WorldWideScience

Sample records for human h19 locus

  1. The Increasing Complexity of the Oncofetal H19 Gene Locus: Functional Dissection and Therapeutic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Hochberg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA is advancing rapidly. Currently, it is one of the most popular fields in the biological and medical sciences. It is becoming increasingly obvious that the majority of the human transcriptome has little or no-protein coding capacity. Historically, H19 was the first imprinted non-coding RNA (ncRNA transcript identified, and the H19/IGF2 locus has served as a paradigm for the study of genomic imprinting since its discovery. In recent years, we have extensively investigated the expression of the H19 gene in a number of human cancers and explored the role of H19 RNA in tumor development. Here, we discuss recently published data from our group and others that provide further support for a central role of H19 RNA in the process of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we focus on major transcriptional modulators of the H19 gene and discuss them in the context of the tumor-promoting activity of the H19 RNA. Based on the pivotal role of the H19 gene in human cancers, we have developed a DNA-based therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers that have upregulated levels of H19 expression. This approach uses a diphtheria toxin A (DTA protein expressed under the regulation of the H19 promoter to treat tumors with significant expression of H19 RNA. In this review, we discuss the treatment of four cancer indications in human subjects using this approach, which is currently under development. This represents perhaps one of the very few examples of an existing DNA-based therapy centered on an lncRNA system. Apart from cancer, H19 expression has been reported also in other conditions, syndromes and diseases, where deregulated imprinting at the H19 locus was obvious in some cases and will be summarized below. Moreover, the H19 locus proved to be much more complicated than initially thought. It houses a genomic sequence that can transcribe, yielding various transcriptional outputs, both in sense and antisense directions. The

  2. Cohesin is required for higher-order chromatin conformation at the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Nativio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cohesin is a chromatin-associated protein complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion by connecting replicated DNA molecules. Cohesin also has important roles in gene regulation, but the mechanistic basis of this function is poorly understood. In mammalian genomes, cohesin co-localizes with CCCTC binding factor (CTCF, a zinc finger protein implicated in multiple gene regulatory events. At the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus, CTCF plays an important role in organizing allele-specific higher-order chromatin conformation and functions as an enhancer blocking transcriptional insulator. Here we have used chromosome conformation capture (3C assays and RNAi-mediated depletion of cohesin to address whether cohesin affects higher order chromatin conformation at the IGF2-H19 locus in human cells. Our data show that cohesin has a critical role in maintaining CTCF-mediated chromatin conformation at the locus and that disruption of this conformation coincides with changes in IGF2 expression. We show that the cohesin-dependent, higher-order chromatin conformation of the locus exists in both G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle and is therefore independent of cohesin's function in sister chromatid cohesion. We propose that cohesin can mediate interactions between DNA molecules in cis to insulate genes through the formation of chromatin loops, analogous to the cohesin mediated interaction with sister chromatids in trans to establish cohesion.

  3. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Álvarez, P; Ramos-Ibeas, P; Park, K E; Powell, A P; Vansandt, L; Derek, Bickhart; Ramirez, M A; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Telugu, B P

    2015-09-02

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. Currently, it is unclear whether artificial reprogramming induced by the expression of Yamanaka factors disrupts these marks and whether cell type of origin affects the dynamics of reprogramming. In this study, spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) that harbor paternalized imprinting marks, and fibroblasts were reprogrammed to iPSC (SSCiPSC and fiPSC). The SSCiPSC were able to form teratomas and generated chimeras with a higher skin chimerism than those derived from fiPSC. RNA-seq revealed extensive reprogramming at the transcriptional level with 8124 genes differentially expressed between SSC and SSCiPSC and only 490 between SSCiPSC and fiPSC. Likewise, reprogramming of SSC affected 26 of 41 imprinting gene clusters known in the mouse genome. A closer look at H19 ICR revealed complete erasure in SSCiPSC in contrast to fiPSC. Imprinting erasure in SSCiPSC was maintained even after in vivo differentiation into teratomas. Reprogramming of SSC from Tet1 and Tet2 double knockout mice however lacked demethylation of H19 ICR. These results suggest that imprinting erasure during reprogramming depends on the epigenetic landscape of the precursor cell and is mediated by TETs at the H19 locus.

  4. Differential methylation status of IGF2-H19 locus does not affect the fertility of crossbred bulls but some of the CTCF binding sites could be potentially important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Subas C; Kumar, Sandeep; Rajput, Sandeep; Roy, Bhaskar; Verma, Arpana; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Mohanty, Tushar K; De, Sachinandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Datta, Tirtha K

    2014-04-01

    Associations between abnormal methylation of spermatozoan DNA with male infertility have been sought in recent years to identify a molecular explanation of differential spermatozoan function. The present work was undertaken to investigate the methylation profile of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the IGF2-H19 locus of Bos taurus X Bos indicus crossbred bull spermatozoa. Bulls having more than at least 100 insemination records over a period of 12 years were classified into two groups of five bulls each belonging to low- and high-fertility groups. The IGF2 and H19 DMR sequences in B. indicus cattle were observed to be in absolute homology with B. taurus cattle. The DNA of crossbred bull spermatozoa was isolated, bisulfite treated, and amplified for specific DMR regions using methylation-change-specific primers. The overall degree of methylation at IGF2-H19 DMRs was not found to be significantly different among two groups of bulls. The sixth CTCF binding site (CCCTC) identified in H19 DMR, however, had a significant methylation difference between the high- and low-fertility bulls. It was concluded that alteration of the methylation levels at IGF2-H19 DMRs might not be responsible for the fertility difference of crossbred bulls, although the role played by the specific CTCF binding sites at this locus, which could influence IGF2 expression during spermatogenesis and early embryonic development, deserves further attention.

  5. Potential role of estrogen in regulation of the insulin-like growth factor2-H19 locus in the rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Shilpa; D'Souza, Ryan; Ankolkar, Mandar; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, Nafisa H

    2010-01-15

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen, has been shown to reduce DNA methylation at Insulin-like growth factor 2/H19 differentially methylated region (Igf2/H19 DMR) in the spermatozoa of the Holtzman rats. Since imprint at this locus is acquired during spermatogenesis in the male germ-line, we hypothesized role for estrogen signaling in the methylation dynamics in the testis. The present study was designed to identify putative estrogen response elements (ERE) at Igf2/H19 DMR and their interaction with DNA methylation pathway. Here, we demonstrate presence of functional ERE at 2637/2655 base pair on Igf2/H19 DMR in testicular germ cells, which was found to bind to estrogen receptor beta (ER beta) in the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Tamoxifen attenuated ER beta-ERE association thereby acting as an estrogen antagonist at this locus. Further mechanistic study involving colocalization and immunoprecipitation assay revealed interaction of ER beta and Dnmt1 in the testis. The study provides evidence for the role for estrogen in acquisition of imprint at Igf2/H19 DMR in testis and help in understanding molecular mechanism of environmental estrogens impacting male fertility.

  6. Molekulargenetische Analyse eines evolutionär konservierten Silencer-Elements aus dem murinen H19-Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Schönfelder, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Die genomische Prägung (“Genomic Imprinting“) bestimmter Säugergene resultiert in ihrer allelspezifischen Expression. Die monoallelische Expression genomisch geprägter Gene wird durch ein Zusammenwirken cis-regulatorischer DNA-Elemente kontrolliert, zu denen differentiell methylierte Regionen, Chromatin-Insulators, Enhancer und Silencer zählen. Das murine H19-Gen ist einer der am intensivsten erforschten genomisch geprägten Loci. Eine zentrale Rolle in der monoallelischen Expression des H19-G...

  7. The H19 non-coding RNA is essential for human tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad J Matouk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations and epigenetic aberrant signaling of growth factors pathways contribute to carcinogenesis. Recent studies reveal that non-coding RNAs are controllers of gene expression. H19 is an imprinted gene that demonstrates maternal monoallelic expression without a protein product; although its expression is shut off in most tissues postnatally, it is re-activated during adult tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis. Moreover, H19 is highly expressed in liver metastasis derived from a range of carcinomas. The objective of this study is to explore the role of H19 in carcinogenesis, and to determine its identification as an anti-tumor target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: By controlling oxygen pressure during tumor cell growth and H19 expression levels, we investigated the role of H19 expression in vitro and in vivo in hepatocellular (HCC and bladder carcinoma. Hypoxia upregulates the level of H19 RNA. Ablations of tumorigenicity of HCC and bladder carcinomas in vivo are seen by H19 knockdown which also significantly abrogates anchorage-independent growth after hypoxia recovery, while ectopic H19 expression enhances tumorigenic potential of carcinoma cells in vivo. Knocking-down H19 message in hypoxic stress severely diminishes p57(kip2 induction. We identified a number of potential downstream targets of H19 RNA, including angiogenin and FGF18. CONCLUSIONS: H19 RNA harbors pro-tumorigenic properties, thus the H19 gene behaves as an oncogene and may serve as a potential new target for anti-tumor therapy.

  8. Knockdown of long noncoding RNA H19 sensitizes human glioma cells to temozolomide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Wang, Ping; Sun, Xiaoling; Yuan, Zhongshun; Zhan, Rucai; Ma, Xiangyu; Li, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is commonly used in glioma chemotherapy. However, a great clinical challenge for TMZ is chemoresistance. H19 transcripts are recognized as long noncoding RNAs, which potentially interact with chromatin-modifying complexes to regulate gene expression via epigenetic changes. Our data based on glioma patients showed that the expression of H19 was significantly upregulated in TMZ-resistant tumors compared with the TMZ-sensitive tumors. To determine the function of H19 in glioma, cell lines U87 and U251 were exposed to TMZ to establish TMZ-resistant clones U87TMZ and U251TMZ. In U87TMZ and U251TMZ, the expression level of H19 transcripts was increased compared to wild-type or nonresistant clones, as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Concomitant treatment with small interfering RNA specifically targeting H19 and TMZ in resistant glioma clones resulted in decreased IC50 values for TMZ, and increased apoptotic rates than control small interfering RNA-treated cells. This was also evident by the increased PARP cleavage in resistant cells exposed to TMZ + si-H19. Furthermore, the reduced expression of H19 altered major drug resistance genes, such as MDR, MRP, and ABCG2, both at the mRNA and protein levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that H19 plays an important role in the development of TMZ resistance, and may represent a novel therapeutic target for TMZ-resistant gliomas. PMID:27366087

  9. Methylation Status of H19/IGF2 Differentially Methylated Region in in vitro Human Blastocysts Donated by Healthy Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan-Horeh, Marzieh; Abolhassani, Farid; Jafarpour, Farnoosh; Moini, Ashraf; Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Ostadhosseini, Somayyeh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background: Imprinted genes are a unique subset of few genes that have been differentially methylated region (DMR) in a parental origin-dependent manner during gametogenesis, and these genes are highly protected during pre-implantation epigenetic reprogramming. Several studies have shown that the particular vulnerability of imprinting genes during suboptimal pre- and peri-conception micro-environments often is occurred by assisted reproduction techniques (ART). This study investigated the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR at high-quality expanding/expanded human blastocysts donated by healthy individuals to evaluate the risks linked to ART. Method: Methylation levels of H19/IGF2 DMR were analyzed by bisulfite conversion and sequencing at 18 CpG sites (CpGs) located in this region. Result: The overall percentage of methylated CpGs and the proportion of hyper-methylated clones of H19/IGF2 DMR in analyzed blastocysts were 37.85±4.87% and 43.75±5.1%, respectively. For validation of our technique, the corresponding methylation levels of peripheral human lymphocytes were defined (49.52±1.86% and 50%, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the absence of in vivo- produced human embryos, it is not possible to conclude that the methylation found in H19/IGF2 DMR is actually normal or abnormal. Regarding the possible risks associated with ART, the procedures should be optimized in order to at least reduce some of the epigenetic risks. PMID:27432596

  10. Long-term exposure to cigarette smoke extract induces hypomethylation at the RUNX3 and IGF2-H19 loci in immortalized human urothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is the single most important epidemiological risk factor for bladder cancer but it is not known whether exposure of urothelial cells to the systemic soluble contents of cigarette smoke is directly causative to bladder cancer and the associated epigenetic changes such as tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation. We undertook this study to investigate if long-term treatment of human urothelial cells with cigarette smoke extract (CSE results in tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation, a phenotype that was previously associated with long-term constant CSE treatment of airway epithelial cells. We chronically treated an immortalized human urothelial cell line UROtsa with CSE using a cyclic daily regimen but the cells were cultured in CSE-free medium between daily treatments. Bisulfite sequencing and real-time PCR array-based methylation profiling were employed to evaluate methylation changes at tumor suppressor gene loci in the chronically CSE-treated cells versus the passage-matched untreated control cells. The RUNX3 tumor suppressor gene promoter was hypomethylated with a significant increase in proportion of the completely unmethylated haplotype after the long-term CSE treatment; whereas RUNX3 promoter hypermethylation was previously reported for bladder cancers of smokers. Hypomethylation induced by the long-term CSE treatment was also observed for the IGF2-H19 locus. The methylation status at the PRSS8/prostasin and 16 additional loci however, was unaffected by the chronic CSE treatment. Transient CSE treatment over 1 daily regimen resulted in transcriptional down-regulation of RUNX3 and H19, but only the H19 transcription was down-regulated in the chronically CSE-treated urothelial cells. Transcription of a key enzyme in one-carbon metabolism, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR was greatly reduced by the long-term CSE treatment, potentially serving as a mechanism for the hypomethylation phenotype via a reduced supply of methyl donor

  11. DNA methylation patterns of imprinting centers for H19, SNRPN, and KCNQ1OT1 in single-cell clones of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Huei Peng

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells contain a unique epigenetic signature during in vitro cell culture. H19 and KCNQ1OT1 possessed a substantial degree of hypermethylation status, and variable DNA methylation patterns of SNRPN was observed during in vitro cell culture of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells. Our results urge further understanding of epigenetic status of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells before it is applied in cell replacement therapy.

  12. Altered DNA methylation patterns of the H19 differentially methylated region and the DAZL gene promoter are associated with defective human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation disturbance is associated with defective human sperm. However, oligozoospermia (OZ and asthenozoospermia (AZ usually present together, and the relationship between the single-phenotype defects in human sperm and DNA methylation is poorly understood. In this study, 20 infertile OZ patients and 20 infertile AZ patients were compared with 20 fertile normozoospermic men. Bisulfate-specific PCR was used to analyze DNA methylation of the H19-DMR and the DAZL promoter in these subjects. A similar DNA methylation pattern of the H19-DMR was detected in AZ and NZ(control, with only complete methylation and mild hypomethylation(0.05. However, the methylation pattern of severe hypomethylation (>50% unmethylated CpGs and complete unmethylation was only detected in 5 OZ patients, and the occurrence of these two methylation patterns was 8.54±10.86% and 9±6.06%, respectively. Loss of DNA methylation of the H19-DMR in the OZ patients was found to mainly occur in CTCF-binding site 6, with occurrence of 18.15±14.71%, which was much higher than that in patients with NZ (0.84±2.05% and AZ (0.58±1.77% (P20% methylated clones in the DAZL promoter only in infertile patients, there was no significant difference between the AZ and OZ patients in the proportion of moderately-to-severely hypermethylated clones (p>0.05. In all cases, global sperm genome methylation analyses, using LINE1 transposon as the indicator, showed that dysregulation of DNA methylation is specifically associated with the H19-DMR and DAZL promoter. Therefore, abnormal DNA methylation status of H19-DMR, especially at the CTCF-binding site 6, is closely associated with OZ. Abnormal DNA methylation of the DAZL promoter might represent an epigenetic marker of male infertility.

  13. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  14. The long non-coding RNA H19-derived miR-675 modulates human gastric cancer cell proliferation by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Ming [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Oncology, The First People’s Hospital of Lianyungang, Lianyungang, Jiangsu (China); Gao, Wen; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ping [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Shu, Yongqian, E-mail: shuyongqian39000@163.com [Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2014-06-06

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • H19 regulates gastric cancer cell proliferation phenotype via miR-675. • MiR-675 modulates cell proliferation of gastric cancer cells by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1. • The H19/miR-675/RUNX1 axis plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. - Abstract: The lncRNA H19 has been recently shown to be upregulated and play important roles in gastric cancer tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism of H19 and its mature product miR-675 in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we found that miR-675 was positively expressed with H19 and was a pivotal mediator in H19-induced gastric cancer cell growth promotion. Subsequently, the tumor suppressor Runt Domain Transcription Factor1 (RUNX1) was confirmed to be a direct target of miR-675 using a luciferase reporter assay and Western blotting analyses. A series of rescue assays indicated that RUNX1 mediated H19/miR-67-induced gastric cancer cell phenotypic changes. Moreover, the inverse relationship between the expression of RUNX1 and H19/miR-675 was also revealed in gastric cancer tissues and gastric cancer cell lines. Taken together, our study demonstrated that the novel pathway H19/miR-675/RUNX1 regulates gastric cancer development and may serve as a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  15. The hepatic Igf2/H19 locus is not altered in 1-day old pups born to obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low protein diet containing adequate folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong et al. (Epigenetics, 2010) found, using diets low in folic acid, that compared to an 18% protein diet a 9% protein diet fed to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in increased Igf2 and H19 gene expression in the liver of day 0 male offspring. In addition DNA methylation in the Imprinting Cont...

  16. Epigenetic status of H19/IGF2 and SNRPN imprinted genes in aborted and successfully derived embryonic stem cell lines in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wianny

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The imprinted genes of primate embryonic stem cells (ESCs often show altered DNA methylation. It is unknown whether these alterations emerge while deriving the ESCs. Here we studied the methylation patterns of two differentially methylated regions (DMRs, SNRPN and H19/IGF2 DMRs, during the derivation of monkey ESCs. We show that the SNRPN DMR is characteristically methylated at maternal alleles, whereas the H19/IGF2 DMR is globally highly methylated, with unusual methylation on the maternal alleles. These methylation patterns remain stable from the early stages of ESC derivation to late passages of monkey ESCs and following differentiation. Importantly, the methylation status of H19/IGF2 DMR and the expression levels of IGF2, H19, and DNMT3B mRNAs in early embryo-derived cells were correlated with their capacity to generate genuine ESC lines. Thus, we propose that these markers could be useful to predict the outcomes of establishing an ESC line in primates.

  17. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  18. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  19. Molecular studies of deletions at the human steroid sulfatase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, L.J.; Yen, P.; Pomerantz, D.; Martin, E.; Rolewic, L.; Mohandas, T. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The human steroid sulfatase gene (STS) is located on the distal X chromosome short arm close to the pseudoautosomal region but in a segment of DNA that is unique to the X chromosome. In contrast to most X chromosome-encoded genes, STS expression is not extinguished during the process of X chromosome inactivation. Deficiency of STS activity produced the syndrome of X chromosome-linked ichthyosis, which is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism in man. Approximately 90% of STS{sup {minus}} individuals have large deletions at the STS locus. The authors and others have found that the end points of such deletions are heterogeneous in their location. One recently ascertained subject was observed to have a 40-kilobase deletion that is entirely intragenic, permitting the cloning and sequencing of the deletion junction. Studies of this patient and of other X chromosome sequences in other subjects permit some insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for generating frequent deletions on the short arm of the X chromosome.

  20. Developmental regulation of a complete 70kb human β-globin locus in transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Strouboulis (John); N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used a linker-based ligation strategy to combine two 35-kb cosmid inserts from the human beta-globin locus into one linear fragment containing the entire locus. This 70-kb fragment was introduced into transgenic mice by microinjection of fertilized eggs. Southern blot analysis sh

  1. Locus of Control and Human Capital Investment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebi, Merve

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of teenagers' outlooks--specified as their locus of control--on educational attainment and labor market outcomes. I replicate the study of Coleman and DeLeire (2003) and test the predictions of their theoretical model using a different data set--National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The findings fail to…

  2. Non-coding transcripts in the H19 imprinting control region mediate gene silencing in transgenic Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Smits, Guillaume; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf; Paro, Renato

    2007-11-01

    The imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of H19 is the key regulatory element conferring monoallelic expression on H19 and Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2). Epigenetic marks in the ICR regulate its interaction with the chromatin protein CCCTC-binding factor and with other control factors to coordinate gene silencing in the imprinting cluster. Here, we show that the H19 ICR is biallelically transcribed, producing both sense and antisense RNAs. We analyse the function of the non-coding transcripts in a Drosophila transgenic system in which the H19 upstream region silences the expression of a reporter gene. We show that knockdown of H19 ICR non-coding RNA (ncRNA) by RNA interference leads to the loss of reporter gene silencing. Our results are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to show that ncRNAs in the H19 ICR are functionally significant, and also indicate that they have a role in regulating gene expression and perhaps epigenetic marks at the H19/Igf2 locus.

  3. Evolutionary conservation of CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus from zebrafish to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2003-07-01

    The CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4-FGF3-FLJ10261-FADD-PPFIA1-EMS1 locus on human chromosome 11q13 is frequently amplified in esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and bladder tumors. FGF19, FGF4 and FGF3 genes are implicated in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. We proposed in 2002 the hypothesis that mouse Fgf15 might be the ortholog of human FGF19 based on comparative genomics. Here, we identified zebrafish fgf19 and oraov1 genes by using bioinformatics to demonstrate the hypothesis. Zebrafish fgf19 gene, consisting of three exons, was located around nucleotide position 121802-124963 of zebrafish genome draft sequence AL929586.12 in the reverse orientation. Zebrafish fgf19 (209 aa) was more homologous to chicken fgf19 and human FGF19 than to rodent Fgf15. Zebrafish oraov1 gene, consisting of five exons, was located around nucleotide position 112172-115838 of AL929586.12 in the reverse orientation. Zebrafish oraov1 protein (141 aa) was more homologous to human ORAOV1 than to rodent Oraov1. The CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus was well conserved between human and zebrafish genomes in the order of genes, in the direction of genes, and in the exon-intron structure. Rat Ccnd1-Oraov1-Fgf15-Fgf4 locus was synthenic to mouse Ccnd1-Oraov1 (also known as 2210010N10Rik)-Fgf15-Fgf4 locus. Fgf15, homologous to human FGF19 and zebrafish fgf19, was located on the synthenic locus of human FGF19 and zebrafish fgf19 within rodent genomes. Based on the evolutionary conservation of the CCND1-ORAOV1-FGF19-FGF4 locus from zebrafish to human, it was concluded that Fgf15 gene is the rodent ortholog of human FGF19 gene.

  4. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  5. Physical map and one-megabase sequencing of the human immunoglobulin lambda locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A.S. Passos Jr.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The human immunoglobulin lambda (IGL locus is located on chromosome 22q11.1-q11.2 and contains the genes responsible for the immunoglobulin lambda light chains. This locus was recently mapped (physical map and its 1-Mb DNA totally sequenced. In this review we focus on the characterization of the v-lambda genes, its chromosomal location, genomics and sequencing of the IGL locus.O locus IGL humano está localizado no cromosomo 22q11.1-q11.2 e contém os genes responsáveis pelas cadeias leves de imunoglobulina tipo lambda. Este locus foi recentemente mapeado (mapa físico e seu 1 Mb DNA totalmente sequenciado. Nesta revisão focamos os principais resultados de caracterização dos genes v-lambda, sua localização cromossômica, a genômica e seqüenciamento do locus IGL.

  6. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-06-15

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes.

  7. RUNX1-dependent RAG1 deposition instigates human TCR-δ locus rearrangement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cieslak (Agata); S. le Noir (Sandrine); A. Trinquand (Amélie); L. Lhermitte; D.-M. Franchini (Don-Marc); P. Villarese (Patrick); S. Gon (Stéphanie); J. Bond (Jonathan); M. Simonin (Mathieu); L. Vanhile (Laurent); C. Reimann (Christian); E. Verhoeyen (Els); J. Larghero (Jerome); E. Six (Emmanuelle); S. Spicuglia (Salvatore); I. André-Schmutz (Isabelle); A.W. Langerak (Anton); B. Nadel (Bertrand); E.A. Macintyre (Elizabeth); D. Payet-Bornet (Dominique); V. Asnafi (Vahid)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractV(D)J recombination of TCR loci is regulated by chromatin accessibility to RAG1/2 proteins, rendering RAG1/2 targeting a potentially important regulator of lymphoid differentiation. We show that within the human TCR-α/δ locus, Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangements occur at a very immature thymic,

  8. A Dual Reporter Mouse Model of the Human β-Globin Locus: Applications and Limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Papadopoulos (Petros); L. Gutiérrez (Laura); R. van der Linden (Reinier); J. Kong-a-San (John); A. Maas (Alex); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); G.P. Patrinos (George); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe human β-globin locus contains the β-like globin genes (i.e. fetal γ-globin and adult β-globin), which heterotetramerize with α-globin subunits to form fetal or adult hemoglobin. Thalassemia is one of the commonest inherited disorders in the world, which results in quantitative

  9. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  10. Updated listing of haplotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Analysis of mutant PAH chromosomes has identified approximately 60 different single-base substitutions and deletions within the PAH locus. Nearly all of these molecular lesions are in strong linkage disequilibrium with specific RFLP haplotypes in different ethnic populations. Thus, haplotype analysis is not only useful for diagnostic purposes but is proving to be a valuable tool in population genetic studies of the origin and spread of phenylketonuria alleles in human populations. PCR-based methods have been developed to detect six of the eight polymorphic restriction sites used for determination of RFLP haplotypes at the PAH locus. A table of the proposed expanded haplotypes is given.

  11. Generation of Five Human Lactoferrin Transgenic Cloned Goats Using Fibroblast Cells and Their Methylation Status of Putative Differential Methylation Regions of IGF2R and H19 Imprinted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Wan, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Song, Y.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce transgenic cloned mammalian, including transgenic goats which may produce Human Lactoferrin (hLF). However, success percentage of SCNT is low, because of gestational and neonatal failure of transgenic embryos.

  12. DNA methylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region and adiposity distribution in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Rae-Chi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes control growth and body composition. Adverse in-utero environments have been associated with obesity-related diseases and linked with altered DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. Postnatally, methylation at the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR has been linked with cerebellum weight. We aimed to investigate whether decreased IGF2/H19 ICR methylation is associated with decreased birth and childhood anthropometry and increased contemporaneous adiposity. DNA methylation in peripheral blood (n = 315 at 17 years old was measured at 12 cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites (CpGs, analysed as Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER units within the IGF2/H19 ICR. Birth size, childhood head circumference (HC at six time-points and anthropometry at age 17 years were measured. DNA methylation was investigated for its association with anthropometry using linear regression. Results The principal component of IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation (representing mean methylation across all CpG units positively correlated with skin fold thickness (at four CpG units (P-values between 0.04 to 0.001 and subcutaneous adiposity (P = 0.023 at age 17, but not with weight, height, BMI, waist circumference or visceral adiposity. IGF2/H19 methylation did not associate with birth weight, length or HC, but CpG unit 13 to 14 methylation was negatively associated with HC between 1 and 10 years. β-coefficients of four out of five remaining CpG units also estimated lower methylation with increasing childhood HC. Conclusions As greater IGF2/H19 methylation was associated with greater subcutaneous fat measures, but not overall, visceral or central adiposity, we hypothesize that obesogenic pressures in youth result in excess fat being preferentially stored in peripheral fat depots via the IGF2/H19 domain. Secondly, as IGF2/H19 methylation was not associated with birth size but negatively with early childhood HC, we

  13. DNA methylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region and adiposity distribution in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rae-Chi; Galati, John C; Burrows, Sally; Beilin, Lawrence J; Li, Xin; Pennell, Craig E; van Eekelen, Jam; Mori, Trevor A; Adams, Leon A; Craig, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-13

    The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and H19 imprinted genes control growth and body composition. Adverse in-utero environments have been associated with obesity-related diseases and linked with altered DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. Postnatally, methylation at the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) has been linked with cerebellum weight. We aimed to investigate whether decreased IGF2/H19 ICR methylation is associated with decreased birth and childhood anthropometry and increased contemporaneous adiposity.DNA methylation in peripheral blood (n = 315) at 17 years old was measured at 12 cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites (CpGs), analysed as Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER units within the IGF2/H19 ICR. Birth size, childhood head circumference (HC) at six time-points and anthropometry at age 17 years were measured. DNA methylation was investigated for its association with anthropometry using linear regression. The principal component of IGF2/H19 ICR DNA methylation (representing mean methylation across all CpG units) positively correlated with skin fold thickness (at four CpG units) (P-values between 0.04 to 0.001) and subcutaneous adiposity (P = 0.023) at age 17, but not with weight, height, BMI, waist circumference or visceral adiposity. IGF2/H19 methylation did not associate with birth weight, length or HC, but CpG unit 13 to 14 methylation was negatively associated with HC between 1 and 10 years. β-coefficients of four out of five remaining CpG units also estimated lower methylation with increasing childhood HC. As greater IGF2/H19 methylation was associated with greater subcutaneous fat measures, but not overall, visceral or central adiposity, we hypothesize that obesogenic pressures in youth result in excess fat being preferentially stored in peripheral fat depots via the IGF2/H19 domain. Secondly, as IGF2/H19 methylation was not associated with birth size but negatively with early childhood HC, we hypothesize that the HC may be a more sensitive

  14. Structural variations of the VWA locus in humans and comparison with non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaguchi, K; Takenaka, O

    2000-09-11

    The HUMVWA locus was examined in 160 samples from the Japanese population. A total of 142 fragments were sequenced, and the counterpart sequences were also determined in non-human primates. In humans, 10 different alleles were found; they could be grouped into seven allelic classes based on the total number of repeats. No variation was observed in the alleles 17, 18 and 19, which showed consensus sequence structures and in the allele 14, which showed a different structure. New variation was found in alleles 15, 16, and 20, which had differences occurred in a basic (TCTA)(TCTG)(n) repeat in the 5' side. The counterpart fragments were successfully amplified in three species (chimpanzees, gorilla, and orangutan) out of four kinds of anthropoids, three species (rhesus macaques, Japanese macaques, and green monkey) out of four kinds of old world monkeys, but not in one species of either new world monkey or prosimian. The sizes of the fragments distributed from 92 to 180 bp in non-human primates and showed allelic size differences in four species. The sequence of the 5' flanking region followed by primer sequences in humans and anthropoids, which consisted of 19 bp, was identical in all, but differed from that in old world monkeys. The basic repeat motifs of humans and anthropoids consisted of TCTA, TCTG, and TCCA but that of old world monkeys consisted of TCTG, TCCG and TCCA The structures of humans and anthropoids were essentially similar, but with characteristic difference in each species. Differences in the allelic structures of old world monkeys were complex. Seven different alleles were observed in two rhesus and two Japanese macaques and one type of allele was observed in two green monkeys. Duplication of more than two repeat units of 4 bp was found in an allele of an old world monkey. These data illuminate interesting features of mutational changes in STRs during the long generations and also some insight into evolutional aspects of primates.

  15. Disruption of the ugt1 locus in mice resembles human Crigler-Najjar type I disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nghia; Bonzo, Jessica A; Chen, Shujuan; Chouinard, Sarah; Kelner, Michael J; Hardiman, Gary; Bélanger, Alain; Tukey, Robert H

    2008-03-21

    The 9 UDP-glucuronosyltranferases (UGTs) encoded by the UGT1 locus in humans are key enzymes in the metabolism of most drugs as well as endogenous substances such as bile acids, fatty acids, steroids, hormones, neurotransmitters, and bilirubin. Severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in humans that suffer from Crigler-Najjar type I disease results from lesions in the UGT1A1 gene and is often fatal. To examine the physiological importance of the Ugt1 locus in mice, this locus was rendered non-functional by interrupting exon 4 to create Ugt1(-/-) mice. Because UGT1A1 in humans is responsible for 100% of the conjugated bilirubin, it followed that newborn Ugt1(-/-) mice developed serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin that were 40-60 times higher than Ugt1(+/-) or wild-type mice. The result of extreme unconjugated bilirubin in Ugt1(-/-) mice, comparable to the induced levels noted in patients with Crigler-Najjar type 1 disease, is fatal in neonatal Ugt1(-/-) mice within 2 weeks following birth. The extreme jaundice is present as a phenotype in skin color after 8 h. Neonatal Ugt1(-/-) mice exhibit no detectable UGT1A-specific RNA, which corresponds to a complete absence of UGT1A proteins in liver microsomes. Conserved glucuronidation activity attributed to the Ugt1 locus can be defined in Ugt1(-/-) mice, because UGT2-dependent glucuronidation activity is unaffected. Remarkably, the loss of UGT1A functionality in liver results in significant alterations in cellular metabolism as investigated through changes in gene expression. Thus, the loss of UGT1A function in Ugt1(-/-) mice leads to a metabolic syndrome that can serve as a model to further investigate the toxicities associated with unconjugated bilirubin and the impact of this disease in humans.

  16. IGF2/H19 hypomethylation is tissue, cell, and CpG site dependent and not correlated with body asymmetry in adolescents with Silver-Russell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannenberg Kai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS is characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth failure and frequent body asymmetry. Half of the patients with SRS carry a DNA hypomethylation of the imprinting center region 1 (ICR1 of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2/H19 locus, and the clinical phenotype is most severe in these patients. We aimed to elucidate the epigenetic basis of asymmetry in SRS and the cellular consequences of the ICR1 hypomethylation. Results The ICR1 methylation status was analyzed in blood and in addition in buccal smear probes and cultured fibroblasts obtained from punch biopsies taken from the two body halves of 5 SRS patients and 3 controls. We found that the ICR1 hypomethylation in SRS patients was stronger in blood leukocytes and oral mucosa cells than in fibroblasts. ICR1 CpG sites were affected differently. The severity of hypomethylation was not correlated to body asymmetry. IGF2 expression and IGF-II secretion of fibroblasts were not correlated to the degree of ICR1 hypomethylation. SRS fibroblasts responded well to stimulation by recombinant human IGF-I or IGF-II, with proliferation rates comparable with controls. Clonal expansion of primary fibroblasts confirmed the complexity of the cellular mosaicism. Conclusions We conclude that the ICR1 hypomethylation SRS is tissue, cell, and CpG site specific. The correlation of the ICR1 hypomethylation to IGF2 and H19 expression is not strict, may depend on the investigated tissue, and may become evident only in case of more severe methylation defects. The body asymmetry in juvenile SRS patients is not related to a corresponding ICR1 hypomethylation gradient, rendering more likely an intrauterine origin of asymmetry. Overall, it may be instrumental to consider not only the ICR1 methylation status as decisive for IGF2/H19 expression regulation.

  17. Lipooligosaccharide locus classes and putative virulence genes among chicken and human Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, Patrik; Hansson, Ingrid; Nilsson, Anna; Rautelin, Hilpi; Olsson Engvall, Eva

    2016-11-21

    Campylobacter cause morbidity and considerable economic loss due to hospitalization and post infectious sequelae such as reactive arthritis, Guillain Barré- and Miller Fischer syndromes. Such sequelae have been linked to C. jejuni harboring sialic acid structures in their lipooligosaccharide (LOS) layer of the cell wall. Poultry is an important source of human Campylobacter infections but little is known about the prevalence of sialylated C. jejuni isolates and the extent of transmission of such isolates to humans. Genotypes of C. jejuni isolates from enteritis patients were compared with those of broiler chicken with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), to study the patterns of LOS biosynthesis genes and other virulence associated genes and to what extent these occur among Campylobacter genotypes found both in humans and chickens. Chicken and human isolates generally had similar distributions of the putative virulence genes and LOS locus classes studied. However, there were significant differences regarding LOS locus class of PFGE types that were overlapping between chicken and human isolates and those that were distinct to each source. The study highlights the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Campylobacter isolates from humans and chickens and suggests possible patterns of transmission between the two species.

  18. Targeting of the human coagulation factor IX gene at rDNA locus of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xionghao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic modification is a prerequisite to realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs in human genetic research and regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, the random integration methods that have been the primary techniques used keep creating problems, and the primary alternative method, gene targeting, has been effective in manipulating mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs but poorly in hESCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human ribosomal DNA (rDNA repeats are clustered on the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes. They consist of approximately 400 copies of the 45S pre-RNA (rRNA gene per haploid. In the present study, we targeted a physiological gene, human coagulation factor IX, into the rDNA locus of hESCs via homologous recombination. The relative gene targeting efficiency (>50% and homologous recombination frequency (>10(-5 were more than 10-fold higher than those of loci targeted in previous reports. Meanwhile, the targeted clones retained both a normal karyotype and the main characteristics of ES cells. The transgene was found to be stably and ectopically expressed in targeted hESCs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first targeting of a human physiological gene at a defined locus on the hESC genome. Our findings indicate that the rDNA locus may serve as an ideal harbor for transgenes in hESCs.

  19. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  20. Igf2-H19, an imprinted tandem gene, is an important regulator of embryonic development, a guardian of proliferation of adult pluripotent stem cells, a regulator of longevity, and a ‘passkey’ to cancerogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2-H19 locus encodes important paternally imprinted genes that govern normal embryonic development. While Igf-2 encodes IGF2, which is an autocrine/paracrine mitogen,  transcription of H19 gives rise to non-coding mRNA that is a precursor of several microRNAs (miRNAs that negatively affect cell proliferation. The proper imprinting of a differentially methylated region (DMR within this locus, with methylation of the paternal chromosome and a lack of methylation on the maternal chromosome, regulates expression of both of these genes so that Igf2 is transcribed only from the paternal chromosome and H19 only from the maternal chromosome. There is growing evidence that this ‘Yin-Yang’ locus regulates embryonic development. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that erasure of imprinting (hypomethylation of the Igf2-H19 locus on both chromosomes, which leads to downregulation of Igf2 and upregulation of H19 expression, plays an important role in regulating quiescence of pluripotent stem cells in adult organisms, and may be involved in the regulation of lifespan. In contrast, hypermethylation of this locus on both chromosomes (loss of imprinting results in Igf2 overexpression and is observed in several malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the biological consequences of changes in Igf2-H19 expression.

  1. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  2. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes. PMID:25862232

  3. Relaxation of IGF2/H19 imprinting in Wilms tumour is associated with a switch in DNA methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, A.E.; Taniguchi, T.; Sullivan, M.J.; Ogawa, O. [Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    1994-09-01

    We and others have recently shown that the normal imprinting of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene is disrupted in Wilms tumor. The process of relaxation of IGF2 imprinting leads to the activation of transcription of the normally silent maternally inherited IGF2 allele such that both alleles of the IGF2 gene are transcribed. Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting has also been detected as a constitutional event in patients with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrom and a patient with gigantism and Wilms tumor. We have now shown that in Wilms tumors in which imprinting is relaxed, IGF2 is transcribed from the maternal allele and there is a concomitant transcriptional inactivation of the H19 maternal allele. Furthermore, the patterns of methylation of the IGF2 and H19 gene are reversed on the maternal chromosome. Relaxation of imprinting in Wilms tumors appear, therefore, to be associated with a switch in gene expression and methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. The data supports the notion of a disrupted IGF2/H19 imprinting switch in Wilms tumor.

  4. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells’ proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs.

  5. Uptake of inorganic mercury by human locus ceruleus and corticomotor neurons: implications for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental toxins are suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an attempt to determine which pathways these toxins can use to enter motor neurons we compared the distribution of mercury in the CNS of a human and of mice that had been exposed to inorganic mercury. Results In the human who had been exposed to metallic mercury, mercury was seen predominantly in the locus ceruleus and corticomotor neurons, as well as in scattered glial cells. In mice that had been exposed to mercury vapor or mercuric chloride, mercury was present in lower motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. Conclusions In humans, inorganic mercury can be taken up predominantly by corticomotor neurons, possibly when the locus ceruleus is upregulated by stress. This toxin uptake into corticomotor neurons is in accord with the hypothesis that ALS originates in these upper motor neurons. In mice, inorganic mercury is taken up predominantly by lower motor neurons. The routes toxins use to enter motor neurons depends on the nature of the toxin, the duration of exposure, and possibly the amount of stress (for upper motor neuron uptake) and exercise (for lower motor neuron uptake) at the time of toxin exposure. PMID:24252585

  6. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer.

  7. Methylation status of imprinting centers for H19/IGF2 and SNURF/SNRPN in primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Clepper, Lisa; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Fujimoto, Akihisa; Wolf, Don

    2007-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold promise for cell and tissue replacement approaches to treating human diseases based on their capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of somatic cells and tissues. However, long-term in vitro culture and manipulations of ESCs may adversely affect their epigenetic integrity, including imprinting. We have recently reported aberrant biallelic expression of IGF2 and H19 in several rhesus monkey ESC lines, whereas SNRPN and NDN were normally imprinted and expressed predominantly from the paternal allele. The dysregulation of IGF2 and H19 that is associated with tumorigenesis in humans may result from improper maintenance of allele-specific methylation patterns at an imprinting center (IC) upstream of H19. To test this possibility, we performed methylation analysis of several monkey ESC lines by genomic bisulfite sequencing. We investigated methylation profiles of CpG islands within the IGF2/H19 IC harboring the CTCF-6 binding site. In addition, the methylation status of the IC within the promoter/exon 1 of SNURF/SNRPN known as the Prader-Willi syndrome IC was examined. Our results demonstrate abnormal hypermethylation within the IGF2/H19 IC in all analyzed ESC lines, whereas the SNURF/SNRPN IC was differentially methylated, consistent with monoallelic expression.

  8. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. Copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the largest genomic influence on obesity, although genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole-genome sequence analysis, droplet digital PCR and genome mapping, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that the AMY1 copy number in an individual's genome is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates with nearby SNPs, which do not associate with body mass index (BMI). We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in 2 other cohorts totaling ∼3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI, yet found no association.

  9. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  10. Energy homeostasis targets chromosomal reconfiguration of the human GH1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Cattini, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Levels of pituitary growth hormone (GH), a metabolic homeostatic factor with strong lipolytic activity, are decreased in obese individuals. GH declines prior to the onset of weight gain in response to excess caloric intake and hyperinsulinemia; however, the mechanism by which GH is reduced is not clear. We used transgenic mice expressing the human GH (hGH) gene, GH1, to assess the effect of high caloric intake on expression as well as the local chromosome structure of the intact GH1 locus. Animals exposed to 3 days of high caloric intake exhibited hyperinsulinemia without hyperglycemia and a decrease in both hGH synthesis and secretion, but no difference in endogenous production of murine GH. Efficient GH1 expression requires a long-range intrachromosomal interaction between remote enhancer sequences and the proximal promoter region through "looping" of intervening chromatin. High caloric intake disrupted this interaction and decreased both histone H3/H4 hyperacetylation and RNA polymerase II occupancy at the GH1 promoter. Incorporation of physical activity muted the effects of excess caloric intake on insulin levels, GH1 promoter hyperacetylation, chromosomal architecture, and expression. These results indicate that energy homeostasis alters postnatal hGH synthesis through dynamic changes in the 3-dimensional chromatin structure of the GH1 locus, including structures required for cell type specificity during development.

  11. Molecular population genetics of human CYP3A locus: signatures of positive selection and implications for evolutionary environmental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Wang, Haijian; Zhou, Gangqiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Dong, Xiaojia; Zhi, Lianteng; Jin, Li; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-01

    The human CYP3A gene cluster codes for cytochrome P450 (CYP) subfamily enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of various exogenous and endogenous chemicals and is an obvious candidate for evolutionary and environmental genomic study. Functional variants in the CYP3A locus may have undergone a selective sweep in response to various environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to profile the allelic structure across the human CYP3A locus and investigate natural selection on that locus. From the CYP3A locus spanning 231 kb, we resequenced 54 genomic DNA fragments (a total of 43,675 bases) spanning four genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP3A43) and two pseudogenes (CYP3AP1 and CYP3AP2), and randomly selected intergenic regions at the CYP3A locus in Africans (24 individuals), Caucasians (24 individuals), and Chinese (29 individuals). We comprehensively investigated the nucleotide diversity and haplotype structure and examined the possible role of natural selection in shaping the sequence variation throughout the gene cluster. Neutrality tests with Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*, and Fay and Wu's H indicated possible roles of positive selection on the entire CYP3A locus in non-Africans. Sliding-window analyses of nucleotide diversity and frequency spectrum, as well as haplotype diversity and phylogenetically inferred haplotype structure, revealed that CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 had recently undergone or were undergoing a selective sweep in all three populations, whereas CYP3A43 and CYP3A5 were undergoing a selective sweep in non-Africans and Caucasians, respectively. The refined allelic architecture and selection spectrum for the human CYP3A locus highlight that evolutionary dynamics of molecular adaptation may underlie the phenotypic variation of the xenobiotic disposition system and varied predisposition to complex disorders in which xenobiotics play a role.

  12. Molecular basis of engineered meganuclease targeting of the endogenous human RAG1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Inés G; Prieto, Jesús; Subramanian, Sunita; Coloma, Javier; Redondo, Pilar; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Marenchino, Marco; D'Abramo, Marco; Gervasio, Francesco L; Grizot, Sylvestre; Daboussi, Fayza; Smith, Julianne; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Pâques, Frédéric; Duchateau, Philippe; Alibés, Andreu; Stricher, François; Serrano, Luis; Blanco, Francisco J; Montoya, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize long target DNA sequences generating an accurate double-strand break that promotes gene targeting through homologous recombination. We have modified the homodimeric I-CreI endonuclease through protein engineering to target a specific DNA sequence within the human RAG1 gene. Mutations in RAG1 produce severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a monogenic disease leading to defective immune response in the individuals, leaving them vulnerable to infectious diseases. The structures of two engineered heterodimeric variants and one single-chain variant of I-CreI, in complex with a 24-bp oligonucleotide of the human RAG1 gene sequence, show how the DNA binding is achieved through interactions in the major groove. In addition, the introduction of the G19S mutation in the neighborhood of the catalytic site lowers the reaction energy barrier for DNA cleavage without compromising DNA recognition. Gene-targeting experiments in human cell lines show that the designed single-chain molecule preserves its in vivo activity with higher specificity, further enhanced by the G19S mutation. This is the first time that an engineered meganuclease variant targets the human RAG1 locus by stimulating homologous recombination in human cell lines up to 265 bp away from the cleavage site. Our analysis illustrates the key features for à la carte procedure in protein-DNA recognition design, opening new possibilities for SCID patients whose illness can be treated ex vivo.

  13. Sdhd and SDHD/H19 knockout mice do not develop paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Bayley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH is a component of both the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the electron transport chain. Mutations of SDHD, the first protein of intermediary metabolism shown to be involved in tumorigenesis, lead to the human tumors paraganglioma (PGL and pheochromocytoma (PC. SDHD is remarkable in showing an 'imprinted' tumor suppressor phenotype. Mutations of SDHD show a very high penetrance in man and we postulated that knockout of Sdhd would lead to the development of PGL/PC, probably in aged mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a conventional knockout of Sdhd in the mouse, removing the entire third exon. We also crossed this mouse with a knockout of H19, a postulated imprinted modifier gene of Sdhd tumorigenesis, to evaluate if loss of these genes together would lead to the initiation or enhancement of tumor development. Homozygous knockout of Sdhd results in embryonic lethality. No paraganglioma or other tumor development was seen in Sdhd KO mice followed for their entire lifespan, in sharp contrast to the highly penetrant phenotype in humans. Heterozygous Sdhd KO mice did not show hyperplasia of paraganglioma-related tissues such as the carotid body or of the adrenal medulla, or any genotype-related pathology, with similar body and organ weights to wildtype mice. A cohort of Sdhd/H19 KO mice developed several cases of profound cardiac hypertrophy, but showed no evidence of PGL/PC. CONCLUSIONS: Knockout of Sdhd in the mouse does not result in a disease phenotype. H19 may not be an initiator of PGL/PC tumorigenesis.

  14. Methylation and Transcripts Expression at the Imprinted GNAS Locus in Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Grybek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature indicate that genomic imprint marks are disturbed in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs. GNAS is an imprinted locus that produces one biallelic (Gsα and four monoallelic (NESP55, GNAS-AS1, XLsα, and A/B transcripts due to differential methylation of their promoters (DMR. To document imprinting at the GNAS locus in PSCs, we studied GNAS locus DMR methylation and transcript (NESP55, XLsα, and A/B expression in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs derived from two human fibroblasts and their progenies. Results showed that (1 methylation at the GNAS locus DMRs is DMR and cell line specific, (2 changes in allelic transcript expression can be independent of a change in allele-specific DNA methylation, and (3 interestingly, methylation at A/B DMR is correlated with A/B transcript expression. These results indicate that these models are valuable to study the mechanisms controlling GNAS methylation, factors involved in transcript expression, and possibly mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1B.

  15. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]. To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1].

  16. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article "Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85" [1].

  17. A dominant chromatin opening activity in 5' hypersensitive site 3 of the human β-globin locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); K.C. Tan-Un; A. Harper; D. Michalovich (David); P.J. Fraser (Peter); N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractSingle-copy human beta-globin transgenes are very susceptible to suppression by position effects of surrounding closed chromatin. However, these position effects are overcome by a 20 kbp DNA fragment containing the locus control region (LCR). Here we show that the 6.5 kbp microlocus LCR

  18. H19/let-7/LIN28 reciprocal negative regulatory circuit promotes breast cancer stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Li, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Li; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Hong; Zhao, Hai-Dong; Kang, Zhi-Jie; Fan, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Li-Li; Li, Mei; Cui, Bai; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Lam, Eric W-F; Wang, Bo; Xu, Jie; Liu, Quentin

    2017-01-19

    Long noncoding RNA-H19 (H19), an imprinted oncofetal gene, has a central role in carcinogenesis. Hitherto, the mechanism by which H19 regulates cancer stem cells, remains elusive. Here we show that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) express high levels of H19, and ectopic overexpression of H19 significantly promotes breast cancer cell clonogenicity, migration and mammosphere-forming ability. Conversely, silencing of H19 represses these BCSC properties. In concordance, knockdown of H19 markedly inhibits tumor growth and suppresses tumorigenesis in nude mice. Mechanistically, we found that H19 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to sponge miRNA let-7, leading to an increase in expression of a let-7 target, the core pluripotency factor LIN28, which is enriched in BCSC populations and breast patient samples. Intriguingly, this gain of LIN28 expression can also feedback to reverse the H19 loss-mediated suppression of BCSC properties. Our data also reveal that LIN28 blocks mature let-7 production and, thereby, de-represses H19 expression in breast cancer cells. Appropriately, H19 and LIN28 expression exhibits strong correlations in primary breast carcinomas. Collectively, these findings reveal that lncRNA H19, miRNA let-7 and transcriptional factor LIN28 form a double-negative feedback loop, which has a critical role in the maintenance of BCSCs. Consequently, disrupting this pathway provides a novel therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  19. Genomic approaches uncover increasing complexities in the regulatory landscape at the human SCL (TAL1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawandeep Dhami

    Full Text Available The SCL (TAL1 transcription factor is a critical regulator of haematopoiesis and its expression is tightly controlled by multiple cis-acting regulatory elements. To elaborate further the DNA elements which control its regulation, we used genomic tiling microarrays covering 256 kb of the human SCL locus to perform a concerted analysis of chromatin structure and binding of regulatory proteins in human haematopoietic cell lines. This approach allowed us to characterise further or redefine known human SCL regulatory elements and led to the identification of six novel elements with putative regulatory function both up and downstream of the SCL gene. They bind a number of haematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, E2A LMO2, SCL, LDB1, CTCF or components of the transcriptional machinery and are associated with relevant histone modifications, accessible chromatin and low nucleosomal density. Functional characterisation shows that these novel elements are able to enhance or repress SCL promoter activity, have endogenous promoter function or enhancer-blocking insulator function. Our analysis opens up several areas for further investigation and adds new layers of complexity to our understanding of the regulation of SCL expression.

  20. Locus Reference Genomic sequences: An improved basis for describing human DNA variants

    KAUST Repository

    Dalgleish, Raymond

    2010-04-15

    As our knowledge of the complexity of gene architecture grows, and we increase our understanding of the subtleties of gene expression, the process of accurately describing disease-causing gene variants has become increasingly problematic. In part, this is due to current reference DNA sequence formats that do not fully meet present needs. Here we present the Locus Reference Genomic (LRG) sequence format, which has been designed for the specifi c purpose of gene variant reporting. The format builds on the successful National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) RefSeqGene project and provides a single-fi le record containing a uniquely stable reference DNA sequence along with all relevant transcript and protein sequences essential to the description of gene variants. In principle, LRGs can be created for any organism, not just human. In addition, we recognize the need to respect legacy numbering systems for exons and amino acids and the LRG format takes account of these. We hope that widespread adoption of LRGs - which will be created and maintained by the NCBI and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) - along with consistent use of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS)- approved variant nomenclature will reduce errors in the reporting of variants in the literature and improve communication about variants aff ecting human health. Further information can be found on the LRG web site (http://www.lrg-sequence.org). 2010 Dalgleish et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Association of in vitro fertilization with global and IGF2/H19 methylation variation in newborn twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Y J; Galati, J C; Saffery, R; Craig, J M

    2015-04-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) and its subset intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), are widely used medical treatments for conception. There has been controversy over whether IVF is associated with adverse short- and long-term health outcomes of offspring. As with other prenatal factors, epigenetic change is thought to be a molecular mediator of any in utero programming effects. Most studies focused on DNA methylation at gene-specific and genomic level, with only a few on associations between DNA methylation and IVF. Using buccal epithelium from 208 twin pairs from the Peri/Postnatal Epigenetic Twin Study (PETS), we investigated associations between IVF and DNA methylation on a global level, using the proxies of Alu and LINE-1 interspersed repeats in addition to two locus-specific regulatory regions within IGF2/H19, controlling for 13 potentially confounding factors. Using multiple correction testing, we found strong evidence that IVF-conceived twins have lower DNA methylation in Alu, and weak evidence of lower methylation in one of the two IGF2/H19 regulatory regions and LINE-1, compared with naturally conceived twins. Weak evidence of a relationship between ICSI and DNA methylation within IGF2/H19 regulatory region was found, suggesting that one or more of the processes associated with IVF/ICSI may contribute to these methylation differences. Lower within- and between-pair DNA methylation variation was also found in IVF-conceived twins for LINE-1, Alu and one IGF2/H19 regulatory region. Although larger sample sizes are needed, our results provide additional insight to the possible influence of IVF and ICSI on DNA methylation. To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date investigating the association of IVF and DNA methylation.

  2. Strengthening Locus Standi in Human Rights Litigation in Zimbabwe: An analysis of the Provisions in the New Zimbabwean Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovemore Chiduza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabweans have been both victims of and witnesses to serious human rights violations over the years. Though there is wide agreement and speculation that the state and its agencies are the perpetrators of these atrocities, they have largely remained unprosecuted and unpunished. Such impunity is inter alia the result of ineffective law enforcement mechanisms and institutions as well as the lack of capacity and legal knowledge of victims to approach the courts and seek redress. These factors negatively affected the protection of human rights and access to justice in Zimbabwe. Although the Lancaster House Constitution contained a Declaration of Rights, its enforcement mechanisms, particularly those relating to locus standi (legal standing, posed a great challenge to human rights litigation in Zimbabwe. This is so because the Lancaster House Constitution adopted the traditional common law approach to standing. Under this approach it was required that an individual must have a "personal, direct or substantial interest" in a matter in order to have standing. The Lancaster House Constitution failed to recognise the importance of broader rules of standing, which would accommodate public interest litigation, specifically for protecting human rights. Contrary to this, the new Constitution of Zimbabwe (2013 broadens the rules of standing in order to enhance access to the courts. This paper analyses the new approach to standing under the new constitutional dispensation in Zimbabwe. To this end, the discussion commences with an elucidation of the concept of locus standi and its link to access to justice. This is followed by an analysis of locus standi under the Lancaster House Constitution. Since the new approach in Zimbabwe is greatly informed by the South African approach to locus standi, a brief analysis of standing in South Africa is made. The paper concludes with a discussion of the approach to locus standi under the new constitution with a view to

  3. A discrete genetic locus confers xyloglucan metabolism in select human gut Bacteroidetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbrink, Johan; Rogers, Theresa E; Hemsworth, Glyn R; McKee, Lauren S; Tauzin, Alexandra S; Spadiut, Oliver; Klinter, Stefan; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Urs, Karthik; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kelly, Amelia G; Cederholm, Stefan Nilsson; Davies, Gideon J; Martens, Eric C; Brumer, Harry

    2014-02-27

    A well-balanced human diet includes a significant intake of non-starch polysaccharides, collectively termed 'dietary fibre', from the cell walls of diverse fruits and vegetables. Owing to the paucity of alimentary enzymes encoded by the human genome, our ability to derive energy from dietary fibre depends on the saccharification and fermentation of complex carbohydrates by the massive microbial community residing in our distal gut. The xyloglucans (XyGs) are a ubiquitous family of highly branched plant cell wall polysaccharides whose mechanism(s) of degradation in the human gut and consequent importance in nutrition have been unclear. Here we demonstrate that a single, complex gene locus in Bacteroides ovatus confers XyG catabolism in this common colonic symbiont. Through targeted gene disruption, biochemical analysis of all predicted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate-binding proteins, and three-dimensional structural determination of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanase, we reveal the molecular mechanisms through which XyGs are hydrolysed to component monosaccharides for further metabolism. We also observe that orthologous XyG utilization loci (XyGULs) serve as genetic markers of XyG catabolism in Bacteroidetes, that XyGULs are restricted to a limited number of phylogenetically diverse strains, and that XyGULs are ubiquitous in surveyed human metagenomes. Our findings reveal that the metabolism of even highly abundant components of dietary fibre may be mediated by niche species, which has immediate fundamental and practical implications for gut symbiont population ecology in the context of human diet, nutrition and health.

  4. Chromatin structure, epigenetic mechanisms and long-range interactions in the human insulin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z; Lefevre, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    2012-10-01

    Regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes is largely dependent on variations in chromatin structure. More recently, it has become clear that this may involve not only local chromatin organization but also distant regulatory elements that participate in large-scale chromatin architecture within the nucleus. We describe recent methods that make possible the detection of such structures and apply them to analysis of the human insulin (INS) locus in pancreatic islets. We show that the INS gene is part of an extended 'open' chromatin domain that includes adjacent genes as well. We also find that in islets, the INS promoter is in physical contact with distant sites on the same human chromosome and notably, with the SYT8 gene, located nearly 300 kb away. The strength of the contact between INS and SYT8 is increased by glucose, and this results in stimulation of SYT8 expression. Inhibition of INS transcription decreases SYT8 expression. Furthermore, downregulation of SYT8 results in decreased secretion of insulin. Our results thus establish the existence of a regulatory network between the INS gene and other distant genes through long-range physical interactions, and suggest that such networks may have general importance for insulin biology and diabetes.

  5. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyang Mou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001 and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05. We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype.

  6. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  7. DNA methylation-histone modification relationships across the desmin locus in human primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl Allen, Marianne; Koch, Christoph M; Clelland, Gayle K; Dunham, Ian; Antoniou, Michael

    2009-05-27

    We present here an extensive epigenetic analysis of a 500 kb region, which encompasses the human desmin gene (DES) and its 5' locus control region (LCR), the only muscle-specific transcriptional regulatory element of this type described to date. These data complement and extend Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) studies on region ENr133. We analysed histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation patterns in physiologically relevant DES expressing (myoblast/myotube) and non-expressing (peripheral blood mononuclear) primary human cells. We found that in expressing myoblast/myotube but not peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, histone H4 acetylation displays a broadly distributed enrichment across a gene rich 200 kb region whereas H3 acetylation localizes at the transcriptional start site (TSS) of genes. We show that the DES LCR and TSS of DES are enriched with hyperacetylated domains of acetylated histone H3, with H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methylation (H3K4me2 and me3) exhibiting a different distribution pattern across this locus. The CpG island that extends into the first intron of DES is methylation-free regardless of the gene's expression status and in non-expressing PBMCs is marked with histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27me3). Overall, our results constitute the first study correlating patterns of histone modifications and underlying DNA methylation of a muscle-specific LCR and its associated downstream gene region whilst additionally placing this within a much broader genomic context. Our results clearly show that there are distinct patterns of histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation at the DES LCR, promoter and intragenic region. In addition, the presence of H3K27me3 at the DES methylation-free CpG only in non-expressing PBMCs may serve to silence this gene in non-muscle tissues. Generally, our work demonstrates the importance of using multiple, physiologically relevant tissue types that represent different expressing

  8. Identification of the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant using a combination of mouse and human genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu;

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 2...... that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure....... recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897...... complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest...

  9. Gene discovery at the human T-cell receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Marsha R; Wu, Gillian E

    2007-02-01

    The human T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha/delta variable loci are interspersed on the chromosome 14q11 and consist of 57 intergenic spaces ranging from 4 to 100 kb in length. To elucidate the evolutionary history of this locus, we searched the intergenic spaces of all TCR alpha/delta variable (TRAV/DV) genes for pseudogenes and potential protein-coding genes. We applied direct open reading frame (ORF) searches, an exon-finding algorithm and comparative genomics. Two TRAV/DV pseudogenes were discovered bearing 80 and 65% sequence similarity to TRAV14DV4 and TRAV9-1/9-2 genes, respectively. A gene bearing 85% sequence identity to B lymphocyte activation-related protein, BC-1514, upstream of TRAV26-2 was also discovered. This ORF (BC-1514tcra) is a member of a gene family whose evolutionary history and function are not known. In total, 36 analogs of this gene exist in the human, the chimpanzee, the Rhesus monkey, the frog and the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analyses show convergent evolution of these genes. Assays for the expression of BC-1514tcra revealed transcripts in the bone marrow, thymus, spleen, and small intestine. These assays also showed the expression of another analog to BC-1514, found on chromosome 5 in the bone marrow and thymus RNA. The existence of at least 17 analogs at various locations in the human genome and in nonsyntenic chromosomes of the chimpanzee suggest that BC-1514tcra, along with its analogs may be transposable elements with evolved function(s). The identification of conserved putative serine phosphorylation sites provide evidence of their possible role(s) in signal transduction events involved in B cell development and differentiation.

  10. MicroRNAs at the human 14q32 locus have prognostic significance in osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Deregulation of microRNA (miRNA) transcript levels has been observed in many types of tumors including osteosarcoma. Molecular pathways regulated by differentially expressed miRNAs may contribute to the heterogeneous tumor behaviors observed in naturally occurring cancers. Thus, tumor-associated miRNA expression may provide informative biomarkers for disease outcome and metastatic potential in osteosarcoma patients. We showed previously that clusters of miRNAs at the 14q32 locus are downregulated in human osteosarcoma. Methods Human and canine osteosarcoma patient’s samples with clinical follow-up data were used in this study. We used bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to identify miRNA based prognostic biomarkers in osteosarcoma. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Whitney Mann U tests were conducted for validating the statistical significance. Results Here we show that an inverse correlation exists between aggressive tumor behavior (increased metastatic potential and accelerated time to death) and the residual expression of 14q32 miRNAs (using miR-382 as a representative of 14q32 miRNAs) in a series of clinically annotated samples from human osteosarcoma patients. We also show a comparable decrease in expression of orthologous 14q32 miRNAs in canine osteosarcoma samples, with conservation of the inverse correlation between aggressive behavior and expression of orthologous miRNA miR-134 and miR-544. Conclusions We conclude that downregulation of 14q32 miRNA expression is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that contributes to the biological behavior of osteosarcoma, and that quantification of representative transcripts from this family, such as miR-382, miR-134, and miR-544, provide prognostic and predictive markers that can assist in the management of patients with this disease. PMID:23311495

  11. MicroRNAs at the human 14q32 locus have prognostic significance in osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarver Aaron L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deregulation of microRNA (miRNA transcript levels has been observed in many types of tumors including osteosarcoma. Molecular pathways regulated by differentially expressed miRNAs may contribute to the heterogeneous tumor behaviors observed in naturally occurring cancers. Thus, tumor-associated miRNA expression may provide informative biomarkers for disease outcome and metastatic potential in osteosarcoma patients. We showed previously that clusters of miRNAs at the 14q32 locus are downregulated in human osteosarcoma. Methods Human and canine osteosarcoma patient’s samples with clinical follow-up data were used in this study. We used bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to identify miRNA based prognostic biomarkers in osteosarcoma. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Whitney Mann U tests were conducted for validating the statistical significance. Results Here we show that an inverse correlation exists between aggressive tumor behavior (increased metastatic potential and accelerated time to death and the residual expression of 14q32 miRNAs (using miR-382 as a representative of 14q32 miRNAs in a series of clinically annotated samples from human osteosarcoma patients. We also show a comparable decrease in expression of orthologous 14q32 miRNAs in canine osteosarcoma samples, with conservation of the inverse correlation between aggressive behavior and expression of orthologous miRNA miR-134 and miR-544. Conclusions We conclude that downregulation of 14q32 miRNA expression is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that contributes to the biological behavior of osteosarcoma, and that quantification of representative transcripts from this family, such as miR-382, miR-134, and miR-544, provide prognostic and predictive markers that can assist in the management of patients with this disease.

  12. Developmental hyperbilirubinemia and CNS toxicity in mice humanized with the UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ryoichi; Nguyen, Nghia; Chen, Shujuan; Tukey, Robert H

    2010-03-16

    High levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) in newborn children is associated with a reduction in hepatic UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 activity that can lead to CNS toxicity, brain damage, and even death. Little is known regarding those events that lead to UCB accumulation in brain tissue, and therefore, we sought to duplicate this condition in mice. The human UGT1 locus, encoding all 9-UGT1A genes including UGT1A1, was expressed in Ugt1(-/-) mice. Because the most common clinical condition associated with jaundice in adults is Gilbert's syndrome, which is characterized by an allelic polymorphism in the UGT1A1 promoter, hyperbilirubinemia was monitored in humanized UGT1 mice that expressed either the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice] or the normal UGT1A1*1 allele [Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice]. Adult Tg(UGT1(A1*28))Ugt1(-/-) mice expressed elevated levels of total bilirubin (TB) compared with Tg(UGT1(A1*1))Ugt1(-/-) mice, confirming that the promoter polymorphism associated with the UGT1A1*28 allele contributes to hyperbilirubinemia in mice. However, TB accumulated to near toxic levels during neonatal development, a finding that is independent of the Gilbert's UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism. Whereas serum TB levels eventually returned to adult levels, TB clearance in neonatal mice was not associated with hepatic UGT1A1 expression. In approximately 10% of the humanized UGT1 mice, peak TB levels culminated in seizures followed by death. UCB deposition in brain tissue and the ensuing seizures were associated with developmental milestones and can be prevented by enhancing regulation of the UGT1A1 gene in neonatal mice.

  13. Sterile DJH rearrangements reveal that distance between gene segments on the human Ig H chain locus influences their ability to rearrange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Østergaard; Lange, Anders Blaabjerg; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of the Ig locus occurs in two steps. First, a JH gene is rearranged to a D gene followed by a VH gene rearranging to the DJH rearrangement. By next generation sequencing, we analyzed 9969 unique DJH rearrangements and 5919 unique VHDJH rearrangements obtained from peripheral blood B...... frequently than JH locus distal D genes, whereas VH locus proximal D genes were observed more frequently in nonproductive VHDJH rearrangements. We further demonstrate that the distance between VH, D, and JH gene segments influence their ability to rearrange within the human Ig locus....

  14. Long Non-coding RNA H19 Induces Cerebral Ischemia Reperfusion Injury via Activation of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Cao, Bin; Han, Dong; Sun, Miao; Feng, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA H19 (lncRNA H19) was found to be upregulated by hypoxia, its expression and function have never been tested in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study intended to investigate the role of lncRNA H19 and H19 gene variation in cerebral I/R injury with focusing on its relationship with autophagy activation. Cerebral I/R was induced in rats by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. SH-SY5Y cells were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) to simulate I/R injury. Real-time PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to evaluate the level of lncRNA H19, apoptosis, autophagy and some related proteins. The modified multiple ligase reaction was used to analyze the gene polymorphism of six SNPs in H19, rs217727, rs2067051, rs2251375, rs492994, rs2839698 and rs10732516 in ischemic stroke patients. We found that the expression of lncRNA H19 was upregulated by cerebral I/R in rats, as well as by OGD/R in vitro in the cells. Inhibition of lncRNA H19 and autophagy protected cells from OGD/R-induced death, respectively. Autophagy activation induced by OGD/R was prevented by H19 siRNA. Autophagy inducer, rapamycin, abolished lncRNA H19 effect. Furthermore, we found that lncRNA H19 inhibited autophagy through DUSP5-ERK1/2 axis. The result from blood samples of ischemic patients revealed that the variation of H19 gene increased the risk of ischemic stroke. Taken together, the results of present study suggest that LncRNA H19 could be a new therapeutic target of ischemic stroke. PMID:28203482

  15. TALE nickase mediates high efficient targeted transgene integration at the human multi-copy ribosomal DNA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Gao, Tieli; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Youjin; Hu, Xuyun; Hu, Zhiqing; Pang, Jialun; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Feng, Mai; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2014-03-28

    Although targeted gene addition could be stimulated strikingly by a DNA double strand break (DSB) created by either zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or TALE nucleases (TALENs), the DSBs are really mutagenic and toxic to human cells. As a compromised solution, DNA single-strand break (SSB) or nick has been reported to mediate high efficient gene addition but with marked reduction of random mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated effective targeted gene addition at the human multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus, a genomic safe harbor for the transgene with therapeutic potential. To improve the transgene integration efficiency by using TALENs while lowering the cytotoxicity of DSBs, we created both TALENs and TALE nickases (TALENickases) targeting this multicopy locus. A targeting vector which could integrate a GFP cassette at the rDNA locus was constructed and co-transfected with TALENs or TALENickases. Although the fraction of GFP positive cells using TALENs was greater than that using TALENickases during the first few days after transfection, it reduced to a level less than that using TALENickases after continuous culture. Our findings showed that the TALENickases were more effective than their TALEN counterparts at the multi-copy rDNA locus, though earlier studies using ZFNs and ZFNickases targeting the single-copy loci showed the reverse. Besides, TALENickases mediated the targeted integration of a 5.4 kb fragment at a frequency of up to 0.62% in HT1080 cells after drug selection, suggesting their potential application in targeted gene modification not being limited at the rDNA locus.

  16. Assisted Reproductive Technology affects developmental kinetics, H19 Imprinting Control Region methylation and H19 gene expression in individual mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandolo Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last few years, an increase in imprinting anomalies has been reported in children born from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART. Various clinical and experimental studies also suggest alterations of embryo development after ART. Therefore, there is a need for studying early epigenetic anomalies which could result from ART manipulations, especially on single embryos. In this study, we evaluated the impact of superovulation, in vitro fertilization (IVF and embryo culture conditions on proper genomic imprinting and blastocyst development in single mouse embryos. In this study, different experimental groups were established to obtain embryos from superovulated and non-superovulated females, either from in vivo or in vitro fertilized oocytes, themselves grown in vitro or not. The embryos were cultured either in M16 medium or in G1.2/G2.2 sequential medium. The methylation status of H19 Imprinting Control Region (ICR and H19 promoter was assessed, as well as the gene expression level of H19, in individual blastocysts. In parallel, we have evaluated embryo cleavage kinetics and recorded morphological data. Results We show that: 1. The culture medium influences early embryo development with faster cleavage kinetics for culture in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16 medium. 2. Epigenetic alterations of the H19 ICR and H19 PP are influenced by the fertilization method since methylation anomalies were observed only in the in vitro fertilized subgroup, however to different degrees according to the culture medium. 3. Superovulation clearly disrupted H19 gene expression in individual blastocysts. Moreover, when embryos were cultured in vitro after either in vivo or in vitro fertilization, the percentage of blastocysts which expressed H19 was higher in G1.2/G2.2 medium compared to M16. Conclusion Compared to previous reports utilizing pools of embryos, our study enables us to emphasize a high individual variability of blastocysts in

  17. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  18. Oct4/Sox2 binding sites contribute to maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal igf2/h19 imprinting control region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Zimmerman

    Full Text Available A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors.

  19. Fracture prediction using modified mohr coulomb theory for non-linear strain paths using AA3104-H19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Robert; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2016-08-01

    Experiment results from uniaxial tensile tests, bi-axial bulge tests, and disk compression tests for a beverage can AA3104-H19 material are presented. The results from the experimental tests are used to determine material coefficients for both Yld2000 and Yld2004 models. Finite element simulations are developed to study the influence of materials model on the predicted earing profile. It is shown that only the YLD2004 model is capable of accurately predicting the earing profile as the YLD2000 model only predicts 4 ears. Excellent agreement with the experimental data for earing is achieved using the AA3104-H19 material data and the Yld2004 constitutive model. Mechanical tests are also conducted on the AA3104-H19 to generate fracture data under different stress triaxiality conditions. Tensile tests are performed on specimens with a central hole and notched specimens. Torsion of a double bridge specimen is conducted to generate points near pure shear conditions. The Nakajima test is utilized to produce points in bi-axial tension. The data from the experiments is used to develop the fracture locus in the principal strain space. Mapping from principal strain space to stress triaxiality space, principal stress space, and polar effective plastic strain space is accomplished using a generalized mapping technique. Finite element modeling is used to validate the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model in the polar space. Models of a hole expansion during cup drawing and a cup draw/reverse redraw/expand forming sequence demonstrate the robustness of the modified PEPS fracture theory for the condition with nonlinear forming paths and accurately predicts the onset of failure. The proposed methods can be widely used for predicting failure for the examples which undergo nonlinear strain path including rigid-packaging and automotive forming.

  20. Deletional rearrangement in the human T-cell receptor. cap alpha. -chain locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Villartay, J.P.; Lewis, D.; Hockett, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Cohen, D.I.

    1987-12-01

    The antigen-specific receptor on the surface of mature T lymphocytes is a heterodimer consisting of polypeptides termed ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... In the course of characterizing human T-cell tumors with an immature (CD4/sup -/, CD8/sup -/) surface phenotype, the authors detected a 2-kilobase ..cap alpha..-related transcript. Analysis of cDNA clones corresponding to this transcript established that a genetic element (which they call TEA, for T early ..cap alpha..) located between the ..cap alpha..-chain variable- and joining-region genes had been spliced to the ..cap alpha.. constant region. The TEA transcript is present early in thymocyte ontogeny, and its expression declines during T-cell maturation. More important, the TEA area functions as an active site for rearrangement within the ..cap alpha.. gene locus. Blot hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested DNA with a TEA probe revealed a narrowly limited pattern of rearrangement in polyclonal thymic DNA, surprisingly different from the pattern expected for the mature ..cap alpha.. gene with its complex diversity. These DNA blots also showed that TEA is generally present in the germ-line configuration in cells expressing the ..gamma..delta heterodimeric receptor and is deleted from mature (..cap alpha beta..-expressing) T-lymphocyte tumors and lines. Moreover, the TEA transcript lacked a long open reading frame for protein but instead possessed multiple copies of a repetitive element resembling those utilized in the heavy-chain class switch of the immunoglobulin genes. The temporal nature of the rearrangements and expression detected by TEA suggests that this recombination could mediate a transition between immature (..gamma..delta-expressing) T cells and mature (..cap alpha beta..-expressing) T cells.

  1. Synthetic Human β-Globin 5'HS2 Constructs Function as Partially Active Locus Control Regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Ellis (James); D. Talbot; N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTransgenes linked to the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) are transcribed in a copy-dependent manner that is independent of the integration site. It has previously been shown that the LCR 5'HS2 region does not require its NF-E2 dimer binding site for LCR activity. In this paper we

  2. Basic Data Report for Drillholes on the H-19 Hydropad (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant--WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.W.; Cole, D.L.; Holt, R.M.

    1998-10-09

    Seven holes were drilled and wells (H-19b0, H-19b2, H-19b3, H-19b4, H-19b5, H-19b6, and H-19b7) were constructed on the H-19 hydropad to conduct field activities in support of the Culebra Transport Program. These wells were drilled and completed on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site during February to September 1995. An eighth hole, H-19b1, was drilled but had to be abandoned before the target depth was reached because of adverse hole conditions. The geologic units penetrated at the H-19 location include surficial deposits of Holocene age, rocks from the Dockum Group of Upper Triassic age, the Dewey Lake Redbeds, and Rustler Formation of the Permian age. The Rustler Formation has been further divided into five informal members which include the Forty-niner Member, Magenta Member, Tamarisk Member, Culebra Dolomite Member, and an unnamed lower member. The Rustler Formation, particularly the Culebra Dolomite Member, is considered critical for hydrologic site characterization. The Culebra is the most transmissive saturated unit above the WIPP repository and, as such, is considered to be the most likely pathway for radionuclide transport to the accessible environment in the unlikely event the repository is breached. Seven cores from the Culebra were recovered during drilling activities at the H-19 hydropad and detailed descriptions of these cores were made. On the basis of geologic descriptions, four hydrostratigraphic units were identified in the Culebra cores and were correlated with the mapping units from the WFP air intake shaft. The entire length of H-19b1 was cored and was described in detail. During coring of H-19b1, moisture was encountered in the upper part of the Dewey Lake Redbeds. A 41-ft-thick section of this core was selected for detailed description to qualify the geologic conditions related to perched water in the upper Dewey Lake. In addition to cuttings and core, a suite of geophysical logs run on the drillholes was used to identify and

  3. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  4. H19DMR methylation analysis in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and isolated hemihyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinícius de Matos Gomes

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS is a congenital overgrowth disorder of complex and heterogeneous etiology involving alterations in genomic imprinting. The cause of isolated hemihyperplasia (IHH is unknown but might be due to partial or incomplete expression of BWS because both these conditions share predisposition for the same types of neoplasias. We investigated the methylation pattern of the putative imprinting control region H19DMR using peripheral blood from 12 patients, six with clinical features of BWS and six with IHH. All the patients had normal karyotypes and paternal uniparental disomy (UPD was excluded in 10 informative cases. The normal H19DMR methylation pattern was found in eight informative patients, indicating that H19DMR methylation was not related to their condition. We suggest that the absence of neoplasias in the BWS and IHH patients studied might be related to the absence of UPD and to the presence of normal H19DMR methylation.

  5. Elevated expression of H19 and Igf2 in the female mouse eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Reinius

    Full Text Available The catalogue of genes expressed at different levels in the two sexes is growing, and the mechanisms underlying sex differences in regulation of the mammalian transcriptomes are being explored. Here we report that the expression of the imprinted non-protein-coding maternally expressed gene H19 was female-biased specifically in the female mouse eye (1.9-fold, p = 3.0E-6 while not being sex-biased in other somatic tissues. The female-to-male expression fold-change of H19 fell in the range expected from an effect of biallelic versus monoallelic expression. Recently, the possibility of sex-specific parent-of-origin allelic expression has been debated. This led us to hypothesize that H19 might express biallelically in the female mouse eye, thus escape its silencing imprint on the paternal allele specifically in this tissue. We therefore performed a sex-specific imprinting assay of H19 in female and male eye derived from a cross between Mus musculus and Mus spretus. However, this analysis demonstrated that H19 was exclusively expressed from the maternal gene copy, disproving the escape hypothesis. Instead, this supports that the female-biased expression of H19 is the result of upregulation of the single maternal. Furthermore, if H19 would have been expressed from both gene copies in the female eye, an associated downregulation of Insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2 was expected, since H19 and Igf2 compete for a common enhancer element located in the H19/Igf2 imprinted domain. On the contrary we found that also Igf2 was significantly upregulated in its expression in the female eye (1.2-fold, p = 6.1E-3, in further agreement with the conclusion that H19 is monoallelically elevated in females. The female-biased expression of H19 and Igf2 specifically in the eye may contribute to our understanding of sex differences in normal as well as abnormal eye physiology and processes.

  6. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. The imprinting marks are protected from global demethylation taking place during pre-implantation development before being reset in primordial germ cells. However, it...

  7. Cohesin is required for higher-order chromatin conformation at the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Nativio (Raffaella); K.S. Wendt (Kerstin); Y. Ito (Yoko); J.E. Huddleston (Joanna); S. Uribe-Lewis (Santiago); K. Woodfine (Kathryn); C. Krueger (Christel); W. Reik (Wolf); J.M. Peters; A. Murrell (Adele)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCohesin is a chromatin-associated protein complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion by connecting replicated DNA molecules. Cohesin also has important roles in gene regulation, but the mechanistic basis of this function is poorly understood. In mammalian genomes, cohesin

  8. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  9. DNA methylation in the CTCF-binding site I and the expression pattern of the H19 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Leda I C V; Javaroni, Afonso C; Nishimoto, Inês N

    2005-01-01

    Loss of allele-specific expression by the imprinted genes IGF2 and H19 has been correlated with a differentially methylated region (DMR) upstream to the H19 gene. The H19-DMR contains seven potential CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites. CTCF is a chromatin insulator and a multifunctional...... of imprinting. We detected a significant correlation (P = 0.041, Fisher's exact test) between H19 expression and tumor recurrence. Among H19 positive cases, six were T2, in which five developed recurrence and/or metastasis. Inversely, in the group of tumors that showed no H19 gene expression, 5 out of 24 were T...

  10. Rat Mcs5a is a compound quantitative trait locus with orthologous human loci that associate with breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, David J.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Aperavich, Beth A.; Zan, Yunhong; Haag, Jill D.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M.; Mau, Bob; Chen, Kai-Shun; Baynes, Caroline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Doug F.; Ponder, Bruce A.; Gould, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is a polygenic trait. To identify breast cancer modifier alleles that have a high population frequency and low penetrance we used a comparative genomics approach. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were initially identified by linkage analysis in a rat mammary carcinogenesis model followed by verification in congenic rats carrying the specific QTL allele under study. The Mcs5a locus was identified by fine-mapping Mcs5 in a congenic model. Here we characterize the Mcs5a locus, which when homozygous for the Wky allele, reduces mammary cancer risk by 50%. The Mcs5a locus is a compound QTL with at least two noncoding interacting elements: Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2. The resistance phenotype is only observed in rats carrying at least one copy of the Wky allele of each element on the same chromosome. Mcs5a1 is located within the ubiquitin ligase Fbxo10, whereas Mcs5a2 includes the 5′ portion of Frmpd1. Resistant congenic rats show a down-regulation of Fbxo10 in the thymus and an up-regulation of Frmpd1 in the spleen. The association of the Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2 human orthologs with breast cancer was tested in two population-based breast cancer case-control studies (≈12,000 women). The minor alleles of rs6476643 (MCS5A1) and rs2182317 (MCS5A2) were independently associated with breast cancer risk. The minor allele of rs6476643 increases risk, whereas the rs2182317 minor allele decreases risk. Both alleles have a high population frequency and a low penetrance toward breast cancer risk. PMID:17404222

  11. Maternal mRNA expression levels of H19 are inversely associated with risk of macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Yu, Yang; Xun, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Guanghua; Wang, Qiuwei

    2014-06-29

    To investigate the associations between the mRNA levels of H19 in term placenta and risk of macrosomia. Term placentas were collected from 37 macrosomia and 37 matched neonates with normal birth weight (controls) born in Changzhou Women and Children Health Hospital, Jiangsu province, P. R. China from March 1 to June 30, 2008. The mRNA levels of H19 in those placentas were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Simple and multiple logistic regression models were used to explore the risk factors in the development of macrosomia. All analyses were performed using Stata 10.0 (StataCorp, College Station, Texas, USA). The average H19 mRNA level of the macrosomia group was 1.450 ±0.456 while in the control group it was 2.080 ±1.296. Based on the result of Student's t test, there was a significant difference in H19 mRNA level between the macrosomia group and the control group (p = 0.008). After controlling for potential confounders, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia for those in the highest tertile of H19 mRNA level was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02-0.59) when compared to those in the lowest tertile (p for linear trend = 0.009). The term placental H19 mRNA levels were inversely related to the occurrence of macrosomia. Our findings suggest that the low expression of H19 mRNA may contribute to the development of macrosomia.

  12. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Daniel; Schwarz, Stefan; Bergonier, Dominique; Brisabois, Anne; Feßler, Andrea T; Gilbert, Florence B; Kadlec, Kristina; Lebeau, Benoit; Loisy-Hamon, Fabienne; Treilles, Michaël; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs) and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398) previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51), representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  13. High throughput multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA of Staphylococcus aureus from human, animal and food sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sobral

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, a relevant pathogen in veterinary medicine, and a major cause of food poisoning. Epidemiological investigation tools are needed to establish surveillance of S. aureus strains in humans, animals and food. In this study, we investigated 145 S. aureus isolates recovered from various animal species, disease conditions, food products and food poisoning events. Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA, known to be highly efficient for the genotyping of human S. aureus isolates, was used and shown to be equally well suited for the typing of animal S. aureus isolates. MLVA was improved by using sixteen VNTR loci amplified in two multiplex PCRs and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis ensuring a high throughput and high discriminatory power. The isolates were assigned to twelve known clonal complexes (CCs and--a few singletons. Half of the test collection belonged to four CCs (CC9, CC97, CC133, CC398 previously described as mostly associated with animals. The remaining eight CCs (CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15, CC25, CC30, CC45, CC51, representing 46% of the animal isolates, are common in humans. Interestingly, isolates responsible for food poisoning show a CC distribution signature typical of human isolates and strikingly different from animal isolates, suggesting a predominantly human origin.

  14. Identification and regional localization of a human IMP dehydrogenase-like locus (IMPHDL1) at 16p13. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doggett, N.A.; Tesmer, J.G.; Duesing, L.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Callen, D.F.; Chen, Z.L.; Moore, S. (Adelaide Children' s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)); Stallings, R.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Sequence-tagged sites (STS)s are versatile chromosomal markers for a variety of genome mapping efforts. In this report, the authors describe a randomly generated STS (323F4) from human chromosome 16 genomic DNA that has 90.0% sequence identity to the type I human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) gene and 72% identity to the type II human inosine-5[prime]-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH2) gene. Additional sequencing by primer walking has provided a total of 1380 bp of the human chromosome 16 sequence. The IMPDH-like sequence 323F4 was regionally localized by PCR analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing different portions of human chromosome 16 to 16p13.3-13.12, between the breakpoints found in hybrids CY196/CY197 and CY198. This regional mapping assignment was further refined to subband 16p13.3 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization using cosmid 323F4 as a probe. The authors conclude that a third, previously undescribed IMPDH locus, termed IMPDHL1, exists at human chromosome 16p13.13. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. A Polymer Physics Investigation of the Architecture of the Murine Orthologue of the 7q11.23 Human Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Chiariello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the developments of novel technologies, such as Hi-C or GAM methods, allowed to discover that chromosomes in the nucleus of mammalian cells have a complex spatial organization, encompassing the functional contacts between genes and regulators. In this work, we review recent progresses in chromosome modeling based on polymer physics to understand chromatin structure and folding mechanisms. As an example, we derive in mouse embryonic stem cells the full 3D structure of the Bmp7 locus, a genomic region that plays a key role in osteoblastic differentiation. Next, as an application to Neuroscience, we present the first 3D model for the mouse orthologoue of the Williams–Beuren syndrome 7q11.23 human locus. Deletions and duplications of the 7q11.23 region generate neurodevelopmental disorders with multi-system involvement and variable expressivity, and with autism. Understanding the impact of such mutations on the rewiring of the interactions of genes and regulators could be a new key to make sense of their related diseases, with potential applications in biomedicine.

  16. Developmentally-regulated extended domains of DNA hypomethylation encompass highly transcribed genes of the human β-globin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J.; Hsu, Mei; Richardson, Christine A.; Olivier, Emmanuel N.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has long been implicated in developmental β-globin gene regulation. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is unclear, especially since these genes do not contain CpG islands. This has led us to propose and test the hypothesis that, just as for histone modifications, developmentally-specific changes in human β-like globin gene expression are associated with long-range changes in DNA methylation. Methods Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine the methylation state of individual CpG dinucleotides across the β-globin locus in uncultured primary human erythroblasts from fetal liver and bone marrow, and in primitive-like erythroid cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Results β-globin locus CpGs are generally highly methylated but domains of DNA hypomethylation spanning thousands of base pairs are established around the most highly expressed genes during each developmental stage. These large domains of DNA hypomethylation are found within domains of histone modifications associated with gene expression. We also find hypomethylation of a small proportion of γ-globin promoters in adult erythroid cells, suggesting a mechanism by which adult erythroid cells produce fetal hemoglobin. Conclusion This is one of the first reports to show that changes in DNA methylation patterns across large domains around non-CpG island genes correspond with changes in developmentally-regulated histone modifications and gene expression. This data supports a new model in which extended domains of DNA hypomethylation and active histone marks are coordinately established to achieve developmentally-specific gene expression of non-CpG island genes. PMID:19460471

  17. Prenatal famine and genetic variation are independently and additively associated with DNA methylation at regulatory loci within IGF2/H19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar W Tobi

    Full Text Available Both the early environment and genetic variation may affect DNA methylation, which is one of the major molecular marks of the epigenome. The combined effect of these factors on a well-defined locus has not been studied to date. We evaluated the association of periconceptional exposure to the Dutch Famine of 1944-45, as an example of an early environmental exposure, and single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the genetic variation (tagging SNPs with DNA methylation at the imprinted IGF2/H19 region, a model for an epigenetically regulated genomic region. DNA methylation was measured at five differentially methylated regions (DMRs that regulate the imprinted status of the IGF2/H19 region. Small but consistent differences in DNA methylation were observed comparing 60 individuals with periconceptional famine exposure with unexposed same-sex siblings at all IGF2 DMRs (P(BH<0.05 after adjustment for multiple testing, but not at the H19 DMR. IGF2 DMR0 methylation was associated with IGF2 SNP rs2239681 (P(BH = 0.027 and INS promoter methylation with INS SNPs, including rs689, which tags the INS VNTR, suggesting a mechanism for the reported effect of the VNTR on INS expression (P(BH = 3.4 × 10(-3. Prenatal famine and genetic variation showed similar associations with IGF2/H19 methylation and their contributions were additive. They were small in absolute terms (<3%, but on average 0.5 standard deviations relative to the variation in the population. Our analyses suggest that environmental and genetic factors could have independent and additive similarly sized effects on DNA methylation at the same regulatory site.

  18. Visualizing allele-specific expression in single cells reveals epigenetic mosaicism in an H19 loss-of-imprinting mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginart, Paul; Kalish, Jennifer M; Jiang, Connie L; Yu, Alice C; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Raj, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    Imprinting is a classic mammalian epigenetic phenomenon that results in expression from a single parental allele. Imprinting defects can lead to inappropriate expression from the normally silenced allele, but it remains unclear whether every cell in a mutant organism follows the population average, which would have profound implications for human imprinting disorders. Here, we apply a new fluorescence in situ hybridization method that measures allele-specific expression in single cells to address this question in mutants exhibiting aberrant H19/Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) imprinting. We show that mutant primary embryonic mouse fibroblasts are comprised of two subpopulations: one expressing both H19 alleles and another expressing only the maternal copy. Only in the latter cell population is Igf2 expression detected. Furthermore, the two subpopulations are stable in that cells do not interconvert between the two expression patterns. Combined small input methylation analysis and transcriptional imaging revealed that these two mutant subpopulations exhibit distinct methylation patterns at their imprinting control regions. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation reduced the proportion of monoallelic cells. Importantly, we observed that the same two subpopulations are also present in vivo within murine cardiac tissue. Our results establish that imprinting disorders can display striking single-cell heterogeneity in their molecular phenotypes and suggest that such heterogeneity may underlie epigenetic mosaicism in human imprinting disorders.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglian Ge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-11-29

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  1. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bee Yong; Ahmad, Norazah; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Thong, Kwai Lin; Koh, Xiu Pei; Mohd Noor, Azura

    2015-06-02

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. It can cause acute febrile illness in human and is a major health problem. Studies in human brucellosis in Malaysia is limited and so far no genotyping studies has been done on Brucella isolates. The aim of the study was to determine the genetic diversity among Brucella species isolated from human brucellosis, obtained over a 6-year period (2009-2014). In this study, the genotypic characteristics of 43 human Brucella melitensis isolates were analysed using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) which consisted of eight minisatellite loci (panel 1) and eight microsatellite loci; panels 2A (3 microsatellite loci) and panel 2B (5 microsatellite loci). Two human Brucella suis isolates were also investigated using the MLVA assay. Using panel 1 (MLVA8), two genotypes namely genotype 43 and 44 were obtained from the 43 B. melitensis isolates. Using the combination of panels 1 and 2A loci (MLVA11), two genotypes were obtained while using the complete panels 1, 2A and 2B, nine genotypes were obtained. The polymorphisms in using the complete panels (MLVA16) were observed in three loci from panel 2B, which showed a diversity index higher than 0.17. All B. melitensis isolates were closely related to the East Mediterranean group. For B. suis isolates, only genotype 6 and genotype 33 were obtained using panel 1 and MLVA11 respectively. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a low genetic diversity among B. melitensis and B. suis isolates from human patients. Based on the MLVA16 assay, B. melitensis belonging to the East Mediterranean group is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in our Malaysian patients. To our knowledge, this is the first genotyping study of human Brucella isolates in Malaysia.

  2. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N; Durmaz, Riza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaslioglu, Ergin; Uyanik, M Hamidullah; Aliskan, Hikmet; Yasar, Ekrem; Bayramoglu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V

    2011-09-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16(Orsay)) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16(Orsay) yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group.

  3. Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Genotyping of Human Brucella Isolates from Turkey▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Selçuk; Ivanov, Ivan N.; Durmaz, Rıza; Bayraktar, Mehmet Refik; Ayaşlıoğlu, Ergin; Uyanık, M. Hamidullah; Alışkan, Hikmet; Yaşar, Ekrem; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Arslantürk, Ahmet; Vergnaud, Gilles; Kantardjiev, Todor V.

    2011-01-01

    A multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to investigate the epidemiological relationship and genetic diversity among 162 human Brucella isolates collected from all geographic regions of Turkey in an 8-year period (2001 to 2008). The isolates were genotyped by using an MLVA assay developed in Orsay, France (MLVA-16Orsay) including eight minisatellite (panel 1) and eight microsatellite (panel 2, subdivided into 2A and 2B) markers. Panels 1 and 2A distinguish 14 genotypes; two of these represented 85% of the strains. Panel 2B displayed a very high discriminatory power. Three loci from panel 2B had diversity index values higher than 0.74. MLVA-16Orsay yielded 105 genotypes; 73 were represented by a unique isolate, and 32 included two to eight isolates. The isolates from different patients within the same outbreak or from the same patient before first-line therapy and after relapse showed identical genotypes. A number of MLVA genotypes appeared to be partially restricted to some geographic areas and displayed no annual variation, possibly reflecting persistence of genotypes in certain areas for a time span of at least a decade. This study, representing the first molecular typing results of human Brucella isolates from Turkey, indicated that Turkish human Brucella melitensis isolates were most closely related to the neighboring countries' isolates included in the East Mediterranean group. PMID:21795514

  4. Igf2/H19 Imprinting Control Region (ICR: An Insulator or a Position-Dependent Silencer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Banerjee

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The imprinting control region (ICR located far upstream of the H19 gene, in conjunction with enhancers, modulates the transcription of Igf2 and H19 genes in an allele-specific manner. On paternal inheritance, the methylated ICR silences the H19 gene and indirectly facilitates transcription from the distant Igf2 promoter, whereas on the maternal chromosome the unmethylated ICR, together with enhancers, activates transcription of the H19 gene and thereby contributes to the repression of Igf2. This repression of maternal Igf2 has recently been postulated to be due to a chromatin boundary or insulator function of the unmethylated ICR. Central to the insulator model is the site-specific binding of a ubiquitous nuclear factor CTCF which exhibits remarkable flexibility in functioning as transcriptional activator or silencer. We suggest that the ICR positioned close to the enhancers in an episomal context might function as a transcriptional silencer by virtue of interaction of CTCF with its modifiers such as SIN3A and histone deacetylases. Furthermore, a localised folded chromatin structure resulting from juxtaposition of two disparate regulatory sequences (enhancer ICR could be the mechanistic basis of ICR-mediated position-dependent (ICR-promoter transcriptional repression in transgenic Drosophila.

  5. Construction and characterization of a H19 epitope point mutant of MDV CVI988/Rispens strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z; Qin, A; Lee, L F; Wu, P; Kung, H J

    1999-01-01

    A recombinant virus, CVI/rpp38, was developed from the Marek's disease virus (MDV) CVI988/Rispens vaccine strain. This recombinant was obtained by transfection of CVI988/Rispens-infected chick embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) with plasmid pHA25 DNA containing pp38 gene from GA strain of MDV. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) H19 which reacts with pp38 from GA but not with that from CVI988 was used to screen for recombinant viruses in transfected cell culture plates by immunofluorescent assay (IFA). A positive plaque was isolated, propagated, and purified from cell-free virus particles after sonication of infected CEFs. The mutant CVI/rpp38 was not only reactive with MAb H19 in IFA but also in immunoprecipitation. A 38 kDa protein was immunoprecipitated from the CVI/rpp38 mutant virus but not from parental CVI988 virus. DNA sequence of the mutant virus showed a substitution of G at position 320 by a resulting in a change of an amino acid residue from arginine to glutamine. Comparison of nucleotide sequence of pp38 from strains GA, Md5 and Md11/75c/R2 and CVI988 revealed change to glutamine in this position. The result of this study provides a direct evidence for the location of the identified H19 epitope in pp38. This mutant is potentially useful to further explore the biological function of pp38 and its H19 epitope.

  6. A highly polymorphic locus in human DNA revealed by cosmid-derived probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Litt, M.; White, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Human gene mapping would be greatly facilitated if marker loci with sufficient heterozygosity were generally available. As a source of such markers, we have used cosmids from a human genomic library. We have developed a rapid method for screening random cosmids to identify those that are homologous to genomic regions especially rich in restriction fragment length polymorphisms. This method allows whole cosmids to be used as probes against Southern transfers of genomic DNA; regions of cosmid p...

  7. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhu

    Full Text Available Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG. Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine.

  8. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  9. The human HNRPD locus maps to 4q21 and encodes a highly conserved protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, L A; Li, M J; DePace, A; Bray-Ward, P; Maizels, N

    1998-05-01

    The hnRNP D protein interacts with nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Like many other proteins that interact with RNA, it contains RBD (or "RRM") domains and arg-gly-gly (RGG) motifs. We have examined the organization and localization of the human and murine genes that encode the hnRNP D protein. Comparison of the predicted sequences of the hnRNP D proteins in human and mouse shows that they are 96.9% identical (98.9% similar). This very high level of conservation suggests a critical function for hnRNP D. Sequence analysis of the human HNRPD gene shows that the protein is encoded by eight exons and that two additional exons specify sequences in the 3' UTR. Use of two of the coding exons is determined by alternative splicing of the HNRPD mRNA. The human HNRPD gene maps to 4q21. The mouse Hnrpd gene maps to the F region of chromosome 3, which is syntenic with the human 4q21 region.

  10. Structure of the human G gamma-A gamma-delta-beta-globin gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Little, P.F.R.; Annison, F.; Williamson, R.; Flavell, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    We have constructed a physical map of the human G gamma-, A gamma-, delta-, and beta-globin genes. The previously described maps of the fetal and adult beta-like globin genes have been linked to one another by identification of a DNA fragment, generated by BamHI, that contains part of each of the A

  11. Phylogenetic divergence of CD47 interactions with human signal regulatory protein alpha reveals locus of species specificity. Implications for the binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2007-01-19

    Cell-cell interactions between ubiquitously expressed integrin-associated protein (CD47) and its counterreceptor signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha) on phagocytes regulate a wide range of adhesive signaling processes, including the inhibition of phagocytosis as documented in mice. We show that CD47-SIRPalpha binding interactions are different between mice and humans, and we exploit phylogenetic divergence to identify the species-specific binding locus on the immunoglobulin domain of human CD47. All of the studies are conducted in the physiological context of membrane protein display on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Novel quantitative flow cytometry analyses with CD47-green fluorescent protein and soluble human SIRPalpha as a probe show that neither human CD47 nor SIRPalpha requires glycosylation for interaction. Human CD47-expressing CHO cells spread rapidly on SIRPalpha-coated glass surfaces, correlating well with the spreading of primary human T cells. In contrast, CHO cells expressing mouse CD47 spread minimally and show equally weak binding to soluble human SIRPalpha. Further phylogenetic analyses and multisite substitutions of the CD47 Ig domain show that human to cow mutation of a cluster of seven residues on adjacent strands near the middle of the domain decreases the association constant for human SIRPalpha to about one-third that of human CD47. Direct tests of cell-cell adhesion between human monocytes and CD47-displaying CHO cells affirm the species specificity as well as the importance of the newly identified binding locus in cell-cell interactions.

  12. The F7 gene and clotting factor VII levels: dissection of a human quantitative trait locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jose Manuel; Almasy, Laura; Souto, Juan Carlos; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Blangero, John

    2005-10-01

    Localization of human quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is now routine. However, identifying their functional DNA variants is still a formidable challenge. We present a complete dissection of a human QTL using novel statistical techniques to infer the most likely functional polymorphisms of a QTL that influence plasma levels of clotting factor VII (FVII), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Resequencing of 15 kb in and around the F7 gene identified 49 polymorphisms, which were then genotyped in 398 people. Using a Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) method, we identified four to seven functional variants that completely account for this QTL. These variants include both rare coding variants and more common, potentially regulatory polymorphisms in intronic and promoter regions.

  13. Analysis and comparison of the mouse and human immunoglobulin heavy chain JH-Cmu-Cdelta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, B F; Richards, J E; Durfee, T D; Bansberg, J; Wells, J; Gilliam, A C; Chen, H L; Clausell, A; Tucker, P W; Blattner, F R

    1996-02-01

    We report here 23,686 bases of contiguous DNA sequences from the mouse germline immunoglobulin heavy chain (H) constant (C) mu delta region. The sequence spans the joining (JH) regions, the mu constant region (C mu), the delta constant region (C delta) coding regions, a domain relic, the mu switch region (S mu), seven blocks of simple sequence repeats, a large unique sequence inverted repeat, a large unique sequence forward repeat, and all of the intervening material. A comparison of this 23.7-kb region with the corresponding human C mu/C delta region reveals clear homology in the coding and introns of C mu but not in the 5' flanking J gene segments nor in the intergenic and C delta regions. This mixed pattern of similarity between the human and the mouse sequences contrasts with high levels of similarity found in the T-cell receptor C alpha/C delta region and alpha and beta myosin genes and the very low levels found in the gamma-crystallin, XRCC1, and beta-globin gene clusters. The human and mouse comparison further suggests the incorporation of novel sequences into expressed genes of IgD.

  14. Identification of the human chromosomal region containing the iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly locus by genomic-mismatch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayans, F; Mears, A J; Guo, S W; Pearce, W G; Walter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Genome-mismatch scanning (GMS) is a new method of linkage analysis that rapidly isolates regions of identity between two genomes. DNA molecules from regions of identity by descent from two relatives are isolated based on their ability to form extended mismatch-free heteroduplexes. We have applied this rapid technology to identify the chromosomal region shared by two fifth-degree cousins with autosomal dominant iridogoniodysgenesis anomaly (IGDA), a rare ocular neurocristopathy. Markers on the short arm of human chromosome 6p were recovered, consistent with the results of conventional linkage analysis conducted in parallel, indicating linkage of IGDA to 6p25. Control markers tested on a second human chromosome were not recovered. A GMS error rate of approximately 11% was observed, well within an acceptable range for a rapid, first screening approach, especially since GMS results would be confirmed by family analysis with selected markers from the putative region of identity by descent. These results demonstrate not only the value of this technique in the rapid mapping of human genetic traits, but the first application of GMS to a multicellular organism. Images Figure 2 PMID:9245991

  15. A radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, C.W. III; Cox, D.R.; Kapp, L.; Murnane, J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Cornelis, F.; Julier, C.; Lathrop, M.; James, M.R. (Centre d' Etude du Polymorphisme Humain, Paris (France))

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a high-resolution radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) disease gene loci. The order and intermarker distances of 32 chromosome 11q22-q23 markers were determined by a multipoint maximum likelihood method analysis of the cosegregation of markers in 100 radiation hybrids. The radiation hybrid map of polymorphic loci was consistent with genetic linkage maps of common markers. Several genes, including [alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CBL2, collagenase, dopamine receptor type 2, neural cell adhesion molecule, progesterone receptor, and stromelysins 1 and 2, were placed in relation to previously ordered, genetically mapped polymorphic loci. Five new markers ([alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CJ52.114, CJ52.3, and D11S535) were ordered within the current published flanking markers for the AT group A and group C disease loci. A candidate AT group D gene (ATDC) identified by Kapp et al. was mapped telomeric to THY1, outside the flanking markers identified by multipoint linkage analysis for the major AT locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Efficient CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Generation of Knockin Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Lacking Undesired Mutations at the Targeted Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian T. Merkle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR-Cas9 system has the potential to revolutionize genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, but its advantages and pitfalls are still poorly understood. We systematically tested the ability of CRISPR-Cas9 to mediate reporter gene knockin at 16 distinct genomic sites in hPSCs. We observed efficient gene targeting but found that targeted clones carried an unexpectedly high frequency of insertion and deletion (indel mutations at both alleles of the targeted gene. These indels were induced by Cas9 nuclease, as well as Cas9-D10A single or dual nickases, and often disrupted gene function. To overcome this problem, we designed strategies to physically destroy or separate CRISPR target sites at the targeted allele and developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and eliminate clones harboring deleterious indels at the other allele. This two-pronged approach enables the reliable generation of knockin hPSC reporter cell lines free of unwanted mutations at the targeted locus.

  17. Human lactoferrin efficiently targeted into caprine beta-lactoglobulin locus with transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guo Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To create genetically modified goat as a biopharming source of recombinant human lacotoferrin (hLF with transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Methods TALENs and targeting vector were transferred into cultured fibroblasts to insert hLF cDNA in the goat beta-lactoglobulin (BLG locus with homology-directed repair. The gene targeted efficiency was checked using sequencing and TE7I assay. The bi-allelic gene targeted colonies were isolated and confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, and used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. Results The targeted efficiency for BLG gene was approximately 10%. Among 12 Bi-allelic gene targeted colonies, five were used in first round SCNT and 4 recipients (23% were confirmed pregnant at 30 d. In second round SCNT, 7 (53%, 4 (31%, and 3 (23% recipients were confirmed to be pregnant by ultrasound on 30 d, 60 d, and 90 d. Conclusion This finding signifies the combined use of TALENs and SCNT can generate bi-allelic knock-in fibroblasts that can be cloned in a fetus. Therefore, it might lay the foundation for transgenic hLF goat generation and possible use of their mammary gland as a bioreactor for large-scale production of recombinant hLF.

  18. Dosage-sensitive X-linked locus influences the development of amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, and fear recognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Catriona D; Lawrence, Kate; Thomas, N Simon; Price, Cathy J; Ashburner, John; Friston, Karl J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Oreland, Lars; Skuse, David H

    2003-11-01

    The amygdala, which plays a critical role in emotional learning and social cognition, is structurally and functionally sexually dimorphic in humans. We used magnetic neuroimaging and molecular genetic analyses with healthy subjects and patients possessing X-chromosome anomalies to find dosage-sensitive genes that might influence amygdala development. If such X-linked genes lacked a homologue on the Y-chromosome they would be expressed in one copy in normal 46,XY males and two copies in normal 46,XX females. We showed by means of magnetic neuroimaging that 46,XY males possess significantly increased amygdala volumes relative to normal 46,XX females. However, females with Turner syndrome (45,X) have even larger amygdalae than 46,XY males. This finding implies that haploinsufficiency for one or more X-linked genes influences amygdala development irrespective of a direct or indirect (endocrinological) mechanism involving the Y-chromosome. 45,X females also have increased grey matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, close to a region implicated in emotional learning. They are as poor as patients with bilateral amygdalectomies in the recognition of fear from facial expressions. We attempted to localize the gene(s) responsible for these deficits in X-monosomy by means of a deletion mapping strategy. We studied female patients possessing structural X-anomalies of the short arm. A genetic locus (no greater than 4.96 Mb in size) at Xp11.3 appears to play a key role in amygdala and orbitofrontal structural and (by implication) functional development. Females with partial X-chromosome deletions, in whom this critical locus is deleted, have normal intelligence. Their fear recognition is as poor as that of 45,X females and their amygdalae are correspondingly enlarged. This 4.96 Mb region contains, among others, the genes for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and B (MAOB), which are involved in the oxidative deamination of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine and

  19. Rat Genome Database: a unique resource for rat, human, and mouse quantitative trait locus data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Rajni; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Smith, Jennifer R; Wang, Shur-Jen; Lowry, Timothy F; Petri, Victoria; De Pons, Jeff; Tutaj, Marek; Liu, Weisong; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-09-16

    The rat has been widely used as a disease model in a laboratory setting, resulting in an abundance of genetic and phenotype data from a wide variety of studies. These data can be found at the Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu/), which provides a platform for researchers interested in linking genomic variations to phenotypes. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) form one of the earliest and core datasets, allowing researchers to identify loci harboring genes associated with disease. These QTLs are not only important for those using the rat to identify genes and regions associated with disease, but also for cross-organism analyses of syntenic regions on the mouse and the human genomes to identify potential regions for study in these organisms. Currently, RGD has data on >1,900 rat QTLs that include details about the methods and animals used to determine the respective QTL along with the genomic positions and markers that define the region. RGD also curates human QTLs (>1,900) and houses>4,000 mouse QTLs (imported from Mouse Genome Informatics). Multiple ontologies are used to standardize traits, phenotypes, diseases, and experimental methods to facilitate queries, analyses, and cross-organism comparisons. QTLs are visualized in tools such as GBrowse and GViewer, with additional tools for analysis of gene sets within QTL regions. The QTL data at RGD provide valuable information for the study of mapped phenotypes and identification of candidate genes for disease associations.

  20. A case of Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS): multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, lack of H19 hypomethylation and favourable growth hormone (GH) treatment response

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zoran S. Gucev; Velibor Tasic; Aleksandra Jancevska; Ilija Kirovski

    2009-08-01

    Hypomethylation of the imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at the IGF2/H19 locus on 11p15 is linked to Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS) and/or hemihypertrophy. This SRS patient was born in term with weight of 3500 g (50 percentile) and length 48 cm (>1 SD below the mean). He was first noticed at the age of 10 years for short stature (114.5 cm, $-3.85$ SD), relatively normal head circumference, a classic facial phenotype, hemihypertrophy (2.5 cm thinner left arm and leg in comparison to the right, asymmetric face), moderate clinodactyly and striking thinness (BMI of 15.3). At the age of 30, the body asymmetry ameliorated (1 cm thinner left arm and leg than the right), and BMI normalized (20.5 cm). Methylation analysis was performed by bisulphate treatment of DNA samples, radiolabelled PCR amplification, and digestion of the PCR products using restriction enzymes. The patient had normomethylation, and in addition hypopituitarism, with low levels of growth hormone (GH) (provocative testing before the start and after termination of GH treatment), thyroxin, TSH, FSH, LH and testosterone. The GH was given for six years, growth response was satisfactory and he reached an adult height of 166 cm. This is a first report of hypopituitarism in a patient with SRS without H19 hypomethylation. It seems that the lack of hypomethylation in this hypopituitary SRS patient is responsible, at least partly, for the favourable final adult height under GH treatment.

  1. Trans locus inhibitors limit concomitant polysaccharide synthesis in the human gut symbiont Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Weinacht, Katja G; Comstock, Laurie E

    2010-06-29

    Bacteroides is an abundant genus of bacteria of the human intestinal microbiota. Bacteroides species synthesize a large number of capsular polysaccharides (PS), a biological property not shared with closely related oral species, suggesting importance for intestinal survival. Bacteroides fragilis, for example, synthesizes eight capsular polysaccharides per strain, each of which phase varies via inversion of the promoters located upstream of seven of the eight polysaccharide biosynthesis operons. In a single cell, many of these polysaccharide loci promoters can be simultaneously oriented on for transcription of the downstream biosynthesis operons. Here, we demonstrate that despite the promoter orientations, concomitant transcription of multiple polysaccharide loci within a cell is inhibited. The proteins encoded by the second gene of each of these eight loci, collectively designated the UpxZ proteins, inhibit the synthesis of heterologous polysaccharides. These unique proteins interfere with the ability of UpxY proteins encoded by other polysaccharide loci to function in transcriptional antitermination of their respective operon. The eight UpxZs have different inhibitory spectra, thus establishing a hierarchical regulatory network for polysaccharide synthesis. Limitation of concurrent polysaccharide synthesis strongly suggests that these bacteria evolved this property as an evasion-type mechanism to avoid killing by polysaccharide-targeting factors in the ecosystem.

  2. H19 RNA binds four molecules of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Steffen; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nielsen, Jacob;

    2000-01-01

    attachment sites are clustered within a 700-nucleotide segment encoded by exons 4 and 5. This 3'-terminal segment targets H19 RNA to lamellipodia and perinuclear regions in dispersed fibroblasts where IMP is also localized. The results suggest that IMP participates in H19 RNA localization and provides a link...

  3. Rescue of retinal morphology and function in a humanized mouse at the mouse retinol-binding protein locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shen, Jingling; Wakana, Shigeharu; Araki, Kimi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Lei, Lei; Li, Zhenghua

    2017-01-30

    Retinol-binding protein RBP4 is the specific carrier for retinol in the blood. We previously produced a Rbp4-deficient (Rbp4(-/-)) mouse that showed electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities, accompanied by histological and electron-microscopic changes such as fewer synapses in the inner plexiform layer in the central retina. To address whether human RBP4 gene expression can rescue the phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice, we produced a humanized (Rbp4(hRBP4orf/ hRBP4orf)) mouse with a human RBP4 open reading frame in the mouse Rbp4 locus using a Cre-mutant lox recombination system. In Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice, the tissue-specific expression pattern of hRBP4orf was roughly the same as that of mouse Rbp4. ERG and morphological abnormalities observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice were rescued in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice as early as 7 weeks of age. The temporal expression pattern of hRBP4orf in the liver of Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice was similar to that of mouse Rbp4 in Rbp4(+/+)mice. In contrast, hRBP4orf expression levels in eyes were significantly lower at 6 and 12 weeks of age compared with mouse Rbp4 but were restored to the control levels at 24 weeks. The serum hRBP4 levels in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice were approximately 30% of those in Rbp4(+/+) at all ages examined. In accordance with this finding, the plasma retinol levels remained low in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Retinol accumulation in the liver occurred in control and Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice but was higher in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice at 30 weeks of age. Mouse transthyretin expression was not altered in Rbp4(-/-) or Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Taken together, 30% of the serum RBP4 level was sufficient to correct the abnormal phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 30 January 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2016.156.

  4. Salmeterol and cytokines modulate inositol-phosphate signalling in Human airway smooth muscle cells via regulation at the receptor locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swan Caroline

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR is a key feature of asthma and a causal relationship between airway inflammation and AHR has been identified. The aim of the current study was to clarify the effect of proinflammatory cytokines and asthma medication on primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM inositol phosphate (IPx signalling and define the regulatory loci involved. Methods Primary Human ASM cells were isolated from explants of trachealis muscle from individuals with no history of respiratory disease. The effect of cytokine or asthma medication on histamine or bradykinin induced IPx signalling was assessed by [3H] inositol incorporation. Quantitative Real Time PCR was used to measure mRNA levels of receptors and downstream signalling components. Transcriptional mechanisms were explored using a combination of 5'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5'RACE and promoter-reporter techniques. Results Treatment of Human ASM cells with IL-13, IFNγ or salmeterol for 24 hours lead to a modest augmentation of histamine induced IPx responses (144.3 +/- 9.3, 126.4 +/- 7.5 and 117.7 +/- 5.2%, p i.e. H1 Histamine Receptor (HRH1, B2 Bradykinin Receptor (BDKRB2, Gαq/11 and PLC-β1 identified that a significant induction of receptor mRNA (>2 fold was a feature of these responses explaining the cytokine and spasmogen specificity. The HRH1 and BDKRB2 promoter regions were mapped in ASM and promoter-reporter analyses identified that salmeterol can induce HRH1 (>2 fold and BDKRB2 (2–5 fold transcription. The effect of cytokines on HRH1 and BDKRB2 promoter-reporter expression suggested a more complex regulation of mRNA expression involving additional loci to the core promoter. Conclusion Our results indicate that the spasmogen specific receptor locus may be a key site of regulation determining the magnitude of spasmogen mediated ASM IPx responses during airway inflammation or following asthma medication. These data provide further insight into the

  5. Dynamics of alpha-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34(+) cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Newburger, Peter E; Krause, Diane S; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish serum-free culture conditions for ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34(+) cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression, and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha-globin locus in the developing erythron. A basal Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for expansion and differentiation of the CD34(+) cells. Expression patterns of the alpha- and beta-like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by Western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha-globin locus was investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Human CD34(+) cells in the serum-free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the alpha-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34(+) cells. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (NF-E2) was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (EPO), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after EPO treatment. After 7 days of EPO treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the alpha-globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2, and GATA-1 were restricted to certain hypersensitive sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the alpha-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the alpha-globin locus as CD34(+) cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Our results

  6. lncRNA H19/miR-675 axis regulates cardiomyocyte apoptosis by targeting VDAC1 in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangquan; Wang, Hao; Yao, Biao; Xu, Weiting; Chen, Jianchang; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) and found that the expression of lncRNA H19 was significantly downregulated. The present study was designed to investigate the pathogenic role of H19 in the development of DCM. Overexpression of H19 in diabetic rats attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, and consequently improved left ventricular function. High glucose was associated with reduced H19 expression and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. To explore the molecular mechanisms involved, we performed in vitro experiments using cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that miR-675 expression was decreased in cardiomyocytes transfected with H19 siRNA. The 3′UTR of VDAC1 was cloned downstream of a luciferase reporter construct and cotransfected into HEK293 cells with miR-675 mimic. The results of luciferase assay indicated that VDAC1 might be a direct target of miR-675. The expression of VDAC1 was upregulated in cardiomyocytes transfected with miR-675 antagomir, which consequently promotes cellular apoptosis. Moreover, enforced expression of H19 was found to reduce VDAC1 expression and inhibit apoptosis in cardiomyocytes exposed to high glucose. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that H19/miR-675 axis is involved in the regulation of high glucose-induced apoptosis by targeting VDAC1, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DCM. PMID:27796346

  7. The application of the human beta-globin gene locus control region and murine erythroleukemia cell system to the expression and pharmacological characterization of human endothelin receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Whiting, E; Bath, C; Tang, E; Brennand, J

    1995-06-01

    The cDNAs encoding both A and B subtypes of the human endothelin receptor have been inserted into mammalian cell expression vectors that utilize the human globin gene, locus control region. These constructs have been introduced into murine erythroleukemia cells and inducible high level expression of the receptors has been achieved (approximately 1.5-pM/mg membrane protein and approximately 13,500 binding sites/cell for both receptor subtypes). Cell lines expressing these receptors were obtained on a rapid time scale (3-4 weeks), facilitated by the need for the analysis of only small numbers of cell clones/receptor (approximately 6). Competitive binding assays with endothelin-1 gave IC50s of 130 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-A receptor and 160 +/- 30 pM for endothelin-B receptor. Similar studies with the different isoforms of endothelin, sarafatoxin-S6b and -S6c, BQ123 and BQ3020, all gave the expected selectivity profiles. The IC50s for all compounds were in close agreement with those reported for native receptors. Thus, this expression system, which has several advantages over other described expression systems, is capable of rapidly providing large quantities of receptor for detailed pharmacological analyses or drug screening. In addition, the expressed receptors display the expected pharmacological profiles in the absence of any complicating, competing interactions from other subtypes or binding sites.

  8. The human PINK1 locus is regulated in vivo by a non-coding natural antisense RNA during modulation of mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahlestedt Claes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the PTEN induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 are implicated in early-onset Parkinson's disease. PINK1 is expressed abundantly in mitochondria rich tissues, such as skeletal muscle, where it plays a critical role determining mitochondrial structural integrity in Drosophila. Results Herein we characterize a novel splice variant of PINK1 (svPINK1 that is homologous to the C-terminus regulatory domain of the protein kinase. Naturally occurring non-coding antisense provides sophisticated mechanisms for diversifying genomes and we describe a human specific non-coding antisense expressed at the PINK1 locus (naPINK1. We further demonstrate that PINK1 varies in vivo when human skeletal muscle mitochondrial content is enhanced, supporting the idea that PINK1 has a physiological role in mitochondrion. The observation of concordant regulation of svPINK1 and naPINK1 during in vivo mitochondrial biogenesis was confirmed using RNAi, where selective targeting of naPINK1 results in loss of the PINK1 splice variant in neuronal cell lines. Conclusion Our data presents the first direct observation that a mammalian non-coding antisense molecule can positively influence the abundance of a cis-transcribed mRNA under physiological abundance conditions. While our analysis implies a possible human specific and dsRNA-mediated mechanism for stabilizing the expression of svPINK1, it also points to a broader genomic strategy for regulating a human disease locus and increases the complexity through which alterations in the regulation of the PINK1 locus could occur.

  9. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P; Saunders, Gary I; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J C; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jukema, J Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J M; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline

    2014-08-15

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼ 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated.

  10. Evidence for association of D1S249 locus on human chromosome 1 with the susceptibility to essential hypertension in Han Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Yong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Jeunemaitre, X., Soubrier, F., Kotelevtsev, Y. V. et al., Molecular basis of hypertension: role of angiotensinogen, Cell, 1993, 71: 169.[2]Hingorani, A. D., Sharma, P., Jia, H. et al., Blood pressure and M235T polymorphism of the angiotensinogen gene, Hypertension, 1996, 28: 907.[3]Liu, Y., Zhou, W. Y., Qiu, C. C. et al., Association analysis of polymorphisms of ACE gene and AGT gene with essential hypertension in Chinese Han's population, Chin. Med. Sci. J., 1998, 13(2): 71.[4]Davies, E., Bonnar, D. A., Lathrop, G. M. et al., Human angiotensin II type I receptor locus, CA repeat polymorphism and genetic mapping, Hum. Mol. Genet., 1994, 3: 838.[5]Kainulainen, K., Perola, M., Terwilliger, J. et al., Evidence for involvement of the type I angiotensin II receptor locus in essential hypertension, Hypertension, 1999, 33: 844.[6]Wang, W. Y. S., Zee, R. Y. L., Morris, B. J. et al., Association of angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphism with essential hypertension, Clin. Genet., 1997, 51: 31.[7]Mastana, S., Nunn, J., Angiotensin-converting enzyme deletion polymorphism is associated with hypertension in a sikh population, Human Hered., 1997, 47: 250.[8]Poirier, O., Georges, J. L., Ricard, S. et al., New polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type I receptor gene and their associations with myocardial infarction and blood pressure: the ECTIM study, J. of Hypertension, 1998, 16: 1443.[9]Liu, Y., Qiu, C. C., Zhou, W. Y. et al., Gene polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system in essential hypertension, Chinese Medical Journal, 1999, 112(2): 115.[10] Todd, J. A., Genetic analysis of type I diabetes using whole genome approaches, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1995, 92: 8560.[11] Hanis, C. L., Boerwinkle, E., Chakraborty, R. et al., A genome-wide search for human non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes genes reveals a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 2, Nature Genetics, 1996, 13: 161.[12] Hager, J., Dina, C

  11. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  12. Hypomethylation of the H19 gene causes not only Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) but also isolated asymmetry or an SRS-like phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, J.; Terhal, P.; Bogaard, M.J. van den; Maas, S.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Salieb-Beugelaar, G.; Simon, M.; Letteboer, T.; Smagt, J. van der; Kroes, H.Y.; Mannens, M.

    2006-01-01

    The H19 differentially methylated region (DMR) controls the allele-specific expression of both the imprinted H19 tumor-suppressor gene and the IGF2 growth factor. Hypermethylation of this DMR--and subsequently of the H19 promoter region--is a major cause of the clinical features of gigantism and/or

  13. H19 expression in placenta with pre-eclampsia%印迹基因H19在子痫前期孕妇胎盘组织中的印迹状态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹; 李力; 俞丽丽; 卢林杉; 韩建; 陈星云; 周元国

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨印迹基因H19印迹状态在子痫前期发病中的作用.方法 2007年8月-2008年3月第三军医大学附属大坪医院、西南医院、新桥医院妇产科行剖宫产分娩的子痫前期孕妇24例为子痫前期组(其中轻度子痫前期3例、重度子痫前期21例);同期行择期剖宫产的正常足月孕妇50例为正常晚孕组.采用PCR-RFLP法检测两组孕妇胎盘组织中H19基因的印迹状态,并对子痫前期组H19基因组DNA杂合子小同印迹状态孕妇的血压进行分析.结果 (1)正常晚孕组胎盘组织中有H19基因组DNA杂合子20例(40%),纯合子30例(60%);子痫前期组胎盘组织中有H19基因组DNA杂合子11例(46%),纯合子13例(57%).两组孕妇H19基因组DNA杂合子比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).(2)正常晚孕组20例H19基因组DNA杂合子孕妇全部为单等位基因表达;子痫前期组11例H19基因DNA杂合子孕妇中,有5例(45%)为双等位基因表达,单等位基因表达6例(55%),子痫前期组存在印迹丢失,两组比较,差异有统计学意义(P 0.05 ). (2) All 20 heterozygotes in placenta tissues of the third trimesters are exclusively monoallelically expressed, while 5 cases (45%) in 11 heterozygotes of pre-eclampsia are biallelically expressed (loss of imprinting, LOI). There were significant difference between two groups (P < 0. 01 ). (3) The values of systolic and diastolic pressure of patients with monoallelic expression of H19 were (171 ±9) mm Hg (1 nun Hg =0.133 kPa) and ( 104±8) mm Hg, the values of systolic and diastolic pressure with biallelic expression were ( 194±21 ) mm Hg and ( 124±18) mm Hg. There were significant difference between two groups (P<0.05 ). Conclusion LOI of H19 can be identified in pre-eclamptic placentas and is associated with maternal blood pressures, which implies the involvement of H19 gene LOI in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia and its potential relationship with the severity of the disease.

  14. Polymorphisms in Long Noncoding RNA H19 Contribute to the Protective Effects of Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyun Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The H19 is a kind of long noncoding RNA, which has been implicated in multiple biological functions. However, the associations between genetic variants in H19 and susceptibility of coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP have been seldom reported. In the present study, three potential polymorphisms (rs2067051, rs217727, and rs2839702 in H19 were genotyped in a case-control study including 703 CWP cases and 705 controls. We found that individuals with the H19 rs2067051 CT/TT genotypes showed a decreased risk of CWP compared with those with the CC genotype (adjusted OR = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.49–0.83, p = 0.001. Further stratified analyses revealed that the associations between variant genotypes of rs2067051 and the risk of CWP were more prominent in subjects of non-smokers (adjusted OR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.39–0.79, p = 0.001 and CWP patients with Stage I (adjusted OR = 0.63, 95%CI = 0.46–0.86, p = 0.004. Additionally, the protective effects of H19 rs2067051 were also evident in coal miners both with dust exposure years <25 years (adjusted OR = 0.63, 95%CI = 0.42–0.95, p = 0.026 and ≥25 years (adjusted OR = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.40–0.80, p = 0.001. Our results indicated that rs2067051 in the H19 gene is correlated with a deceased risk of CWP in a Chinese population, which may be a potential genetic marker for prevention and intervention of CWP. Further functional studies are warranted to validate our findings.

  15. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Huguet

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice. After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice. Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing, were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances. We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic

  16. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic

  17. Evidence of a locus for orofacial clefting on human chromosome 6p24 and STS content map of the region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A F; Stephens, R J; Olavesen, M G; Heather, L; Dixon, M J; Magee, A; Flinter, F; Ragoussis, J

    1995-01-01

    Orofacial clefting is genetically complex, no single gene being responsible for all forms. It can, however, result from a single gene defect either as part of a syndrome (e.g. van der Woude syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome) or as an isolated phenotypic effect (e.g. X-linked cleft palate; non-syndromic, autosomal dominant orofacial clefting). Several studies have suggested that chromosome 6p is a candidate region for a locus involved in orofacial clefting. We have used YAC clones from contigs in 6p25-p23 to investigate three unrelated cases of cleft lip and palate coincident with chromosome 6p abnormalities. Case 1 has bilateral cleft lip and palate and a balanced translocation reported as 46,XY,t(6,7)(p23;q36.1). Case 2 has multiple abnormalities including cleft lip and palate and was reported as 46,XX,del(6)(p23;pter). Case 3 has bilateral cleft lip and palate and carries a balanced translocation reported as 46,XX,t(6;9)(p23;q22.3). We have identified two YAC clones, both of which cross the breakpoint in cases 1 and 3 and are deleted in case 2. These clones map to 6p24.3 and therefore suggest the presence of a locus for orofacial clefting in this region. The HGP22 and AP2 genes, potentially involved in face formation, have been found to flank this region, while F13A maps further telomeric in 6p24.3/25.

  18. GDNF在精原干细胞中对H19和A-myb表达的调控研究%Role of GDNF in regulation of expression of H19 and A-myb in spermatogonial stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查巍巍; 曹静萍; 张迪; 冯立新; 程金科

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the regulation of expression of H19 and A-myb by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (CDNF), and explore the molecular mechanism of self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells regulated by GDNF. Methods Spermatogonial stem cells were isolated, identified and cultured from testes of 6-day-old mice with mixed enzyme digestion and differential plating procedure. Spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogonial stem cells pretreated with LY294002, inhibitor of phosphotylinosital 3 kinase/protein kinase B(PI3K/Akt), were stimulated with CDNF, and the expression of H19 and A-myb in spermatogonial stem cells was detected by RT-PCR. Results Spermatogonial stem cells were successfully isolated and cultured. The expression of H19 and A-myb was upregulated in spermatogonial stem cells after stimulation with CDNF, while there was no significant change in the expression of H19 and A-myb in spermatogonial stem cells after pretreatment with LY294002. Conclusion GDNF can upregulate the expression of H19 and A-myb via PI3K/ AKT signal pathway in cultured mouse spermatogonial stem cells.%目的 通过研究胶质细胞神经源性营养因子(GDNF)对H19和A-myb表达的调控,探讨GDNF调节精原干细胞自我更新的分子机制.方法 采用混合酶消化和差速贴壁法从出生后6d的小鼠睾丸中分离、鉴定并培养精原干细胞.用GDNF分别刺激精原干细胞和经磷酸肌醇3激酶/蛋白激酶B(PI3K/Akt)通路抑制剂LY294002预处理的精原干细胞后,采用RT-PCR技术检测细胞H19和A-myb的表达.结果 相关鉴定分析证实分离培养的细胞为精原干细胞.RT-PCR检测结果显示:GDNF刺激下的精原干细胞的H19和A-myb表达均显著上调,而经LY294002预处理的精原干细胞在GDNF刺激下其H19和A-myb的表达无明显变化.结论 在体外培养的小鼠精原干细胞中,GDNF通过PI3 K/A kt信号通路上调H19和A-myb的表达.

  19. Complete biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region position results in fetal growth retardation and perinatal lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR functions as an insulator exclusively in the unmethylated maternal allele, where enhancer-blocking by CTCF protein prevents the interaction between the Igf2 promoter and the distant enhancers. DNA methylation inhibits CTCF binding in the paternal ICR allele. Two copies of the chicken β-globin insulator (ChβGI(2 are capable of substituting for the enhancer blocking function of the ICR. Insulation, however, now also occurs upon paternal inheritance, because unlike the H19 ICR, the (ChβGI(2 does not become methylated in fetal male germ cells. The (ChβGI(2 is a composite insulator, exhibiting enhancer blocking by CTCF and chromatin barrier functions by USF1 and VEZF1. We asked the question whether these barrier proteins protected the (ChβGI(2 sequences from methylation in the male germ line. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genetically dissected the ChβGI in the mouse by deleting the binding sites USF1 and VEZF1. The methylation of the mutant versus normal (ChβGI(2 significantly increased from 11% to 32% in perinatal male germ cells, suggesting that the barrier proteins did have a role in protecting the (ChβGI(2 from methylation in the male germ line. Contrary to the H19 ICR, however, the mutant (mChβGI(2 lacked the potential to attain full de novo methylation in the germ line and to maintain methylation in the paternal allele in the soma, where it consequently functioned as a biallelic insulator. Unexpectedly, a stricter enhancer blocking was achieved by CTCF alone than by a combination of the CTCF, USF1 and VEZF1 sites, illustrated by undetectable Igf2 expression upon paternal transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this in vivo model, hypomethylation at the ICR position together with fetal growth retardation mimicked the human Silver-Russell syndrome. Importantly, late fetal/perinatal death occurred arguing that strict biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 ICR position is not

  20. Association of genetic variants in lncRNA H19 with risk of colorectal cancer in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixiao; Du, Mulong; Zhu, Lingjun; Chu, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhengdong; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) gene, H19, has been involving in multiple biological functions, which also plays a vital role in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. However, the association between genetic variants in H19 and colorectal cancer susceptibility has not been reported. In this study, we aim to explore whether H19 polymorphisms are related to the susceptibility of colorectal cancer. Methods We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the association between four selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs2839698, rs3024270, rs217727, and rs2735971) in H19 and the risk of colorectal cancer in a Chinese population. Results We found that individuals with rs2839698 A allele had a significantly increased risk of colorectal cancer, compared to those carrying G allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05–1.36 in additive model]. Further stratified analyses revealed that colon tumor site, well differentiated grade and Duke's stage of C/D were significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (P cancer, which may be a potential biomarker for predicting colorectal cancer susceptibility. PMID:27027436

  1. Genomic organization of the human osteopontin gene: Exclusion of the locus from a causative role in the pathogenesis of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, A.H.; Edwards, S.J.; Murray, J.C. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is the principal phosphorylated glycoprotein of bone that is also expressed in a limited number of other tissues including dentine. In the current investigation the authors report the genomic organization of the SPP1 gene, which comprises seven exons, six of which contain coding sequence. The splice sites for exon donor and acceptor positions are in close agreement with previously published consensus sequences. Comparison of the human gene with its murine and bovine counterparts revealed a highly homologous organization. A highly informative short tandem repeat polymorphism isolated at the SPP1 locus showed no recombination with the autosomal dominant disorder dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. Nevertheless, sequencing of each exon in individuals affected by this disorder failed to reveal any disease-specific mutations. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Genotyping of TRIM5 locus in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina, a primate species susceptible to Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xue-Long

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pig-tailed macaques are the only Old World monkeys known to be susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. We have previously reported that the TRIM5-Cyclophilin A (TRIMCyp fusion in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina is dysfunctional in restricting HIV-1, which may explain why pig-tailed macaques are susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Similar results have also been reported by other groups. However, according to the current primate taxonomy, the previously reported M. nemestrina are further classified into three species, which all belong to the Macaca spp. This calls for the need to look into the previous studies in more details. Results The local species Northern pig-tailed macaque (M. leonina was analyzed for the correlation of TRIM5 structure and HIV-1 infection. Eleven M. leonina animals were analyzed, and all of them were found to possess TRIM5-CypA fusion at the TRIM5 locus. The transcripts encoding the dysfunctional TRIM5-CypA should result from the G-to-T mutation in the 3'-splicing site of intron 6. Polymorphism in the putative TRIMCyp recognition domain was observed. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of M. leonina were susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Consistent with the previous results, expression of the M. leonina TRIMCyp in HeLa-T4 cells rendered the cells resistant to HIV-2ROD but not to SIVmac239 infection. Conclusion The susceptibility of M. leonina to HIV-1 infection is due to the dysfunctional TRIM5-CypA fusion in the TRIM5 locus. This finding should broaden our perspective in developing better HIV/AIDS non-human primate animal models.

  3. MAPK3 at the Autism-Linked Human 16p11.2 Locus Influences Precise Synaptic Target Selection at Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Mee; Park, Hae Ryoun; Lee, Ji Hye

    2017-01-01

    Proper synaptic function in neural circuits requires precise pairings between correct pre- and post-synaptic partners. Errors in this process may underlie development of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Development of ASD can be influenced by genetic factors, including copy number variations (CNVs). In this study, we focused on a CNV occurring at the 16p11.2 locus in the human genome and investigated potential defects in synaptic connectivity caused by reduced activities of genes located in this region at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions, a well-established model synapse with stereotypic synaptic structures. A mutation of rolled, a Drosophila homolog of human mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) at the 16p11.2 locus, caused ectopic innervation of axonal branches and their abnormal defasciculation. The specificity of these phenotypes was confirmed by expression of wild-type rolled in the mutant background. Albeit to a lesser extent, we also observed ectopic innervation patterns in mutants defective in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93, all of which were expected to interact with Rolled MAPK3. A further genetic analysis in double heterozygous combinations revealed a synergistic interaction between rolled and Gp93. In addition, results from RT-qPCR analyses indicated consistently reduced rolled mRNA levels in Cdk2, Gαq, and Gp93 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest a central role of MAPK3 in regulating the precise targeting of presynaptic axons to proper postsynaptic targets, a critical step that may be altered significantly in ASD. PMID:28196412

  4. Functional environmental screening of a metagenomic library identifies stlA; a unique salt tolerance locus from the human gut microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamonn P Culligan

    Full Text Available Functional environmental screening of metagenomic libraries is a powerful means to identify and assign function to novel genes and their encoded proteins without any prior sequence knowledge. In the current study we describe the identification and subsequent analysis of a salt-tolerant clone from a human gut metagenomic library. Following transposon mutagenesis we identified an unknown gene (stlA, for "salt tolerance locus A" with no current known homologues in the databases. Subsequent cloning and expression in Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that stlA confers a salt tolerance phenotype in its surrogate host. Furthermore, a detailed in silico analysis was also conducted to gain additional information on the properties of the encoded StlA protein. The stlA gene is rare when searched against human metagenome datasets such as MetaHit and the Human Microbiome Project and represents a novel and unique salt tolerance determinant which appears to be found exclusively in the human gut environment.

  5. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  6. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

  7. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  8. Association of common genetic variants in the MAP4K4 locus with prediabetic traits in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sartorius

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4 is expressed in all diabetes-relevant tissues and mediates cytokine-induced insulin resistance. We investigated whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the MAP4K4 locus associate with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release, or elevated plasma cytokines. The best hit was tested for association with type 2 diabetes. Subjects (N = 1,769 were recruited from the Tübingen Family (TÜF study for type 2 diabetes and genotyped for tagging SNPs. In a subgroup, cytokines were measured. Association with type 2 diabetes was tested in a prospective case-cohort study (N = 2,971 derived from the EPIC-Potsdam study. Three SNPs (rs6543087, rs17801985, rs1003376 revealed nominal and two SNPs (rs11674694, rs11678405 significant associations with 2-hour glucose levels. SNPs rs6543087 and rs11674694 were also nominally associated with decreased insulin sensitivity. Another two SNPs (rs2236936, rs2236935 showed associations with reduced insulin release, driven by effects in lean subjects only. Three SNPs (rs11674694, rs13003883, rs2236936 revealed nominal associations with IL-6 levels. SNP rs11674694 was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, common variation in MAP4K4 is associated with insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, possibly via this gene's role in inflammatory signalling. This variation's impact on insulin sensitivity may be more important since its effect on insulin release vanishes with increasing BMI.

  9. The role of the oncofetal H19 lncRNA in tumor metastasis: orchestrating the EMT-MET decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matouk, Imad J.; Halle, David; Raveh, Eli; Gilon, Michal; Sorin, Vladimir; Hochberg, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes are emerging as key players in the metastatic cascade. Current evidence indicate that H19 lncRNA and the microRNA(miRNA) miR-675, which is processed from it, play crucial roles in metastasis, through the regulation of critical events specifically the epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) and the mesenchymal to epithelial transitions (MET). This review summarizes recent mechanistic pathways and tries to put together seemingly conflicting data from different reports under one proposed general scheme underlying the various roles of H19/miR-675 in the metastatic cascade. We propose several approaches to harnessing this knowledge for translational medicine. PMID:26623562

  10. Deletion of the core region of 5' HS2 of the mouse beta-globin locus control region reveals a distinct effect in comparison with human beta-globin transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Bulger, Michael; Bender, M A; Fields, Jennifer; Groudine, Mark; Fiering, Steven

    2006-01-15

    The beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is a large DNA element that is required for high-level expression of beta-like globin genes from the endogenous mouse locus or in transgenic mice carrying the human beta-globin locus. The LCR encompasses 6 DNaseI hypersensitive sites (HSs) that bind transcription factors. These HSs each contain a core of a few hundred base pairs (bp) that has most of the functional activity and exhibits high interspecies sequence homology. Adjoining the cores are 500- to 1000-bp "flanks" with weaker functional activity and lower interspecies homology. Studies of human beta-globin transgenes and of the endogenous murine locus show that deletion of an entire HS (core plus flanks) moderately suppresses expression. However, human transgenes in which only individual HS core regions were deleted showed drastic loss of expression accompanied by changes in chromatin structure. To address these disparate results, we have deleted the core region of 5'HS2 from the endogenous murine beta-LCR. The phenotype was similar to that of the larger 5'HS2 deletion, with no apparent disruption of chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that the greater severity of HS core deletions in comparison to full HS deletions is not a general property of the beta-LCR.

  11. Deletion of the core region of 5′ HS2 of the mouse β-globin locus control region reveals a distinct effect in comparison with human β-globin transgenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Bulger, Michael; Bender, M. A.; Fields, Jennifer; Groudine, Mark; Fiering, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The β-globin locus control region (LCR) is a large DNA element that is required for high-level expression of β-like globin genes from the endogenous mouse locus or in transgenic mice carrying the human β-globin locus. The LCR encompasses 6 DNaseI hypersensitive sites (HSs) that bind transcription factors. These HSs each contain a core of a few hundred base pairs (bp) that has most of the functional activity and exhibits high interspecies sequence homology. Adjoining the cores are 500- to 1000-bp “flanks” with weaker functional activity and lower interspecies homology. Studies of human β-globin transgenes and of the endogenous murine locus show that deletion of an entire HS (core plus flanks) moderately suppresses expression. However, human transgenes in which only individual HS core regions were deleted showed drastic loss of expression accompanied by changes in chromatin structure. To address these disparate results, we have deleted the core region of 5′HS2 from the endogenous murine β-LCR. The phenotype was similar to that of the larger 5′HS2 deletion, with no apparent disruption of chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that the greater severity of HS core deletions in comparison to full HS deletions is not a general property of the β-LCR. (Blood. 2006;107:821-826) PMID:16189270

  12. An N-terminally truncated envelope protein encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus W locus on chromosome Xq22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roebke Christina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that the envelope (env sequence of a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-W locus on chromosome Xq22.3 is transcribed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The env open reading frame (ORF of this locus is interrupted by a premature stop at codon 39, but otherwise harbors a long ORF for an N-terminally truncated 475 amino acid Env protein, starting at an in-frame ATG at codon 68. We set out to characterize the protein encoded by that ORF. Results Transient expression of the 475 amino acid Xq22.3 HERV-W env ORF produced an N-terminally truncated HERV-W Env protein, as detected by the monoclonal anti-HERV-W Env antibodies 6A2B2 and 13H5A5. Remarkably, reversion of the stop at codon 39 in Xq22.3 HERV-W env reconstituted a full-length HERV-W Xq22.3 Env protein. Similar to the full-length HERV-W Env protein Syncytin-1, reconstituted full-length Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is glycosylated, forms oligomers, and is expressed at the cell surface. In contrast, Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is unglycosylated, does not form oligomers, and is located intracellularly, probably due to lack of a signal peptide. Finally, we reconfirm by immunohistochemistry that monoclonal antibody 6A2B2 detects an antigen expressed in placenta and multiple sclerosis brain lesions. Conclusions A partially defective HERV-W env gene located on chromosome Xq22.3, which we propose to designate ERVWE2, has retained coding capacity and can produce ex vivo an N-terminally truncated Env protein, named N-Trenv. Detection of an antigen by 6A2B2 in placenta and multiple sclerosis lesions opens the possibility that N-Trenv could be expressed in vivo. More generally, our findings are compatible with the idea that defective HERV elements may be capable of producing incomplete HERV proteins that, speculatively, may exert functions in human physiology or pathology.

  13. Deletions and rearrangements of the H19/IGF2 enhancer region in patients with Silver-Russell syndrome and growth retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Poole, Rebecca L; Hahnemann, Johanne M D

    2011-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is characterised by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and body asymmetry. In 35-60% of SRS cases the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of the H19 gene (H19-ICR) is hypomethylated, leading to downregula......Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is characterised by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and body asymmetry. In 35-60% of SRS cases the paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR) upstream of the H19 gene (H19-ICR) is hypomethylated, leading...

  14. Multidimensional human capital formation in a developing country: Health, cognition and locus of control in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Kira M

    2017-07-08

    Economic success depends on multiple human capital stocks whose production is interrelated and occurs over many life stages. Yet, much empirical work fails to account for human capital's multidimensional nature and limits its focus to specific childhood stages. Using longitudinal data from the Philippines, I estimate a model of multidimensional human capital formation from birth through adulthood where health, cognitive, and noncognitive dimensions are jointly produced. I examine during which developmental stages parental investment is most influential and address the endogeneity of investment using a policy function where investment depends on child characteristics, exogenous conditions at birth and local prices. Findings imply that not only will early human capital disparities persist into adulthood without early remediation but also that cognitive gains yielded from early remediation will be lost without complementary investment in adolescence. Findings further suggest that interventions will be undervalued if their multidimensional effects are not accounted for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Carr, Aprell L; Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary; Li, Lei

    2014-07-11

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson's disease.

  16. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  17. Ambiguity of human gene symbols in LocusLink and MEDLINE: creating an inventory and a disambiguation test collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Weeber (Marc); R.J.A. Schijvenaars (Bob); E.M. van Mulligen (Erik); B. Mons (Barend); R. Jelier (Rob); C.C. van der Eijk (Christiaan); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenes are discovered almost on a daily basis and new names have to be found. Although there are guidelines for gene nomenclature, the naming process is highly creative. Human genes are often named with a gene symbol and a longer, more descriptive term; the short form is

  18. Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    technology, locus information and allele frequency in different ... DNA can be used to study human evolution. Besides ... STR markers are important for human identification ..... discovery resource for research on human genetic variation.

  19. Transcript encoded on the opposite strand of the human steroid 21-hydroxylase/complement component C4 gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, Y.; Bristow, J.; Gitelman, S.E.; Miller, W.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The gene encoding human adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) and its highly similar pseudogene are duplicated in tandem with the two genes encoding the fourth component of human serum hemolytic complement (C4). This 60-kilobase gene complex, which lies within the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of human chromosome 6, has been studied in considerable detail because genetic disorders in steroid 21-hydroxylation and in C4 are common. The authors have cloned a cDNA encoded by a previously unidentified gene in this region. This gene lies on the strand of DNA opposite from the strand containing the P450c21 and C4 genes, and it overlaps the last exon of P450c21. The newly identified gene encodes mRNAs of 3.5 and 1.8 kilobases that are expressed in the adrenal and in a Leydig cell tumor but are not expressed in nonsteroidogenic tissues. The sequence of the longest cDNA (2.7 kilobases) shows no similarity to known sequences available in two computerized data bases. The 5{prime} end of this sequence is characterized by three repeats, each encoding about 100 amino acids flanked by potential sites for proteolytic cleavage. Although numerous studies have shown that gene deletions causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia occur in this region, none of these gene deletions extends into this newly identified gene, suggesting that it encodes an essential function.

  20. H19 non coding RNA-derived miR-675 enhances tumorigenesis and metastasis of breast cancer cells by downregulating c-Cbl and Cbl-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennin, Constance; Spruyt, Nathalie; Dahmani, Fatima; Julien, Sylvain; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Chassat, Thierry; Bourette, Roland P; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Adriaenssens, Eric

    2015-10-06

    H19 is a long non-coding RNA precursor of miR-675 microRNA. H19 is increasingly described to play key roles in the progression and metastasis of cancers from different tissue origins. We have previously shown that the H19 gene is activated by growth factors and increases breast cancer cell invasion. In this study, we established H19/miR-675 ectopic expression models of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to further investigate the underlying mechanisms of H19 oncogenic action. We showed that overexpression of H19/miR-675 enhanced the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells including increased cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and increased tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Moreover, we identified ubiquitin ligase E3 family (c-Cbl and Cbl-b) as direct targets of miR-675 in breast cancer cells. Using a luciferase assay, we demonstrated that H19, through its microRNA, decreased both c-Cbl and Cbl-b expression in all breast cancer cell lines tested. Thus, by directly binding c-Cbl and Cbl-b mRNA, miR-675 increased the stability and the activation of EGFR and c-Met, leading to sustained activation of Akt and Erk as well as enhanced cell proliferation and migration. Our data describe a novel mechanism of protumoral action of H19 in breast cancer.

  1. Statistical evaluation of multiple-locus linkage data in experimental species and its relevance to human studies: Application to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and human insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risch, N. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)); Ghosh, S.; Todd, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    Common, familial human disorders generally do not follow Mendelian inheritance patterns, presumably because multiple loci are involved in disease susceptibility. One approach to mapping genes for such traits in humans is to first study an analogous form in an animal model, such as mouse, by using inbred strains and backcross experiments. Here the authors describe methodology for analyzing multiple-locus linkage data from such experimental backcrosses, particularly in light of multilocus genetic models, including the effects of epistasis. They illustrate these methods by using data from backcrosses involving nonobese diabetic mouse, which serves as an animal model for human insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. They show that it is likely that a minimum of nine loci contribute to susceptibility, with strong epistasis effects among these loci. Three of the loci actually confer a protective effect in the homozygote, compared with the heterozygote. Further, they discuss the relevance of these studies for analogous studies of the human form of the trait. Specifically, they show that the magnitude of the gene effect in the experimental backcross is likely to correlate only weakly, at best, with the expected magnitude of effect for a human form, because in humans the gene effect will depend more heavily on disease allele frequencies than on the observed penetrance ratios; such allele frequencies are unpredictable. Hence, the major benefit from animal studies may be a better understanding of the disease process itself, rather than identification of cells through comparison mapping in humans by using regions of homology. 12 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Molecular analysis of THH-induced mutations at HPRT locus in human promyelocytic leukemia cells with multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sheng-xue; CAO Jia; AN Hui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the genotoxicity and antitumor activity of a Chinese medicinal herb, Tripterygium Hypoglaucum (Level) Hutch (THH). Methods: The genotoxicity and antitumor activity of TH-H were investigated in human promyelocytic leukemia cells on the mutation of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene by using single cell clone culture, two-way screening counting, multiplex PCR amplification and gel electrophoresis. Results: The results showed that different mutant spectra existed between the spontaneous mutation and induced mutation by THH. Only 7. 7% (1/13) of spontaneous mutants showed deletion mutations, whereas the induced mutants included 46.6% (27/58) deletions. Mapping of all intragenic deletion breakpoints showed a random distribution in all 9 exons, but toward the 3'-end of the HPRT gene. Deletion of exon 1 only appeared when whole gene was deleted. Deletions of exon 7/8 and 9 often showed linkage deletions (71.4%). Conclusion: THH can induce the mutation, mainly deletions, of HPRT gene in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  3. Transgenerational pancreatic impairment with Igf2/H19 epigenetic alteration induced by p,p'-DDE exposure in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Yang, Lei

    2017-09-01

    The hypothesis of fetal origins indicates that exposures in early development could induce epigenetic modifications in the male germ-line, affecting the susceptibility of adult-onset disease for generations. p,p'-DDE, the primary metabolite of persistent organochlorine pesticide DDT, is highly correlated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and a strong contributing factor to type 2 diabetes. In our previous study, ancestral p,p'-DDE exposure could induce transgenerational impaired male fertility with sperm Igf2 hypomethylation. It is still unknown whether this germline epigenetic defect would affect the somatic tissue endocrine pancreas. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to p,p'-DDE from gestation day 8 to 15. The F1 male offspring were mated with female to produce F2 progeny. F3 generation was obtained by intercrossing the control and treated male and female of F2 generation and divided as C♂-C♀, DDE♂-DDE♀, DDE♂-C♀ and C♂-DDE♀. Results indicated that F1 offspring in p,p'-DDE group exhibited impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), abnormal insulin secretion, β-cell dysfunction and altered Igf2 and H19 expression induced by Igf2/H19 hypomethylation, which could be transferred to the F3 offspring through the male germ line. IGT and abnormal insulin secretion were more obvious in males than those in females. Ancestral p,p'-DDE exposure could induce transgenerational pancreatic impairment with Igf2/H19 epigenetic defect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of global Fxr deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis and genetic variation in the FXR locus in human acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR, which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis.Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs.In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology.We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a secondary phenomenon.

  5. DNA methylation status of H19 and Xist genos in lungs of somatic cell nuclear transfer bovines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; LI DongJie; LIU YanQin; ZHANG Cui; DAI YunPing; LI ShiJie; LINing

    2008-01-01

    In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technologies, the donor cell's nuclei need to be epigenetically reprogrammed for embryonic development. The incomplete reprogramming of donor cell nuclei has been implicated as a primary reason for the low efficiency of SCNT. DNA methylation is a major epige- netic modification of the genome that regulates crucial aspects of genome function, including estab-lishment of genomic imprinting. In order to make sure whether the DNA methylation reprogramming is efficient in SCNT animals, we analyzed the DNA methylation status of two imprinting genes, H19 and Xist, in lungs of deceased SCNT bovines that died within 48 h of birth using bisulfite sequencing analysis. Our findings demonstrated that cloned bovines showed significantly lower DNA methylation of H19 than controls (P<0.05), and three tested CpGs sites (1, 2, 3) exhibited unmethylation in one cloned bovine (9C3); however, Xist showed similar DNA methylation levels between clones and con- trols, and both showed hypermethylation (96.11% and 86.67%).

  6. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  7. Complex signatures of locus-specific selective pressures and gene conversion on Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Laura; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Kelgo, Piret; Laan, Maris

    2008-10-01

    Reduced birth weight and slow neonatal growth are risks correlated with the development of common diseases in adulthood. The Human Growth Hormone/Chorionic Somatomammotropin (hGH/CSH) gene cluster (48 kb) at 17q22-24, consisting of one pituitary-expressed postnatal (GH1) and four placental genes (GH2, CSH1, CSH2, and CSHL1) may contribute to common variation in intrauterine and infant growth, and also to the regulation of feto-maternal and adult glucose metabolism. In contrast to GH1, there are limited genetic data on the hGH/CSH genes expressed in utero. We report the first survey of sequence variation encompassing all five hGH/CSH genes. Resequencing identified 113 SNPs/indels (ss86217675-ss86217787 in dbSNP) including 66 novel variants, and revealed remarkable differences in diversity patterns among the homologous duplicated genes as well as between the study populations of European (Estonians), Asian (Han Chinese), and African (Mandenkalu) ancestries. A dominant feature of the hGH/CSH region is hyperactive gene conversion, with the rate exceeding tens to hundreds of times the rate of reciprocal crossing-over and resulting in near absence of linkage disequilibrium. The initiation of gene conversion seems to be uniformly distributed because the data do not predict any recombination hotspots. Signatures of different selective constraints acting on each gene indicate functional specification of the hGH/CSH genes. Most strikingly, the GH2 coding for placental growth hormone shows strong intercontinental diversification (F(ST)=0.41-0.91; p<10(-6)) indicative of balancing selection, whereas the flanking CSH1 exhibits low population differentiation (F(ST)=0.03-0.09), low diversity (non-Africans, pi=8-9 x 10(-5); Africans, pi=8.2 x 10(-4)), and one dominant haplotype worldwide, consistent with purifying selection. The results imply that the success of an association study targeted to duplicated genes may be enhanced by prior resequencing of the study population in order

  8. High lncRNA H19 expression as prognostic indicator: data mining in female cancers and polling analysis in non-female cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Liu, Zhao-Yang; Li, Wen-Ling; Zhang, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Pan, Xi; Chen, Jun; Li, Yue-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Upregulation of lncRNA H19 expression is associated with an unfavorable prognosis in some cancers. However, the prognostic value of H19 in female-specific cancers has remained uncharacterized. In this study, the prognostic power of high H19 expression in female cancer patients from the TCGA datasets was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox's proportional hazard modeling. In addition, in a meta-analysis of non-female cancer patients from TCGA datasets and 12 independent studies, hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS)/relapse-free survival (RFS)/metastasis-free survival (MFS)/progression-free survival (PFS) were pooled to assess the prognostic value of high H19 expression. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with uterine corpus cancer and higher H19 expression had a shorter OS (HR=2.710, p<0.05), while females with cervical cancer and increased H19 expression had a shorter RFS (HR=2.261, p<0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high H19 expression could independently predict a poorer prognosis in cervical cancer patients (HR=4.099, p<0.05). In the meta-analysis, patients with high H19 expression showed a poorer outcome in non-female cancer (p<0.05). These results suggest that high lncRNA H19 expression is predictive of an unfavorable prognosis in two female cancers (uterine corpus endometrioid cancer and cervical cancer) as well as in non-female cancer patients. PMID:27926484

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of triclosan-susceptible and -tolerant Escherichia coli O157:H19 in response to triclosan exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Mary; Sheridan, Áine; Morris, Dermot; Duffy, Geraldine; Fanning, Séamus; Burgess, Catherine M

    2014-04-01

    Triclosan is an active agent that is commonly found in biocide formulations which are used by the food industry to control microbial contamination. The aim of this study was to use microarray analysis to compare gene expression between a triclosan-susceptible Escherichia coli O157:H19 isolate (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 6.25 μg/ml) and its in vitro generated triclosan-tolerant mutant (MIC >8,000 μg/ml). Gene expression profiling was performed on the wild-type and mutant isogenic pairs after 30 min exposure to the parent MIC for triclosan and an untreated control. Microarray analysis was carried out using the Affymetrix GeneChip E. coli Genome 2.0 Array, and differential expression of genes was analyzed using the pumaDE method in Bioconductor R software. Wild-type gene expression was found to be significantly different from the triclosan-tolerant mutant for a large number of genes, even in the absence of triclosan exposure. Significant differences were observed in the expression of a number of pathway genes involved in metabolism, transport, and chemotaxis. In particular, gene expression in the triclosan-tolerant mutant was highly up-regulated for 33 of 38 genes belonging to the flagellar assembly pathway. The presence of extended flagella in the mutant isolate was confirmed visually by transmission electron microscopy, although no significant difference was observed in the motility of the parent and mutant at low levels of triclosan. Data from this study show that at a transcriptomic level, a triclosan-tolerant E. coli O157:H19 mutant is significantly different from the wild-type strain in a number of different pathways, providing an increased understanding of triclosan tolerance.

  10. Alteration in Expression and Methylation of IGF2/H19 in Placenta and Umbilical Cord Blood Are Associated with Macrosomia Exposed to Intrauterine Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rina; Wang, Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Li; Liu, Xinyue; Wei, Yumei; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Macrosomia is one of the most common complications in gestational diabetes mellitus. Insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 are two of the imprinted candidate genes that are involved in fetal growth and development. Change in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 has been proved to be an early event related to the programming of metabolic profile, including macrosomia and small for gestational age in offspring. Here we hypothesize that alteration in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 is associated with macrosomia induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in gestational diabetes mellitus group (GDM group) compared to normal glucose tolerance group (NGT group) both in umbilical cord blood and placenta, while the expression of H19 is significant lower in GDM group in umbilical cord blood. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in normal glucose tolerance with macrosomia group (NGT-M) compared to normal glucose tolerance with normal birthweight group (NGT-NBW group) both in placenta and umbilical cord blood. A model with interaction term of gene expression of IGF2 and H19 found that IGF2 and the joint action of IGF2 and H19 in placenta showed significantly relationship with GDM/NGT and GDM-NBW/NGT-NBW. A borderline significant association was seen among IGF2 and H19 in cord blood and GDM-M/NGT-M. The methylation level at different CpG sites of insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 in umbilical cord blood was also significantly different among groups. Based on the multivariable linear regression analysis, the methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 / H19 is closely related to birth weight and intrauterine hyperglycemia. We confirmed the existence of alteration in DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and reported a

  11. Alteration in Expression and Methylation of IGF2/H19 in Placenta and Umbilical Cord Blood Are Associated with Macrosomia Exposed to Intrauterine Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Su

    Full Text Available Macrosomia is one of the most common complications in gestational diabetes mellitus. Insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 are two of the imprinted candidate genes that are involved in fetal growth and development. Change in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 has been proved to be an early event related to the programming of metabolic profile, including macrosomia and small for gestational age in offspring. Here we hypothesize that alteration in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 is associated with macrosomia induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia.The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in gestational diabetes mellitus group (GDM group compared to normal glucose tolerance group (NGT group both in umbilical cord blood and placenta, while the expression of H19 is significant lower in GDM group in umbilical cord blood. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in normal glucose tolerance with macrosomia group (NGT-M compared to normal glucose tolerance with normal birthweight group (NGT-NBW group both in placenta and umbilical cord blood. A model with interaction term of gene expression of IGF2 and H19 found that IGF2 and the joint action of IGF2 and H19 in placenta showed significantly relationship with GDM/NGT and GDM-NBW/NGT-NBW. A borderline significant association was seen among IGF2 and H19 in cord blood and GDM-M/NGT-M. The methylation level at different CpG sites of insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 in umbilical cord blood was also significantly different among groups. Based on the multivariable linear regression analysis, the methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 / H19 is closely related to birth weight and intrauterine hyperglycemia.We confirmed the existence of alteration in DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and

  12. Use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) to investigate genetic diversity of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from human, food, and veterinary sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateva, Gergana; Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    -locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and compared results with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinations for 100 S. Typhimurium strains isolated in Bulgaria during 2008-2012 (50 veterinary/food and 50 human isolates). Results showed that isolates were divided into 80 and 34 groups using......). No clustering of isolates related to susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobials, source of isolation, or year of isolation was observed. Some MLVA types were found in both human and veterinary/food isolates, indicating a possible route of transmission. A majority (83%) of the isolates were found...

  13. 5'HS5 of the human beta-globin locus control region is dispensable for the formation of the beta-globin active chromatin hub.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kei Chan

    Full Text Available Hypersensitive site 5 (5'HS5 of the beta-globin Locus Control Region functions as a developmental stage-specific border in erythroid cells. Here, we have analyzed the role of 5'HS5 in the three dimensional organization of the beta-gene locus using the Chromatin Conformation Capture (3C technique. The results show that when 5'HS5 is deleted from the locus, both remote and internal regulatory elements are still able to interact with each other in a three-dimensional configuration termed the Active Chromatin Hub. Thus, the absence of 5'HS5 does not have an appreciable effect on the three dimensional organization of the beta-globin locus. This rules out models in which 5'HS5 nucleates interactions with remote and/or internal regulatory elements. We also determined the binding of CTCF, the only defined insulator protein in mammalian cells, to 5'HS5 by using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. We detect low levels of CTCF binding to 5'HS5 in primitive erythroid cells, in which it functions as a border element. Surprisingly, we also observe binding levels of CTCF to 5'HS5 in definitive erythroid cells. Thus, binding of CTCF to 5'HS5 per se does not render it a functional border element. This is consistent with the previous data suggesting that CTCF has dual functionality.

  14. The human beta-globin locus control region confers an early embryonic erythroid-specific expression pattern to a basic promoter driving the bacterial lacZ gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tewari (Rita); N. Gillemans (Nynke); A. Harper; M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); G. Zafarana (Gaetano); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is contained on a 20 kb DNA fragment and is characterized by the presence of five DNaseI hypersensitive sites in erythroid cells, termed 5'HS1-5. A fully active 6.5 kb version of the LCR, called the muLCR, has been

  15. The human β-globin locus control region confers an early embryonic erythroid-specific expression pattern to a basic promoter driving the bacterial β-galactosidase gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tewari (Rita); N. Gillemans (Nynke); A. Harper; M.G.J.M. Wijgerde (Mark); G. Zafarana (Gaetano); D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is contained on a 20 kb DNA fragment and is characterized by the presence of five DNaseI hypersensitive sites in erythroid cells, termed 5'HS1-5. A fully active 6.5 kb version of the LCR, called the muLCR, has been described. Expression of the

  16. The Methylation Status of IGF2/H19 Imprinting Control Region in Cloned Pig%克隆猪印迹基因IGF2/H19印迹控制区的甲基化状态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志强; 谢一妮; 张廷宇; 戴建军; 吴彩凤; 马恒东; 张德福

    2011-01-01

    为了探求核移植过程中DNA甲基化重编程是否充分,运用亚硫酸氢盐测序法分别检测新生死亡克隆猪和同期正常猪心脏、肝脏、脾脏、肺脏和肾脏组织中IGF2/H19基因印迹控制区(DMR1、DMR2、DMR3)的甲基化状态.结果发现,DMR1、DMR3在克隆猪和正常猪各组织中的甲基化水平不同,但差异不显著(P>0.05).DMR2在克隆猪肺脏组织表现为超甲基化,极显著高于正常猪(P<0.01),且10个测序克隆中存在2处连续的全甲基化CpG位点(分别为4-9位和12-17位),而在其它组织中甲基化差异不显著(P>0.05).说明DMR2在克隆猪肺脏组织可能存在DNA甲基化重编程紊乱,这也可能是导致该克隆猪死亡的因素之一.%In order to make sure whether the DNA methylation reprogramming is efficient in SCNT animals, we analyzed the DNA methylation status of IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (DMR1,DMR2,DMR3) in heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney of cloned pig using bisulfite sequencing analysis. The results demonstrated that the methylation level of DMR1 and DMR3 in dead cloned pig tissues were different from that of normal pig, but there was no significant differences among them (P>0. 05) ;The DMR2 showed hypermethylation in the lung of the dead cloned pig,and was significantly higher than that in the control(P0. 05). Results showed that the abnormal DNA methylation prof lies of DMR2 may occurred in the lung of cloned pig, which may be one of the factors for the death of cloned animals.

  17. Haplotyping and copy number estimation of the highly polymorphic human beta-defensin locus on 8p23 by 454 amplicon sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenstiel Philip

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB at chromosome 8p23.1 is one of the most copy number (CN variable regions of the human genome. Whereas individual DEFB CNs have been suggested as independent genetic risk factors for several diseases (e.g. psoriasis and Crohn's disease, the role of multisite sequence variations (MSV is less well understood and to date has only been reported for prostate cancer. Simultaneous assessment of MSVs and CNs can be achieved by PCR, cloning and Sanger sequencing, however, these methods are labour and cost intensive as well as prone to methodological bias introduced by bacterial cloning. Here, we demonstrate that amplicon sequencing of pooled individual PCR products by the 454 technology allows in-depth determination of MSV haplotypes and estimation of DEFB CNs in parallel. Results Six PCR products spread over ~87 kb of DEFB and harbouring 24 known MSVs were amplified from 11 DNA samples, pooled and sequenced on a Roche 454 GS FLX sequencer. From ~142,000 reads, ~120,000 haplotype calls (HC were inferred that identified 22 haplotypes ranging from 2 to 7 per amplicon. In addition to the 24 known MSVs, two additional sequence variations were detected. Minimal CNs were estimated from the ratio of HCs and compared to absolute CNs determined by alternative methods. Concordance in CNs was found for 7 samples, the CNs differed by one in 2 samples and the estimated minimal CN was half of the absolute in one sample. For 7 samples and 2 amplicons, the 454 haplotyping results were compared to those by cloning/Sanger sequencing. Intrinsic problems related to chimera formation during PCR and differences between haplotyping by 454 and cloning/Sanger sequencing are discussed. Conclusion Deep amplicon sequencing using the 454 technology yield thousands of HCs per amplicon for an affordable price and may represent an effective method for parallel haplotyping and CN estimation in small to medium-sized cohorts. The

  18. Effect of Texture on Deep-Drawing Property of Air-Condition Aluminium 1050H19 Foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Ze-sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Guo-jun; ZHANG Tao; CHI Da-zhao

    2004-01-01

    The textures induced by deformation processes of different crafts in air-condition used aluminium 1050H19 foils were measured by using X-ray goniometer. Combining with TEM analysis, effect of texture on deep-drawing property was discussed. It is show that deformation textures in the specimens, on which four types of rolling-crafts are carried out respectively, are all typical Cu components, and recrystallized R-, Cube-texture don't exist. Cu-texture is still the predominant component with different orientation density according to different rolling-craft. To specimens which are prone to cracking, their orientation densities of Cu-textures are higher, their textures are stronger and they contain P- and Goss-texture, which are harder to be deformed. The analyses indicat that with the decrease in the rate of reduction/rolling-time and the execution of intermediate holding, textures that are harder to be deformed are eliminated and orientation density of Cu-texture is weakened. Thus, deep-drawing property of aluminium foils is improved.

  19. Targeting of the human F8 at the multicopy rDNA locus in Hemophilia A patient-derived iPSCs using TALENickases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jialun; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhuo; Hu, Zhiqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xionghao; Zhou, Miaojin; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yanchi; Feng, Mai; Liang, Desheng

    2016-03-25

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a monogenic disease due to lack of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII). This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding but there is no cure for HA until very recently. In this study, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with severe HA and used transcription activator-like effector nickases (TALENickases) to target the factor VIII gene (F8) at the multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus in HA-iPSCs, aiming to rescue the shortage of FVIII protein. The results revealed that more than one copy of the exogenous F8 could be integrated into the rDNA locus. Importantly, we detected exogenous F8 mRNA and FVIII protein in targeted HA-iPSCs. After they were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), the exogenous FVIII protein was still detectable. Thus, it is showed that the multicopy rDNA locus could be utilized as an effective target site in patient-derived iPSCs for gene therapy. This strategy provides a novel iPSCs-based therapeutic option for HA and other monogenic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus maps to a locus (IDDM11) on human chromosome 14q24.3-q31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, L.L.; Tobias, R. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Thomson, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    To locate genes predisposing to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), an autoimmune disorder resulting from destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic cells, we are testing linkage of IDDM susceptibility to polymorphic markers across the genome using families with two or more IDDM children. A new susceptibility locus (IDDM11) has been localized to chromosome 14q24.3-q31 by detection of significant linkage to microsatellite D14S67, using both maximum likelihood methods D14S67, using both maximum likelihood methods (LOD{sub max} = 4.0 at {theta} = 0.20) and affected sib pair (ASP) methods (P = 1 x 10{sup -5}). This represents the strongest reported evidence for linkage to any IDDM locus outside the HLA region. The subset of families in which affected children did not show increased sharing of HLA genes (HLA sharing {le}50%) provided most of the support for D14S67 linkage (LOD{sub max}4.6 at {theta} = 0.12;ASP P < 5 x 10{sup -6}). There was significant linkage heterogeneity between the HLA-defined subsets of families (P = 0.009), suggesting that IDDM11 may be an important susceptibility locus in families lacking strong HLA region predisposition. 52 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern...... of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic...... methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also...

  2. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  3. Intra-and inter-population genetic diversity at the HLA-DQA1 locus and their implications for parentage analysis and human identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, F. [Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, MX (United States)]|[Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cerda-Flores, R. [Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)]|[Centro de Investigacion Biomedica del Noreste, Monterrey, MX (United States); Zhong, Y. [Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DQA1 locus, studied by PCR-based sequence specific oligonucleotide probes, is highly polymorphic in all populations thus far studied. From the literature we compiled genotype and allele frequency data at this locus for 87 populations to examine the pattern of intra- and inter- population genetic diversity. In general, allele frequency variations in populations are consistent with their ethno-history, although small isolated populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders) exhibit somewhat disparate variations of allele frequencies. A nested gene diversity analysis of 41 populations, classified into 5 ethnic groups (African, n = 3; Caucasian, n = 18; American Native, n = 3; Asian, n = 8; Pacific Islanders, n = 9) showed that the total gene diversity (80.4%) is largely (95%) due to intra-population variation. Only 3% of the gene diversity is due to inter-population within ethnic group variation, with the remaining 2% due to between ethnic group variation. In terms of average heterozygosity, probability of paternity exlusion, and probability of individual identification, the inter-ethnic group variation is larger than that between poulation samples within the ethnic groups. No significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg expectations of genotype frequencies was observed in any population. With an average heterozygosity of 77% around the world, this locus provides a 57% chance of exclusion of a falsely accused person from paternity, and is able to exclude 91% of individuals for identification purposes. In terms of allele fequencies, the geometric positions of the admixed populations (e.g. African-Americans and American-Hispanics) are consistent with their admixture estimates in their gene pool.

  4. Physiological Expression and Accumulation of the Products of Two Upstream Open Reading Frames mrtl and MycHex1 Along With p64 and p67 Myc From the Human c-myc Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Mi Hong; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, Chae-Yong; Phi, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyun Jin; Blume, Scott W; Choi, Hyoung Soo

    2016-06-01

    In addition to the canonical c-Myc p64 and p67 proteins, the human c-myc locus encodes two distinct proteins, mrtl (myc-related translation/localization regulatory factor) and MycHex1 (Myc Human Exon 1), from the upstream open reading frames within the 5'-untranslated region of the c-myc P0 mRNA. The aim of this study is to examine simultaneously, for the first time, mrtl, MycHex1, c-Myc p64, and p67 in human tumor cell lines and pediatric brain tumor tissues. Western blot analysis demonstrated endogenous mrtl, MycHex1, c-Myc p64, and p67 simultaneously. The relative abundance of mrtl and MycHex1 were consistent among a variety of human tumor cell lines, and the relative intensities of mrtl and MycHex1 correlated positively. Confocal imaging revealed mrtl predominantly localized to the nuclear envelope, along with prominent reticular pattern in the cytoplasm. MycHex1 was observed as a series of bright foci located within the nucleus, a subset of which colocalized with fibrillarin. mrtl and MycHex1 co-immunoprecipitated with RACK1, c-Myc, fibrillarin, coilin, and with each other. These findings suggest that mrtl and MycHex1 have multiple interaction partners in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Sequence analyses confirmed a known polymorphism of mrtl at base 1965 (G>T) and new mutations at bases 1900 (C>G) and 1798 (C>G). Evidence is presented for expression and stable accumulation of all four proteins encoded by three distinct non-overlapping open reading frames within the human c-myc locus. Additional work is warranted to further elucidate the functional or regulatory roles of these molecules in regulation of c-Myc and in oncogenesis.

  5. Localization of the human RNA polymerase I transcription factor gene (UBTF) to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 and construction of a long-range restriction map of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A.; Black, D.M.; Griffiths, B.L.; Solomon, E. [Somatic Cell Genetics Lab., London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-10

    Human upstream binding factor (hUBF) is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is essential for the activation of human 18s and 28s rRNA gene transcription. We have isolated and localized the gene (UBTF) encoding hUBF to the D17S183 locus on chromosome 17q21 by analyzing a cosmid from the region and carrying out Southern analysis on a previously constructed chromosome 17 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel using a probe from the hUBF cDNA. Confirmation of its location at this region was obtained from the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA using the hUBF cDNA and other probes from the region. These data also enabled the construction of a long-range restriction map of the region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Eliana Machado, Locus Brasilis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Locus Brasilis es un complejo libro de la poeta brasileña y trilingüe Eliana Machado, que actualmente radica en Europa y por primera vez publica en el Perú. El volumen, el segundo de la autora luego de Blanco en el blanco, que apareció en Sao Paulo, consta de tres partes bien definidas, que corresponden a los tres reinos de la naturaleza. En poesía esto se traslada al hombre con sus respectivos correlatos del animal como ser destructivo, pero también conciliador y hasta protector de un mundo ...

  7. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Natasha Z R; Carr, Jessie S; Bonham, Luke W; Geier, Ethan G; Damotte, Vincent; Miller, Zachary A; Desikan, Rahul S; Boehme, Kevin L; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Hollenbach, Jill A; Huang, Yadong; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4. Separate

  8. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Z R Steele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations.Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015 and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, a National Institute on Aging (NIA-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012. We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37] in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE ɛ4. Separate

  9. 肝癌遗传关联研究中LncRNA H19遗传变异的生物信息学分析%Integrated bioinformatics analysis for genetic variations of LncRNA H19 in the genetic association study of liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊国; 林志丰; 邓煜盛; 王臻; 祁永芬; 刘丽; 郜艳晖

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究lncRNA H19遗传变异与肝癌易感性的关联,利用生物信息学的方法在实验前期筛选出H19中有潜在功能的SNPs.方法 运用1000 Genomes Project和Ensembl等数据库确定H19 SNPs名录,利用Allele frequency calculator选取MAF值大于0.05的SNPs;结合文献查阅,运用SNP Function Prediction和F-SNP等功能预测软件筛选有潜在功能的SNPs.结果 5个SNPs在转录调控、蛋白质编码以及剪切调控中可能存在相应生物活性,值得进一步研究.结论 对lncRNA H19的SNPs进行了科学合理的选择,可以更全面深入地探寻H19影响肝癌发生发展的遗传机制.

  10. Relationship of porcine IGF2 imprinting status to DNA methylation at the H19 DMD and the IGF2 DMRs 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owczarek-Lipska Marta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine IGF2 and the H19 genes are imprinted. The IGF2 is paternally expressed, while the H19 gene is maternally expressed. Extensive studies in mice established a boundary model indicating that the H19 differentially methylated domain (DMD controls, upon binding with the CTCF protein, reciprocal imprinting of the IGF2 and the H19 genes. IGF2 transcription is tissue and development specific involving the use of 4 promoters. In the liver of adult Large White boars IGF2 is expressed from both parental alleles, whereas in skeletal muscle and kidney tissues we observed variable relaxation of IGF2 imprinting. We hypothesized that IGF2 expression from both paternal alleles and relaxation of IGF2 imprinting is reflected in differences in DNA methylation patterns at the H19 DMD and IGF2 differentially methylated regions 1 and 2 (DMR1 and DMR2. Results Bisulfite sequencing analysis did not show any differences in DNA methylation at the three porcine CTCF binding sites in the H19 DMD between liver, muscle and kidney tissues of adult pigs. A DNA methylation analysis using methyl-sensitive restriction endonuclease SacII and 'hot-stop' PCR gave consistent results with those from the bisulfite sequencing analysis. We found that porcine H19 DMD is distinctly differentially methylated, at least for the region formally confirmed by two SNPs, in liver, skeletal muscle and kidney of foetal, newborn and adult pigs, independent of the combined imprinting status of all IGF2 expressed transcripts. DNA methylation at CpG sites in DMR1 of foetal liver was significantly lower than in the adult liver due to the presence of hypomethylated molecules. An allele specific analysis was performed for IGF2 DMR2 using a SNP in the IGF2 3'-UTR. The maternal IGF2 DMR2 of foetal and newborn liver revealed a higher DNA methylation content compared to the respective paternal allele. Conclusions Our results indicate that the IGF2 imprinting status is transcript

  11. Determination of magnitudes and relative signs of 1H-19F coupling constants through 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2013-12-20

    A novel methodology based on 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments is described for a quick and accurate measurement of proton-fluorine coupling constants in fluorinated organic compounds. The magnitude of the (1)H-(19)F coupling was measured from the displacement between the relayed peaks associated with the α or β spin state of the fluorine, and its relative sign was derived from the sense of the displacement.

  12. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exons were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Expression of the human UGT1 locus in transgenic mice by 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2-pyrimidinylthioacetic acid (WY-14643) and implications on drug metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekeo-Effenberger, Kathy; Chen, Shujuan; Brace-Sinnokrak, Erin; Bonzo, Jessica A; Yueh, Mei-Fei; Argikar, Upendra; Kaeding, Jenny; Trottier, Jocelyn; Remmel, Rory P; Ritter, Joseph K; Barbier, Olivier; Tukey, Robert H

    2007-03-01

    The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A genes in humans have been shown to be differentially regulated in a tissue-specific fashion. Transgenic mice carrying the human UGT1 locus (Tg-UGT1) were recently created, demonstrating that expression of the nine UGT1A genes closely resembles the patterns of expression observed in human tissues. In the present study, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, and UGT1A6 have been identified as targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha in human hepatocytes and Tg-UGT1 mice. Oral administration of the PPARalpha agonist 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2-pyrimidinylthioacetic acid (pirinixic acid, WY-14643) to Tg-UGT1 mice led to induction of these proteins in either the liver, gastrointestinal tract, or kidney. The levels of induced UGT1A3 gene transcripts in liver and UGT1A4 protein in small intestine correlated with induced lamotrigine glucuronidation activity in these tissues. With UGT1A3 previously identified as the major human enzyme involved in human C24-glucuronidation of lithocholic acid (LCA), the dramatic induction of liver UGT1A3 RNA in Tg-UGT1 mice was consistent with the formation of LCA-24G in plasma. Furthermore, PPAR-responsive elements (PPREs) were identified flanking the UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A6 genes by a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, specific binding to PPARalpha and retinoic acid X receptor alpha, and functional response of the concatenated PPREs in HepG2 cells overexpressing PPARalpha. In conclusion, these results suggest that oral fibrate treatment in humans will induce the UGT1A family of proteins in the gastrointestinal tract and liver, influencing bile acid glucuronidation and first-pass metabolism of other drugs that are taken concurrently with hypolipidemic therapy.

  14. MSRE-qPCR法检测少弱精子症患者父源印记基因H19上游区域甲基化水平%The methylation level detection of the upstream of H19 paternal imprinted gene in olig-asthenospermia patient by MSRE-qPCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严鹏; 任丽娟; 成振; 郭大玮; 白丽娟; 贾琳娜

    2014-01-01

    目的 建立精子中父源印记基因H19上游区域MSRE-qPCR检测方法,并分析男性少弱精子症患者精子父源印记基因H19上游区域甲基化水平.方法 收集20例正常精液样本,同时筛选30例少弱精子症患者精液样本,应用甲基化敏感性限制性内切酶法并结合定量PCR对所有样本父源印记基因H19上游区域甲基化水平进行分析.结果 正常精液样本父源印记基因H19上游区域平均甲基化率为(99.8±2.72)%,高于少弱精子症患者精液样本的(82.4±15.30)%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 MSRE-qPCR法可用于父源印记基因H19上游区域甲基化水平的检测,少弱精子症者精液样本父源印记基因H19上游区域甲基化水平显著低于正常人.

  15. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ing, Jordan; Crane, Ana M; Venken, Koen; Davis, Brian R; Ng, Philip

    2016-10-11

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50-64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4-100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9-57.1% after positive selection and 87.5-100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6-16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10(-3)) necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  16. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human β-like globin gene's expression.

  17. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681--10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human b-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and the HS2core DNA sequence which exists in different states (the naked DNA or the in vitro reconstituted nucleosomal DNA) are quite different. We speculate that HMG proteins might play a critical role in the regulation of the human b-like globin gene's expression.

  18. The human granzyme A (HFSP, CTLA3) gene maps to 5q11-q12 and defines a new locus of the serine protease superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, T.M.; Lichter, P. (Institut fuer angewandte Tumorvirologie, Heidelberg (Germany)); Wekerle, H.; Zimmer, M.; Jenne, D.E. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Planegg-Martinsried (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    Human granzyme A (HFSP, Hanukah factor serine protease; CTLA3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated serine esterase-3), a homodimeric, trypsin-like serine protease of 60 kDa found in granules of cytolytic T cells and natural killer cells, is implicated in lymphocyte-mediated target cell lysis. It contributes to DNA fragmentation in perforin (PRF1)-lysed target cells through an unknown mechanism. The authors have isolated a cosmid clone for the functional gene of human granzyme A and established its complete exon-intron map of 10 kb. Using an 11-kb subfragment of the cloned genomic DNA as a probe, they have identified the chromosomal position of human granzyme A on 5q11-q12. Thus, the human granzyme A gene falls into a region of homology between human chromosome 5 and mouse chromosome 13, band D, where the mouse granzyme A gene has been located previously. The granzyme A gene is not linked to known members of the large superfamily of serine proteases. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  19. HULC and H19 Played Different Roles in Overall and Disease-Free Survival from Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Curative Hepatectomy: A Preliminary Analysis from Gene Expression Omnibus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongguo Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in tumor tissues and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC aggressiveness and survival. Methods. We correlated the lncRNAs in tumor tissues with HCC survival and clinicopathological features based on Gene Expression Omnibus expression profile GSE36376. Results. Eight lncRNAs and 240 HCC patients were included. Cox regression analysis indicated that HULC was a positive factor for HCC overall survival (HR = 0.885, 95% CI = 0.797–0.983, and P=0.023 and disease-free survival time (HR = 0.913, 95% CI = 0.835–0.998, and P=0.045. H19 and UCA1 were both demonstrated to be risk factors of HCC disease-free survival in multivariate Cox model (HR = 1.071, 95% CI = 1.01–1.137, and P=0.022 and HR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.092–5.273, and P=0.029, resp.. But Kaplan-Meier method showed no significant association between UCA1 and HCC disease-free survival (log rank P=0.616. Logistic regression demonstrated that H19 was overexpressed in HBV-infected patients (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.008–1.29, and P=0.037. HULC had a significant association with vascular invasion (OR = 0.648, 95% CI = 0.523–0.803, and P<0.001. H19 and MEG3 were both considered to be risk factors for high AFP level (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.277–1.646, and P<0.001 and OR = 1.613, 95% CI = 1.1–2.365, and P=0.014, resp.. Conclusions. Contributing to decreased susceptibility to vascular invasion, upregulation of HULC in tumor tissues was positively associated with HCC survival. In contrast, H19 overexpression might be risk factor for HCC aggressiveness and poor outcomes.

  20. Long non-coding RNA H19-mediated mouse cleft palate induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    OpenAIRE

    GAO, LIYUN; Yin, Jun; Wu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of transcripts, which are pervasively transcribed in the genome and a have greatly unknown biological function. Previous studies have identified that lncRNAs serve an important role in embryonic development. However, the function and mechanism of lncRNAs in the development of palate remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of lncRNA H19 in cleft palate (CP) development in mice. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxi...

  1. Locus ceruleus neurons in people with autism contain no histochemically-detectable mercury

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to environmental mercury has been proposed to play a part in autism. Mercury is selectively taken up by the human locus ceruleus, a region of the brain that has been implicated in autism. We therefore looked for the presence of mercury in the locus ceruleus of people who had autism, using the histochemical technique of autometallography which can detect nanogram amounts of mercury in tissues. In addition, we sought evidence of damage to locus ceruleus neurons in autism by immunostain...

  2. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won;

    2014-01-01

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is approximately 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality.We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of Eu...

  3. Generation of a heterozygous knockout human embryonic stem cell line for the OCIAD1 locus using CRISPR/CAS9 mediated targeting: BJNhem20-OCIAD1-CRISPR-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeti K. Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma immuno-reactive antigen domain containing 1(OCIAD1 single copy was knocked out generating an OCIAD1 heterozygous knockout human embryonic stem line named BJNhem20-OCIAD1-CRISPR-20. The line was generated using CRISPR-Cas9D10A double nickase knockout strategy (Mali et al., 2013.

  4. cDNA sequence and gene locus of the human retinal phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase-C{beta}4 (PLCB4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Ghalayini, A.J.; Anderson, R.E. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Defects in the Drosophila norpA (no receptor potential A) gene encoding a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) block invertebrate phototransduction and lead to retinal degeneration. The mammalian homolog, PLCB4, is expressed in rat brain, bovine cerebellum, and the bovine retina in several splice variants. To determine a possible role of PLCB4 gene defects in human disease, we isolated several overlapping cDNA clones from a human retina library. The composite cDNA sequence predicts a human PLC{beta}4 polypeptide of 1022 amino acid residues (MW 117,000). This PLC{beta}4 variant lacks a 165-amino-acid N-terminal domain characteristic for the rat brain isoforms, but has a distinct putative exon 1 unique for human and bovine retina isoforms. A PLC{beta}4 monospecific antibody detected a major (130 kDa) and a minor (160 kDa) isoform in retina homogenates. Somatic cell hybrids and deletion panels were used to localize the PCLB4 gene to the short arm of chromosome 20. The gene was further sublocalized to 20p12 by florescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Nonredundant and locus-specific gene repression functions of PRC1 paralog family members in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Vincent; Rozenveld-Geugien, Marjan; Bonardi, Francesco; Malanga, Donatella; van Gosliga, Djoke; Heyink, Anne Margriet; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Morrone, Giovanni; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is a key factor in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic stem cell self-renewal and functions in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). In humans, each of the 5 subunits of PRC1 has paralog family members of which many reside in

  6. The Effect of Preconception Paternal Alcohol Exposure on Epigenetic Remodelling of the H19 and Rasgrf1 Imprinting Control Regions in Mouse Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaysen Gregory Knezovich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted loci play a critical role in fetal development. Their expression is often regulated by CTCF protein binding at imprinting control regions (ICRs. Parental alcohol exposure has been shown to reduce global DNA methylation in the developing mouse fetus. This study explored the effect of preconception paternal alcohol exposure on DNA methylation at two paternally methylated ICRs (H19 and Rasgrf1 in the sperm of exposed males and somatic DNA of sired offspring. Significant reductions at the H19 CTCF 1 (p=0.0027 and CTCF 2 (p=0.0009 binding sites were observed in the offspring of ethanol-treated sires, which was significantly correlated with reduced weight at postnatal days 35 to 42 (p<0.05. As birth weight was unaffected and growth was only delayed during the postnatal weaning period, with subsequent re-convergence, we hypothesise that this may be the result of a mental deficit causing delayed establishment of independent feeding following weaning and would explain why this effect is transient. No difference in DNA methylation was observed in the sperm of alcohol-exposed males, indicating that the transmission of the epigenetic signal at conception is not due to altered methylation, but may be the result of an RNA-mediated mechanism or altered chromatin remodelling.

  7. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  8. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  9. Mapping of a macular drusen susceptibility locus in rhesus macaques to the homologue of human chromosome 6q14-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Krishna K; Ristau, Steven; Dawson, William W; Krawczak, Michael; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2005-10-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are a natural model for retinal drusen formation. The present study aimed at clarifying whether chromosomal regions homologous to candidate genes for drusen formation and progression in humans are also associated with a drusen phenotype in rhesus macaques. Some 42 genetic markers from seven chromosomal regions implicated in macular degeneration syndromes in humans were tested for whether they identified homologous, polymorphic sequences in rhesus DNA. This was found to be the case for seven markers, all of which were subsequently screened for the presence of potentially disease-predisposing alleles in 52 randomly chosen adult animals from the Cayo Santiago population of rhesus macaques (Caribbean Primate Research Center, PR, USA). The high drusen prevalence expected in the Cayo Santiago colony was confirmed in our sample in that 38 animals were found to have drusen (73%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that some alleles of the rhesus homologue of anonymous human marker D6S1036 were consistently over-represented among affected animals. Of two candidate genes located in the respective region, allelic variation in one (IMPG1) showed strong association with drusen formation. We conclude that one or more genes located at the rhesus homologue of human 6q14-15 are likely to play a role in retinal drusen formation, a finding that represents a first step towards the identification of genetic factors implicated in macular drusen formation in rhesus macaques. This is an important tool for the separation of genetic and environmental factors which must occur before satisfactory management methods can be developed.

  10. Coherent states and geodesics cut locus and conjugate locus

    CERN Document Server

    Berceanu, S

    1997-01-01

    The intimate relationship between coherent states and geodesics is pointed out. For homogenous manifolds on which the exponential from the Lie algebra to the Lie group equals the geodesic exponential, and in particular for symmetric spaces, it is proved that the cut locus of the point $0$ is equal to the set of coherent vectors orthogonal to $\\vert 0>$. A simple method to calculate the conjugate locus in Hermitian symmetric spaces with significance in the coherent state approach is presented. The results are illustrated on the complex Grassmann manifold.

  11. Interactions between HMG proteins and the core sequence of DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-Mike globin gene cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖; 张树冰; 蒋俶; 钱若兰

    2000-01-01

    HMG proteins are abundant chromosomal non-histone proteins. It has been suggested that the HMG proteins may play an important role in the structure and function of chromatin. In the present study, the binding of HMG proteins (HMG1/2 and HMG14/17) to the core DNA sequence of DNasel hypersensitive site 2 (HS2core DNA sequence, -10681-10970 bp) in the locus control region (LCR) of the human β-like globin gene cluster has been examined by using both the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution and the gel mobility shift assays. Here we show that HMG1/2 can bind to the naked HS2core DNA sequence, however, HMG 14/17 cannot. Using the in vitro nucleosome reconstitution we demonstrate that HMG14/17 can bind to the HS2core DNA sequence which is assembled into nucleosomes with the core histone octamer transferred from chicken erythrocytes. In contrast, HMG 1/2 cannot bind to the nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro with the HS2core DNA sequence. These results indicate that the binding patterns between HMG proteins and t

  12. Mapping of the human bradikinin B2 receptor gene and GALC gene at 14q31-32.1, the region of the Machado Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, V.T.T.; Cox, D.W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Bradykinin is a nine amino acid peptide liberated from the {alpha}2 globulin, kininogen, during inflammatory responses. Substantial evidence shows that bradikinin is involved in human inflammatory disorders. There are two types of kinin receptors: B1 and B2. The human bradikinin B2 receptor (BKRB2) gene was previously localized to chromosome 14 by somatic cell hybrids. Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of galactocerebrosidase (GALC). GALC has been previously localized to chromosome 14 at q31 by in situ hybridization. We have further defined the localization of the BKRB2 and GALC genes by physical and genetic linkage mapping. Primers were designed from the 3{prime} untranslated region of each gene. PCR was performed on human/rodent somatic cell hybrid carrying portions of chromosome 14, and on flow sorted chromosome DNA of patients with a deletion or translocation on chromosome 14. Results place the two genes between D14S48 and Pl, the same region as the Machado Joseph disease (MJD) gene. The genomic chromosome 14-specific cosmid library (DOE, Los Alamos) was screened using PCR products obtained from both sets of primers as probes. Positive clones for each gene were screened for di, tri and tetranucleotide repeats. A polymorphic CA repeat marker was obtained from the BKRB2 clones. CEPH families which show recombinants between D14S48 and Pl were typed with this marker and other published markers, which we have mapped in the region: D14S140, D14S68, D14S73, D14S67, D14S256 and D14S81. This positions BDRB2 more precisely and also provides an important map for further localization of the MJD gene.

  13. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  14. The cps locus of Streptococcus suis serotype 16: Development of a serotype-specific PCR assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.; Weixing, Fan; Wisselink, H.J.; Chengping, Lu

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 16 can infect pigs and humans. We describe the identification and the characterization of the capsular polysaccharides synthesis locus of S. suis serotype 16. Using PCR primers flanking the capsular polysaccharides synthesis locus, a 30,101-bp fragment was amplified. Twen

  15. LncRNAs H19 and HULC, activated by oxidative stress, promote cell migration and invasion in cholangiocarcinoma through a ceRNA manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are known to play important roles in different cell contexts, including cancers. However, little is known about lncRNAs in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA, a cholangiocyte malignancy with poor prognosis, associated with chronic inflammation and damage to the biliary epithelium. The aim of the study is to identify if any lncRNA might associate with inflammation or oxidative stress in CCA and regulate the disease progression. Methods In this study, RNA-seqs datasets were used to identify aberrantly expressed lncRNAs. Small interfering RNA and overexpressed plasmids were used to modulate the expression of lncRNAs, and luciferase target assay RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP was performed to explore the mechanism of miRNA-lncRNA sponging. Results We firstly analyzed five available RNA-seqs datasets to investigate aberrantly expressed lncRNAs which might associate with inflammation or oxidative stress. We identified that two lncRNAs, H19 and HULC, were differentially expressed among all the samples under the treatment of hypoxic or inflammatory factors, and they were shown to be stimulated by short-term oxidative stress responses to H2O2 and glucose oxidase in CCA cell lines. Further studies revealed that these two lncRNAs promoted cholangiocyte migration and invasion via the inflammation pathway. H19 and HULC functioned as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs by sponging let-7a/let-7b and miR-372/miR-373, respectively, which activate pivotal inflammation cytokine IL-6 and chemokine receptor CXCR4. Conclusions Our study revealed that H19 and HULC, up-regulated by oxidative stress, regulate CCA cell migration and invasion by targeting IL-6 and CXCR4 via ceRNA patterns of sponging let-7a/let-7b and miR-372/miR-373, respectively. The results suggest that these lncRNAs might be the chief culprits of CCA pathogenesis and progression. The study provides new insight into the mechanism linking lncRNA function with CCA and

  16. Use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) to investigate genetic diversity of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates from human, food, and veterinary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateva, Gergana; Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Asseva, Galina; Daskalov, Hristo; Petrov, Petar; Kantardjiev, Todor; Alexandar, Irina; Löfström, Charlotta

    2017-08-23

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most common zoonotic pathogen in Bulgaria. To allow efficient outbreak investigations and surveillance in the food chain, accurate and discriminatory methods for typing are needed. This study evaluated the use of multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and compared results with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinations for 100 S. Typhimurium strains isolated in Bulgaria during 2008-2012 (50 veterinary/food and 50 human isolates). Results showed that isolates were divided into 80 and 34 groups using MLVA and AMR, respectively. Simpson's index of diversity was determined to 0.994 ± 0.003 and 0.945 ± 0.012. The most frequently encountered MLVA profiles were 3-11-9-NA-211 (n = 5); 3-12-9-NA-211 (n = 3); 3-12-11-21-311 (n = 3); 3-17-10-NA-311 (n = 3); 2-20-9-7-212 (n = 3); and 2-23-NA-NA-111 (n = 3). No clustering of isolates related to susceptibility/resistance to antimicrobials, source of isolation, or year of isolation was observed. Some MLVA types were found in both human and veterinary/food isolates, indicating a possible route of transmission. A majority (83%) of the isolates were found to be resistant against at least one antimicrobial and 44% against ≥4 antimicrobials. Further studies are needed to verify MLVA usefulness over a longer period of time and with more isolates, including outbreak strains. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Genomic analysis of ERVWE2 locus in patients with Multiple sclerosis: absence of genetic association but potential role of Human Endogenous retrovirus type W elements in molecular mimicry with myelin antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S Olival

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs arise from ancient infections of the host germline cells by exogenous retroviruses, constituting 8% of the human genome. Elevated level of envelope transcripts from HERVs-W has been detected in CSF, plasma and brain tissues from patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS, most of them from Xq22.3, 15q21.3 and 6q21 chromosomes. However, since the locus Xq22.3 (ERVWE2 lack the 5' LTR promoter and the putative protein should be truncated due to a stop codon, we investigated the ERVWE2 genomic loci from 84 individuals, including MS patients with active HERV-W expression detected in PBMC. In addition, an automated search for promoter sequences in 20kb nearby region of ERVWE2 reference sequence was performed. Several putative binding sites for cellular cofactors and enhancers were found, suggesting that transcription may occur via alternative promoters. However, ERVWE2 DNA sequencing of MS and healthy individuals revealed that all of them harbor a stop codon at site 39, undermining the expression of a full-length protein. Finally, since plaque formation in CNS of MS patients is attributed to immunological mechanisms triggered by autoimmune attack against myelin, we also investigated the level of similarity between envelope protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG. Comparison of the MOG to the envelope identified five retroviral regions similar to the Ig-like domain of MOG. Interestingly, one of them includes T and B cell epitopes, capable to induce T effector functions and circulating Abs in rats. In sum, although no DNA substitutions that would link ERVWE2 to the MS pathogeny was found, the similarity between the envelope protein to MOG extends the idea that ERVEW2 may be involved on the immunopathogenesis of MS, maybe facilitating the MOG recognizing by the immune system. Although awaiting experimental evidences, the data presented here may expand the scope of the endogenous retroviruses involvement on MS

  18. Locus of Control and Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, M. Michael

    1980-01-01

    The role of locus of control in interpersonal attraction was examined by administering 1) the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and 2) a sociometric test of friendship to 200 eighth graders. (CM)

  19. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Natasha Z. R.; Geier, Ethan G.; Damotte, Vincent; Boehme, Kevin L.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Kramer, Joel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Huang, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Methods and findings Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case–control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999–2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984–2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005–2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10−4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08–1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk

  20. H19和IGF2R基因在体细胞克隆猪各组织中的甲基化状态%The methylation status of H19 and IGF2R in different tissues of somatic cell cloned pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志强; 谢一妮; 戴建军; 张廷宇; 吴彩凤; 张树山; 顾晓龙; 刘亮; 吴斌; 陈慧兰; 张德福; 马恒东

    2012-01-01

    为了探求新生克隆猪可能的死亡原因以及是否存在不完全的DNA甲基化重编程,本试验运用亚硫酸氢盐测序法分别检测了H19基因和IGF2R基因差异甲基化区(DMR)在新生死亡克隆猪和同期正常猪心脏、肝脏、脾脏、肺脏和肾脏中的甲基化状态。结果发现,H19基因DMR在克隆猪肺脏中表现为超甲基化,极显著高于正常猪(95.20%VS46.80%P〈0.01),且10个测序克隆中存在2处连续的全甲基化CpG位点(4-9位、12-S17位),而在其他组织中甲基化差异不显著(P〉0.05);IGF2R基因DMR在肝脏中处于超甲基化状态,显著高于正常猪(80.00%V839.41%P〈0.05),而在肺脏中为去甲基化状态,板显著低于正常猪(14.71%VS66.47%P〈0.01),在其他组织差异不显著(P〉0.05)。结果说明,在死亡克隆猪中,H19基因DMR在肺脏和IGF2R基因在肝脏与肺脏中存在不完全的DNA甲基化重编程,这可能是导致克隆动物死亡的因素之一。%In order to search for the possible reasons for the death of new borned cloned pig,and whether the incom- plete DNA methylation reprogramming has occurred in SCNT animals. The DNA methylation status of H19 and IGF2R differentially methylated region (DMR) in heart,liver,spleen,lung and kidney of cloned pig and normal pig were analyzed using bisulfite sequencing analysis. The results demonstrated that the H19 DMR was hypermethylated in the lung of the dead cloned pig,and was significantly higher compared with the control (95.20% vs 46.80% P〈0.01). Also,the tested CpGs sites from 4 to 9 and 12 to17 exhibited full methylation. The differences among others tissues were insignificant (P〉0.05) ; the IGF2R DMR showed hypermethylation in liver of the cloned pig,and was significantly higher than the control (80.00% vs 39.41% P〈0. 05); while in lung of the dead cloned pig, the IGF2R DMR was hypomethylated, and

  1. Locus ceruleus neurons in people with autism contain no histochemically-detectable mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to environmental mercury has been proposed to play a part in autism. Mercury is selectively taken up by the human locus ceruleus, a region of the brain that has been implicated in autism. We therefore looked for the presence of mercury in the locus ceruleus of people who had autism, using the histochemical technique of autometallography which can detect nanogram amounts of mercury in tissues. In addition, we sought evidence of damage to locus ceruleus neurons in autism by immunostaining for hyperphosphorylated tau. No mercury was found in any neurons of the locus ceruleus of 6 individuals with autism (5 male, 1 female, age range 16-48 years). Mercury was present in locus ceruleus neurons in 7 of 11 (64%) age-matched control individuals who did not have autism, which is significantly more than in individuals with autism. No increase in numbers of locus ceruleus neurons containing hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in people with autism. In conclusion, most people with autism have not been exposed early in life to quantities of mercury large enough to be found later in adult locus ceruleus neurons. Human locus ceruleus neurons are sensitive indicators of mercury exposure, and mercury appears to remain in these neurons indefinitely, so these findings do not support the hypothesis that mercury neurotoxicity plays a role in autism.

  2. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant–vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change. PMID:24535890

  3. Decreased Expression of MiR-138-5p by LncRNA H19 in Cervical Cancer Promotes Tumor Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Lei; Wang, Dazhong; Zhang, Han; Yu, Qian; Hua, Fangfang

    2017-08-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. However, the expression and underlying mechanisms of miRNA in cervical cancer progression remain unclear. In the present study, our data showed that the expression of miR-138-5p was significantly downregulated in cervical cancer tissues, decreased expression of miR-138-5p was correlated with advanced FIGO stage, poor differentiation, lymph nodes metastasis, and poor overall survival of cervical cancer patients. Function assays showed that overexpression of miR-138-5p reduced cervical cancer cell proliferation, arrested cell in G0/G1 phase and induced cell apoptosis in vitro. Remarkably, SIRT1 was confirmed as a direct target of miR-138-5p in cervical cancer and miR-138-5p exerted the tumor suppressed functions by suppressing SIRT1 expression. Moreover, we further identified that lncRNA H19 could act as a molecular sponge of miR-138-5p in cervical cancer progression. Taken together, these results suggested that miR-138-5p could suppress cervical cancer cell progression by targeting SIRT1.

  4. Correlation of DNA methylation status of imprinted gene H19 ICR with oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia%父源印记基因H19印记控制区域DNA甲基化与少、弱精子症相关性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建波; 李博; 梁新新; 王珺; 马夜肥; 张永琦; 刘正; 闵保华; 马旭辉

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究印记基因H19印记控制区域的DNA甲基化程度与男性少、弱精子症的相关性. 方法:通过染色体核型分析和Y染色体微缺失检测排除染色体因素干扰,进一步借助精液常规参数、伊红染色以及精子形态等指标,筛选出18例单一因素少精子症患者(浓度< 15×106/ml,其余指标均正常)和20例单一因素弱精子症患者(前向运动精子百分率<32%,其余指标均正常)用于DNA甲基化检测;提取精子样本全基因组DNA,进行亚硫酸氢盐处理、PCR扩增目的基因片段并测序;通过BIQ Analyzer软件对测序结果进行质控和DNA甲基化程度分析.20例正常生育男性精液标本作为对照组. 结果:与对照组甲基化丢失率[(0.30±0.06)%]相比,少精子症患者的H19印记控制区域的DNA甲基化丢失程度显著增高[(9.19±2.45)%],尤其当精子浓度<3×106/ml时,差异达到极显著水平(P<0.0l).在弱精子症患者中H19印记控制区域的DNA甲基化丢失程度[(0.30±0.07)%]和模式均与对照组无显著差异(P=0.62).进一步重点分析了CTCF6位点的DNA甲基化状态,少精子症患者的DNA甲基化丢失程度[(2.67±0.75)%]显著高于对照组[(0.05±0.03)%]和弱精子症组[(0.03±0.02)%],而后两者之间无显著差异(P=0.35). 结论:H19印记控制区域的DNA甲基化程度的降低与少精子症密切相关,且降低程度与精子浓度呈显著负相关,而与精子活力无关.%Objective:To study the correlation of the DNA methylation status of the imprinted gene H19 imprinting control region (ICR) with oligozoospermia and asthenozoosperrnia.Methods:We eliminated chromosomal abnormality as the cause of male infertility in the subjects by karyotype analysis and detection of Y-chromosome microdeletions,and identified 18 cases of single factorinduced oligozoospermia (sperm concentration < 15 × 106/ml) and 20 cases of single factor-induced asthenozoospermia (progressively motile

  5. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the function of the laminin alpha5-chain, previously identified in mice, cDNA clones encoding the 953-amino-acid carboxy terminal G-domain of the human laminin alpha5-chain were characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that the laminin alpha5-chain is expressed in human placenta...

  6. Organization of the cpe locus in CPE-positive clostridium perfringens type C and D isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Li

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644 found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity.

  7. Organization of the cpe Locus in CPE-Positive Clostridium perfringens Type C and D Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sayeed, Sameera; McClane, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene) contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne) cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644) found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity. PMID:20532170

  8. Psicologia e Arquitetura: em busca do locus interdisciplinar Psychology and Architecture: looking for the interdisciplinary locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleice Azambuja Elali

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Partindo do reconhecimento da inevitável interdisciplinaridade no estudo da relação pessoa-ambiente, o artigo discute a Psicologia Ambiental enquanto locus privilegiado na interseção entre Psicologia e Arquitetura, com especial ênfase para a interrelação ambiente construído - comportamento humano. Definindo a escolha dos métodos de pesquisa como fator crucial a esta posição interdisciplinar, o texto aponta os principais métodos atualmente utilizados, facilidades de aplicação e vantagens/desvantagens dos mesmos, defendendo a propriedade do uso de multimétodos na realização de trabalhos na área.Acknowledging interdisciplinarity as an inevitable condition for the study of person-environment relationship, the article discusses Environmental Psychology as locus of intersection between Psychology and Architecture, converging upon the interrelationship human behavior - built environment. Considering that the choice of research methods is an essential element to such an approach, the text defines the main methods and techniques used in this area, their application and advantages/disadvantages, emphasizing a multi-method strategy.

  9. The locus of microRNA-10b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  10. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Mayoral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos. Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los juicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.

  11. Emerging types of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC O178 present in cattle, deer and humans from Argentina and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eMiko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 400 serotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC have been implicated in outbreaks and sporadic human diseases. In recent years STEC strains belonging to serogroup O178 have been commonly isolated from cattle and food of bovine origin in South America and Europe. In order to explore the significance of these STEC strains as potential human pathogens, 74 German and Argentinean E. coli O178 strains from animals, food and humans were characterized phenotypically and investigated for their serotypes, stx-genotypes and forty-three virulence-associated markers by a real-time PCR-microarray. The majority (n=66 of the O178 strains belonged to serotype O178:H19. The remaining strains divided into O178:H7 (n=6, O178:H10 (n=1 and O178:H16 (n=1. STEC O178:H19 strains were mainly isolated from cattle and food of bovine origin, but one strain was from a patient with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Genotyping of the STEC O178:H19 strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed two major clusters of genetically highly related strains which differ in their stx-genotypes and non-Stx putative virulence traits, including adhesins, toxins and serine-proteases. Cluster A-strains including the HUS-strain (n=35 carried genes associated with severe disease in humans (stx2a, stx2d, ehxA, saa, subAB1, lpfAO113, terE combined with stx1a, espP, iha. Cluster B-strains (n=26 showed a limited repertoire of virulence genes (stx2c, pagC, lpfAO113, espP, iha. Among O178:H7 strains isolated from deer meat and patients with uncomplicated disease a new STEC variant was detected that is associated with the genotype stx1c/stx2b/ehxA/subAB2/espI/[terE]/espP/iha. None of the STEC O178 strains was positive for locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE- and nle-genes. Results indicate that STEC O178:H19 strains belong to the growing group of LEE-negative STEC that should be considered with respect to their potential to cause diseases in humans.

  12. A schizophrenia-associated HLA locus affects thalamus volume and asymmetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brucato, N.; Guadalupe, T.; Franke, B.; Fisher, S.E.; Francks, C.

    2015-01-01

    Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have recently been shown to have neuronal functions in the thalamus and hippocampus. Common genetic variants in the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) region, human homologue of the MHC locus, are associated with small effects on susceptibility to

  13. Locus of control and decision to abort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P N; Strano, D A; Willingham, W

    1984-04-01

    The relationship of locus of control to deciding on an abortion was investigated by administering Rotter's Locus of Control Scale to 118 women immediately prior to abortion and 2 weeks and 3 months following abortion. Subjects' scores were compared across the 3 time periods, and the abortion group's pretest scores were compared with those of a nonpregnant control, group. As hypothesized, the aborting group scored significantly more internal than the general population but no differences in locus of control were found across the 3 time period. The length of delay in deciding to abort an unwanted pregnancy following confirmation was also assessed. Women seeking 1st trimester abortions were divided into internal and external groups on the Rotter Scale and the lengths of delay were compared. The hypothesis that external scores would delay the decision longer than internal ones was confirmed. The results confirm characteristics of the locus of control construct and add information about personality characteristics of women undergoing abortion.

  14. Search, Effort, and Locus of Control

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Andrew; McGee, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that locus of control – one's perception of control over events in life – influences search by affecting beliefs about the efficacy of search effort in a laboratory experiment. We find that reservation offers and effort are increasing in the belief that one's efforts influence outcomes when subjects exert effort without knowing how effort influences the generation of offers but are unrelated to locus of control beliefs when subjects are informed about the relationship b...

  15. Culture, gender and locus of control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control.......The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control....

  16. Analyzing the H19- and T65-epitopes in 38 kd phosphorylated protein of Marek's disease viruses and comparing chicken immunological reactions to viruses point-mutated in the epitopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhizhong; ZHANG Zhi; QIN Aijian; Lee Lucy F

    2004-01-01

    DNA sequencing analysis in 38 kd phosphorylated protein (pp38) ORF of Marek's disease viruses (MDV) indicated that all tested 10 virulent strains with different pathotypes had 'A' at base #320 and glutamine at aa#107 while reacted with monoclonal antibody (Mab) H19 in indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFA). However, vaccine strain CVI988 had 'G' at base#320 and arginine at aa#107 instead, when it was negative in IFA with Mab H19. Some strains were also reactive with Mab T65 in IFA while there was 'G' at base #326 and glycine at aa#109, but the other strains, which had 'A' at base #326 and glutamic acid at aa#109, did not react with Mab T65. By comparison of CVI988 to its point mutants CVI/rpp38(AG) and CVI/rpp38(AA) with 1 or 2 base(s) changes at bases #320 and /or #326 of pp38 gene for their reactivity with Mab H19 and T65, it was confirmed that the glutamine at aa#107 and glycine at aa#109 were critical to epitopes H19 and T65 respectively. Immuno-reactions to MDV were compared in SPF chickens inoculated with cloned CVI988 and its mutant CVI/rpp38(AG). It was found that antibody responses to MDV in chickens inoculated with CVI/rpp38(AG) were delayed and significantly lower than that in chickens inoculated with the native CVI988. By differential comparison of antibody titers to different antigens, a third epitope specific to CVI988 and dependent on arginine at aa#107 was suggested to be responsible for the big difference in antibody responses induced by native CVI988 and its mutant.

  17. Functional analysis of the TRIB1 associated locus linked to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvris, Adrianna; Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Naing, Thet; Martinuk, Amy; Nikpay, Majid; Williams, Andrew; Buick, Julie; Yauk, Carole; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-06-03

    The TRIB1 locus has been linked to hepatic triglyceride metabolism in mice and to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease in humans. The lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by genome-wide association studies, are located ≈30 kb downstream from TRIB1, suggesting complex regulatory effects on genes or pathways relevant to hepatic triglyceride metabolism. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between common SNPs at the TRIB1 locus and plasma lipid traits. Characterization of the risk locus reveals that it encompasses a gene, TRIB1-associated locus (TRIBAL), composed of a well-conserved promoter region and an alternatively spliced transcript. Bioinformatic analysis and resequencing identified a single SNP, rs2001844, within the promoter region that associates with increased plasma triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk. Further, correction for triglycerides as a covariate indicated that the genome-wide association studies association is largely dependent on triglycerides. In addition, we show that rs2001844 is an expression trait locus (eQTL) for TRIB1 expression in blood and alters TRIBAL promoter activity in a reporter assay model. The TRIBAL transcript has features typical of long noncoding RNAs, including poor sequence conservation. Modulation of TRIBAL expression had limited impact on either TRIB1 or lipid regulatory genes mRNA levels in human hepatocyte models. In contrast, TRIB1 knockdown markedly increased TRIBAL expression in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. These studies demonstrate an interplay between a novel locus, TRIBAL, and TRIB1. TRIBAL is located in the genome-wide association studies identified risk locus, responds to altered expression of TRIB1, harbors a risk SNP that is an eQTL for TRIB1 expression, and associates with plasma triglyceride concentrations. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  18. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A. [Montreal General Hospital, Quebec (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  19. RefSeq and LocusLink: NCBI gene-centered resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, K D; Maglott, D R

    2001-01-01

    Thousands of genes have been painstakingly identified and characterized a few genes at a time. Many thousands more are being predicted by large scale cDNA and genomic sequencing projects, with levels of evidence ranging from supporting mRNA sequence and comparative genomics to computing ab initio models. This, coupled with the burgeoning scientific literature, makes it critical to have a comprehensive directory for genes and reference sequences for key genomes. The NCBI provides two resources, LocusLink and RefSeq, to meet these needs. LocusLink organizes information around genes to generate a central hub for accessing gene-specific information for fruit fly, human, mouse, rat and zebrafish. RefSeq provides reference sequence standards for genomes, transcripts and proteins; human, mouse and rat mRNA RefSeqs, and their corresponding proteins, are discussed here. Together, RefSeq and LocusLink provide a non-redundant view of genes and other loci to support research on genes and gene families, variation, gene expression and genome annotation. Additional information about LocusLink and RefSeq is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/.

  20. Extensive investigation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region reveals novel OCT4/SOX2 binding site defects associated with specific methylation patterns in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Habib, Walid; Azzi, Salah; Brioude, Frédéric; Steunou, Virginie; Thibaud, Nathalie; Das Neves, Cristina; Le Jule, Marilyne; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Keren, Boris; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Michot, Caroline; Rossi, Massimiliano; Pasquier, Laurent; Gicquel, Christine; Rossignol, Sylvie; Le Bouc, Yves; Netchine, Irène

    2014-11-01

    Isolated gain of methylation (GOM) at the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) accounts for about 10% of patients with BWS. A subset of these patients have genetic defects within ICR1, but the frequency of these defects has not yet been established in a large cohort of BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM. Here, we carried out a genetic analysis in a large cohort of 57 BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM and analyzed the methylation status of the entire domain. We found a new point mutation in two unrelated families and a 21 bp deletion in another unrelated child, both of which were maternally inherited and affected the OCT4/SOX2 binding site in the A2 repeat of ICR1. Based on data from this and previous studies, we estimate that cis genetic defects account for about 20% of BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM. Methylation analysis at eight loci of the IGF2/H19 domain revealed that sites surrounding OCT4/SOX2 binding site mutations were fully methylated and methylation indexes declined as a function of distance from these sites. This was not the case in BWS patients without genetic defects identified. Thus, GOM does not spread uniformly across the IGF2/H19 domain, suggesting that OCT4/SOX2 protects against methylation at local sites. These findings add new insights to the mechanism of the regulation of the ICR1 domain. Our data show that mutations and deletions within ICR1 are relatively common. Systematic identification is therefore necessary to establish appropriate genetic counseling for BWS patients with isolated ICR1 GOM.

  1. Genetic association of multiple sclerosis with the marker rs391745 near the endogenous retroviral locus HERV-Fc1: analysis of disease subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bettina; Oturai, Annette Bang; Harbo, Hanne F;

    2011-01-01

    We have previously described the occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) to be associated with human endogenous retroviruses, specifically the X-linked viral locus HERV-Fc1. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association of the HERV-Fc1 locus with subtypes of MS. MS patients are ge...

  2. Locus of Equity and Brand Extension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J. van Osselaer (Stijn); J.W. Alba (Joseph)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPrevailing wisdom assumes that brand equity increases when a brand touts its desirable attributes. We report conditions under which the use of attribute information to promote a product can shift the locus of equity from brand to attribute, thereby reducing the attractiveness of extensio

  3. Locus of Equity and Brand Extension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J. van Osselaer (Stijn); J.W. Alba (Joseph)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPrevailing wisdom assumes that brand equity increases when a brand touts its desirable attributes. We report conditions under which the use of attribute information to promote a product can shift the locus of equity from brand to attribute, thereby reducing the attractiveness of extensio

  4. Natural history of the ERVWE1 endogenous retroviral locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duret Laurent

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human HERV-W multicopy family includes a unique proviral locus, termed ERVWE1, whose full-length envelope ORF was preserved through evolution by the action of a selective pressure. The encoded Env protein (Syncytin is involved in hominoid placental physiology. Results In order to infer the natural history of this domestication process, a comparative genomic analysis of the human 7q21.2 syntenic regions in eutherians was performed. In primates, this region was progressively colonized by LTR-elements, leading to two different evolutionary pathways in Cercopithecidae and Hominidae, a genetic drift versus a domestication, respectively. Conclusion The preservation in Hominoids of a genomic structure consisting in the juxtaposition of a retrotransposon-derived MaLR LTR and the ERVWE1 provirus suggests a functional link between both elements.

  5. Natural history of the ERVWE1 endogenous retroviral locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Bertrand; Beliaeff, Jean; Bouton, Olivier; Oriol, Guy; Duret, Laurent; Mallet, François

    2005-01-01

    Background The human HERV-W multicopy family includes a unique proviral locus, termed ERVWE1, whose full-length envelope ORF was preserved through evolution by the action of a selective pressure. The encoded Env protein (Syncytin) is involved in hominoid placental physiology. Results In order to infer the natural history of this domestication process, a comparative genomic analysis of the human 7q21.2 syntenic regions in eutherians was performed. In primates, this region was progressively colonized by LTR-elements, leading to two different evolutionary pathways in Cercopithecidae and Hominidae, a genetic drift versus a domestication, respectively. Conclusion The preservation in Hominoids of a genomic structure consisting in the juxtaposition of a retrotransposon-derived MaLR LTR and the ERVWE1 provirus suggests a functional link between both elements. PMID:16176588

  6. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McPeek, M.S. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  7. The IgH locus 3' regulatory region: pulling the strings from behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Eric; Marquet, Marie; Fiancette, Rémi; Péron, Sophie; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Antigen receptor gene loci are among the most complex in mammals. The IgH locus, encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) in B-lineage cells, undergoes major transcription-dependent DNA remodeling events, namely V(D)J recombination, Ig class-switch recombination (CSR), and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Various cis-regulatory elements (encompassing promoters, enhancers, and chromatin insulators) recruit multiple nuclear factors in order to ensure IgH locus regulation by tightly orchestrated physical and/or functional interactions. Among major IgH cis-acting regions, the large 3' regulatory region (3'RR) located at the 3' boundary of the locus includes several enhancers and harbors an intriguing quasi-palindromic structure. In this review, we report progress insights made over the past decade in order to describe in more details the structure and functions of IgH 3'RRs in mouse and human. Generation of multiple cellular, transgenic and knock-out models helped out to decipher the function of the IgH 3' regulatory elements in the context of normal and pathologic B cells. Beside its interest in physiology, the challenge of elucidating the locus-wide cross talk between distant cis-regulatory elements might provide useful insights into the mechanisms that mediate oncogene deregulation after chromosomal translocations onto the IgH locus.

  8. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  9. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Locus of Control and Career Interest of Sophomore Accountancy Students: Basis for Employment Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovielyn Mañibo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This academic undertaking sought to determine the relationship between the locus of control and career interest of the respondents towards their future employment. The objectives of the study were to determine the respondents’ locus of control and career interest; to find if there is a significant relationship between the respondents’ locus of control and career interest and to develop an action plan that will gauge the students’ employment success as to their chosen field. In measuring and finding the relationship between the variables of the study, the researchers employed the quantitative method in the analysis of data using the questionnaires for locus of control (LOC and Career Cluster Interest Survey (CCIS as dominant tools. The participants chosen from this study were 74sophomore Accountancy students for Second Semester, School Year 2012 – 2013. Based from the results, most of the respondents (74 sophomore accountancy students have an external locus of control with career interest on education and training, human services, and finance. The computed rvalues indicates slight positive correlation, however, careers on government services, manufacturing , public administration, health science, human services showed significant correlation to internal (positive and external (negative locus of control. .Likewise, the Counseling and Testing Center of the university should conduct cognitive training targeting reasoning and speed of processing that can improve sense of personal control over one’s life and facilitate career orientation during the student- applicants’ admission as regards to their National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE results. With the findings of the study, a program design was created to gauge students employment path.

  11. Variation at the TERT locus and predisposition for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Duncan M

    2010-05-18

    Telomerase and the control of telomere length are intimately linked to the process of tumourigenesis in humans. Here I review the evidence that variation at the 5p15.33 locus, which contains the TERT gene (encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase), might play a role in the determination of cancer risk. Mutations in the coding regions of TERT can affect telomerase activity and telomere length, and create severe clinical phenotypes, including bone marrow failure syndromes and a substantive increase in cancer frequency. Variants within the TERT gene have been associated with increased risk of haematological malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia as well as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Furthermore, there is good evidence from a number of independent genome-wide association studies to implicate variants at the 5p15.33 locus in cancer risk at several different sites: lung cancer, basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer show strong associations, while bladder, prostate and cervical cancer and glioma also show risk alleles in this region. Thus, multiple independent lines of evidence have implicated variation in the TERT gene as a risk factor for cancer. The mechanistic basis of these risk variants is yet to be established; however, the basic biology suggests that telomere length control is a tantalising candidate mechanism underlying cancer risk.

  12. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  13. Genotyping of human Brucella isolated by multiple locus variable numbers of tandem repeats analysis%布鲁菌多位点可变数目串联重复序列分析的分型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红霞; 张秋香; 郝瑞娥; 姚素霞; 张凡非; 李虹; 崔步云; 姜海

    2016-01-01

    目的 采用多位点可变数目串联重复序列分析(MLVA)方法对山西省分离的布鲁菌进行基因型分析.方法 2012、2013年,在山西省布鲁菌病(简称布病)监测点,采集已确诊的布病患者血液,进行血培养,对培养出的布鲁菌进行传统的生物分型鉴定.选取MLVA的16个位点[分为2组:panel 1、panel 2(包括panel 2A、panel 2B)],对分离的布鲁菌进行MLVA分型,并对分型结果进行聚类分析.结果 2012、2013年,共分离47株羊种3型布鲁菌;MLVA分型后进行聚类分析,发现分离的菌株高度同源,均为东地中海型;菌株可分为A群和B群,A群为优势基因群;panel 2B的Bruce04 、Bruce16及Bruce30位点的变异度较高.结论 在同一年份,相邻地区的布鲁菌菌株MLVA分型结果一致或相近,对追溯传染源、分析布病的流行和爆发有重要意义.panel 2B的Bruce04、Bruce16及Bruce30位点的变异度高,提示这3个位点对分析研究同一生物型菌株的变异情况有价值.%Objective To analyze the genotypes of Brucella isolated in Shanxi Province using multiple locus variable numbers of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA).Methods In brucellosis monitoring points in Shanxi Province in 2012 and 2013,the blood samples were collected from brucellosis patients,and blood culture was done,then the traditional identification of biological classification was carried out.MLVA-t6 [two groups:panel 1,panel 2(including panel 2A,panel 2B)] was used for typing of Brucella,then genotyping results were cluster analyzed.Results In 2012 and 2013,a total of 47 Brucella were isolated,all of the strains were Brucella melitensis type 3 and highly homologous,clustering in panel 1 to the"East Mediterranean" Brucella melitensis group.The strains were divided into groups A and B,and group A was an advantageous gene group;the variabilities of Bruce04,Bruce16and Bruce30 in panel 2B were higher.Conclusions The result of MLVA for Brucella is identical or similar in the same

  14. Characterization of the human laminin beta2 chain locus (LAMB2): linkage to a gene containing a nonprocessed, transcribed LAMB2-like pseudogene (LAMB2L) and to the gene encoding glutaminyl tRNA synthetase (QARS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Jäger, A C; Khurana, T S

    1999-01-01

    The laminin beta2 chain is an important constituent of certain kidney and muscle basement membranes. We have generated a detailed physical map of a 110-kb genomic DNA segment surrounding the human laminin beta2 chain gene (LAMB2) on chromosome 3p21.3-->p21.2, a region paralogous with the chromoso...

  15. Sheep (Ovis aries) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piccinni, Barbara; Massari, Serafina; Caputi Jambrenghi, Anna; Giannico, Francesco; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ciccarese, Salvatrice; Antonacci, Rachele

    2015-01-01

    ..."). While the T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and the genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus has been determined in human and mouse, this information is still poorly known in artiodactyl species, such as sheep...

  16. C14H19RuSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Subvolume D5 `Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13. Part 5: Organometallic Compounds' of Volume 35 `Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data' of Landolt-Börnstein Group III: `Condensed Matter'.

  17. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargan David R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity. Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9. Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in the Swedish lapphund, may correspond to progressive rod-cone degeneration. This would increase the number of known dog breeds having this particular form of progressive retinal atrophy.

  18. Regulatory organization of the staphylococcal sae locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Novick, Richard P

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the complex internal regulatory circuitry of the staphylococcal sae locus and the impact of modifying this circuitry on the expression of external genes in the sae regulon. The sae locus contains four genes, the saeR and S two-component signalling module (TCS), and saeP and Q, two upstream genes of hitherto unknown function. It is expressed from two promoters, P(A)sae, which transcribes only the TCS, and P(C)sae, which transcribes the entire locus. A bursa aurealis (bursa) transposon insertion in saeP in a derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 has a profound effect on sae function. It modifies the activity of the TCS, changing the expression of many genes in the sae regulon, even though transcription of the TCS (from P(A)sae) is not interrupted. Moreover, these effects are not due to disruption of saeP since an in-frame deletion in saeP has essentially no phenotype. The phenotype of S. aureus strain Newman is remarkably similar to that of the saeP : : bursa and this similarity is explained by an amino acid substitution in the Newman saeS gene that is predicted to modify profoundly the signalling function of the protein. This concurrence suggests that the saeP : : bursa insertion affects the signalling function of saeS, a suggestion that is supported by the ability of an saeQR clone, but not an saeR clone, to complement the effects of the saeP : : bursa insertion.

  19. Locus of control and online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suretha Esterhuysen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The integration of online learning in university courses is considered to be both inevitable and necessary. Thus there is an increasing need to raise awareness among educators and course designers about the critical issues impacting on online learning. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess the differences between two groups of first-year Business Sciences learners (online and conventional learners in terms of biographic and demographic characteristics and locus of control. The study population consisted of 586 first-year learners of whom 185 completed the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI. The results show that the two groups of learners do not differ statistically significantly from each other with respect to locus of control. The findings and their implications are also discussed. Opsomming Die integrasie van aanlyn-leer in universiteitskursusse word beskou as sowel onafwendbaar as noodsaaklik. Daar is dus ’n toenemende behoefte om bewustheid onder opvoedkundiges en kursusontwerpers te kweek oor die kritiese aspekte wat ’n impak op aanlyn-leer het (Morgan, 1996. Daarom was die doel van hierdie ondersoek om die verskille tussen twee groepe eerstejaarleerders in Bestuurs- en Ekonomiese Wetenskap (aanlyn en konvensionele leerders te bepaal ten opsigte van biografiese en demografiese eienskappe en lokus van beheer. Die populasie het bestaan uit 586 eerstejaarleerders waarvan 185 die Lokus van Beheer Vraelys voltooi het. Die resultate toon dat die twee groepe leerders nie statisties beduidend van mekaar verskil het met betrekking tot lokus van beheer nie. Die bevindinge en implikasies word ook bespreek.

  20. Cut Locus Construction using Deformable Simplicial Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Anton, François

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for appproximating cut loci for a given point p on Riemannian 2D manifolds, closely related to the notion of Voronoi diagrams. Our method finds the cut locus by advecting a front of points equally distant from p along the geodesics originating at p and finding...... the lines of self-intersections of the front in the parametric space. This becomes possible by using the deformable simplicial complexes (DSC, [1]) method for deformable interface tracking. DSC provide a simple collision detection mechanism, allows for interface topology control, and does not require...

  1. The MTAP-CDKN2A Locus Confers Susceptibility to a Naturally Occurring Canine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Abigail L.; Hedan, Benoit; Cadieu, Edouard; Erich, Suzanne A.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Faden, Daniel L.; Cullen, John; Abadie, Jerome; Kwon, Erika M.; Gröne, Andrea; Devauchelle, Patrick; Rimbault, Maud; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Lynch, Mary; Galibert, Francis; Breen, Matthew; Rutteman, Gerard R.; André, Catherine; Parker, Heidi G.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Advantages offered by canine population substructure, combined with clinical presentations similar to human disorders, makes the dog an attractive system for studies of cancer genetics. Cancers that have been difficult to study in human families or populations are of particular interest. Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare and poorly understood neoplasm in humans that occurs in 15–25% of Bernese Mountain Dogs (BMD). Methods Genomic DNA was collected from affected and unaffected BMD in North America (NA) and Europe. Both independent and combined genome wide association studies (GWAS) were used to identify cancer-associated loci. Fine mapping and sequencing narrowed the primary locus to a single gene region. Results Both populations shared the same primary locus, which features a single haplotype spanning MTAP and part of CDKN2A and is present in 96% of affected BMD. The haplotype is within the region homologous to human chromosome 9p21, which has been implicated in several types of cancer. Conclusions We present the first GWAS for HS in any species. The data identify an associated haplotype in the highly cited tumor suppressor locus near CDKN2A. These data demonstrate the power of studying distinctive malignancies in highly predisposed dog breeds. Impact Here, we establish a naturally-occurring model of cancer susceptibility due to CDKN2 dysregulation, thus providing insight regarding this cancer-associated, complex, and poorly understood genomic region. PMID:22623710

  2. A new strategy for estimating two-locus recombination fractions under some natural inequality restrictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ying Zhou; Weijun Ma; Xiaona Sheng; Huakun Wang

    2011-08-01

    Linkage analysis is now being widely used to map markers on each chromosome in the human genome, to map genetic diseases, and to identify genetic forms of common diseases. Two-locus linkage analysis and multi-locus analysis have been investigated comprehensively, and many computer programs have been developed to perform linkage analysis. Yet there exists a shortcoming in traditional methods, i.e., the parameter space of two-locus recombination fractions has not been emphasized sufficiently in the usual analyses. In this paper, we propose a new strategy for estimating the two-locus recombination fractions based on data of backcross family in the framework of some natural and necessary parameter restrictions. The new strategy is based on a restricted projection algorithm, which can provide fast reasonable estimates of recombination fraction, and can therefore serve as a superior alternative algorithm. Results obtained from both real and simulated data indicate that the new algorithm performs well in the estimation of recombination fractions and outperforms current methods.

  3. Self efficacy, social acceptance and locus of control as predictors of social interest among Iranian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ataie Moghanloo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Social interest is human phenomenon which can be considered as structure of personality in psychology. This descriptive correlation study aimed to investigate self efficacy, social acceptance and locus of control as predictors of social interest. This was correlational study. The sample consisted of 153 boys and 147 girls who were studying at private middle schools. Multistage cluster sampling method was used. General self efficacy questionnaire, marlowe-crowne social desirability scale, Rotter's Locus of control scale and sulliman scale of social interest were used to collect data. The level of significance was at 5%. The results showed that social interest had significant positive relationship with self efficacy and social acceptability and hadsignificant negative relationship with locus of control. Three variables of self efficacy, social acceptance and locus of control were able to explain about 59% of social interest variance. According to obtained results about social interest in adolescents and also consider other predictors in this context appropriate training promotion of social interest should be used and developed.

  4. Direct visualization of the highly polymorphic RNU2 locus in proximity to the BRCA1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Tessereau

    Full Text Available Although the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is one of the most extensively characterized genetic loci, much less is known about its upstream variable number tandem repeat element, the RNU2 locus. RNU2 encodes the U2 small nuclear RNA, an essential splicing element, but this locus is missing from the human genome assembly due to the inherent difficulty in the assembly of repetitive sequences. To fill the gap between RNU2 and BRCA1, we have reconstructed the physical map of this region by re-examining genomic clone sequences of public databases, which allowed us to precisely localize the RNU2 array 124 kb telomeric to BRCA1. We measured by performing FISH analyses on combed DNA for the first time the exact number of repeats carried by each of the two alleles in 41 individuals and found a range of 6-82 copies and a level of heterozygosity of 98%. The precise localisation of the RNU2 locus in the genome reference assembly and the implementation of a new technical tool to study it will make the detailed exploration of this locus possible. This recently neglected macrosatellite could be valuable for evaluating the potential role of structural variations in disease due to its location next to a major cancer susceptibility gene.

  5. TALEN/CRISPR-mediated eGFP knock-in add-on at the OCT4 locus does not impact differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards endoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A J Krentz

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have great promise as a source of unlimited transplantable cells for regenerative medicine. However, current progress on producing the desired cell type for disease treatment has been limited due to an insufficient understanding of the developmental processes that govern their differentiation, as well as a paucity of tools to systematically study differentiation in the lab. In order to overcome these limitations, cell-type reporter hESC lines will be required. Here we outline two strategies using Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-Associated protein (Cas to create OCT4-eGFP knock-in add-on hESC lines. Thirty-one and forty-seven percent of clones were correctly modified using the TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, respectively. Further analysis of three correctly targeted clones demonstrated that the insertion of eGFP in-frame with OCT4 neither significantly impacted expression from the wild type allele nor did the fusion protein have a dramatically different biological stability. Importantly, the OCT4-eGFP fusion was easily detected using microscopy, flow cytometry and western blotting. The OCT4 reporter lines remained equally competent at producing CXCR4+ definitive endoderm that expressed a panel of endodermal genes. Moreover, the genomic modification did not impact the formation of NKX6.1+/SOX9+ pancreatic progenitor cells following directed differentiation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate for the first time that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to modify OCT4 and highlight the feasibility of creating cell-type specific reporter hESC lines utilizing genome-editing tools that facilitate homologous recombination.

  6. Impact of locus of control on health message effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Shen, Fuyuan

    2011-10-01

    This article examined how individuals' locus of control might moderate the effect of health message frames. An experiment was conducted whereby participants read either individual- or social-responsibility message frames after their locus of control was primed. Results indicated that messages presented in individual-responsibility frames were more persuasive when people were primed with internal locus of control, whereas social-responsibility framed appeals were more persuasive when people were primed with external locus of control. These results were found for individuals in both high and low cognitive load conditions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. Relationships between locus of control and paranormal beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Robert W; Davis, Jessica Boyette

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated the associations between scores on paranormal beliefs, locus of control, and certain psychological processes such as affect and cognitions as measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Analysis yielded significant correlations between scores on Locus of Control and two subscales of Tobacyk's (1988) Revised Paranormal Beliefs Scale, New Age Philosophy and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs. A step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that Locus of Control was significantly related to New Age Philosophy. Other correlations were found between Tobacyk's subscales, Locus of Control, and three processes measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count.

  8. Inside the CBF locus in Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondelli, Alessandro; Francia, Enrico; Barabaschi, Delfina; Pasquariello, Marianna; Pecchioni, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Several molecular evidences have been gathered in Poaceae that point out a central role of the CBF/DREB1 transcription factors in the signal transduction pathways leading to low-temperature tolerance, although to a quite different extent between crops originating from either temperate or tropical climates. A common feature of the CBF/DREB1 genes in Poaceae is their structural organization at the genome level in clusters of tandemly duplicated genes. In temperate cereals such as barley and wheat, expansion of specific multigene phylogenetic clades of CBFs that map at the Frost Resistance-2 locus has been exclusively observed. In addition, copy number variants of CBF genes between frost resistant and frost sensitive genotypes raise the question if multiple copies of the CBF/DREB1s are required to ensure freezing tolerance. On the other hand, in crops of tropical origin such as rice and maize, a smaller or less-responsive CBF regulon may have evolved, and different mechanisms might determine chilling tolerance. In this review, recent advances on the organization and diversity at the CBF cluster locus in the grasses are provided and discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a siderophore utilization locus in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seale Thomas W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae has an absolute aerobic growth requirement for either heme, or iron in the presence of protoporphyrin IX. Both iron and heme in the mammalian host are strictly limited in their availability to invading microorganisms. Many bacterial species overcome iron limitation in their environment by the synthesis and secretion of small iron binding molecules termed siderophores, which bind iron and deliver it into the bacterial cell via specific siderophore receptor proteins on the bacterial cell surface. There are currently no reports of siderophore production or utilization by H. influenzae. Results Comparative genomics revealed a putative four gene operon in the recently sequenced nontypeable H. influenzae strain R2846 that encodes predicted proteins exhibiting significant identity at the amino acid level to proteins involved in the utilization of the siderophore ferrichrome in other bacterial species. No siderophore biosynthesis genes were identified in the R2846 genome. Both comparative genomics and a PCR based analysis identified several additional H. influenzae strains possessing this operon. In growth curve assays strains containing the genes were able to utilize ferrichrome as an iron source. H. influenzae strains lacking the operon were unable to obtain iron from ferrichrome. An insertional mutation in one gene of the operon abrogated the ability of strains to utilize ferrichrome. In addition transcription of genes in the identified operon were repressible by high iron/heme levels in the growth media. Conclusions We have identified an iron/heme-repressible siderophore utilization locus present in several nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The same strains do not possess genes encoding proteins associated with siderophore synthesis. The siderophore utilization locus may enable the utilization of siderophores produced by other microorganisms in the polymicrobial environmental niche of the human nasopharynx

  10. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    OpenAIRE

    Sargan David R; Wickström Kaisa; Aguirre-Hernández Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus...

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry thin film and first-principles calculations of electronic and linear optical properties of [(C9H19NH3)2PbI2Br2] 2D perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, H.; Hlil, E. K.; Abid, Y.

    2017-03-01

    In this study we report results of first-principles density functional calculations using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method as implemented in the WIEN2K code. We employed the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy to calculate electronic and linear optical properties of the (C9H19NH3)2PbI2Br2 compound. The linear optical properties, namely, the real ε1 (ω) and imaginary ε2 (ω) parts of dielectric function, the refractive index n (ω) and the extinction coefficient k (ω) are calculated and compared with experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra. The reflectivity R (ω) and electron energy loss function L (ω) are calculated too. Our calculations performed for band structure and density of states show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum are located at Γ point resulting in a direct band gap of about (Γv -Γc) of 2.42 eV in good agreement with the experimental data. The investigated compound has a large uniaxial anisotropy of the dielectric function of about 0.0739 and a negative birefringence at zero energy Δn (0) =-0.11.

  12. Turkish population data on the short tandem repeat locus TPOX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vural, B; Poda, M; Atlioglu, E;

    1998-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals.......Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals....

  13. Metacognition: As a Predictor of One's Academic Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serhat; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of metacognition on one's academic locus of control. The study's sample group consists of 451 university students enrolled in various programs at Sakarya University, Turkey. In this study, the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and the Academic Locus of Control Scale were used. The correlations and…

  14. Locus of Control, Attitudes toward Education, and Teaching Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Lya

    1982-01-01

    Tests 191 elementary school teachers in northern Israel for the relationships among locus of control, traditional and progressive educational attitudes, and related teaching behaviors. Finds external and internal locus of control explain the variance in traditional and progressive attitudes, respectively, and teaching behaviors. (Author/LC)

  15. The Cut Locus of a Torus of Revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Markvorsen, Steen; Sinclair, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We determine the structure of the cut locus of a class of tori of revolution, which includes the standard tori in 3-dimensional Euclidean space.......We determine the structure of the cut locus of a class of tori of revolution, which includes the standard tori in 3-dimensional Euclidean space....

  16. Locus of control and investment in risky assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca, N.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Using representative household panel data, we show that the investment behavior of households is related to the economic locus of control of household heads. A household's internal locus of control in economic issues is positively related to its decision to hold risky assets as well as its share of

  17. Locus of Control and Protection of Consumer Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Krastev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influence of locus of control on the consumer behavior. Theoretical supposition is proven by analyzing empirical data from a study of 287 students. The methods assessed the capacity for defending personal and consumer rights, as well as the type of locus of control.

  18. Locus of Control in Underachieving and Achieving Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study, with 87 underachieving and 77 achieving gifted students in grades 6-9, found that general locus of control measures did not differentiate between the 2 groups, that both scored significantly higher on positive internal than on negative internal locus of control, and that there were no gender or grade effects. (Author/DB)

  19. Locus of Control and Marital Stability: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, John A.; Bahr, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and marital stability of young men. Factors derived from locus of control measures included leadership, personal, and fate scales. Results indicated the only significant difference was on the leadership scale between men remaining married and those who did not. (RC)

  20. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  1. Is this Red Spot the Blue Spot (locus ceruleum)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Yu Kyung; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The authors report brain images of 18F-FDG-PET in a case of schizophrenia. The images showed strikingly increased bilateral uptake in the locus ceruleum. The locus ceruleum is called the blue spot and known to be a center of the norepinephrinergic system.

  2. Locus of Control in Underachieving and Achieving Gifted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study, with 87 underachieving and 77 achieving gifted students in grades 6-9, found that general locus of control measures did not differentiate between the 2 groups, that both scored significantly higher on positive internal than on negative internal locus of control, and that there were no gender or grade effects. (Author/DB)

  3. Physical Attractiveness, Locus of Control, Sex Role, and Conversational Assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Keith F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship among physical attractiveness, locus of control, sex role orientation, and assertiveness in undergraduate students. Reviews videotapes of mixed-sex student groups engaged in discussion. Finds an internal locus of control positively correlated with assertiveness. Uses a behavioral measure of assertiveness rather than…

  4. Sign Stability via Root Locus Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Travis E

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of network science old topics in ecology and economics are resurfacing. One such topic is structural stability (often referred to as qualitative stability or sign stability). A system is deemed structurally stable if the system remains stable for all possible parameter variations so long as the parameters do not change sign. This type of stability analysis is appealing when studying real systems as the underlying stability result only requires the scientist or engineer to know the sign of the parameters in the model and not the specific values. The necessary and sufficient conditions for qualitative stability however are opaque. In order to shed light on those conditions root locus analysis is employed. This technique allows us to illustrate the necessary conditions for qualitative stability.

  5. Cut Locus Construction using Deformable Simplicial Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Anton, François;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for appproximating cut loci for a given point p on Riemannian 2D manifolds, closely related to the notion of Voronoi diagrams. Our method finds the cut locus by advecting a front of points equally distant from p along the geodesics originating at p and finding...... the domain to have disk topology. We test our method for tori of revolution and compare our results to the benchmark ones from [2]. The method, however, is generic and can be easily adapted to construct cut loci for other manifolds of genera other than 1....... the lines of self-intersections of the front in the parametric space. This becomes possible by using the deformable simplicial complexes (DSC, [1]) method for deformable interface tracking. DSC provide a simple collision detection mechanism, allows for interface topology control, and does not require...

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Saija J; Pietilä, Elina; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Tiira, Katriina; Hansen, Liz; Johnson, Gary S; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG), primary open-angle (POAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT) in which it is a late-onset (>7 years) disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively) in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10), OR = 32 for homozygosity). Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG, primary open-angle (POAG and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT in which it is a late-onset (>7 years disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10, OR = 32 for homozygosity. Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  8. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Kia; M.M. Gorski (Marcin); S. Giannakopoulos (Stavros); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously

  9. Imported brucellosis in Denmark: Molecular identification and multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping of the bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, H.; Dargis, R.; Christensen, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction was used to identify Brucella species isolated from humans in Denmark. Consecutive analysis of referred bacteria and re-examination of historical isolates identified all as Brucella melitensis. Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) placed the iso...

  10. Burnout in Health Care Professionals as a Function of Coping Profiles, Locus of Control, and Self Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkind, F. Jane; And Others

    Registered nurses, interns, and residents from five hospitals in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey were administered the Maslach Human Services Survey, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, Newman's Alpha Omega Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. Results strongly suggested that an individual with high self-esteem and…

  11. Inter-ethnic polymorphism of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in sickle-cell anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périchon, B; Ragusa, A; Lapouméroulie, C; Romand, A; Moi, P; Ikuta, T; Labie, D; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1993-06-01

    Sequence polymorphisms within the 5'HS2 segment of human locus control region is described among sickle cell anemia patients. Distinct polymorphic patterns of a simple sequence repeat are observed in strong linkage disequilibrium with each of the five major beta s haplotypes. Potential functional relevance of this polymorphic region in globin gene expression is discussed.

  12. Effects of preferred retinal locus placement on text navigation and development of advantageous trained retinal locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gale R; Schuchard, Ronald A; De l'Aune, William R; Watkins, Erica

    2006-01-01

    Sixty readers were evaluated for visual function and text-navigation ability. The visual field and preferred retinal locus (PRL) were measured with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). We found significant differences in text-navigation ability based on scotoma and PRL placement. Readers with a PRL to the left of or above a scotoma had significantly less text-navigation abilities. Readers with a PRL to the left of a scotoma tended to misread words with similar beginnings and omit the last word on a line. Readers with a PRL above a scotoma tended to skip a line or reread the same line twice. In a follow-up study, seven subjects with a nonadvantageous PRL quickly developed a trained retinal locus (TRL) during instruction with an SLO. Although the readers developed the TRL in about 15 minutes, they read slower with the TRL than the PRL. This TRL research provides promising pilot data.

  13. Escala de Locus de controle ELCO/TELEBRÁS Scale of Locus of control - ELCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Pasquali

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Com base na teoria de Rotter e Escala de Levenson foi elaborada uma escala de Locus de Controle Organizacional (ELCO, composta por 28 itens. A escala foi validada com uma amostra de 350 empregados do Sistema Telebrás. Verificou-se a presença dos 2 fatores previstos na teoria, a saber: internalidade e externalidade, aparecendo a escala de externalidade, com 18 itens, bem estruturada (alfa = 0.81 e a de internalidade, com 10 itens, deixando a desejar no que se refere à consistência interna (alfa = 0.66. Com os dados desta pesquisa foi feita também análise do Locus de Controle desses mesmos empregados. A constatação mais saliente foi a de que o nível de internalidade caiu com o aumento do nível escolar e o aumento da experiência profissional desses mesmos empregados. Estes resultados surpreendentes foram interpretados em termos da situação típica da empresa, que está passando por um período de transição, a saber: a passagem da condição de empresa estatal para empresa privada, o que seria motivo da perda de confiança dos empregados na própria competência, particularmente por parte daqueles com maior competência intelectual e maior experiência profissional. Fez-se igualmente reparos na qualidade psicométrica da escala e da própria teoria do Locus de controle, no sentido de que esta precisa ser melhor axiomatizada para possibilitar a elaboração de escalas mais precisas para a medida dos construtos que propõe.A scale with 28 items, the Organizational Locus of Control (ELCO, was built based on Rotter’s theory and Levenson’s scale. ELCO was validated on a sample of 350 employees of Telebrás, a governmental firm in Brazil. As foreseen from the theory, a principal-axis factoring showed the presence of the expected two factors, namely internal and external locus of control. The external locus of control factor, composed of 18 items, showed good internal consistency (alpha =.81 whereas the internal factor, with 10 items

  14. Polycomb Mediated Epigenetic Silencing and Replication Timing at the INK4a/ARF Locus during Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthuy, Christophe; Chasson, Lionel; Serrano, Manuel; Djabali, Malek

    2009-01-01

    Background The INK4/ARF locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes (p15Ink4b, Arf and p16Ink4a) and is frequently inactivated in a large number of human cancers. Mechanisms regulating INK4/ARF expression are not fully characterized. Principal Findings Here we show that in young proliferating embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2 together with PRC1 members BMI1 and M33 are strongly expressed and localized at the INK4/ARF regulatory domain (RD) identified as a DNA replication origin. When cells enter senescence the binding to RD of both PRC1 and PRC2 complexes is lost leading to a decreased level of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). This loss is accompanied with an increased expression of the histone demethylase Jmjd3 and with the recruitment of the MLL1 protein, and correlates with the expression of the Ink4a/Arf genes. Moreover, we show that the Polycomb protein BMI1 interacts with CDC6, an essential regulator of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Polycomb proteins and associated epigenetic marks are crucial for the control of the replication timing of the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence. Conclusions We identified the replication licencing factor CDC6 as a new partner of the Polycomb group member BMI1. Our results suggest that in young cells Polycomb proteins are recruited to the INK4/ARF locus through CDC6 and the resulting silent locus is replicated during late S-phase. Upon senescence, Jmjd3 is overexpressed and the MLL1 protein is recruited to the locus provoking the dissociation of Polycomb from the INK4/ARF locus, its transcriptional activation and its replication during early S-phase. Together, these results provide a unified model that integrates replication, transcription and epigenetics at the INK4/ARF locus. PMID:19462008

  15. Evaluation of single and double-locus real-time PCR assays for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielly Haya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a human pathogen, representing an infection control challenge. Conventional MRSA screening takes up to three days, therefore development of rapid detection is essential. Real time-PCR (rt-PCR is the fastest method fulfilling this task. All currently published or commercially available rt-PCR MRSA assays relay on single or double-locus detection. Double-locus assays are based on simultaneous detection of mecA gene and a S. aureus-specific gene. Such assays cannot be applied on clinical samples, which often contain both coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS and S. aureus, either of which can carry mecA. Single-locus assays are based on detection of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec element and the S. aureus-specific orfX gene, assuming that it is equivalent to mecA detection. Findings Parallel evaluation of several published single and double-locus rt-PCR MRSA assays of 150 pure culture strains, followed by analysis of 460 swab-derived clinical samples which included standard identification, susceptibility testing, followed by PCR detection of staphylococcal suspected isolates and in-PCR mixed bacterial populations analysis indicated the following findings. Pure cultures analysis indicated that one of the single-locus assay had very high prevalence of false positives (Positive predictive value = 77.8% and was excluded from further analysis. Analysis of 460 swab-derived samples indicated that the second single-locus assay misidentified 16 out of 219 MRSA's and 13 out of 90 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus's (MSSA were misidentified as MRSA's. The double-locus detection assay misidentified 55 out of 90 MSSA's. 46 MSSA containing samples were misidentified as MRSA and 9 as other than S. aureus ending with low positive predicted value ( Conclusion The results indicate that high prevalence of false-positive and false-negative reactions occurs in such assays.

  16. Polycomb mediated epigenetic silencing and replication timing at the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Agherbi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The INK4/ARF locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes (p15(Ink4b, Arf and p16(Ink4a and is frequently inactivated in a large number of human cancers. Mechanisms regulating INK4/ARF expression are not fully characterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that in young proliferating embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 member EZH2 together with PRC1 members BMI1 and M33 are strongly expressed and localized at the INK4/ARF regulatory domain (RD identified as a DNA replication origin. When cells enter senescence the binding to RD of both PRC1 and PRC2 complexes is lost leading to a decreased level of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3. This loss is accompanied with an increased expression of the histone demethylase Jmjd3 and with the recruitment of the MLL1 protein, and correlates with the expression of the Ink4a/Arf genes. Moreover, we show that the Polycomb protein BMI1 interacts with CDC6, an essential regulator of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Polycomb proteins and associated epigenetic marks are crucial for the control of the replication timing of the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence. CONCLUSIONS: We identified the replication licencing factor CDC6 as a new partner of the Polycomb group member BMI1. Our results suggest that in young cells Polycomb proteins are recruited to the INK4/ARF locus through CDC6 and the resulting silent locus is replicated during late S-phase. Upon senescence, Jmjd3 is overexpressed and the MLL1 protein is recruited to the locus provoking the dissociation of Polycomb from the INK4/ARF locus, its transcriptional activation and its replication during early S-phase. Together, these results provide a unified model that integrates replication, transcription and epigenetics at the INK4/ARF locus.

  17. Altered Methylation of IGF2 Locus 20 Years after Preterm Birth at Very Low Birth Weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoliina Wehkalampi

    Full Text Available People born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW, ≤1500g have higher rates of risk factors for adult-onset diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. These risks may be mediated through epigenetic modification of genes that are critical to normal growth and development.We measured the methylation level of an imprinted insulin-like-growth-factor 2 (IGF2 locus (IGF2/H19 in young adults born preterm at VLBW and in their peers born at term. We studied 158 VLBW and 161 control subjects aged 18 to 27 years from the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults. Methylation fraction at two IGF2 differentially methylated regions (DMRs - IGF2 antisense transcript (IGF2AS, also known as IGF2 DMR0 and last exon of IGF2 (IGF2_05, also known as IGF2 DMR2 - were measured with Sequenom Epityper. We used linear regression and adjustment for covariates to compare methylation fractions at these DMRs between VLBW and control subjects.At one IGF2AS CpG site, methylation was significantly lower in VLBW than in control subjects, mean difference -0.017 (95% CI; -0.028, -0.005, P = 0.004. Methylation at IGF2_05 was not different between the groups.Methylation of IGF2AS is altered 20 years after preterm birth at VLBW. Altered methylation may be a mechanism of later increased disease risk but more data are needed to indicate causality.

  18. Strengthening Locus Standi in Human Rights Litigation in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    2016-05-30

    May 30, 2016 ... Email. Lovemore.Chiduza@ul.ac.za pnmakiwane@wsu.ac.za. Date published ..... exception to the aforementioned rule was if the court viewed the raising of .... The post-apartheid legal framework in South Africa provides an.

  19. CTCF-mediated reduction of vigilin binding affects the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-Yan; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Wei, Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ran; Yang, Wen-Li; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Wen-Quan; Huang, Yuan; Qin, Yang

    2014-05-02

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in numerous aspects of chromosome biology, and vigilin, a multi-KH-domain protein, participates in heterochromatin formation and chromosome segregation. We previously showed that CTCF interacts with vigilin. Here, we show that human vigilin, but not CTCF, colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. CTCF up-regulates the transcription of satellite 2, while vigilin down-regulates it. Vigilin depletion or CTCF overexpression reduces the binding of HP1α on the satellite 2 locus. Furthermore, overexpression of CTCF resists the loading of vigilin onto the satellite 2 locus. Thus CTCF may regulate vigilin behavior and thus indirectly influence the binding of HP1α to the satellite 2 locus.

  20. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism locus maps to chromosome 15q11. 2-q12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, M.; Colman, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Zwane, E.; Kromberg, J.; Jenkins, T. (South African Institute for Medical Research, Johannesburg (South Africa)); Garral, M.

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common type of albinism occurring worldwide. In southern African Bantu-speaking negroids it has an overall prevalence of about 1/3,900. Since the basic biochemical defect is unknown, a linkage study with candidate loci, candidate chromosomal regions, and random loci was undertaken. The ty-pos OCA locus was found to be linked to two arbitrary loci, D15S10 and D15S13, in the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosomal region on chromosome 15q11.2-q12. The pink-eyed dilute locus, p, on mouse chromosome 7, maps close to a region of homology on human chromosome 15q, and we postulate that the ty-pos OCA and p loci are homologous. 43 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The genetic and regulatory architecture of ERBB3-type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Mirza, Aashiq H; Brorsson, Caroline Anna;

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the role of ERBB3 in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We examined whether genetic variation of ERBB3 (rs2292239) affects residual β-cell function in T1D cases. Furthermore, we examined the expression of ERBB3 in human islets, the effect of ERBB3 knockdown on apoptosis in insulin......-producing INS-1E cells and the genetic and regulatory architecture of the ERBB3 locus to provide insights to how rs2292239 may confer disease susceptibility. rs2292239 strongly correlated with residual β-cell function and metabolic control in children with T1D. ERBB3 locus associated lncRNA (NONHSAG011351...... regulators in the β-cells and may constitute novel targets to prevent β-cell destruction in T1D....

  2. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    near future. We describe the current instrument configuration of LOCUS, and give a first preview of the expected science return such a mission would yield. The LOCUS instrument concept calls for four spectral bands, a first band at 4.7 THz to target atomic oxygen (O), a second band at 3.5 THz to target hydroxyl (OH), a third band at 1.1 THz to cover several diatomic species (NO, CO, O3, H2O) and finally a fourth band at 0.8 THz to retrieve pointing information from molecular oxygen (O2). LOCUS would be the first satellite instrument to measure atomic oxygen on a global scale with a precision that will allow the retrieval of the global O distribution. It would also be the first time that annual and diurnal changes in O are measured. This will be a significant step forward in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the MLT. Current indications (derived from CRISTA measurement) lead us to believe that current models only give a poor representation of upper atmospheric O. The secondary target species can help us to address additional scientific questions related to both Climate (distribution of climate relevant gases, highly geared cooling of the MLT in response to Climate change, increased occurrence of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), etc) and Space Weather (precipitation of electrically charged particles and impact on NOx chemistry, fluctuations of solar Lyman-alpha flux through shown in the the distribution of photochemically active species, etc).

  3. Impact of variation at the FTO locus on milk fat yield in Holstein dairy cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea G Zielke

    Full Text Available This study explores the biological role of the Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO gene locus on milk composition in German Holstein cattle. Since FTO controls energy homeostasis and expenditure and the FTO locus has repeatedly shown association with obesity in human studies, we tested FTO as a candidate gene in particular for milk fat yield, which represents a high amount of energy secreted during lactation. The study was performed on 2,402 bulls and 860 cows where dense milk composition data were available. Genetic information was taken from a 2 Mb region around FTO. Five SNPs and two haplotype blocks in a 725 kb region covering FTO and the neighboring genes RPGRIP1L, U6ATAC, and 5 S rRNA were associated with milk fat yield and also affected protein yield in the same direction. Interestingly, higher frequency SNP alleles and haplotypes within the FTO gene increased milk fat and protein yields by up to 2.8 and 2.2 kg per lactation, respectively, while the most frequent haplotype in the upstream block covering exon 1 of FTO to exon 15 of RPGRIP1L had opposite effects with lower fat and milk yield. Both haplotype blocks were also significant in cows. The loci accounted for about 1% of the corresponding trait variance in the population. The association signals not only provided evidence for at least two causative mutations in the FTO locus with a functional effect on milk but also milk protein yield. The pleiotropic effects suggest a biological function on the usage of energy resources and the control of energy balance rather than directly affecting fat and protein synthesis. The identified effect of the obesity gene locus on milk energy content suggests an impact on infant nutrition by breast feeding in humans.

  4. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL (THE LOCUS OF DISTRIBUTION AS A COROLLARY TO THE LOCUS OF CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayoral Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos.Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los j uicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.Abstract:This one is a scientific article brings over of the Locus of Distribution, arisen from a study realized with a population of teachers and university pupils. Respect of the first ones, it has been investigated brings over of the attributions that were concerning around the reinforcements which they were distributing to pupils. Respect of the second ones, one has sought to determine the valuation that these realized of the teachers, in terms of those attributions. For it, two paradigms were in use classic used to check the existence of a norm: the paradigm of the auto-presentation (teachers, and the paradigm of the judgments (pupils The raised question was to determine if in case of the distributive behaviours of reinforcements, the reasons were assuming to external

  5. Locus coeruleus and dopaminergic consolidation of everyday memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tomonori; Duszkiewicz, Adrian J.; Sonneborn, Alex; Spooner, Patrick A.; Yamasaki, Miwako; Watanabe, Masahiko; Smith, Caroline C.; Fernández, Guillén; Deisseroth, Karl; Greene, Robert W.; Morris, Richard G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retention of episodic-like memory is enhanced, in humans and animals, when something novel happens shortly before or after encoding. Using an everyday memory task in mice, we sought the neurons mediating this dopamine-dependent novelty effect, previously thought to originate exclusively from the tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing (TH+) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We report that neuronal firing in the locus coeruleus (LC) is especially sensitive to environmental novelty, LC-TH+ neurons project more profusely than VTA-TH+ neurons to the hippocampus, optogenetic activation of LC-TH+ neurons mimics the novelty effect, and this novelty-associated memory enhancement is unaffected by VTA inactivation. Surprisingly, two effects of LC-TH+ photoactivation are sensitive to hippocampal D1/D5 receptor blockade and resistant to adrenoceptors blockade – memory enhancement and long lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission in CA1 ex vivo. Thus, LC-TH+ neurons can mediate post-encoding memory enhancement in a manner consistent with possible co-release of dopamine in hippocampus. PMID:27602521

  6. Rapid multi-locus sequence typing using microfluidic biochips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Read

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST has become a central genotyping strategy for analysis of bacterial populations. The scheme involves de novo sequencing of 6-8 housekeeping loci to assign unique sequence types. In this work we adapted MLST to a rapid microfluidics platform in order to enhance speed and reduce laboratory labor time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using two integrated microfluidic devices, DNA was purified from 100 Bacillus cereus soil isolates, used as a template for multiplex amplification of 7 loci and sequenced on forward and reverse strands. The time on instrument from loading genomic DNA to generation of electropherograms was only 1.5 hours. We obtained full-length sequence of all seven MLST alleles from 84 representing 46 different Sequence Types. At least one allele could be sequenced from a further 15 strains. The nucleotide diversity of B. cereus isolated in this study from one location in Rockville, Maryland (0.04 substitutions per site was found to be as great as the global collection of isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biogeographical investigation of pathogens is only one of a panoply of possible applications of microfluidics based MLST; others include microbiologic forensics, biothreat identification, and rapid characterization of human clinical samples.

  7. Bypass of senescence by the polycomb group protein CBX8 through direct binding to the INK4A-ARF locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Nikolaj; Bracken, Adrian P; Trinh, Emmanuelle

    2007-01-01

    , we demonstrate that the chromodomain-containing protein, CBX8, which is part of one of the PRC1 complexes, regulates proliferation of diploid human and mouse fibroblasts through direct binding to the INK4A-ARF locus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBX8 is limiting for the regulation of INK4A......-ARF, and that ectopic expression of CBX8 leads to repression of the Ink4a-Arf locus and bypass of senescence, leading to cellular immortalization. Gene expression and location analysis demonstrate that besides the INK4A-ARF locus, CBX8 also regulates a number of other genes important for cell growth and survival....... On the basis of these results, we conclude that CBX8 is an essential component of one of the PRC1 complexes, which directly regulate the expression of numerous target genes, including the INK4A-ARF locus, involved in cell-fate decisions....

  8. The beta-globin LCR is not necessary for an open chromatin structure or developmentally regulated transcription of the native mouse beta-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, E; Reik, A; Cimbora, D; Telling, A; Bender, M A; Fiering, S; Enver, T; Martin, D I; Kennedy, M; Keller, G; Groudine, M

    1998-10-01

    The murine beta-globin locus control region (LCR) was deleted from its native chromosomal location. The approximately 25 kb deletion eliminates all sequences and structures homologous to those defined as the human LCR. In differentiated ES cells and erythroleukemia cells containing the LCR-deleted chromosome, DNasel sensitivity of the beta-globin domain is established and maintained, developmental regulation of the locus is intact, and beta-like globin RNA levels are reduced 5%-25% of normal. Thus, in the native murine beta-globin locus, the LCR is necessary for normal levels of transcription, but other elements are sufficient to establish the open chromatin structure, transcription, and developmental specificity of the locus. These findings suggest a contributory rather than dominant function for the LCR in its native location.

  9. Locus of control and cerebral asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brabander, B; Boone, C; Gerits, P

    1992-08-01

    Data about the lack of synchronism of flexor carpi ulnaris peak EMG values of bimanual reactions during a semantic and during a visuospatial discrimination reaction time task are reported. The effects of type of task as well as the presence or absence of an unexpected stimulus preceding the reaction stimulus on lack of synchronism clearly depend upon the locus of control of the subjects, as measured on Rotter's I-E scale. On the basis of several arguments it is proposed that the measure of lack of synchronism reflects in an opposite sense the amount of dopaminergic activation or motor readiness in the sense in which Pribram and McGuinness in 1975 and Tucker and Williamson in 1984 have defined these concepts. The results for 15 women and 18 men show that more internally oriented subjects are more activated by a semantic task and by an unexpected preparatory stimulus in this type of task than more externally oriented subjects. The opposite appears to hold on the visuospatial task and unexpected preparatory stimuli therein. Together with earlier findings about reaction times and a number of relevant findings in the literature, the results are interpreted as indicative of basic differences in asymmetric tonic activation of the cerebral hemispheres between more internally and more externally oriented subjects. A model is proposed to explain phasic activating effects which ensue when tonically more left- or right-activated subjects perform left- or right-hemisphere tasks and when supplementary irrelevant stimuli are received.

  10. THE LOCUS COERULEUS AND CENTRAL CHEMOSENSITIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargaglioni, Luciane H.; Hartzler, Lynn K.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) lies in the dorsal pons and supplies noradrenergic (NA) input to many regions of the brain, including respiratory control areas. The LC may provide tonic input for basal respiratory drive and is involved in central chemosensitivity since focal acidosis of the region stimulates ventilation and ablation reduces CO2-induced increased ventilation. The output of LC is modulated by both serotonergic and glutamatergic inputs. A large percentage of LC neurons are intrinsically activated by hypercapnia. This percentage and the magnitude of their response are highest in young neonates and decrease dramatically after postnatal day P10. The cellular bases for intrinsic chemosensitivity of LC neurons are comprised of multiple factors, primary among them being reduced extracellular and intracellular pH, which inhibit inwardly rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels, and activate L-type Ca2+ channels. Activation of KCa channels in LC neurons may limit their ultimate response to hypercapnia. Finally, the LC mediates central chemosensitivity and contains pH-sensitive neurons in amphibians, suggesting that the LC has a long-standing phylogenetic role in respiratory control. PMID:20435170

  11. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Locus Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Field Synopsis and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Daunia; Pooley, Karen A.; Landi, Maria T.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Baird, Duncan M.; Prescott, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Nitti, Donato

    2012-01-01

    polymorphisms (TERT rs2736100, intergenic rs4635969, and CLPTM1L rs402710) was 41%. Strong evidence for lack of association was identified for five polymorphisms in three tumor types. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the largest collection of data for associations between TERT locus polymorphisms and cancer risk. Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic variability in this genomic region can modulate cancer susceptibility in humans. PMID:22523397

  12. automatic generation of root locus plots for linear time invariant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    root locus as a time domain technique for system design and analysis. The Tool Box can also ... theory, it has equally been applied to classical formulation and the ... major constraint, therefore the use of complex graphical ..... The computation.

  13. LOCUS OF CONTROL AND JOB SATISFACTION: PSU EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshman Vijayashree

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous research studies have demonstrated that internal/external locus of control impacts jobsatisfaction. The present study thus aims to analyze type of locus of control and its relation with jobsatisfaction. The study will be of great help for organization to understand and know what type oflocus of control their employees has and how it has an impact on job satisfaction.The objectives of this study were: 1- To identify the type of Locus of Control (i.e. Internal orExternal present in Public Sector Units (PSU in Bangalore and 2- To analyze the impact of differenttype of Locus of Control on job satisfaction of PSU Employees. Further hypothesis was also set tocheck the relationship between locus of control and job satisfaction. In addition, the relationshipbetween different demographic factors was also examined. The tool used for this study was LocoInventory. The concept of locus of control by Levenson (1972 was used to develop Loco Inventory(Locus of Control in Organization Inventory. The survey used a questionnaire, which had thirty fivestatements which highlights the factors that determine the locus of control and job satisfaction levelof the employees. The Ratio, ANOVA, and Correlation analysis were used as statistical techniquesfor analysis.The results indicate that there is a positive correlation between internal locus of control and jobsatisfaction as well as between External (other locus of control and job satisfaction. And in case ofExternal (Chance locus of control and job satisfaction there exists partial positive correlation. As perthis study Job satisfaction level among the employees is also good as the mean is 17, which is closerto maximum scale value of 25. As per ANOVA table there is a significant variance betweeninternality and age as well as between externality (chance and age. There is no significantrelationship between internality and demographic factors like gender and education. There is nosignificant relationship between

  14. Regulation of the vapBC-1 toxin-antitoxin locus in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Cline

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi are human-adapted commensal bacteria that can cause a number of chronic mucosal infections, including otitis media and bronchitis. One way for these organisms to survive antibiotic therapy and cause recurrent disease is to stop replicating, as most antimicrobials target essential biosynthetic pathways. Toxin-antitoxin (TA gene pairs have been shown to facilitate entry into a reversible bacteriostatic state. Characteristically, these operons encode a protein toxin and an antitoxin that associate following translation to form a nontoxic complex, which then binds to and regulates the cognate TA promoter. Under stressful conditions, the labile antitoxin is degraded and the complex disintegrates, freeing the stable toxin to facilitate growth arrest. How these events affected the regulation of the TA locus, as well as how the transcription of the operon was subsequently returned to its normal state upon resumption of growth, was not fully understood. Here we show that expression of the NTHi vapBC-1 TA locus is repressed by a complex of VapB-1 and VapC-1 under conditions favorable for growth, and activated by the global transactivator Factor for Inversion Stimulation (Fis upon nutrient upshift from stationary phase. Further, we demonstrate for the first time that the VapC-1 toxin alone can bind to its cognate TA locus control region and that the presence of VapB-1 directs the binding of the VapBC-1 complex in the transcriptional regulation of vapBC-1.

  15. An improved procedure of mapping a quantitative trait locus via the EM algorithm using posterior probabilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh Ghosh; Partha P. Majumder

    2000-08-01

    Mapping a locus controlling a quantitative genetic trait (e.g. blood pressure) to a specific genomic region is of considerable contemporary interest. Data on the quantitative trait under consideration and several codominant genetic markers with known genomic locations are collected from members of families and statistically analysed to estimate the recombination fraction, , between the putative quantitative trait locus and a genetic marker. One of the major complications in estimating for a quantitative trait in humans is the lack of haplotype information on members of families. We have devised a computationally simple two-stage method of estimation of in the absence of haplotypic information using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. In the first stage, parameters of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) are estimated on the basis of data of a sample of unrelated individuals and a Bayes's rule is used to classify each parent into a QTL genotypic class. In the second stage, we have proposed an EM algorithm for obtaining the maximum-likelihood estimate of based on data of informative families (which are identified upon inferring parental QTL genotypes performed in the first stage). The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether, instead of using genotypically `classified' data of parents, the use of posterior probabilities of QT genotypes of parents at the second stage yields better estimators. We show, using simulated data, that the proposed procedure using posterior probabilities is statistically more efficient than our earlier classification procedure, although it is computationally heavier.

  16. DFNB79: reincarnation of a nonsyndromic deafness locus on chromosome 9q34.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid Yar; Riazuddin, Saima; Shahzad, Mohsin; Ahmed, Nazir; Zafar, Ahmad Usman; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Morell, Robert J; Griffith, Andrew J; Ahmed, Zubair M; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    Genetic analysis of an inbred Pakistani family PKDF280, segregating prelingual severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss, provided evidence for a DFNB locus on human chromosome 9q34.3. Co-segregation of the deafness trait with marker D9SH159 was determined by a two-point linkage analysis (LOD score 9.43 at theta=0). Two additional large families, PKDF517 and PKDF741, co-segregate recessive deafness with markers linked to the same interval. Haplotype analyses of these three families refined the interval to 3.84 Mb defined by D9S1818 (centromeric) and D9SH6 (telomeric). This interval overlaps with the previously reported DFNB33 locus whose chromosomal map position has been recently revised and assigned to a new position on chromosome 10p11.23-q21.1. The nonsyndromic deafness locus on chromosome 9q segregating in family PKDF280 was designated DFNB79. We are currently screening the 113 candidate DFNB79 genes for mutations and have excluded CACNA1B, EDF1, PTGDS, EHMT1, QSOX2, NOTCH1, MIR126 and MIR602.

  17. Molecular analysis of the glucocerebrosidase gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, S.L.; Martin, B.M.; Fandino, A. [Clinical Neuroscience Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gaucher disease is due to a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Both the functional gene for this enzyme and a pseudogene are located in close proximity on chromosome 1q21. Analysis of the mutations present in patient samples has suggested interaction between the functional gene and the pseudogene in the origin of mutant genotypes. To investigate the involvement of regions flanking the functional gene and pseudogene in the origin of mutations found in Gaucher disease, a YAC clone containing DNA from this locus has been subcloned and characterized. The original YAC containing {approximately}360 kb was truncated with the use of fragmentation plasmids to about 85 kb. A lambda library derived from this YAC was screened to obtain clones containing glucocerebrosidase sequences. PCR amplification was used to identify subclones containing 5{prime}, central, or 3{prime} sequences of the functional gene or of the pseudogene. Clones spanning the entire distance from the last exon of the functional gene to intron 1 of the pseudogene, the 5{prime} end of the functional gene and 16 kb of 5{prime} flanking region and approximately 15 kb of 3{prime} flanking region of the pseudogene were sequenced. Sequence data from 48 kb of intergenic and flanking regions of the glucocerebrosidase gene and its pseudogene has been generated. A large number of Alu sequences and several simple repeats have been found. Two of these repeats exhibit fragment length polymorphism. There is almost 100% homology between the 3{prime} flanking regions of the functional gene and the pseudogene, extending to about 4 kb past the termination codons. A much lower degree of homology is observed in the 5{prime} flanking region. Patient samples are currently being screened for polymorphisms in these flanking regions.

  18. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible.

  19. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  20. Lipooligosaccharide locus class of Campylobacter jejuni: sialylation is not needed for invasive infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, P; Feodoroff, B; Hänninen, M-L; Rautelin, H

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse enteropathogen that is commonly detected worldwide. It can sometimes cause bacteraemia, but the bacterial characteristics facilitating bloodstream infection are not known. A total of 73 C. jejuni isolates, consecutively collected from blood-borne infections during a 10-year period all over Finland and for which detailed clinical information of the patients were available, were included. We screened the isolates by PCR for the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) locus class and for the presence of the putative virulence genes ceuE, ciaB, fucP, and virB11. The isolates were also tested for γ-glutamyl transpeptidase production. The results were analysed with respect to the clinical characteristics of the patients, and the multilocus sequence types (MLSTs) and serum resistance of the isolates. LOS locus classes A, B, and C, which carry genes for sialylation of LOS, were detected in only 23% of the isolates. These isolates were not more resistant to human serum than those with the genes of non-sialylated LOS locus classes, but were significantly more prevalent among patients with underlying diseases (p 0.02). The fucose permease gene fucP was quite uncommon, but was associated with the isolates with the potential to sialylate LOS (p <0.0001). LOS locus classes and some of the putative virulence factors were associated with MLST clonal complexes. Although some of the bacterial characteristics studied here have been suggested to be important for the invasiveness of C. jejuni, they did not explain why the clinical isolates in the present study were able to cause bacteraemia.

  1. Gene conversion occurs within the mating-type locus of Cryptococcus neoformans during sexual reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Sun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination of sex chromosomes is thought to be repressed in organisms with heterogametic sex determination (e.g. mammalian X/Y chromosomes, due to extensive divergence and chromosomal rearrangements between the two chromosomes. However, proper segregation of sex chromosomes during meiosis requires crossing-over occurring within the pseudoautosomal regions (PAR. Recent studies reveal that recombination, in the form of gene conversion, is widely distributed within and may have played important roles in the evolution of some chromosomal regions within which recombination was thought to be repressed, such as the centromere cores of maize. Cryptococcus neoformans, a major human pathogenic fungus, has an unusually large mating-type locus (MAT, >100 kb, and the MAT alleles from the two opposite mating-types show extensive nucleotide sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements, mirroring characteristics of sex chromosomes. Meiotic recombination was assumed to be repressed within the C. neoformans MAT locus. A previous study identified recombination hot spots flanking the C. neoformans MAT, and these hot spots are associated with high GC content. Here, we investigated a GC-rich intergenic region located within the MAT locus of C. neoformans to establish if this region also exhibits unique recombination behavior during meiosis. Population genetics analysis of natural C. neoformans isolates revealed signals of homogenization spanning this GC-rich intergenic region within different C. neoformans lineages, consistent with a model in which gene conversion of this region during meiosis prevents it from diversifying within each lineage. By analyzing meiotic progeny from laboratory crosses, we found that meiotic recombination (gene conversion occurs around the GC-rich intergenic region at a frequency equal to or greater than the meiotic recombination frequency observed in other genomic regions. We discuss the implications of these findings with

  2. From noncoding variant to phenotype via SORT1 at the 1p13 cholesterol locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran; Strong, Alanna; Frank-Kamenetsky, Maria; Lee, Noemi E.; Ahfeldt, Tim; Sachs, Katherine V.; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Hui; Kuperwasser, Nicolas; Ruda, Vera M.; Pirruccello, James J.; Muchmore, Brian; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Hall, Jennifer L.; Schadt, Eric E.; Morales, Carlos R.; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Phillips, Michael C.; Wong, Jamie; Cantley, William; Racie, Timothy; Ejebe, Kenechi G.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; Koteliansky, Victor; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Krauss, Ronald M.; Cowan, Chad A.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a locus on chromosome 1p13 as strongly associated with both serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and myocardial infarction (MI) in humans. Here we show through a series of studies in human cohorts and human-derived hepatocytes that a common noncoding polymorphism at the 1p13 locus, rs12740374, creates a C/EBP transcription factor binding site and alters the hepatic expression of the SORT1 gene. With siRNA knockdown and viral overexpression in mouse liver, we demonstrate that Sort1 alters plasma LDL-C and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle levels by modulating hepatic VLDL secretion. Thus, we provide functional evidence for a novel regulatory pathway for lipoprotein metabolism and suggest that modulation of this pathway may alter risk for MI in humans. We also demonstrate that common noncoding DNA variants identified by GWASs can directly contribute to clinical phenotypes. PMID:20686566

  3. Replication of an Association Between the Lymphoid Tyrosine Phosphatase Locus (LYP/PTPN22) With Type 1 Diabetes, and Evidence for Its Role as a General Autoimmunity Locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deborah Smyth; Jason D. Cooper; Joanne E. Collins; Joanne M. Heward; Jayne A. Franklyn; Joanna M.M. Howson; Adrian Vella; Sarah Nutland; Helen E. Rance; Lisa Maier; Bryan J. Barratt; Cristian Guja; Constantin Ionescu-Tı̂rgovişte; David A. Savage; David B. Dunger; Barry Widmer; David P. Strachan; Susan M. Ring; Neil Walker; David G. Clayton; Rebecca C.J. Twells; Stephen C.L. Gough; John A. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Replication of an Association Between the Lymphoid Tyrosine Phosphatase Locus ( LYP/PTPN22 ) With Type 1 Diabetes, and Evidence for Its Role as a General Autoimmunity Locus Deborah Smyth 1 , Jason D...

  4. CD33 Alzheimer’s disease locus: Altered monocyte function and amyloid biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Chibnik, Lori B; Keenan, Brendan T; Ottoboni, Linda; Raj, Towfique; Tang, Anna; Rosenkrantz, Laura L; Imboywa, Selina; Lee, Michelle; Von Korff, Alina; Morris, Martha C; Evans, Denis A; Johnson, Keith; Sperling, Reisa A; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    In our functional dissection of the CD33 Alzheimer’s disease susceptibility locus, we find that the rs3865444C risk allele is associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in monocytes (t50 = 10.06, pjoint=1.3×10–13) of young and older individuals. It is also associated with (1) diminished internalization of Aβ42) (2) accumulation of neuritic amyloid pathology and fibrillar amyloid on in vivo imaging and (3), increased numbers of activated human microglia. PMID:23708142

  5. Analysis in a large hyperkalemic periodic paralysis pedigree supports tight linkage to a sodium channel locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacek, L J; Tyler, F; Trimmer, J S; Agnew, W S; Leppert, M

    1991-01-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an autosomal dominant muscle disease with electrophysiological abnormalities suggesting a defect in a voltage-gated sodium channel (NaCh) gene. A human NaCh gene was recently shown to cosegregate with the disease allele in a family with HYPP. Using an independent clone, we have demonstrated close genetic linkage between an NaCh gene and the HYPP locus in another family. With physiological data demonstrating abnormal NaCh function in HYPP patients, the absence of any obligate recombinations in the two families strengthens the argument that this NaCh gene is the site of the defect in this disorder. PMID:1651050

  6. Genomic analysis reveals extensive gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Andy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse TR and IG repertoires are generated by V(DJ somatic recombination. Genomic studies have been pivotal in cataloguing the V, D, J and C genes present in the various TR/IG loci and describing how duplication events have expanded the number of these genes. Such studies have also provided insights into the evolution of these loci and the complex mechanisms that regulate TR/IG expression. In this study we analyze the sequence of the third bovine genome assembly to characterize the germline repertoire of bovine TRB genes and compare the organization, evolution and regulatory structure of the bovine TRB locus with that of humans and mice. Results The TRB locus in the third bovine genome assembly is distributed over 5 scaffolds, extending to ~730 Kb. The available sequence contains 134 TRBV genes, assigned to 24 subgroups, and 3 clusters of DJC genes, each comprising a single TRBD gene, 5–7 TRBJ genes and a single TRBC gene. Seventy-nine of the TRBV genes are predicted to be functional. Comparison with the human and murine TRB loci shows that the gene order, as well as the sequences of non-coding elements that regulate TRB expression, are highly conserved in the bovine. Dot-plot analyses demonstrate that expansion of the genomic TRBV repertoire has occurred via a complex and extensive series of duplications, predominantly involving DNA blocks containing multiple genes. These duplication events have resulted in massive expansion of several TRBV subgroups, most notably TRBV6, 9 and 21 which contain 40, 35 and 16 members respectively. Similarly, duplication has lead to the generation of a third DJC cluster. Analyses of cDNA data confirms the diversity of the TRBV genes and, in addition, identifies a substantial number of TRBV genes, predominantly from the larger subgroups, which are still absent from the genome assembly. The observed gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus has created a repertoire of phylogenetically

  7. Beta-defensin genomic copy number is not a modifier locus for cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Juliana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4, also known as DEFB2 or hBD-2 is a salt-sensitive antimicrobial protein that is expressed in lung epithelia. Previous work has shown that it is encoded in a cluster of beta-defensin genes at 8p23.1, which varies in copy number between 2 and 12 in different individuals. We determined the copy number of this locus in 355 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, and tested for correlation between beta-defensin cluster genomic copy number and lung disease associated with CF. No significant association was found.

  8. Fine mapping of the NRG1 Hirschsprung's disease locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available The primary pathology of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR, colon aganglionosis is the absence of ganglia in variable lengths of the hindgut, resulting in functional obstruction. HSCR is attributed to a failure of migration of the enteric ganglion precursors along the developing gut. RET is a key regulator of the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS and the major HSCR-causing gene. Yet the reduced penetrance of RET DNA HSCR-associated variants together with the phenotypic variability suggest the involvement of additional genes in the disease. Through a genome-wide association study, we uncovered a ∼350 kb HSCR-associated region encompassing part of the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1. To identify the causal NRG1 variants contributing to HSCR, we genotyped 243 SNPs variants on 343 ethnic Chinese HSCR patients and 359 controls. Genotype analysis coupled with imputation narrowed down the HSCR-associated region to 21 kb, with four of the most associated SNPs (rs10088313, rs10094655, rs4624987, and rs3884552 mapping to the NRG1 promoter. We investigated whether there was correlation between the genotype at the rs10088313 locus and the amount of NRG1 expressed in human gut tissues (40 patients and 21 controls and found differences in expression as a function of genotype. We also found significant differences in NRG1 expression levels between diseased and control individuals bearing the same rs10088313 risk genotype. This indicates that the effects of NRG1 common variants are likely to depend on other alleles or epigenetic factors present in the patients and would account for the variability in the genetic predisposition to HSCR.

  9. The Lbw2 locus promotes autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scatizzi, John C; Haraldsson, Maria K; Pollard, K Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H

    2012-04-01

    The lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4; however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. In this study, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of New Zealand White (NZW) on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate its role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants.

  10. First multi-locus sequence typing scheme for Arcobacter spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guilin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arcobacter spp. are a common contaminant of food and water, and some species, primarily A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, have been isolated increasingly from human diarrheal stool samples. Here, we describe the first Arcobacter multilocus sequence typing (MLST method for A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, A. skirrowii, A. cibarius and A. thereius. Results A sample set of 374 arcobacters, including 275 A. butzleri, 72 A. cryaerophilus, 15 A. skirrowii and 8 A. cibarius isolates from a wide variety of geographic locations and sources, was typed in this study. Additionally, this sample set contained four strains representing a new Arcobacter species, A. thereius. The seven loci used in the four-species Arcobacter MLST method are the same as those employed previously in C. jejuni, C. coli, C. helveticus and C. fetus (i.e. aspA, atpA(uncA, glnA, gltA, glyA, pgm and tkt. A large number of alleles were identified at each locus with the majority of isolates containing a unique sequence type. All Arcobacter isolates typed in this study contain two glyA genes, one linked to lysS (glyA1 and the other linked to ada (glyA2. glyA1 was incorporated into the Arcobacter MLST method while glyA2 was not because it did not increase substantially the level of discrimination. Conclusion No association of MLST alleles or sequence types with host or geographical source was observed with this sample set. Nevertheless, the large number of identified alleles and sequence types indicate that this MLST method will prove useful in both Arcobacter strain discrimination and in epidemiological studies of sporadic Arcobacter-related gastroenteritis. A new Arcobacter MLST database was created http://pubmlst.org/arcobacter/; allele and ST data generated in this study were deposited in this database and are available online.

  11. Inferring Demographic History Using Two-Locus Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Aaron P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2017-06-01

    Population demographic history may be learned from contemporary genetic variation data. Methods based on aggregating the statistics of many single loci into an allele frequency spectrum (AFS) have proven powerful, but such methods ignore potentially informative patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between neighboring loci. To leverage such patterns, we developed a composite-likelihood framework for inferring demographic history from aggregated statistics of pairs of loci. Using this framework, we show that two-locus statistics are more sensitive to demographic history than single-locus statistics such as the AFS. In particular, two-locus statistics escape the notorious confounding of depth and duration of a bottleneck, and they provide a means to estimate effective population size based on the recombination rather than mutation rate. We applied our approach to a Zambian population of Drosophila melanogaster Notably, using both single- and two-locus statistics, we inferred a substantially lower ancestral effective population size than previous works and did not infer a bottleneck history. Together, our results demonstrate the broad potential for two-locus statistics to enable powerful population genetic inference. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Analysis of case-parent trios at a locus with a deletion allele: association of GSTM1 with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Rong

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain loci on the human genome, such as glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1, do not permit heterozygotes to be reliably determined by commonly used methods. Association of such a locus with a disease is therefore generally tested with a case-control design. When subjects have already been ascertained in a case-parent design however, the question arises as to whether the data can still be used to test disease association at such a locus. Results A likelihood ratio test was constructed that can be used with a case-parents design but has somewhat less power than a Pearson's chi-squared test that uses a case-control design. The test is illustrated on a novel dataset showing a genotype relative risk near 2 for the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype and autism. Conclusion Although the case-control design will remain the mainstay for a locus with a deletion, the likelihood ratio test will be useful for such a locus analyzed as part of a larger case-parent study design. The likelihood ratio test has the advantage that it can incorporate complete and incomplete case-parent trios as well as independent cases and controls. Both analyses support (p = 0.046 for the proposed test, p = 0.028 for the case-control analysis an association of the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype with autism.

  13. Analysis of case-parent trios at a locus with a deletion allele: association of GSTM1 with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyske, Steven; Williams, Tanishia A; Mars, Audrey E; Stenroos, Edward S; Ming, Sue X; Wang, Rong; Sreenath, Madhura; Factura, Marivic F; Reddy, Chitra; Lambert, George H; Johnson, William G

    2006-02-10

    Certain loci on the human genome, such as glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), do not permit heterozygotes to be reliably determined by commonly used methods. Association of such a locus with a disease is therefore generally tested with a case-control design. When subjects have already been ascertained in a case-parent design however, the question arises as to whether the data can still be used to test disease association at such a locus. A likelihood ratio test was constructed that can be used with a case-parents design but has somewhat less power than a Pearson's chi-squared test that uses a case-control design. The test is illustrated on a novel dataset showing a genotype relative risk near 2 for the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype and autism. Although the case-control design will remain the mainstay for a locus with a deletion, the likelihood ratio test will be useful for such a locus analyzed as part of a larger case-parent study design. The likelihood ratio test has the advantage that it can incorporate complete and incomplete case-parent trios as well as independent cases and controls. Both analyses support (p = 0.046 for the proposed test, p = 0.028 for the case-control analysis) an association of the homozygous GSTM1 deletion genotype with autism.

  14. TCR gene segments from at least one third of V alpha subfamilies rearrange at the delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevée, C; Chung, V; Diu, A; Hercend, T; Triebel, F

    1994-02-01

    Using PCR and an experimentally validated V alpha subfamily-specific oligonucleotide panel (V alpha 1-w29), we have investigated whether the TCR delta chain may increase its combinatorial diversity by using V genes considered as alpha chain-specific. We show that at least 10 distinct human V alpha segments rearrange at the J delta locus, leading to scrambling of the two V gene repertoires. Fifty-five per cent of the V alpha/J delta transcripts characterized here were in frame. The 17 V alpha/C delta chains analysed included an extended CDR3 region with up to 18 aa encoded by the junctional region. In addition, a new J delta segment (J delta 4) has been characterized. Together, these findings demonstrate that combinatorial diversity in the human delta locus is larger than previously thought.

  15. The complexity of selection at the major primate β-defensin locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eastwood Hayden

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have examined the evolution of the genes at the major human β-defensin locus and the orthologous loci in a range of other primates and mouse. For the first time these data allow us to examine selective episodes in the more recent evolutionary history of this locus as well as the ancient past. We have used a combination of maximum likelihood based tests and a maximum parsimony based sliding window approach to give a detailed view of the varying modes of selection operating at this locus. Results We provide evidence for strong positive selection soon after the duplication of these genes within an ancestral mammalian genome. Consequently variable selective pressures have acted on β-defensin genes in different evolutionary lineages, with episodes both of negative, and more rarely positive selection, during the divergence of primates. Positive selection appears to have been more common in the rodent lineage, accompanying the birth of novel, rodent-specific β-defensin genes. These observations allow a fuller understanding of the evolution of mammalian innate immunity. In both the rodent and primate lineages, sites in the second exon have been subject to positive selection and by implication are important in functional diversity. A small number of sites in the mature human peptides were found to have undergone repeated episodes of selection in different primate lineages. Particular sites were consistently implicated by multiple methods at positions throughout the mature peptides. These sites are clustered at positions predicted to be important for the specificity of the antimicrobial or chemoattractant properties of β-defensins. Surprisingly, sites within the prepropeptide region were also implicated as being subject to significant positive selection, suggesting previously unappreciated functional significance for this region. Conclusions Identification of these putatively functional sites has important implications for our

  16. Parenting style, locus of control, and oral hygiene in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksejūnienė, Jolanta; Brukienė, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test if variations in oral hygiene levels in adolescents were associated with locus of control and parenting styles after controlling for demographic factors. The study sample comprised 237 adolescents aged 12-13 years. The structured questionnaire included demographic characteristics and items about parenting style and locus of control. The Individual Quantitative Plaque % Index (IQPI) and toothbrushing frequency were used as clinical outcome measures. In the bivariate analyses, socioeconomic status (P=0.012), number of children in the family (P=0.003), and frequency of toothbrushing (P=0.001) were related to dental plaque levels. Gender (Pparenting styles, locus of control, and oral hygiene levels was not confirmed.

  17. Lupus vulgaris occurring in a locus minoris resistentiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Richard; Beatch, Anita; Lee, Mao-Cheng; Cheung-Lee, Melody; Wasel, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lupus vulgaris, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis, is not always clear, especially in patients who do not have coexistent extracutaneous tuberculosis and in patients with single lesions. To report a case of lupus vulgaris in a locus minoris resistentiae (a site of reduced resistance) and to use a unique set of clinical circumstances and laboratory tests to reconstruct the pathogenesis of the lesion and the response to treatment. Lupus vulgaris can occur in a locus minoris resistentiae; local trauma and possibly other factors, such as increased temperature, topical corticosteroids, and the virulence of the infecting strain, may facilitate the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present at a locus minoris resistentiae as a result of a silent bacillemia.

  18. Desire for control, locus of control, and proneness to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J M

    1984-03-01

    Two personality constructs, desire for control and locus of control, were related to depression among college students. Measures of levels of depression, desire for control, and locus of control were taken from subjects. Approximately six months later 71% of these subjects returned a questionnaire concerning their experiences with depression during that six-month period. It was found that locus of control scores, particularly the extent to which subjects perceived that their lives were controlled by chance, were significantly related to the depression levels. It was also found that high desire for control subjects who held external perceptions of control were most likely to seek nonprofessional help for depression. In addition, high desire for control subjects who perceived their lives as generally controlled by chance were most likely to have suicidal thoughts. The results are interpreted in terms of a general style that may promote a proneness to depression for certain individuals.

  19. Gpr177, a novel locus for bone-mineral-density and osteoporosis, regulates osteogenesis and chondrogenesis in skeletal development

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jiang, Ming; Hsu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic analysis has recently identified Gpr177 as a susceptibility locus for bone-mineral-density and osteoporosis. Determining the unknown function of this gene is therefore extremely important to further our knowledge base of skeletal development and disease. The protein encoded by Gpr177 exhibits an ability to modulate the trafficking of Wnt similar to the Drosophila Wls/Evi/Srt. Because of a critical role in Wnt regulation, Gpr177 might be required for several key steps of skeletog...

  20. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait.

  1. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coline eGoriaux

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of transposable elements (TEs in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flam an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  2. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  3. Organization, complexity and allelic diversity of the porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) immunoglobulin lambda locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, John C; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2012-05-01

    We have characterized the organization, complexity, and expression of the porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) immunoglobulin lambda (IGL) light chain locus, which accounts for about half of antibody light chain usage in swine, yet is nearly totally unknown. Twenty-two IGL variable (IGLV) genes were identified that belong to seven subgroups. Nine genes appear to be functional. Eight possess stop codons, frameshifts, or both, and one is missing the V-EXON. Two additional genes are missing an essential cysteine residue and are classified as ORF (open reading frame). The IGLV genes are organized in two distinct clusters, a constant (C)-proximal cluster dominated by genes similar to the human IGLV3 subgroup, and a C-distal cluster dominated by genes most similar to the human IGLV8 and IGLV5 subgroups. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the porcine IGLV8 subgroup genes have recently expanded, suggesting a particularly effective role in immunity to porcine-specific pathogens. Moreover, expression of IGLV genes is nearly exclusively restricted to the IGLV3 and IGLV8 genes. The constant locus comprises three tandem cassettes comprised of a joining (IGLJ) gene and a constant (IGLC) gene, whereas a fourth downstream IGLJ gene has no corresponding associated IGLC gene. Comparison of individual BACs generated from the same individual revealed polymorphisms in IGLC2 and several IGLV genes, indicating that allelic variation in IGLV further expands the porcine antibody light chain repertoire.

  4. Linkage mapping of the locus for inherited ovine arthrogryposis (IOA) to sheep chromosome 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Angela M; MacHugh, David E; Park, Stephen D E; Scraggs, Erik; Haley, Chris S; Lynn, David J; Boland, Maurice P; Doherty, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Arthrogryposis is a congenital malformation affecting the limbs of newborn animals and infants. Previous work has demonstrated that inherited ovine arthrogryposis (IOA) has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Two affected homozygous recessive (art/art) Suffolk rams were used as founders for a backcross pedigree of half-sib families segregating the IOA trait. A genome scan was performed using 187 microsatellite genetic markers and all backcross animals were phenotyped at birth for the presence and severity of arthrogryposis. Pairwise LOD scores of 1.86, 1.35, and 1.32 were detected for three microsatellites, BM741, JAZ, and RM006, that are located on sheep Chr 5 (OAR5). Additional markers in the region were identified from the genetic linkage map of BTA7 and by in silico analyses of the draft bovine genome sequence, three of which were informative. Interval mapping of all autosomes produced an F value of 21.97 (p < 0.01) for a causative locus in the region of OAR5 previously flagged by pairwise linkage analysis. Inspection of the orthologous region of HSA5 highlighted a previously fine-mapped locus for human arthrogryposis multiplex congenita neurogenic type (AMCN). A survey of the HSA5 genome sequence identified plausible candidate genes for both IOA and human AMCN.

  5. Sex-specific effects of naturally occurring variants in the dopamine receptor D2 locus on insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guigas, B; de Leeuw van Weenen, J E; van Leeuwen, N

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans. METHODS: Four potentially...

  6. Thought Recognition, Locus of Control, and Adolescent Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Thomas M.; Stack, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the underlying assumptions and principles of a new psychological paradigm, Psychology of Mind/Health Realization (POM/HR). Thought recognition is compared with locus of control (LOC). The relationship of LOC to self-reported happiness and satisfaction is examined from the perspective of POM/HR, using a sample of at-risk adolescents…

  7. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Work Locus of Control Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph E.; Jose, Paul E.; Brough, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Original formulations of the Work Locus of Control Scale (WLCS) proposed a unidimensional structure of this measure; however, more recently, evidence for a two-dimensional structure has been reported, with separate subscales for internal and external loci of control. The current study evaluates the one- and two-factor models with confirmatory…

  8. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  9. Locus of Control and Its Reflection in Teachers' Professional Attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Lya; Lifmann, Margot

    1982-01-01

    Investigated possible reflections of teachers' locus of control in their professional attributions in educational situations. Findings based on a random sample of 190 elementary school teachers point to significant differences between high and low scores on the I.E. Scale (Rotter, 1966) in attribution of responsibility in several educational…

  10. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  11. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  12. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  13. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera : an "unintelligent" design?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilgenburg, Ellen van; Driessen, Gerard; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    2006-01-01

    The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid) has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding,

  14. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinetti Isabella

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi depend on locus heterozygosity (H, and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals.

  15. Modification of Locus of Control among Rehabilitation Counseling Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Calvin M.; Gross, Pincus

    1984-01-01

    Investigated changes in locus of control orientation during graduate education in rehabilitation counseling by comparing students (N=20) who received experiential training with controls who received didactic training. Results indicated movement toward internality was determined by the types of instruction and the level of the initial external…

  16. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  17. Determination of the yield locus by means of temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banabic, D.; Huetink, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical background of the thermo-graphical method of determining the yield locus. The analytical expression of the temperature variation of the specimen deformed in the elastic state is determined starting from the first law of thermodynamics. The experimental method for det

  18. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  19. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mouse visible specific locus test. 798.5200 Section 798.5200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...)F1 or (101×C3H)F1 hybrids. Females shall be T stock virgins. (ii) Age. Healthy sexually...

  20. [Drug compliance and health locus of control in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Feral, F

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent disorder since it affects about 1% of the general population. Drug compliance, that is to say patients' adherence to their treatment, remains rather poor concerning this disease with, on an average, one patient out of two not complying with his/her medication. Among the factors influencing drug compliance, we focused on patients' beliefs in terms of health control, a concept known as health locus of control. This is a concept that originated from social psychology and derived from the Rotters' original concept of locus of control: it corresponds to the type of connexion established by an individual between subsequent events in the history of his/her disease and internal (personal abilities) or external factors (chance, powerful others). Nowadays, the tridimensional structure of this concept is commonly admitted as being in three dimensions: internality, chance externality and powerful others externality, the latter group being divided between doctors and others. We have assumed that there is a correlation between the degree of drug compliance and the internal and/or doctors' external health locus of control. For this purpose, we have determined the quality of drug compliance by using the Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the type of health locus of control by using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale among 65 schizophrenic patients. We have also considered it was important to evaluate patients' insight by using the Amador's scale (Scale of Unawareness of Mental Disorder) because many researchers have established a strong correlation between insight and drug compliance in schizophrenia. Associations between the four dimensions of health locus of control ("internal", "chance external", "others external" and "doctors' external") and drug compliance were assessed by estimating Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) and its degree of significance (p). These associations were judged significant at an alpha

  1. Genetic dissection of the Canq1 locus governing variation in extent of the collateral circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiliang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Native (pre-existing collaterals are arteriole-to-arteriole anastomoses that interconnect adjacent arterial trees and serve as endogenous bypass vessels that limit tissue injury in ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary and peripheral artery disease. Their extent (number and diameter varies widely among mouse strains and healthy humans. We previously identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 7 (Canq1, LOD = 29 responsible for 37% of the heritable variation in collateral extent between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. We sought to identify candidate genes in Canq1 responsible for collateral variation in the cerebral pial circulation, a tissue whose strain-dependent variation is shared by similar variation in other tissues. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Collateral extent was intermediate in a recombinant inbred line that splits Canq1 between the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains. Phenotyping and SNP-mapping of an expanded panel of twenty-one informative inbred strains narrowed the Canq1 locus, and genome-wide linkage analysis of a SWRxSJL-F2 cross confirmed its haplotype structure. Collateral extent, infarct volume after cerebral artery occlusion, bleeding time, and re-bleeding time did not differ in knockout mice for two vascular-related genes located in Canq1, IL4ra and Itgal. Transcript abundance of 6 out of 116 genes within the 95% confidence interval of Canq1 were differentially expressed >2-fold (p-value<0.05÷150 in the cortical pia mater from C57BL/6 and BALB/c embryos at E14.5, E16.5 and E18.5 time-points that span the period of collateral formation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings refine the Canq1 locus and identify several genes as high-priority candidates important in specifying native collateral formation and its wide variation.

  2. Candidate regions for Waardenburg syndrome type II: Search for a second WS locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nance, W.E.; Pandya, A.; Blanton, S.H. [VA Commonwealth Univ, Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by deafness and pigmentary abnormalities such as heterochromia of irides, hypopigmented skin patches, white forlock and premature graying. Clinically the syndrome has been classified into three types. Type II differs from type I in that dystopia canthorum is generally absent, and type III has associated limb anomalies. Recently linkage analysis localized the gene for WSI to chromosome 2q. PAX-3, which is a human analogue of the murine pax-3 locus, maps to this region and mutations in this gene have been found to segregate with WSI. However genetic heterogeneity clearly exists: most if not all WSII families are unlinked to PAX-3 while most if not all WSI cases are linked. We ascertained a four-year-old female child with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 who had features of WS including bilateral congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pale blue irides and pinched nostrils as well as hypertelorism microcephaly, bilateral eyelid ptosis, digitalization of thumbs and fifth finger clinodactyly. High resolution chromosomal analysis revealed a de novo interstitial deletion of 13q22-33.2. There was no family history of WS or retardation. A similar deletion in the region of 13q21-32 has been described in a 13-year-old boy with features of WSII. These two cases strongly suggested that this chromosomal region may include a second locus for WS. We have identified eight families with clinical features of WS type I which have been excluded from linkage to the PAX-3 locus. We have typed these families for microsatellite markers spanning chromosome 13. Linkage between WSII and the chromosome 13 markers was excluded in these families. Hirschsprung disease has been associated with WS and it has recently been mapped to chromosome 10q11.2-q21.1. We are currently typing the 8 families for microsatellites in this region.

  3. A locus of group A Streptococcus involved in invasive disease and DNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Grass, Carlos; Ravins, Miriam; Dan-Goor, Mary; Jaffe, Joseph; Moses, Allon E; Hanski, Emanuel

    2002-10-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes diseases ranging from benign to severe infections such as necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The reasons for the differences in severity of streptococcal infections are unexplained. We developed the polymorphic-tag-lengths-transposon-mutagenesis (PTTM) method to identify virulence genes in vivo. We applied PTTM on an emm14 strain isolated from a patient with NF and screened for mutants of decreased virulence, using a mouse model of human soft-tissue infection. A mutant that survived in the skin but was attenuated in its ability to reach the spleen and to cause a lethal infection was identified. The transposon was inserted into a small open reading frame (ORF) in a locus termed sil, streptococcal invasion locus. sil contains at least five genes (silA-E) and is highly homologous to the quorum-sensing competence regulons of Streptococcus pneumoniae. silA and silB encode a putative two-component system whereas silD and silE encode two putative ABC transporters. silC is a small ORF of unknown function preceded by a combox promoter. Insertion and deletion mutants of sil had a diminished lethality in the animal model. Virulence of a deletion mutant of silC was restored when injected together with the avirulent emm14-deletion mutant, but not when these mutants were injected into opposite flanks of a mouse. DNA transfer between these mutants occurred in vivo but could not account for the complementation of virulence. DNA exchange between the emm14-deletion mutant and mutants of sil occurred also in vitro, at a frequency of approximately 10-8 for a single antibiotic marker. Whereas silC and silD mutants exchanged markers with the emm14 mutant, silB mutant did not. Thus, we identified a novel locus, which controls GAS spreading into deeper tissues and could be involved in DNA transfer.

  4. The aesthetic imaginary as an anthropological locus. Thinking an Anthropology based on Imaginary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Calvo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process by which man is capable of creating beauty not only gives us a fruitive experience but also knowledge of our human nature. Therefore we intend to understand what epistemological possibilities a work of art opens and, ultimately, what we know of man through it and why. Out of an interdisciplinary and dialogical perspective, projected by authors as Adolphe Gesché and Hans-Georg Gadamer, among others, we propose that the imaginary world opened and established by art becomes a privileged locus for human knowledge. The imagery is the symbolic area built by the artists and the community, which influences and affects every member of it, and where the community builds its identity known.Key Words: Imaginary, aesthetics, poiésis, anthropology.

  5. The Role of Locus of Control of Reinforcement in Interpersonal Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.; Blumberg, Neil

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate subjects' locus of control orientation to the degree of initial interpersonal attraction expressed toward a stranger who differed from the subjects only in degree of expressed locus of control orientation. (Author)

  6. Evolutionary process of a tetranucleotide microsatellite locus in Acipenseriformes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhao Jun Shao; Eric Rivals; Na Zhao; Sovan Lek; Jianbo Chang; Patrick Berrebi

    2011-08-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of the tetra-nucleotide microsatellite locus Spl-106 were investigated at the repeat and flanking sequences in 137 individuals of 15 Acipenseriform species, giving 93 homologous sequences, which were detected in 11 out of 15 species. Twenty-three haplotypes of flanking sequences and three distinct types of repeats, type I, type II and type III, were found within these 93 sequences. The MS-Align phylogenetic method, newly applied to microsatellite sequences, permitted us to understand the repeat and flanking sequence evolution of Spl-106 locus. The flanking region of locus Spl-106 was highly conserved among the species of genera Acipenser, Huso and Scaphirhynchus, which diverged about 150 million years ago (Mya). The rate of flanking sequence divergence at the microsatellite locus Spl-106 in sturgeons is between 0.011% and 0.079% with an average at 0.028% per million years. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic trees produced by MS-Align showed that both the flanking and repeat regions can cluster the alleles of different species into Pacific and Atlantic lineages. Our results show a synchronous evolutionary pattern between the flanking and repeat regions. Moreover, the coexistence of different repeat types in the same species, even in the same individual, is probably due to two duplication events encompassing the locus Spl-106 that occurred during the divergence of Pacific lineage. The first occured before the diversification of Pacific species (121–96 Mya) and led to repeat types I and II. The second occurred more recently, just before the speciation of A. sinensis and A. dabryanus (69–10 Mya), and led to repeat type III. Sequences in the same species with different repeat types probably corresponds to paralogous loci. This study sheds a new light on the evolutionary mechanisms that shape the complex microsatellite loci involving different repeat types.

  7. Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the CAI microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (CAI) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the CAI genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the CAI locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the CAI microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans.

  8. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  9. Promoters of the murine embryonic beta-like globin genes Ey and betah1 do not compete for interaction with the beta-globin locus control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Bulger, Michael; Roach, Julia N; Eszterhas, Susan K; Olivier, Emmanuel; Bouhassira, Eric E; Groudine, Mark T; Fiering, Steven

    2003-02-04

    Mammalian beta-globin loci contain multiple beta-like genes that are expressed at different times during development. The murine beta-globin locus contains two genes expressed during the embryo stage, Ey and betah1, and two genes expressed at both the fetal and postnatal stages, beta-major and beta-minor. Studies of transgenic human beta-like globin loci in mice have suggested that expression of one gene at the locus will suppress expression of other genes at the locus. To test this hypothesis we produced mouse lines with deletions of either the Ey or betah1 promoter in the endogenous murine beta-globin locus. Promoter deletion eliminated expression of the mutant gene but did not affect expression of the remaining embryonic gene or the fetal-adult beta-globin genes on the mutant allele. These results demonstrate a lack of competitive effects between individual mouse embryonic beta-globin gene promoters and other genes in the locus. The implication of these findings for models of beta-globin gene expression are discussed.

  10. The locus of microRNA-10b: a critical target for breast cancer insurgence and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell's life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment.

  11. Functional expression of SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) protects retinal dopaminergic cells from neurotoxin-induced degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingling; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell; Wang, Xiaokai; DeLaPaz, April; Sun, Lei; Lee, Eric; Tomei, Erika; Li, Lei

    2013-01-11

    We previously isolated a dominant mutation, night blindness b (nbb), which causes a late onset of retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration in zebrafish. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish nbb locus. Sequencing results revealed that nbb is a homolog of the vertebrate SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil). The Stil gene has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of vertebrate embryonic neural development and human cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that functional expression of Stil is also required for neural survival. In zebrafish, decreased expression of Stil resulted in increased toxic susceptibility of retinal dopaminergic cells to 6-hydroxydopamine. Increases in Stil-mediated Shh signaling transduction (i.e. by knocking down the Shh repressor Sufu) prevented dopaminergic cell death induced by neurotoxic insult. The data suggest that the oncogene Stil also plays important roles in neural protection.

  12. Hubungan Antara Locus of Control dengan Social Loafing Mahasiswa pada Tugas Berbasis Kelompok

    OpenAIRE

    Simanjuntak, Priscilla Deborah Rouly

    2017-01-01

    111301096 Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan locus of control dan social loafing mahasiswa pada tugas berbasis kelompok. Hasil penelitian terhadap 300 mahasiswa di lingkungan Universitas Sumatera Utara menunjukkan ada hubungan positif antara locus of control dengan social loafing. Data yang diperoleh dalam penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa semakin internal locus of control seseorang, maka semakin rendah kecenderungannya untuk mengurangi usaha saat bekerja di ...

  13. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  14. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  15. The active spatial organization of the β-globin locus requires the transcription factor EKLF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Drissen (Roy); R.-J.T.S. Palstra (Robert-Jan); N. Gillemans (Nynke); D. Splinter (Daniël); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); W.L. de Laat (Wouter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThree-dimensional organization of a gene locus is important for its regulation, as recently demonstrated for the β-globin locus. When actively expressed, the cis-regulatory elements of the β-globin locus are in proximity in the nuclear space, forming a compartment termed the Active

  16. A cut locus for finite graphs and the farthest point mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddaloni, Alessandro; Zamfirescu, Carol T.

    2016-01-01

    We reflect upon an analogue of the cut locus, a notion classically studied in Differential Geometry, for finite graphs. The cut locus C(x) of a vertex x shall be the graph induced by the set of all vertices y with the property that no shortest path between x and z, z≠y, contains y. The cut locus ...

  17. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  18. Segregation distortion of the CTG repeats at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, R.; Stivers, D.N. [Univ. of Texas Houston Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States); Deka, R.; Yu, Ling M.; Shriver, M.D.; Ferrell, R.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease, is caused by a CTG-repeat expansion, with affected individuals having {ge}50 repeats of this trinucleotide, at the DMPK locus of human chromosome 19q13.3. Severely affected individuals die early in life; the milder form of this disease reduces reproductive ability. Alleles in the normal range of CTG repeats are not as unstable as the (CTG){sub {ge}50} alleles. In the DM families, anticipation and parental bias of allelic expansions have been noted. However, data on mechanism of maintenance of DM in populations are conflicting. We present a maximum-likelihood model for examining segregation distortion of CTG-repeat alleles in normal families. Analyzing 726 meiotic events in 95 nuclear families from the CEPH panel pedigrees, we find evidence of preferential transmission of larger alleles (of size {le}29 repeats) from females (the probability of transmission of larger alleles is .565 {plus_minus} 0.03, different from .5 at P {approx} .028). There is no evidence of segregation distortion during male meiosis. We propose a hypothesis that preferential transmission of larger CTG-repeat alleles during female meiosis can compensate for mutational contraction of repeats within the normal allelic size range, and reduced viability and fertility of affected individuals. Thus, the pool of premutant alleles at the DM locus can be maintained in populations, which can subsequently mutate to the full mutation status to give rise to DM. 31 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. A multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA scheme for Streptococcus agalactiae genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mereghetti Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multilocus sequence typing (MLST is currently the reference method for genotyping Streptococcus agalactiae strains, the leading cause of infectious disease in newborns and a major cause of disease in immunocompromised children and adults. We describe here a genotyping method based on multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR analysis (MLVA applied to a population of S. agalactiae strains of various origins characterized by MLST and serotyping. Results We studied a collection of 186 strains isolated from humans and cattle and three reference strains (A909, NEM316 and 2603 V/R. Among 34 VNTRs, 6 polymorphic VNTRs loci were selected for use in genotyping of the bacterial population. The MLVA profile consists of a series of allele numbers, corresponding to the number of repeats at each VNTR locus. 98 MLVA genotypes were obtained compared to 51 sequences types generated by MLST. The MLVA scheme generated clusters which corresponded well to the main clonal complexes obtained by MLST. However it provided a higher discriminatory power. The diversity index obtained with MLVA was 0.960 compared to 0.881 with MLST for this population of strains. Conclusions The MLVA scheme proposed here is a rapid, cheap and easy genotyping method generating results suitable for exchange and comparison between different laboratories and for the epidemiologic surveillance of S. agalactiae and analyses of outbreaks.

  20. The psmα locus regulates production of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; Otto, Michael; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human bacterial infection, causing a wide spectrum of disease ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening pneumonia and sepsis. S. aureus toxins play an essential role in disease pathogenesis, contributing to both immunomodulation and host tissue injury. Prominent among these toxins are the membrane-active pore-forming cytolysin alpha-toxin (Hla) and the amphipathic α-helical phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides. As deletion of either the hla or psm locus leads to a phenotypically similar virulence defect in skin and soft tissue infection, we sought to determine the relative contribution of each locus to disease pathogenesis. Here we show that production of Hla can be modulated by PSM expression. An S. aureus mutant lacking PSM expression exhibits a transcriptional delay in hla mRNA production and therefore fails to secrete normal levels of Hla at early phases of growth. This leads to attenuation of virulence in vitro and in murine skin and lung models of infection, correlating with reduced recovery of Hla from host tissues. Production of Hla and restoration of staphylococcal virulence can be achieved in the psm mutant by plasmid-driven overexpression of hla. Our study suggests the coordinated action of Hla and PSMs in host tissue during early pathogenesis, confirming a major role for Hla in epithelial injury during S. aureus infection. These findings highlight the possibility that therapeutics targeting PSM production may simultaneously prevent Hla-mediated tissue injury.

  1. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Alexey I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A, at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel', northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk, and eastern (Russians from Puchezh parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages.

  2. An "in-out" strategy using gene targeting and FLP recombinase for the functional dissection of complex DNA regulatory elements: analysis of the beta-globin locus control region.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiering, S; Kim, C. G.; Epner, E M; Groudine, M

    1993-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is a complex DNA regulatory element that controls the expression of the cis-linked beta-like globin genes located in the 55 kilobases 3' of the LCR. We have initiated the functional analysis of the LCR by homologous recombination in murine erythroleukemia cell somatic hybrids that carry a single copy of human chromosome 11 on which the beta-globin locus is situated. High-level expression of the human beta-globin gene normally occurs when these ...

  3. The rat STSL locus: characterization, chromosomal assignment, and genetic variations in sitosterolemic hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Richard

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plant sterol accumulation has been reported in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP and the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat. Additionally, a blood pressure quantitative trait locus (QTL has been mapped to rat chromosome 6 in a New Zealand genetically hypertensive rat strain (GH rat. ABCG5 and ABCG8 (encoding sterolin-1 and sterolin-2 respectively have been shown to be responsible for causing sitosterolemia in humans. These genes are organized in a head-to-head configuration at the STSL locus on human chromosome 2p21. Methods To investigate whether mutations in Abcg5 or Abcg8 exist in SHR, SHRSP, WKY and GH rats, we initiated a systematic search for the genetic variation in coding and non-coding region of Abcg5 and Abcg8 genes in these strains. We isolated the rat cDNAs for these genes and characterized the genomic structure and tissue expression patterns, using standard molecular biology techniques and FISH for chromosomal assignments. Results Both rat Abcg5 and Abcg8 genes map to chromosome band 6q12. These genes span ~40 kb and contain 13 exons and 12 introns each, in a pattern identical to that of the STSL loci in mouse and man. Both Abcg5 and Abcg8 were expressed only in liver and intestine. Analyses of DNA from SHR, SHRSP, GH, WKY, Wistar, Wistar King A (WKA and Brown Norway (BN rat strains revealed a homozygous G to T substitution at nucleotide 1754, resulting in the coding change Gly583Cys in sterolin-1 only in rats that are both sitosterolemic and hypertensive (SHR, SHRSP and WKY. Conclusions The rat STSL locus maps to chromosome 6q12. A non-synonymous mutation in Abcg5, Gly583Cys, results in sitosterolemia in rat strains that are also hypertensive (WKY, SHR and SHRSP. Those rat strains that are hypertensive, but not sitosterolemic (e.g. GH rat do not have mutations in Abcg5 or Abcg8. This mutation allows for expression and apparent apical targeting of Abcg5

  4. Externality and locus of control in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbitsky, J R; White, D R

    1981-03-01

    Fifty-nine obese and normal-weight children, aged 8-12 years were compared on two dimensions of "externality," previously examined in obese adults. Significant sex difference indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weight children were not differentiated by their performance on either a food-related or three nonfood-related measures of external-cue responsiveness, nor by their locus of control expectancies. Furthermore, the various measures were neither strongly nor consistently intercorrelated, providing little support for the notion of a single underlying dimension of "externality." The contribution of physiological, sensory, cognitive-motivational, and sociocultural parameters to the regulation of eating behavior was discussed.

  5. Two-locus inbreeding measures for recurrent selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S C; Weir, B S

    1977-03-01

    For a population undergoing recurrent selection, a method is presented for determining the average inbreeding coefficients at the end of each breeding cycle. The coefficients are derived in terms of probability measures that genes are identical by descent. For the one-locus case, two digametic measures are defined and employed in the derivation of a recurrence formula for the inbreeding coefficient. Two further classes of measures, trigametic and quadrigametic, are required for transition from one cycle to the previous one to allow the calculation of the inbreeding function for the two-locus case. Numerical values of the average probability of double identity by descent for populations with various imposed assumptions are listed to illustrate the effects of linkage and population size on the accrual of inbreeding and hence of homozygosity.

  6. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F. [Unidad de Genetica, Valencia (Spain); Gal, A. [Universitaets-Krankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between IGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  8. Fine-mapping of an Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟中林; 戴亚; 李家洋

    2000-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cell death mutation locus was mapped to chromosome 2 between lGS1 and mi421. The YAC clone ends, CIC9A3R, CIC11C7L, CIC2G5R and RFLP marker CDs3 within this interval, were used to probe TAMU BAC library and 31 BAC clones were obtained. A BAC contig encompassing the mutation locus, which consists of T6P5, T7M23, T12A21, T8L6 and T18A18, was identified by Southern hybridization with the BAC ends as probes. 11 CAPS and 12 STS markers were developed in this region. These results will facilitate map-based cloning of the genes and sequencing of the genomic DNA in this region.

  9. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study...... patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches....

  10. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Maricic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials.

  11. Male-pattern baldness susceptibility locus at 20p11.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, J.B.; Yuan, X.; Geller, F.; Waterworth, D.; Bataille, V.; Glass, D.; Song, K.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Walters, B.; Soranzo, N.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Rafnar, T.; Deloukas, P.; Sulem, P.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.; Spector, T.D.; Mooser, V.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for androgenic alopecia in 1,125 men and identified a newly associated locus at chromosome 20p11.22, confirmed in three independent cohorts (n = 1,650; OR = 1.60, P = 1.1 x 10(-14) for rs1160312). The one man in seven who harbors risk alleles at both 20p1

  12. Male-pattern baldness susceptibility locus at 20p11.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, J.B.; Yuan, X.; Geller, F.; Waterworth, D.; Bataille, V.; Glass, D.; Song, K.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Walters, B.; Soranzo, N.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Rafnar, T.; Deloukas, P.; Sulem, P.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.; Spector, T.D.; Mooser, V.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for androgenic alopecia in 1,125 men and identified a newly associated locus at chromosome 20p11.22, confirmed in three independent cohorts (n = 1,650; OR = 1.60, P = 1.1 x 10(-14) for rs1160312). The one man in seven who harbors risk alleles at both 20p1

  13. Recent Advances of Flowering Locus T Gene in Higher Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shuiyuan Cheng; Feng Xu; Xiaofeng Rong; Xiaohua Huang

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of t...

  14. Pressure sore survey. Part 3: Locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylor, M; Torrance, C

    1999-03-01

    This is the third in a three-part article which investigates the prevalence, knowledge and attitudes to pressure sores in one NHS trust. This study describes the methodology used in choosing and developing attitude scales to explore whether there are any relationships between the locus of control and pressure sore prevention. Factors to do with attitude and the value associated with pressure sore prevention have a central role. Attitudes and beliefs affect what we do and may contribute to pressure sore development.

  15. The capsule biosynthesis locus of Haemophilus influenzae shows conspicuous similarity to the corresponding locus in Haemophilus sputorum and may have been recruited from this species by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Signe M; de Gier, Camilla; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula; Gupta, Vikas; Hansen, Lars H; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The newly described species Haemophilus sputorum has been cultured from the upper respiratory tract of humans and appears to have little pathogenic potential. The species encodes a capsular biosynthesis locus of approximately 12  kb composed of three distinct regions. Region I and III genes, involved in export and processing of the capsular material, show high similarity to the corresponding genes in capsulate lineages of the pathogenic species Haemophilus influenzae; indeed, standard bexA and bexB PCRs for detection of capsulated strains of H. influenzae give positive results with strains of H. sputorum. Three ORFs are present in region II of the sequenced strain of H. sputorum, of which a putative phosphotransferase showed homology with corresponding genes from H. influenzae serotype c and f. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes from 24 Pasteurellaceae species showed that H. sputorum was only distantly related to H. influenzae. In contrast to H. influenzae, the capsule locus in H. sputorum is not associated with transposases or other transposable elements. Our data suggest that the capsule locus of capsulate lineages of H. influenzae may have been recruited relatively recently from the commensal species H. sputorum by horizontal gene transfer.

  16. The pgm locus and pigmentation phenotype in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Leal-Balbino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The pigmentation (pgm locus is a large unstable area of the Yersinia pestis chromosome composed of a segment of iron acquisition (HPI linked to a pigmentation segment. In this work we examined the mobility of HPI and the pigmentation segment in three Y. pestis isolates using successive subcultures on Congo red agar (CRA plates. Strain P. CE 882 was shown to be highly stable while strains P. Exu 340 and P. Peru 375 dissociated into several phenotypes, PCR analysis showing evidence of changes in the pgm locus of the derived cultures. Strains P. Exu 340 and P. Peru 375 produced previously unreported cultures positive for the pesticin/yersiniabactin outer membrane receptor (psn+ but negative for the iron-regulated protein (irp2-, suggesting the occurrence of rearrangements in this chromosomal region and either a sequential loss or the loss of separated segments. These results provide evidence that besides deletion en bloc, specific rearrangements are also involved in the deletion events for that locus.

  17. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  18. Transcription is required to establish maternal imprinting at the Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Y Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS [MIM 17620] and Angelman syndrome (AS [MIM 105830] locus is controlled by a bipartite imprinting center (IC consisting of the PWS-IC and the AS-IC. The most widely accepted model of IC function proposes that the PWS-IC activates gene expression from the paternal allele, while the AS-IC acts to epigenetically inactivate the PWS-IC on the maternal allele, thus silencing the paternally expressed genes. Gene order and imprinting patterns at the PWS/AS locus are well conserved from human to mouse; however, a murine AS-IC has yet to be identified. We investigated a potential regulatory role for transcription from the Snrpn alternative upstream exons in silencing the maternal allele using a murine transgene containing Snrpn and three upstream exons. This transgene displayed appropriate imprinted expression and epigenetic marks, demonstrating the presence of a functional AS-IC. Transcription of the upstream exons from the endogenous locus correlates with imprint establishment in oocytes, and this upstream exon expression pattern was conserved on the transgene. A transgene bearing targeted deletions of each of the three upstream exons exhibited loss of imprinting upon maternal transmission. These results support a model in which transcription from the Snrpn upstream exons directs the maternal imprint at the PWS-IC.

  19. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  20. Expression analyses of the genes harbored by the type 2 diabetes and pediatric BMI associated locus on 10q23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence that one of the key type 2 diabetes (T2D loci identified by GWAS exerts its influence early on in life through its impact on pediatric BMI. This locus on 10q23 harbors three genes, encoding hematopoietically expressed homeobox (HHEX, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE and kinesin family member 11 (KIF11, respectively. Methods We analyzed the impact of adipogeneis on the mRNA and protein expression levels of these genes in the human adipocyte Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS cell line in order to investigate which could be the culprit gene(s in this region of linkage disequilibrium. Results Following activation of differentiation with a PPARγ ligand, we observed ~20% decrease in IDE, ~40% decrease in HHEX and in excess of 80% decrease in KIF11 mRNA levels when comparing the adipocyte and pre-adipocyte states. We also observed decreases in KIF11 and IDE protein levels, but conversely we observed a dramatic increase in HHEX protein levels. Subsequent time course experiments revealed some marked changes in expression as early as three hours after activation of differentiation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the expression of all three genes at this locus are impacted during SGBS adipogenesis and provides insights in to the possible mechanisms of how the genes at this 10q23 locus could influence both adipocyte differentiation and susceptibility to T2D through insulin resistance.

  1. An embryonic stage-specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E; Kingsley, Paul D; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven; Bulger, Michael

    2011-05-12

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ε-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure.

  2. Independent formation of DnaseI hypersensitive sites in the murine beta-globin locus control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, M A; Mehaffey, M G; Telling, A; Hug, B; Ley, T J; Groudine, M; Fiering, S

    2000-06-01

    Mammalian beta-globin loci are composed of multiple orthologous genes whose expression is erythroid specific and developmentally regulated. The expression of these genes both from the endogenous locus and from transgenes is strongly influenced by a linked 15-kilobase region of clustered DNaseI hypersensitive sites (HSs) known as the locus control region (LCR). The LCR encompasses 5 major HSs, each of which is highly homologous among humans, mice, and other mammals. To analyze the function of individual HSs in the endogenous murine beta-globin LCR, we have used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to produce 5 mouse lines, each of which is deficient for 1 of these major HSs. In this report, we demonstrate that deletion of the conserved region of 5'HS 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5/6 abolishes HS formation at the deletion site but has no influence on the formation of the remaining HSs in the LCR. Therefore, in the endogenous murine locus, there is no dominant or initiating site whose formation must precede the formation of the other HSs. This is consistent with the idea that HSs form autonomously. We discuss the implications of these findings for current models of beta-globin regulation.

  3. An embryonic stage–specific enhancer within the murine β-globin locus mediates domain-wide histone hyperacetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, George; Cadiz-Rivera, Brenda; de Vries, Christina; Getman, Michael; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Fields, Jennifer; Fiering, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian nuclei, a select number of tissue-specific gene loci exhibit broadly distributed patterns of histone modifications, such as histone hyperacetylation, that are normally associated with active gene promoters. Previously, we characterized such hyperacetylated domains within mammalian β-globin gene loci, and determined that within the murine locus, neither the β-globin locus control region nor the gene promoters were required for domain formation. Here, we identify a developmentally specific erythroid enhancer, hypersensitive site-embryonic 1 (HS-E1), located within the embryonic β-globin domain in mouse, which is homologous to a region located downstream of the human embryonic ϵ-globin gene. This sequence exhibits nuclease hypersensitivity in primitive erythroid cells and acts as an enhancer in gain-of-function assays. Deletion of HS-E1 from the endogenous murine β-globin locus results in significant decrease in the expression of the embryonic β-globin genes and loss of the domain-wide pattern of histone hyperacetylation. The data suggest that HS-E1 is an enhancer that is uniquely required for β-like globin expression in primitive erythroid cells, and that it defines a novel class of enhancer that works in part by domain-wide modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:21321362

  4. Mapping of the disease locus and identification of ADAMTS10 as a candidate gene in a canine model of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kuchtey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, with elevated intraocular pressure as an important risk factor. Increased resistance to outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork causes elevated intraocular pressure, but the specific mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used genome-wide SNP arrays to map the disease gene in a colony of Beagle dogs with inherited POAG to within a single 4 Mb locus on canine chromosome 20. The Beagle POAG locus is syntenic to a previously mapped human quantitative trait locus for intraocular pressure on human chromosome 19. Sequence capture and next-generation sequencing of the entire canine POAG locus revealed a total of 2,692 SNPs segregating with disease. Of the disease-segregating SNPs, 54 were within exons, 8 of which result in amino acid substitutions. The strongest candidate variant causes a glycine to arginine substitution in a highly conserved region of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS10. Western blotting revealed ADAMTS10 protein is preferentially expressed in the trabecular meshwork, supporting an effect of the variant specific to aqueous humor outflow. The Gly661Arg variant in ADAMTS10 found in the POAG Beagles suggests that altered processing of extracellular matrix and/or defects in microfibril structure or function may be involved in raising intraocular pressure, offering specific biochemical targets for future research and treatment strategies.

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies a single major locus contributing to survival into old age; the APOE locus revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    there was only moderate linkage disequilibrium between rs2075650 and the ApoE ε4 defining SNP rs429358, we could not find an APOE-independent effect of rs2075650 on longevity, either in cross-sectional or in longitudinal analyses. As expected, rs429358 associated with metabolic phenotypes in the offspring...... the deleterious effects of the ApoE ε4 allele. No other major longevity locus was found....

  6. HIV control through a single nucleotide on the HLA-B locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Harndahl, Mikkel; Leslie, Alasdair J;

    2012-01-01

    :02, which differ by only a single amino acid. Crucially, they occur primarily on identical HLA class I haplotypes and, as Bw6 alleles, do not act as NK cell ligands and are therefore largely unconfounded by other genetic factors. We show that in an outbred cohort (n = 2,093) of HIV C......Genetic variation within the HLA-B locus has the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any polymorphisms within the human genome. However, identifying the exact mechanism involved is complicated by several factors. HLA-Bw4 alleles provide ligands for NK cells and for CD8 T cells......-clade-infected individuals, a single amino acid change at position 9 of the HLA-B molecule critically affects peptide binding and significantly alters the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes targeted, measured directly ex vivo by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay (P = 2 × 10...

  7. A TCTN2 mutation defines a novel Meckel Gruber syndrome locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Sunker, Asma; Alali, Faten Ezzat; AlQahtani, Khadijah; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2011-06-01

    Meckel Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder that represents a severe form of ciliopathy in humans and is characterized by significant genetic heterogeneity. In this article, we describe the identification of a novel MKS locus MKS8 that we map to TCTN2, in a multiplex consanguineous family. TCTN2 is a paralog of the recently identified Tectonic 1, which has been shown to modulate sonic hedgehog signaling. Expression analysis at different developmental stages of the murine ortholog revealed a spatial and temporal pattern consistent with the MKS phenotype observed in our patient. The exclusion of this and the other seven MKS genes in our collection of consanguineous Arab MKS families confirms the existence of two additional MKS loci. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A Replication Study for Association of LBX1 locus with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in French-Canadian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Dina; Julien, Cédric; Samuels, Mark E; Moreau, Alain

    2017-06-09

    A case-control association study. To investigate the relationship between LBX1 polymorphisms and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) in French-Canadian population. It is widely accepted that genetic factors contribute to AIS. Although the LBX1 locus is so far the most successfully replicated locus in different AIS cohorts, these associations were replicated mainly in Asian populations, with few studies in Caucasian populations of European descent. We recruited 1568 participants (667 AIS patients and 901 healthy controls) in the French-Canadian population. Genomic data was generated using the Illumina Human Omni 2.5 M BeadChip. An additional 121 AIS cases and 51 controls were genotyped for specific SNPs by multiplex PCR using standard procedures. BEAGLE 3 was used to impute the following markers: rs7893223, rs11190878 and rs678741 against the 1000-genomes European cohort phased genotypes given that they were absent in our GWAS panel. Resulting genotypes were combined then used for single marker and haplotyped-based association. Four markers showed association with AIS in our cohort at this locus; rs11190870 the most studied marker, rs7893223, rs594791, and rs11190878. When we restricted the analysis to severe cases only, four additional SNPs showed associations: rs11598177, rs1322331, rs670206 and rs678741. In addition, we analyzed the associations of the observed haplotypes and dihaplotypes formed by these SNPs. The haplotype TTAAGAAA and its homozygous dihaplotype showed the highest association with our severe group and was the highest risk haplotype. The haplotype CCGCAGGG was significantly more associated with the control group, and its homozygous or heterozygous dihaplotype was less frequent in the severe group compared to the control group, suggesting that CCGCAGGG may represent a protective haplotype. We have replicated the association of the LBX1 locus with AIS in French-Canadian population, a novel European descent cohort, which is known for its unique

  9. The GimA locus of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli: does reductive evolution correlate with habitat and pathotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Homeier

    Full Text Available IbeA (invasion of brain endothelium, which is located on a genomic island termed GimA, is involved in the pathogenesis of several extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC pathotypes, including newborn meningitic E. coli (NMEC and avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC. To unravel the phylogeny of GimA and to investigate its island character, the putative insertion locus of GimA was determined via Long Range PCR and DNA-DNA hybridization in 410 E. coli isolates, including APEC, NMEC, uropathogenic (UPEC, septicemia-associated E. coli (SEPEC, and human and animal fecal isolates as well as in 72 strains of the E. coli reference (ECOR collection. In addition to a complete GimA (approximately 20.3 kb and a locus lacking GimA we found a third pattern containing a 342 bp remnant of GimA in this strain collection. The presence of GimA was almost exclusively detected in strains belonging to phylogenetic group B2. In addition, the complete GimA was significantly more frequent in APEC and NMEC strains while the GimA remnant showed a higher association with UPEC strains. A detailed analysis of the ibeA sequences revealed the phylogeny of this gene to be consistent with that obtained by Multi Locus Sequence Typing of the strains. Although common criteria for genomic islands are partially fulfilled, GimA rather seems to be an ancestral part of phylogenetic group B2, and it would therefore be more appropriate to term this genomic region GimA locus instead of genomic island. The existence of two other patterns reflects a genomic rearrangement in a reductive evolution-like manner.

  10. DMP1β, a splice isoform of the tumour suppressor DMP1 locus, induces proliferation and progression of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglic, Dejan; Stovall, Daniel B; Cline, J Mark; Fry, Elizabeth A; Mallakin, Ali; Taneja, Pankaj; Caudell, David L; Willingham, Mark C; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2015-05-01

    Our recent work has indicated that the DMP1 locus on 7q21, encoding a haplo-insufficient tumour suppressor, is hemizygously deleted at a high frequency in breast cancer. The locus encodes DMP1α protein, an activator of the p53 pathway leading to cell cycle arrest and senescence, and two other functionally undefined isoforms, DMP1β and DMP1γ. In this study, we show that the DMP1 locus is alternatively spliced in ∼30% of breast cancer cases with relatively decreased DMP1α and increased DMP1β expression. RNA-seq analyses of a publicly available database showed significantly increased DMP1β mRNA in 43-55% of human breast cancers, dependent on histological subtypes. Similarly, DMP1β protein was found to be overexpressed in ∼60% of tumours relative to their surrounding normal tissue. Importantly, alteration of DMP1 splicing and DMP1β overexpression were associated with poor clinical outcomes of the breast cancer patients, indicating that DMP1β may have a biological function. Indeed, DMP1β increased proliferation of non-tumourigenic mammary epithelial cells and knockdown of endogenous DMP1 inhibited breast cancer cell growth. To determine DMP1β's role in vivo, we established MMTV-DMP1β transgenic mouse lines. DMP1β overexpression was sufficient to induce mammary gland hyperplasia and multifocal tumour lesions in mice at 7-18 months of age. The tumours formed were adenosquamous carcinomas with evidence of transdifferentiation and keratinized deposits. Overall, we identify alternative splicing as a mechanism utilized by cancer cells to modulate the DMP1 locus through diminishing DMP1α tumour suppressor expression, while simultaneously up-regulating the tumour-promoting DMP1β isoform.

  11. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F; Dittmar, Rachel L; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression.

  12. Locus de Controle e escolha do método anticoncepcional Locus de Control y método anticonceptivo elegido Locus of Control and choice of contraceptive method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Salheb Alves

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a relação entre o Locus de Controle e o tipo de método contraceptivo escolhido. Foi utilizada a Escala Multidimensional de Locus de Controle de Levenson e entrevistadas 191 mulheres. As usuárias de preservativo masculino apresentaram maior Internalidade do que as usuárias de injetável mensal. Quanto ao locus Externalidade Outros Poderosos, as usuárias de implante apresentavam menor externalidade do que as usuárias de preservativo masculino, laqueadura, injetável trimestral e DIU. Considerando-se o locus Externalidade Acaso, as usuárias de implante apresentaram menores escores do que as mulheres que optaram pela laqueadura, injetável trimestral e DIU. Observou-se ainda, menor Externalidade Acaso entre as usuárias de injetável mensal em relação às mulheres que fizeram opção pelo injetável trimestral.El objetivo es validar la relación entre el Locus de Control y el tipo de método anticonceptivo elegido. Fue usada la Escala Multidimensional de Locus de Control de Levenson. Fueron entrevistadas 191 mujeres. Las usuarias de condón masculino presentaron Internalidad más grande que las usuarias de inyectable mensual. Considerado el Locus Externalidad - Otro poderoso, las usuarias de implante presentaron menor externalidad de que las usuarias de condón masculino, laqueadura, inyectable trimestral y DIU. Considerado el Locus Externalidad - Quizá, las usuarias del implante presentaron menores resultados que las mujeres que eligieron por la laqueadura, inyectable trimestral y DIU. Se observo que las mujeres usuarias de inyectable mensual presentaron menor Externalidad - Quizá que las mujeres usuarias de inyectable trimestral.The purpose was to assess the relationship between locus of control and the contraceptive method chosen. It was used the Levenson's Multidimensional Locus of Control Scale and 191 women was interviewed. Users of male condoms presented greater Internality than the monthly contraceptive

  13. The 1. 5-Mb region spanning the myotonic dystrophy locus shows uniform recombination frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shutler, G.G.; MacKenzie, A.E.; Korneluk, R.G. (Univ. of Ottawa (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    The myotonic dystrophy (DM) mutation has been identified as a heritable unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence. The intergenerational amplification of this sequence is an example of a new class of dynamic mutations responsible for human genetic diseases. To ascertain whether recombination activity influences, or is affected by, the presence of this unique sequence, a comprehensive study of the physical and genetic mapping data for the 1.5-Mb region of human chromosome 19q13.3, which contains the DM locus, was conducted. The recombination rate for this region was examined by correlating genetic distance to physical distance for six selected marker loci. The following markers span the DM region: 19qCEN-p[alpha]1.4 (D19S37)-APOC2-CKM-pE0.8 (D19S115)-pGB2.6 (DM)-p134c (D19S51)-19qTER. Initial linear regression analysis of these two parameters failed to reveal a significant linear correlation (coefficient of determination, r[sup 2] = .19), suggesting nonuniform rates of recombination. However, the presence of a recombination hot spot was believed to be restricted to a specific region of the 1.5 Mb studied and had relatively broad confidence intervals, as reflected by low LOD values. A second linear regression analysis using only marker intervals with high LOD scores (Z[sub max] > 22) showed linear correlation (r[sup 2] = .68) for the entire 1.5-Mb region. This analysis indicated a relatively uniform recombination frequency in the 1.5-Mb region spanning the DM locus. Furthermore, the recombination observed were neither under- nor overrepresented on DM chromosomes. Consequently, recombination activity is unlikely to influence, or be affected by, the presence of the DM mutation. 41 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A conserved interaction that is essential for the biogenesis of histone locus bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-cui; Sabath, Ivan; Kunduru, Lalitha; van Wijnen, Andre J; Marzluff, William F; Dominski, Zbigniew

    2014-12-05

    Nuclear protein, ataxia-telangiectasia locus (NPAT) and FLICE-associated huge protein (FLASH) are two major components of discrete nuclear structures called histone locus bodies (HLBs). NPAT is a key co-activator of histone gene transcription, whereas FLASH through its N-terminal region functions in 3' end processing of histone primary transcripts. The C-terminal region of FLASH contains a highly conserved domain that is also present at the end of Yin Yang 1-associated protein-related protein (YARP) and its Drosophila homologue, Mute, previously shown to localize to HLBs in Drosophila cells. Here, we show that the C-terminal domain of human FLASH and YARP interacts with the C-terminal region of NPAT and that this interaction is essential and sufficient to drive FLASH and YARP to HLBs in HeLa cells. Strikingly, only the last 16 amino acids of NPAT are sufficient for the interaction. We also show that the C-terminal domain of Mute interacts with a short region at the end of the Drosophila NPAT orthologue, multi sex combs (Mxc). Altogether, our data indicate that the conserved C-terminal domain shared by FLASH, YARP, and Mute recognizes the C-terminal sequence of NPAT orthologues, thus acting as a signal targeting proteins to HLBs. Finally, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of human FLASH can be directly joined with its N-terminal region through alternative splicing. The resulting 190-amino acid MiniFLASH, despite lacking 90% of full-length FLASH, contains all regions necessary for 3' end processing of histone pre-mRNA in vitro and accumulates in HLBs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The 1.5-Mb region spanning the myotonic dystrophy locus shows uniform recombination frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutler, G G; MacKenzie, A E; Korneluk, R G

    1994-01-01

    The myotonic dystrophy (DM) mutation has been identified as a heritable unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence. The intergenerational amplification of this sequence is an example of a new class of dynamic mutations responsible for human genetic diseases. To ascertain whether recombination activity influences, or is affected by, the presence of this unique sequence, a comprehensive study of the physical and genetic mapping data for the 1.5-Mb region of human chromosome 19q13.3, which contains the DM locus, was conducted. The recombination rate for this region was examined by correlating genetic distance to physical distance for six selected marker loci. The following markers span the DM region: 19qCEN-p alpha 1.4 (D19S37)-APOC2-CKM-pE0.8 (D19S115)-pGB2.6 (DM)-p134c (D19S51)-19qTER. Initial linear regression analysis of these two parameters failed to reveal a significant linear correlation (coefficient of determination, r2 = .19), suggesting nonuniform rates of recombination. However, the presence of a recombination hot spot was believed to be unlikely, as the marker-to-marker pairs that showed the greatest deviation in recombination frequency were not restricted to a specific region of the 1.5 Mb studied and had relatively broad confidence intervals, as reflected by low LOD values. A second linear regression analysis using only marker intervals with high LOD scores (Zmax > 22) showed linear correlation (r2 = .68) for the entire 1.5-Mb region. This analysis indicated a relatively uniform recombination frequency in the 1.5-Mb region spanning the DM locus. Furthermore, the recombinations observed were neither under- nor overrepresented on DM chromosomes. Consequently, recombination activity is unlikely to influence, or be affected by, the presence of the DM mutation.

  16. A novel method for detection of preferred retinal locus (PRL) through simple retinal image processing using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalikivayi, V.; Pal, Sudip; Ganesan, A. R.

    2013-09-01

    simple and new technique for detection of `Preferred Retinal Locus' (PRL) in human eye is proposed in this paper. Simple MATLAB algorithms for estimating RGB pixel intensity values of retinal images were used. The technique proved non-existence of `S' cones in Fovea Centralis and also proposes that rods are involved in blue color perception. Retinal images of central vision loss and normal retina were taken for image processing. Blue minimum, Red maximum and Red+Green maximum were the three methods used in detecting PRL. Comparative analyses were also performed for these methods with patient's age and visual acuity.

  17. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  18. Detection of a quantitative trait locus associated with resistance to infection with Trichuris suis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher;

    2015-01-01

    Whipworms (Trichuris spp.) infect a variety of hosts, including domestic animals and humans. Of considerable interest is the porcine whipworm, T. suis, which is particularly prevalent in outdoor production systems. High infection levels may cause growth retardation, anaemia and haemorrhagic...... a whole-genome scan of an F1 resource population (n=195) trickle-infected with T. suis. A measured genotype analysis revealed a putative quantitative trait locus (QTL) for T. suis FEC on chromosome 13 covering ∼4.5Mbp, although none of the SNPs reached genome-wide significance. We tested the hypothesis...

  19. The construction of a normative scale of locus of control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann M. Schepers

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the study was to construct a normative scale of locus of control for use with students and adults. A corollary of the study was to establish the personality, interest and cognitive correlates of locus of control. Conceptually the instrument is based on attribution theory and on social learning theory. The first edition of the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI was applied to 356 first-year university students during 1994. A factor analysis of the 65 items of the inventory yielded three factors. The factors were interpreted as Autonomy, Internal Control and External Control. Three scales, corresponding to the three factors, were constructed, and yielded reliability coefficients of 0,80; 0,77 and 0,81 respectively. Following this the cognitive, interest and personality correlates of the LCI were determined. The implications of the findings are discussed. Opsomming Die hoofdoel van die studie was die konstruksie van ’n normatiewe skaal van lokus van beheer vir gebruik met studente en volwassenes. ’n Newe-doelwit van die studie was om die persoonlikheids-, belangstellings- en kognitiewe korrelate van lokus van beheer te bepaal. Konseptueel is die instrument op attribusieteorie en sosiale-leerteorie gebaseer. Die eerste-uitgawe van die Lokus van Beheervraelys (LvB is op 356 eerstejaaruniversiteitstudente toegepas gedurende 1994. ’n Faktorontleding van die 65 items van die vraelys is gedoen en het drie faktore opgelewer. Die faktore is as Outonomie, Interne Beheer en Eksterne Beheer geïnterpreteer. Voorts is drie skale wat ooreenstem met die drie faktore, gekonstrueer en het betroubaarhede van 0,80; 0,77 en 0,81, onderskeidelik, opgelewer. Vervolgens is die kognitiewe, belangstellings- en persoonlikheidskorrelate van die LvB bepaal. Die implikasies van die bevindinge word bespreek.

  20. Gene amplification of the Hps locus in Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuflu Kuflom

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS is an 8 kD cysteine-rich polypeptide that causes asthma in persons allergic to soybean dust. HPS is synthesized in the pod endocarp and deposited on the seed surface during development. Past evidence suggests that the protein may mediate the adherence or dehiscence of endocarp tissues during maturation and affect the lustre, or glossiness of the seed surface. Results A comparison of soybean germplasm by genomic DNA blot hybridization shows that the copy number and structure of the Hps locus is polymorphic among soybean cultivars and related species. Changes in Hps gene copy number were also detected by comparative genomic DNA hybridization using cDNA microarrays. The Hps copy number polymorphisms co-segregated with seed lustre phenotype and HPS surface protein in a cross between dull- and shiny-seeded soybeans. In soybean cultivar Harosoy 63, a minimum of 27 ± 5 copies of the Hps gene were estimated to be present in each haploid genome. The isolation and analysis of genomic clones indicates that the core Hps locus is comprised of a tandem array of reiterated units, with each 8.6 kb unit containing a single HPS open reading frame. Conclusion This study shows that polymorphisms at the Hps locus arise from changes in the gene copy number via gene amplification. We present a model whereby Hps copy number modulates protein expression levels and seed lustre, and we suggest that gene amplification may result from selection pressures imposed on crop plants.

  1. The barley Frost resistance-H2 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquariello, Marianna; Barabaschi, Delfina; Himmelbach, Axel; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stein, Nils; Gandolfi, Francesco; Tenedini, Elena; Bernardis, Isabella; Tagliafico, Enrico; Pecchioni, Nicola; Francia, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Frost resistance-H2 (Fr-H2) is a major QTL affecting freezing tolerance in barley, yet its molecular basis is still not clearly understood. To gain a better insight into the structural characterization of the locus, a high-resolution linkage map developed from the Nure × Tremois cross was initially implemented to map 13 loci which divided the 0.602 cM total genetic distance into ten recombination segments. A PCR-based screening was then applied to identify positive bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from two genomic libraries of the reference genotype Morex. Twenty-six overlapping BACs from the integrated physical-genetic map were 454 sequenced. Reads assembled in contigs were subsequently ordered, aligned and manually curated in 42 scaffolds. In a total of 1.47 Mbp, 58 protein-coding sequences were identified, 33 of which classified according to similarity with sequences in public databases. As three complete barley C-repeat Binding Factors (HvCBF) genes were newly identified, the locus contained13 full-length HvCBFs, four Related to AP2 Triticeae (RAPT) genes, and at least five CBF pseudogenes. The final overall assembly of Fr-H2 includes more than 90 % of target region: all genes were identified along the locus, and a general survey of Repetitive Elements obtained. We believe that this gold-standard sequence for the Morex Fr-H2 will be a useful genomic tool for structural and evolutionary comparisons with Fr-H2 in winter-hardy cultivars along with Fr-2 of other Triticeae crops.

  2. Burnout, locus de control y deportistas de alto rendimiento

    OpenAIRE

    Medina Mojena, Greisy; García Ucha, Francisco Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Los estudios sobre burnout comenzaron en los 70 por Freudenberg (1974) y en los 80 en el deporte. En Cuba este es de los primeros sobre el tema. Se estudiaron 40 deportistas de alto rendimiento de pesas, balonmano, baloncesto y tackewondo. Con una edad entre los 18 y 28 años y experiencia deportiva entre 5 y 16 años. Las técnicas utilizadas son una adaptación, de Garcés de Los Fayos (1999) del Maslach Burnout Inventory (1981) y un test de Locus de control. Los principales resultados c...

  3. Measurement of supernatural belief: sex differences and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, T M; Desrosiers, M

    1980-10-01

    Although we live in an age dominated by science and technology, there exists an increasingly popular anti-science sentiment. This study describes the development of a scale to assess the degree of personal acceptance of supernatural causality versus acceptance of scientific explanation. In addition to the psychometric data concerning validity and reliability of the scale, data are presented which showed the personality factor of supernaturalism to be independent of orthodox religious attitudes. Results indicated a significantly greater supernatural acceptance for women, and a positive relation of supernaturalism with external locus of control.

  4. Recent advances of flowering locus T gene in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Rong, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of the FT gene and its expression products to provide meaningful information for further studies of the functions of FT genes.

  5. Locus of control and its relationship with mental health and adjustment among adolescent females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There exists a plethora of researches which have identified the role of Locus of Control in maintaining sound mental health and adjustment. The present study examined the relationship of Locus of Control with Mental Health & overall Adjustment among adolescent females. Method: The participants consisted of 50 adolescent females. Mental Health Battery designed by Singh, Gupta (2000, Rotter′s Locus of Control Scale (1966 & Adjustment Inventory for College Students by Sinha & Singh (1995 were administered. Findings: The findings of the study revealed that adolescent females who possess internal locus of control showed better mental health & overall adjustment pattern which includes home, social, emotional, educational domains and health adjustment domain than those who possess external locus of control. Conclusion: The study highlights the pervasive influence of internal & external locus of control on mental health & adjustment among adolescent females.

  6. A Complete Enumeration and Classification of Two-Locus Disease Models

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W; Li, Wentian; Reich, Jens

    1999-01-01

    There are 512 two-locus, two-allele, two-phenotype, fully-penetrant disease models. Using the permutation between two alleles, between two loci, and between being affected and unaffected, one model can be considered to be equivalent to another model under the corresponding permutation. These permutations greatly reduce the number of two-locus models in the analysis of complex diseases. This paper determines the number of non-redundant two-locus models (which can be 102, 100, 96, 51, 50, or 48, depending on which permutations are used, and depending on whether zero-locus and single-locus models are excluded). Whenever possible, these non-redundant two-locus models are classified by their property. Besides the familiar features of multiplicative models (logical AND), heterogeneity models (logical OR), and threshold models, new classifications are added or expanded: modifying-effect models, logical XOR models, interference and negative interference models (neither dominant nor recessive), conditionally dominant/...

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing of the HLA locus: Methods and impacts on HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapito, Raphael; Radosavljevic, Mirjana; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-11-01

    The human Major Histocompatibility Complex, known as the "Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)", could be defined as a "super locus" (historically called "supergene") governing the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. It also harbors genes involved in innate immunity. HLA is the most gene-dense, polymorphic and disease-associated region of the human genome. It is of critical medical relevance given its involvement in the fate of the transplanted organs/tissues and its association with more than 100 diseases. However, despite these important roles, comprehensive sequence analysis of the 4 megabase HLA locus has been limited due to technological challenges. Thanks to recent improvements in Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies however, one is now able to handle the peculiarities of the MHC notably the tight linkage disequilibrium between genes as well as their high degree of polymorphism (and hence heterozygosity). Increased read lengths, throughput, accuracy, as well as development of new bioinformatics tools now enable to efficiently generate complete and accurate full-length HLA haplotypes without phase ambiguities. The present report reviews current NGS approaches to capture, sequence and analyze HLA genes and loci. The impact of these new methodologies on various applications including HLA typing, population genetics and disease association studies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic analysis offers insights into the evolution of the bovine TRA/TRD locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelley, Timothy K; Degnan, Kathryn; Longhi, Cassandra W; Morrison, W Ivan

    2014-11-19

    The TRA/TRD locus contains the genes for V(D)J somatic rearrangement of TRA and TRD chains expressed by αβ and γδ T cells respectively. Previous studies have demonstrated that the bovine TRA/TRD locus contains an exceptionally large number of TRAV/TRDV genes. In this study we combine genomic and transcript analysis to provide insights into the evolutionary development of the bovine TRA/TRD locus and the remarkable TRAV/TRDV gene repertoire. Annotation of the UMD3.1 assembly identified 371 TRAV/TRDV genes (distributed in 42 subgroups), 3 TRDJ, 6 TRDD, 62 TRAJ and single TRAC and TRDC genes, most of which were located within a 3.5 Mb region of chromosome 10. Most of the TRAV/TRDV subgroups have multiple members and several have undergone dramatic expansion, most notably TRDV1 (60 genes). Wide variation in the proportion of pseudogenes within individual subgroups, suggest that differential 'birth' and 'death' rates have been used to form a functional bovine TRAV/TRDV repertoire which is phylogenetically distinct from that of humans and mice. The expansion of the bovine TRAV/TRDV gene repertoire has predominantly been achieved through a complex series of homology unit (regions of DNA containing multiple gene) replications. Frequent co-localisation within homology units of genes from subgroups with low and high pseudogene proportions suggest that replication of homology units driven by evolutionary selection for the former may have led to a 'collateral' expansion of the latter. Transcript analysis was used to define the TRAV/TRDV subgroups available for recombination of TRA and TRD chains and demonstrated preferential usage of different subgroups by the expressed TRA and TRD repertoires, indicating that TRA and TRD selection have had distinct impacts on the evolution of the TRAV/TRDV repertoire. Both TRA and TRD selection have contributed to the evolution of the bovine TRAV/TRDV repertoire. However, our data suggest that due to homology unit duplication TRD

  9. Locus de control y conocimiento, actitud y práctica contraceptivas entre adolescentes universitarios

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Salheb Alves; Maria Helena Baena de Moraes Lopes

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between locus of control and knowledge, attitude and practice regarding pill and condom use among university students. METHODS: The inquiry was developed in Campinas, a city in Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. A total of 295 adolescent newcomers to a public university answered a structured questionnaire and Levenson's multidimensional locus of control scale. The scores of the dimensions of locus of control were calculated and Spearman's correlation coefficie...

  10. Toward a mtDNA Locus-Specific Mutation Database Using the LOVD Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, Joanna L.; Sweeney, Mary G.; Procaccio, Vincent; Yarham, John W.; Salas, Antonio; Kong, Qing-Peng; van der Westhuizen, Francois H.; Pitceathly, Robert D.S.; Thorburn, David R.; Lott, Marie T.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Taylor, Robert W.; McFarland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Human Variome Project (HVP) is a global effort to collect and curate all human genetic variation affecting health. Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are an important cause of neurogenetic disease in humans; however, identification of the pathogenic mutations responsible can be problematic. In this article, we provide explanations as to why and suggest how such difficulties might be overcome. We put forward a case in support of a new Locus Specific Mutation Database (LSDB) implemented using the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD) system that will not only list primary mutations, but also present the evidence supporting their role in disease. Critically, we feel that this new database should have the capacity to store information on the observed phenotypes alongside the genetic variation, thereby facilitating our understanding of the complex and variable presentation of mtDNA disease. LOVD supports fast queries of both seen and hidden data and allows storage of sequence variants from high-throughput sequence analysis. The LOVD platform will allow construction of a secure mtDNA database; one that can fully utilize currently available data, as well as that being generated by high-throughput sequencing, to link genotype with phenotype enhancing our understanding of mitochondrial disease, with a view to providing better prognostic information. PMID:22581690

  11. A locus-wide approach to assessing variation in the avian MHC: the B-locus of the wild turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, L D; Faile, G M; Hendrickson, J A; Mock, K E; Reed, K M

    2011-07-01

    Studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity in non-model vertebrates typically focus on structure and sequence variation in the antigen-presenting loci: the highly variable and polymorphic class I and class IIB genes. Although these studies provide estimates of the number of genes and alleles/locus, they often overlook variation in functionally related and co-inherited genes important in the immune response. This study utilizes the sequence of the MHC B-locus derived from a commercial turkey to investigate MHC variation in wild birds. Sequences were obtained for nine interspersed MHC amplicons (non-class I/II) from each of 40 birds representing 3 subspecies of wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Analysis of aligned sequences identified 238 single-nucleotide variants approximately one-third of which had minor allele frequencies >0.2 in the sampled birds. PHASE analysis identified 70 prospective MHC haplotypes in the wild turkeys, whereas a combined analysis with commercial birds identified almost 100 haplotypes in the species. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the class IIB loci was used to test the efficacy of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotyping to capture locus-wide variation. Diversity in SNP haplotypes and haplotype sharing among individuals was directly reflected in the DGGE patterns. Utilization of a reference haplotype to sequence interspersed regions of the MHC has significant advantages over other methods of surveying diversity while identifying high-frequency SNPs for genotyping. SNP haplotyping provides a means to identify both divergent haplotypes and homozygous individuals for assessment of immunological variation in wild and domestic populations.

  12. A novel locus for alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR2) maps to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, A; John, P; Gul, A; Lee, K; Chishti, M S; Ali, G; Hassan, M J; Leal, S M; Ahmad, W

    2006-09-01

    Congenital alopecia may occur either alone or in association with ectodermal and other abnormalities. On the bases of such associations, several different syndromes featuring congenital alopecia can be distinguished. Alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically characterized by total or partial hair loss and mental retardation. In the present study, a five-generation Pakistani family with multiple affected individuals with APMR was ascertained. Patients in this family exhibited typical features of APMR syndrome. The disease locus was mapped to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31 by carrying out a genome scan followed by fine mapping. A maximum two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 2.93 at theta=0.0 was obtained at markers D3S3053 and D3S2309. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.57 with several markers, which supports the linkage. The disease locus was flanked by markers D3S1564 and D3S2427, which corresponds to 9.6-cM region according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map of the human genome (build 35) and contains 5.6 Mb. The linkage interval of the APMR locus identified here does not overlap with the one described previously; therefore, this locus has been designated as APMR2.

  13. Mox: a novel modifier of the tomato Xa locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, P W; Yoder, J I

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated a novel mutation that caused variegated leaf color in a tomato plant which had multiple maize Ac transposable elements and the tomato Xa allele. Xa is a previously characterized semi-dominant mutation that causes tomato leaves to be bright yellow when heterozygous (Xa/xa+). The mutation responsible for the new phenotype was named Mox (Modifier of Xa). The Mox mutation modified the Xa/xa+ yellow leaf phenotype in two ways: it compensated for the Xa allele resulting in a plant with a wildtype green color, and it caused somatic variegation which appeared as white and yellow sectors on the green background. Somatic variegation was visible only if the plant contained both the Mox and Xa loci. Genetic studies indicated that the Mox locus was linked in repulsion to Xa and that the Mox locus was genetically transmitted at a reduced frequency through the male gamete. Molecular characterization of the Ac elements in lines segregating for Mox identified an Ac insertion that appeared to cosegregate with Mox variegation. We propose a model in which the Mox mutation consists of a duplication of the xa+ allele and subsequent Ac-induced breakage of the duplicated region causes variegation.

  14. Synaptic potentials in locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J T; Bobker, D H; Harris, G C

    1991-01-01

    Neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) fire action potentials spontaneously in vitro in the absence of any stimulation. This spontaneous activity is thought to arise from intrinsic membrane properties that include a balance between at least two ion conductances. One is a persistent inward sodium current that is active near the threshold for action potential generation. The second is a calcium-dependent potassium current that is activated following the entry of calcium during the action potential, is responsible for the after-hyperpolarization following the action potential, and decays over a period of 1-2 sec following the action potential. The spontaneous activity of LC neurons can be altered by both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. One excitatory input has been described that is mediated by glutamate receptors of both the non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. Inhibitory synaptic potentials include those mediated by GABA (acting on GABAA-receptors), glycine (acting on a strychnine-sensitive receptor) and noradrenaline (acting on alpha 2-adrenoceptors). The presence of synaptic potentials mediated by these transmitters, studied in vitro, correlate with studies made in vivo and with histochemical identification of synaptic inputs to the locus coeruleus.

  15. Thought recognition, locus of control, and adolescent well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, T M; Stack, S A

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the underlying assumptions and principles of a new psychological paradigm, Psychology of Mind/Health Realization (POM/HR). A core concept of POM/HR, thought recognition, is then compared with locus of control (LOC), a well-known psychological construct. Next, the relationship of LOC to self-reported happiness and satisfaction is examined from the perspective of POM/HR, using a sample of 1,872 at-risk adolescents from 17 nations. The findings support POM/HR predictions that (1) locus of control would account for a slight portion of the variance in adolescent happiness and satisfaction, (2) circumstances that are external in nature would account for additional variance in happiness and satisfaction, and (3) there would be little difference in self-reported happiness and satisfaction between adolescents self-reporting high and low internal LOC. Further, it was conjectured that the adolescents mistook superficial emotions, such as excitement and security, for genuine feelings of well-being. Finally, the implications for prevention and intervention efforts with at-risk adolescents are discussed.

  16. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera: an "unintelligent" design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding, homozygous diploid and sterile males occur which form a genetic burden for a population. We review life history and genetical traits that may overcome the disadvantages of single locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD. Behavioural adaptations to avoid matings between relatives include active dispersal from natal patches and mating preferences for non-relatives. In non-social species, temporal and spatial segregation of male and female offspring reduces the burden of sl-CSD. In social species, diploid males are produced at the expense of workers and female reproductives. In some social species, diploid males and diploid male producing queens are killed by workers. Diploid male production may have played a role in the evolution or maintenance of polygyny (multiple queens and polyandry (multiple mating. Some forms of thelytoky (parthenogenetic female production increase homozygosity and are therefore incompatible with sl-CSD. We discuss a number of hypothetical adaptations to sl-CSD which should be considered in future studies of this insect order.

  17. Geographic distribution of haplotype diversity at the bovine casein locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moazami-Goudarzi Katy

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic diversity of the casein locus in cattle was studied on the basis of haplotype analysis. Consideration of recently described genetic variants of the casein genes which to date have not been the subject of diversity studies, allowed the identification of new haplotypes. Genotyping of 30 cattle breeds from four continents revealed a geographically associated distribution of haplotypes, mainly defined by frequencies of alleles at CSN1S1 and CSN3. The genetic diversity within taurine breeds in Europe was found to decrease significantly from the south to the north and from the east to the west. Such geographic patterns of cattle genetic variation at the casein locus may be a result of the domestication process of modern cattle as well as geographically differentiated natural or artificial selection. The comparison of African Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds allowed the identification of several Bos indicus specific haplotypes (CSN1S1*C-CSN2*A2-CSN3*AI/CSN3*H that are not found in pure taurine breeds. The occurrence of such haplotypes in southern European breeds also suggests that an introgression of indicine genes into taurine breeds could have contributed to the distribution of the genetic variation observed.

  18. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types.

  19. Allelism of Genes in the Ml-a locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Jensen, Hans Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1980-01-01

    Seven barley lines or varieties, each with a different gene at the Ml-a locus for resistance to Erysiphe graminis were intercrossed. Progeny testing of the F2s using two different fungal isolates per cross provided evidence that there are two or more loci in the Ml-a region. Apparent recombinants...... were also screened for recombination between the Hor1 and Hor2 loci which are situated either side of the Ml-a locus. The cross between Ricardo and Iso42R (Rupee) yielded one possible recombinant, with Ml-a3 and Ml-a(Rul) in the coupling phase; other recombinants had wild-type genes in the coupling...... phase. Iso20R, derived from Hordeum spontaneum 'H204', carrying Ml-a6, had an additional gene, in close coupling with Ml-a6, tentatively named Ml-aSp2 or Reglv, causing an intermediate infection type with isolate EmA30. It is suggested that Ml-a(Ar) in Emir and Ml-a(Rul), shown to differ from other Ml...

  20. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  1. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne S Schaefer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a genetic susceptibility locus shared by both diseases. We confirm the known association of two neighboring linkage disequilibrium regions on human chromosome 9p21.3 with CHD and show the additional strong association of these loci with the risk of aggressive periodontitis. For the lead SNP of the main associated linkage disequilibrium region, rs1333048, the odds ratio of the autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance is 1.99 (95% confidence interval 1.33-2.94; P = 6.9 x 10(-4 for generalized aggressive periodontitis, and 1.72 (1.06-2.76; P = 2.6 x 10(-2 for localized aggressive periodontitis. The two associated linkage disequilibrium regions map to the sequence of the large antisense noncoding RNA ANRIL, which partly overlaps regulatory and coding sequences of CDKN2A/CDKN2B. A closely located diabetes-associated variant was independent of the CHD and periodontitis risk haplotypes. Our study demonstrates that CHD and periodontitis are genetically related by at least one susceptibility locus, which is possibly involved in ANRIL activity and independent of diabetes associated risk variants within this region. Elucidation of the interplay of ANRIL transcript variants and their involvement in increased susceptibility to the interactive diseases CHD and periodontitis promises new insight into the underlying shared pathogenic mechanisms of these complex common diseases.

  2. Digital karyotyping reveals probable target genes at 7q21.3 locus in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shengyue

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a worldwide malignant liver tumor with high incidence in China. Subchromosomal amplifications and deletions accounted for major genomic alterations occurred in HCC. Digital karyotyping was an effective method for analyzing genome-wide chromosomal aberrations at high resolution. Methods A digital karyotyping library of HCC was constructed and 454 Genome Sequencer FLX System (Roche was applied in large scale sequencing of the library. Digital Karyotyping Data Viewer software was used to analyze genomic amplifications and deletions. Genomic amplifications of genes detected by digital karyotyping were examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mRNA expression level of these genes in tumorous and paired nontumorous tissues was also detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results A total of 821,252 genomic tags were obtained from the digital karyotyping library of HCC, with 529,162 tags (64% mapped to unique loci of human genome. Multiple subchromosomal amplifications and deletions were detected through analyzing the digital karyotyping data, among which the amplification of 7q21.3 drew our special attention. Validation of genes harbored within amplicons at 7q21.3 locus revealed that genomic amplification of SGCE, PEG10, DYNC1I1 and SLC25A13 occurred in 11 (21%, 11 (21%, 11 (21% and 23 (44% of the 52 HCC samples respectively. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were significantly up-regulated in tumorous liver tissues compared with corresponding nontumorous counterparts. Conclusions Our results indicated that subchromosomal region of 7q21.3 was amplified in HCC, and SGCE, PEG10 and DYNC1I1 were probable protooncogenes located within the 7q21.3 locus.

  3. Copy number analysis of the low-copy repeats at the primate NPHP1 locus by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Rogers, Jeffrey; Lupski, James R

    2016-06-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been widely used to detect copy number variants (CNVs) in both research and clinical settings. A customizable aCGH platform may greatly facilitate copy number analyses in genomic regions with higher-order complexity, such as low-copy repeats (LCRs). Here we present the aCGH analyses focusing on the 45 kb LCRs [1] at the NPHP1 region with diverse copy numbers in humans. Also, the interspecies aCGH analysis comparing human and nonhuman primates revealed dynamic copy number transitions of the human 45 kb LCR orthologues during primate evolution and therefore shed light on the origin of complexity at this locus. The original aCGH data are available at GEO under GSE73962.

  4. CDKN2B expression and subcutaneous adipose tissue expandability: Possible influence of the 9p21 atherosclerosis locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Per-Arne; Wahlstrand, Björn; Olsson, Maja [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Froguel, Philippe; Falchi, Mario [Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Bergman, Richard N. [Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McTernan, Philip G. [Division of Metabolic and Vascular Health, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Hedner, Thomas; Carlsson, Lena M.S. [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jacobson, Peter, E-mail: peter.jacobson@medfak.gu.se [Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B is highly expressed in human adipose tissue. • Risk alleles at the 9p21 locus modify CDKN2B expression in a BMI-dependent fashion. • There is an inverse relationship between expression of CDKN2B and adipogenic genes. • CDKN2B expression influences to postprandial triacylglycerol clearance. • CDKN2B expression in adipose tissue is linked to markers of hepatic steatosis. - Abstract: Risk alleles within a gene desert at the 9p21 locus constitute the most prevalent genetic determinant of cardiovascular disease. Previous research has demonstrated that 9p21 risk variants influence gene expression in vascular tissues, yet the biological mechanisms by which this would mediate atherosclerosis merits further investigation. To investigate possible influences of this locus on other tissues, we explored expression patterns of 9p21-regulated genes in a panel of multiple human tissues and found that the tumor suppressor CDKN2B was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). CDKN2B expression was regulated by obesity status, and this effect was stronger in carriers of 9p21 risk alleles. Covariation between expression of CDKN2B and genes implemented in adipogenesis was consistent with an inhibitory effect of CDKN2B on SAT proliferation. Moreover, studies of postprandial triacylglycerol clearance indicated that CDKN2B is involved in down-regulation of SAT fatty acid trafficking. CDKN2B expression in SAT correlated with indicators of ectopic fat accumulation, including markers of hepatic steatosis. Among genes regulated by 9p21 risk variants, CDKN2B appears to play a significant role in the regulation of SAT expandability, which is a strong determinant of lipotoxicity and therefore might contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.

  5. Sexual and contraceptives attitudes, the locus of health control and self-esteem among higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel da Silva Vilelas Janeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the relationship between sexual and contraceptive attitudes, the locus of health control and self-esteem among students of a private institution of higher education. Methods: Descriptive and correlational study with a quantitative approach, performed in a higher education school in Lisbon, with 152 students, from the 1st to the 4th year of undergraduate courses in Nursing, Physiotherapy, Cardiopneumology and Radiology. As research instrument, it was used a questionnaire with rating scales on ‘sexual attitudes’, ‘contraception attitudes’, ‘locus of health control’ and ‘self-esteem’. The data obtained was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The majority of students (90.7% have already had sexual intercourse. Sexual attitudes were influenced by gender (p=0.0035, but not by the start of sexual activity or by the course’s year (p>0.05. Contraceptive attitudes were related to the year that students attended (p=0.031 and to gender (p=0.029. The external locus of control, on average, was higher among girls (29.2 than boys (30.1. The self-esteem increased with the student’s age (p=0.003. Conclusion: Investment in the area of sexual education is needed in the undergraduate programs, since the young people live their days in the school setting, spending little time with their families. The university should assume a special position in the development of the concept of sexuality based on the holistic perspective of the human being, promoting sexual education as essential in the construction of human identity and fundamental for health promotion doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p505

  6. Bivariate genome-wide association meta-analysis of pediatric musculoskeletal traits reveals pleiotropic effects at the SREBF1/TOM1L2 locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Kemp, John P; Dimou, Niki L

    2017-01-01

    bone mineral density loci: WNT4, GALNT3, MEPE, CPED1/WNT16, TNFSF11, RIN3, and PPP6R3/LRP5. Variants in the TOM1L2/SREBF1 locus exert opposing effects TB-LM and TBLH-BMD, and have a stronger association with the former trait. We show that SREBF1 is expressed in murine and human osteoblasts, as well...

  7. Association of Five SNPs at the PARK16 locus as a Susceptibility Locus with Parkinson's Disease for Forensic Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Hong-gang; TIAN Xiao-fei; LUO Xiao-guang; LI Feng-rui; ZHU Lan-hui; ZHOU Yi-shu; REN Yan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association of five SNPs (rs823083,rs708723,rs4951261,rs823076 and rs16856110) at the PARK16 locus with Parkinson's disease (PD),and to potentiate its forensic application.The genomic DNAs of 215 PD patients and 212 matched controls from the northern Han Chinese population were amplified in two independent PCR systems and subsequently genotyped by digestion with the three endonucleases (Hinf Ⅰ,Nco Ⅰ and Msp Ⅰ).The genetic parameters and association studies were carried out with SPSS 13.0,Haploview version 4.2 and PLINK 1.07 sofiwares.We detected accurately all genotypes in the five SNPs with multiplex PCR-RFLP and mismatched multiplex PCR-RFLP techniques.The genotypes of four SNPs,except for rs823083,were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.The four SNPs,rs16856110,rs4951261,rs708723 and rs823076,which were in linkage equilibrium,should not be associated with PD (P-values ranging from 0.077 to 0.544).The SNPs investigated at the PARK16 locus were not found to be involved in PD-associated blocks in the northern Han Chinese population.The allele distributions of rs708723,rs4951261,rs823076 and rs16856110 in the northern Han Chinese population can be highly polymorphic,which can be applied to genetic analvsis and forensic practices.

  8. Secondary evolution of a self-incompatibility locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sier-Ching Chantha

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is the flowering plant reproductive system in which self pollen tube growth is inhibited, thereby preventing self-fertilization. SI has evolved independently in several different flowering plant lineages. In all Brassicaceae species in which the molecular basis of SI has been investigated in detail, the product of the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK gene functions as receptor in the initial step of the self pollen-rejection pathway, while that of the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR gene functions as ligand. Here we examine the hypothesis that the S locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia is paralogous with the S locus previously characterized in other members of the family. We also test the hypothesis that self-compatibility in this group is based on disruption of the pollen ligand-producing gene. Sequence analysis of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, phylogeny of S alleles, gene expression patterns, and comparative genomics analyses provide support for both hypotheses. Of special interest are two genes located in a non-S locus genomic region of Arabidopsis lyrata that exhibit domain structures, sequences, and phylogenetic histories similar to those of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, and that also share synteny with these genes. These A. lyrata genes resemble those comprising the A. lyrata S locus, but they do not function in self-recognition. Moreover, they appear to belong to a lineage that diverged from the ancestral Brassicaceae S-locus genes before allelic diversification at the S locus. We hypothesize that there has been neo-functionalization of these S-locus-like genes in the Leavenworthia lineage, resulting in evolution of a separate ligand-receptor system of SI. Our results also provide support for theoretical models that predict that the least constrained pathway to the evolution of self-compatibility is one involving loss of pollen gene function.

  9. The DNA replication program is altered at the FMR1 locus in fragile X embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Tomishima, Mark J; Zaninovic, Nikica; Colak, Dilek; Yan, Zi; Zhan, Qiansheng; Rosenwaks, Zev; Jaffrey, Samie R; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-01-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by a CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene that appears to occur during oogenesis and during early embryogenesis. One model proposes that repeat instability depends on the replication fork direction through the repeats such that (CNG)n hairpin-like structures form, causing DNA polymerase to stall and slip. Examining DNA replication fork progression on single DNA molecules at the endogenous FMR1 locus revealed that replication forks stall at CGG repeats in human cells. Furthermore, replication profiles of FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared to nonaffected hESCs showed that fork direction through the repeats is altered at the FMR1 locus in FXS hESCs, such that predominantly the CCG strand serves as the lagging-strand template. This is due to the absence of replication initiation that would typically occur upstream of FMR1, suggesting that altered replication origin usage combined with fork stalling promotes repeat instability during early embryonic development.

  10. Description and targeted deletion of 5' hypersensitive site 5 and 6 of the mouse beta-globin locus control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, M A; Reik, A; Close, J; Telling, A; Epner, E; Fiering, S; Hardison, R; Groudine, M

    1998-12-01

    The most upstream hypersensitive site (HS) of the beta-globin locus control region (LCR) in humans (5' HS 5) and chickens (5' HS 4) can act as an insulating element in some gain of function assays and may demarcate a beta-globin domain. We have mapped the most upstream HSs of the mouse beta-globin LCR and sequenced this region. We find that mice have a region homologous to human 5' HS 5 that is associated with a minor HS. In addition we map a unique HS upstream of 5' HS 5 and refer to this novel site as mouse 5' HS 6. We have also generated mice containing a targeted deletion of the region containing 5' HS 5 and 6. We find that after excision of the selectable marker in vivo, deletion of 5' HS 5 and 6 has a minimal effect on transcription and does not prevent formation of the remaining LCR HSs. Taken together these findings suggest that the most upstream HSs of the mouse beta-globin LCR are not necessary for maintaining the beta-globin locus in an active configuration or to protect it from a surrounding repressive chromatin environment.

  11. Sequence and organization of coelacanth neurohypophysial hormone genes: Evolutionary history of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone gene locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Sydney

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian neurohypophysial hormones, vasopressin and oxytocin are involved in osmoregulation and uterine smooth muscle contraction respectively. All jawed vertebrates contain at least one homolog each of vasopressin and oxytocin whereas jawless vertebrates contain a single neurohypophysial hormone called vasotocin. The vasopressin homolog in non-mammalian vertebrates is vasotocin; and the oxytocin homolog is mesotocin in non-eutherian tetrapods, mesotocin and [Phe2]mesotocin in lungfishes, and isotocin in ray-finned fishes. The genes encoding vasopressin and oxytocin genes are closely linked in the human and rodent genomes in a tail-to-tail orientation. In contrast, their pufferfish homologs (vasotocin and isotocin are located on the same strand of DNA with isotocin gene located upstream of vasotocin gene separated by five genes, suggesting that this locus has experienced rearrangements in either mammalian or ray-finned fish lineage, or in both lineages. The coelacanths occupy a unique phylogenetic position close to the divergence of the mammalian and ray-finned fish lineages. Results We have sequenced a coelacanth (Latimeria menadoensis BAC clone encompassing the neurohypophysial hormone genes and investigated the evolutionary history of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone gene locus within a comparative genomics framework. The coelacanth contains vasotocin and mesotocin genes like non-mammalian tetrapods. The coelacanth genes are present on the same strand of DNA with no intervening genes, with the vasotocin gene located upstream of the mesotocin gene. Nucleotide sequences of the second exons of the two genes are under purifying selection implying a regulatory function. We have also analyzed the neurohypophysial hormone gene locus in the genomes of opossum, chicken and Xenopus tropicalis. The opossum contains two tandem copies of vasopressin and mesotocin genes. The vasotocin and mesotocin genes in chicken and

  12. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Murray, J. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Crall, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  13. Mapping of a further malignant hyperthermia susceptibility locus to chromosome 3q13.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudbrak, R.; Deufel, T. [Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Procaccio, V.; Lunardi, J.; Klausnitzer, M.; Mueller, C.R.; Hartung, E.J.; Curran, J.L.; Stewart, A.D. [and others

    1995-03-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a potentially lethal pharmacogenetic disease for which MH susceptibility (MHS) is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. A potentially life-threatening MH crisis is triggered by exposure to commonly used inhalational anesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants. The first malignant hyperthermia susceptibility locus (MHS1) was identified on human chromosome 19{sub q}13.1, and evidence has been obtained that defects in the gene for the calcium-release channel of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptor; RYR1) can cause some forms of MH. However, MH has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, and additional loci on chromosomes 17q and 7q have been suggested. In a collaborative search of the human genome with polymorphic microsatellite markers, we now found linkage of the MHS phenotype, as assessed by the European in vitro contracture test protocol, to markers defining a 1-cM interval on chromosome 3q13.1. A maximum multipoint lod score of 3.22 was obtained in a single German pedigree with classical MH, and none of the other pedigrees investigated in this study showed linkage to this region. Linkage to both MHS1/RYR1 and putative loci on chromosome 17q and 7q were excluded. This study supports the view that considerable genetic heterogeneity exists in MH. 47 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Self Esteem, Locus of Control and Multidimensional Perfectionism as the Predictors of Subjective Well Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Zeynep; Tagay, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism, and the extent to which the variables of self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism contribute to the prediction of subjective well-being. The study was carried out with 318 final…

  15. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Kerstin B; O'Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of...

  16. Locus of Control, Perceptions and Attributions of Student Teachers in Educational Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Lya; Kurtz, Chaya

    Student teachers' perceptions of locus of control was investigated. Locus of control is defined as representing the extent of dependence upon inner or outer forces, the extent one is willing to invest in shaping the environment, and the perception of reinforcement as dependent upon those efforts, or upon random events. The specific questions were:…

  17. The location of the restriction locus for λ·K in Escherichia coli B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Haan, P.G. de

    1965-01-01

    Analysis of recombinants from E. coli K 12 Hfr × E. coli B F− crosses showed that one locus on the chromosome of Escherichia coli, controlling restriction and probably also the modification of phage λ, is located between the leading point of the Hfr H chromosome and the locus for threonine synthesis

  18. Mapping of panda plumage color locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panda (s is an autosomal recessive mutation, which displays overall white plumage color with spots of wild-type plumage in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica. In a previous study, the s locus was included in the same linkage group as serum albumin (Alb and vitamin-D binding protein (GC which are mapped on chicken (Gallus gallus chromosome 4 (GGA4. In this study, we mapped the s locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail by linkage analysis. Results Segregation data on the s locus were obtained from three-generation families (n = 106. Two microsatellite markers derived from the Japanese quail chromosome 4 (CJA04 and three microsatellite markers derived from GGA4 were genotyped in the three-generation families. We mapped the s locus between GUJ0026 and ABR0544 on CJA04. By comparative mapping with chicken, this locus was mapped between 10.0 Mb and 14.5 Mb region on GGA4. In this region, the endothelin receptor B subtype 2 gene (EDNRB2, an avian-specific paralog of the mammalian endothelin receptor B gene (EDNRB, is located. Because EDNRB is responsible for aganglionic megacolon and spot coat color in mouse, rat and equine, EDNRB2 is suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus. Conclusion The s locus and the five microsatellite markers were mapped on CJA04 of the Japanese quail. EDNRB2 was suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus.

  19. Hubungan antara Locus Of Control dan Efektivitas Komunikasi antar Pribadi dengan Problem Focused Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Sujadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem focused coping need to be possessed by every individual. The purposes of this research were to described locus of control, the effectiveness of interpersonal communication, problem focused coping,the correlation between locus of control with problem focused coping, andthe correlationbetween the effectiveness of interpersonal communication with problem focused coping.This research was descriptive & correlation research by using quantitative approach. Data were collected through a Likert scale questionaire and locus of controlby using inventory Rotters Internal-External Locus of Control (I-E Scale, which was the validity and reliability has been tested. The data were analyzed by percentage technique and product moment correlation. The finding of research are:  1locus of control were in the middle range between internal locus of control and external locus of control with an average as big as 11.46, 2 the general level of effectiveness of interpersonal communication is in high category, 3 the general level of problem focused coping is in high category, 4 there is correlation between locus of control withproblem focused coping, and 5 there is correlation betweeneffectiveness of interpersonal communicationwithproblem focused coping.

  20. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  1. Two-step activation of meiosis by the mat1 locus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, M; Hoffmann, Ulla-Lisbeth; Styrkársdóttir, U

    1995-01-01

    The mat1 locus is a key regulator of both conjugation and meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Two alternative DNA segments of this locus, mat1-P and mat1-M, specify the haploid cell types (Plus and Minus). Each segment includes two genes: mat1-P includes mat1-Pc and mat1-Pm, w...

  2. An Examination of Locus of Control, Epistemological Beliefs and Metacognitive Awareness in Preservice Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel, Emine Ferda

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the locus of control, epistemological beliefs and metacognitive awareness levels of preservice early childhood education teachers and to determine the interrelations among these variables. 206 teacher candidates have been asked to fill out Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Central Epistemological Beliefs…

  3. Partial duplication of the PRLR and SPEF2 genes at the late feathering locus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.G.; Vallee, N.; Jungerius, B.J.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the loci responsible for feather development in chickens is K. The K allele is partially dominant to the k+ allele and causes a retard in the emergence of flight feathers at hatch. The K locus is sex linked and located on the Z chromosome. Therefore, the locus can be utilized to pr

  4. Locus of Control as It Relates to the Teaching Style of Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ture, Abidemi

    2013-01-01

    This research explored the relationship between elementary teachers' locus of control and teaching style. This research observed elementary teachers in their classrooms coupled with data gathered from information sheets, surveys, and interviews to determine if a relationship exists between the locus of control of the elementary teachers and…

  5. Identification of heat resistant Escherichia coli by qPCR for the locus of heat resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Angela; Chui, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Three qPCR assays targeting the locus of heat resistance to identify heat resistant clinical Escherichia coli isolates are described. Of 613 isolates, 3 (0.5%) possessed the locus. The assays are a rapid, highly sensitive and specific alternative to screening by heat shock and can be used in food safety surveillance.

  6. The Effect of Supervisor's Locus of Control and Employee Behavior on Supervisor Attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Maxine

    Two theoretical areas that lend themselves to study as they relate to supervisor-worker relations are locus of control and attribution theory. This study examined two general problems: (1) how a supervisor behaves toward an employee in relation to how that employee performs in the work place; and (2) how a supervisor's locus of control influences…

  7. Locus of Control as It Relates to the Teaching Style of Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ture, Abidemi

    2013-01-01

    This research explored the relationship between elementary teachers' locus of control and teaching style. This research observed elementary teachers in their classrooms coupled with data gathered from information sheets, surveys, and interviews to determine if a relationship exists between the locus of control of the elementary teachers and…

  8. DMPD: The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10669111 The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysa...ccharide. Qureshi ST, Gros P, Malo D. Inflamm Res. 1999 Dec;48(12):613-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. PubmedID 10669111 Title The

  9. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  10. Evolution of an Expanded Sex Determining Locus in Volvox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Patrick; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.; De Hoff, Peter L.; Douglass, Stephen; Diaz-Cano, David Casero; Prochnik, Simon; Geng, Sa; Rai, Rhitu; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Nishii, Ichiro; Hamaji, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although dimorphic sexes have evolved repeatedly in multicellular eukaryotes, their origins are unknown. The mating locus (MT) of the sexually dimorphic multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri, specifies the production of eggs and sperm and has undergone a remarkable expansion and divergence relative to MT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a closely related unicellular species that has equal-sized gametes. Transcriptome analysis revealed a rewired gametic expression program for Volvox MT genes relative to Chlamydomonas, and identified multiple gender-specific and sex-regulated transcripts. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor homolog MAT3 is a Volvox MT gene that displays sexually regulated alternative splicing and evidence of gender-specific selection, both indicative of cooption into the sexual cycle. Thus, sex-determining loci impact the evolution of both sex-related and non-sex-related genes. PMID:20395508

  11. Dynamic Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Plant Phenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2015-12-01

    Advanced platforms have recently become available for automatic and systematic quantification of plant growth and development. These new techniques can efficiently produce multiple measurements of phenotypes over time, and introduce time as an extra dimension to quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies. Functional mapping utilizes a class of statistical models for identifying QTLs associated with the growth characteristics of interest. A major benefit of functional mapping is that it integrates information over multiple timepoints, and therefore could increase the statistical power for QTL detection. We review the current development of computationally efficient functional mapping methods which provide invaluable tools for analyzing large-scale timecourse data that are readily available in our post-genome era. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-11-10

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as "middle", and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins.

  13. A novel stroke locus identified in a northern Sweden pedigree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janunger, T.; Nilsson-Ardnor, S.; Wiklund, P.-G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The population of northern Sweden is characterized by reduced genetic diversity and a high incidence of stroke. We sought to reduce genetic variation further, using genealogic analysis in a set of nuclear families affected by stroke, and we subsequently performed a genome-wide scan...... to identify novel stroke susceptibility loci. METHODS: Through genealogy, 7 nuclear families with a common ancestor, connected over 8 generations, were identified. A genome-wide scan using 449 microsatellite markers was performed with subsequent haplotype analyses. RESULTS: A maximum allele-sharing lod score...... of 4.81 on chromosome 9q31-q33 was detected. Haplotype analysis identified a common 2.2-megabase interval in the chromosomal region in 4 of the nuclear families, where an overrepresentation of intracerebral hemorrhage was observed. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel susceptibility locus for stroke...

  14. CSGRqtl: A Comparative Quantitative Trait Locus Database for Saccharinae Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Conventional biparental quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has led to some successes in the identification of causal genes in many organisms. QTL likelihood intervals not only provide "prior information" for finer-resolution approaches such as GWAS but also provide better statistical power than GWAS to detect variants with low/rare frequency in a natural population. Here, we describe a new element of an ongoing effort to provide online resources to facilitate study and improvement of the important Saccharinae clade. The primary goal of this new resource is the anchoring of published QTLs for this clade to the Sorghum genome. Genetic map alignments translate a wealth of genomic information from sorghum to Saccharum spp., Miscanthus spp., and other taxa. In addition, genome alignments facilitate comparison of the Saccharinae QTL sets to those of other taxa that enjoy comparable resources, exemplified herein by rice.

  15. [Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies: molecular structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodiuchenko, T A; Krasikova, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides modern classification of evolutionarily conserved coilin-containing nuclear bodies of somatic and germ cells that is based on the characteristic features of their molecular composition and the nature of their functions. The main differences between Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies, which are involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear spliceosomal and nucleolar RNAs and in the 3'-end processing of histone precursor messenger RNA, respectively, are considered. It is shown that a significant contribution to the investigation of the diversity of coilin-containing bodies was made by the studies on the architecture of the RNA processing machinery in oocyte nuclei in a number of model organisms. The characteristics features of the molecular composition of coilin-containing bodies in the nuclei of growing oocytes (the so-called germinal vesicles) of vertebrates, including amphibians and birds, are described.

  16. Cajal bodies and histone locus bodies in Drosophila and Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, Z F; Deryusheva, S; Gall, J G

    2010-01-01

    The organization of the cell nucleus into specialized compartments is important for nuclear function. We address the significance of compartmentalization by studying the Cajal body, an evolutionarily conserved nuclear organelle proposed to be involved in such diverse functions as assembly of the spliceosome, assembly of the transcription machinery, and modification of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs. The Cajal body is typically identified by the presence of coilin, a protein of poorly defined function. Here, we demonstrate that coilin is not a unique Cajal body marker but also occurs in a related yet distinct nuclear organelle known as the histone locus body in both Drosophila and Xenopus. We stress the importance of multiple markers not only for identification of nuclear bodies but also for assessing their functional significance.

  17. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Lanni

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation. An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1, starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis.

  18. The locus of semantic interference in picture naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Macizo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El locus del efecto de interferencia semántica en la denominación de dibujos. En los experimentos que se presentan se utilizó el procedimiento de priming enmascarado para explorar el locus del efecto de interferencia semántica. Para ello se manipuló la naturaleza de la tarea (denominación y decisión de género, el tipo de relación entre el prime y el target (semántica y fonológica y el tiempo de presentación del prime. Los resultados indicaron que el efecto de interferencia semántica aparece en las tareas de denominación (Experimento 1 y de decisión de género (Experimento 2, con tiempos de presentación del prime de 100 ms. Este resultado replica el efecto encontrado por otros investigadores y lo extiende a la tarea de decisión de género. Por otro lado, el efecto de facilitación fonológica no apareció en la tarea de decisión de género (Experimento 3. Este patrón de resultados sugiere que el efecto de interferencia semántica es consecuencia de procesos que ocurren en el nivel de representación del lemma, y que la tarea de decisión de género no está influenciada por la activación fonológica.

  19. African Americans with cancer: the relationships among self-esteem, locus of control, and health perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Jean E

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and examine the relationships among self-esteem, locus of control, and perceived health status in African Americans with cancer and to identify predictors of perceived health status. A convenience sample of 95 oncology outpatients at two large medical facilities completed the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the Cantril Ladder, a measurement of perceived health. In an audiotaped interview two open-ended questions were used to clarify participants' Cantril Ladder scores. A significant positive relationship was discovered between self-esteem and powerful others health locus of control (p Self-esteem and an internal health locus of control were found to account for 23% of the perceived variance in health status. In addition, interview data indicated that participants with normal to high levels of self-esteem and an internal health locus of control perceived their state of health and well-being positively.

  20. Aggression and Multidimensional Perfectionism as the Predictors of Locus of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep KARATAŞ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between locus of control, aggression and multidimensional perfectionism, and the extent to which the variables of aggression and multidimensional perfectionism contribute to the prediction of locus of control. The study was carried out with students of 268 teachers colleges in Mehmet Akif Ersoy University. Aggression Questionnaire adopted by Can (2002, Locus of Control Scale (Dağ, 2002 and Multi-Dimensional Perfectionism Scale adopted by Oral (1999 were used in the study. Correlation Coefficient of Pearson Moments Multiplying and Gradual Regression Analysis were used in the analysis of the data. As a consequence, it was determined that there is a positive relationship between locus of control, aggression and multi-dimensional perfectionism. Also, it was observed that the variables of aggression and multidimensional perfectionism significantly predict locus of control.

  1. Evidence for the existence of a fourth dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. (Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Quebec (Canada) Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada) McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)); Andermann, E. (Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada) McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)); Rouleau, G.A. (Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Quebec (Canada) Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-05-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, three loci have been identified: The SCA1 locus (on chr 6p), the SCA2 locus (on chr 12q), and more recently a Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) locus (on chr 14q). The authors have studied one large French-Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers that flank the three previously described loci significantly exclude the French-Canadian kindred from the SCA1, SCA2, and MJD loci. Therefore, a fourth, still unmapped SCA locus remains to be identified. In addition, the unique clinical phenotype present in all affected individuals of the French-Canadian kindred might be characteristic of this still unmapped SCA locus. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A 27-locus STR assay to meet all United States and European law enforcement agency standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, James W; Gutierrez-Mateo, Cristina; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Different national and international agencies have selected specific STR sets for forensic database use. To enhance database comparison across national and international borders, a 27-locus multiplex system was developed comprising all 15 STR loci of the European standard set, the current 13 STR loci of the CODIS core, the proposed 22 STR loci of the expanded CODIS core, 4 additional commonly used STR loci, and the amelogenin locus. Development required iterative primer design to resolve primer-related artifacts, amplicon sizing, and locus-to-locus balance issues. The 19.5-min assay incorporated newly developed six-dye chemistry analyzed using a novel microfluidic electrophoresis instrument capable of simultaneous detection and discrimination of 8 or more fluorescent dyes. The 27-locus multiplex offers the potential for a new international STR standard permitting laboratories in any jurisdiction to use a single reaction to determine profiles for loci they typically generate plus an expanded common STR profiling set of global interest.

  3. Is the novel SCKL3 at 14q23 the predominant Seckel locus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinç, Mehmet Okyay; Ninis, Vasiliki Ninidu; Ugur, Sibel Aylin; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Seven, Mehmet; Balci, Sevim; Goodship, Judith; Tolun, Aslihan

    2003-11-01

    Seckel syndrome (SCKL) is a rare disease with wide phenotypic heterogeneity. A locus (SCKL1) has been identified at 3q and another (SCKL2) at 18p, both in single kindreds afflicted with the syndrome. We report here a novel locus (SCKL3) at 14q by linkage analysis in 13 Turkish families. In total, 18 affected and 10 unaffected sibs were included in the study. Of the 10 informative families, nine with parental consanguinity and one reportedly nonconsanguineous but with two affected sibs, five were indicative of linkage to the novel locus. One of those families also linked to the SCKL1 locus. A consanguineous family with one affected sib was indicative of linkage to SCKL2. The novel gene locus SCKL3 is 1.18 cM and harbors ménage a trois 1, a gene with a role in DNA repair.

  4. Structure and expression of the S locus-related genes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Walker, J C

    1993-03-01

    The extracellular of the putative receptor-like protein kinase, ZmPK1, is related to the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) genes of Brassica. We have isolated and characterized a genomic DNA clone of ZmPK1 and three additional genes from maize that are highly related to ZmPK1. These three S-locus related genes do not appear to have the protein kinase catalytic domain that is found in ZmPK1. One or more of these genes are expressed specifically in the silks. This initial description of S-locus related genes in monocotyledonous plants suggests that the S-locus domain may be involved in several different cellular functions in a wide variety of plants.

  5. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zane A.; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans. PMID:28119736

  6. Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjan Arvand

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST to detect any associations between sequence type (ST, host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24 of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158 of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human and 7 (feline was statistically significant (P< or =0.001. eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

  7. Clostridium botulinum group I strain genotyping by 15-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C; Splettstoesser, Wolf D; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse.

  8. Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Keiko; Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Sargan, David R

    2012-02-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1(-/-) MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10(-13)) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ~11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1(-/-) alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD.

  9. Clostridium botulinum Group I Strain Genotyping by 15-Locus Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M.; Scholz, Holger C.; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse. PMID:22012011

  10. Linkage analysis of congenital nuclear cataract and DLAD locus%先天性核性白内障家系DLAD基因的连锁分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳琳; 唐爱兰; 张学; 张劲松

    2005-01-01

    目的:为进一步确定DLAD基因缺陷与人类白内障发生的关系.方法:对6个先天性白内障家系进行临床遗传学分析,然后进行连锁分析.结果:D1 S551和D1 S3471(GATA65B07)引物两点LOD值均为负值.结论:该6个家系的先天性白内障的发生与DLAD基因缺陷无关.%· AIM: DLAD (DnaseII-like acid Dnase) is an acid DNase that is highly expressed in human and murine lens fibre cells. Recently, the DLAD-/- mice with a deficience in DLAD gene were reported to develop nuclear cataract.To elucidate whether a deficient DLAD gene can cause some human cataract, we studied autosomal dominant nuclear catarat in 6 families and analysed linkage between cataract and DLAD locus.·METHODS: Two-point Lod score values were obtained for markers D1S551 and GATA65B07.· RESULTS: The results show negative Lod scores (z=-∞ at θ =0), so linkage was excluded between the defect and DLAD locus in these families.·CONCLUSION: no evidence for cataracts in these families linkage to chromosome 1p22.3, the DLAD locus.

  11. Sequence variation in the Trichuris trichiura beta-tubulin locus: implications for the development of benzimidazole resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A B; Anderson, T J C; Barker, G C; Michael, E; Bundy, D A P

    2002-11-01

    Benzimidazole resistance has evolved in a variety of organisms and typically results from mutations in the beta-tubulin locus at specific amino acid sites. Despite widespread treatment of human intestinal nematodes with benzimidazole drugs, there have been no unambiguous reports of resistance. However, since beta-tubulin mutations conferring resistance are generally recessive, frequencies of resistance alleles less than 30% would be difficult to detect on the basis of drug treatment failures. Here we investigate sequence variation in a 1079 bp segment of the beta-tubulin locus in the human whipworm Trichuris trichiura from 72 individual nematodes from seven countries. We did not observe any alleles with amino acid mutations indicative of resistance, and of 40 point mutations there were only four non-synonymous mutations all of which were singletons. Estimated effective population sizes are an order of magnitude lower than those from another nematode species in which benzimidazole resistance has developed (Haemonchus contortus). Both the lower diversity and reduced population sizes suggest that benzimidazole resistance is likely to evolve less rapidly in Trichuris than in trichostrongyle parasites of livestock. We observed moderate levels of population subdivision (Phi(ST)=0.26) comparable with that previously observed in Ascaris lumbricoides, and identical alleles were frequently found in parasites from different continents, suggestive of recent admixture. A particularly interesting feature of the data is the high nucleotide diversities observed in nematodes from the Caribbean. This genetic complexity may be a direct result of extensive admixture and complex history of human populations in this region of the world. These data should encourage (but not make complacent) those involved in large-scale benzimidazole treatment of human intestinal nematodes.

  12. The H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 contributes to the activation of the INK4A-ARF locus in response to oncogene- and stress-induced senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A C; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor proteins p16INK4A and p14ARF, encoded by the INK4A-ARF locus, are key regulators of cellular senescence. The locus is epigenetically silenced by the repressive H3K27me3 mark in normally growing cells, but becomes activated in response to oncogenic stress. Here, we show...... that expression of the histone H3 Lys 27 (H3K27) demethylase JMJD3 is induced upon activation of the RAS-RAF signaling pathway. JMJD3 is recruited to the INK4A-ARF locus and contributes to the transcriptional activation of p16INK4A in human diploid fibroblasts. Additionally, inhibition of Jmjd3 expression...... in mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in suppression of p16Ink4a and p19Arf expression and in their immortalization....

  13. Promoters of the murine embryonic β-like globin genes Ey and βh1 do not compete for interaction with the β-globin locus control region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Bulger, Michael; Roach, Julia N.; Eszterhas, Susan K.; Olivier, Emmanuel; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Groudine, Mark T.; Fiering, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple β-like genes that are expressed at different times during development. The murine β-globin locus contains two genes expressed during the embryo stage, Ey and βh1, and two genes expressed at both the fetal and postnatal stages, β-major and β-minor. Studies of transgenic human β-like globin loci in mice have suggested that expression of one gene at the locus will suppress expression of other genes at the locus. To test this hypothesis we produced mouse lines with deletions of either the Ey or βh1 promoter in the endogenous murine β-globin locus. Promoter deletion eliminated expression of the mutant gene but did not affect expression of the remaining embryonic gene or the fetal/adult β-globin genes on the mutant allele. These results demonstrate a lack of competitive effects between individual mouse embryonic β-globin gene promoters and other genes in the locus. The implication of these findings for models of β-globin gene expression are discussed. PMID:12525692

  14. A new locus for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation maps to 1p21.1-p13.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyguner, O; Kayserili, H; Li, Y; Karaman, B; Nürnberg, G; Hennies, Hc; Becker, C; Nürnberg, P; Başaran, S; Apak, M Y; Wollnik, B

    2007-03-01

    Autosomal recessive inheritance of non-syndromic mental retardation (ARNSMR) may account for approximately 25% of all patients with non-specific mental retardation (NSMR). Although many X-linked genes have been identified as a cause of NSMR, only three autosomal genes are known to cause ARNSMR. We present here a large consanguineous Turkish family with four mentally retarded individuals from different branches of the family. Clinical tests showed cognitive impairment but no neurological, skeletal, and biochemical involvements. Genome-wide mapping using Human Mapping 10K Array showed a single positive locus with a parametric LOD score of 4.92 in a region on chromosome 1p21.1-p13.3. Further analyses using polymorphic microsatellite markers defined a 6.6-Mb critical region containing approximately 130 known genes. This locus is the fourth one linked to ARNSMR.

  15. The bovine T cell receptor alpha/delta locus contains over 400 V genes and encodes V genes without CDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, Peter; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2009-07-01

    Alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells perform nonoverlapping immune functions. In mammalian species with a high percentage of very diverse gammadelta T cells, like ruminants and pigs, it is often assumed that alphabeta T cells are less diverse than gammadelta T cells. Based on the bovine genome, we have created a map of the bovine TRA/TRD locus and show that, in cattle, in addition to the anticipated >100 TRDV genes, there are also >300 TRAV or TRAV/DV genes. Among the V genes in the TRA/TRD locus, there are several genes that lack a CDR2 and are functionally rearranged and transcribed and, in some cases, have an extended CDR1. The number of bovine V genes is a multiple of the number in mice and humans and may encode T cell receptors that use a novel way of interacting with antigen.

  16. Buffering Role of Locus of Control on Stress among the College/University Teachers of Bahawalpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Ahmad Khan (Corresponding author

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research is aimed to ascertain the role of locus of control in mediating or coping on various degree/levels of stress among the college/university teachers of Bahawalpur. For that purpose a sample of N=200 male/female college/university teacherswas selected by convenient sampling. Research tools, Locus of control by Julian Rotter (1966 and Stress questionnaire by International Stress Management Association UK, (2009 were administered for data collection. After the collection of data it was analyzedby SPSS. The results shows that the teachers identified with internal locus of control reveal low level of stress as contrast to the teachers with external locus of control. The study also confirms that high internal locus of control determines high coping andmediating ability of stress among the teachers. The study also pointed out that the teachers with external locus of control were more incline or prone to stress. Furthermore, Pearson and Spearman’s Correlation results at significant level of .000 show that bothvariables are highly correlated. Similarly, overall Mean of locus of control and Coefficient of variation reveals the high consistency role in relation with stress.

  17. Internal health locus of control predicts willingness to track health behaviors online and with smartphone applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brooke L; Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Hughes, Joel W; Latner, Janet D

    2017-04-17

    Given rising technology use across all demographic groups, digital interventions offer a potential strategy for increasing access to health information and care. Research is lacking on identifying individual differences that impact willingness to use digital interventions, which may affect patient engagement. Health locus of control, the amount of control an individual believes they have over their own health, may predict willingness to use mobile health (mHealth) applications ('apps') and online trackers. A cross-sectional study (n = 276) was conducted to assess college students' health locus of control beliefs and willingness to use health apps and online trackers. Internal and powerful other health locus of control beliefs predicted willingness to use health apps and online trackers while chance health locus of control beliefs did not. Individuals with internal and powerful other health locus of control beliefs are more willing than those with chance health locus of control beliefs to utilize a form of technology to monitor or change health behaviors. Health locus of control is an easy-to-assess patient characteristic providers can measure to identify which patients are more likely to utilize mHealth apps and online trackers.

  18. The X-linked F cell production locus: Genetic mapping and role in fetal hemoglobin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.C.; Smith, K.D.; Moore, R.D. [John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Postnatal fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) production is confined to a subset of erythocytes termed F-cells. There is a 10-20 fold variation in F-cell