in the cooling pattern of the lower part of the head in all the cases studied. A comparison of various model fits to the raw data was undertaken and the "best" bodies, models and features were determined on a statistical basis. The formula that best fitted the raw data was a novel double application of Newton's law. The features with the least error in data fitting were the chin and zygoma; that with the most error was the mouth.

  17. Sensor and Display Human Factors Based Design Constraints for Head Mounted and Tele-Operation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Etienne-Cummings

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For mobile imaging systems in head mounted displays and tele-operation systems it is important to maximize the amount of visual information transmitted to the human visual system without exceeding its input capacity. This paper aims to describe the design constraints on the imager and display systems of head mounted devices and tele-operated systems based upon the capabilities of the human visual system. We also present the experimental results of methods to improve the amount of visual information conveyed to a user when trying to display a high dynamic range image on a low dynamic range display.

  18. Laboratory Validation of Two Wearable Sensor Systems for Measuring Head Impact Severity in Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Marshall, Stephen W; DeMarco, Alyssa L; Bonin, Stephanie J

    2016-04-01

    Wearable sensors can measure head impact frequency and magnitude in football players. Our goal was to quantify the impact detection rate and validity of the direction and peak kinematics of two wearable sensors: a helmet system (HITS) and a mouthguard system (X2). Using a linear impactor, modified Hybrid-III headform and one helmet model, we conducted 16 impacts for each system at 12 helmet sites and 5 speeds (3.6-11.2 m/s) (N = 896 tests). Peak linear and angular accelerations (PLA, PAA), head injury criteria (HIC) and impact directions from each device were compared to reference sensors in the headform. Both sensors detected ~96% of impacts. Median angular errors for impact directions were 34° for HITS and 16° for X2. PLA, PAA and HIC were simultaneously valid at 2 sites for HITS (side, oblique) and one site for X2 (side). At least one kinematic parameter was valid at 2 and 7 other sites for HITS and X2 respectively. Median relative errors for PLA were 7% for HITS and -7% for X2. Although sensor validity may differ for other helmets and headforms, our analyses show that data generated by these two sensors need careful interpretation.

  19. SAR Simulation with Magneto Chiral Effects for Human Head Radiated from Cellular Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Silva, H.

    2008-09-01

    A numerical method for a microwave signal emitted by a cellular phone, propagating in a magneto-chiral media, characterized by an extended Born-Fedorov formalism, is presented. It is shown that the use of a cell model, combined with a real model of the human head, derived from the magnetic resonance of images allows a good determination of the near fields induced in the head when the brain chirality and the battery magnetic field are considered together. The results on a 2-Dim human head model show the evolution of the specific absorption rate, (SAR coefficient) and the spatial peak specific absorption rate which are sensitives to the magneto-chiral factor, which is important in the brain layer. For GSM/PCN phones, extremely low frequency real pulsed magnetic fields (in the order of 10 to 60 milligauss) are added to the model through the whole of the user's head. The more important conclusion of our work is that the head absorption is bigger than the results for a classical model without the magneto chiral effect. Hot spots are produced due to the combination of microwave and the magnetic field produced by the phone's operation. The FDTD method was used to compute the SARs inside the MRI based head models consisting of various tissues for 1.8 GHz. As a result, we found that in the head model having more than four kinds of tissue, the localized peak SAR reaches maximum inside the head for over five tissues including skin, bone, blood and brain cells.

  20. Where Is Human Evolution Heading?(节选)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nancy Shute

    2008-01-01

    @@ If you judge the progress of humanity by Homer Simpson, Paris Hilton, and Girls Gone Wild videos, you might conclude that our evolution has stalled-or even shifted into reverse. Not so, scientists say.

  1. Covariation between human pelvis shape, stature, and head size alleviates the obstetric dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2015-05-05

    Compared with other primates, childbirth is remarkably difficult in humans because the head of a human neonate is large relative to the birth-relevant dimensions of the maternal pelvis. It seems puzzling that females have not evolved wider pelvises despite the high maternal mortality and morbidity risk connected to childbirth. Despite this seeming lack of change in average pelvic morphology, we show that humans have evolved a complex link between pelvis shape, stature, and head circumference that was not recognized before. The identified covariance patterns contribute to ameliorate the "obstetric dilemma." Females with a large head, who are likely to give birth to neonates with a large head, possess birth canals that are shaped to better accommodate large-headed neonates. Short females with an increased risk of cephalopelvic mismatch possess a rounder inlet, which is beneficial for obstetrics. We suggest that these covariances have evolved by the strong correlational selection resulting from childbirth. Although males are not subject to obstetric selection, they also show part of these association patterns, indicating a genetic-developmental origin of integration.

  2. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  3. Network analysis of human glaucomatous optic nerve head astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Sanjoy K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocyte activation is a characteristic response to injury in the central nervous system, and can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective, while the regulation of both roles remains elusive. Methods To decipher the regulatory elements controlling astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity in glaucoma, we conducted a systems-level functional analysis of gene expression, proteomic and genetic data associated with reactive optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs. Results Our reconstruction of the molecular interactions affected by glaucoma revealed multi-domain biological networks controlling activation of ONHAs at the level of intercellular stimuli, intracellular signaling and core effectors. The analysis revealed that synergistic action of the transcription factors AP-1, vitamin D receptor and Nuclear Factor-kappaB in cross-activation of multiple pathways, including inflammatory cytokines, complement, clusterin, ephrins, and multiple metabolic pathways. We found that the products of over two thirds of genes linked to glaucoma by genetic analysis can be functionally interconnected into one epistatic network via experimentally-validated interactions. Finally, we built and analyzed an integrative disease pathology network from a combined set of genes revealed in genetic studies, genes differentially expressed in glaucoma and closely connected genes/proteins in the interactome. Conclusion Our results suggest several key biological network modules that are involved in regulating neurotoxicity of reactive astrocytes in glaucoma, and comprise potential targets for cell-based therapy.

  4. Linking the Heart and the Head: Humanism and Professionalism in Medical Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Lynda; Loue, Sana; Stange, Kurt C

    2017-05-01

    This paper articulates a practical interpretive framework for understanding humanism in medicine through the lens of how it is taught and learned. Beginning with a search for key tensions and relevant insights in the literature on humanism in health professions education, we synthesized a conceptual model designed to foster reflection and action to realize humanistic principles in medical education and practice. The resulting model centers on the interaction between the heart and the head. The heart represents the emotive domains of empathy, compassion, and connectedness. The head represents the cognitive domains of knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. The cognitive domains often are associated with professionalism, and the emotive domains with humanism, but it is the connection between the two that is vital to humanistic education and practice. The connection between the heart and the head is nurtured by critical reflection and conscious awareness. Four provinces of experience nurture humanism: (1) personal reflection, (2) action, (3) system support, and (4) collective reflection. These domains represent potential levers for developing humanism. Critical reflection and conscious awareness between the heart and head through personal reflection, individual and collective behavior, and supportive systems has potential to foster humanistic development toward healing and health.

  5. The Impact of Reverse Trendelenburg Versus Head-up Position on Intraoperative Bleeding of Elective Rhinoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooraei, Navid; Dabbagh, Ali; Niazi, Feizolah; Mohammadi, Siamak; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Radmand, Golnar; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification) patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ± 13.20 ml) than head-up position (83.33 ± 21.18 ml), although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry. PMID:24498500

  6. The impact of reverse trendelenburg versus head-up position on intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nooraei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several efforts for decreasing blood loss, our experience sometimes shows that some patients bleed more profusely during rhinoplasty. Patient position could have deep impact on bleeding amount during surgical procedures. Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare reverse trendelenburg position and head-up position on intra-operative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. This was to check the effects of reverse trendelenburg position and head up position on the intraoperative bleeding of elective rhinoplasty. Methods: In this study, 30 ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiology physical condition classification patients between 18 and 40 years of age who were candidate to rhinoplasty operations for first time were included. Patients were randomly assigned to reverse trendelenburg or head-up position. Exclusion criteria was any history or lab indicating coagulation problems or using any drug. All gauzes used and the blood that accumulated in the aspirator throughout the operation were calculated. Results: Our results showed that the mean amount of blood loss in reverse trendelenburg was lower (77.00 ΁ 13.20 ml than head-up position (83.33 ΁ 21.18 ml, although, there was no statistical difference between two groups. However, there was no significant differences among two groups in different aspects of hemodynamic determinants and bleeding amount during and after rhinoplasty. Conclusions: Our results showed that patient bleeding is not increased because of positioning per se. In conclusion, perhaps in the future reverse trendelenburg will be given more often during rhinoplasry.

  7. Estimating Contact Exposure in Football Using the Head Impact Exposure Estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Littleton, Ashley C; Cox, Leah M; DeFreese, J D; Varangis, Eleanna; Lynall, Robert C; Schmidt, Julianne D; Marshall, Stephen W; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2015-07-15

    Over the past decade, there has been significant debate regarding the effect of cumulative subconcussive head impacts on short and long-term neurological impairment. This debate remains unresolved, because valid epidemiological estimates of athletes' total contact exposure are lacking. We present a measure to estimate the total hours of contact exposure in football over the majority of an athlete's lifespan. Through a structured oral interview, former football players provided information related to primary position played and participation in games and practice contacts during the pre-season, regular season, and post-season of each year of their high school, college, and professional football careers. Spring football for college was also included. We calculated contact exposure estimates for 64 former football players (n = 32 college football only, n = 32 professional and college football). The head impact exposure estimate (HIEE) discriminated between individuals who stopped after college football, and individuals who played professional football (p < 0.001). The HIEE measure was independent of concussion history (p = 0.82). Estimating total hours of contact exposure may allow for the detection of differences between individuals with variation in subconcussive impacts, regardless of concussion history. This measure is valuable for the surveillance of subconcussive impacts and their associated potential negative effects.

  8. A computational study of influence of helmet padding materials on the human brain under ballistic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi Jazi, Mehdi; Rezaei, Asghar; Karami, Ghodrat; Azarmi, Fardad; Ziejewski, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The results of a computational study of a helmeted human head are presented in this paper. The focus of the work is to study the effects of helmet pad materials on the level of acceleration, inflicted pressure and shear stress in a human brain model subjected to a ballistic impact. Four different closed cell foam materials, made of expanded polystyrene and expanded polypropylene, are examined for the padding material. It is assumed that bullets cannot penetrate the helmet shell. Finite element modelling of the helmet, padding system, head and head components is used for this dynamic nonlinear analysis. Appropriate contacts and conditions are applied between the different components of the head, as well as between the head and the pads, and the pads and the helmet. Based on the results of simulations in this work, it is concluded that the stiffness of the foam has a prominent role in reducing the level of the transferred load to the brain. A pad that is less stiff is more efficient in absorbing the impact energy and reducing the sudden acceleration of the head and consequently lowers the brain injury level. Using the pad with the least stiffness, the influence of the angle of impacts as well as the locations of the ballistic strike is studied.

  9. Muecas: a multi-sensor robotic head for affective human robot interaction and imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Felipe; Moreno, Jose; Bustos, Pablo; Núñez, Pedro

    2014-04-28

    This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, including eyes, eyebrows, mouth and neck, and has been designed and built entirely by IADeX (Engineering, Automation and Design of Extremadura) and RoboLab. A detailed description of its kinematics is provided along with the design of the most complex controllers. Muecas can be directly controlled by FACS (Facial Action Coding System), the de facto standard for facial expression recognition and synthesis. This feature facilitates its use by third party platforms and encourages the development of imitation and of goal-based systems. Imitation systems learn from the user, while goal-based ones use planning techniques to drive the user towards a final desired state. To show the flexibility and reliability of the robotic head, the paper presents a software architecture that is able to detect, recognize, classify and generate facial expressions in real time using FACS. This system has been implemented using the robotics framework, RoboComp, which provides hardware-independent access to the sensors in the head. Finally, the paper presents experimental results showing the real-time functioning of the whole system, including recognition and imitation of human facial expressions.

  10. Muecas: A Multi-Sensor Robotic Head for Affective Human Robot Interaction and Imitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a multi-sensor humanoid robotic head for human robot interaction. The design of the robotic head, Muecas, is based on ongoing research on the mechanisms of perception and imitation of human expressions and emotions. These mechanisms allow direct interaction between the robot and its human companion through the different natural language modalities: speech, body language and facial expressions. The robotic head has 12 degrees of freedom, in a human-like configuration, including eyes, eyebrows, mouth and neck, and has been designed and built entirely by IADeX (Engineering, Automation and Design of Extremadura and RoboLab. A detailed description of its kinematics is provided along with the design of the most complex controllers. Muecas can be directly controlled by FACS (Facial Action Coding System, the de facto standard for facial expression recognition and synthesis. This feature facilitates its use by third party platforms and encourages the development of imitation and of goal-based systems. Imitation systems learn from the user, while goal-based ones use planning techniques to drive the user towards a final desired state. To show the flexibility and reliability of the robotic head, the paper presents a software architecture that is able to detect, recognize, classify and generate facial expressions in real time using FACS. This system has been implemented using the robotics framework, RoboComp, which provides hardware-independent access to the sensors in the head. Finally, the paper presents experimental results showing the real-time functioning of the whole system, including recognition and imitation of human facial expressions.

  11. The impact of comorbidity on outcome in 12 623 Danish head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl; Dalton, Susanne O; Grønborg, Therese K

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is primarily caused by smoking and alcohol. Besides having a carcinogenic effect, smoking also leads to other diseases and thus contributes to a high prevalence of comorbidities among HNSCC patients. Furthermore, the world population is becoming older...... resulting in more elderly patients with HNSCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of comorbidity in a retrospective nationwide population-based study of all Danish HNSCC patients diagnosed from 1992 to 2008.......Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is primarily caused by smoking and alcohol. Besides having a carcinogenic effect, smoking also leads to other diseases and thus contributes to a high prevalence of comorbidities among HNSCC patients. Furthermore, the world population is becoming older...

  12. Glucocorticoids Significantly Influence the Transcriptome of Bone Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Human Femoral Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Sheng Yu; Wan-Shou Guo; Li-Ming Cheng; Yu-Feng Lu; Jian-Ying Shen; Ping Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Appropriate expression and regulation of the transcriptome,which mainly comprise ofmRNAs and lncRNAs,are important for all biological and cellular processes including the physiological activities of bone microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs).Through an intricate intracellular signaling systems,the transcriptome regulates the pharmacological response of the cells.Although studies have elucidated the impact of glucocorticoids (GCs) cell-specific gene expression signatures,it remains necessary to comprehensively characterize the impact of lncRNAs to transcriptional changes.Methods:BMECs were divided into two groups.One was treated with GCs and the other left untreated as a paired control.Differential expression was analyzed with GeneSpring software V12.0 (Agilent,Santa Clara,CA,USA) and hierarchical clustering was conducted using Cluster 3.0 software.The Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was performed with Molecular Annotation System provided by CapitalBio Corporation.Results:Our results highlight the involvement of genes implicated in development,differentiation and apoptosis following GC stimulation.Elucidation of differential gene expression emphasizes the importance of regulatory gene networks induced by GCs.We identified 73 up-regulated and 166 down-regulated long noncoding RNAs,the expression of 107 of which significantly correlated with 172 mRNAs induced by hydrocortisone.Conclusions:Transcriptome analysis of BMECs from human samples was performed to identify specific gene networks induced by GCs.Our results identified complex RNA crosstalk underlying the pathogenesis of steroid-induced necrosis of femoral head.

  13. Realistic numerical modelling of human head tissue exposure to electromagnetic waves from cellular phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarella, Gilles; Clatz, Olivier; Lanteri, Stéphane; Beaume, Grégory; Oudot, Steve; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Piperno, Sergo; Joly, Patrick; Wiart, Joe

    2006-06-01

    The ever-rising diffusion of cellular phones has brought about an increased concern for the possible consequences of electromagnetic radiation on human health. Possible thermal effects have been investigated, via experimentation or simulation, by several research projects in the last decade. Concerning numerical modeling, the power absorption in a user's head is generally computed using discretized models built from clinical MRI data. The vast majority of such numerical studies have been conducted using Finite Differences Time Domain methods, although strong limitations of their accuracy are due to heterogeneity, poor definition of the detailed structures of head tissues (staircasing effects), etc. In order to propose numerical modeling using Finite Element or Discontinuous Galerkin Time Domain methods, reliable automated tools for the unstructured discretization of human heads are also needed. Results presented in this article aim at filling the gap between human head MRI images and the accurate numerical modeling of wave propagation in biological tissues and its thermal effects. To cite this article: G. Scarella et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  14. HEADING RECOVERY FROM OPTIC FLOW: COMPARING PERFORMANCE OF HUMANS AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Foulkes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human observers can perceive their direction of heading with a precision of about a degree. Several computational models of the processes underpinning the perception of heading have been proposed. In the present study we set out to assess which of four candidate models best captured human performance; the four models we selected reflected key differences in terms of approach and methods to modelling optic flow processing to recover movement parameters. We first generated a performance profile for human observers by measuring how performance changed as we systematically manipulated both the quantity (number of dots in the stimulus per frame and quality (amount of 2D directional noise of the flow field information. We then generated comparable performance profiles for the four candidate models. Models varied markedly in terms of both their performance and similarity to human data. To formally assess the match between the models and human performance we regressed the output of each of the four models against human performance data. We were able to rule out two models that produced very different performance profiles to human observers. The remaining two shared some similarities with human performance profiles in terms of the magnitude and pattern of thresholds. However none of the models tested could capture all aspect of the human data.

  15. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Allie K. [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wise-Draper, Trisha M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Wells, Susanne I., E-mail: Susanne.Wells@cchmc.org [Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allie K. Adams

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  17. Climate Impacts on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more rapidly in warm environments. These diseases can cause gastrointestinal distress and, in severe cases, death. [1] Practices to safeguard food can help avoid these illnesses even as the climate changes. Climate change will have a variety of impacts ...

  18. Interaction of Blast and Head Impact in the Generation of Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    supported during the acceleration phase in order to eliminate the neck flexion /extension prior to impact. The NDTs were implanted into two columns...al. (1999). Relationship Between Localized Spine Deformation and Cervical Vertebral Motions for Low Speed Rear Impacts Using Human Volunteers. In: Ir

  19. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties....... This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions...

  20. Multivariate head injury threshold measures for various sized children seated behind vehicle seats in rear impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saczalski, Kenneth; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam; Pozzi, Mark; Saczalski, Todd; Burton, J L; Lewis, P

    2004-01-01

    Government recommendations to place children into the rear areas of motor vehicles to avoid airbag induced injuries have been complicated by the fact that most adult occupied front seats will collapse into the rear area during rear-impacts, and thus pose another potentially serious injury hazard to rear-seated children. Many variables affect whether or not a front seat occupant will collapse into the rear child, and whether that interaction could be injurious to the child. For instance, the severity of rear impact, coupled with front and rear occupant sizes (mass and stature), and the level of front seat strength, all interrelate to influence whether or not a rear seated child is likely to be impacted and possibly injured. The most common types of child injuries in these instances are head and chest injuries. In this study, a "high-low" experimental method was employed with a multi-level "factorial analysis" technique to study "multivariate" biomechanics of child head injury potential determined from rear-seated 3 and 6 year-old child surrogates in different types of vehicle bodies mounted to a sled system. The sled-buck systems were towed rearward into crushable barriers that matched the crash pulses of the vehicle types being tested. Various sizes of adult surrogates (i.e. 50 kg up to 110 kg), seated in both the "typical" low strength "single recliner" collapsing type front seat (i.e. 3.2 kN) and a much stronger "belt-integrated" seat design (i.e. up to 14.5 kN), were tested in the two different "sled body-buck" set-ups at various impact levels (i.e. 22.5 to 50 kph). One set-up used a popular minivan vehicle body with "built-in booster" seats for the 3 year-old. The other used a 4-door family sedan vehicle body with the 6 year-old in a standard rear bench seat. The parameters of the tests enabled the experimental data to be combined into polynomial "head injury" functions of the independent variables so the "likelihood" of rear child head-injury potential could

  1. Quantitative relationship between axonal injury and mechanical response in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-09-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R(2)=0.612, plinear and angular acceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height.

  2. Cumulative human impacts on marine predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Sara M; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Stressors associated with human activities interact in complex ways to affect marine ecosystems, yet we lack spatially explicit assessments of cumulative impacts on ecologically and economically key components such as marine predators. Here we develop a metric of cumulative utilization and impact...

  3. Impact of genetic targets on therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Goldenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the mortality from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly. Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by tobacco use, alcohol consumption and infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus. It is the 6th most common cancer in the world, with upwards of 45,000 new cases reported yearly in the United States alone.In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of head and neck cancer, shedding light on the unexpected heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic analysis has led to new classification schemes for HNSCC, with different subgroups exhibiting different prognoses. In addition, multiple targets in aberrant signaling pathways have been identified using increasingly sophisticated bio-informatics tools. Advances in technology have allowed for novel delivery mechanisms to introduce genetic material into cells to produce a therapeutic effect by targeting cancer cells via a number of different approaches.A pressing need to develop novel therapies to augment current treatment modalities has led to a number of translational studies involving gene therapy in the treatment of HNSCC. This article will focus on a review of the most recent developments in molecular biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in regards to possible targets for gene therapy, as well as the array of novel therapeutic strategies directed at these targets.

  4. A Method for Head-shoulder Segmentation and Human Facial Feature Positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of head-shoulder segmentation and human facial feature allocation for videotelephone application. Utilizing the characteristic of multi-resolution processing of human eyes, analyzing the edge information of only a single frame in different frequency bands, this method can automatically perform head-shoulder segmentation and locate the facial feature regions (eyes, mouth, etc.) with rather high precision, simple and fast computation. Therefore, this method makes the 3-D model automatic adaptation and 3-D motion estimation possible. However, this method may fail while processing practical images with a complex background. Then it is preferable to use some pre-known information and multi-frame joint processing.

  5. A multi-tissue segmentation of the human head for detailed computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Markus; Narra, Nathaniel; Onnela, Niina; Dastidar, Prasun; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of an anatomically detailed high resolution model of the human head based on the Visible Human Female data from the National Library of Medicine archives. Automatic and semi-automatic segmentation algorithms were applied over the 3 image volumes – CT, MRI and anatomical cryo-sections of the cadaver – to label a total of 23 tissues. The results were combined to create a labeled volume of the head with voxel dimensions of 0.33×0.33×0.33 mm. The individual label matrices and their corresponding surface meshes are made available to be used freely. The detailed blood vessel network and ocular tissues will be of interest in computational modelling and simulation studies.

  6. Ovicidal Efficacy of Abametapir Against Eggs of Human Head and Body Lice (Anoplura: Pediculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Vernon M; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Barker, Stephen C; Tran, Christopher; Rhodes, Christopher; Clark, Marshall J

    2017-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the ovicidal efficacy of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridyl (abametapir) against eggs of both human head and body lice. Head lice eggs of different ages (0-2, 3-5, and 6-8-d-old eggs) were exposed to varying concentrations of abametapir in isopropanol and concentration-dependent response relationships established based on egg hatch. One hundred percent of all abametapir-treated eggs failed to hatch at the 0.74 and 0.55% concentrations, whereas 100% of 6-8-d-old head louse eggs failed to hatch only at the 0.74% concentration. The LC50 value for abametapir varied, depending on the age of the head lice eggs, from ∼0.10% recorded for 0-2-d-old eggs and increasing to ∼0.15% for 6-8-d-old eggs. Abametapir was also evaluated once formulated into a lotion referred to as Xeglyze (0.74% abametapir) and serial dilutions made. Ovicidal efficacies were determined against head lice eggs 0-8-d-old. Results indicated 100% ovicidal activity at the 0.74, 0.55, 0.37, and 0.18% concentrations. Additional studies undertaken using body lice eggs also demonstrated that abametapir was 100% ovicidal against eggs of all ages when evaluated at a concentration of 0.37 and 0.55%. Given that ovicidal activity is a critical component of any effective treatment regime for louse control, the data presented in this study clearly demonstrate the ability of abametapir to inhibit hatching of both head and body louse eggs as assessed in vitro.

  7. The rate of change of acceleration: implications to head kinematics during rear-end impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Loriann M; Dickey, James P

    2008-05-01

    Whiplash is a mechanism of injury commonly associated with rear-impact vehicle collisions. To date, research has focused primarily on changes in velocity and acceleration as key factors for determining injuries due to whiplash mechanisms, but other characteristics of the acceleration pulse may be important. This study assessed whether the head acceleration response to whiplash-like perturbation profiles were affected by a change in the rate of the applied acceleration, or jerk. Twenty-one subjects were exposed to different low-velocity rear-impact whiplash-like perturbations using a precisely controlled robotic platform. The perturbations were divided into two groupings of peak acceleration (approximately 10 (high) and 5.7 (low) m/s2) and three groupings of jerk (approximately 260, 310, and 360 m/s3). These six profiles were repeated twice. Results demonstrated that the jerk magnitude significantly affected forehead acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. Increasing the magnitude of the platform acceleration also differentially affected the horizontal and vertical forehead accelerations. This indicates that the level of jerk influences the resulting head kinematics and should be considered when designing or interpreting experiments that are attempting to predict injury from whiplash-like perturbations.

  8. A novel device for head gesture measurement system in combination with eye-controlled human machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Ho, Chien-Wa; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Hung, San-Shan; Shei, Hung-Jung; Yeh, Mau-Shiun

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the design and combination of an eye-controlled and a head-controlled human-machine interface system. This system is a highly effective human-machine interface, detecting head movement by changing positions and numbers of light sources on the head. When the users utilize the head-mounted display to browse a computer screen, the system will catch the images of the user's eyes with CCD cameras, which can also measure the angle and position of the light sources. In the eye-tracking system, the program in the computer will locate each center point of the pupils in the images, and record the information on moving traces and pupil diameters. In the head gesture measurement system, the user wears a double-source eyeglass frame, so the system catches images of the user's head by using a CCD camera in front of the user. The computer program will locate the center point of the head, transferring it to the screen coordinates, and then the user can control the cursor by head motions. We combine the eye-controlled and head-controlled human-machine interface system for the virtual reality applications.

  9. Natural Resources and Human Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkel, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    It is rotational movement of the Earth that decides on the climatic zonation of natural resources, as modified by the positions of the continents and oceans and the irregular spread of fossil fuels. Intensive human activity poses threats to the development of natural geoecosystems. The last century also brought growing civilizational threats to the environment on the global, regional and local scales. The author characterise the prospects in regard to global changes, and discuss the solutions needing to be pursued if human geoecosystems are to be protected (through management and education).

  10. IMPACT OF MANAGERIAL SKILLS LEARNT THROUGH MA EDUCATIONAL PLANNING MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME OF AIOU ON THE PERFORMANCE OF INSTITUTIONAL HEADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif CHUADHRY

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Management provides formal coordination in an organization for achieving pre-determined goals. The educational manager particulary performs his duties by using different planning and management techniques. These techniques are equally important for the manager of other sectors. The present study was focused on the impact of managerial skills learnt through MA EPM programme on the performance of the heads. Following were the objectives of the study .to assess the contribution of the programme towards the learning of the heads of educational institutions. Ø To identify the managerial skills and competencies of Educational Managers and heads trained through EPPSL Department of the Allama Iqbal Open University. Ø (ii To evaluate the effectiveness of the programme and its impact on the skills of the MA EPM graduates. Ø (iii To analyze the performance of EPM graduates working as heads in their respective institutions.A questionnaire for graduates was developed for those working as institutional heads in Rawalpindi and Islamabad. There were 58 educational institutionl heads who have their master degree in EPM .The data obtained was organized, tabulated, and analyzed by using descriptive statistics means of percentage method in numbers of tables in order to find out the impact of the skills of the MA EPM programme. The finding and conclusions of the data indicated that the impact of the skills on their performance. Majority of the heads were agreed that the programme was beneficial for them. It was recommended on the basis of the conclusions that the selection of the resource person should be on merit; quality of books might be improved; and there should be a separate course for educational budgeting. It was also recommended that this programme should be compulsory for the institutional heads. There might be upgradation of the course.

  11. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Papademetris, Xenophon; Tucker, Don M

    2016-01-01

    BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM) or finite element model (FEM) created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG) measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa). BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  12. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM or finite element model (FEM created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa. BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  13. Retrieval and Clustering from a 3D Human Database based on Body and Head Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Godil, Afzal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a framework for similarity based retrieval and clustering from a 3D human database. Our technique is based on both body and head shape representation and the retrieval is based on similarity of both of them. The 3D human database used in our study is the CAESAR anthropometric database which contains approximately 5000 bodies. We have developed a web-based interface for specifying the queries to interact with the retrieval system. Our approach performs the similarity based retrieval in a reasonable amount of time and is a practical approach.

  14. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V.; Burk, Robert D.; Prystowsky, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas to a “gold standard” human papillomavirus PCR assay. One hundred-and-ten prospectively collected, formalin fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarrays and tested for human papillomavirus DNA by in-situ hybridization with two probe sets: a biotinylated probe for high-risk human papillomavirus types 16/18 (Dako, CA), and a probe cocktail for 16/18 plus 10 additional high-risk types (Ventana, AZ). P16INK4 expression was also assessed using a Pharmingen immuno-histochemistry antibody (BD Biosciences, CA). Tissue microarrays were stained and scored at expert laboratories. Human papillomavirus DNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR using Gold AmpliTaq and dot-blot hybridization on matched fresh frozen specimens in a research laboratory. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7-RNA expression was also measured using RT-PCR. Test performance was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. High-risk human papillomavirus DNA types 16, 18 and 35 were detected by MY-PCR in 28% of tumors, with the majority (97%) testing positive for type 16. Compared to MY-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity for high-risk human papillomavirus DNA detection with Dako in-situ hybridization was 21% (95%CI:7–42) and 100% (95%CI:93–100), respectively. Corresponding test results by Ventana in-situ hybridization were 59% (95%CI:39–78) and 58% (95%CI:45–71), respectively. P16 immuno-histochemistry performed better overall than Dako (p=0.042) and Ventana (p=0.055), with a sensitivity of 52% (95%CI:32–71) and specificity of 93% (95%CI:84–98). Compared to a gold standard human papillomavirus PCR assays, HPV detection by in-situ hybridization was

  15. Human brain factor 1, a new member of the fork head gene family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, D.B.; Wiese, S.; Burfeind, P. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Goettingen (Germany)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Analysis of cDNA clones that cross-hybridized with the fork head domain of the rat HNF-3 gene family revealed 10 cDNAs from human fetal brain and human testis cDNA libraries containing this highly conserved DNA-binding domain. Three of these cDNAs (HFK1, HFK2, and HFK3) were further analyzed. The cDNA HFK1 has a length of 2557 nucleotides and shows strong homology at the nucleotide level (91.2%) to brain factor 1 (BF-1) from rat. The HFK1 cDNA codes for a putative 476 amino acid protein. The homology to BF-1 from rat in the coding region at the amino acid level is 87.5%. The fork head homologous region includes 111 amino acids starting at amino acid 160 and has a 97.5% homology to BF-1. Southern hybridization revealed that HFK1 is highly conserved among mammalian species and possibly birds. Northern analysis with total RNA from human tissues and poly(A)-rich RNA from mouse revealed a 3.2-kb transcript that is present in human and mouse fetal brain and in adult mouse brain. In situ hybridization with sections of mouse embryo and human fetal brain reveals that HFK1 expression is restricted to the neuronal cells in the telencepthalon, with strong expression being observed in the developing dentate gyrus and hippocampus. HFK1 was chromosomally localized by in situ hybridization to 14q12. The cDNA clones HFK2 and HFK3 were analyzed by restriction analysis and sequencing. HFK2 and HFK3 were found to be closely related but different from HFK1. Therefore, it would appear that HFK1, HFK2, HFK3, and BF-1 form a new fork head related subfamily. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  16. The influence of head and body tilt on human fore-aft translation perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Benjamin T.

    2016-01-01

    The tilt-translation ambiguity occurs because acceleration due to translation cannot be differentiated from gravitational acceleration. Head tilt can occur independent of body tilt which further complicates the problem. The tilt-translation ambiguity is examined for fore-aft (surge) translation with head and/or body orientations that are tilted in pitch 10° forward or backward. Eleven human subjects (6 female), mean age 40 years participated. Conditions included no tilt (NT), head and body tilt (HBT), head only tilt (HOT), and body only tilt (BOT). The fore-aft stimulus consisted of a 2s (0.5 Hz) sine wave in acceleration which a maximum peak velocity of 10 cm/s. After each stimulus the subject reported the direction of motion as forward or backward. Subsequent stimuli were adjusted to determine the point at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction. During the HBT responses were biased such that upward pitch caused a neutral stimulus to be more likely to be perceived as forward and downward pitch caused the stimulus to be more likely to be perceived as backward. The difference in the point of subjective equality based on the direction of tilt was 3.3 cm/s. During the BOT condition the bias with respect to the direction of body tilt was in a similar direction with a difference in PSE 1.6 cm/s. During HOT and NT there was no significant bias on fore-aft perception. These findings demonstrate that body tilt shifts the PSE of fore-aft direction discrimination while head tilt has no influence. PMID:25160866

  17. Survival of patients with head and neck cancer. Impact of physical status and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, F; Wienke, A; Dunst, J; Kuhnt, T

    2012-01-01

    Prognostic factors (e.g., gender, tumor stage, and hypoxia) have an impact on survival in patients with head and neck cancer. Thus, the impact of physical status and comorbidities on treatment decision and survival were evaluated. A total of 169 primary, inoperable patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were retrospectively investigated. Patients were treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radio(chemo)therapy (HARcT) or hypofractionated radio(chemo)therapy (HypoRcT). Depending on the individual patient's situation (Karnofsky Performance Index, KPI), treatment for patients with a KPI of 80-100% was generally radiochemotherapy and for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% treatment was radiotherapy alone. In addition, all comorbidities were evaluated. Uni- and multivariate proportional hazards model were used, and overall survival (OS) was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Treatment consisted of HARcT for 76 patients (45%), HART for 28 patients (17%), HypoRcT for 14 patients(8%), and HypoRT for 51 patients (30%). Of the patients, 107 patients (63%) presented with a KPI of 80-100%. OS (20%) was significantly better for patients with a KPI of 80-100%, while the OS for patients with a KPI ≤ 70% was 8% (p KPI, total irradiation dose (> 70 Gy), and chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for better OS. Our retrospective analysis shows that performance status with dependency on comorbidities was an independent risk factor for OS.

  18. Instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for head impacts in amateur rugby union players over a season of matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria A; Brughelli, Matt; Gissane, Conor

    2015-03-01

    Direct impacts with the head (linear acceleration or pressure) and inertial loading of the head (rotational acceleration or strain) have been postulated as the 2 major mechanisms of head-related injuries such as concussion. Although data are accumulating for soccer and American football, there are no published data for nonhelmeted collision sports such as rugby union. To quantify head impacts via instrumented mouthguard acceleration analyses for rugby union players over a season of matches. Descriptive epidemiology study. Data on impact magnitude and frequency were collected with molded instrumented mouthguards worn by 38 premier amateur senior rugby players participating in the 2013 domestic season of matches. A total of 20,687 impacts >10g (range, 10.0-164.9g) were recorded over the duration of the study. The mean ± SD number of impacts per player over the duration of the season of matches was 564 ± 618, resulting in a mean ± SD of 95 ± 133 impacts to the head per player, per match over the duration of the season of matches. The impact magnitudes for linear accelerations were skewed to the lower values (Sp = 3.7 ± 0.02; P rugby union players over a season of matches, measured via instrumented mouthguard accelerations, were higher than for most sports previously reported. Mean linear acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to the mean linear accelerations previously reported for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but lower than that for female youth soccer players. Mean rotational acceleration measured over a season of matches was similar to mean rotational accelerations for youth, high school, and collegiate American football players but less than those for female youth soccer players, concussed American collegiate players, collegiate American football players, and professional American football players. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  20. No impact of early intervention on late outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heskestad, Ben; Waterloo, Knut; Baardsen, Roald

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury.......To evaluate the effect of an educational intervention on outcome after minimal, mild and moderate head injury....

  1. China in Africa: The Human Rights Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Bennett (Clare); S. McCann (S.); B. Radley (Ben)

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This report examines the practical impact of Chinese investment on human rights in Africa, in order to assess how the positive effects of China in Africa can be maximised and how the negative effects – which have the potential to be particularly damaging in states

  2. China in Africa: The Human Rights Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Bennett (Clare); S. McCann (S.); B. Radley (Ben)

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This report examines the practical impact of Chinese investment on human rights in Africa, in order to assess how the positive effects of China in Africa can be maximised and how the negative effects – which have the potential to be particularly damaging in states that

  3. Humans and Their Impact on Cyber Agility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ends. It is a closed circuit. Within C2, the major loop is called the MAPE (Monitor-Assess-Plan-Execute) which is used to create an Air Tasking...overall MAPE process. Some examples of “loops” are: Humans and Their Impact on Cyber Agility    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited

  4. A morphological study on femoral heads in human hip joint osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, S; Pannarale, L; Braidotti, P; Marinozzi, A; Gaudio, E

    1996-01-01

    Several pathogenetical and clinical interpretation of osteoarthritic modifications are given in the literature. In this work we tried to compare in humans macroscopic, structural and ultrastructural observations on eight osteoarthritic with four femural heads from control patients. The sample for Light Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy observations came from selected regions of the femural head, which included both cartilage and bone tissue of loaded and unloaded regions. The cartilage showed superficial lesions, such as erosions and fissures, and deep lesions that included matrix alterations and chondrocyte proliferation. In relation to the thickening of the subchondral bone we noticed an irregular bone-cartilage surface with signs of bone tissue proliferation. The trabeculae appeared thickened in loaded zones and rarefied in unloaded ones. Cavities were sometimes present at different depths in cancellous bone. Our observations allow us to conclude that cartilage lesions are precocious, diffusely located and relatively independent of the considered zone of the femural head, while bone tissue alterations seem evenly sited and chronologically subsequent. The cavities in the cancellous bone could produce load modifications and consequent bone deformity.

  5. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleli Tôrres Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX, of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects.

  6. Fuzzy Integral-Based Gaze Control of a Robotic Head for Human Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Bum-Soo; Kim, Jong-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    During the last few decades, as a part of effort to enhance natural human robot interaction (HRI), considerable research has been carried out to develop human-like gaze control. However, most studies did not consider hardware implementation, real-time processing, and the real environment, factors that should be taken into account to achieve natural HRI. This paper proposes a fuzzy integral-based gaze control algorithm, operating in real-time and the real environment, for a robotic head. We formulate the gaze control as a multicriteria decision making problem and devise seven human gaze-inspired criteria. Partial evaluations of all candidate gaze directions are carried out with respect to the seven criteria defined from perceived visual, auditory, and internal inputs, and fuzzy measures are assigned to a power set of the criteria to reflect the user defined preference. A fuzzy integral of the partial evaluations with respect to the fuzzy measures is employed to make global evaluations of all candidate gaze directions. The global evaluation values are adjusted by applying inhibition of return and are compared with the global evaluation values of the previous gaze directions to decide the final gaze direction. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated with a robotic head, developed in the Robot Intelligence Technology Laboratory at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, through three interaction scenarios and three comparison scenarios with another algorithm.

  7. Studies on Human Head Louse Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura) Infestation (Case Report)

    OpenAIRE

    HATSUSHIKA, Ryo; MIYOSHI, Kaoru

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen cases of the human head louse infestation (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, 1778) in Okayama City were reported. All the patients were found in ages between 2 and 35, and the highest incidence ranged in the age group of 10 years old and younger. The sex ratio of the patients was higher in female than in male. The patients were recognized more often in the early winter months of November and December. Adults and/or eggs (nits) of Pediculus louse were localized on hair of all the pat...

  8. Do crash helmets retain their position on the head in case of an impact ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beusenberg, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    This report gives the description and results of three sled tests with each four dummy heads, to record the behaviour of the head and neck of the dummy and the helmet in case of a simulated accident. The simulated accident resulted in a motions of the head, neck and helmet owing to the effects of in

  9. Modelling and assessment of the electric field strength caused by mobile phone to the human head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckus Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Electromagnetic field exposure is the one of the most important physical agents that actively affects live organisms and environment. Active use of mobile phones influences the increase of electromagnetic field radiation. The aim of the study was to measure and assess the electric field strength caused by mobile phones to the human head. Methods. In this paper the software “COMSOL Multiphysics” was used to establish the electric field strength created by mobile phones around the head. Results. The second generation (2G Global System for Mobile (GSM phones that operate in the frequency band of 900 MHz and reach the power of 2 W have a stronger electric field than (2G GSM mobile phones that operate in the higher frequency band of 1,800 MHz and reach the power up to 1 W during conversation. The third generation of (3G UMTS smart phones that effectively use high (2,100 MHz radio frequency band emit the smallest electric field strength values during conversation. The highest electric field strength created by mobile phones is around the ear, i.e. the mobile phone location. The strength of mobile phone electric field on the phantom head decreases exponentially while moving sidewards from the center of the effect zone (the ear, and constitutes 1-12% of the artificial head’s surface. Conclusion. The highest electric field strength values of mobile phones are associated with their higher power, bigger specific energy absorption rate (SAR and lower frequency of mobile phone. The stronger electric field emitted by the more powerful mobile phones takes a higher percentage of the head surface. The highest electric field strength created by mobile phones is distributed over the user ear.

  10. Impact of sentinel node status and other risk factors on the clinical outcome of head and neck melanoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leong, SPL; Accortt, NA; Essner, R; Ross, M; Gershenwald, JE; Pockaj, B; Hoekstra, HJ; Garberoglio, C; White, RL; Biel, M; Charney, K; Wanebo, H; Avisar, E; Vetto, J; Soong, SJ

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of sentinel lymph node (SLN) status and other risk factors on recurrence and overall survival in head and neck melanoma patients. Design: The SLN Working Group, based in San Francisco, Calif, with its 11 member centers, the John Wayne Cancer Institute, and The Univ

  11. Altered Blood Biomarker Profiles in Athletes with a History of Repetitive Head Impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex P Di Battista

    Full Text Available The long-term health effects of concussion and sub-concussive impacts in sport are unknown. Growing evidence suggests both inflammation and neurodegeneration are pivotal to secondary injury processes and the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we characterized circulating brain injury and inflammatory mediators in healthy male and female athletes according to concussion history and collision sport participation. Eighty-seven university level athletes (male, n = 60; female, n = 27 were recruited before the start of the competitive season. Athletes were healthy at the time of the study (no medications, illness, concussion or musculoskeletal injuries. Dependent variables included 29 inflammatory and 10 neurological injury analytes assessed in the peripheral blood by immunoassay. Biomarkers were statistically evaluated using partial least squares multivariate analysis to identify possible relationships to self-reported previous concussion history, number of previous concussions and collision sport participation in male and female athletes. Multiple concussions were associated with increases in peripheral MCP-1 in females, and MCP-4 in males. Collision sport participation was associated with increases in tau levels in males. These results are consistent with previous experimental and clinical findings that suggest ongoing inflammatory and cerebral injury processes after repetitive mild head trauma. However, further validation is needed to correlate systemic biomarkers to repetitive brain impacts, as opposed to the extracranial effects common to an athletic population such as exercise and muscle damage.

  12. Head size may modify the impact of white matter lesions on dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Ingmar; Olesen, Pernille J; Blennow, Kaj; Palmertz, Bo; Johnson, Sterling C; Bigler, Erin D

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to examine whether total intracranial volume (TICV), a marker of premorbid brain size, modified the impact of the apolipoprotein E (apoE) e4 phenotype and ischemic white matter lesions (WMLs) on odds for dementia. The study comprised a population-based sample of 104 demented and 135 nondemented 85-year-olds, and included physical and neuropsychiatric examinations, and head computerized tomography (CT). Dementia disorders were defined according to standard criteria. TICV and WMLs were rated on computerized tomography. Using the highest group as reference, the risk for dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) was increased in those with the smallest half, tertile, and quartile of TICV. Smaller TICV increased the odds of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia in participants with WMLs. WMLs were not associated with increased odds of dementia in those with the largest TICV. The interaction term WMLs*TICV was also significant. TICV did not modify the odds of dementia in those with the apolipoprotein e4 phenotype. Our results suggest that the impact of brain pathology on the risk of dementia is modified by premorbid brain size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human impact gradient on mammalian biodiversity

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    Mariana Munguía

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drastic changes have been caused by human influence in natural landscapes, which may exert an intensive effect on species loss. However, species loss from human pressure is not random but depends on a series of environmentally associated factors. Linking species traits to environmental attributes may allow us to detect the ecological impacts of habitat so that meaningful habitat degradation gradients can be identified. The relationships between environmental factors and species traits provide the basis for identifying those biological traits that make species more sensitive to disturbance. These relationships are also helpful to detect the geographic distribution of latent risk to reveal areas where biodiversity is threatened. Here, we identify a “Human Impact Gradient for Biodiversity (HIGB” based on a three-table ordination method (RLQ analysis and fourth-corner analysis to identify key species traits that are associated with environmental gradient. Species distribution and environmental geographic data were gathered nationwide to analyze 68 localities, which represent 27% of Mexico’s surface, including 211 species of mammals. Nine environmental variables (including biophysical, geophysical and land-use impacts were analyzed by using the Geographic Information System. Three types of species’ traits were evaluated: locomotion, trophic habit and body size. We identified a human impact gradient, which was mainly determined by the percentage of the area that was covered by seedlings, the plant richness, the understory coverage percentage and the human settlement index. The most important species traits that are associated with non-human-impacted sites were carnivores, frugivores–herbivores and a body size that was greater than 17.8 kg; 25 species were selected by the decision criteria framework for species that were sensitive to degradation based on ecological function information. Conversely, granivores, fossorial and semifossorial

  14. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Eric

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown clinically to cure 82% of patients with only a 10-minute treatment time, repeated once after 7 days. All insects, including human head lice, have a wax-covered exoskeleton. This wax, composed of hydrocarbons, provides the insect with protection against water loss and is therefore critical to its survival. When the protective wax is disrupted, water loss becomes uncontrollable and irreversible, leading to dehydration and death. A specific pattern of hydrocarbons has been found in all of the head louse cuticular wax studied. Iso-octane effectively removes these hydrocarbons from human head lice’s cuticular wax. Methods A method of head louse cuticle wax extraction and analysis by gas chromatography was developed. Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis were collected from infested patients and subjected to any of three extraction solvents comprising either the test product or one of two solvents introduced as controls. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID was used to determine the presence of hydrocarbons in the three head lice extracts. Results In the study reported herein, the test product isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 (IPM/D5 was shown to perform comparably with iso-octane, effectively extracting the target hydrocarbons from the cuticular wax that coats the human head louse exoskeleton. Conclusions Disruption of the integrity of the insect cuticle by removal of specific hydrocarbons found in the cuticular wax

  15. Numerical Analysis of Induced Current in Human Head Exposed to Nonuniform Magnetic Field Including Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarao, Hiroo; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    In this paper, induced currents in an anatomical head model exposed to a non-uniform ELF magnetic field (B-field) including harmonics are numerically calculated, and are discussed based on the basic restriction established by International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). A casual hair dryer of 100V and 1.2kW is chosen as a typical source of the non-uniform B-field including both the fundamental and second harmonic components. The B-field distribution around the hair dryer is estimated by using the 3-orthogonal magnetic dipole moments, which are derived from a couple of measured values around it. The high-resolution human head model used is constructed based on the MRI images of a real human, and consists of six kinds of tissues (bone, brain, eyeballs, muscle, skin and blood). So-called impedance method is used for the numerical calculation of the induced current. The numerical results show that the maximum values of the induced current of 17µA/m2, for the 60Hz component, which is about 1/120 of the ICNIRP basic restriction appear in the muscle near the eyeball when the hair dryer is used from the side of the head model, and the averaged current in the eyeballs that have the highest conductivity is the highest among the six tissues. It is also demonstrated that the induced current due to the 120Hz B-field becomes comparable to the 60Hz current although the magnitude of the 120Hz B-field is much smaller than that of the 60Hz B-field.

  16. Analysis on the effect of the distances and inclination angles between human head and mobile phone on SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M I; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the distances between the human head and internal cellular device antenna on the specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper also analyzes the effects of inclination angles between user head and mobile terminal antenna on SAR values. The effects of the metal-glass casing of mobile phone on the SAR values were observed in the vicinity of the human head model. Moreover, the return losses were investigated in all cases to mark antenna performance. This analysis was performed by adopting finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio. The results indicate that by increasing the distance between the user head and antenna, SAR values are decreased. But the increase in inclination angle does not reduce SAR values in all cases. Additionally, this investigation provides some useful indication for future design of low SAR mobile terminal antenna.

  17. Partially Automated Method for Localizing Standardized Acupuncture Points on the Heads of Digital Human Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungdae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Having modernized imaging tools for precise positioning of acupuncture points over the human body where the traditional therapeutic method is applied is essential. For that reason, we suggest a more systematic positioning method that uses X-ray computer tomographic images to precisely position acupoints. Digital Korean human data were obtained to construct three-dimensional head-skin and skull surface models of six individuals. Depending on the method used to pinpoint the positions of the acupoints, every acupoint was classified into one of three types: anatomical points, proportional points, and morphological points. A computational algorithm and procedure were developed for partial automation of the positioning. The anatomical points were selected by using the structural characteristics of the skin surface and skull. The proportional points were calculated from the positions of the anatomical points. The morphological points were also calculated by using some control points related to the connections between the source and the target models. All the acupoints on the heads of the six individual were displayed on three-dimensional computer graphical image models. This method may be helpful for developing more accurate experimental designs and for providing more quantitative volumetric methods for performing analyses in acupuncture-related research.

  18. Neuropsychological development in preschool children born with asymmetrical intrauterine growth restriction and impact of postnatal head growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaric, Andrea Simić; Galić, Slavka; Kolundzić, Zdravko; Bosnjak, Vlatka Mejaski

    2013-07-01

    Neuropsychological development and the impact of postnatal head growth were studied in preschool children with asymmetrical intrauterine growth restriction. Examinees born at term with a birth weight below the 10th percentile were matched to the control group according to chronological and gestational age, gender, and maternal education. Fifty children were in each group, with a mean age of 6 years, 4 months. The Touwen neurological examination, the Čuturić developmental test, an imitative hand positions test, and a visual attention test were performed. There were significant differences (Pdevelopment. Slow postnatal head growth is correlated with a poorer neuropsychological outcome.

  19. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01

    Fishing is one of the oldest anthropogenic disturbances in the ocean, differing from other impacts in its direct removal of biomass from the ecosystem. Despite the centuries of fishing activities, there is much we still do not understand regarding the effects of fish removal on the benthic community. I use an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the affect of human disturbance, primarily the alteration of fish communities, on major functional groups of coral reefs, over extended temporal...

  20. Impact force and time analysis influenced by execution distance in a roundhouse kick to the head in taekwondo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevan, Isaac; Alvarez, Octavio; Falco, Coral; Molina-García, Javier; Castillo, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    The execution distance is a tactic factor that affects mechanical performance and execution technique in taekwondo. This study analyzes the roundhouse kick to the head by comparing the maximum impact force, execution time, and impact time in 3 distances according to the athletes' competition level. It also analyzes the relationship between impact force and weight in each group. It examines whether the execution distance affects the maximum impact force, execution time, and impact time, in each level group or 2 different competition levels. Participants were 27 male taekwondo players (13 medallists and 14 nonmedallists). The medallists executed the roundhouse kick to the head with greater impact force and in a shorter execution time than did the nonmedallists when they kicked from any distance different to their combat distance. However, the results showed that the execution distance is influential in the execution time and impact time in the nonmedallist group. It is considered appropriate to orientate the high-level competitors to train for offensive actions from any distance similar to the long execution distance because it offers equally effectiveness and a greater security against the opponent. Also, practitioners should focus their training to improve time performance because it is more affected by distance than impact force.

  1. Analysis of finite element models for head injury investigation: reconstruction of four real-world impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Melanie; Fildes, Brian; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King; Sparke, Laurie

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that both excessive linear and rotational accelerations are the cause of head injuries. Although the head injury criterion has been beneficial as an indicator of head injury risk, it only considers linear acceleration, so there is a need to consider both types of motion in future safety standards. Advanced models of the head/brain complex have recently been developed to gain a better understanding of head injury biomechanics. While these models have been verified against laboratory experimental data, there is a lack of suitable real-world data available for validation. Hence, using two computer models of the head/brain, the objective of the current study was to reconstruct four real-world crashes with known head injury outcomes in a full-vehicle crash laboratory, simulate head/brain responses using kinematics obtained during these reconstructions, and to compare the results predicted by the models against the actual injuries sustained by the occupant. Cases where the occupant sustained no head injuries (AIS 0) and head injuries of severity AIS 4, AIS 5, and multiple head injuries were selected. Data collected from a 9-accelerometer skull were input into the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) and the NHTSA Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon). The results demonstrated that both models were able to predict varying injury severities consistent with the difference in AIS injury levels in the real-world cases. The WSUHIM predicted a slightly higher injury threshold than the SIMon, probably due to the finer mesh and different software used for the simulations, and could also determine regions of the brain which had been injured. With further validation, finite element models can be used to establish an injury criterion for each type of brain injury in the future.

  2. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Refsgaard, Jens C.; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2015-12-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a popular data assimilation (DA) technique that has been extensively used in environmental sciences for combining complementary information from model predictions and observations. One of the major challenges in EnKF applications is the description of model uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties. This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The synthetic data used in the assimilation study makes it possible to diagnose model uncertainty assumptions statistically. Besides the model uncertainty, other factors such as observation error, observation locations, and ensemble size are also analysed with respect to performance and sensitivity. Results show that inappropriate definition of model uncertainty can greatly degrade the assimilation performance, and an appropriate combination of different model uncertainty sources is advised.

  3. Through the Google Glass: The impact of heads-up displays on visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joanna E; Neider, Mark B

    2016-01-01

    In five experiments, we evaluated how secondary information presented on a heads-up display (HUD) impacts performance of a concurrent visual attention task. To do so, we had participants complete a primary visual search task under a variety of secondary load conditions (a single word presented on Google Glass during each search trial). Processing of secondary information was measured through a recognition memory task. Other manipulations included relevance (Experiments 1-4) and temporal onset of secondary information relative to the primary task (Experiment 3). Secondary information was always disruptive to the visual search, regardless of temporal onset and even when participants were instructed to ignore it. These patterns were evident in search tasks reflective of both selective (Experiments 1-3) and preattentive (Experiment 4) attentional mechanisms, and were not a result of onset-offset attentional capture (Experiment 5). Recognition memory for secondary information was always above chance. Our findings suggest that HUD-based visual information is profoundly disruptive to attentional processes and largely immune to user-centric prioritization.

  4. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Verrucous carcinoma of the head and neck - not a human papillomavirus-related tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odar, Katarina; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario; Zidar, Nina

    2014-04-01

    Association between verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the head and neck and human papillomaviruses (HPV) is highly controversial. Previous prevalence studies focused mostly on α-PV, while little is known about other PV genera. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of a broad spectrum of HPV in VC of the head and neck using sensitive and specific molecular assays. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 30 VC and 30 location-matched normal tissue samples were analysed, by using six different polymerase chain reaction-based methods targeting DNA of at least 87 HPV types from α-PV, β-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV genera, and immunohistochemistry against p16 protein. α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV were not detected. β-PV DNA was detected in 5/30 VC (16.7%) and in 18/30 normal tissue samples (60.0%): HPV-19, -24 and -36 were identified in VC, and HPV-5, -9, -12, -23, -24, -38, -47, -49 and -96 in normal tissue, whereas HPV type was not determined in 2/5 cases of VC and in 6/18 normal tissue samples. p16 expression was detected in a subset of samples and was higher in VC than in normal tissue. However, the reaction was predominantly cytoplasmic and only occasionally nuclear, and the extent of staining did not exceed 75%. Our results indicate that α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV are not associated with aetiopathogenesis of VC of the head and neck. β-PV DNA in a subset of VC and normal tissue might reflect incidental colonization, but its potential biological significance needs further investigation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Verrucous carcinoma of the head and neck – not a human papillomavirus-related tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odar, Katarina; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario; Zidar, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Association between verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the head and neck and human papillomaviruses (HPV) is highly controversial. Previous prevalence studies focused mostly on α-PV, while little is known about other PV genera. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of a broad spectrum of HPV in VC of the head and neck using sensitive and specific molecular assays. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 30 VC and 30 location-matched normal tissue samples were analysed, by using six different polymerase chain reaction-based methods targeting DNA of at least 87 HPV types from α-PV, β-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV genera, and immunohistochemistry against p16 protein. α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV were not detected. β-PV DNA was detected in 5/30 VC (16.7%) and in 18/30 normal tissue samples (60.0%): HPV-19, -24 and -36 were identified in VC, and HPV-5, -9, -12, -23, -24, -38, -47, -49 and -96 in normal tissue, whereas HPV type was not determined in 2/5 cases of VC and in 6/18 normal tissue samples. p16 expression was detected in a subset of samples and was higher in VC than in normal tissue. However, the reaction was predominantly cytoplasmic and only occasionally nuclear, and the extent of staining did not exceed 75%. Our results indicate that α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV are not associated with aetiopathogenesis of VC of the head and neck. β-PV DNA in a subset of VC and normal tissue might reflect incidental colonization, but its potential biological significance needs further investigation. PMID:24350715

  7. Study of Electromagnetic Radiation and Specific Absorption Rate of Mobile Phones with Fractional Human Head Models via Green's Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nookala S. Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Electromagnetic Radiation from mobile hand set is identified as one of the side effects for increasing rate of brain tumor. Due to this reason, Mobile phone industries are attentive towards safety issues of human health. Specific Absorption Rate is one of the important parameter while modeling the radiation effect on human head. Brain material with homogeneity is treated as an equivalent model of human head. The radiation caused by antennas mounted on mobile set is assumed to be monopolar. Approach: Apart from the Specific Absorption Rate, period of exposure to radiation is an extremely important parameter while assessing the effects on brain tissue. Correlation between the amount of radiation versus spherical model of brain is a complex phenomena, addressed in various simulation models. In the present work the field distribution inside the head are modeled using Dyadic Greens Functions while describing the effect of radiation pattern. Multilayered homogeneous lossy spherical model is proposed as an equivalent to head. Results: In this paper we present the depth of penetration of radiation and its effect on brain tissue. In essence the amount of electromagnetic power absorbed by biological tissues for various exposure conditions and types of emitting sources, utilizing a detailed model of the human head. Conclusion: Bio-heat equation is used to predict heat distribution inside the brain when exposed to radiation. The medium is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic, linear, non dispersive and stationary. A critical evaluation of the method is discussed.

  8. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  9. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  10. Productivity Losses Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Using the Human Capital and Friction Cost Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Alison M; Hanly, Paul; Timmons, Aileen; Walsh, Paul M; O'Neill, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Thomas, Audrey Alforque; Gallagher, Pamela; Sharp, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that productivity losses associated with head and neck cancer (HNC) are higher than in other cancers. These studies have only assessed a single aspect of productivity loss, such as temporary absenteeism or premature mortality, and have only used the Human Capital Approach (HCA). The Friction Cost Approach (FCA) is increasingly recommended, although has not previously been used to assess lost production from HNC. The aim of this study was to estimate the lost productivity associated with HNC due to different types of absenteeism and premature mortality, using both the HCA and FCA. Survey data on employment status were collected from 251 HNC survivors in Ireland and combined with population-level survival estimates and national wage data. The cost of temporary and permanent time off work, reduced working hours and premature mortality using both the HCA and FCA were calculated. Estimated total productivity losses per employed person of working age were EUR253,800 using HCA and EUR6800 using FCA. The main driver of HCA costs was premature mortality (38% of total) while for FCA it was temporary time off (73% of total). The productivity losses associated with head and neck cancer are substantial, and return to work assistance could form an important part of rehabilitation. Use of both the HCA and FCA approaches allowed different drivers of productivity losses to be identified, due to the different assumptions of the two methods. For future estimates of productivity losses, the use of both approaches may be pragmatic.

  11. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J.; Fildes, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997–2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000–2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990–1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03–1.04, pcrash- and occupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation. PMID:22105402

  12. Wireless Performance of a Fully Passive Neurorecording Microsystem Embedded in Dispersive Human Head Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, Helen N.; Chae, Junseok; Miranda, Felix A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the wireless performance of a biocompatible fully passive microsystem implanted in phantom media simulating the dispersive dielectric properties of the human head, for potential application in recording cortical neuropotentials. Fully passive wireless operation is achieved by means of backscattering electromagnetic (EM) waves carrying 3rd order harmonic mixing products (2f(sub 0) plus or minus f(sub m)=4.4-4.9 GHZ) containing targeted neuropotential signals (fm approximately equal to 1-1000 Hz). The microsystem is enclosed in 4 micrometer thick parylene-C for biocompatibility and has a footprint of 4 millimeters x 12 millimeters x 500 micrometers. Preliminary testing of the microsystem implanted in the lossy biological simulating media results in signal-to-noise ratio's (SNR) near 22 (SNR approximately equal to 38 in free space) for millivolt level neuropotentials, demonstrating the potential for fully passive wireless microsystems in implantable medical applications.

  13. Nanotribological characterization of human head hair by friction force microscopy in dry atmosphere and aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikogeorgos, Nikos; Fletcher, Ian W; Boardman, Christopher; Doyle, Peter; Ortuoste, Nerea; Leggett, Graham J

    2010-06-01

    Friction force microscopy was employed for the tribological investigation of human head hair in two different environments: a dry atmosphere and de-ionized water. The fibers were immobilized by embedding them in indium. The effects of bleaching, conditioning, and immersion in methanolic KOH were quantified in terms of the relative coefficient of friction (μ). The virgin fibers were clearly distinguished in terms of friction coefficient from the chemically damaged ones in both environments, while all categories of hair exhibited higher friction coefficients in the aqueous environment. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used as a complementary technique to examine the presence of fatty acids on the cuticular surface of the different categories of hair as well as the conditioner distribution. Neither bleaching nor 30 min treatment in methanolic KOH was found adequate to completely remove the fatty acids from the fibers' surface. Conditioner species were detected along the whole cuticular surface.

  14. Microdialysis in the femoral head of the minipig and in a blood cloth of human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten Foged; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Microdialysis can detect ischemia in soft tissue. In a previous study, we have shown the development of ischemia in the femoral head removed from patients undergoing total hip replacement. That study also raised some methodological questions that this study tries to answer: what...... is happening in the dead space around the catheter in the drill canal, and is there an equilibrium period after the insertion of the catheter? Material and methods In an ex-vivo study using 5 syringes with 5 mL human blood, a microdialysis catheter was inserted and microdialysis was performed over 3 h....... In an in-vivo study, a drill hole was made in the proximal part of the femur in 6 mature Göttingen minipigs and microdialysis was performed over 3 h. The pigs were kept normoventilated during the experiment. Results The ex-vivo microdialysis results showed that lactate kept a steady level and glucose...

  15. Dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head rotations in roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, S. H.; Leigh, R. J.; Tomsak, R. L.; Grant, M. P.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the dynamic properties of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during roll head rotations in three human subjects using the magnetic search coil technique. In the first of two experiments, we quantify the behavior of the ocular motor plant in the torsional plane. The subject's eye was mechanically displaced into intorsion, extorsion or abduction, and the dynamic course of return of the eye to its resting position was measured. The mean predominant time constants of return were 210 msec from intorsion, 83 msec from extorsion, and 217 msec from abduction, although there was considerable variability of results from different trials and subjects. In the second experiment, we quantify the efficacy of velocity-to-position integration of the vestibular signal. Position-step stimuli were used to test the torsional or horizontal VOR, being applied with subjects heads erect or supine. After a torsional position-step, the eye drifted back to its resting position, but after a horizontal position-step the eye held its new horizontal position. To interpret these responses we used a simple model of the VOR with parameters of the ocular motor plant set to values determined during Exp 1. The time constant of the velocity-to-position neural integrator was smaller (typically 2 sec) in the torsional plane than in the horizontal plane (> 20 sec). No disconjugacy of torsional eye movements was observed. Thus, the dynamic properties of the VOR in roll differ significantly from those of the VOR in yaw, reflecting different visual demands placed on this reflex in these two planes.

  16. [Analysis of Electric Stress in Human Head in High-frequency Low-power Electromagnetic Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongjun; Zhang, Hui; Niu, Zhongqi

    2015-04-01

    Action of electromagnetic radiation exerting on human body has been a concerned issue for people. Because electromagnetic waves could generate an electric stress in a discontinuous medium, we used the finite difference time domain (FDTD) as calculation methods to calculate the electric stress and its distribution in human head caused by high-frequency low-power electromagnetic environment, which was generated by dual-band (900 MHz and 1 800 MHz) PIFA antennas with radiated power 1 W, and we then performed the safety evaluation of cell phone radiation from the angle whether the electric stress further reached the human hearing threshold. The result showed that there existed the electric stress at the interface of different permittivity organization caused by the two kinds of high-frequency low-power electromagnetic environment and the maximum electric stress was located at the interface between skin and air of the phone side, and the electric stress peak at skull did not reach the threshold of auditory caused by bone tissue conduction so that it can not produce auditory effects.

  17. Impact of chemotherapy on the outcome of osteosarcoma of the head and neck in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Eline; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Gelderblom, Hans; Tesselaar, Margot E. T.; van Es, Robert J. J.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; de Bree, Remco; van Meerten, Esther; Hoeben, Ann; Smeele, Ludi E.; Willems, Stefan M.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Buter, Jan; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Flucke, Uta E.; Peer, Petronella G. M.; Bovée, Judith V. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate about the value of (neo‐)adjuvant chemotherapy in high‐ and intermediate‐grade osteosarcoma of the head and neck. Methods All records of patients older than 16 years diagnosed with osteosarcoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed. Results We identified a total of 77 patients with an osteosarcoma of the head and neck; the 5‐year overall survival (OS) was 55%. In 50 patients with surgically resected high‐ or intermediate‐grade osteosarcoma of the head and neck younger than 75 years, univariate and multivariable analysis, adjusting for age and resection margins, showed that patients who had not received chemotherapy had a significantly higher risk of local recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.78 and 3.66, respectively). Conclusion In patients younger than 75 years of age with surgically resected high‐ and intermediate‐grade osteosarcoma of the head and neck, treatment with (neo‐)adjuvant chemotherapy resulted in a significantly smaller risk of local recurrence. Therefore, we suggest (neo‐)adjuvant chemotherapy in patients amenable to chemotherapy. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 140–146, 2017 PMID:27507299

  18. Rotational Acceleration during Head Impact Resulting from Different Judo Throwing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    MURAYAMA, Haruo; HITOSUGI, Masahito; MOTOZAWA, Yasuki; OGINO, Masahiro; KOYAMA, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most severe head injuries in judo are reported as acute subdural hematoma. It is thus necessary to examine the rotational acceleration of the head to clarify the mechanism of head injuries. We determined the rotational acceleration of the head when the subject is thrown by judo techniques. One Japanese male judo expert threw an anthropomorphic test device using two throwing techniques, Osoto-gari and Ouchigari. Rotational and translational head accelerations were measured with and without an under-mat. For Osoto-gari, peak resultant rotational acceleration ranged from 4,284.2 rad/s2 to 5,525.9 rad/s2 and peak resultant translational acceleration ranged from 64.3 g to 87.2 g; for Ouchi-gari, the accelerations respectively ranged from 1,708.0 rad/s2 to 2,104.1 rad/s2 and from 120.2 g to 149.4 g. The resultant rotational acceleration did not decrease with installation of an under-mat for both Ouchi-gari and Osoto-gari. We found that head contact with the tatami could result in the peak values of translational and rotational accelerations, respectively. In general, because kinematics of the body strongly affects translational and rotational accelerations of the head, both accelerations should be measured to analyze the underlying mechanism of head injury. As a primary preventative measure, throwing techniques should be restricted to participants demonstrating ability in ukemi techniques to avoid head contact with the tatami. PMID:24477065

  19. Impact of head immobilization position on dose distribution in patients of brainstem glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of patient position (supine and prone on conventional bilateral field, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans in patients of brainstem glioma with a view to exploring the possibility of avoiding beam entry through immobilization accessories. Methods: Five patients of brainstem glioma were immobilized and scanned in supine and prone positions with a combination of head rest and thermoplastic cast. Each patient was planned with three techniques: (i 2-fields bilateral (ii 3-fields 3DCRT, and (iii 5-fields IMRT. Plan quality was analyzed in terms of planning target volume (PTV coverage and dose to various critical organs at risk (OAR for both the supine and prone treatment positions. Results: In case of bilateral fields (parallel opposed planning, the PTV coverage and dose to the OAR were almost similar for both the supine and prone positions. In 3DCRT plan, although the PTV coverage and dose to critical structures were comparable for both the supine and prone position, dose to cochlea was lower for the prone position plan. A modest decrease in maximum dose to optic nerves and mean dose to temporal lobes were also observed for the prone position plan. In IMRT plans, the PTV coverage and homogeneity were comparable in both the supine and prone positions. Reduction in average maximum and mean doses to all OARs with functional subunit (FSU in series and parallel respectively was observed in the IMRT plan for prone position when compared to the supine position.Conclusion: Supine and prone positions resulted in almost similar dose distribution in all the three techniques applied. At some instances, the prone position showed better normal tissues sparing when compared to supine. Moreover, prone position is more likely to avoid attenuation due to immobilization devices and uncertainty in dose calculation under large

  20. Capabilities of Helmets for Preventing Head Injuries Induced by Ballistic Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Balandin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The limiting performance of ballistically loaded helmets designed to reduce head injuries is studied analytically. The projectile does not penetrate the helmet. This analysis evaluates the absolute minimum of the peak displacement of the helmet shell relative to the head, provided that criteria measuring the severity of head injuries lie within prescribed limits. Rather than optimize a specific design configuration, e.g. a viscoelastic foam liner, characteristics of a time-dependent force representing the helmet liner are calculated. The formulation reduces the limiting performance analysis to an optimal control problem.

  1. The influence of gravity on regional lung blood flow in humans: SPECT in the upright and head-down posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ax, M; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Lindahl, S G E; Mure, M; Petersson, J

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that gravity has little influence on the distribution of lung blood flow while changing posture from supine to prone. This study aimed to evaluate the maximal influence of posture by comparison of regional lung blood flow in the upright and head-down posture in 8 healthy volunteers, using a tilt table. Regional lung blood flow was marked by intravenous injection of macroaggregates of human albumin labeled with (99m)Tc or (113m)In, in the upright and head-down posture, respectively, during tidal breathing. Both radiotracers remain fixed in the lung after administration. The distribution of radioactivity was mapped using quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) corrected for attenuation and scatter. All images were obtained supine during tidal breathing. A shift from upright to the head-down posture caused a clear redistribution of blood flow from basal to apical regions. We conclude that posture plays a role for the distribution of lung blood flow in upright humans, and that the influence of posture, and thereby gravity, is much greater in the upright and head-down posture than in horizontal postures. However, the results of the study demonstrate that lung structure is the main determinant of regional blood flow and gravity is a secondary contributor to the distribution of lung blood flow in the upright and head-down positions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using a dual-isotope quantitative SPECT method, we demonstrated that although a shift in posture redistributes blood flow in the direction of gravity, the results are also consistent with lung structure being a greater determinant of regional blood flow than gravity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use modern imaging methods to quantify the shift in regional lung blood flow in humans at a change between the upright and head-down postures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The relation between mechanical impact parameters and most frequent bicycle related head injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monea, A.G.; Perre, G. van der; Baeck, K.; Delye, H.H.; Verschueren, P.; Forausebergher, E.; Lierde, C. van; Verpoest, I.; Sloten, J. van der; Goffin, J.; Depreitere, B.

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent head injuries resulting from bicycle accidents include skull fracture acute subdural hematoma (ASDH), cerebral contusions, and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). This review includes epidemiological studies, cadaver experiments, in vivo imaging, image processing techniques, and computer

  3. Impacts of Social-Emotional Curricula on Three-Year-Olds: Exploratory Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration. Research Snapshot. OPRE Report 2014-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, JoAnn; Lowenstein, Amy E.; Morris, Pamela; Mattera, Shira K.; Bangser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This report presents exploratory impact findings for 3-year-olds from the Head Start CARES demonstration, a large-scale randomized controlled trial implemented in Head Start centers for one academic year across the country. The study was designed primarily to test the effects of the enhancements on 4-year-olds, but it also provides an opportunity…

  4. Does superior caval vein pressure impact head growth in Fontan circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsel, Tina; Balmer, Christian; Wåhlander, Håkan; Weber, Roland; Dave, Hitendu; Poretti, Andrea; Kretschmar, Oliver; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Patients with bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis have unphysiologically high superior caval vein pressure as it equals pulmonary artery pressure. Elevated superior caval vein pressure may cause communicating hydrocephalus and macrocephaly. This study analysed whether there exists an association between head circumference and superior caval vein pressure in patients with single ventricle physiology. We carried out a retrospective analysis of infants undergoing Fontan completion at our institution from 2007 to 2013. Superior caval vein pressures were measured during routine catheterisation before bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan completion as well as head circumference, adjusted to longitudinal age-dependent percentiles. We included 74 infants in our study. Median ages at bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan were 4.8 (1.6-12) and 27.9 (7-40.6) months, respectively. Head circumference showed significant growth from bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis until Fontan completion (7th (0-100th) versus 20th (0-100th) percentile). There was no correlation between superior caval vein pressure and head circumference before Fontan (R2=0.001). Children with lower differences in superior caval vein pressures between pre-bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and pre-Fontan catheterisations showed increased growth of head circumference (R2=0.19). Patients with moderately elevated superior caval vein pressure associated with single ventricle physiology did not have a tendency to develop macrocephaly. There is no correlation between superior caval vein pressure before Fontan and head circumference, but between bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis and Fontan head circumference increases significantly. This may be explained by catch-up growth of head circumference in patients with more favourable haemodynamics and concomitant venous pressures in the lower range. Further studies with focus on high superior caval vein pressures are needed to

  5. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for HPV detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with a 'gold standard' HPV PCR assay. A total of 110 prospectively collected, formalin-fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarrays and tested for HPV DNA by in situ hybridization with two probe sets, a biotinylated probe for high-risk (HR) HPV types 16/18 (Dako, CA, USA) and a probe cocktail for 16/18, plus 10 additional HR types (Ventana, AZ, USA). The p16(INK4) expression was also assessed using a Pharmingen immunohistochemistry antibody (BD Biosciences, CA, USA). Tissue microarrays were stained and scored at expert laboratories. HPV DNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR, using Gold AmpliTaq and dot-blot hybridization on matched-fresh frozen specimens in a research laboratory. HPV 16 E6 and E7-RNA expression was also measured using RT-PCR. Test performance was assessed by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. HR-HPV DNA types 16, 18 and 35 were detected by MY-PCR in 28% of tumors, with the majority (97%) testing positive for type 16. Compared with MY-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity for HR-HPV DNA detection with Dako in situ hybridization was 21% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-42) and 100% (95% CI: 93-100), respectively. Corresponding test results by Ventana in situ hybridization were 59% (95% CI: 39-78) and 58% (95% CI: 45-71), respectively. The p16 immunohistochemistry performed better overall than Dako (P=0.042) and Ventana (P=0.055), with a sensitivity of 52% (95% CI: 32-71) and specificity of 93% (95% CI: 84-98). Compared with a gold standard HPV-PCR assay, HPV detection by in situ hybridization was less accurate for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on tissue microarrays than p16 immunohistochemistry. Further

  6. Ocular Reflex Phase During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation In Humans Is Modified By Head-On-Trunk Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott; Clement, Gilles; Denise, Pierre; Reschke, Millard

    2005-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both horizontal and torsional eye velocity as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the modulation of these ocular reflexes would be modified by different head-on-trunk positions. Ten human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple cycles for each head-on-trunk position. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of torsional eye movements was greater at 0.125 Hz while the modulation of horizontal eye movements was greater at 0.5 Hz. Neither amplitude nor bias velocities were significantly altered by head-on-trunk position. The phases of both torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes, on the other hand, shifted towards alignment with the head. These results are consistent with the modulation of torsional and horizontal ocular reflexes during OVAR being primarily mediated by the otoliths in response to the sinusoidally varying linear acceleration along the interaural head axis.

  7. BabyMEG: A whole-head pediatric magnetoencephalography system for human brain development research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti; Pratt, Kevin; Mascarenas, Anthony; Miller, Paul; Han, Menglai; Robles, Jose; Cavallini, Anders; Power, Bill; Sieng, Kosal; Sun, Limin; Lew, Seok; Doshi, Chiran; Ahtam, Banu; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Grant, Ellen; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Paulson, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    We developed a 375-channel, whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system ("BabyMEG") for studying the electrophysiological development of human brain during the first years of life. The helmet accommodates heads up to 95% of 36-month old boys in the USA. The unique two-layer sensor array consists of: (1) 270 magnetometers (10 mm diameter, ˜15 mm coil-to-coil spacing) in the inner layer, (2) thirty-five three-axis magnetometers (20 mm × 20 mm) in the outer layer 4 cm away from the inner layer. Additionally, there are three three-axis reference magnetometers. With the help of a remotely operated position adjustment mechanism, the sensor array can be positioned to provide a uniform short spacing (mean 8.5 mm) between the sensor array and room temperature surface of the dewar. The sensors are connected to superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4.2 K with median sensitivity levels of 7.5 fT/√Hz for the inner and 4 fT/√Hz for the outer layer sensors. SQUID outputs are digitized by a 24-bit acquisition system. A closed-cycle helium recycler provides maintenance-free continuous operation, eliminating the need for helium, with no interruption needed during MEG measurements. BabyMEG with the recycler has been fully operational from March, 2015. Ongoing spontaneous brain activity can be monitored in real time without interference from external magnetic noise sources including the recycler, using a combination of a lightly shielded two-layer magnetically shielded room, an external active shielding, a signal-space projection method, and a synthetic gradiometer approach. Evoked responses in the cortex can be clearly detected without averaging. These new design features and capabilities represent several advances in MEG, increasing the utility of this technique in basic neuroscience as well as in clinical research and patient studies.

  8. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    Full Text Available Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data to image the vasculature, and iii diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  9. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  10. Basics of tumor development and importance of human papilloma virus (HPV for head and neck cancer [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC are the 6 most common cancers worldwide. While incidence rates for cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx are decreasing, a significant increase in cancer of the oropharynx (OSCC is observed. Classical risk factors for HNSCC are smoking and alcohol. It has been shown for 25 to 60% of OSCC to be associated with an infection by oncogenic human papilloma viruses (HPV. The development of “common” cancer of the head and neck is substantially enhanced by an accumulation of genetic changes, which lead to an inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of proto-oncogenes. A more or less uniform sequence of different DNA-damages leads to genetic instability. In this context, an early and frequent event is deletion on the short arm of chromosome 9, which results in inactivation of the p16-gene. In contrast, for HPV-induced carcinogenesis, expression of the viral proteins E6 and E7 is most important, since they lead to inactivation of the cellular tumor-suppressor-proteins p53 and Rb. The natural route of transoral infection is a matter of debate; peroral HPV-infections might be frequent and disappear uneventfully in most cases. Smoking seems to increase the probability for developing an HPV-associated OSCC. The association of HNSCC with HPV can be proven with established methods in clinical diagnostics. In addition to classical prognostic factors, diagnosis of HPV-association may become important for selection of future therapies. Prognostic relevance of HPV probably surmounts many known risk-factors, for example regional metastasis. Until now, no other molecular markers are established in clinical routine. Future therapy concepts may vary for the two subgroups of patients, particularly patients with HPV-associated OSCC may take advantage of less aggressive treatments. Finally, an outlook will be given on possible targeted therapies.

  11. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  12. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  13. Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug A; Hume, Patria A; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor N

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct impact with the head and the inertial loading of the head have been postulated as major mechanisms of head-related injuries, such as concussion. METHODS This descriptive observational study was conducted to quantify the head impact acceleration characteristics in under-9-year-old junior rugby union players in New Zealand. The impact magnitude, frequency, and location were collected with a wireless head impact sensor that was worn by 14 junior rugby players who participated in 4 matches. RESULTS A total of 721 impacts > 10g were recorded. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of impacts per player was 46 (IQR 37-58), resulting in 10 (IQR 4-18) impacts to the head per player per match. The median impact magnitudes recorded were 15g (IQR 12g-21g) for linear acceleration and 2296 rad/sec(2) (IQR 1352-4152 rad/sec(2)) for rotational acceleration. CONCLUSIONS There were 121 impacts (16.8%) above the rotational injury risk limit and 1 (0.1%) impact above the linear injury risk limit. The acceleration magnitude and number of head impacts in junior rugby union players were higher than those previously reported in similar age-group sports participants. The median linear acceleration for the under-9-year-old rugby players were similar to 7- to 8-year-old American football players, but lower than 9- to 12-year-old youth American football players. The median rotational accelerations measured were higher than the median and 95th percentiles in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players.

  14. Chemical processing and shampooing impact cortisol measured in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M Camille; Karban, Laura V; Benitez, Patrick; Goodteacher, Angela; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-08-01

    The assessment of cortisol in hair has gained popularity as a means to measure retrospective hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in a number of species; however, cortisol levels from human hair subjected to typical chemicals for cosmetic or hygienic purposes may be altered by the chemicals used. The purposed of this study was to determine if exposure of hair to chemical processing or shampooing impacts cortisol values. Human hair not exposed to prior chemical processing was cut from the posterior vertex region of the head of 106 human subjects as close to the scalp as possible. The hair sample was divided into 4-6 full-length clusters depending on quantity of hair available. Each hair sample was processed for baseline (native) cortisol and remaining clusters were exposed to five standard chemical hair treatments (Experiment 1) or were shampooed 15 or 30 times (Experiment 2). Hair was ground and cortisol levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Comparisons were made between native hair and processed hair using paired t-tests and Pearson correlation. Hair cortisol as assessed by EIA was significantly altered by chemical processing but in somewhat different ways. Exposure to bleach (harshest exposure), demi-perm (least exposure) or 15-30 shampoos resulted in a significant decrease in cortisol level while exposure to varying percentages of peroxides increased cortisol measured. There were no differences in cortisol levels associated with sex, age or tobacco use in the native hair for this particular group. Chemical processing and frequent shampooing affect cortisol levels measured in hair. Chemically processed or excessively shampooed hair should be avoided when recruiting subjects for hair cortisol studies.

  15. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahari Taha; Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan; Iskandar Hasanuddin

    2015-08-01

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model consists of a mass–spring–damper system, in which the skull, the brain and the soccer ball are modelled as a mass and the neck modelled as a spring–damper system. The proposed model was compared with previous dynamic model for soccer ball-to-head impact. Moreover, it was also validated against drop ball experiment on an instrumented dummy skull and also compared with head acceleration data from previous studies. Comparison shows that our proposed model is capable of describing both the skull and brain accelerations qualitatively and quantitatively. This study shows that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on the kinematics of human skull and brain during a ball-to-head impact. The model can be used to investigate the important parameters during soccer heading that affect the brain displacement and acceleration, thus providing better understanding of the mechanics behind it.

  16. The impact of head movements on EEG and contact impedance: an adaptive filtering solution for motion artifact reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan; Patki, Shrishail; Grundlehner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Designing and developing a comfortable and convenient EEG system for daily usage that can provide reliable and robust EEG signal, encompasses a number of challenges. Among them, the most ambitious is the reduction of artifacts due to body movements. This paper studies the effect of head movement artifacts on the EEG signal and on the dry electrode-tissue impedance (ETI), monitored continuously using the imec's wireless EEG headset. We have shown that motion artifacts have huge impact on the EEG spectral content in the frequency range lower than 20 Hz. Coherence and spectral analysis revealed that ETI is not capable of describing disturbances at very low frequencies (below 2 Hz). Therefore, we devised a motion artifact reduction (MAR) method that uses a combination of a band-pass filtering and multi-channel adaptive filtering (AF), suitable for real-time MAR. This method was capable of substantially reducing artifacts produced by head movements.

  17. The future of human rights impact assessments of trade agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Future of Human Rights Impact Assessments of Trade Agreements develops a methodology for human rights impact assessments of trade agreements and considers whether there is any value in using the methodology on a sustained basis to ensure that the human dimensions of international trade are taken

  18. Measurement of Hybrid III Head Impact Kinematics Using an Accelerometer and Gyroscope System in Ice Hockey Helmets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Mari A; Kang, Yun Seok; Maltese, Matthew R; Bolte, John H; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2015-08-01

    Helmet-based instrumentation is used to study the biomechanics of concussion. The most extensively used systems estimate rotational acceleration from linear acceleration, but new instrumentation measures rotational velocity using gyroscopes, potentially reducing error. This study compared kinematics from an accelerometer and gyroscope-containing system to reference measures. A Hybrid III (HIII) adult male anthropometric test device head and neck was fit with two helmet brands, each instrumented with gForce Tracker (GFT) sensor systems in four locations. Helmets were impacted at various speeds and directions. Regression relationships between GFT-measured and reference peak kinematics were quantified, and influence of impact direction, sensor location, and helmet brand was evaluated. The relationship between the sensor output and the reference acceleration/velocity experienced by the head was strong. Coefficients of determination for data stratified by individual impact directions ranged from 0.77 to 0.99 for peak linear acceleration and from 0.78 to 1.0 for peak rotational velocity. For the data from all impact directions combined, coefficients of determination ranged from 0.60 to 0.80 for peak resultant linear acceleration and 0.83 to 0.91 for peak resultant rotational velocity. As expected, raw peak resultant linear acceleration measures exhibited large percent differences from reference measures. Adjustment using regressions resulted in average absolute errors of 10-15% if regression adjustments were done by impact direction or 25-40% if regressions incorporating data from all impact directions were used. Average absolute percent differences in raw peak resultant rotational velocity were much lower, around 10-15%. It is important to define system accuracy for a particular helmet brand, sensor location, and impact direction in order to interpret real-world data.

  19. How the unique configuration of the human head may enhance flavor perception capabilities: an evolutionary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Lieberman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since flavor derives from the synthesis of taste, somatosensation and smell, one of the most important factors in the ability to perceive flavor is retronasal olfaction in which volatile compounds pass from the oral cavity through the pharynx to the olfactory epithelium. Retronasal olfaction has been documented in both humans and rodents, but appears less effective in rodents than orthonasal olfaction because expired air does not come into as much contact with the sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium as inspired air [1,2]. Detailed comparisons of retronasal airflow patterns among different species have not been conducted, but several lines of evidence lead to the hypothesis that retronasal airflow may be specially enhanced in humans because of four derived features of the human head and neck that evolved at different stages because of selection for functions other than olfaction [3]. If so, then human flavor perception capabilities may be more derived than is commonly appreciated, and perhaps played a role in selecting for the evolution of cooking. The first derived adaptation that aids human retronasal olfaction is the absence of the transverse lamina, a horizontal shelf of bone that partitions the olfactory chamber of the nasal fossa from the more inferior respiratory passage. This lamina, which is present in most mammals, was lost during the evolution of monkeys (haplorhines from more primitive primates (strepsirhines as part of a reorganization of the nasal cavity. The function of the transverse lamina has not been tested but it probably aids orthonasal olfaction by trapping inspired air in the olfactory region. Loss of the transverse lamina is commonly interpreted to be one of several trade-offs in primate evolution that favored vision over olfaction [4], but it likely benefits retronasal olfaction by permitting a direct pathway for expired air to flow towards the olfactory epithelium. A second derived adaptation present in humans is

  20. 'Goats that stare at men': dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to human head orientation, but do not spontaneously use head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, comparative research on the mechanisms and species-specific adaptive values of attributing attentive states and using communicative cues has gained increased interest, particularly in non-human primates, birds, and dogs. Here, we investigate these phenomena in a farm animal species, the dwarf goat (Capra aegagrus hircus). In the first experiment, we investigated the effects of different human head and body orientations, as well as human experimenter presence/absence, on the behaviour of goats in a food-anticipating paradigm. Over a 30-s interval, the experimenter engaged in one of four different postures or behaviours (head and body towards the subject-'Control', head to the side, head and body away from the subject, or leaving the room) before delivering a reward. We found that the level of subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the control condition and decreased with a decreasing level of attention paid to the subject by the experimenter. Additionally, goats 'stared' (i.e. stood alert) at the experimental set-up for significantly more time when the experimenter was present but paid less attention to the subject ('Head' and 'Back' condition) than in the 'Control' and 'Out' conditions. In a second experiment, the experimenter provided different human-given cues that indicated the location of a hidden food reward in a two-way object choice task. Goats were able to use both 'Touch' and 'Point' cues to infer the correct location of the reward but did not perform above the level expected by chance in the 'Head only' condition. We conclude that goats are able to differentiate among different body postures of a human, including head orientation; however, despite their success at using multiple physical human cues, they fail to spontaneously use human head direction as a cue in a food-related context.

  1. The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Scott R; Olivier, Jake; Churches, Tim; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2011-11-01

    The study aimed to assess the effect of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries given the ongoing debate in Australia as to the efficacy of this measure at a population level. We used hospital admissions data from New South Wales, Australia, from a 36 month period centred at the time legislation came into effect. Negative binomial regression of hospital admission counts of head and limb injuries to cyclists were performed to identify differential changes in head and limb injury rates at the time of legislation. Interaction terms were included to allow different trends between injury types and pre- and post-law time periods. To avoid the issue of lack of cyclist exposure data, we assumed equal exposures between head and limb injuries which allowed an arbitrary proxy exposure to be used in the model. As a comparison, analyses were also performed for pedestrian data to identify which of the observed effects were specific to cyclists. In general, the models identified a decreasing trend in injury rates prior to legislation, an increasing trend thereafter and a drop in rates at the time legislation was enacted, all of which were thought to represent background effects in transport safety. Head injury rates decreased significantly more than limb injury rates at the time of legislation among cyclists but not among pedestrians. This additional benefit was attributed to compulsory helmet legislation. Despite numerous data limitations, we identified evidence of a positive effect of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries at a population level such that repealing the law cannot be justified.

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

  3. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-01

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  4. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-07

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  5. Harvesting the biosphere: the human impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smil, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The human species has evolved to dominate the biosphere: global anthropomass is now an order of magnitude greater than the mass of all wild terrestrial mammals. As a result, our dependence on harvesting the products of photosynthesis for food, animal feed, raw materials, and energy has grown to make substantial global impacts. During the past two millennia these harvests, and changes of land use due to deforestation and conversions of grasslands and wetlands, have reduced the stock of global terrestrial plant mass by as much as 45 percent, with the twentieth-century reduction amounting to more than 15 percent. Current annual harvests of phytomass have been a significant share of the global net primary productivity (NPP, the total amount of new plant tissues created by photosynthesis). Some studies put the human appropriation of NPP (the ratio of these two variables) as high as 40 percent but the measure itself is problematic. Future population growth and improved quality of life will result in additional claims on the biosphere, but options to accommodate these demands exist without severely compromising the irreplaceable biospheric services.

  6. Prevalence of human papillomaviruses in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Lithuania and Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudleviciene, Zivile; Didziapetriene, Janina; Mackeviciene, Irina; Cicenas, Saulius; Smolyakova, Raisa; Zhukavetc, Aliaksandr; Zivile, Gudleviciene; Janina, Didziapetriene; Irina, Mackeviciene; Saulius, Cicenas; Raisa, Smolyakova; Aliaksandr, Zhukavetc

    2014-03-01

    Overall, head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma accounts for more than 550,000 cases annually worldwide. It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for cervical cancer development. As the incidence and the mortality of cervical cancer are closely related to the HPV prevalence, we hypothesized that there is the same association between HPV prevalence and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore we performed the study aiming to compare the level of HPV infection and HPV type distribution between two groups of Lithuanian and Belarusian patients with head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma. One hundred ninety head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients were included in the study, 75 from Lithuania and 115 from Belarus. PCR was used for HPV detection and typing. The distribution of HPV infection among head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients was similar in the Lithuanian (20.0%) and Belarusian (18.3%) patient groups, however differences were found in the distribution of HPV types.

  7. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  8. Dissection and Exposure of the Whole Course of Deep Nerves in Human Head Specimens after Decalcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The whole course of the chorda tympani nerve, nerve of pterygoid canal, and facial nerves and their relationships with surrounding structures are complex. After reviewing the literature, it was found that details of the whole course of these deep nerves are rarely reported and specimens displaying these nerves are rarely seen in the dissecting room, anatomical museum, or atlases. Dissections were performed on 16 decalcified human head specimens, exposing the chorda tympani and the nerve connection between the geniculate and pterygopalatine ganglia. Measurements of nerve lengths, branching distances, and ganglia size were taken. The chorda tympani is a very fine nerve (0.44 mm in diameter within the tympanic cavity and approximately 54 mm in length. The mean length of the facial nerve from opening of internal acoustic meatus to stylomastoid foramen was 52.5 mm. The mean length of the greater petrosal nerve was 26.1 mm and nerve of the pterygoid canal was 15.1 mm.

  9. Abnormal white matter integrity related to head impact exposure in a season of high school varsity football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Elizabeth M; Whitlow, Christopher T; Urban, Jillian E; Espeland, Mark A; Jung, Youngkyoo; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Gioia, Gerard A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D; Maldjian, Joseph A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cumulative effects of head impacts from a season of high school football produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measureable changes in the brain in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussion. Players from a local high school football team were instrumented with the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS™) during all practices and games. All players received pre- and postseason MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was also conducted. Total impacts and risk-weighted cumulative exposure (RWE), including linear (RWELinear), rotational (RWERotational), and combined components (RWECP), were computed from the sensor data. Fractional, linear, planar, and spherical anisotropies (FA, CL, CP, and CS, respectively), as well as mean diffusivity (MD), were used to determine total number of abnormal white matter voxels defined as 2 standard deviations above or below the group mean. Delta (post-preseason) ImPACT scores for each individual were computed and compared to the DTI measures using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. None of the players analyzed experienced clinical concussion (N=24). Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship between RWECP and FA. Secondary analyses demonstrated additional statistically significant linear associations between RWE (RWECP and RWELinear) and all DTI measures. There was also a strong correlation between DTI measures and change in Verbal Memory subscore of the ImPACT. We demonstrate that a single season of football can produce brain MRI changes in the absence of clinical concussion. Similar brain MRI changes have been previously associated with mild traumatic brain injury.

  10. The Impact of Gross Anatomy on the Future Head and Neck Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, David J.; Carlson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Gross anatomy is not only a rite of passage for medical students as they enter the world of practicing medicine but may also be an unrecognized fork in the road in their pursuit of choosing a medical specialty. Otolaryngology: head and neck surgery tends to be poorly represented in medical school curriculum, often only offered as an elective…

  11. Supporting Head Start Parents: Impact of a Text Message Intervention on Parent-Child Activity Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Lisa B.; Lauricella, Alexis R.; Hanson, Ann; Raden, Anthony; Wartella, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Head Start emphasises parent engagement as a critical strategy in promoting children's long-term learning. Parents can support children's positive development by engaging them in stimulating activities. The following study assessed whether a service that delivered parenting tips via text message could prompt parents of children enrolled in Head…

  12. The Impact of Human Resource Management Practices on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRREV IJAH: An International Journal of Arts and Humanities ... Abstract. The focus of this paper is on the impact of HRM practices on private sector organisations ... Keywords: Human Resource Management, Performance; Best Practices ...

  13. Cryodamage to plasma membrane integrity in head and tail regions of human sperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-JieZHU; Xue-GaoLIU

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of cryopreservation on the plasma membrane integrity in the head and tail regions of individual sperm, and the relationship between intact cryopreserved sperm and its motility and zona-free hamster oocyte penetration rate. Methods: The eosin Y exclusion and the hypoosmotic swelling tests were combined to form a single test (HOS-EY test) to identify the spermatozoa with four types of membrane integrity. Results: After cryopreservation, there was a marked decline in the percentage of spermatozoa with Type IV membrane integrity (head membrane intact/tail membrane intact), and a significant increase in those with Type Ⅰ (head membrane damaged/tail membrane damaged) and Type Ⅲ (head membrane damaged/tail membrane intact) membrane integrity (n = 50, P0.05). Conclusion: (1) The HOS-EY test has the advantage of showing four patterns of membrane integrity in individual spermatozoon; (2) Cryopreservation causes a significant membrane rupture in the head and tail regions of spermatozoa; Type IT[ is the main transitional state of membrane cryodamage; (3) Cryodamage to head and tail membrane may occur independently; the presence of an intact tail membrane does not necessarily indicate the intactness of head membrane. (4) Intact membranes am closely related to postthaw motility, but do not reflect the fertilizing potential.

  14. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain.

  15. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  16. Investigation of Sub-Assembly of Product for Environment Impact Assessment: Quantitative Evaluation of Shroud Fan Cover assembly and Cylinder Head Cover assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. SUMAN SHARMA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We live in a changing world. In many countries the systems are under change. The changes are largely driven by environmental considerations and one driving force is the threat of global climate change. When making new strategic decisions related to manufacturing any product it becomes important to consider the environmentalimplications. The total consumption of materials and energy during the Life cycle of product is greatly affecting the environment. The proper selection of engineering materials for manufacturing of a product can minimize the environmental impact. The environmental impact of products and processes has become a key issue that has led companies to investigate ways to minimize their effects on the environment. LCA is a means of deriving a quantitative evaluation of environmental impact of product design and thereby refining product quality and characteristics. The overall aim of the present work is to evaluate the environmental impact of some important sub-assembliesof a two wheeler for main stages of life cycle i.e. manufacturing stages of raw material and part manufacturing. An investigation has been done on two sub-assemblies of engine group of Activa i.e. shroud fan cover and cylinder head cover. It has been presented using EDIP (Environmental Design of Industrial Product as LCA method as per ISO 14040. The study reveals that the environmental impact is more in the case of manufacturing of steel and rubber parts as compared to plastic and aluminium parts of selected subassemblies and eco-toxicityand human toxicity is more as compared to other impact categories.

  17. Effect of the Head Restraint Properties on Head-neck Kinematics in Low Speed Rear-end Impacts%汽车低速追尾碰撞中人体颈部伤害及保护系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔维高; 商博

    2011-01-01

    在MADYMO软件中使用BioRID Ⅱ后碰撞假人建立追尾碰撞模型,分析了头枕位置和倾角参数对汽车发生追尾碰撞时头颈部动力学的影响,并使用颈部损伤准则值NIC和Nkm来评估颈部损伤的风险.仿真结果表明这些因素对颈部的动力学响应有着重要影响,高而且靠近头部,并且有适当增大倾角的头枕,有助于减小颈部的损伤.%Head restraint plays a very important part in protecting the occupants during the rear impact. The present study investigated the effects of the position, tilt angle of the head restraint on the biomechanical responses and related injury measures of the neck in a rear-end impact. A series of simulated rear-end impacts were conducted by applying a rear-end impact model, which is developed in the MADYMO package by using the BioRID II dummy. Then, the neck injury criterion (NIC) and JV\\-km were utilized to assess the likelihood of injury. The results show that modifying the head restraint may influence the head-neck kinematics to a great extent. It is possible to reduce the neck injury risk by positioning the head restraint higher and closer to the head, and with a proper larger tilt angle.

  18. Postradiation trismus and its impact on quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Yun; Chen, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Bing-Shen; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the following in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC): (1) factors related to trismus that predict the development of trismus, (2) factors affecting quality of life and measurements of these factors, and (3) comparison of these findings in patients with and without trismus to evaluate the effects of trismus on quality of life. This cross-sectional study included the questionnaires: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Depression Subscale, the Chewing Function Questionnaire (CFQ), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - Head and Neck Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-HN35). A scaled ruler was used to measure maximal intercisal opening (MIO). Of the 104 patients in the study, 8.7% had clinical depression. The average MIO was 35.81 mm, and 47.1% of patients had trismus. Moderate levels of chewing dysfunction with regard to different types of food were noted. Lower body mass index, chemoradiotherapy treatment, longer time since treatment completion, and higher radiation dose were significantly associated with trismus. Such patients had significantly lower head and neck-specific quality of life in terms of social contact, sexuality, teeth, mouth opening, dry mouth, feeling ill, nutritional supplement, and weight loss. Patients with trismus should be provided mouth opening exercises after treatment and programs to improve trismus and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human papillomavirus infection on initiating synchronous esophageal neoplasia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Lun; Wang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chi-Yang; Lo, Jo-Lin; Kuo, Yao-Hung; Hwang, Tzer-Zen; Wang, Chih-Chun; Mo, Lein-Ray; Lin, Jaw-Town; Lee, Ching-Tai

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as well as esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We aimed to investigate whether HPV infection underlies the field cancerization phenomenon over upper aerodigestive tract to develop synchronous multiple cancers. A case control study. The presence and subtype of HPV-DNA sequence in cancers were examined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing in a prospective cohort with 100 HNSCCs, 50 of which had synchronous ESCCs. The clinicopathologic characteristics were further analyzed according to the presence of HPV. Twelve patients were HPV-positive, of which 11 were positive for HPV-16. The prevalence of HPV infection were not different between the synchronous and HNSCC alone groups (P = 0.357). Testing for HPV in paired HNSCC and ESCC tissues from the same patient revealed that none were concomitantly HPV-positive. Multivariate logistic regression showed drinking alcohol (odds ratio [OR], 18.75; P = 0.030), alcohol flushing (OR, 2.53; P = 0.041), and body mass index (OR, 0.77; P = 0.001) but not HPV infection were independent risk factors for synchronous phenotype. The patients with synchronous ESCCs had significantly poorer survival than those with HNSCC alone (5-year overall survival: 30% vs. 70%; log-rank P infection plays little role in field cancerization phenomenon to initiate synchronous SCC. The synchronous HNSCC and ESCC from the same patients had no clonal relationship. Routine endoscopic examination of the esophagus should be recommended for patients with risk factors identified. NA. Laryngoscope, 126:1097-1102, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Do anthropogenic or coastal aerosol sources impact on a clean marine aerosol signature at Mace Head?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O'Dowd

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols have been sampled and characterised at the Mace Head North East (N.E. Atlantic atmospheric research station since 1958, with many interesting phenomena being discovered. However, with the range of new discoveries and scientific advances, there has been a range of concomitant criticisms challenging the representativeness of aerosol sampled at the station to that of aerosol over the open ocean. Two recurring criticisms relate to the lack of representativeness due to enhanced coastal sources, thereby leading to artificially high values to aerosol parameters, and to the influence of long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosol and its potential dominance over, or drowning-out of, a natural marine aerosol signal. Here we review the results of previous experimental studies into marine aerosols over the N.E. Atlantic and at Mace Head with the aim of evaluating their representativeness relative to that of an open ocean aerosol with negligible anthropogenic influence. Particular focus is given to organic matter (OM aerosol. In summary, no correlation was found between OM and black carbon (BC either at BC levels of 0–15 or 15–50 ng m−3, suggesting that OM concentrations up to peak values of 3.8 μg m−3 are predominantly natural in origin. Sophisticated carbon isotope analysis and aerosol mass spectral finger printing corroborate the natural source of OM with 80% biogenic source apportionment being observed for general clean air conditions, rising to 98% during specific primary marine organic plumes when peak concentrations >3 μg m−3 are observed. A range of other experiments are discussed which corroborate the dominance of a marine signal under Mace Head clean air criteria along. Further, analysis of a series of experiments conducted at Mace Head conclude that negligible coastal, surf zone, or tidal effects are discernible in the submicron size range for sampling heights of 7 m and above. The Mace Head clean air criteria

  1. Activity of superior head of human lateral pterygoid increases with increases in contralateral and protrusive jaw displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Manish K; Phanachet, Intira; Whittle, Terry; Peck, Chris C; Murray, Greg M

    2007-08-01

    The hypothesis was that the superior head of human lateral pterygoid muscle (SHLP) plays a similar role in jaw movement as the inferior head of human lateral pterygoid muscle (IHLP). The aims were to determine the functional properties of SHLP single motor units (SMUs) and root mean square activity (RMS) of the SHLP during contralateral and protrusive jaw movement tasks and to compare these features with those identified previously for the IHLP. In 22 human subjects, SMUs were recorded intramuscularly from computer tomography-verified sites within the SHLP during standardized contralateral and protrusive jaw movement tasks recorded by a jaw-tracking device. Of the 50 SMUs discriminated, 39 were active during contralateral and 29 during protrusive jaw movements. The firing rates and RMS of the SHLP motor units increased with an increase in jaw displacement. The RMS activity across the entire trial during contralateral jaw movement was significantly greater than that during protrusion. Similarly to conclusions previously identified for the IHLP, the data are consistent with an important role for the SHLP in the control of contralateral and protrusive jaw movements. The similarities in SHLP and IHLP functional properties support the proposal that both heads should be regarded as a system of fibers acting as one muscle.

  2. A Novel Cellular Handset Design for an Enhanced Antenna Performance and a Reduced SAR in the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah I. Al-Mously

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel cellular handset design with a bottom-mounted short loaded-whip antenna. This new handset design is modeled and simulated using a finite difference time-domain (FDTD-based platform SEMCAD. The proposed handset is based on a current commercially available bar-phone type with a curvature shape, keypad positioned above the screen, and top-mounted antenna. The specific absorption rates (SARs are determined computationally in the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM and anatomically correct model of a human head when exposed to the EM-field radiation of the proposed cellular handset and the handset with top-mounted antenna. The two cellular handsets are simulated to operate at both GSM standards, 900 MHz as well as 1800 MHz, having different antenna dimensions and intput power of 0.6 W and 0.125 W, respectively. The proposed human hand holding the two handset models is a semirealistic hand model consists of three tissues: skin, muscle, and bone. The simulations are conducted with handset positions based on the IEEE standard 1528-2003. The results show that the proposed handset has a significant improvement of antenna efficiency when it is hand-held close to head, as compared with the handset of top-mounted antenna. Also, the results show that a significant reduction of the induced SAR in the human head-tissues can be achieved with the proposed handset.

  3. System identification of the human vestibulo-ocular reflex during head-free tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangorra, James L; Jones, Lynette A; Hunter, Ian W

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed to identify the linear, system level dynamics of the horizontal, angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) as it stabilized vision during head-free tracking of a visual target. Small amplitude, broad spectrum, stochastic torque perturbations were applied to the head while the subject tracked an unpredictable, moving target with active head and eye motions. Stochastic system identification techniques were used to design the torque and target inputs and to conduct the analysis such that the linear dynamics of the VOR, independently of the visual system's influence on eye motions, were determined. The linear analysis was limited to evaluating VOR dynamics from approximately 0.5 to 4.5 Hz. Nonlinearities in the head-neck system affected the low frequency response of the head to the torque perturbations, and the eye velocity sequence was affected by nonlinearities and degraded by noise at high frequencies. The VOR's gain was near 1.0 between about 0.5 and 2.5 Hz, and then decreased steadily to 0.85 as the frequency increased towards 4.0 Hz. The VOR phase angle was also frequency dependent and corresponded to VOR eye motions lagging the head's disturbance motion by less than 10 ms at frequencies greater than 1.0 Hz.

  4. Measurement of six degrees of freedom head kinematics in impact conditions employing six accelerometers and three angular rate sensors (6aω configuration).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun-Seok; Moorhouse, Kevin; Bolte, John H

    2011-11-01

    The ability to measure six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) head kinematics in motor vehicle crash conditions is important for assessing head-neck loads as well as brain injuries. A method for obtaining accurate 6 DOF head kinematics in short duration impact conditions is proposed and validated in this study. The proposed methodology utilizes six accelerometers and three angular rate sensors (6aω configuration) such that an algebraic equation is used to determine angular acceleration with respect to the body-fixed coordinate system, and angular velocity is measured directly rather than numerically integrating the angular acceleration. Head impact tests to validate the method were conducted using the internal nine accelerometer head of the Hybrid III dummy and the proposed 6aω scheme in both low (2.3 m/s) and high (4.0 m/s) speed impact conditions. The 6aω method was compared with a nine accelerometer array sensor package (NAP) as well as a configuration of three accelerometers and three angular rate sensors (3aω), both of which have been commonly used to measure 6 DOF kinematics of the head for assessment of brain and neck injuries. The ability of each of the three methods (6aω, 3aω, and NAP) to accurately measure 6 DOF head kinematics was quantified by calculating the normalized root mean squared deviation (NRMSD), which provides an average percent error over time. Results from the head impact tests indicate that the proposed 6aω scheme is capable of producing angular accelerations and linear accelerations transformed to a remote location that are comparable to that determined from the NAP scheme in both low and high speed impact conditions. The 3aω scheme was found to be unable to provide accurate angular accelerations or linear accelerations transformed to a remote location in the high speed head impact condition due to the required numerical differentiation. Both the 6aω and 3aω schemes were capable of measuring accurate angular displacement while the

  5. Simplified realistic human head model for simulating Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Cornelia; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields in the intermediate frequency range (100-300 kHz) of low-intensity (1-3 V/cm). TTFields are an anti-mitotic treatment against solid tumors, which are approved for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients. These electric fields are induced non-invasively by transducer arrays placed directly on the patient's scalp. Cell culture experiments showed that treatment efficacy is dependent on the induced field intensity. In clinical practice, a software called NovoTalTM uses head measurements to estimate the optimal array placement to maximize the electric field delivery to the tumor. Computational studies predict an increase in the tumor's electric field strength when adapting transducer arrays to its location. Ideally, a personalized head model could be created for each patient, to calculate the electric field distribution for the specific situation. Thus, the optimal transducer layout could be inferred from field calculation rather than distance measurements. Nonetheless, creating realistic head models of patients is time-consuming and often needs user interaction, because automated image segmentation is prone to failure. This study presents a first approach to creating simplified head models consisting of convex hulls of the tissue layers. The model is able to account for anisotropic conductivity in the cortical tissues by using a tensor representation estimated from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. The induced electric field distribution is compared in the simplified and realistic head models. The average field intensities in the brain and tumor are generally slightly higher in the realistic head model, with a maximal ratio of 114% for a simplified model with reasonable layer thicknesses. Thus, the present pipeline is a fast and efficient means towards personalized head models with less complexity involved in characterizing tissue interfaces, while enabling accurate predictions of electric field distribution.

  6. Computerized Virtual Reality Simulation in Preclinical Dentistry: Can a Computerized Simulator Replace the Conventional Phantom Heads and Human Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, Anastasios

    2017-07-10

    In preclinical dental education, the acquisition of clinical, technical skills, and the transfer of these skills to the clinic are paramount. Phantom heads provide an efficient way to teach preclinical students dental procedures safely while increasing their dexterity skills considerably. Modern computerized phantom head training units incorporate features of virtual reality technology and the ability to offer concurrent augmented feedback. The aims of this review were to examine and evaluate the dental literature for evidence supporting their use and to discuss the role of augmented feedback versus the facilitator's instruction. Adjunctive training in these units seems to enhance student's learning and skill acquisition and reduce the required faculty supervision time. However, the virtual augmented feedback cannot be used as the sole method of feedback, and the facilitator's input is still critical. Well-powered longitudinal randomized trials exploring the impact of these units on student's clinical performance and issues of cost-effectiveness are warranted.

  7. Finite element modeling of human brain response to football helmet impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T; Muthuswamy, J; Rajan, S D

    2016-10-01

    The football helmet is used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. While the current helmet design methodology may be adequate for reducing linear acceleration of the head and minimizing TBI, it however has had less effect in minimizing mTBI. The objectives of this study are (a) to develop and validate a coupled finite element (FE) model of a football helmet and the human body, and (b) to assess responses of different regions of the brain to two different impact conditions - frontal oblique and crown impact conditions. The FE helmet model was validated using experimental results of drop tests. Subsequently, the integrated helmet-human body FE model was used to assess the responses of different regions of the brain to impact loads. Strain-rate, strain, and stress measures in the corpus callosum, midbrain, and brain stem were assessed. Results show that maximum strain-rates of 27 and 19 s(-1) are observed in the brain-stem and mid-brain, respectively. This could potentially lead to axonal injuries and neuronal cell death during crown impact conditions. The developed experimental-numerical framework can be used in the study of other helmet-related impact conditions.

  8. The Asymmetric Impact of Growth Fluctuation on Human Development

    OpenAIRE

    Serap Bedir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we re-examine the impact of economic growth fluctuation on human development indicators. Using the per capita growth rate and human development indicators for 131 countries between 1974 and 2007, we find that growth acceleration and deceleration have significant impact on the human development indicators. We also find that the effects are asymmetric. This asymmetric effect is valid both in terms of acceleration and deceleration periods and countries which are classified accordi...

  9. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact resistance and hardness modelling of Aluminium alloy welds using square-headed friction-stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, U.; Srinivas, J., Dr.

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes modelling and optimization issues relating to friction-stir welding process of aluminium alloys. A specially prepared SS tool of square headed pin profile with cylindrical shoulder is used with a vertical milling machine. Effects of process variables including tool rotation and tool velocity on the weld performance are studied in terms of impact strength and hardness. Three different rotational motions and three welding speeds (feeds) of tool are considered at constant axial load (depth of cut) condition and altogether nine experiments are conducted on a vertical milling machine with specially prepared fixture. Each weld sample is then tested for its impact strength (IS) and hardness independently. A model is developed to correlate the relations between the hardness/impact strength with tool rotation and weld speed using neural networks. The optimized process conditions are predicted to improvise the impact strength and hardness of the weld. Further, the morphology of the weld is studied using SEM to know the material flow characteristics.

  11. Gaze following in baboons (Papio anubis): juveniles adjust their gaze and body position to human's head redirections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parron, Carole; Meguerditchian, Adrien

    2016-12-01

    Gaze following, the ability to follow the gaze of other individuals, has been widely studied in non-human primate species, mostly in adult individuals. Yet, the literature on gaze following revealed a quite variability across the different findings, some of it might reflect true inter-species differences, while others might be related to methodological differences, or to an underestimation of the factors involved in the expression of gaze following. In the current study, we tested 54 captive olive baboons (Papio anubis), housed in social groups, to assess how juvenile and adult baboons would spontaneously react to a sudden change in the direction of a human experimenter's head. First, our results showed that juveniles, more than adult baboons, co-oriented their gaze with the experimenter's gaze. We also observed a strong habituation effect in adult baboons but not in juveniles, as the adults' response vanished at the second exposure to a change of direction of the experimenter's head. Second, our results showed that juveniles subsequently adopted an original strategy when the experimenter's head indicated some new directions: they reliably adjusted their spatial body position to keep a gaze contact with the experimenter's line of sight. We discussed how the age class and the individual expertise of the baboons could lead to some modulations in terms of attentiveness, motivation, or cognitive abilities, and thus likely influence gaze following.

  12. Organization and Detailed Parcellation of Human Hippocampal Head and Body Regions Based on a Combined Analysis of Cyto- and Chemoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Lin; Van Hoesen, Gary W

    2015-10-15

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is one of the hottest regions in neuroscience because it is critical to learning, memory, and cognition, while being vulnerable to many neurological and mental disorders. With increasing high-resolution imaging techniques, many scientists have started to use distinct landmarks along the anterior-posterior axis of HF to allow segmentation into individual subfields in order to identify specific functions in both normal and diseased conditions. These studies urgently call for more reliable and accurate segmentation of the HF subfields DG, CA3, CA2, CA1, prosubiculum, subiculum, presubiculum, and parasubiculum. Unfortunately, very limited data are available on detailed parcellation of the HF subfields, especially in the complex, curved hippocampal head region. In this study we revealed detailed organization and parcellation of all subfields of the hippocampal head and body regions on the base of a combined analysis of multiple cyto- and chemoarchitectural stains and dense sequential section sampling. We also correlated these subfields to macro-anatomical landmarks, which are visible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Furthermore, we created three versions of the detailed anatomic atlas for the hippocampal head region to account for brains with four, three, or two hippocampal digitations. These results will provide a fundamental basis for understanding the organization, parcellation, and anterior-posterior difference of human HF, facilitating accurate segmentation and measurement of HF subfields in the human brain on MRI scans.

  13. Role of human papillomavirus and its detection in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions: updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Mamta; Sundaram, Shanthy; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2009-06-25

    Head and neck malignancies are characterized by a multiphasic and multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most common risk factors for head and neck malignancy. Other factors, including DNA viruses, especially human papilloma virus (HPV), may also play a role in the initiation or development of these lesions. The pathways of HPV transmission in the head and neck mucosal lesions include oral-genital contact, more than one sexual partner and perinatal transmission of HPV to the neonatal child. The increase in prevalence of HPV infection in these lesions may be due to wider acceptance of oral sex among teenagers and adults as this is perceived to be a form of safe sex. The prevalence of HPV in benign lesions as well as malignancies has been assessed by many techniques. Among these, the polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive method. Review of literature reveals that HPV may be a risk factor for malignancies, but not in all cases. For confirmation of the role of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, large population studies are necessary in an assortment of clinical settings. Prophylactic vaccination against high-risk HPV types eventually may prevent a significant number of cervical carcinomas. Of the two vaccines currently available, Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, while the other vaccine, Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) protects against HPV types 16 and 18 only. However, the HPV vaccine has, to the best of our knowledge, not been tried in head and neck carcinoma. The role of HPV in etiopathogenesis, prevalence in benign and malignant lesions of this area and vaccination strategies are briefly reviewed here.

  14. Human surrogate neck response to +Gz vertical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Uittenbogaard, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the evaluation of impact scenarios with a substantial vertical component, the performance of current human surrogates - the RID 3D hardware dummy and two numerical human models - was evaluated. Volunteer tests with 10G and 6G pulses were compared to reconstructed tests with human surrogates.

  15. Human surrogate neck response to +Gz vertical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Uittenbogaard, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the evaluation of impact scenarios with a substantial vertical component, the performance of current human surrogates - the RID 3D hardware dummy and two numerical human models - was evaluated. Volunteer tests with 10G and 6G pulses were compared to reconstructed tests with human surrogates. Add

  16. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  18. Understanding Edward Muybridge: historical review of behavioral alterations after a 19th-century head injury and their multifactorial influence on human life and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro

    2015-07-01

    Edward Muybridge was an Anglo-American photographer, well known for his pioneering contributions in photography and his invention of the "zoopraxiscope," a forerunner of motion pictures. However, this 19th-century genius, with two original patents in photographic technology, made outstanding contributions in art and neurology alike, the latter being seldom acknowledged. A head injury that he sustained changed his behavior and artistic expression. The shift of his interests from animal motion photography to human locomotion and gait remains a pivotal milestone in our understanding of patterns in biomechanics and clinical neurology, while his own behavioral patterns, owing to an injury to the orbitofrontal cortex, remain a mystery even for cognitive neurologists. The behavioral changes he exhibited and the legal conundrum that followed, including a murder of which he was acquitted, all depict the complexities of his personality and impact of frontal lobe injuries. This article highlights the life journey of Muybridge, drawing parallels with Phineas Gage, whose penetrating head injury has been studied widely. The wide sojourn of Muybridge also illustrates the strong connections that he maintained with Stanford and Pennsylvania universities, which were later considered pinnacles of higher education on the two coasts of the United States.

  19. Dentinal innervation of impacted human third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, J; Fagerberg-Mohlin, B

    1984-12-01

    Five totally impacted third molars were studied in the transmission electron microscope for the presence of nervous structures in the dentin before eruption. In contradiction to earlier studies available, nervous structures were found in the predentin and the dentin of the impacted third molars in different parts of the crown and also in the predentin of the root.

  20. The impact of pediatric-specific dose modulation curves on radiation dose and image quality in head computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joana; Paulo, Graciano [Instituto Politecnico de Coimbra, ESTESC, DMIR, Coimbra (Portugal); Foley, Shane; Rainford, Louise [University College Dublin, School of Medicine and Medical Science, Health Science Centre, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEntee, Mark F. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cumberland Campus, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    The volume of CT examinations has increased with resultant increases in collective dose values over the last decade. To analyze the impact of the tube current and voltage modulation for dose values and image quality of pediatric head CT examinations. Head CT examinations were performed on anthropomorphic phantoms and four pediatric age categories before and after the introduction of dedicated pediatric curves for tube voltage and current modulation. Local diagnostic reference levels were calculated. Visual grading characteristic image quality evaluation was performed by four pediatric neuroradiologists and image noise comparisons were performed. Pediatric-specific modulation curves demonstrated a 49% decrease in mean radiation dose for phantom examinations. The local diagnostic reference levels (CTDIvol) for clinical examinations decreased by 52%, 41%, 46% and 40% for newborn, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, respectively. Visual grading characteristic image quality was maintained for the majority of age categorizations (area under the curve = 0.5) and image noise measurements did not change (P = 0.693). Pediatric-specific dose modulation curves resulted in an overall mean dose reduction of 45% with no significant differences in subjective or objective image quality findings. (orig.)

  1. Impact of MLC leaf position errors on simple and complex IMRT plans for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, G; Ludlum, E; Xia, P [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-01-07

    The dosimetric impact of random and systematic multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaf position errors is relatively unknown for head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) patients. In this report we studied 17 head and neck IMRT patients, including 12 treated with simple plans (<50 segments) and 5 treated with complex plans (>100 segments). Random errors (-2 to +2 mm) and systematic errors ({+-}0.5 mm and {+-}1 mm) in MLC leaf positions were introduced into the clinical plans and the resultant dose distributions were analyzed based on defined endpoint doses. The dosimetric effect was insignificant for random MLC leaf position errors up to 2 mm for both simple and complex plans. However, for systematic MLC leaf position errors, we found significant dosimetric differences between the simple and complex IMRT plans. For 1 mm systematic error, the average changes in D{sub 95%} were 4% in simple plans versus 8% in complex plans. The average changes in D{sub 0.1cc} of the spinal cord and brain stem were 4% in simple plans versus 12% in complex plans. The average changes in parotid glands were 9% in simple plans versus 13% for the complex plans. Overall, simple IMRT plans are less sensitive to leaf position errors than complex IMRT plans.

  2. Impact of head models in N170 component source imaging: results in control subjects and ADHD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrachini, L.; Blenkmann, A.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Petroni, A.; Urquina, H.; Manes, F.; Ibáñez, A.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The major goal of evoked related potential studies arise in source localization techniques to identify the loci of neural activity that give rise to a particular voltage distribution measured on the surface of the scalp. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the head model adopted in order to estimate the N170 component source in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and control subjects, considering faces and words stimuli. The standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography algorithm (sLORETA) is used to compare between the three shell spherical head model and a fully realistic model based on the ICBM-152 atlas. We compare their variance on source estimation and analyze the impact on the N170 source localization. Results show that the often used three shell spherical model may lead to erroneous solutions, specially on ADHD patients, so its use is not recommended. Our results also suggest that N170 sources are mainly located in the right occipital fusiform gyrus for faces stimuli and in the left occipital fusiform gyrus for words stimuli, for both control subjects and ADHD patients. We also found a notable decrease on the N170 estimated source amplitude on ADHD patients, resulting in a plausible marker of the disease.

  3. The impacts of climate change on a Norwegian high-head hydropower plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernet, Haregewoin Haile; Alfredsen, Knut; Killintveit, Aanund

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Norway relies on hydropower for 99 percent of the electricity production and thus Hydropower is important for Norway today and in the future energy system. The work presented in this paper shows how a high-head hydropower system in Norway will be affected in the future climate. The Aurland Hydropower system, operated by E-Co Vannkraft, Norway is the test case for the study. The Aurland hydropower system has many reservoirs and transfer systems and is considered to be one of the complex systems in Norway, but also a typical example of a Norwegian high head system. The nMAG Hydropower simulation model, which has been developed at the Norwegian Hydro technical Laboratory, is used to simulate the hydropower system. Historical and future inflow series were transposed from the neighbouring catchment Flaamselvi using scaling based on area and specific runoff, as there is no discharge station in Aurland catchment with long unregulated inflow series to set up the model and to be used for developing future climate scenarios. To generate the future inflow series for the analysis, the HBV hydrological model is calibrated for the Flaamselvi catchment. The model is then used to generate future inflow series of using the Hadley GCM (HADAm3) and A2, B2 climate scenarios. The operation of the hydropower system is then simulated for the period 2071 -2100 to see how future power production is affected by the change in the inflow conditions. The HBV model is also used to see how snow accumulation will be affected in the future as snow melt is important for Norwegian reservoir and hydropower systems. The Hydrologic scenarios under climate change imply an average increase in runoff for the system. Snow accumulation will decrease with sooner snow melt and more winter precipitation as rain. The hydropower simulation results show that associated with the increase in runoff there is an increase in energy generation with 10-20% under the current reservoir operation strategies

  4. Dysphagia. Impact on quality of life after radio(chemo)therapy of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Julia; Hipp, Matthias; Koelbl, Oliver [Regensburg Univ. Medical Center (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Schaefer, Christof [Hospital St. Elisabeth Straubing (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-11-15

    In the past, xerostomia was considered one of the most important determining factors of quality of life (QoL) after radiotherapy (RT) of the head and neck region. In addition, more recent studies have shown that RT-induced dysphagia has an essential influence on the QoL. Between September 2005 and August 2007, 35 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region were included in the prospective study. Patients were treated by IMAT (intensity-modulated arc therapy) or IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) planned on 3D imaging. A total of 28 patients (80%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The evaluation of QoL (EORTC QLQ - C30, H and N C-35) and toxicities (CTC 2.0) were assessed at the beginning of, during, and after RT as well as up to 12 months after the end of therapy. At the end of therapy, 86% of the patients experienced difficulties in swallowing (62% CTC II-III ). Twelve months after the end of treatment, 15% still suffered from dysphagia CTC II-III . Concomitant chemotherapy exacerbated the incidence and gravity of dysphagia, resulting in increasing dietary problems. QoL (EORTC) was significantly affected by dysphagia. In particular, the global state of health and QoL were influenced at the end of treatment (p = 0.033) and at a later stage (p = 0.050). The findings of this study suggest that more emphasis should be placed on structured clinical diagnostics, therapy, and rehabilitation of deglutition problems. This means in particular to not only spare the parotids while planning the irradiation, but also to take into consideration the important structures for deglutition, like the retropharyngeal muscles. (orig.)

  5. Eye-head stabilization mechanism for a humanoid robot tested on human inertial data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannucci, Lorenzo; Falotico, Egidio; Tolu, Silvia;

    2016-01-01

    they keep the image stationary on the retina. In this work we present the first complete model of eye-head stabilization based on the coordination of VCR and VOR. The model is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. Tests on a simulated humanoid platform replicating...

  6. [Cosmus Conrad Cuno (1652-1745) on a human ectoparasite: the head louse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, G H

    1979-07-01

    Cosmus Conrad Cuno, a less well known optician and inventor of microscopes from the second half of the 17th century, published in 1734 at Augsburg his Observationes durch dessen verfertigte Microscopia where along with various observations he communicated salient details pertaining to the biology of the head louse.

  7. Survey of Permethrin and Malathion Resistance in Human Head Lice Populations from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Knorr, Mette; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2006-01-01

    at the discriminating dose. The connection between permethrin resistance and kdr-like mutations is confirmed by our findings. The frequency of the double mutation T929I-L932 F in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with permethrin resistance was 0.95 in Danish head lice populations....

  8. The impact of technological era in human resource management

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Impact of the Technological Era in Human Resource Management This work project is a literature review, which covers current studies (theoretical and empirical) on electronic Human Resource Management, human resources analytics and telework, and discusses some implications of the adoption of technology in human resource management processes. The Work Project presents and discusses different and contradictory perspectives between empirical and theoretical studies, demonstrating that t...

  9. The impact of technological era in human resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Andrea Fernandes Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The Impact of the Technological Era in Human Resource Management This work project is a literature review, which covers current studies (theoretical and empirical) on electronic Human Resource Management, human resources analytics and telework, and discusses some implications of the adoption of technology in human resource management processes. The Work Project presents and discusses different and contradictory perspectives between empirical and theoretical studies, demonstrating that t...

  10. The impact of compulsory helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: a response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Scott R; Olivier, Jake; Churches, Tim; Grzebieta, Raphael

    2013-03-01

    This article responds to criticisms made in a rejoinder (Accident Analysis and Prevention 2012, 45: 107-109) questioning the validity of a study on the impact of mandatory helmet legislation (MHL) for cyclists in New South Wales, Australia. We systematically address the criticisms through clarification of our methods, extension of the original analysis and discussion of new evidence on the population-level effects of MHL. Extensions of our analysis confirm the original conclusions that MHL had a beneficial effect on head injury rates over and above background trends and changes in cycling participation. The ongoing debate around MHL draws attention away from important ways in which both safety and participation can be improved through investment in well-connected cycling infrastructure, fostering consideration between road users, and adequate legal protection for vulnerable road users. These are the essential elements for providing a cycling environment that encourages participation, with all its health, economic and environmental benefits, while maximising safety.

  11. The Asymmetric Impact of Growth Fluctuation on Human Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Bedir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we re-examine the impact of economic growth fluctuation on human development indicators. Using the per capita growth rate and human development indicators for 131 countries between 1974 and 2007, we find that growth acceleration and deceleration have significant impact on the human development indicators. We also find that the effects are asymmetric. This asymmetric effect is valid both in terms of acceleration and deceleration periods and countries which are classified according to human development. Namely, the negative impact of economic deceleration on human development outcomes is greater than the positive impact of economic acceleration for all countries. The same is true for medium and low human development countries. The positive impact of economic acceleration and negative impact of economic deceleration are greater than the impacts on very high and high development countries. Therefore, economic growth must be provided, which will reach everyone and ensure everyone's utilization of economic opportunities in order to achieve the 2023 Millennium Goals.

  12. The impact of 'anthropotechnology’ on human evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blad, S.

    2010-01-01

    From the time that they diverged from their common ancestor, chimpanzees and humans have had a very different evolutionary path. It seems obvious that the appearance of culture and technology has increasingly alienated humans from the path of natural selection that has informed chimpanzee evolution.

  13. The impact of 'anthropotechnology’ on human evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blad, S.

    2010-01-01

    From the time that they diverged from their common ancestor, chimpanzees and humans have had a very different evolutionary path. It seems obvious that the appearance of culture and technology has increasingly alienated humans from the path of natural selection that has informed chimpanzee evolution.

  14. Mapping cumulative human impacts in the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, A.; Andersen, Jesper; Heinänen, S.

    of the MSFD; and 3) to deepen the understanding of how errors in expert judgment affect the resulting cumulative human impact maps by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We combined existing data sets on the spatial distribution of 33 anthropogenic stressors (linked to the MSFD pressures) and 28 key habitats....... In contrast, the predicted impacts for much of the Norwegian EEZ and areas far offshore were lower. The Monte Carlo simulations confirmed earlier findings that mapping cumulative impacts is generally "robust", but also showed that specific combinations of errors can seriously change local and regional...... on marine ecosystems have only recently been developed. The aims of our study were: 1) to develop a map of cumulative human impacts for the Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and German parts of the Greater North Sea; 2) to adjust the existing methods for mapping cumulative human impacts to fit the requirements...

  15. Impact of memory on human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, A

    2006-01-01

    Our experience of web access slowing down is a consequence of the aggregated web access pattern of web users. This is just one example among several human oriented services which are strongly affected by human activity patterns. Recent empirical evidence is indicating that human activity patterns are characterized by power law distributions of inter-event times, where large fluctuations rather than regularity is the common case. I show that this temporal heterogeneity can be explained by two mechanisms: (i) humans have some perception of their past activity rate and (ii) based on that they react by accelerating or reducing their activity rate. Using these two mechanisms I explain the inter-event time statistics of Darwin's and Einstein's correspondence and the email activity within an university environment. Moreover, they are typical examples of the the accelerating and reducing class, respectively. These results are relevant to the system design of human oriented services.

  16. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV. ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 4 (2013) > ... HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital ...

  17. Review: The impact of changing human environment and climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: The impact of changing human environment and climate change on ... and evaluation, have after completion caused untold public health problems. ... rapid international travels, changes in food handling and processing as well as ...

  18. EXPERIMENTAL AND MICRO-IMPACT MECHANISM OF GRINDING HEAD IN POLISHING MACHINE%抛光机磨头微观冲击机理与实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵俊鹏; 徐斌

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the microcosmic polishing mechanism ot grlnclmg neaa. Micro impact Mechanism of low/ high speed grinding head were derived. Mathematical modeling of microimpact and amplitude is established. It is concluded that the process of forming ceramic tile defects, by a series of SEM experiments of ceramic tiles. It is concluded that the micro-impact mechanism theory agreement with ceramic tile surface topography is obtained. A series of vibration experiments of grinding head is performed, low speed grinding head can help ceramic tile defects and it can considerably reduce the impact vibration of grinding head at the rough polishing; high speed grinding head so as to effectively enhance the tile surface smoothness at the finish polishing.%为了研究磨头微观加工机理,提出低、高速磨头微观冲击机理。建立微观冲击速度和振幅模型。通过SEM实验得出瓷砖微观缺陷形成过程,并验证了冲击机理理论符合瓷砖表面形貌。通过振动实验得出:粗抛阶段,低速磨头可以减少瓷砖缺陷,降低冲击振动;精抛阶段,高转速磨头可以提高瓷砖的表面质量。

  19. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hernández-Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA—assessed implant stability (ISQ values with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP (n=7 or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA (n=10. Sixty 4.5×13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA (P0.5 in all cases, and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P>0.08. Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA. This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  20. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  1. Asteroid impact effects and their immediate hazards for human populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Clemens M.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2017-04-01

    A set of 50,000 artificial Earth impacting asteroids was used to obtain, for the first time, information about the dominance of individual impact effects such as wind blast, overpressure shock, thermal radiation, cratering, seismic shaking, ejecta deposition, and tsunami for the loss of human life during an impact event for impactor sizes between 15 and 400 m and how the dominance of impact effects changes over size. Information about the dominance of each impact effect can enable disaster managers to plan for the most relevant effects in the event of an asteroid impact. Furthermore, the analysis of average casualty numbers per impactor shows that there is a significant difference in expected loss for airburst and surface impacts and that the average impact over land is an order of magnitude more dangerous than one over water.

  2. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Ahmad Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Anees, Moazzam; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Fatima, Ammara

    2015-01-01

    Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) to elevated Cu(2+) levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu(2+) levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu(2+) in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu(2+) indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu(2+) the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins).

  3. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata in hydroponics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata to elevated Cu2+ levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu2+ levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu2+ in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu2+ indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu2+ the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins.

  4. The Impact of Ocular Pressures, Material Properties and Geometry on Optic Nerve Head Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, Andrew J.; Myers, Jerry G.; Raykin, Julia; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier C. Ross

    2017-01-01

    Alteration in intracranial pressure (ICP) has been associated with various diseases that cause visual impairment, including glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. However, how changes in ICP lead to vision loss is unclear, although it is hypothesized to involve deformations of the tissues in the optic nerve head (ONH). Recently, understanding the effect of ICP alterations on ocular tissues has become a major concern for NASA, where 42 of astronauts that partake in long duration space missions suffer from VIIP syndrome. Astronauts with VIIP syndrome suffer from visual impairment and changes in ocular anatomy that persist after returning to earth (1). It is hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that occurs upon entering microgravity increases ICP, which leads to an altered biomechanical environment in the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath, and subsequently VIIP syndrome. Our goal was to develop a finite element (FE) model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye. Here, we simulated how inter-individual differences affect the deformation of ONH tissues. Further, we examined how several different geometries influenced deformations when exposed to elevated ICP.

  5. Robust human machine interface based on head movements applied to assistive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Elisa; López, Natalia; Orosco, Eugenio; Soria, Carlos; Mut, Vicente; Freire-Bastos, Teodiano

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user's head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user's head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair.

  6. Robust Human Machine Interface Based on Head Movements Applied to Assistive Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Perez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user’s head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user’s head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair.

  7. Efficacy of neem seed extract shampoo on head lice of naturally infected humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Semmler, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Sixty heavily lice-infested male and female children (4-15 years) were selected and subjected to the treatment with a neem seed extract shampoo. Twenty to thirty milliliter of the shampoo were thoroughly mixed with completely wet hair and rubbed in to reach the skin of the scalp. After 5, 10, 15 and 30 min, the shampoo was washed out and the hair basically combed. Head lice were collected and examined. The neem seed extract shampoo proved to be highly effective against all stages of head lice. No obvious differences regarding the efficacy of the shampoo were observed between an exposure time of 10, 15 or 30 min. No side effects, such as skin irritation, burning sensations, or red spots on the scalp, forehead or neck, respectively, were observed.

  8. Experience and lessons from health impact assessment for human rights impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Utzinger, Jürg; Krieger, Gary R; Wielga, Mark; Singer, Burton H; Winkler, Mirko S; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2015-09-16

    As globalisation has opened remote parts of the world to foreign investment, global leaders at the United Nations and beyond have called on multinational companies to foresee and mitigate negative impacts on the communities surrounding their overseas operations. This movement towards corporate impact assessment began with a push for environmental and social inquiries. It has been followed by demands for more detailed assessments, including health and human rights. In the policy world the two have been joined as a right-to-health impact assessment. In the corporate world, the right-to-health approach fulfils neither managers' need to comprehensively understand impacts of a project, nor rightsholders' need to know that the full suite of their human rights will be safe from violation. Despite the limitations of a right-to-health tool for companies, integration of health into human rights provides numerous potential benefits to companies and the communities they affect. Here, a detailed health analysis through the human rights lens is carried out, drawing on a case study from the United Republic of Tanzania. This paper examines the positive and negative health and human rights impacts of a corporate operation in a low-income setting, as viewed through the human rights lens, considering observations on the added value of the approach. It explores the relationship between health impact assessment (HIA) and human rights impact assessment (HRIA). First, it considers the ways in which HIA, as a study directly concerned with human welfare, is a more appropriate guide than environmental or social impact assessment for evaluating human rights impacts. Second, it considers the contributions HRIA can make to HIA, by viewing determinants of health not as direct versus indirect, but as interrelated.

  9. Understanding the Societal Impact of Humanities Scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2016-01-01

    in society. An important assumption in this paper is that impact should be studied both from conceptual, qualitative and quantitative perspectives. Any approach that focuses merely on scientific outputs (such as publications or citations) or that relies on purely bibliometric indicators will result...

  10. The impact of Arabidopsis on human health: diversifying our portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan M; Chory, Joanne; Dangl, Jeffery L; Estelle, Mark; Jacobsen, Steven E; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef

    2008-06-13

    Studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana may seem to have little impact on advances in medical research, yet a survey of the scientific literature shows that this is a misconception. Many discoveries with direct relevance to human health and disease have been elaborated using Arabidopsis, and several processes important to human biology are more easily studied in this versatile model plant.

  11. Unpacking the Treatment Contrast in the Head Start Impact Study: To What Extent Does Assignment to Treatment Affect Quality of Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Connors, Maia C.; Morris, Pamela A.

    2017-01-01

    Attending high-quality early childhood care and education (ECCE) is associated with higher cognitive and social-emotional skills, especially for children growing up in poverty, but access to high-quality ECCE is limited. This study capitalizes on the random assignment design of the Head Start Impact Study to better understand whether the…

  12. Strengthening Families in Head Start: The Impact of a Parent Education Programme on the Emotional Well-Being of Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duch, Helena; Rodriguez, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the impact of a Head Start add-on programme, a matrix of services for parents which provides educational and vocational supports, on maternal depression and children's behaviour in Latino families. We hypothesise that after having completed training, parents who participated in the add-on programme would have lower levels of…

  13. An examination of the impact of participation in a conversation group for individuals with a closed head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblum, G; Mulder, M; von Gruenewaldt, A

    2001-01-01

    This study describes the impact of participation in a conversational group for individuals with chronic closed head injury in the Department of Communication Pathology at the University of Pretoria over the period 1995-2000. The information was obtained through a combination of clinical observations by the writers; the examination of data from Pragmatic measures; and a Quality of Life Scale that was compiled and administered (to both the subjects and their significant others) examining the perceived effects of group therapy over time. The results showed that despite the plateauing of pragmatic competence over time, the impact of group therapy appeared to reveal itself in perceived improvements in social-communicative competence and quality of life by the subjects. Recommendation and suggestions were made for the refinement of the QOL Scale to more reliably measure the subjective perceptions of group members regarding the perceived value of group therapy. In addition to addressing future implications to move the conversation group forward, the results of the current study lead the authors to advocate the establishment of conversation groups for individuals with CHI who are suitable candidates.

  14. Assessment of shoulder position variation and its impact on IMRT and VMAT doses for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Emily

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For radiotherapy of the head and neck, 5-point mask immobilization is used to stabilize the shoulders. Still, the daily position of the shoulders during treatment may be different from the position in the treatment plan despite correct isocenter setup. The purpose of this study was to determine the interfractional displacement of the shoulders relative to isocenter over the course of treatment and the associated dosimetric effect of this displacement. Methods The extent of shoulder displacements relative to isocenter was assessed for 10 patients in 5-point thermoplastic masks using image registration and daily CT-on-rails scans. Dosimetric effects on IMRT and VMAT plans were evaluated in Pinnacle based on simulation CTs modified to represent shoulder shifts between 3 and 15 mm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left directions. The impact of clinically observed shoulder shifts on the low-neck dose distributions was examined. Results Shoulder motion was 2-5 mm in each direction on average but reached 20 mm. Superior shifts resulted in coverage loss, whereas inferior shifts increased the dose to the brachial plexus. These findings were generally consistent for both IMRT and VMAT plans. Over a course of observed shifts, the dose to 99% of the CTV decreased by up to 101 cGy, and the brachial plexus dose increased by up to 72 cGy. Conclusions he position of the shoulder affects target coverage and critical structure dose, and may therefore be a concern during the setup of head and neck patients, particularly those with low neck primary disease.

  15. Assessment of shoulder position variation and its impact on IMRT and VMAT doses for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For radiotherapy of the head and neck, 5-point mask immobilization is used to stabilize the shoulders. Still, the daily position of the shoulders during treatment may be different from the position in the treatment plan despite correct isocenter setup. The purpose of this study was to determine the interfractional displacement of the shoulders relative to isocenter over the course of treatment and the associated dosimetric effect of this displacement. Methods The extent of shoulder displacements relative to isocenter was assessed for 10 patients in 5-point thermoplastic masks using image registration and daily CT-on-rails scans. Dosimetric effects on IMRT and VMAT plans were evaluated in Pinnacle based on simulation CTs modified to represent shoulder shifts between 3 and 15 mm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left directions. The impact of clinically observed shoulder shifts on the low-neck dose distributions was examined. Results Shoulder motion was 2-5 mm in each direction on average but reached 20 mm. Superior shifts resulted in coverage loss, whereas inferior shifts increased the dose to the brachial plexus. These findings were generally consistent for both IMRT and VMAT plans. Over a course of observed shifts, the dose to 99% of the CTV decreased by up to 101 cGy, and the brachial plexus dose increased by up to 72 cGy. Conclusions he position of the shoulder affects target coverage and critical structure dose, and may therefore be a concern during the setup of head and neck patients, particularly those with low neck primary disease. PMID:22316381

  16. Tooth enamel EPR dosimetry of neutrons: Enhancement of the apparent sensitivity at irradiation in the human head phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khailov, A.M. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249032 (Russian Federation); Ivannikov, A.I. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249032 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivannikov@mrrc.obninsk.ru; Tikunov, D.D.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249032 (Russian Federation); Zhumadilov, K.; Tanaka, K.; Endo, S.; Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Induction of the EPR signal in tooth enamel at irradiation by the neutrons produced by a generator with maximal energy of 0.8 MeV in the air and in the human head phantom was investigated. Neutron and photon tissue absorbed doses in the mixed radiation field were determined experimentally and calculated using the Monte-Carlo method. It is shown that the EPR signal response of enamel to neutrons relative to the tissue dose is (2{+-}2)% of the appropriate value for {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. At irradiation in the human head phantom, the EPR signal response relatively to the input neutron tissue dose near the surface of the phantom (apparent EPR sensitivity to neutrons) increases to (14{+-}1)%. The observed EPR signal enhancement is caused by absorption in enamel of the secondary photons produced at H(n,{gamma})H{sup 2}, E{sub {gamma}}=2.23MeV reaction in the material of the phantom.

  17. Direct comparison of the impact of head tracking, reverberation, and individualized head-related transfer functions on the spatial perception of a virtual speech source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, D. R.; Wenzel, E. M.; Anderson, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    A study of sound localization performance was conducted using headphone-delivered virtual speech stimuli, rendered via HRTF-based acoustic auralization software and hardware, and blocked-meatus HRTF measurements. The independent variables were chosen to evaluate commonly held assumptions in the literature regarding improved localization: inclusion of head tracking, individualized HRTFs, and early and diffuse reflections. Significant effects were found for azimuth and elevation error, reversal rates, and externalization.

  18. Impact of repeat computerized tomography replans in the radiation therapy of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical changes can occur during course of head-and-neck (H and N radiotherapy like tumor shrinkage, decreased edema and/or weight loss. This can lead to discrepancies in planned and delivered dose increasing the dose to organs at risk. A study was conducted to determine the volumetric and dosimetric changes with the help of repeat computed tomography (CT and replanning for selected H and N cancer patients treated with IMRT plans to see for these effects. In 15 patients with primary H and N cancer, a repeat CT scan after 3 rd week of radiotherapy was done when it was clinically indicated and then two plans were generated on repeat CT scan, actual plan (AP planned on repeat CT scan, and hybrid plan (HP, which was generated by applying the first intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plan (including monitoring units to the images of second CT scan. Both plans (AP and HP on repeat CT scan were compared for volumetric and dosimetric parameter. The mean variation in volumes between CT and repeat CT were 44.32 cc, 82.2 cc, and 149.83 cc for gross tumor volume (GTV, clinical target volumes (CTV, and planning target volume (PTV, respectively. Mean conformity index and homogeneity index was 0.68 and 1.07, respectively for AP and 0.5 and 1.16, respectively for HP. Mean D 95 and D 99 of PTV was 97.92% (standard deviation, SD 2.32 and 93.4% (SD 3.75, respectively for AP and 92.8% (SD 3.83 and 82.8% (SD 8.0, respectively for HP. Increase in mean doses to right parotid, left parotid, spine, and brainstem were 5.56 Gy (D mean , 3.28 Gy (D mean , 1.25 Gy (D max , and 3.88 Gy (D max , respectively in HP compared to AP. Repeat CT and replanning reduces the chance of discrepancies in delivered dose due to volume changes and also improves coverage to target volume and further reduces dose to organ at risk.

  19. Life cycle human health impacts of 875 pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Residues in field crops grown and harvested for human consumption are the main contributor to overall human exposure toward agricultural pesticides for the general population. However, exposure from crop residues is currently not considered in life cycle assessment practice. We therefore...... present a consistent framework for characterizing human toxicological impacts associated with pesticides applied to agricultural crops in the frame of life cycle impact assessment based on state-of-the-art data and methods. Methods We combine a dynamic multicrop plant uptake model designed for evaluating......-crop combinations of 10 orders of magnitude. Conclusions Our framework is operational for use in current life cycle impact assessment models, is made available for USEtox, and closes an important gap in the assessment of human exposure to pesticides. For ready use in life cycle assessment studies, we present...

  20. Mathematical human modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Lange, R. de

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash-safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimization of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently, such simulations are largely performed using occupant models b

  1. Human Experimentation: Impact on Health Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacalis, T. Demetri; Griffis, Kathleen

    1980-01-01

    The problems of the use of humans as subjects of medical research and the protection of their rights are discussed. Issues include the use of informed consent, the evaluation of risks and benefits, and the review of research plans by a committee. (JD)

  2. Mathematical human modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Hoof, J.F.A.M. van; Lange, R. de

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash-safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimization of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently, such simulations are largely performed using occupant models

  3. Mathematical human body modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Morsink, P.L.J.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modelling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimisation of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently such simulations are largely performed using occupant models

  4. Mathematical human body modelling for impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Morsink, P.L.J.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modelling of the human body is widely used for automotive crash safety research and design. Simulations have contributed to a reduction of injury numbers by optimisation of vehicle structures and restraint systems. Currently such simulations are largely performed using occupant models b

  5. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcito, Kendyl, E-mail: kendyl.salcito@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Utzinger, Jürg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Weiss, Mitchell G., E-mail: Mitchell-g.Weiss@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Münch, Anna K., E-mail: annak.muench@gmail.com [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Wielga, Mark, E-mail: wielga@nomogaia.org [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projects—a uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: • We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. • We piloted the methodology on two corporate projects—a mine and a plantation.

  6. The sex ratio distortion in the human head louse is conserved over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliński Szczepan M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the turn of the 19th century the first observations of a female-biased sex ratio in broods and populations of the head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, had been reported. A study by Buxton in 1940 on the sex ratio of lice on prisoners in Ceylon is still today the subject of reanalyses. This sex ratio distortion had been detected in ten different countries. In the last sixty years no new data have been collected, especially on scalp infestations under economically and socially more developed conditions. Results Here we report a female bias of head lice in a survey of 480 school children in Argentina. This bias is independent of the intensity of the pediculosis, which makes local mate competition highly unlikely as the source of the aberrant sex ratio; however, other possible adaptive mechanisms cannot be discounted. These lice as well as lice from pupils in Britain were carrying several strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, one of the most wide spread intracellular sex ratio distorters. Similar Wolbachia strains are also present in the pig louse, Haematopinus suis, suggesting that this endosymbiont might have a marked influence on the biology of the whole order. The presence of a related obligate nutritional bacterium in lice prevents the investigation of a causal link between sex ratio and endosymbionts. Conclusions Regardless of its origin, this sex ratio distortion in head lice that has been reported world wide, is stable over time and is a remarkable deviation from the stability of frequency-dependent selection of Fisher's sex ratio. A female bias first reported in 1898 is still present over a hundred years and a thousand generations later.

  7. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  8. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: yxzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Y.S. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: wangyinsong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangyongping@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn; Huang, Y.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: huangyy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; He, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: hew@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  9. Human impacts drive a global topographic signature in tree cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-01-01

    The Anthropocene is a geological epoch marked by major human influences on processes in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. One of the most dramatic features of the Anthropocene is the massive alteration of the Earth's vegetation, including forests. Here we investigate the role of topography in shaping human impacts on tree cover from local to global scales. We show that human impacts have resulted in a global tendency for tree cover to be constrained to sloped terrain and losses to be concentrated on flat terrain. This effect increases in strength with increasing human pressure and is most pronounced in countries with rapidly growing economies, limited human population stress and highly effective governments. These patterns likely reflect the relative inaccessibility of sloped topography and have important implications for conservation and modelling of future tree cover.

  10. Biodiversity loss and its impact on humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Bradley J.; Duffy, J. Emmett; Gonzalez, Andrew; Hooper, David U.; Perrings, Charles; Patrick, Venail; Narwani, Anita; Mace, Georgina M.; Tilman, David; Wardle, David A.; Kinzig, Ann P.; Daily, Gretchen C.; Loreau, Michel; Grace, James B.; Larigauderie, Anne; Srivastava, Diane S.; Naeem, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    The most unique feature of Earth is the existence of life, and the most extraordinary feature of life is its diversity. Approximately 9 million types of plants, animals, protists and fungi inhabit the Earth. So, too, do 7 billion people. Two decades ago, at the first Earth Summit, the vast majority of the world's nations declared that human actions were dismantling the Earth's ecosystems, eliminating genes, species and biological traits at an alarming rate. This observation led to the question of how such loss of biological diversity will alter the functioning of ecosystems and their ability to provide society with the goods and services needed to prosper.

  11. 'Goats that stare at men'--revisited: do dwarf goats alter their behaviour in response to eye visibility and head direction of a human?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; von Borell, Eberhard; Langbein, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Being able to recognise when one is being observed by someone else is thought to be adaptive during cooperative or competitive events. In particular for prey species, this ability should be of use in the context of predation. A previous study reported that goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) alter their behaviour according to the body and head orientation of a human experimenter. During a food anticipation task, an experimenter remained in a particular posture for 30 s before delivering a reward, and the goats' active anticipation and standing alert behaviour were analysed. To further evaluate the specific mechanisms at work, we here present two additional test conditions. In particular, we investigated the effects of the eye visibility and head orientation of a human experimenter on the behaviour of the goats (N = 7). We found that the level of the subjects' active anticipatory behaviour was highest in the conditions where the experimenter was directing his head and body towards the goat ('Control' and 'Eyes closed' conditions), but the anticipatory behaviour was significantly decreased when the body ('Head only') or the head and body of the experimenter were directed away from the subject ('Back' condition). For standing alert, we found no significant differences between the three conditions in which the experimenter was directing his head towards the subject ('Control', 'Eyes closed' and 'Head only'). This lack of differences in the expression of standing alert suggests that goats evaluate the direction of a human's head as an important cue in their anticipatory behaviour. However, goats did not respond to the visibility of the experimenter's eyes alone.

  12. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Wang, Edward [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sejpal, Samir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Agulnik, Mark [Section of Medical Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Amit [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Harris, Kirk [Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  13. Human Impacts on Coral Reefs in the Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jufaili, S.; Al-Jabri, M.; Al-Baluchi, A.; Baldwin, R. M.; Wilson, S. C.; West, F.; Matthews, A. D.

    1999-08-01

    A rapid assessment survey of the coral reefs of the Sultanate of Oman was conducted by the Ministry of Regional Municipalities and Environment during the first half of 1996. The survey revealed new information on the distribution pattern of corals in Oman and identified impacts, threats and potential threats to coral communities for the purpose of preparation of a National Coral Reef Management Plan (Phase One of the implementation of a National Coastal Zone Management Plan). Impacts on coral reefs in Oman were found to be attributable to both natural and human causes, resulting in significant and widespread degradation. Damage resulting from fisheries activities was the most commonly recorded human impact, with the most severe effects. Other human impacts resulted from coastal construction, recreational activities, oil pollution and eutrophication. Predation of corals by Acanthaster planci, damage caused by storms, coral diseases and temperature-related stress were the most commonly recorded natural impacts to coral reefs. Further minor natural impacts were attributable to siltation, rock falls and predation by a corallivorous gastropod (Drupella sp.). Significant differences between different areas of the country were found in terms of human impacts on coral reefs and these were related to coastal demography and human activity. Eighty per cent of sites studied were recorded to have been affected by human impacts to some degree. Impacts attributable to fisheries activities were found at 69% of the sites. Lost or abandoned gill nets were found to affect coral reefs at 49% of sites throughout Oman and accounted for 70% of all severe human impacts. Lost gill nets were also found to have a negative affect on fisheries resources and other marine wildlife. Observations of the behaviour of gill nets on coral reefs suggested a predictable pattern of damage over time and a significant increase in damage intensity during storms. Fishing nets were found to act selectively

  14. Human factors in a dynamic information society: where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, J

    2000-07-01

    Society is becoming increasingly dynamic and integrated owing to the extensive use of information technology. This has several implications that pose new challenges to the human factors profession. In an integrated society, changes and disturbances propagate rapidly and widely and the increasing scale of operations requires also that rare events and circumstances are considered during systems design. In this situation, human factors contributions should be increasingly proactive, not only responding to observed problems, but also, they should be based on models of adaptive human behaviour in complex, dynamic systems. The paper suggests some methodological issues to consider for human factors analyses by designers, evaluators and teachers.

  15. Calculating the induced electromagnetic fields in real human head by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. This paper presents numerical simulation of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) by considering double cone, H-and Halo coils. Three-dimensional distributions of the induced fields i.e. magnetic flux density, current density and electric fields in realistic head model by dTMS coils were calculated by impedance method and the results were compared with that of figure-of-eight coil. It was found that double cone and H-coils have significantly deep field penetration at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. The Halo coil working with a circular coil carrying currents in opposite directions provides a flexible way to stimulate deep brain structures with much lower stimulation in superficial brain tissues.

  16. The role of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of head & neck squamous cell carcinoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer statistics report an increased incidence of OSCC and OPSCC around the world. Though improvements in screening and early diagnosis have dramatically reduced the incidence of this neoplasm in recent years, the 5-year-disease-free survival, is still poor, specially for oropharyngeal cancer, despite the great scientific and financial efforts. Recently, several papers showed that HPV may be involved at least in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of oral and cervical SCC, leading to distinct molecular characteristics compared with HPV-negative ones. Nevertheless, OPSCCs associated with HPV infection seem to show a better prognosis and affect younger patients ( Comparing findings reported in the recent literature, the data of this state of the art about HPV might add useful informations concerning oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. Moreover, our review would be useful in order to define novel perspectives of treatment choice for Head & Neck cancer patients, by combining well known chemotherapeutical drugs with new molecular "target" therapy.

  17. Ovicidal and adulticidal effects of monoterpenoids against permethrin-resistant human head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, A C; Vassena, C; Picollo, M I

    2008-12-01

    The improper use of pediculicides containing permethrin has led to the development of resistance. Thus, new alternatives for control are needed. Plant-derived insecticides are attractive alternatives to common chemical insecticides because most of them are environmentally friendly and non-toxic to mammals. The toxic activity of 23 monoterpenoids belonging to several chemical classes was tested against the eggs of permethrin-resistant head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Significant differences in ovicidal action were observed among the tested substances. The most effective chemicals were hydrocarbons and ethers, followed by ketones, alcohols, phenols and esters. A linear relationship between egg mortality and knockdown time (KT(50)) on adults by the tested components revealed that most of the components were effective on both egg and adult stages. The monoterpenoids described herein are good candidates as effective pediculicides.

  18. Humanities and the future notion of societal impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Bolette Rye

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author relates various areas such as Higher Education, social media, educational politics, society and humanistic research in regards to comment on the challenges faced by Humanities and its future notion of societal impact. It is argued that in order to identify and understand...... Education in Denmark is explored as an educational example of both the development and future of Humanities and its notion of impact. The specific study programme in question is a humanities-based Higher Educational programme called Humanistic Informatics at Aalborg University. The collective purpose...... of the article is therefore to look upon the recent development within this specific Higher Educational programme as an important and unique type of humanistic societal impact....

  19. Neuromagnetic field strength outside the human head due to impedance changes from neuronal depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadzi, G M; Liston, A D; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2004-02-01

    The holy grail of neuroimaging would be to have an imaging system, which could image neuronal electrical activity over milliseconds. One way to do this would be by imaging the impedance changes associated with ion channels opening in neuronal membranes in the brain during activity. In principle, we could measure this change by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) but it is close to its threshold of detectability. With the inherent limitation in the use of electrodes, we propose a new scheme based on recording the magnetic field resulting from an injected current with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), used in magnetoencephalography (MEG). We have performed a feasibility study using computer simulation. The head was modelled as concentric spheres to mimic the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid and brain using the finite element method. The magnetic field 1 cm away from the scalp was estimated. An impedance change of 1% in a 2 cm radius volume in the brain was modelled as the region of depolarization. A constant current of 100 microA was injected into the head from diametrically opposite electrodes. The model predicts that the standing magnetic field is about 10 pT and changed by about 3 fT (0.03%) on depolarization. The spectral noise density in a typical MEG system in the frequency band 1-100 Hz is about 7 fT, so this places the change at the limit of detectability. This is similar to electrical recording, as in conventional EIT systems, but there may be advantages to MEG in that the magnetic field directly traverses the skull and instrumentation errors from the electrode-skin interface will be obviated.

  20. Impact Propagation of Human Errors on Software Requirements Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Askarinejadamiri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Requirements volatility (RV is one of the key risk sources in software development and maintenance projects because of the frequent changes made to the software. Human faults and errors are major factors contributing to requirement change in software development projects. As such, predicting requirements volatility is a challenge to risk management in the software area. Previous studies only focused on certain aspects of the human error in this area. This study specifically identifies and analyses the impact of human errors on requirements gathering and requirements volatility. It proposes a model based on responses to a survey questionnaire administered to 215 participants who have experience in software requirement gathering. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA and structural equation modelling (SEM were used to analyse the correlation of human errors and requirement volatility. The results of the analysis confirm the correlation between human errors and RV. The results show that human actions have a higher impact on RV compared to human perception. The study provides insights into software management to understand socio-technical aspects of requirements volatility in order to control risk management. Human actions and perceptions respectively are a root cause contributing to human errors that lead to RV.

  1. The prevalence and impact of Fusarium head blight pathogens and mycotoxins on malting barley quality in UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.K.; Cook, D.J.; Edwards, S.G.; Ray, R.V.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium and Microdochium species can significantly affect the yield of barley grain as well as the quality and safety of malt and beer. The present study provides new knowledge on the impacts of the FHB pathogen complex on the malting and brewing quality parameters of naturally infected barley. Quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography double mass spectrometry were used to quantify the predominant FHB pathogens and Fusarium mycotoxins, respectively, in commercially grown UK malting barley samples collected between 2007 and 2011. The predominant Fusarium species identified across the years were F. poae, F. tricinctum and F. avenaceum. Microdochium majus was the predominant Microdochium species in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 whilst Microdochium nivale predominated in 2009. Deoxynivalenol and zearalenone quantified in samples collected between 2007 and 2009 were associated with F. graminearum and F. culmorum, whilst HT-2 and T-2, and nivalenol in samples collected between 2010 and 2011 correlated positively with F. langsethiae and F. poae, respectively. Analysis of the regional distribution and yearly variation in samples from 2010 to 2011 showed significant differences in the composition of the FHB species complex. In most regions (Scotland, the South and North of England) the harvest in 2010 had higher concentrations of Fusarium spp. than in 2011, although no significant difference was observed in the Midlands between the two years. Microdochium DNA was significantly higher in 2011 and in the North of England and Scotland compared to the South or Midlands regions. Pathogens of the FHB complex impacted negatively on grain yield and quality parameters. Thousand grain weight of malting barley was affected significantly by M. nivale and M. majus whilst specific weight correlated negatively with F. avenaceum and F. graminearum. To determine the impact of sub-acute infections of the identified Fusarium and Microdochium

  2. The prevalence and impact of Fusarium head blight pathogens and mycotoxins on malting barley quality in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L K; Cook, D J; Edwards, S G; Ray, R V

    2014-06-02

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium and Microdochium species can significantly affect the yield of barley grain as well as the quality and safety of malt and beer. The present study provides new knowledge on the impacts of the FHB pathogen complex on the malting and brewing quality parameters of naturally infected barley. Quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography double mass spectrometry were used to quantify the predominant FHB pathogens and Fusarium mycotoxins, respectively, in commercially grown UK malting barley samples collected between 2007 and 2011. The predominant Fusarium species identified across the years were F. poae, F. tricinctum and F. avenaceum. Microdochium majus was the predominant Microdochium species in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 whilst Microdochium nivale predominated in 2009. Deoxynivalenol and zearalenone quantified in samples collected between 2007 and 2009 were associated with F. graminearum and F. culmorum, whilst HT-2 and T-2, and nivalenol in samples collected between 2010 and 2011 correlated positively with F. langsethiae and F. poae, respectively. Analysis of the regional distribution and yearly variation in samples from 2010 to 2011 showed significant differences in the composition of the FHB species complex. In most regions (Scotland, the South and North of England) the harvest in 2010 had higher concentrations of Fusarium spp. than in 2011, although no significant difference was observed in the Midlands between the two years. Microdochium DNA was significantly higher in 2011 and in the North of England and Scotland compared to the South or Midlands regions. Pathogens of the FHB complex impacted negatively on grain yield and quality parameters. Thousand grain weight of malting barley was affected significantly by M. nivale and M. majus whilst specific weight correlated negatively with F. avenaceum and F. graminearum. To determine the impact of sub-acute infections of the identified Fusarium and Microdochium

  3. P16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in human papilloma virus-related head and neck mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Sengüven, Burcu; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Dienes, Hans Peter

    2015-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is postulated as a risk factor in the etiology of some specific mucosal pathologies in the head and neck regions. Despite the frequent use of p16(INK4a) as a surrogate marker for HPV-infection, there is still controversy with respect to its reliability. This study has been undertaken to assess the potential role of p16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in HPV-related lesions. The study was conducted on 71 specimens of oral, tonsillar and laryngeal lesions which comprised 25 dysplasia and 46 papilloma specimens. Specimens were immunohistochemically stained for p16(INK4A) and Ki-67 proteins. HPV DNA was determined by one step multiplex polymerase chain reaction. HPV DNA was detected in 33.8% of all lesions. Tonsil and larynx lesions showed significant differences with oral lesions for HPV positivity (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) over-expression was seen in 56.5% of papilloma and 60% of dysplasia specimens. HPV status showed a positive correlation with p16(INK 4a) expression in tonsillar dysplasias (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) expression may have a value as a marker in high risk HPV induced dysplasias, but not in low risk infected lesions. The proliferation index is not related to HPV-induced lesions and may be evaluated as an independent marker in head and neck premalignant lesions.

  4. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi

    2013-03-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development.

  5. The role of human papilloma virus and p16 in occult primary of the head and neck: a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, George; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Cancer of unknown primary of the head and neck is a challenging entity for the oncologist. The role of human papilloma virus/p16 in carcinogenesis and in prognosis is well established in certain HNSCC especially in that of the oropharynx. In the case of occult primary of the head and neck the role of HPV/p16 positivity is not well defined regarding prognosis and localization of the primary. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect database was performed up to May 2014 using combinations of terms such as "occult primary of the head and neck", "CUP of the head and neck" "metastatic cervical squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary", "HPV" and "HPV and head and neck cancer". Literature review shows a strong association between HPV/p16 positivity and primary location in the oropharynx in patients with CUP of the head and neck as well as a better clinical outcome. HPV positivity and p16 overexpression could be used as surrogate markers in the search of the primary site of patients with CUP of the head and neck therefore maybe guiding treatment decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of in-scanner head motion on multiple measures of functional connectivity: relevance for studies of neurodevelopment in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Wolf, Daniel H; Loughead, James; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2012-03-01

    It has recently been reported (Van Dijk et al., 2011) that in-scanner head motion can have a substantial impact on MRI measurements of resting-state functional connectivity. This finding may be of particular relevance for studies of neurodevelopment in youth, confounding analyses to the extent that motion and subject age are related. Furthermore, while Van Dijk et al. demonstrated the effect of motion on seed-based connectivity analyses, it is not known how motion impacts other common measures of connectivity. Here we expand on the findings of Van Dijk et al. by examining the effect of motion on multiple types of resting-state connectivity analyses in a large sample of children and adolescents (n=456). Following replication of the effect of motion on seed-based analyses, we examine the influence of motion on graphical measures of network modularity, dual-regression of independent component analysis, as well as the amplitude and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation. In the entire sample, subject age was highly related to motion. Using a subsample where age and motion were unrelated, we demonstrate that motion has marked effects on connectivity in every analysis examined. While subject age was associated with increased within-network connectivity even when motion was accounted for, controlling for motion substantially attenuated the strength of this relationship. The results demonstrate the pervasive influence of motion on multiple types functional connectivity analysis, and underline the importance of accounting for motion in studies of neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact on human health of climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that climate is rapidly changing. These changes, which are mainly driven by the dramatic increase of greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic activities, have the potential to affect human health in several ways. These include a global rise in average temperature, an increased frequency of heat waves, of weather events such as hurricanes, cyclones and drought periods, plus an altered distribution of allergens and vector-borne infectious diseases. The cardiopulmonary system and the gastrointestinal tract are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of global warming. Moreover, some infectious diseases and their animal vectors are influenced by climate changes, resulting in higher risk of typhus, cholera, malaria, dengue and West Nile virus infection. On the other hand, at mid latitudes warming may reduce the rate of diseases related to cold temperatures (such as pneumonia, bronchitis and arthritis), but these benefits are unlikely to rebalance the risks associated to warming.

  8. Representation of head-centric flow in the human motion complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, J.; Dukelow, S.P.; Menon, R.S.; Vilis, T.; Berg, A.V. van den

    2006-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have identified putative homologs of macaque middle temporal area (area MT) and medial superior temporal area (area MST) in humans. Little is known about the integration of visual and nonvisual signals in human motion areas compared with monkeys. Through extra-retinal sig

  9. High-resolution modeling of human and climate impacts on global water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide; de Graaf, Inge E. M.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.

    2016-06-01

    A number of global hydrological models [GHMs) have been developed in recent decades in order to understand the impacts of climate variability and human activities on water resources availability. The spatial resolution of GHMs is mostly constrained at a 0.5° by 0.5° grid [˜50km by ˜50km at the equator). However, for many of the water-related problems facing society, the current spatial scale of GHMs is insufficient to provide locally relevant information. Here using the PCR-GLOBWB model we present for the first time an analysis of human and climate impacts on global water resources at a 0.1° by 0.1° grid [˜10km by ˜10km at the equator) in order to depict more precisely regional variability in water availability and use. Most of the model input data (topography, vegetation, soil properties, routing, human water use) have been parameterized at a 0.1° global grid and feature a distinctively higher resolution. Distinct from many other GHMs, PCR-GLOBWB includes groundwater representation and simulates groundwater heads and lateral groundwater flows based on MODFLOW with existing geohydrological information. This study shows that global hydrological simulations at higher spatial resolutions are feasible for multi-decadal to century periods.

  10. CoolSim: using industrial modeling techniques to examine the impact of selective head cooling in a model of perinatal regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, James; Geva, Alon; Zheng, Zheng; Zupancic, John A F

    2008-01-01

    A selective head-cooling device for the treatment of moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States. To reflect the complexity of health care delivery at the systems level, we used the industrial modeling technique of discrete event simulation to analyze the impact of various deployment strategies for selective head cooling and its partner technology, amplitude-integrated electroencephalography. We modeled the course through the perinatal system of all births in Massachusetts over a 1-year period. Cohort and care characteristics were drawn from existing databases. Results of a recently published trial were used to estimate the effects of selective head cooling. One thousand cohort replications were conducted to assess uncertainty. Several policy alternatives were examined, including no use of selective head cooling and scenarios that altered the number and placement of selective head-cooling and amplitude-integrated electroencephalography units throughout the state. Patient-level outcome and cost data were assessed. For all scenarios tested, the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography/selective head cooling resulted in better outcomes at lower cost. However, substantial differences in transfer rates, failure-to-cool rates, and total costs were seen across scenarios. Optimal decision-making regarding the number and placement of devices led to a 16% improvement in cost savings and a 10-fold decrease in failure-to-cool rates, compared with other deployment scenarios. These results were insensitive to significant changes in model inputs. On the basis of currently available data, the package of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography and selective head cooling seems to be an economically desirable intervention. Quantifiable techniques to assess system-wide technology performance provide a powerful approach to informing decisions regarding the structure and function of

  11. The "human" statistics of terrestrial impact cratering rate

    CERN Document Server

    Jetsu, L

    1997-01-01

    The most significant periodicities in the terrestrial impact crater record are due to the human-signal: the bias of assigning integer values for the crater ages. This bias seems to have eluded the proponents and opponents of real periodicity in the occurrence of these events, as well as the theorists searching for an extraterrestrial explanation for such periodicity. The human-signal should be seriously considered by scientists in astronomy, geology and paleontology when searching for a connection between terrestrial major comet or asteroid impacts and mass extinctions of species.

  12. Window Size Impact in Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oresti Banos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signal segmentation is a crucial stage in the activity recognition process; however, this has been rarely and vaguely characterized so far. Windowing approaches are normally used for segmentation, but no clear consensus exists on which window size should be preferably employed. In fact, most designs normally rely on figures used in previous works, but with no strict studies that support them. Intuitively, decreasing the window size allows for a faster activity detection, as well as reduced resources and energy needs. On the contrary, large data windows are normally considered for the recognition of complex activities. In this work, we present an extensive study to fairly characterize the windowing procedure, to determine its impact within the activity recognition process and to help clarify some of the habitual assumptions made during the recognition system design. To that end, some of the most widely used activity recognition procedures are evaluated for a wide range of window sizes and activities. From the evaluation, the interval 1–2 s proves to provide the best trade-off between recognition speed and accuracy. The study, specifically intended for on-body activity recognition systems, further provides designers with a set of guidelines devised to facilitate the system definition and configuration according to the particular application requirements and target activities.

  13. Human observers impact habituated samango monkeys’ perceived landscape of fear.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, K.; LE ROUX A.; Richards, S A; Scheijen, C.; Hill, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and human infrastructure are known to alter the relationship between predators and prey, typically by directly or indirectly shielding one of the species from the other. In addition to these overt changes to animals’ behavior, observers may have more subtle impacts on animals’ foraging decisions. However, the anthropogenic alteration of risk-taking behavior has rarely been acknowledged or quantified, particularly in behavioral ecological studies reliant on habituated animals. We tested...

  14. C6-pyridinium ceramide sensitizes SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-02-01

    Combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with another anticancer treatment modality is an important strategy for improved efficacy. PDT with Pc4, a silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer, was combined with C6-pyridinium ceramide (LCL29) to determine their potential to promote death of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. PDT+LCL29-induced enhanced cell death was inhibited by zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and fumonisin B1 (FB), a ceramide synthase inhibitor. Quantitative confocal microscopy showed that combining PDT with LCL29 enhanced FB-sensitive ceramide accumulation in the mitochondria. Furthermore, PDT+LCL29 induced enhanced FB-sensitive redistribution of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Overall, the data indicate that PDT+LCL29 enhanced cell death via FB-sensitive, mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and apoptosis.

  15. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  16. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  17. The impact of physical activity on health-related fitness and quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Lauren C; Nishimura, Kathryn C; McNeely, Margaret L; Lau, Harold; Culos-Reed, S Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer often face a plethora of cancer and treatment-related side effects, negatively impacting their lean body mass, physical functioning, quality of life and fatigue management. Physical activity is a potential mediator of many of these side effects. This is the first systematic review reporting on head and neck cancer and physical activity literature. A literature search was conducted up to January 2015. Two reviewers independently identified articles using the outlined inclusion criteria, assessing the study methodology, risk of bias and extracting the necessary data from studies evaluating the impact of full-body physical activity on patients with head and neck cancer. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement was used to guide this review. We identified 16 articles published from 2003 to 2014, the majority of which were published within the past 5 years. Physical activity interventions were feasible, safe and beneficial in mediating cancer and treatment-related side effects. Specifically, patients experienced improvements in lean body mass, muscular strength, physical functioning, quality of life and fatigue management. Owing to significant study heterogeneity, data were not pooled. Reflecting the early state of the literature, included studies were found to vary greatly in design, quality and reporting characteristics. There is early evidence that supports the benefit of physical activity interventions for patients with head and neck cancer, both during and following treatment. Future research is necessary to determine the benefits of different physical activity interventions, and their impact on patients with different head and neck cancers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Oxidative injury to blood vessels and glia of the pre-laminar optic nerve head in human glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilchenfeld, Zac; Yücel, Yeni H; Gupta, Neeru

    2008-11-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible world blindness. Oxidative damage and vascular injury have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine in human primary open angle glaucoma whether oxidative injury occurs in pre-laminar optic nerve blood vessels and glial cells. Following IRB approval, sections from post-mortem primary open angle glaucoma eyes (n=5) with mean age of 77 +/- 9 yrs (+/-SD) were compared to normal control eyes (n=4) with mean age 70 +/- 9 yrs (Eye Bank of Canada). Immunostaining with nitrotyrosine, a footprint for peroxynitrite-mediated injury, was performed and sections were double-labeled with markers for vascular endothelial cells, perivascular smooth muscle cells, and astrocytes with CD34, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. Immunostaining was captured in a masked fashion using confocal microscopy, and defined regions of interest for blood vessels and glial tissue. Intensity measurements of supra-threshold area in pixels as percent of the total number of pixels were calculated using ImageJ (NIH) and compared using two-tailed Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests between glaucoma and control groups. Colocalization coefficients with cell-specific markers were determined and compared with random coefficients of correlation. Increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in pre-laminar optic nerve head blood vessels of primary open angle glaucoma eyes compared to controls and this difference was statistically significant (1.35 +/- 1.11% [+/-SD] vs. 0.01 +/- 0.01%, P=0.016). NT-immunoreactivity was also increased in the glial tissue surrounding the pre-laminar optic nerve head in the glaucoma group and compared to controls, and this difference was statistically significant (18.37 +/-12.80% vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04%, P=0.016). Colocalization studies demonstrated nitrotyrosine staining in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, in addition to

  19. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg. The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant.

  20. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E; Sinclair, S H

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  1. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  2. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Makris, Nikos; Mainardi, Luca; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF) energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS) was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes) refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m) and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg). The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant. PMID:23956789

  3. Cocoa and Human Health: From Head to Foot--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Araujo, Quintino Reis; Gattward, James Nascimento; Almoosawi, Suzana; Silva, Maria das Graças Conceição Parada Costa; Dantas, Paulo Alfredo De Santana; De Araujo Júnior, Quintino Reis

    2016-01-01

    The cocoa, as part of the wonderful nature, provides the mankind a wide variety of valuable food products and health benefits. The most known and universally relished product derived from this fruit is chocolate, an amazing and unique food for the human nutrition with records of consumption of similar products dating to 1000 years BC. In fact, the cocoa is a complex food that includes over 300 different components. This review is designed to inform scientists, technicians, academicians, farmers, and interested communities of numerous studies that have been conducted worldwide to investigate the properties of various cocoa constituents, their relations to human health, and their potential role in the prevention and treatment of many medical conditions. The general population, for example in Brazil, despite being one of the major producers of cocoa, is poorly informed of the significant and beneficial properties of cocoa. The present review covers important topics linking cocoa to human health and show the state of the art of effect of cocoa in different systems that comprise the human body. The paper is organized based on the main human organ system and includes: cardiovascular/circulatory, neurological/nervous, oral health, endocrine, lymphatic and immunological, respiratory, reproductive, and dermatological systems. Scientific findings tend to confirm the historic designation of cocoa as "food of the Gods."

  4. Human Interventions versus Climate Change: Impacts on Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, M. R.; Acharya, K.

    2009-12-01

    Water availability and occurrence of water induced disasters are impacted by both natural and human centric drivers. Climate change is considered to be one of the noted drivers in this regard. Human interventions through land use/land cover change, stream and floodplain regulations via dams, weirs, and embankments could be other equally important group of drivers. Unlike developed countries that have both resources and capabilities to adapt and mitigate the impact of such drivers, developing countries are increasingly at more risk. Identifying roles of such drivers are fundamental to the formulation of any adaptation and mitigation plans for their impacts for developing countries. In this study, we present a few examples from three regions of Nepal- a developing country in South Asia generally considered as a water rich country. Through results of modeling and statistical analyses, we show which driver is in control in different watersheds. Preliminary results show that climate change impact appears to be more prominent in large snow-fed river basins. In the smaller non-snow-fed watersheds originating from the middle hill, the impacts are not explicit despite perception of local people about changes in the water availability. In the southern belt bordering India, the impacts of river regulation on downstream areas are found to be the principal cause of flooding/inundation.

  5. Analysis of mobile phone design features affecting radiofrequency power absorbed in a human head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Sven; Kelsh, Michael A; Kuster, Niels; Sheppard, Asher R; Shum, Mona

    2013-09-01

    The US FCC mandates the testing of all mobile phones to demonstrate compliance with the rule requiring that the peak spatial SAR does not exceed the limit of 1.6 W/kg averaged over any 1 g of tissue. These test data, measured in phantoms with mobile phones operating at maximum antenna input power, permitted us to evaluate the variation in SARs across mobile phone design factors such as shape and antenna design, communication technology, and test date (over a 7-year period). Descriptive statistical summaries calculated for 850 MHz and 1900 MHz phones and ANOVA were used to evaluate the influence of the foregoing factors on SARs. Service technology accounted for the greatest variability in compliance test SARs that ranged from AMPS (highest) to CDMA, iDEN, TDMA, and GSM (lowest). However, the dominant factor for SARs during use is the time-averaged antenna input power, which may be much less than the maximum power used in testing. This factor is largely defined by the communication system; e.g., the GSM phone average output can be higher than CDMA by a factor of 100. Phone shape, antenna type, and orientation of a phone were found to be significant but only on the order of up to a factor of 2 (3 dB). The SAR in the tilt position was significantly smaller than for touch. The side of the head did not affect SAR levels significantly. Among the remaining factors, external antennae produced greater SARs than internal ones, and brick and clamshell phones produced greater SARs than slide phones. Assuming phone design and usage patterns do not change significantly over time, we have developed a normalization procedure and formula that permits reliable prediction of the relative SAR between various communication systems. This approach can be applied to improve exposure assessment in epidemiological research.

  6. Optical metabolic imaging of treatment response in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy T Shah

    Full Text Available Optical metabolic imaging measures fluorescence intensity and lifetimes from metabolic cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD. These molecular level measurements provide unique biomarkers for early cellular responses to cancer treatments. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is an attractive target for optical imaging because of easy access to the site using fiber optic probes. Two HNSCC cell lines, SCC25 and SCC61, were treated with Cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody, BGT226 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, or cisplatin (chemotherapy for 24 hours. Results show increased redox ratio, NADH α1 (contribution from free NADH, and FAD α1 (contribution from protein-bound FAD for malignant cells compared with the nonmalignant cell line OKF6 (p<0.05. In SCC25 and SCC61 cells, the redox ratio is unaffected by cetuximab treatment and decreases with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment (p<0.05, and these results agree with standard measurements of proliferation rates after treatment. For SCC25, NADH α1 is reduced with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment. For SCC61, NADH α1 is reduced with cetuximab, BGT226, and cisplatin treatment. Trends in NADH α1 are statistically similar to changes in standard measurements of glycolytic rates after treatment. FAD α1 is reduced with cisplatin treatment (p<0.05. These shifts in optical endpoints reflect early metabolic changes induced by drug treatment. Overall, these results indicate that optical metabolic imaging has potential to detect early response to cancer treatment in HNSCC, enabling optimal treatment regimens and improved patient outcomes.

  7. Head injuries, heading, and the use of headgear in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedfeldt, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Soccer has more than 265 million players around the world and is the only contact sport with purposeful use of the head for controlling and advancing the ball. Head contact in soccer has the potential to cause acute traumatic brain injury including concussion or, potentially, a pattern of chronic brain injury. Although early retrospective research on the effects of soccer heading seemed to suggest that purposeful heading may contribute to long-term cognitive impairment, prospective controlled studies do not support this and, in fact, suggest that purposeful heading may not be a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Headgear has not been shown to be effective in reducing ball impact but may be helpful in reducing the force of non-ball-related impacts to the head. There are concerns that universal use of headgear may cause more aggressive heading and head challenges, leading to increased risk of injury.

  8. THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL AUDIT IN HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NĂSTASIE MIHAELA – ANDREEA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available General research area of this article is the impacts of social audit in human resources management, in full compliance with the identification of social risks that may threaten the proper functioning of the economic entity. An essential tool used in human resource management is social audit, which provides a balance between the economic entity's financial results and its social results. Social audit is at the same time, an instrument of leadership and management interference in internal audit and financial audit and pursues an economic entity management capacity on the part of human problems and on the other hand the social problems generated by a continuously changing environment. This article is part of a broader research and through it we tried to address a topical issue, ie the impact of social audit and its consequences on economic and financial development level of economic entities.

  9. Impact of head and neck radiotherapy on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Troconis, Cristhian Camilo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2017-08-08

    To analyze the evidence regarding the impact of head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT) on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems. Searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ISI Web of Science databases using "Radiotherapy", "Composite resins" and "Adhesive systems" as keywords. Selected studies were written in English and assessed the mechanical behavior of composite resins and/or adhesive systems when bonding procedure was conducted before and/or after a maximum radiation dose ≥50Gy, applied under in vitro or in vivo conditions. In total, 115 studies were found but only 16 were included, from which five evaluated the effect of in vitro HNRT on microhardness, wear resistance, diametral tensile and flexural strength of composite resins, showing no significant negative effect in most of reports. Regarding bond strength of adhesive systems, 11 studies were included from which five reported no meaningful negative effect when bonding procedure was conducted before simulated HNRT. Conversely, five studies showed that bond strength diminished when adhesive procedure was done after in vitro radiation therapy. Only two studies about dental adhesion were conducted after in vivo radiotherapy but the results were not conclusive. The mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems seems not to be affected when in vitro HNRT is applied after bonding procedure. However, bond strength of adhesive systems tends to decrease when simulated radiotherapy is used immediately before bonding procedure. Studies assessing dentin bond strength after in-vivo HNRT were limited and controversial. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Basosquamous Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Clinical and Histologic Characteristics and Their Impact on Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wermker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Basosquamous carcinoma (BSC is a rare tumor entity, and the most common onset is in the head and neck region (BSC-HN. The data on diagnosis, treatment, and especially risk assessment concerning disease course and outcome are deficient or inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors for local relapse (LR and lymph node metastasis (LNM and their impact on progression-free survival (PFS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective monocentric study, patients with BSC-HN treated between 1999 and 2011 were analyzed regarding clinical and histologic characteristics. Prognostic parameters for LR, LNM, and PFS were evaluated. In total, 89 patients (55 male, 34 female, mean age of 71.8 years with a mean follow-up time of 47.7 months (range 12-112 were included. RESULTS: LR occurred in four patients (4.5%, LNM occurred in five patients (5.6%. Patients with LNM had a significantly shorter PFS time (16.1 months compared with patients without LNM (154.2 months; P < .001. Tumor depth and size (T classification, incomplete resection, localization at the ear, deep maximal vertical infiltration, muscle and vessel invasion all showed significant (P < .05 associations with LR, LNM, and shorter PFS time. BSC showed more histologic features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC, especially with regard to BerEP4 expression. CONCLUSION: While histology shows some typical characteristics of BCC, the biologic behavior and aggressiveness of BSC are similar to those of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first study to show that LR and, especially, LNM indicate a higher risk of an unfavorable outcome.

  11. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead Delany-Moretlwe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence of a significant burden of human papillomavirus (HPV infection and associated disease in men. High rates of HPV infection have been observed in men from sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high. HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital warts and anal, penile and head and neck cancers in men. Despite increasing access to antiretroviral therapy, there appears to be little benefit in preventing the development of these cancers in HIV-positive men, making prevention of infection a priority. New prevention options that are being introduced in many African countries include male circumcision and HPV vaccination. However, more data are needed on the burden of HPV disease in men before boys are included in HPV vaccination programmes.

  12. The Impact of Human Capital Outsourcing on Human Capital Management Practices in Karachi Pharmaceutical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Tariq Mehmood; Syed, Qamar Ali Zaidi; Muhmmad, Sajid; Herani, Gobind M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine relationship between Human Capital Management (HRM) and Human Resource (HR) Outsourcing in the Pharmaceutical sector. The specific objective is to find out that how important is HRM for an Organization to perform its operations more efficiently, and at what level Human Resource Outsourcing is affecting it. Literature review: Literature review shows that HR outsourcing has positive impact on HRM for an Organization to perform its operations more ...

  13. Administrative Strategies of Departmental Heads as Determinants for the Effective Management of Human Resources in Tertiary Institutions in Delta State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated administrative strategies of departmental heads as determinants of effective management of human resources in tertiary institutions. Four research questions were asked and four hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. As a descriptive survey, the population comprised all the eight tertiary institutions in the state…

  14. Correlation of human papillomavirus status with apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Juliette P; van Bemmel, Xander; van Kempen, Pauline M. W.; Janssen, Luuk M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Pameijer, Frank A; Willems, Stefan M.; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of prognostic patient characteristics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of great importance. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive HNSCCs have favorable response to (chemo)radiotherapy. Apparent diffusion coefficient, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI, has

  15. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  16. Cervical Spine Muscle-Tendon Unit Length Differences Between Neutral and Forward Head Postures: Biomechanical Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatzadeh, Saeed; Kalmanson, Olivia A; Schuit, Dale; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Leonard I; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2017-07-01

    Forward head posture (FHP) may be associated with neck pain and poor health-related quality of life. Literature describes only qualitative muscle length changes associated with FHP. The purpose of this study was to quantify how muscle-tendon unit lengths are altered when human cadaveric specimens are placed in alignments representing different severities of FHP. This biomechanical study used 13 fresh-frozen cadaveric cervical spine specimens (Occiput-T1, 54±15 y). Specimens' postural changes simulating increasing FHP severity while maintaining horizontal gaze were assessed. Specimen-specific anatomic models derived from computed tomography-based anatomic data were combined with postural data and specimen-specific anatomy of muscle attachment points to estimate the muscle length changes associated with FHP. Forward head posture was associated with flexion of the mid-lower cervical spine and extension of the upper cervical (sub-occipital) spine. Muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as flexors (termed "cervical flexors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as extensors ("occipital extensors") shortened in FHP when compared to neutral posture. In contrast, muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as extensors ("cervical extensors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as flexors ("occipital flexors") lengthened. The greatest shortening was seen in the major and minor rectus capitis posterior muscles. These muscles cross the Occiput-C2 segments, which exhibited extension to maintain horizontal gaze. The greatest lengthening was seen in posterior muscles crossing the C4-C6 segments, which exhibited the most flexion. This cadaver study did not incorporate the biomechanical influence of active musculature. This study offers a novel way to quantify postural alignment and muscle length changes associated with FHP. Model predictions are consistent with qualitative descriptions in the literature.

  17. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucousmembranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplasticlesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital regionwhich might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according tothe invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papillomais often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children andyoung adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, butpeople’s lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  18. Impact injury prediction by FE human body model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynčík L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical simulations as powerful instruments are used in many areas such as traffic, medicine, sport, army etc. The simulations are often performed with models, which are based on the Finite Element Method. The great ability of FE deformable models of human bodies is to predict the injuries during accidents. Due to its modular implementation of thorax and abdomen FE models, human articulated rigid body model ROBBY, which was previously developed at the University of West Bohemia in cooperation with ESI Group (Engineering Simulation for Industry, can be used for this purpose. ROBBY model representing average adult man is still being improved to obtain more precise model of human body with the possibility to predict injuries during accidents. Recently, new generated thoracic model was embedded into ROBBY model and this was subsequently satisfactorily validated. In this study the updated ROBBY model was used and injury of head and thorax were investigated during frontal crashes simulated by virtue of two types of sled tests with various types of restraint system (shoulder belt, lap belt and airbag. The results of the simulation were compared with the experimental ones.

  19. The Impact of Secondary Lymphedema after Head and Neck Cancer Treatment on Symptoms, Functional Status, and Quality Of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Murphy, Barbara A.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Gilbert, Jill; Ridner, Sheila H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphedema may disrupt local function and affect quality of life (QOL) in patients with head and neck cancer. The study aim was to examine the associations among severity of internal and external lymphedema, symptoms, functional status, and QOL in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods The sample included 103 patients who were ≥3 months post head and neck cancer treatment. Variables assessed included severity of internal and external lymphedema, physical/psychological symptoms, functional status, and QOL. Results Severity of internal and external lymphedema was associated with physical symptoms and psychological symptoms. Patients with more severe external lymphedema were more likely to have a decrease in neck left/right rotation. The combined effects of external and internal lymphedema severity were associated with hearing impairment and decreased QOL. Conclusions Lymphedema severity correlates with symptom burden, functional status, and QOL in patients post head and neck cancer treatment. PMID:22791550

  20. ADP-ribose polymer - a novel and general biomarker of human cancers of head & neck, breast, and cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharan Rajeshwar N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly-ADP-ribosylation, a reversible post-translational modification of primarily chromosomal proteins, is involved in various cellular and molecular processes including carcinogenesis. ADP-ribose polymer or poly-ADP-ribose adducts are enzymatically added onto or stripped off the target chromosomal proteins during this metabolic process. Due to this, the chromatin superstructure is reversibly altered, which significantly influences the pattern of gene expression. We hypothesize that a decrease in the concentration of total poly-ADP-ribose adducts of peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL proteins strongly correlates with the incidence of human cancer. Results Using a novel immunoprobe assay, we show a statistically significant (P ≤ 0.001 reduction (~ 42 to 49% in the level of poly-ADP-ribose adducts of PBL proteins of patients with advanced cancers of head & neck (H & N region (comprising fourteen distinct cancers at different sites, breast and cervix in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusions These findings imply potential utility of the poly-ADP-ribose adducts of PBL proteins as a novel and general biomarker of human cancers with potentials of significant clinical and epidemiological applications.

  1. Early Head Start Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  2. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Burger-Calderon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD. HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future.

  3. Incorporating Human Body Mass in Standards of Helmet Impact Protection against Traumatic Brain Injury

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Impact induced traumatic brain injury (ITBI) describes brain injury from head impact not necessarily accompanied by skull fracture. For sufficiently abrupt head impact decelerations, ITBI results from brain tissue stress incurred as the brain crashes into the inside of the skull wall, displacing the surrounding cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Proper helmet cushioning can damp the impact force and reduce ITBI. But force is mass times acceleration and commonly used helmet blunt impact standards are based only on acceleration thresholds. Here I show how this implies that present standards overestimate the minimum acceleration onset for ITBI by implicitly assuming that the brain is mechanically decoupled from the body. I quantify how an arbitrary orientation of the body with respect to impact direction increases the effective mass that should be used in calculating the required damping force and injury threshold accelerations. I suggest a practical method to incorporate the body mass and impact angle into ITBI helme...

  4. Impact of information technology on human resources in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Mehran

    2007-01-01

    Incorporation of advances in information communications technology (ICT) into the workplace has had a major impact in human resource utilization in sectors of the economy where it has occurred in a substantial manner, such as manufacturing and financial services. While some benefits of ICT have been realized in healthcare, the full impact of its benefits will only be realized if it is incorporated in a systematic form, rather than in the current patchy and uneven manner seen around the province and across the country to date.

  5. Principles for ethical research involving humans: ethical professional practice in impact assessment Part I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanclay, Frank; Baines, James T; Taylor, C. Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    ... methods textbooks, this paper identifies current principles for ethical research involving humans and discusses their implications for impact assessment practice generally and social impact assessment specifically...

  6. Human papillomavirus is a favourable prognostic factor in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region and in hypopharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivars, Lars; Bersani, Cinzia; Grün, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), in addition to smoking and alcohol, is a cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), particularly of the tonsils and base of the tongue (TSCC and BOTSCC, respectively). Moreover, HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC are associated with a better outcome compared......-positive CUPs of the head and neck region, where the primary tumour likely originates from the oropharynx. Thus, the determination of HPV status and p16 expression may be of value for the diagnosis and treatment of CUP of the head and neck region and may also be of value for hypopharyngeal cancers in the future...

  7. Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, W Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forte, Maurizio [UC MERCED; Barrientos, Gustavo [UNIV OF LA PLATA, ARG.

    2009-01-01

    Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma of dogs and cats: an ideal test system for human head and neck PDT protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucroy, Michael D.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is ideally suited for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) in humans. Developing useful PDT protocols for HNC is challenging due to the expense of Phase I and II clinical trials. Moreover, the often-poor predictive value of murine models means that photosensitizers may proceed far into development before problems are noted. Dogs and cats with spontaneous oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) share striking similarities with humans affected with oral SCC. These similarities include viral and environmental tobacco smoke as risk factors, location-dependent prognoses, and relative resistance to chemotherapy. The relatively large oral cancers encountered in veterinary patients allow for light and drug dosimetry that are directly applicable to humans. The irregular shape of oral SCC allows a rigorous evaluation of novel photodynamic therapy protocols under field conditions. Because spontaneous tumors in dogs and cats arise in an outbred animal population it is possible to observe an intact host response to PDT. The shorter lifespan of dogs and cats allows rapid accrual of endpoint data. External beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy are commonplace in veterinary medicine, making dogs and cats with spontaneous SCC a useful resource to study the interactions with PDT and other cancer treatment modalities. Our preliminary results demonstrate that PDT is well-tolerated by dogs with oral cancer, and a Phase II clinical trial of zinc-phthalocyanine-based photodynamic therapy is underway in dogs with oral SCC. The usefulness of 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester-based PDT is being investigated in cats with oral SCC.

  9. Robust human body model injury prediction in simulated side impact crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golman, Adam J; Danelson, Kerry A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a parametric methodology to robustly predict occupant injuries sustained in real-world crashes using a finite element (FE) human body model (HBM). One hundred and twenty near-side impact motor vehicle crashes were simulated over a range of parameters using a Toyota RAV4 (bullet vehicle), Ford Taurus (struck vehicle) FE models and a validated human body model (HBM) Total HUman Model for Safety (THUMS). Three bullet vehicle crash parameters (speed, location and angle) and two occupant parameters (seat position and age) were varied using a Latin hypercube design of Experiments. Four injury metrics (head injury criterion, half deflection, thoracic trauma index and pelvic force) were used to calculate injury risk. Rib fracture prediction and lung strain metrics were also analysed. As hypothesized, bullet speed had the greatest effect on each injury measure. Injury risk was reduced when bullet location was further from the B-pillar or when the bullet angle was more oblique. Age had strong correlation to rib fractures frequency and lung strain severity. The injuries from a real-world crash were predicted using two different methods by (1) subsampling the injury predictors from the 12 best crush profile matching simulations and (2) using regression models. Both injury prediction methods successfully predicted the case occupant's low risk for pelvic injury, high risk for thoracic injury, rib fractures and high lung strains with tight confidence intervals. This parametric methodology was successfully used to explore crash parameter interactions and to robustly predict real-world injuries.

  10. The impact of Chinese cultural values on Taiwan nursing leadership styles: comparing the self-assessments of staff nurses and head nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuanmay

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Chinese culture on nursing leadership behavior in Taiwan nurses. A descriptive study compared staff nurses' assessment of Chinese value in the leadership behavior of their head nurses. Data analysis was made on a convenience sample in Taiwan of 214 head nurses and 2,127 staff nurses who had worked with their head nurse for at least one year. Six medical centers and regional hospitals in northern (Taipei), central (Taichung) and southern (Kaohsiung) Taiwan were recruited for this study. Instruments included the demographic questionnaire, Chinese Value Survey, and Kang's Chinese Leadership Behaviors Module Scale. Results indicated that head nurses scored significantly higher than staff nurses in terms of all cultural values and leadership behaviors. Both staff nurses and head nurses scored the highest mean scores in personal integrity (Yi) and human connectedness (Ren) and the lowest in moral discipline (Li). Staff nurse perceptions of leadership behavior indicated the role of parent to be higher than either the role of director or mentor. Head nurses perceptions of leadership behavior emphasized the role of the director more than either parent or mentor. There were no significant differences between the staff nurses and head nurses in terms of expectative leadership behavior, which gave the role of director higher mean scores than those of either the parent or mentor. Positive and significant associations (r = .266 to r = .334) were found between cultural values and perceptions of leadership behavior. Cultural values predicted 10.6% of leadership behavior variance. The three demographic characteristics of location in northern Taiwan (beta = .09), intention to leave (beta = -.14), and general unit (beta = .10) and the two cultural values of human connectedness (Ren) (beta = .16) and personal integrity (Yi) (beta = .16) together reported a cumulative R2 of 14.6% to explain variance in leadership behavior

  11. Impact of Gender Binarism on Hijras' Life Course and Their Access to Fundamental Human Rights in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizai, Aurangzaib; Doneys, Philippe; Doane, Donna L

    2017-01-01

    This study adds to the growing body of knowledge on gender nonconformity aspects of heteronormativity by examining its impact on the life course of hijras and their access to fundamental human rights in Pakistan. Drawing on 50 semistructured interviews conducted in two sites, the findings suggest that the participants' lived experiences associated with gender nonconformity significantly influenced the direction of their life course and their ability to have access to human rights. These experiences spanned from childhood to elderhood across a wide range of settings, such as family, school, guru dera (residence headed by a hijra guru), workplace, and interactions with authorities. The participants' human rights were not recognized, resulting in abuse, social stigma, discrimination against them, and their exclusion from mainstream society. Finally, implications are drawn for public policy and future research on third gender concerns in Pakistan and elsewhere.

  12. Polymorphisms in the Human Cytochrome P450 and Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase: Susceptibility to Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Khlifi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC is associated with smoking and alcohol drinking. Tobacco smoking exposes smokers to a series of carcinogenic chemicals. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450s, such as CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and CYP2D6, usually metabolize carcinogens to their inactive derivatives, but they occasionally convert the chemicals to more potent carcinogens. In addition, via CYP450 (CYP2E1 oxidase, alcohol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a highly toxic compound, which plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NATs, NAT1 and NAT2, are polymorphic and catalyze both N-acetylation and O-acetylation of aromatic and heterocyclic amine carcinogens. Genetic polymorphisms are associated with a number of enzymes involved in the metabolism of carcinogens important in the induction of HNC. It has been suggested that such polymorphisms may be linked to cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we select four cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1BA1, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1, and two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NAT1 and NAT2 in order to summarize and analyze findings from the literature related to HNC risk by focusing on (i the interaction between these genes and the environment, (ii the impact of genetic defect on protein activity and/or expression, and (iii the eventual involvement of race in such associations.

  13. Indicators for human toxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krewitt, Wolfram; Pennington, David W.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this task group under SETAC-Europe’s Second Working Group on Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA-WIA2) were to identify and discuss the suitability of toxicological impact measures for human health for use in characterization in LCIA. The current state of the art of defining...... such as No Observed Effect Levels (NOEL). NOELs, and similar data, are determined in laboratory studies using rodents and are then extrapolated to more relevant human measures. Many examples also exist of measures and methods beyond potency-based indicators that attempt to account for differences in expected severity......, as well as potency. Quantitative severity-based indicators yield measures in terms of Years of Life Lost (YOLL), Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY), Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) and other similar measures. DALYs and QALYs are examples of approaches that attempt to account for both years of life...

  14. Eden in Peril: Impact of Humans on Pacific Island Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Rapaport

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Islands have often been cited as models of human impact upon the environment. With high rates of endemism and other unique characteristics, island ecosystems are subject to dramatic perturbation. The arrival of humans in Near Oceania during the Pleistocene led swiftly to a series of fauna extinctions. In the New Guinea Highlands clearing and tending of wild plants gave rise to tree and root crop agriculture, intensive cultivation technology, and anthropogenic grasslands. By 3600 BP (Before Present, Lapita settlers had reached Remote Oceania, leading to deforestation and declines in birds and other species. European contact introduced new biota and new technology, with significant consequences for island environments and societies. Questions have been raised concerning the impact of climate change on island ecosystems. Population growth plays a significant role in environmental degradation, though not necessarily as a proximate cause. The Tikopian arboriculture system provides one of several Oceanic models of sustainability.

  15. The Impact of Strategic Human Resource Management on Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luftim CANIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Organizational performance is getting more and more important, especially in a market with greater competition and dynamic. Organizational performance is measured through different indicators. It guarantees the continuity of the organization to be competitive in a global marketplace. Normally, the implementation of performance indicators achieved through human resources. Human resources are the key for keeping the organization in the market so competitive. These human resources need to be managed effectively to achieve the required performance of the organization. It is necessary to manage strategically the human resources and to adapt at its strategy with organizational strategy. The aim of this study is focused on the impact of the strategic management of human resource in achieving organizational performance. This study was conducted based on primary and secondary sources. How much organizations appear competitive in the market through achieving the performance indicators? How important is the management of human resources in achieving organizational performance? So, through the skills, behaviors and attitudes would be expected by human resources to achieve the required performance in the organization.

  16. [Gender, human rights and socioeconomic impact of AIDS in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues

    2006-04-01

    The paper critically analyzes, from the gender standpoint, official results presented in the Brazilian government report to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Specifically, the fulfillment of 2003 targets set forth in the United Nations Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, under the category of Human Rights and Reduction of the Economic and Social Impact of AIDS, are evaluated. Key concepts are highlighted, including indicators and strategies that may help civilian society better monitor these targets until 2010.

  17. Biological impact of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging of head and neck cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindemann A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antje Lindemann,1 Kerstin Lüdtke-Buzug,2 Bianca M Fräderich,1 Ksenija Gräfe,2 Ralph Pries,1 Barbara Wollenberg11Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck, Germany; 2Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, Luebeck, GermanyBackground: As a tomographic imaging technology, magnetic particle imaging (MPI allows high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and the possibility to create real-time images by determining the spatial distribution of magnetic particles. To ensure a prospective biosafe application of UL-D (University of Luebeck-Dextran coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles, we evaluated the biocompatibility of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, their impact on biological properties, and their cellular uptake using head and neck squamous cancer cells (HNSCCs.Methods: SPIONs that met specific MPI requirements were synthesized as tracers. Labeling and uptake efficiency were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and magnetic particle spectrometry. Flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assays, and real-time cell analyzer assays were used to investigate apoptosis, proliferation, and the cytokine response of SPION-labeled cells. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS was determined using a fluorescent dye. Experimental results were compared to the contrast agent Resovist®, a standard agent used in MPI.Results: UL-D nanoparticles and Resovist particles were taken up in vitro by HNSCCs via unspecific phagocytosis followed by cytosolic accumulation. To evaluate toxicity, flow cytometry analysis was performed; results showed that dose- and time-dependent administration of Resovist induced apoptosis whereas cell viability of UL-D-labeled cells was not altered. We observed decreased cell proliferation in response to increased SPION concentrations. An intracellular production of ROS could not be detected, suggesting that

  18. Teardrop fracture following head-first impact in an ice hockey player: Case report and analysis of injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, James J; Ivancic, Paul C; Scott, David L

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a young male athlete who sustained a three column displaced teardrop fracture of the C5 vertebra due to a head-first impact in hockey, suffered neurapraxia, yet made full neurological recovery. This full recovery was in sharp contrast to multiple case series which reported permanent quadriplegia in the vast majority of teardrop fracture patients. We investigate the etiology and biomechanical mechanisms of injury. Admission imaging revealed the teardrop fracture which consisted of: a frontal plane fracture which separated an anterior quadrilateral-shaped fragment from the posterior vertebral body; a vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body in the sagittal plane; and incomplete fractures of the neural arch that initiated superiorly at the anterior aspect of the spinous process and left lamina adjacent to the superior facet. Epidural hematoma in the region of the C5 vertebra was observed in addition to disc and ligamentous disruptions at C4-5 and C5-6. Our patient was ultimately treated surgically with anterior fusion from C4 through C6 and subsequently with bilateral posterior fusion at C5-6. The injuries were caused by high-energy axial compression with the neck in a pre-flexed posture. The first fracture event consisted of the anterior vertebral body fragment being sheared off of the posterior fragment under the compression load due in part to the sagittal plane concavity of the C5 inferior endplate. The etiology of the vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body fragment in the sagittal plane was consistent with a previously described hypothesis of the mechanistic injury events. First, the C4-5 disc height decreased under load which increased its hoop stress. Next, this increased hoop stress transferred lateral forces to the C5 uncinate processes which caused their outward expansion. Finally, the outward expansion of the uncinate processes caused the left and right sides of the vertebral body to split and spread. Evidence in

  19. Impact of apigenin and kaempferol on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Hollie I.; Choi, Eun-Young; Helton, W. Brian; Gairola, C. Gary; Valentino, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective Apigenin and kaempferol are plant flavonoids with reported chemopreventive activities. This study aimed to determine the effect of apigenin and kaempferol on cell viability in cultured cells derived from the pharynx (FaDu cell line), an oral cavity carcinoma (PCI-13 cell line), and a metastatic lymph node (PCI-15B cell line) and in explanted FaDu cells. Study Design The in vitro viability of FaDu, PCI-13, and PCI-15B cells treated with apigenin and kaempferol was determined. Tumor growth of FaDu explants was evaluated in athymic mice that were gavaged with either apigenin or kaempferol. Results Although apigenin and kaempferol treatment decreased viability of cells in vitro, cell-type-dependent differences in responsiveness were observed. In vivo apigenin treatment significantly increased the tumor size of FaDu explants. Results obtained using kaempferol were similar. Conclusions The in vitro decrease in FaDu cell viability by apigenin and kaempferol was not observed in in vivo tumor explants using the conditions described in this study. PMID:24439916

  20. The Value of Mainstreaming Human Rights into Health Impact Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNaughton, Gillian; Forman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is increasingly being used to predict the health and social impacts of domestic and global laws, policies and programs. In a comprehensive review of HIA practice in 2012, the authors indicated that, given the diverse range of HIA practice, there is an immediate need to reconsider the governing values and standards for HIA implementation [1]. This article responds to this call for governing values and standards for HIA. It proposes that international human rights standards be integrated into HIA to provide a universal value system backed up by international and domestic laws and mechanisms of accountability. The idea of mainstreaming human rights into HIA is illustrated with the example of impact assessments that have been carried out to predict the potential effects of intellectual property rights in international trade agreements on the availability and affordability of medicines. The article concludes by recommending international human rights standards as a legal and ethical framework for HIA that will enhance the universal values of nondiscrimination, participation, transparency and accountability and bring legitimacy and coherence to HIA practice as well. PMID:25264683

  1. Experience of head and neck theatre staff and attitudes to human factors using an aviation-based analysis and classification system--a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Katarzyna M; Seager, Leonie; Scott, Jim; Colbert, Serryth; Dale, Trevor; Brennan, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    The role that human factors have in contributing to air crashes is well known and is included as an essential part of training. Awareness of human factors in surgery is increasingly being recognised but surprisingly few papers have come from head and neck specialties. We circulated a questionnaire on human factors based on an aviation model to 140 head and neck medical and ancillary staff who work in operating theatres in 3 large UK hospitals. Most positive responses were found in the consultant group followed by trainee doctors and support staff. A significant difference was found in the subcategories of Unsafe Supervision (p=0.002) and Preconditions to Unsafe Acts (p=0.001). This work will help to identify multi-system deficiencies that can be corrected, and highlights aspects that may yield the greatest reduction in surgical errors. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impacts of local human activities on the Antarctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, T.; Fleming, Z. L.; Hughes, K. A.; Ainley, D. G.; Convey, P.; Moreno, C. A.; Pfeiffer, S.; Scott, J.; Snape, I.

    2009-04-01

    An overview of a recently published review of the scientific literature from the past decade on the impacts of human activities on the Antarctic environment is presented. An assessment of the cumulative effects of scientists and accompanying base construction, tourists and fishery activities in Antarctica is timely given a decade since the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty came into force in 1998 and the increasing attention given to and human presence in Antarctica during this 2007-2009 IPY. A range of impacts has been identified at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Chemical contamination and sewage disposal on the continent have been found to be long-lived, with contemporary sewage management practices at many coastal stations insufficient to prevent local contamination. Human activities, particularly construction and transport, have affected Antarctic flora and fauna and a small number of non-indigenous plant and animal species has become established on some of the Antarctic Peninsula and sub Antarctic islands. There is little indication of recovery of overexploited fish stocks, and ramifications of fishing activity on bycatch species and the ecosystem could also be far-reaching. The Antarctic Treaty System and its instruments, in particular the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the Environmental Protocol, provide a framework within which management of human activities take place. In order to ensure comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, including its intrinsic, wilderness and scientific values in the face of the continuing expansion of human activities in Antarctica, a more effective implementation of a wide range of measures is essential. These include effective environmental impact assessments, long-term monitoring, mitigation measures for non-indigenous species, ecosystem-based management of living resources, and increased regulation of National Antarctic

  3. Cytotoxic Effect of Coscinium fenestratum on Human Head and Neck Cancer Cell Line (HN31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranyapin Potikanond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coscinium fenestratum is widely used as a medicinal plant in many Asian countries. This study aimed to investigate the cytotoxic effect of a crude water extract of C. fenestratum (CF extract compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU on human HN31 cell line, a metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx. The results revealed that cell morphology visualized under inverted light microscopy was changed from flat with a polygonal appearance to round appearance after CF extract application. The cell viability assay (MTT test showed that the concentration producing 50% growth inhibition (IC50 at 48-hour incubation of CF extract on HN31 was 0.12 mg/mL, while the IC50 of 5-FU was 6.6 mg/mL, indicating that CF extract has a higher potency. However, combining various concentrations of 5-FU and CF extract at IC50 did not show synergistic effect. The CF extract dose dependently increased cell apoptosis determined by Annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. It decreased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and pAkt, while it increased the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, the cytotoxicity of CF extract was associated with the modulation of p38 MAPK, pAkt, and p53 signal molecules, leading to inhibiting cell survival and increasing apoptosis. No synergistic effects of CF extract and 5-FU were observed.

  4. Smoking has a negative impact upon health related quality of life after treatment for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Grau, Cai

    2006-01-01

    To examine the influence of smoking on observer based morbidity scores and patient assessed health related quality of life after treatment for head and neck cancer. The results of EORTC C30 and H&N35 questionnaires and DAHANCA morbidity scores were studied according to smoking status in 114...... recurrence free head and neck cancer patients. In contrast to observer based toxicity scoring, smoking had a significantly negative influence on 20 of the 33 quality of life scales. Previous smokers had quality of life scores in between never smokers and continuous smokers. Smoking after treatment of head...... and neck cancer adversely influenced a wide range of quality of life endpoints. Quitters had better quality of life than patients who continued to smoke after treatment, suggesting that smoking cessation may improve quality of life in addition to reducing the risk of new cancer. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb...

  5. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Virus DNA by PCR in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in E.N.T. Ward of Ahwaz Imam Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nikakhlagh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, epidemiological and experimental evidences in western countries consistently support an etiological role for human papillomavirus (HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The role of HPV in the etiology of head and neck SCC in developing countries such as Iran has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate HPV DNA in the head and neck cancer by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital Ahwaz.Materials & Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 176 patients with SCC of head and neck who admitted in Ahwaz Imam Khomeini Hospital were evaluated with PCR for HPV DNA and compared to 176 control samples with benign pathology. Results: In this study 7 specimens (3.97% of the case group were positive for HPV DNA that include HPV 16(3 cases ,18(2 cases ,57(1 case, 33 (1case and only 1 specimen (0.57% of the control group was positive that include HPV 6 ( P value<0.001Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of HPVs in the SCC of head and neck. Further studies are needed to evaluate larger population in Ahwaz for the presence and types of HPV.

  6. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A. [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harris, Stephen L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Manchester, New Hampshire (United States); Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  7. Vulnerability assessment of atmospheric environment driven by human impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shen, Jing; Ding, Feng; Li, Yu; He, Li

    2016-11-15

    Atmospheric environment quality worsening is a substantial threat to public health worldwide, and in many places, air pollution due to the intensification of the human activity is increasing dramatically. However, no studies have been investigated the integration of vulnerability assessment and atmospheric environment driven by human impacts. The objective of this study was to identify and prioritize the undesirable environmental changes as an early warning system for environment managers and decision makers in term of human, atmospheric environment, and social economic elements. We conduct a vulnerability assessment method of atmospheric environment associated with human impact, this method integrates spatial context of Geographic Information System (GIS) tool, multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method, ordered weighted averaging (OWA) operators under the Exposure-Sensitivity- Adaptive Capacity (ESA) framework. Decision makers can find out relevant vulnerability assessment results with different vulnerable attitudes. In the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region, China, we further applied this developed method and proved it to be reliable and consistent with the China Environmental Status Bulletin. Results indicate that the vulnerability of atmospheric environment in the BTH region is not optimistic, and environment managers should do more about air pollution. Thus, the most appropriate strategic decision and development program of city or state can be picked out assisting by the vulnerable results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. How Big of an Effect Do Small Dams Have? Using Geomorphological Footprints to Quantify Spatial Impact of Low-Head Dams and Identify Patterns of Across-Dam Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jane S; Mather, Martha E; Costigan, Katie H; Daniels, Melinda D

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal connectivity is a fundamental characteristic of rivers that can be disrupted by natural and anthropogenic processes. Dams are significant disruptions to streams. Over 2,000,000 low-head dams (dams on geomorphology and ecology are largely untested. Progress for research and conservation is impaired by not knowing the magnitude of low-head dam impacts. Based on the geomorphic literature, we refined a methodology that allowed us to quantify the spatial extent of low-head dam impacts (herein dam footprint), assessed variation in dam footprints across low-head dams within a river network, and identified select aspects of the context of this variation. Wetted width, depth, and substrate size distributions upstream and downstream of six low-head dams within the Upper Neosho River, Kansas, United States of America were measured. Total dam footprints averaged 7.9 km (3.0-15.3 km) or 287 wetted widths (136-437 wetted widths). Estimates included both upstream (mean: 6.7 km or 243 wetted widths) and downstream footprints (mean: 1.2 km or 44 wetted widths). Altogether the six low-head dams impacted 47.3 km (about 17%) of the mainstem in the river network. Despite differences in age, size, location, and primary function, the sizes of geomorphic footprints of individual low-head dams in the Upper Neosho river network were relatively similar. The number of upstream dams and distance to upstream dams, but not dam height, affected the spatial extent of dam footprints. In summary, ubiquitous low-head dams individually and cumulatively altered lotic ecosystems. Both characteristics of individual dams and the context of neighboring dams affected low-head dam impacts within the river network. For these reasons, low-head dams require a different, more integrative, approach for research and management than the individualistic approach that has been applied to larger dams.

  9. Effect of serotonin receptor blockade on endocrine and cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, S; Secher, N H; Knigge, U

    1993-01-01

    Effects of blockade of serotonin (5-HT) receptors on the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine adaptations during head-up tilt were investigated in normal men. In control experiments 50 degrees head-up tilt increased heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), plasma renin activity (PRA...

  10. Evaluation of human thorax FE model in various impact scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansová M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on the validation of the 50th percentile male model — a detailed FE model of the thoracic segment of the human body developed within project Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Thorax and Upper Extremities (THOMO co-funded by the European Commission (7th Framework Programme. The model response was tested in three impact scenarios: frontal, lateral and oblique. The resulting impactor contact force vs. time and chest deflection vs. time responses were compared with experimental results. The strain profile of the 5th rib was checked with lateral and oblique strain profiles from post-mortem human subject (PMHS experiments. The influence of heart and lungs on the mechanical response of the model was assessed and the material data configuration, giving the most biofidelic thorax behaviour, was identified.

  11. Low prevalence of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the northwest region of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Dana; Salvador, Christianne; Orosa, Jose; Racelis, Sheryl; Leaño, Modesty; Sanchez, Danilo; Angeles, Lara Mae; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Ramos, John Donnie; Pawlita, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Geographic heterogeneity of human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been observed over the last few years. This trend has not been evaluated in the Philippines. Hence, this study aims to provide for the first time a data on the prevalence of HPV in HNSCC in the northwestern region of the Philippines. Methods Two hundred one (201) biopsy samples (179 formalin fixed paraffin embedded and 22 fresh frozen) from 163 Filipino HNSCC cases (oral cavity = 88; larynx = 60; oropharynx = 15) diagnosed between 2003 to 2013 were initially included in this study. HPV DNA was detected by two methods: (1) BSGP5+/6+-PCR/ multiplex human papillomavirus genotyping and (2) TaqMan probes-based real-time qPCR. Presence of HPV type-specific transcripts were also analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with subsequent hybridization to oligonucleotide probes coupled to Luminex beads. Co-amplification of the β-globin and ubiquitin C genes served as internal positive controls for DNA and RNA analyses, respectively. Results and conclusions Of the 163, 82 (50.3%) cases had at least one tissue sample that was valid for molecular analysis. Only two of the DNA valid cases (2.4%) were HPV DNA-positive (HPV11 and HPV33). All HPV mRNA assays rendered negative results except for HPV11 transcripts. Results of this study may indicate that there is probably very low prevalence of HPV-associated HNSCC among Filipino adults living in a rural region of the Philippines. This study could serve as a benchmark for designing follow-up studies that would assess possible changes in trends of HNSCC among Filipinos in different ethnic regions of the country, especially urban areas in which the population is expected to adapt Western style sexual behavior. A prospective sampling of fresh frozen tissue is also highly recommended to ensure better molecular analyses. PMID:28199413

  12. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  13. Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 by hypoxia and irradiation in human head and neck carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengele Karin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN often contain highly radioresistant hypoxic regions, nonetheless, radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for these tumours. Reoxygenation during fractionated radiotherapy is desired to render these hypoxic tumour regions more radiosensitive. Hypoxia additionally leads to up-regulation of PAI-1, a protein involved in tumour progression and an established prognostic marker for poor outcome. However, the impact of reoxygenation and radiation on PAI-1 levels is not yet clear. Therefore, we investigated the kinetics of PAI-1 expression and secretion after hypoxia and reoxygenation, and determined the influence of ionizing radiation on PAI-1 levels in the two human SCCHN cell lines, BHY and FaDu. Methods HIF-1α immunoblot was used to visualize the degree of hypoxia in the two cell lines. Cellular PAI-1 expression was investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy. ELISA was used to quantify relative changes in PAI-1 expression (cell lysates and secretion (cell culture supernatants in response to various lengths (2 – 4 h of hypoxic exposure (2, reoxygenation (24 h, 20 % O2, and radiation (0, 2, 5 and 10 Gy. Results HIF-1α expression was induced between 2 and 24 h of hypoxic exposure. Intracellular PAI-1 expression was significantly increased in BHY and FaDu cells as early as 4 h after hypoxic exposure. A significant induction in secreted PAI-1 was seen after 12 to 24 h (BHY and 8 to 24 h (FaDu hypoxia, as compared to the normoxic control. A 24 h reoxygenation period caused significantly less PAI-1 secretion than a 24 h hypoxia period in FaDu cells. Irradiation led to an up-regulation of PAI-1 expression and secretion in both, BHY and FaDu cells. Conclusion Our data suggest that both, short-term (~4 – 8 h and long-term (~20 – 24 h hypoxic exposure could increase PAI-1 levels in SCCHN in vivo. Importantly, radiation itself could lead to PAI-1 up-regulation in head and

  14. EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraba, K; Hibino, K; Hiranuma, K; Negoro, T

    2000-04-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac 3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by the INF because the disk

  15. Keeping Kids on Track: Impacts of a Parenting-Focused Early Head Start Program on Attachment Security and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggman, Lori A.; Boyce, Lisa K.; Cook, Gina A.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: The home-based Early Head Start program in this local study aimed to promote children's early attachment and cognitive development by establishing supportive relationships with parents and guiding responsive parenting and positive parent-child play interactions. To test the effectiveness of this approach, we studied the…

  16. The Impact of the Chile Intervention on the Food Served in Head Start Centers in Rural New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Alexandra B.; Davis, Sally M.; Keane, Patricia C.; Myers, Orrin B.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise is a multicomponent obesity-prevention intervention, which was evaluated among Head Start (HS) centers in American Indian and predominantly Hispanic communities in rural New Mexico. This study examines the intervention's foodservice outcomes: fruits, vegetables, whole grains,…

  17. The Impact of the Chile Intervention on the Food Served in Head Start Centers in Rural New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Alexandra B.; Davis, Sally M.; Keane, Patricia C.; Myers, Orrin B.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise is a multicomponent obesity-prevention intervention, which was evaluated among Head Start (HS) centers in American Indian and predominantly Hispanic communities in rural New Mexico. This study examines the intervention's foodservice outcomes: fruits, vegetables, whole grains,…

  18. Human impacts on morphodynamic thresholds in estuarine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. B.; Van Maren, D. S.; Ding, P. X.; Yang, S. L.; Van Prooijen, B. C.; De Vet, P. L. M.; Winterwerp, J. C.; De Vriend, H. J.; Stive, M. J. F.; He, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Many estuaries worldwide are modified, primarily driven by economic gain or safety. These works, combined with global climate changes heavily influence the morphologic development of estuaries. In this paper, we analyze the impact of human activities on the morphodynamic developments of the Scheldt Estuary and the Wadden Sea basins in the Netherlands and the Yangtze Estuary in China at various spatial scales, and identify mechanisms responsible for their change. Human activities in these systems include engineering works and dredging activities for improving and maintaining the navigation channels, engineering works for flood protection, and shoreline management activities such as land reclamations. The Yangtze Estuary is influenced by human activities in the upstream river basin as well, especially through the construction of many dams. The tidal basins in the Netherlands are also influenced by human activities along the adjacent coasts. Furthermore, all these systems are influenced by global changes through (accelerated) sea-level rise and changing weather patterns. We show that the cumulative impacts of these human activities and global changes may lead to exceeding thresholds beyond which the morphology of the tidal basins significantly changes, and loses its natural characteristics. A threshold is called tipping point when the changes are even irreversible. Knowledge on such thresholds or tipping points is important for the sustainable management of these systems. We have identified and quantified various examples of such thresholds and/or tipping points for the morphodynamic developments at various spatial and temporal scales. At the largest scale (mega-scale) we consider the sediment budget of a tidal basin as a whole. A smaller scale (macro-scale) is the development of channel structures in an estuary, especially the development of two competing channels. At the smallest scale (meso-scale) we analyze the developments of tidal flats and the connecting

  19. A Prediction of Response of the Head and Neck of the U.S. Adult Military Population to Dynamic Impact Acceleration from Selected Dynamic Test Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    concussion in whiplash . However, Hodgson (13), Gurdjian (12) and others contend that other factors such as resultant intracranial pressure gradients may...degree of head-neck hyperextension. This disagreement among researchers as to the mecha- nisms of injury in hdad impact and whiplash is also seen in...results were obtained after some 62 42 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ > _ _ _ _ _ fi 4 ae I4 *0 &AeJ s- C9. d -- q a 3 1 8 £ 3 36 3’ U) L) 4’ U- 4-) i d

  20. Impacts of Launch Vehicle Fairing Size on Human Exploration Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Sharon; Collins, Tim; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Polsgrove, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars, particularly to the Martian surface, are grand endeavors that place extensive demands on ground infrastructure, launch capabilities, and mission systems. The interplay of capabilities and limitations among these areas can have significant impacts on the costs and ability to conduct Mars missions and campaigns. From a mission and campaign perspective, decisions that affect element designs, including those based on launch vehicle and ground considerations, can create effects that ripple through all phases of the mission and have significant impact on the overall campaign. These effects result in impacts to element designs and performance, launch and surface manifesting, and mission operations. In current Evolvable Mars Campaign concepts, the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) is the primary launch vehicle for delivering crew and payloads to cis-lunar space. SLS is currently developing an 8.4m diameter cargo fairing, with a planned upgrade to a 10m diameter fairing in the future. Fairing diameter is a driving factor that impacts many aspects of system design, vehicle performance, and operational concepts. It creates a ripple effect that influences all aspects of a Mars mission, including: element designs, grounds operations, launch vehicle design, payload packaging on the lander, launch vehicle adapter design to meet structural launch requirements, control and thermal protection during entry and descent at Mars, landing stability, and surface operations. Analyses have been performed in each of these areas to assess and, where possible, quantify the impacts of fairing diameter selection on all aspects of a Mars mission. Several potential impacts of launch fairing diameter selection are identified in each of these areas, along with changes to system designs that result. Solutions for addressing these impacts generally result in increased systems mass and propellant needs, which can further exacerbate packaging and flight challenges. This paper

  1. Learning toward practical head pose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Gaoli; He, Feixiang; Zhu, Rong; Xuan, Shibin

    2017-08-01

    Head pose is useful information for many face-related tasks, such as face recognition, behavior analysis, human-computer interfaces, etc. Existing head pose estimation methods usually assume that the face images have been well aligned or that sufficient and precise training data are available. In practical applications, however, these assumptions are very likely to be invalid. This paper first investigates the impact of the failure of these assumptions, i.e., misalignment of face images, uncertainty and undersampling of training data, on head pose estimation accuracy of state-of-the-art methods. A learning-based approach is then designed to enhance the robustness of head pose estimation to these factors. To cope with misalignment, instead of using hand-crafted features, it seeks suitable features by learning from a set of training data with a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN), such that the training data can be best classified into the correct head pose categories. To handle uncertainty and undersampling, it employs multivariate labeling distributions (MLDs) with dense sampling intervals to represent the head pose attributes of face images. The correlation between the features and the dense MLD representations of face images is approximated by a maximum entropy model, whose parameters are optimized on the given training data. To estimate the head pose of a face image, its MLD representation is first computed according to the model based on the features extracted from the image by the trained DCNN, and its head pose is then assumed to be the one corresponding to the peak in its MLD. Evaluation experiments on the Pointing'04, FacePix, Multi-PIE, and CASIA-PEAL databases prove the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IMPACTS ON SUSTAINABLE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Anstätt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to critically analyze the findings of the first, recently published, studies about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR impacts on Sustainable Human Development (SHD. We aim at deriving conclusions for effective CSR strategies and at identifying consequences for management and research. As CSR claims to create value for corporations and for society, we argue that the people-centered Capability Approach (CA is promising to provide neglected and much needed insights how corporate activities affect individuals and communities. Based on a survey of recent literature addressing CSR impacts on SHD, we highlight CSR potentials to improve average well-being in multiple dimensions of SHD. Moreover, we critically assess challenges and limitations of CSR as a strategy to preserve and foster SHD. For instance, studies have shown that, despite CSR-driven well-being increases, social capital, relational capabilities and collective agency may become challenged by corporate strategies. Moreover, corporate environmental impacts have been found to be less often addressed by both, companies and SHD researchers. Resulting inequality and fairness issues have been identified as causes of violence against corporations even in the presence of total well-being improvements. We conclude that companies should strategically take into account a comprehensive range of factors driving and hampering SHD to account for their whole portfolio of corporate opportunities and risks. This requires evaluating CSR impacts instead of only focusing on CSR inputs and outputs. Thereby, corporations can mitigate their risks, improve their stakeholder trust and strengthen their competitiveness.

  3. Social Media Impact on Human Resources Management Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela-Eliza Micu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to do a research of human resource management in Romania for the ITsector, and focus the attention to a couple of things like culture, trainings and the impact resultedon social media that this companies and their employees are producing. The use of social media has a huge impact on the quality of the work and also is contributing tostrengthen the relationships between employees. It can be a good resource in attracting new talentsand also promoting the company. This research used mined data from LinkedIn and other socialmedia and publicly available websites in order to statistically test hypotheses using the Pearsonchi-square method and successfully finding 6 strong correlations between data analyzed forRomanian software development companies.

  4. Indicators for human toxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krewitt, Wolfram; Pennington, David W.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this task group under SETAC-Europe’s Second Working Group on Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA-WIA2) were to identify and discuss the suitability of toxicological impact measures for human health for use in characterization in LCIA. The current state of the art of defining......, as well as potency. Quantitative severity-based indicators yield measures in terms of Years of Life Lost (YOLL), Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY), Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) and other similar measures. DALYs and QALYs are examples of approaches that attempt to account for both years of life...... lost (mortality) and years of impaired life (morbidity). Qualitative severity approaches tend to arrange potency-based indicators in categories, avoiding the need to quantitatively express differences in severity. Based on the proposed criteria and current state of the knowledge, toxicological potency...

  5. Impact and Effectiveness of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Kjaer, Susanne K; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs constitute major public health initiatives worldwide. We assessed the global effect of quadrivalent HPV (4vHPV) vaccination on HPV infection and disease. PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles from...... January 2007 through February 2016 to identify observational studies reporting the impact or effectiveness of 4vHPV vaccination on infection, anogenital warts, and cervical cancer or precancerous lesions. Over the last decade, the impact of HPV vaccination in real-world settings has become increasingly...... evident, especially among girls vaccinated before HPV exposure in countries with high vaccine uptake. Maximal reductions of approximately 90% for HPV 6/11/16/18 infection, approximately 90% for genital warts, approximately 45% for low-grade cytological cervical abnormalities, and approximately 85...

  6. Effectiveness of isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone D5 solution of removing cuticular hydrocarbons from human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis)

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett Eric; Palma Kathleen G; Clayton Bert; Ballard Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In the treatment of human head lice infestation, healthcare providers are increasingly concerned about lice becoming resistant to existing pesticide treatments. Traditional pesticides, used to control these pests, have a neurological mechanism of action. This publication describes a topical solution with a non-traditional mechanism of action, based on physical disruption of the wax layer that covers the cuticle of the louse exoskeleton. This topical solution has been shown...

  7. Impact of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Luiz Felipe; Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Marcucci, Marcelo; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2017-03-03

    Late effects of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment have been increasingly investigated due to its impact on patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, low salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy. Twenty-nine patients with radiation-induced xerostomia received laser sessions twice a week, during 3 months (24 sessions). For this, a continuous wave Indium-Gallium-Aluminium-Phosphorus diode laser device was used punctually on the major salivary glands (808 nm, 0.75 W/cm(2), 30 mW, illuminated area 0.04 cm(2), 7.5 J/cm(2), 10 s, 0.3 J). Six extraoral points were illuminated on each parotid gland and three on each submandibular gland, as well as two intraoral points on each sublingual gland. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate, pH (two scales with different gradations), and quality of life (University Of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. There were significant increases in both mean salivary flow rates (unstimulated: p = 0.0012; stimulated: p < 0.0001), mean pH values (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0004), and mean score from the quality of life questionnaire (p < 0.0001). Low-level laser therapy seems to be effective to mitigate salivary hypofunction and increase salivary pH of patients submitted to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, thereby leading to an improvement in quality of life.

  8. The prognostic role of sex, race, and human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal and nonoropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhry, Carole; Westra, William H; Wang, Steven J; van Zante, Annemieke; Zhang, Yuehan; Rettig, Eleni; Yin, Linda X; Ryan, William R; Ha, Patrick K; Wentz, Alicia; Koch, Wayne; Richmon, Jeremy D; Eisele, David W; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established prognostic marker for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OPSCC). Because of the limited numbers of women and nonwhites in studies to date, sex and racial/ethnic differences in prognosis have not been well explored. In this study, survival differences were explored by the tumor HPV status among 1) patients with OPSCCs by sex and race and 2) patients with nonoropharyngeal (non-OP) head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs). This retrospective, multi-institution study included OPSCCs and non-OP HNSCCs of the oral cavity, larynx, and nasopharynx diagnosed from 1995 to 2012. Race/ethnicity was categorized as white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, Asian non-Hispanic, and Hispanic of any race. Tumors were centrally tested for p16 overexpression and the presence of HPV by HPV16 DNA and high-risk HPV E6/E7 messenger RNA in situ hybridization. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate overall survival (OS). The study population included 239 patients with OPSCC and 621 patients with non-OP HNSCC with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. After adjustments for the tumor HPV status, age, current tobacco use, and stage, the risk of death was lower for women versus men with OPSCC (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.55; P = .04). The results were similar with p16. In contrast, for non-OP HNSCCs, HPV positivity, p16 positivity, and sex were not associated with OS. For OPSCC, there are differences in survival by sex, even after the tumor HPV status has been taken into account. For non-OP HNSCC, the HPV status and the p16 status are not of prognostic significance. Cancer 2017;123:1566-1575. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Osteopontin is induced by TGF-β2 and regulates metabolic cell activity in cultured human optic nerve head astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Neumann

    Full Text Available The aqueous humor (AH component transforming growth factor (TGF-β2 is strongly correlated to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, and was shown to up-regulate glaucoma-associated extracellular matrix (ECM components, members of the ECM degradation system and heat shock proteins (HSP in primary ocular cells. Here we present osteopontin (OPN as a new TGF-β2 responsive factor in cultured human optic nerve head (ONH astrocytes. Activation was initially demonstrated by Oligo GEArray microarray and confirmed by semiquantitative (sq RT-PCR, realtime RT-PCR and western blot. Expressions of most prevalent OPN receptors CD44 and integrin receptor subunits αV, α4, α 5, α6, α9, β1, β3 and β5 by ONH astrocytes were shown by sqRT-PCR and immunofluorescence labeling. TGF-β2 treatment did not affect their expression levels. OPN did not regulate gene expression of described TGF-β2 targets shown by sqRT-PCR. In MTS-assays, OPN had a time- and dose-dependent stimulating effect on the metabolic activity of ONH astrocytes, whereas TGF-β2 significantly reduced metabolism. OPN signaling via CD44 mediated a repressive outcome on metabolic activity, whereas signaling via integrin receptors resulted in a pro-metabolic effect. In summary, our findings characterize OPN as a TGF-β2 responsive factor that is not involved in TGF-β2 mediated ECM and HSP modulation, but affects the metabolic activity of astrocytes. A potential involvement in a protective response to TGF-β2 triggered damage is indicated, but requires further investigation.

  10. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía García-Guerrero

    Full Text Available Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA through the T-cell receptor (TCR. However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR. In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges.

  11. Climate Change, Human Impacts, and the Resilience of Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T. P.; Baird, A. H.; Bellwood, D. R.; Card, M.; Connolly, S. R.; Folke, C.; Grosberg, R.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Jackson, J. B. C.; Kleypas, J.; Lough, J. M.; Marshall, P.; Nyström, M.; Palumbi, S. R.; Pandolfi, J. M.; Rosen, B.; Roughgarden, J.

    2003-08-01

    The diversity, frequency, and scale of human impacts on coral reefs are increasing to the extent that reefs are threatened globally. Projected increases in carbon dioxide and temperature over the next 50 years exceed the conditions under which coral reefs have flourished over the past half-million years. However, reefs will change rather than disappear entirely, with some species already showing far greater tolerance to climate change and coral bleaching than others. International integration of management strategies that support reef resilience need to be vigorously implemented, and complemented by strong policy decisions to reduce the rate of global warming.

  12. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    -resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus......Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin...

  13. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasic, B. [Hospital for pulmonary diseases, Zagreb (Croatia); Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K. [Merkur Univ. Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  14. Globalisation and Human Rights: An Overview of its Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabina Arfat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of human rights law in response to globalization is not new, and there is nothing inherent in the international system that would prevent further protective measures. A number of U.N. specialized agencies have also addressed the question of globalization. This global development is sometimes viewed as being responsible for exploitation, and other forms of human rights abuses. On the other hand, improvements in human rights are sometimes attributed to the spread of liberal ideas and movements, which is one of the key dimensions of globalization. Critics say human rights have been adversely affected by globalization for instance right to equality and other socio economic rights. The commitment of the United Nations to the indivisibility of human rights is reflected in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Human rights are the first responsibility of governments. While globalization offers great opportunities, the fact that its benefits are very unevenly shared and its costs unevenly distributed represents an aspect of the process that affects the full enjoyment of all human rights, in particular in developing countries. Inequality has risen during this present globalization period. In this paper an attempt has been made to highlight the impact of globalization on human rights regime. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-align:justify; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  15. Preventing head and neck injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  16. Global hotspots of water scarcity impacts due to human interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, T.; Wada, Y.; Aerts, J.; Ward, P.; Satoh, Y.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Masaki, Y.; Doll, P. M.; Ostberg, S.; Oki, T.; Gosling, S.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Water scarcity is rapidly increasing in many global river basins, due to both local increases in water demand and human interventions affecting stream flow. In a novel multi-model multi-forcing assessment over the period 1971-2010, we examine how several human interventions have affected water scarcity, namely land use change, reservoir operations, and upstream water withdrawals. We show that these human interventions have caused increased water scarcity for 16% of the global population, and decreased water scarcity for 13%, and have contributed to distinct patterns of water scarcity hotspots. We also show that a combination of human interventions and changes in local water demands have led to an increase in the duration of extreme water scarcity events in 30% of the global land area, inhabited by 49% of the global population. Upstream human interventions are the main dominant driver (in 86% of the cases) of negative impacts on downstream fresh water resources and water scarcity. Therefore, adaptation measures should be embedded in integrated river basin management plans, addressing upstream effects on downstream water scarcity.This study is the first in its kind to evaluate how human interventions affected water scarcity conditions as well as the exposure to and persistence of water scarcity events, using an ensemble of five global water impact models (H08, LPJmL, MATSIRO, PCR-GLOBWB, WaterGAP) driven by three global state-of-the art observations-based historical climate data-sets (PGFv2, GSWP3, WFD/WFDEI) and a set of socio-economic proxies (GDP, population density, livestock density, land use and land cover) to model historical demands. A novelty of this research is the use of the HYDE 3.1 - MIRCA dataset for simulating the time-varying effects of changes in irrigation and/or cropland patterns. With the incorporation of a spatially and temporally explicit indicator to describe minimum environmental flow requirements, i.e. the amount of water that ecosystems need

  17. Chromothripsis: how does such a catastrophic event impact human reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellestor, Franck

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of a new kind of massive chromosomal rearrangement, baptized chromothripsis (chromo for chromosomes, thripsis for shattering into pieces), greatly modifies our understanding of molecular mechanisms implicated in the repair of DNA damage and the genesis of complex chromosomal rearrangements. Initially described in cancers, and then in constitutional rearrangements, chromothripsis is characterized by the shattering of one (or a few) chromosome(s) segments followed by a chaotic reassembly of the chromosomal fragments, occurring during one unique cellular event. The diversity and the high complexity of chromothripsis events raise questions about their origin, their ties to chromosome instability and their impact in pathology. Several causative mechanisms, involving abortive apoptosis, telomere erosion, mitotic errors, micronuclei formation and p53 inactivation, have been proposed. The remarkable point is that all these mechanisms have been identified in the field of human reproduction as causal factors for reproductive failures and chromosomal abnormalities. Consequently, it seems important to consider this unexpected catastrophic phenomenon in the context of fertilization and early embryonic development in order to discuss its potential impact on human reproduction.

  18. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change.

  19. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  20. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jack C; Merkle, Andrew C; Carneal, Catherine M; Voo, Liming M; Johannes, Matthew S; Paulson, Jeff M; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  1. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  2. Human adipocyte function is impacted by mechanical cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinelli, V; Heuvingh, J; du Roure, O; Rouault, C; Devulder, A; Klein, C; Lacasa, M; Clément, E; Lacasa, D; Clément, K

    2014-06-01

    Fibrosis is a hallmark of human white adipose tissue (WAT) during obesity-induced chronic inflammation. The functional impact of increased interstitial fibrosis (peri-adipocyte fibrosis) on adjacent adipocytes remains unknown. Here we developed a novel in vitro 3D culture system in which human adipocytes and decellularized material of adipose tissue (dMAT) from obese subjects are embedded in a peptide hydrogel. When cultured with dMAT, adipocytes showed decreased lipolysis and adipokine secretion and increased expression/production of cytokines (IL-6, G-CSF) and fibrotic mediators (LOXL2 and the matricellular proteins THSB2 and CTGF). Moreover, some alterations including lipolytic activity and fibro-inflammation also occurred when the adipocyte/hydrogel culture was mechanically compressed. Notably, CTGF expression levels correlated with the amount of peri-adipocyte fibrosis in WAT from obese individuals. Moreover, dMAT-dependent CTGF promoter activity, which depends on β1-integrin/cytoskeleton pathways, was enhanced in the presence of YAP, a mechanosensitive co-activator of TEAD transcription factors. Mutation of TEAD binding sites abolished the dMAT-induced promoter activity. In conclusion, fibrosis may negatively affect human adipocyte function via mechanosensitive molecules, in part stimulated by cell deformation. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Human papillomavirus and p53 expression in cancer of unknown primary in the head and neck region in relation to clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivars, Lars; Näsman, Anders; Tertipis, Nikolaos; Vlastos, Andrea; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Nordemar, Sushma

    2014-04-01

    Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head neck region are generally treated with neck dissection followed by radiotherapy at times combined with chemotherapy, a treatment associated with considerable side effects. Some of these tumors may originate as human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with better clinical outcome than head neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in general, and could potentially do well with less treatment. Here, we therefore investigated whether HPV status and p53-expression correlated to clinical outcome in patients with CUP in the head neck region. Fifty metastases were analyzed for presence of HPV DNA, and expression of p16(INK4A) and p53 and the data were correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with HPV DNA-positive (HPVDNA+) metastases had significantly better 5-year overall survival (OS) compared to those with HPVDNA- metastases (80.0% vs. 36.7%, respectively; P = 0.004), with a similar tendency for disease-free survival (DFS). These survival rates showed excellent concordance with those of HPVDNA+ and HPVDNA- OSCC in Sweden during the same time period, strengthening the hypothesis that HPVDNA+ head and neck CUP may originate from HPVDNA+ OSCC. In addition, having absent/intermediary-low as compared to high expression of p53 correlated to a better prognosis with a 69% as compared to 14% 5-year OS, respectively (P p53 expression are valuable prognostic factors in patients with CUP in the head and neck region and should be further explored for clinical use.

  4. Fabrication of robot head module using contact resistance force sensor for human robot interaction and its evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Jong Ho [Korea Reserch Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyun Joon [Univ. of Maryland, Maryland (United States); Kwon, Young Ha [Kyung Hee Univ., Gyunggi Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents a design of a robot head module with touch sensing algorithms that can simultaneously detect contact force and location. The module is constructed with a hemisphere and three sensor units that are fabricated using contact resistance force sensors. The surface part is designed with the hemisphere that measures 300 mm in diameter and 150 mm in height. Placed at the bottom of the robot head module are three sensor units fabricated using a simple screen printing technique. The contact force and the location of the model are evaluated through the calibration setup. The experiment showed that the calculated contact positions almost coincided with the applied load points as the contact location changed with a location error of about {+-}8.67 mm. The force responses of the module were evaluated at two points under loading and unloading conditions from 0 N to 5 N. The robot head module showed almost the same force responses at the two points.

  5. Human-Like Behavior Generation Based on Head-Arms Model for Robot Tracking External Targets and Body Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Beck, Aryel; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Facing and pointing toward moving targets is a usual and natural behavior in daily life. Social robots should be able to display such coordinated behaviors in order to interact naturally with people. For instance, a robot should be able to point and look at specific objects. This is why, a scheme to generate coordinated head-arm motion for a humanoid robot with two degrees-of-freedom for the head and seven for each arm is proposed in this paper. Specifically, a virtual plane approach is employed to generate the analytical solution of the head motion. A quadratic program (QP)-based method is exploited to formulate the coordinated dual-arm motion. To obtain the optimal solution, a simplified recurrent neural network is used to solve the QP problem. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is demonstrated using both computer simulation and physical experiments.

  6. Cordycepin enhances cisplatin apoptotic effect through caspase/MAPK pathways in human head and neck tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Hui Chen,1,2,* Jo-Yu Wang,3,* Bo-Syong Pan,3,4 Yi-Fen Mu,3 Meng-Shao Lai,3,4 Edmund Cheung So,5 Thian-Sze Wong,6 Bu-Miin Huang3,4 1Department of Anesthesia, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Liouying, 2Department of Nursing, Min-Hwei College of Health Care Management, 3Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 4The Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 5Department of Anesthesia, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong *Authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The present study aims to investigate whether the combination treatment of cordycepin (an extracted pure compound from Cordyceps sinensis and cisplatin (a platinum-based chemotherapy drug has better apoptotic effect in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods: The apoptotic influences of cordycepin and/or cisplatin treatments to human OC3, OEC-M1, and FaDu HNSCC cells were investigated by morphological observations, viability assay, flow cytometry assay, and Western blotting methods. Results: Data showed that the cell death phenomenon increased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and it appeared more in cordycepin plus cisplatin cotreatment among three cell lines. Cell survival rates significantly decreased as the dosage of cordycepin or cisplatin increased, and the better apoptotic effects were observed in cotreatment. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated that percentages of subG1 cells in cordycepin or cisplatin treatments significantly increased, suggesting that cells underwent apoptosis, and cordycepin plus cisplatin induced many more subG1 cells. Furthermore, cordycepin or cisplatin induced caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase protein cleavages, and stimulated c

  7. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  8. Blunt force impact to the head using a teeball bat: systematic comparison of physical and finite element modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Mattias; Ramsthaler, Frank; Potente, Stefan; Bockenheimer, Alexander; Schmidt, Peter H; Schrodt, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Blunt head trauma secondary to violent actions with various weapons is frequently a cause of injury in forensic casework; differing striking tools have varying degrees of injury capacity. The systematic approach used to examine a 19-year-old student who was beaten with a wooden teeball bat will be described. The assailant stopped beating the student when the teeball bat broke into two pieces. The surviving victim sustained bruises and a forehead laceration. The State's Attorney assigned a forensic expert to examine whether the forces exerted on the victim's head (leading to the fracture of the bat) were potentially life threatening (e.g. causing cranial bone fractures). Physical modeling was conducted using a pigskin-covered polyethylene end cap cushioned by cellulose that was connected to a piezoelectric force gauge. Experiments with teeball bats weighing 295-485 g demonstrated that 12-20 kN forces were necessary to cause a comparable bat fracture. In addition to physical testing, a computer-aided simulation was conducted, utilizing a finite-element (FE) method. In the FE approach, after selecting for wood properties, a virtual bat was swung against a hemisphere comprising two layers that represented bone and soft tissue. Employing this model, a 17.6 kN force was calculated, with the highest fracture probability points resembling the fracture patterns of the physically tested bats.

  9. Regional differences in islet distribution in the human pancreas--preferential beta-cell loss in the head region in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Wang

    Full Text Available While regional heterogeneity in islet distribution has been well studied in rodents, less is known about human pancreatic histology. To fill gaps in our understanding, regional differences in the adult human pancreas were quantitatively analyzed including the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Cadaveric pancreas specimens were collected from the head, body and tail regions of each donor, including subjects with no history of diabetes or pancreatic diseases (n = 23 as well as patients with T2D (n = 12. The study further included individuals from whom islets were isolated (n = 7 to study islet yield and function in a clinical setting of islet transplantation. The whole pancreatic sections were examined using an innovative large-scale image capture and unbiased detailed quantitative analyses of the characteristics of islets from each individual (architecture, size, shape and distribution. Islet distribution/density is similar between the head and body regions, but is >2-fold higher in the tail region. In contrast to rodents, islet cellular composition and architecture were similar throughout the pancreas and there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets isolated from different regions of the pancreas. Further studies revealed preferential loss of large islets in the head region in patients with T2D. The present study has demonstrated distinct characteristics of the human pancreas, which should provide a baseline for the future studies integrating existing research in the field and helping to advance bi-directional research between humans and preclinical models.

  10. Human impact on Karst: the example of Lusaka (Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Waele Jo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lusaka, the capital of Zambia with over 2,000,000 inhabitants, is built on an extensive plateau composed mainly of schists and dolomitic marbles, constituting a very important aquifer that provides the city with almost half of its drinking water needs. Recent demographic growth, leading to uncontrolled urban expansion, and mismanagement of the water resource and of urban waste has lead, in the past 20 years, to an overexploitation of the aquifer and to a generalised water quality depletion, putting in serious danger the future social and economical development of the capital. This third world city has, for these reasons, become a terrifying example of human impact on a vulnerable karst environment, and if no measures will be taken in the very near future, quality of life in the city will be at serious risk.

  11. Human convective boundary layer and its impact on personal exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan

    People spend most of their time indoors and they are constantly exposed to pollution that affects their health, comfort and productivity. Due to strong economic and environmental pressures to reduce building energy consumption, low air velocity design is gaining popularity; hence buoyancy flows...... differences in pollution concentration mean that personal exposure, rather than average space concentration, determines the risk of elevated exposure. Current room air distribution design practice does not take into account the air movement induced by the thermal flows from occupants, which often results...... in inaccurate exposure prediction. This highlights the importance of a detailed understanding of the complex air movements that take place in the vicinity of the human body and their impact on personal exposure. The two objectives of the present work are: (i) to examine the extent to which the room air...

  12. Knowledge-Intensive Entrepreneurship and the Impact of Human Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Neergaard, Helle; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address selected aspects of human capital in association with the entrepreneurial process in technology-based new ventures. Until recently, research investigating the founding of new businesses has mainly focused on the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs......, but this trait approach tends to underestimate the extent to which crucial skills may be acquired. The preliminary findings presented in this paper indicate that it is not so much the inherent personality that is instrumental in founding and growing a new venture. Previous employments as well as entrepreneurial...... experiences are both considered to be critical to the entrepreneurial process, as they both seem to impact on new venture establishment. The longer the career path before venture founding, the more experience an entrepreneur has gathered. Therefore, age seems to have a positive influence on the success...

  13. Impacts of human activity on reindeer and caribou: The matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Vistnes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of human activity and infrastructure development on reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus have been studied for decades and have resulted in numerous debates among scientists, developers and indigenous people affected. Herein, we discuss the development within this field of research in the context of choice of spatial and temporal scale and concurrent trends in wildlife disturbance studies. Before the 1980s, the vast majority of Rangifer disturbance studies were behavioural studies of individual animals exposed directly to potential disturbance sources. Most of these local studies reported few and short-term impacts on Rangifer. Around the mid 1980s focus shifted to regional scale landscape ecology studies, reporting that reindeer and caribou reduced the use of areas within 5 km from infrastructure and human activity by 50-95%, depending on type of disturbance, landscape, season, sensitivity of herds, and sex and age distribution of animals. In most cases where avoidance was documented a smaller fraction of the animals, typically bulls, were still observed closer to infrastructure or human activity. Local-scale behavioural studies of individual animals may provide complementary information, but will alone seriously underestimate potential regional impacts. Of 85 studies reviewed, 83% of the regional studies concluded that the impacts of human activity were significant, while only 13% of the local studies did the same. Traditional ecological knowledge may further increase our understanding of disturbance effects.Effekter av menneskelig aktivitet på rein og caribou: Betydningen av valg av skalaAbstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Effektene av menneskelig aktivitet og utbygging på rein og caribou (Rangifer tarandus har vært studert i flere tiår og har resultert i utallige debatter mellom forskere, utbyggere og berørt urbefolkning. I denne artikkelen diskuterer vi utviklingen innenfor dette forskningsfeltet i forhold til valg av

  14. The Ecology of Seamounts: Structure, Function, and Human Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Schlacher, Thomas; Williams, Alan; Consalvey, Mireille; Stocks, Karen I.; Rogers, Alex D.; O'Hara, Timothy D.; White, Martin; Shank, Timothy M.; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and function of benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts are centers of enhanced biological productivity, and whether they have unique trophic architecture. We discuss how vulnerable seamount communities are to fishing and mining, and how we can balance exploitation of resources and conservation of habitat. Despite considerable advances in recent years, there remain many questions about seamount ecosystems that need closer integration of molecular, oceanographic, and ecological research.

  15. Exploring the impact of climate on human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robine, Jean-Marie; Herrmann, François R; Arai, Yasumichi; Willcox, D Craig; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of physical geographic factors and climate conditions on human longevity. The centenarian rate (CR) in 2005 was computed for Japan's 47 prefectures, whose geography and climate vary greatly. Several pathways, such as excess winter mortality, land use and agricultural production, possibly linking physical and climate factors with extreme longevity, were explored. The probability of becoming a centenarian varies significantly among the Japanese prefectures. In particular, the computation of CR(70) demonstrated that the actual probability for individuals 70 years old in 1975 of becoming centenarians in 2005 was 3 times higher, on average, in Okinawa, both for males and females, than in Japan as a whole. About three quarters of the variance in CR(70) for females and half for males is explained by the physical environment and land use, even when variations in the level of socio-economic status between prefectures are controlled. Our analysis highlighted two features which might have played an important role in the longevity observed in Okinawa. First, there is virtually no winter in Okinawa. For instance, the mean winter temperature observed in 2005 was 17.2°C. Second, today, there is almost no rice production in Okinawa compared to other parts of Japan. In the past, however, production was higher in Okinawa. If we consider that long term effects of harsh winters can contribute to the mortality differential in old age and if we consider that food availability in the first part of the 20th century was mainly dependent on local production, early 20th century birth cohorts in Okinawa clearly had different experiences in terms of winter conditions and in terms of food availability compared to their counterparts in other parts of Japan. This work confirms the impact of climate conditions on human longevity, but it fails to demonstrate a strong association between longevity and mountainous regions and/or air quality.

  16. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim

    2013-01-01

    scanner. Head motion was independently measured, with a commercial marker-based device and the proposed vision-based system. A list-mode event-by-event reconstruction algorithm using the detected motion was applied. A phantom study with hand-controlled continuous random motion was obtained. Motion...

  17. Design and dosimetric analysis of a 385 MHz TETRA head exposure system for use in human provocation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Gernot; Bolz, Thomas; Uberbacher, Richard; Escorihuela-Navarro, Ana; Bahr, Achim; Dorn, Hans; Sauter, Cornelia; Eggert, Torsten; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi

    2012-10-01

    A new head exposure system for double-blind provocation studies investigating possible effects of terrestrial trunked radio (TETRA)-like exposure (385 MHz) on central nervous processes was developed and dosimetrically analyzed. The exposure system allows localized exposure in the temporal brain, similar to the case of operating a TETRA handset at the ear. The system and antenna concept enables exposure during wake and sleep states while an electroencephalogram (EEG) is recorded. The dosimetric assessment and uncertainty analysis yield high efficiency of 14 W/kg per Watt of accepted antenna input power due to an optimized antenna directly worn on the subject's head. Beside sham exposure, high and low exposure at 6 and 1.5 W/kg (in terms of maxSAR10g in the head) were implemented. Double-blind control and monitoring of exposure is enabled by easy-to-use control software. Exposure uncertainty was rigorously evaluated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computations, taking into account anatomical differences of the head, the physiological range of the dielectric tissue properties including effects of sweating on the antenna, possible influences of the EEG electrodes and cables, variations in antenna input reflection coefficients, and effects on the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution due to unavoidable small variations in the antenna position. This analysis yielded a reasonable uncertainty of analysis.

  18. Variation of the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction in a modern human identified skeletal collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radi, Nico; Mariotti, Valentina; Riga, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the so-called skeletal markers of activity as functional indicators is widely debated. Among them, certain morphological features of the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction (Poirier's facet, cervical fossa of Allen, etc.) have been considered in relation to some...

  19. Impacts of Extreme Events on Human Health. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jesse E.; Herring, Stephanie C.; Jantarasami, Lesley; Adrianopoli, Carl; Benedict, Kaitlin; Conlon, Kathryn; Escobar, Vanessa; Hess, Jeremy; Luvall, Jeffrey; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Quattrochi, Dale; Runkle, Jennifer; Schreck, Carl J., III

    2016-01-01

    Increased Exposure to Extreme Events Key Finding 1: Health impacts associated with climate-related changes in exposure to extreme events include death, injury, or illness; exacerbation of underlying medical conditions; and adverse effects on mental health[High Confidence]. Climate change will increase exposure risk in some regions of the United States due to projected increases in the frequency and/or intensity of drought, wildfires, and flooding related to extreme precipitation and hurricanes [Medium Confidence].Disruption of Essential Infrastructure Key Finding 2: Many types of extreme events related to climate change cause disruption of infrastructure, including power, water, transportation, and communication systems, that are essential to maintaining access to health care and emergency response services and safeguarding human health [High Confidence].Vulnerability to Coastal Flooding Key Finding 3: Coastal populations with greater vulnerability to health impacts from coastal flooding include persons with disabilities or other access and functional needs, certain populations of color, older adults, pregnant women and children, low-income populations, and some occupational groups [High Confidence].Climate change will increase exposure risk to coastal flooding due to increases in extreme precipitation and in hurricane intensity and rainfall rates, as well as sea level rise and the resulting increases in storm surge.

  20. Collapse of a marine mammal species driven by human impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Harkonen

    Full Text Available Understanding historical roles of species in ecosystems can be crucial for assessing long term human impacts on environments, providing context for management or restoration objectives, and making conservation evaluations of species status. In most cases limited historical abundance data impedes quantitative investigations, but harvested species may have long-term data accessible from hunting records. Here we make use of annual hunting records for Caspian seals (Pusa caspica dating back to the mid-19(th century, and current census data from aerial surveys, to reconstruct historical abundance using a hind-casting model. We estimate the minimum numbers of seals in 1867 to have been 1-1.6 million, but the population declined by at least 90% to around 100,000 individuals by 2005, primarily due to unsustainable hunting throughout the 20(th century. This collapse is part of a broader picture of catastrophic ecological change in the Caspian over the 20(th Century. Our results combined with fisheries data show that the current biomass of top predators in the Caspian is much reduced compared to historical conditions. The potential for the Caspian and other similar perturbed ecosystems to sustain natural resources of much greater biological and economic value than at present depends on the extent to which a number of anthropogenic impacts can be harnessed.

  1. Toward measuring the impact of ecological disintegrity on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieswerda, L E; Soskolne, C L; Newman, S C; Schopflocher, D; Smoyer, K E

    2001-01-01

    Ecological integrity refers to the ability of environmental life-support systems to sustain themselves in the face of human-induced impacts. We used a correlational, aggregate-data study design to explore whether life expectancy, as a general measure of population health, is linked to large-scale declines in ecological integrity. Most of the data were obtained from World Resources Institute publications. Selected surrogate measures of ecological integrity and gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (as a socioeconomic confounder) were modeled, for the first time, using linear regression techniques with life expectancy as the health outcome. We found a modest relation between ecological integrity and life expectancy, but the direction of the association was inconsistent. When GDP per capita was controlled, the relation between ecological integrity and life expectancy was lost. GDP per capita was the overwhelming predictor of health. Any relation between ecological integrity and health may be mediated by socioeconomic factors. The effect of declines in ecological integrity may be cushioned by the exploitation of ecological capital, preventing a direct association between measures of exposure and outcome. In addition, life expectancy may be too insensitive a measure of health impacts related to ecological decline, and more sensitive measures may need to be developed.

  2. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  3. The impact of compulsory cycle helmet legislation on cyclist head injuries in New South Wales, Australia: a rejoinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, Chris

    2012-03-01

    This paper challenges the conclusion of a recent paper by Walter et al. (Accident Analysis and Prevention 2011, doi:10.1016/j.aap.2011.05.029) reporting that despite numerous data limitations repealing the helmet legislation in Australia could not be justified. This conclusion is not warranted because of the limited time period used in their analysis and the lack of data beyond a few years before the introduction of legislation, the failure to adequately account for the effect of the phasing in of the legislation, the effect of the marked reduction in child cyclists, and the non-comparability of the pedestrian and cycling injuries and related lack of consideration of the severity of head injuries. The extent to which helmet legislation deters people from cycling is discussed.

  4. Head position and impact direction in whiplash injuries: associations with MRI-verified lesions of ligaments and membranes in the upper cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaale, Bertel Rune; Krakenes, Jostein; Albrektsen, Grethe; Wester, Knut

    2005-11-01

    In the present study, we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of soft tissue structures in the upper cervical spine between whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) patients and population-based control persons, and examined whether MRI-verified abnormalities in WAD patients were related to accident-related factors hypothesized to be of importance for severity of injury. A total of 92 whiplash patients and 30 control persons, randomly drawn, were included. Information on the accident-related factors (i.e., head position and impact direction) was obtained by a questionnaire that was answered within 1 week after the accident. The MRI examination was performed 2-9 (mean 6) years after the accident. Focus was on MRI abnormalities of the alar and the transverse ligaments, and the tectorial and posterior atlanto-occipital membranes, graded 0-3. For all neck structures, the whiplash patients had more high-grade lesions (grade 2 or 3) than the control persons (Chi-square test, p Whiplash patients who had been sitting with their head/neck turned to one side at the moment of collision more often had high-grade lesions of the alar and transverse ligaments (p whiplash trauma.

  5. Impact of organ-specific dose reduction on the image quality of head and neck CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmoeller, L.; Lanzman, R.S.; Heusch, P.; Dietrich, S.; Miese, F.; Aissa, J.; Heusner, T.A.; Antoch, G.; Kroepil, P. [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Organ-specific dose reduction (OSDR) algorithms can reduce radiation on radiosensitive organs up to 59 %. This study evaluates the influence of a new OSDR algorithm on image quality of head and neck computed tomographic angiography (CTA) in clinical routine. Sixty-two consecutive patients (68 {+-} 13 years) were randomised into two groups and imaged using 128-row multidetector CT. Group A (n = 31) underwent conventional CTA and group B (n = 31) CTA with a novel OSDR algorithm. Subjective and objective image quality were statistically compared. Subjective image quality was rated on a five-point scale. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated with region-of-interest measurements. The SNR of the common carotid artery and middle cerebral artery was 53.6 {+-} 22.7 and 43.3 {+-} 15.3 (group A) versus 54.1 {+-} 20.5 and 46.2 {+-} 14.6 (group B). The CNR was 40.0 {+-} 19.3 and 29.7 {+-} 12.0 (group A) compared with 40.7 {+-} 16.8 and 32.9 {+-} 10.9 (group B), respectively. Subjective image quality was excellent in both groups (mean score 4.4 {+-} 0.7 versus 4.4 {+-} 0.6). Differences between the two groups were not significant. The novel OSDR algorithm does not compromise image quality of head and neck CTA. Its application can be recommended for CTA in clinical routine to protect the thyroid gland and ocular lenses from unnecessary high radiation. (orig.)

  6. Food animals and antimicrobials: impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bonnie M; Levy, Stuart B

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobials are valuable therapeutics whose efficacy is seriously compromised by the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The provision of antibiotics to food animals encompasses a wide variety of nontherapeutic purposes that include growth promotion. The concern over resistance emergence and spread to people by nontherapeutic use of antimicrobials has led to conflicted practices and opinions. Considerable evidence supported the removal of nontherapeutic antimicrobials (NTAs) in Europe, based on the "precautionary principle." Still, concrete scientific evidence of the favorable versus unfavorable consequences of NTAs is not clear to all stakeholders. Substantial data show elevated antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with animals fed NTAs and their food products. This resistance spreads to other animals and humans-directly by contact and indirectly via the food chain, water, air, and manured and sludge-fertilized soils. Modern genetic techniques are making advances in deciphering the ecological impact of NTAs, but modeling efforts are thwarted by deficits in key knowledge of microbial and antibiotic loads at each stage of the transmission chain. Still, the substantial and expanding volume of evidence reporting animal-to-human spread of resistant bacteria, including that arising from use of NTAs, supports eliminating NTA use in order to reduce the growing environmental load of resistance genes.

  7. Impacts of discarded coffee waste on human and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A S; Mello, F V C; Thode Filho, S; Carpes, R M; Honório, J G; Marques, M R C; Felzenszwalb, I; Ferraz, E R A

    2017-07-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages throughout the world. So far, many studies have shown the properties of coffee beverages, but little is known about its impacts on human and environmental health from its discard in the environment. So, the present work aims to investigate the mutagenic, genotoxic, cytotoxic and ecotoxic effects of leached (LE) and solubilized (SE) extracts from coffee waste, simulating the disposal of this residue in landfills and via sewage systems, respectively. Chemical analyses were also carried out. LE and SE induced mutagenicity in the TA98 Salmonella strain with and without exogenous metabolization (S9). In the TA100 only SE induced mutagenicity, what was observed without S9. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in HepG2 cell line after 3 and 24h of exposure to both extracts. No cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 cells by WST-1 assay. The EC50 values for the LE and SE were 1.5% and 11.26% for Daphnia similis, 0.12% and 1.39% for Ceriodaphnia dubia and 6.0% and 5.5% for Vibrio fischeri, respectively. Caffeine and several transition metals were found in both extracts. Coffee waste discarded in the environment may pose a risk to human and environmental health, since this compound can cause DNA damage and present toxicity to aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of human interventions on mangrove ecosystem in spatial perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasyid, Abd.; Akbar AS, M.; Nurdin, Nurjannah; Jaya, Ilham; Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Climate change components that affect mangroves include changes in sea level, high water events, storms, precipitation, temperature, and oceanic circulation. Cumulative impacts of these factors have a distinct synergy with respect to an accelerated rate of mangrove degradation. development of coastal agricultural land and shrimp farming ponds in intertidal areas are considered as the major factors behind mangrove delineation. There is no agreement for the extensive of mangrove forest in Indonesia, but invarious forums it is usually used the number of 4.25 million ha for that. At approximately 9 years ago, the extensive vast of mangrove forest in Indonesia was about 4.13 million ha but now it is only 2.49 million ha (60%). The methodology of this study consisted of two main steps: (1) image analysis, and (2) post classification. The aim of this study is to analysis the human intervention base on spatial dynamic of mangrove. The study site was selected Sagara island in Spermonde Archipelago. The results of analyze shows that decreasing of mangrove is caused human intervention.

  9. Microbial Impact on Success of Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Groves, T. O.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify microbiological risks associated with space exploration and identify potential countermeasures available. Identification of microbial risks associated with space habitation requires knowledge of the sources and expected types of microbial agents. Crew data along with environmental data from water, surfaces, air, and free condensate are utilized in risk examination. Data from terrestrial models are also used. Microbial risks to crew health include bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. Adverse effects of microbes include: infections, allergic reactions, toxin production, release of volatiles, food spoilage, plant disease, material degradation, and environmental contamination. Risk is difficult to assess because of unknown potential changes in microbes (e.g., mutation) and the human host (e.g., immune changes). Prevention of adverse microbial impacts is preferred over remediation. Preventative measures include engineering measures (e.g., air filtration), crew microbial screening, acceptability standards, and active verification by onboard monitoring. Microbiological agents are important risks to human health and performance during space flight and risks increase with mission duration. Acceptable risk level must be defined. Prevention must be given high priority. Careful screening of crewmembers and payloads is an important element of any risk mitigation plan. Improved quantitation of microbiological risks is a high priority.

  10. Changes in human lymphocyte subpopulations in tonsils and regional lymph nodes of human head and neck squamous carcinoma compared to control lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Femandez África

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphoid tissues constitute basic structures where specific immune responses take place. This leads to the development of germinal centres (GCs, migration of cells and the generation of memory cells. Here, we have compared human tumour reactive lymph nodes and tonsils with control lymph nodes. Results The study by flow cytometry shows that in control lymph nodes the majority of cells were naive T-lymphocytes (CD45RA+/CD7+. In reactive nodes, although the percentage of CD45RO+ T cells remains constant, there is an increase in the number of B-lymphocytes, and a reduction in naive T cells. The percentage of cells expressing CD69 was similar in reactive nodes and in controls. In both cases, we have found two populations of B cells of either CD69- or CD69dull. Two populations of T cells, which are either negative for CD69 or express it in bright levels (CD69bright, were also found. The analysis of tissue sections by confocal microscopy revealed differences between control, tonsils and tumor reactive lymph nodes. In control lymph nodes, CD19 B cells are surrounded by a unique layer of CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. GCs from tonsils and from tumour reactive nodes are mainly constituted by CD19 B cells and have four distinct layers. The central zone is composed of CD69- B cells surrounded by CD69bright/CD45RO+ T cells. The mantle region has basically CD69dull B-lymphocytes and, finally, there is an outer zone with CD69-/CD45RO+ T cells. Conclusions Human secondary lymphoid organs react with an increase in the proportion of B lymphocytes and a decrease in the number of CD45RA+ T cells (naive. In tonsils, this is due to chronic pathogen stimulation, whereas in lymph nodes draining head and neck carcinomas the reaction is prompted by surrounded tumors. During this process, secondary lymphoid organs develop secondary follicles with a special organization of T and B cells in consecutive layers, that are described here by confocal microscopy

  11. Anticipated Impact of In-Car Mobile Calls on the Electromagnetic Interaction of Handset Antenna and Human

    OpenAIRE

    Salah I. Yahya

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the in-car mobile call on the electromagnetic interaction of the mobile handset antenna and user’s head. This impact was evaluated from two different perspectives; First, the antenna performance, e.g., total isotropic sensitivity and total efficiency, and second, the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the user's head. A Yee-FDTD based electromagnetic solver was used to simulate a mobile phone in hand close proximity to head at cheek and tilt positi...

  12. Lateral neck injury assessments in side impact using post mortem human subject tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Humm, John; Pintar, Frank A; Wolfla, Christopher E; Maiman, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Current neck injury criteria are based on matching upper cervical spine injuries from piglet tests to airbag deployment loads and pairing kinematics from child dummies. These "child-based" scaled data together with adult human cadaver tolerances in axial loading are used to specify neck injury thresholds in axial compression and tension, and flexion and extension moment about the occipital condyles; no thresholds are specified for any other force or moment including lateral bending. The objective of this study was to develop a testing methodology and to determine the lateral bending moment injury threshold under coronal loading. Post mortem human subjects (PMHS) were used. Specimens consisted of whole body and isolated head-neck complexes with intact musculature. Intact specimen positioning included: sitting PMHS upright on a rigid seat, supporting the torso by a plate, maintaining Frankfurt plane horizontal. Isolated head-neck complexes were fixed at T1 with the occiput connected via a custom apparatus to a testing device to induce lateral bending motion. Head angular and linear accelerations and angular velocities were computed using a pyramid nine accelerometer package on the head; specimen-specific physical properties including center of gravity and moments of inertia in the three-dimensions; and equations of equilibrium. These data were used to determine neck loads at the occipital condyles. No specimens sustained injuries, identified by palpation, x-rays, CT, and autopsy. Results from 24 tests indicated that PMHS head-neck complexes can tolerate 75 Nm of coronal moment at low axial load without failure, and this level may be used as an initial estimate of the injury reference value under lateral loading to the human head-neck complex.

  13. Impact of Brunswick River Mouth Training Walls on Adjacent Beaches,Brunswick Heads, New South Wales, Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-jun (黄海军); Andrew D. SHORT; Thomas ZENG; David HANSLOW

    2004-01-01

    River training walls have been built at scores of locations along the NSW coast and their impacts on shoreline change are still not fully understood. In this study, the Bnmswick River entrance and adjacent beaches are selected for examination of the impact of the construction of major training walls. Thirteen sets of aerial photographs taken between 1947 and 1994 are used in a GIS approach to accurately determine the shoreline position, beach contours and sand volumes, and their changes in both time and space, and then to assess the contribution of both the structures and natural hydrodynamic conditions to large scale (years-decades and kilometres) beach changes. The impact of the training walls can be divided into four stages: natural conditions prior to their construction (pre 1959), major downdrift erosion and updrift accretion during and following the construction of the walls in 1959 ~ 1962 and 1966, diminishing impact of the walls between 1966and 1987, and finally no apparent impact between 1987 ~ 1994. The impact extends horizontally about 8 km updrift and 17 km downdrift, and temporally up to 25 years.

  14. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  15. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... When this happens, the neck muscles go into spasm, causing the head to tilt to one side. ...

  16. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  17. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not ... to: Abnormal blood vessels in the brain ( arteriovenous malformations of the head ) Tumor of the nerve that ...

  18. Assessing Socioeconomic Impacts of Cascading Infrastructure Disruptions in a Dynamic Human-Infrastructure Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    directional impacts from system failure to population response, the impacts of human activities on physical system performances should also be considered...ER D C TR -1 6- 11 Human Infrastructure System Assessment for Military Operations Assessing Socioeconomic Impacts of Cascading...Infrastructure Disruptions in a Dynamic Human -Infrastructure Network Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra to ry Liqun Lu, Xin

  19. Human Impact on Atolls Leads to Coral Loss and Community Homogenisation: A Modeling Study

    OpenAIRE

    Riegl, Bernhard M.; Sheppard, Charles R. C.; Sam J Purkis

    2012-01-01

    We explore impacts on pristine atolls subjected to anthropogenic near-field (human habitation) and far-field (climate and environmental change) pressure. Using literature data of human impacts on reefs, we parameterize forecast models to evaluate trajectories in coral cover under impact scenarios that primarily act via recruitment and increased mortality of larger corals. From surveys across the Chagos, we investigate the regeneration dynamics of coral populations distant from human habitatio...

  20. Human impact on atolls leads to coral loss and community homogenisation : a modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Riegl, Bernhard M.; Sheppard, Charles (Charles R. C.); Purkis, Samuel J.

    2012-01-01

    We explore impacts on pristine atolls subjected to anthropogenic near-field (human habitation) and far-field (climate and environmental change) pressure. Using literature data of human impacts on reefs, we parameterize forecast models to evaluate trajectories in coral cover under impact scenarios that primarily act via recruitment and increased mortality of larger corals. From surveys across the Chagos, we investigate the regeneration dynamics of coral populations distant from human habitatio...

  1. Effect of Human Error Factors on the Major Accidents of Tungsten Mining Heading Face%某钨矿掘进工作面人因失误评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史德强; 靳波; 陆刚; 戚星; 曾旭; 陈振伟

    2016-01-01

    Human errors in arbitrated mining and tunneling partially contributed to the major mining accidents. For a comprehensive evaluation of the effect of human error factors on the accidents on tungsten mine heading face, this paper established a human error evaluation system by analyzing the relationship among man, machine and environment. By applying G1 improved fuzzy algorithm method and surveyed data, a model of human error factors is founded to identify important affecting factors. The results show that the highest impact in the human error factors model is environment, followed by human elements and equipments. The evaluation model provides theoretical and practical supports for the prevention of major accidents in tungsten mining heading face caused by human errors.%钨矿掘进工作面人因失误是导致重大事故发生的重要因素之一.为综合评价钨矿掘进工作面的人因失误问题,以人、机和环境三个影响因素为出发点,分析掘进工作面人-机-环境系统的关系,识别人因失误的影响因子,建立人-机-环境系统的人因失误评价体系.引入G1法改进模糊算法构建了人因失误评价模型,并结合调查统计数据,识别重要的影响因素.应用实例分析表明,人因失误致因模型中影响程度最高的是环境因素,其次是人的因素和设备因素等,该评价模型有助于对钨矿掘进工作面人因失误的预防提供理论与实践支持.

  2. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  3. Association between FAT1 mutation and overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus–negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Bo‐Sung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to characterize the mutation profile of FAT atypical cadherin 1 (FAT1) and determine the prognostic significance of FAT1 mutation for overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)‐negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) data portals and used as discovery and validation sets. FAT1 mutational status was determined in 234 and 37 patients with HPV‐negative HNSCC, respectively, and overall survival analysis was performed. For comparison, HPV‐positive patients were also analyzed for overall survival. Results Most of the identified nonsynonymous somatic FAT1 mutations were loss‐of‐function mutations. FAT1 mutation was significantly associated with better overall survival in HPV‐negative patients from both the TCGA cohort (p = .026) and the ICGC cohort (p = .047), but not in HPV‐positive patients. Conclusion FAT1 mutational status is a strong independent prognostic factor in patients with HPV‐negative HNSCC. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2021–E2029, 2016 PMID:26876381

  4. Survivorship Analysis of Eighty Revised Hip Arthroplasties With the Impaction Grafting Technique Using Whole Femoral Head Allografts With the Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadulelmola, Ahmed; Drampalos, Efstathios; Hodgkinson, John; Hemmady, Mukesh

    2017-06-01

    Acetabular impaction bone grafting aims to restore anatomy in hip revision surgery. This is an effective but expensive and time-consuming technique. Usually, the articular cartilage is removed from the femoral head allograft. We aimed to reproduce the same results retaining the cartilage of the allograft. Eighty acetabular revisions using impacted morselized bone graft retaining the articular cartilage and a cemented cup were studied retrospectively. Six were lost during follow-up. The mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range 1-13). Clinical and radiological assessment was made using the Oxford Hip Score, Hodgkinson's criteria for socket loosening, and the Gie classification for evaluation of allograft incorporation. Sixty-three sockets (85.1%) were considered radiologically stable (type 0, 1, and 2 demarcations), 8 (10.8%) were radiologically loose (type 3), and 3 (4.1%) presented with migration. Fifty-one (68.9%) cases showed good trabecular remodeling (grade 3), 20 (27%) showed trabecular incorporation (grade 2), and 3 (4.1%) showed poor allograft incorporation. Mean preoperative hip score was 43 and postoperative score was 28. Six (8.1%) cases presented heterotopic ossification around the revised implants, 2 patients (2.7%) had periprosthetic fractures, and 4 (5.4%) had dislocations. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship at a mean of 6.5 years with revision of the cup for any reason was 95.9% (95% confidence interval 5.6-7.5). The mid-term results of our technique are promising. Particularly when the supply of fresh-frozen allografts and surgical time is limited, using whole femoral head with articular cartilage is both safe and effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A changing climate: impacts on human exposures to O3 using an integrated modeling methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the impacts of changing climate on human exposure to air pollution requires future scenarios that account for changes in ambient pollutant concentrations, population sizes and distributions, and housing stocks. An integrated methodology to model changes in human exposu...

  6. The connective tissue and glial framework in the optic nerve head of the normal human eye: light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Tokuhide; Abe, Haruki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2006-12-01

    The arrangement of connective tissue components (i.e., collagen, reticular, and elastic fibers) and glial elements in the optic nerve head of the human eye was investigated by the combined use of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light-microscopically, the optic nerve head could be subdivided into four parts from the different arrangements of the connective tissue framework: a surface nerve fiber layer, and prelaminar, laminar, and postlaminar regions. The surface nerve fiber layer only possessed connective tissue elements around blood vessels. In the prelaminar region, collagen fibrils, together with delicate elastic fibers, formed thin interrupted sheaths for accommodating small nerve bundles. Immunohistochemistry for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) showed that GFAP-positive cells formed columnar structures (i.e., glial columns), with round cell bodies piled up into layers. These glial columns were located in the fibrous sheaths of collagen fibrils and elastic fibers. In the laminar region, collagen fibrils and elastic fibers ran transversely to the optic nerve axis to form a thick membranous layer - the lamina cribrosa - which had numer