WorldWideScience

Sample records for human grasping posture

  1. Design and validation of a morphing myoelectric hand posture controller based on principal component analysis of human grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segil, Jacob L; Weir, Richard F ff

    2014-03-01

    An ideal myoelectric prosthetic hand should have the ability to continuously morph between any posture like an anatomical hand. This paper describes the design and validation of a morphing myoelectric hand controller based on principal component analysis of human grasping. The controller commands continuously morphing hand postures including functional grasps using between two and four surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes pairs. Four unique maps were developed to transform the EMG control signals in the principal component domain. A preliminary validation experiment was performed by 10 nonamputee subjects to determine the map with highest performance. The subjects used the myoelectric controller to morph a virtual hand between functional grasps in a series of randomized trials. The number of joints controlled accurately was evaluated to characterize the performance of each map. Additional metrics were studied including completion rate, time to completion, and path efficiency. The highest performing map controlled over 13 out of 15 joints accurately.

  2. Representation of grasp postures and anticipatory motor planning in children.

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    Stöckel, Tino; Hughes, Charmayne M L; Schack, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated anticipatory motor planning and the development of cognitive representation of grasp postures in children aged 7, 8, and 9 years. Overall, 9-year-old children were more likely to plan their movements to end in comfortable postures, and have distinct representational structures of certain grasp postures, compared to the 7- and 8-year old children. Additionally, the sensitivity toward comfortable end-states (end-state comfort) was related to the mental representation of certain grasp postures. Children with grasp comfort related and functionally well-structured representations were more likely to have satisfied end-state comfort in both the simple and the advanced planning condition. In contrast, end-state comfort satisfaction for the advanced planning condition was much lower for children whose cognitive representations were not structured by grasp comfort. The results of the present study support the notion that cognitive action representation plays an important role in the planning and control of grasp postures.

  3. Corrections in grasp posture in response to modifications of action goals.

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    Hughes, Charmayne M L; Seegelke, Christian; Spiegel, Marnie Ann; Oehmichen, Corinna; Hammes, Julia; Schack, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There is ample evidence that people plan their movements to ensure comfortable final grasp postures at the end of a movement. The end-state comfort effect has been found to be a robust constraint during unimanual movements, and leads to the inference that goal-postures are represented and planned prior to movement initiation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals make appropriate corrections to ensure comfortable final goal postures when faced with an unexpected change in action goal. Participants reached for a horizontal cylinder and placed the left or right end of the object into the target disk. As soon as the participant began to move, a secondary stimuli was triggered, which indicated whether the intended action goal had changed or not. Confirming previous research, participants selected initial grasp postures that ensured end-state comfort during non-perturbed trials. In addition, participants made appropriate on-line corrections to their reach-to-grasp movements to ensure end-state comfort during perturbed trials. Corrections in grasp posture occurred early or late in the reach-to-grasp phase. The results indicate that individuals plan their movements to afford comfort at the end of the movement, and that grasp posture planning is controlled via both feedforward and feedback mechanisms.

  4. Corrections in grasp posture in response to modifications of action goals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmayne M L Hughes

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that people plan their movements to ensure comfortable final grasp postures at the end of a movement. The end-state comfort effect has been found to be a robust constraint during unimanual movements, and leads to the inference that goal-postures are represented and planned prior to movement initiation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals make appropriate corrections to ensure comfortable final goal postures when faced with an unexpected change in action goal. Participants reached for a horizontal cylinder and placed the left or right end of the object into the target disk. As soon as the participant began to move, a secondary stimuli was triggered, which indicated whether the intended action goal had changed or not. Confirming previous research, participants selected initial grasp postures that ensured end-state comfort during non-perturbed trials. In addition, participants made appropriate on-line corrections to their reach-to-grasp movements to ensure end-state comfort during perturbed trials. Corrections in grasp posture occurred early or late in the reach-to-grasp phase. The results indicate that individuals plan their movements to afford comfort at the end of the movement, and that grasp posture planning is controlled via both feedforward and feedback mechanisms.

  5. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

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    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  6. From robot to human grasping simulation

    CERN Document Server

    León, Beatriz; Sancho-Bru, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The human hand and its dexterity in grasping and manipulating objects are some of the hallmarks of the human species. For years, anatomic and biomechanical studies have deepened the understanding of the human hand’s functioning and, in parallel, the robotics community has been working on the design of robotic hands capable of manipulating objects with a performance similar to that of the human hand. However, although many researchers have partially studied various aspects, to date there has been no comprehensive characterization of the human hand’s function for grasping and manipulation of

  7. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biologically inspired robotic systems can find important applications in biomedical robotics, since studying and replicating human behaviour can provide new insights into motor recovery, functional substitution and human-robot interaction. The analysis of human hand motion is essential for collecting information about human hand movements useful for generalizing reaching and grasping actions on a robotic system. This paper focuses on the definition and extraction of quantitative indicators for describing optimal hand grasping postures and replicating them on an anthropomorphic robotic hand. A motion analysis has been carried out on six healthy human subjects performing a transverse volar grasp. The extracted indicators point to invariant grasping behaviours between the involved subjects, thus providing some constraints for identifying the optimal grasping configuration. Hence, an optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method has been developed for determining the optimal grasp configuration of a robotic hand, grounded on the aforementioned constraints. It is characterized by a reduced computational cost. The grasp stability has been tested by introducing a quality index that satisfies the form-closure property. The grasping strategy has been validated by means of simulation tests and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  8. Unusual hand postures but not familiar tools show motor equivalence with precision grasping.

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    Tang, Rixin; Whitwell, Robert L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2016-06-01

    A central question in sensorimotor control is whether or not actions performed with the hands and corresponding actions performed with tools share a common underlying motor plan, even though different muscles and effectors are engaged. There is certainly evidence that tools used to extend the reach of the limb can be incorporated into the body schema after training. But even so, it is not clear whether or not actions such as grasping with tools and grasping with the fingers share the same programming network, i.e. show 'motor equivalence'. Here we first show that feedback-appropriate motor programming for grasps with atypical hand postures readily transfers to stereotypical precision grasps. In stark contrast, however, we find no evidence for an analogous transfer of the programming for grasps using tools to the same stereotypical precision grasps. These findings have important implications for our understanding of body schema. Although the extension of the limb that is afforded by tool use may be incorporated into the body schema, the programming of a grasping movement made with tools appears to resist such incorporation. It could be the case that the proprioceptive signals from the limb can be easily updated to reflect the end of a tool held in the hand, but the motor programs and sensory signals associated with grasping with the thumb and finger cannot be easily adapted to control the opening and closing of a tool. Instead, new but well-practiced motor programs are put in place for tool use that do not exhibit motor equivalence with manual grasping.

  9. Towards a complete description of grasping kinematics: a framework for quantifying human grasping and manipulation.

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    Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for tracking both human hand kinematics and object contour during grasping task. The framework is based on modeling the object as point cloud and the use of marker-based tracking. We introduce how to estimate contact sites on both the hand and object, hand enclosing space, and graspable features from recorded data. Two experiments were performed to 1) verify the accuracy of contact site estimation (less than 5 mm), and 2) validate the feature extraction. Our approach can provide significant insight into how humans plan grasping and manipulation based on object recognition.

  10. Anticipatory postural adjustments in reach-to-grasp: effect of object mass predictability.

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    Aimola, Ettore; Santello, Marco; La Grua, Giovanni; Casabona, Antonino

    2011-09-15

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are thought to compensate for upcoming and predictable perturbations before they occur, e.g., a backward shift of the body center of pressure (COP) before raising the arm. When the goal of arm movements is to reach, grasp, and manipulate an object, predicting the effect of raising the arm on body COP before reach onset could incorporate the properties of the object to be lifted, as both will affect postural control during reaching and object manipulation. Alternatively, the central nervous system (CNS) might use separate APAs to compensate for the effect of arm raising from raising the arm and object. To distinguish between these two scenarios, we asked subjects to reach, grasp, and lift an object whose mass (100g, 750g, or 1400g) was either constant across trials or variable from trial to trial ('predictable' and 'unpredictable' condition, respectively). We hypothesized that object mass would affect the magnitude of APAs in the predictable condition before the onset of object lift but not before the initial arm onset. We also expected COP variability following object lift to be reduced as a result of APAs. For the unpredictable condition, we expected 'default' APAs that would minimize postural perturbation following object lift. We found that both magnitude and timing of APAs were modulated as a function of predictable object mass prior to contact, rather than at the onset of the reaching movement. Specifically, COP position moved forward with increasing object load (p<0.05) and peak COP velocity related to object contact occurred significantly early for heavier loads (p<0.05). For the random condition, the COP position and timing at all loads resembled that associated with larger predictable loads. These findings suggest that modulating COP to a future event might be more accurate when timed to temporally close events, thus potentially reducing the computational load as well as risks of prediction errors. Additionally, our

  11. Human Grasp Assist Device With Exoskeleton

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    Bergelin, Bryan J (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon B. J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A grasp assist system includes a glove, actuator assembly, and controller. The glove includes a digit, i.e., a finger or thumb, and a force sensor. The sensor measures a grasping force applied to an object by an operator wearing the glove. Phalange rings are positioned with respect to the digit. A flexible tendon is connected at one end to one of the rings and is routed through the remaining rings. An exoskeleton positioned with respect to the digit includes hinged interconnecting members each connected to a corresponding ring, and/or a single piece of slotted material. The actuator assembly is connected to another end of the tendon. The controller calculates a tensile force in response to the measured grasping force, and commands the tensile force from the actuator assembly to thereby pull on the tendon. The exoskeleton offloads some of the tensile force from the operator's finger to the glove.

  12. Grasping Posture Control Design for a Home Service Robot using an ABC-based Adaptive PSO Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuu-Hseng S. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a grasping posture control for a robotic arm is developed based on novel adaptive particle swarm optimization (PSO for the home service robot. To grasp an object using the robotic arm of the home-service robot, both the spatial coordinates of the target and the appropriate collocation of the grasping posture should be examined. In this paper, we present another method for dealing with this problem, which integrates the artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm into the adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO algorithm, where the mutation concept of the scout bee in the ABC algorithm is used to increase the diversity of the particles. In addition, adaptive acceleration coefficients and adaptive inertia weight are presented to ameliorate the convergence rate of the PSO algorithm. We name this control scheme AIWCPSO-S, which represents Adaptive Inertia Weight and acceleration Coefficients PSO with the aid of the Scout bee. Performance comparisons of existing ABC, global ABC, adaptive inertia weight PSO, low-discrepancy sequence initialized PSO algorithm with high-order nonlinear time-varying inertia weight (LHNPSO, oscillating triangular inertia weight PSO (OTIWPSO and AIWCPSO-S algorithms are conducted by computer simulations. The experiment results show that the presented algorithm gives the most correct and fastest convergence capability.

  13. Posture alters human resting-state.

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    Thibault, Robert T; Lifshitz, Michael; Jones, Jennifer M; Raz, Amir

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging is ubiquitous; however, neuroimagers seldom investigate the putative impact of posture on brain activity. Whereas participants in most psychological experiments sit upright, many prominent neuroimaging techniques (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) require participants to lie supine. Such postural discrepancies may hold important implications for brain function in general and for fMRI in particular. We directly investigated the effect of posture on spontaneous brain dynamics by recording scalp electrical activity in four orthostatic conditions (lying supine, inclined at 45°, sitting upright, and standing erect). Here we show that upright versus supine posture increases widespread high-frequency oscillatory activity. Our electroencephalographic findings highlight the importance of posture as a determinant in neuroimaging. When generalizing supine imaging results to ecological human cognition, therefore, cognitive neuroscientists would benefit from considering the influence of posture on brain dynamics.

  14. The influence of body posture on the kinematics of prehension in humans and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla).

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    Reghem, E; Chèze, L; Coppens, Y; Pouydebat, E

    2014-03-01

    Much of our current understanding of human prehension in a comparative context is based on macaque models in a sitting, constrained body posture. In a previous study, we clearly showed differences in the amplitude of the forelimb joints between five primate species (lemur, capuchin, chimpanzee, gorilla and human) during unconstrained grasping where the animals were free to choose their body posture. One of our interrogations was to know if these differences could be due to the body posture. To address this question, this study compares humans with new data for gorillas during an unconstrained food prehension task in two body postures, a sitting and a quadrupedal one. The objective is to determine the behavioral and kinematic strategies (amplitudes and patterns of evolution of the articular angles) as well as differences and invariants of trunk and forelimb motions between species. The subjects were recorded by five cameras, and landmarks were digitized frame by frame to reconstruct 3D movement. Our results show that (1) despite significant influences of body postures on ranges of motion in gorillas and humans, species preserve their specific forelimb joint and trunk contribution; (2) body posture has a limited effect on the basic pattern of wrist velocity. Our study indicates that different primate species have specific kinematic features of limb coordination during prehension, which dose not alter with changes in posture. Therefore, across varying species, it is possible to compare limb kinematics irrespective of postural constraints and unconstrained condition need to be explored in other primates to understand the evolution of primate prehension.

  15. Human Posture Estimation using Visual Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiayu XU

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot cooperation is one of the central research issues in robotics.Al kinds of sensors wil be used since the robot should understand human’s intention.This article wil focus on the human posture estimation by using Microsoft Kinect.The visual Information from Kinect can be acquired and used to extract the human skeletal information and further,calcu-late the human posture.The experiment results have been compared with a Qualisys system,which has been proved quite precisely.

  16. Too much anticipation? Large anticipatory adjustments of grasping movements to minimal object manipulations.

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    Herbort, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    When humans grasp objects, the grasps foreshadow the intended object manipulation. It has been suggested that grasps are selected that lead to medial arm postures, which facilitate movement speed and precision, during critical phases of the object manipulation. In Experiment 1, it has been tested whether grasp selections lead to medial postures during rotations of a dial. Participants twisted their arms considerably before grasping the dial, even when the upcoming dial rotation was minimal (5°). Participants neither assumed a medial posture at any point during a short rotation, nor did they assume any of the postures involved in short rotations in the opposite direction. Thus, grasp selections did not necessarily lead to specific postures at any point of the object manipulation. Experiment 2 examined the effect of various grasps on the speed of dial rotations. A medial initial grasp resulted in the fastest dial rotations for most rotation angles. Spontaneously selected grasps were more excursed than necessary to maximize dial rotation speed. This apparent overshot might be explained by participants' sensitive to the variability of their grasps and is in line with the assumption that grasps facilitate control over the grasped object.

  17. Human left ventral premotor cortex mediates matching of hand posture to object use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Vingerhoets

    Full Text Available Visuomotor transformations for grasping have been associated with a fronto-parietal network in the monkey brain. The human homologue of the parietal monkey region (AIP has been identified as the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, whereas the putative human equivalent of the monkey frontal region (F5 is located in the ventral part of the premotor cortex (vPMC. Results from animal studies suggest that monkey F5 is involved in the selection of appropriate hand postures relative to the constraints of the task. In humans, the functional roles of aIPS and vPMC appear to be more complex and the relative contribution of each region to grasp selection remains uncertain. The present study aimed to identify modulation in brain areas sensitive to the difficulty level of tool object - hand posture matching. Seventeen healthy right handed participants underwent fMRI while observing pictures of familiar tool objects followed by pictures of hand postures. The task was to decide whether the hand posture matched the functional use of the previously shown object. Conditions were manipulated for level of difficulty. Compared to a picture matching control task, the tool object - hand posture matching conditions conjointly showed increased modulation in several left hemispheric regions of the superior and inferior parietal lobules (including aIPS, the middle occipital gyrus, and the inferior temporal gyrus. Comparison of hard versus easy conditions selectively modulated the left inferior frontal gyrus with peak activity located in its opercular part (Brodmann area (BA 44. We suggest that in the human brain, vPMC/BA44 is involved in the matching of hand posture configurations in accordance with visual and functional demands.

  18. Corticospinal excitability underlying digit force planning for grasping in humans.

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    Parikh, Pranav; Davare, Marco; McGurrin, Patrick; Santello, Marco

    2014-06-15

    Control of digit forces for grasping relies on sensorimotor memory gained from prior experience with the same or similar objects and on online sensory feedback. However, little is known about neural mechanisms underlying digit force planning. We addressed this question by quantifying the temporal evolution of corticospinal excitability (CSE) using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during two reach-to-grasp tasks. These tasks differed in terms of the magnitude of force exerted on the same points on the object to isolate digit force planning from reach and grasp planning. We also addressed the role of intracortical circuitry within primary motor cortex (M1) by quantifying the balance between short intracortical inhibition and facilitation using paired-pulse TMS on the same tasks. Eighteen right-handed subjects were visually cued to plan digit placement at predetermined locations on the object and subsequently to exert either negligible force ("low-force" task, LF) or 10% of their maximum pinch force ("high-force" task, HF) on the object. We found that the HF task elicited significantly smaller CSE than the LF task, but only when the TMS pulse coincided with the signal to initiate the reach. This force planning-related CSE modulation was specific to the muscles involved in the performance of both tasks. Interestingly, digit force planning did not result in modulation of M1 intracortical inhibitory and facilitatory circuitry. Our findings suggest that planning of digit forces reflected by CSE modulation starts well before object contact and appears to be driven by inputs from frontoparietal areas other than M1.

  19. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chieh Kuo

    Full Text Available This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  20. Development of Human Posture Simulation Method for Assessing Posture Angles and Spinal Loads

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    Lu, Ming-Lun; Waters, Thomas; Werren, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Video-based posture analysis employing a biomechanical model is gaining a growing popularity for ergonomic assessments. A human posture simulation method of estimating multiple body postural angles and spinal loads from a video record was developed to expedite ergonomic assessments. The method was evaluated by a repeated measures study design with three trunk flexion levels, two lift asymmetry levels, three viewing angles and three trial repetitions as experimental factors. The study comprised two phases evaluating the accuracy of simulating self and other people’s lifting posture via a proxy of a computer-generated humanoid. The mean values of the accuracy of simulating self and humanoid postures were 12° and 15°, respectively. The repeatability of the method for the same lifting condition was excellent (~2°). The least simulation error was associated with side viewing angle. The estimated back compressive force and moment, calculated by a three dimensional biomechanical model, exhibited a range of 5% underestimation. The posture simulation method enables researchers to simultaneously quantify body posture angles and spinal loading variables with accuracy and precision comparable to on-screen posture matching methods. PMID:26361435

  1. Correlation dimension estimates of human postural sway.

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    Gurses, Senih; Celik, Huseyin

    2013-02-01

    Human postural sway during quiet standing demonstrates a complex structured dynamics, which has been studied by applying numerous methods, such as linear system identification methods, stochastic analysis, and nonlinear system dynamics tools. Although each of the methods applied revealed some particular features of the sway data none of them have succeeded to present a global picture of the quiet stance dynamics, which probably has both stochastic and deterministic properties. In this study we have started applying ergodic theory of dynamical systems to explore statistical characteristic of the sway dynamics observed in successive trials of a subject, different subjects in an age group, and finally different age groups constituted by children, adults, and elderly subjects. Five successive 180-s long trials were performed by each of 28 subjects in four age groups at quiet stance with eyes open. Stationary and ergodic signal characteristics of five successive center of pressure time series collected from a subject in antero-posterior direction (CoPx) were examined. 97% of the trials were found to be stationary by applying Run Test while children and elderly groups demonstrated significant nonstationary behavior. On the other hand 13 out of 24 subjects were found to be nonergodic. We expected to observe differences in complexity of CoPx dynamics due to aging (Farmer, Ott, & Yorke, 1983). However linear metrics such as standard deviation and Fourier spectra of CoPx signals did not show differences due to the age groups. Correlation dimension (Dk) estimates of stationary CoPx signals being an invariant measure of nonlinear system dynamics were computed by using the average displacement method (Eckmann & Ruelle, 1985). Postural dynamics was expanded in m-dimensional space through CoPx signal by introducing optimum time delays, τcritical. 112 out of 136 stationary CoPx signals for 24 stationary subjects converged to Dk estimates. Average of Dk estimates for children and

  2. Sensorimotor integration in human postural control

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    Peterka, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that human bipedal upright stance is achieved by feedback mechanisms that generate an appropriate corrective torque based on body-sway motion detected primarily by visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive sensory systems. Because orientation information from the various senses is not always available (eyes closed) or accurate (compliant support surface), the postural control system must somehow adjust to maintain stance in a wide variety of environmental conditions. This is the sensorimotor integration problem that we investigated by evoking anterior-posterior (AP) body sway using pseudorandom rotation of the visual surround and/or support surface (amplitudes 0.5-8 degrees ) in both normal subjects and subjects with severe bilateral vestibular loss (VL). AP rotation of body center-of-mass (COM) was measured in response to six conditions offering different combinations of available sensory information. Stimulus-response data were analyzed using spectral analysis to compute transfer functions and coherence functions over a frequency range from 0.017 to 2.23 Hz. Stimulus-response data were quite linear for any given condition and amplitude. However, overall behavior in normal subjects was nonlinear because gain decreased and phase functions sometimes changed with increasing stimulus amplitude. "Sensory channel reweighting" could account for this nonlinear behavior with subjects showing increasing reliance on vestibular cues as stimulus amplitudes increased. VL subjects could not perform this reweighting, and their stimulus-response behavior remained quite linear. Transfer function curve fits based on a simple feedback control model provided estimates of postural stiffness, damping, and feedback time delay. There were only small changes in these parameters with increasing visual stimulus amplitude. However, stiffness increased as much as 60% with increasing support surface amplitude. To maintain postural stability and avoid resonant behavior, an

  3. Delayed Random Walks: Modeling Human Posture Control

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    Ohira, Toru

    1998-03-01

    We consider a phenomenological description of a noisy trajectory which appears on a stabiliogram platform during human postural sway. We hypothesize that this trajectory arises due to a mixture of uncontrollable noise and a corrective delayed feedback to an upright position. Based on this hypothesis, we model the process with a biased random walk whose transition probability depends on its position at a fixed time delay in the past, which we call a delayed random walk. We first introduce a very simple model (T. Ohira and J. G. Milton, Phys.Rev.E. 52), 3277, (1995), which can nevertheless capture the rough qualitative features of the two--point mean square displacement of experimental data with reasonable estimation of delay time. Then, we discuss two approaches toward better capturing and understanding of the experimental data. The first approach is an extension of the model to include a spatial displacement threshold from the upright position below which no or only weak corrective feedback motion takes place. This can be incorporated into an extended delayed random walk model. Numerical simulations show that this extended model can better capture the three scaling region which appears in the two--point mean square displacement. The other approach studied the autocorrelation function of the experimental data, which shows oscillatory behavior. We recently investigated a delayed random walk model whose autocorrelation function has analytically tractable oscillatory behavior (T. Ohira, Phys.Rev.E. 55), R1255, (1997). We discuss how this analytical understanding and its application to delay estimation (T. Ohira and R. Sawatari, Phys.Rev.E. 55), R2077, (1997) could possibly be used to further understand the postural sway data.

  4. Across-muscle coherence is modulated as a function of wrist posture during two-digit grasping.

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    Jesunathadas, Mark; Laitano, Juan; Hamm, Thomas M; Santello, Marco

    2013-10-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which correlated neural inputs, quantified as EMG-EMG coherence across intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles, varied as a function of wrist angle during a constant force precision grip task. Eight adults (5 males; mean age 29 years) participated in the experiment. Subjects held an object using a two-digit precision grip at a constant force at a flexed, neutral, and extended wrist posture, while the EMG activity from intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles was recorded through intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. The integral of z-transformed coherence computed across muscles pairs was greatest in the flexed wrist posture and significantly greater than EMG-EMG coherence measured in the neutral and extended wrist posture (P < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). Furthermore, EMG-EMG coherence did not differ statistically between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle pairs, even though it tended to be greater for the extrinsic muscle pair (P ≥ 0.063). These findings lend support to the notion of a functional role of correlated neural inputs to hand muscles for the task-dependent coordination of hand muscle activity that is likely mediated by somatosensory feedback.

  5. Estimation of Human Body Shape and Posture Under Clothing

    OpenAIRE

    Wuhrer, Stefanie; Pishchulin, Leonid; Brunton, Alan; Shu, Chang; Lang, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the body shape and posture of a dressed human subject in motion represented as a sequence of (possibly incomplete) 3D meshes is important for virtual change rooms and security. To solve this problem, statistical shape spaces encoding human body shape and posture variations are commonly used to constrain the search space for the shape estimate. In this work, we propose a novel method that uses a posture-invariant shape space to model body shape variation combined with a skeleton-bas...

  6. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

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    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  7. A novel design method of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands for reproducing human hand grasping.

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    Sun, Baiyang; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenrui; Zhang, Qiaofei; Mao, Liu; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Because hand is often used for grasping, developing a design of prosthetic hands, particularly light and compact underactuated anthropomorphic transradial prostheses for reproducing human hand complex grasping is crucial for upper-limb amputees. Obviously, the less the number of actuators is, the worse the anthropomorphic motion capability of the prosthetic hands will be. This paper aims to design a transmission mechanism with few motors actuating fingers which could serve the relatively accurate grasp movement of a human hand and has the potential to be embedded in a palm including the motors. We start with establishing an index for evaluating the anthropomorphic motion capability of a prosthetic hand. Based on the optimization of this index, we determine the number of actuators in fingers and the transmission relationship between the actuators and the metacarpophalangeal(MCP) joints. Then, a new design method to mechanically implement the transmission relationship based on a novel decomposition of transmission matrix is proposed in this paper. Utilizing this method, we obtained the final mechanical structure of a new prosthetic hand.

  8. Enhanced propriospinal excitation from hand muscles to wrist flexors during reach-to-grasp in humans.

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    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Burke, David; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    In humans, propriospinal neurons located at midcervical levels receive peripheral and corticospinal inputs and probably participate in the control of grip tasks, but their role in reaching movements, as observed in cats and primates, is still an open question. The effect of ulnar nerve stimulation on flexor carpi radialis (FCR) motor evoked potential (MEP) was tested during reaching tasks and tonic wrist flexion. Significant MEP facilitation was observed at the end of reach during reach-to-grasp but not during grasp, reach-to-point, or tonic contractions. MEP facilitation occurred at a longer interstimulus interval than expected for convergence of corticospinal and afferent volleys at motoneuron level and was not paralleled by a change in the H-reflex. These findings suggest convergence of the two volleys at propriospinal level. Ulnar-induced MEP facilitation was observed when conditioning stimuli were at 0.75 motor response threshold (MT), but not 1 MT. This favors an increased excitability of propriospinal neurons rather than depression of their feedback inhibition, as has been observed during tonic power grip tasks. It is suggested that the ulnar-induced facilitation of FCR MEP during reach may be due to descending activation of propriospinal neurons, assisting the early recruitment of large motoneurons for rapid movement. Because the feedback inhibitory control is still open, this excitation can be truncated by cutaneous inputs from the palmar side of the hand during grasp, thus assisting movement termination. It is concluded that the feedforward activation of propriospinal neurons and their feedback control may be involved in the internal model, motor planning, and online adjustments for reach-to-grasp movements in humans.

  9. Human Posture and Movement Prediction based on Musculoskeletal Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Saeed Davoudabadi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explores an optimization-based formulation, so-called inverse-inverse dynamics, for the prediction of human posture and motion dynamics performing various tasks. It is explained how this technique enables us to predict natural kinematic and kinetic patterns for human posture...... and motion using AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). AMS uses inverse dynamics to analyze musculoskeletal systems and is, therefore, limited by its dependency on input kinematics. We propose to alleviate this dependency by assuming that voluntary postures and movement strategies in humans are guided by a desire...... investigated, a scaling to the mean height and body mass may be sufficient, while other questions require subject-specific models. The movement is parameterized by means of time functions controlling selected degrees-of-freedom (DOF). Subsequently, the parameters of these functions, usually referred...

  10. Research of Human Postural Balance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Griškevičius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In present article postural balance between subjects with stroke and healthy subjects, is being investigated with eyes opened and eyes closed. In the research participated 30 healthy subjects and 15 subjects with stroke. At the same time two experimental measurements were performed – postural balance was measured using balance platform and oscillations of the centre of mass were observed using two-axial accelerometer. It was noted, that amplitudes of subjects with stroke were larger almost two times than control group’s of healthy subjects. It was find out, that ratios of pressure distribution on both left and right legs are in range from 1 to 0.9 for healthy subjects, and ratios below 0.9 are common for subjects with stroke. When subjects were standing with eyes closed, sway amplitudes were higher and the ratios of load distribution on left and right legs were lower.Article in Lithuanian

  11. Postural control of the human mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Timothy S

    2007-04-01

    This article reviews recent experimental evidence explaining the mechanisms that support the mandible in its rest or postural position when the head is stationary and during locomotion. At rest, and during slow jaw movements, there is alternating activation of the jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscles which arises from a central pattern generator. However, this cannot account for the rest position of the mandible even when the head is stationary. Jaw movements and masticatory muscle activity were measured in subjects who stood, walked and ran on a treadmill. Even during walking, there are no bursts of masseter EMG time-locked to heel-landing. However, when subjects ran, the downward movement of the mandible in each step evokes a burst of EMG in the masseters. This is a stretch reflex in the jaw-closing muscles, which acts to limit the downward movement of the mandible relative to the maxilla during locomotion, and to restore the mandibular position towards its rest position. Thus, when the head is stationary, the low-level activity in the jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscles does not contribute to the rest position. Instead, the mandible is supported by passive viscoelastic forces in perioral soft tissues which limit vertical jaw movements even when the head moves gently up and down during walking. When the head moves more vigorously up and down, stretch reflexes in the jaw-closing muscles limit the movement of the mandible. That is, both passive forces and active reflex responses maintain jaw posture within narrow limits during brisk head movements.

  12. Continuous decoding of human grasp kinematics using epidural and subdural signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Robert D.; Rosenow, Joshua M.; Tate, Matthew C.; Slutzky, Marc W.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Restoring or replacing function in paralyzed individuals will one day be achieved through the use of brain-machine interfaces. Regaining hand function is a major goal for paralyzed patients. Two competing prerequisites for the widespread adoption of any hand neuroprosthesis are accurate control over the fine details of movement, and minimized invasiveness. Here, we explore the interplay between these two goals by comparing our ability to decode hand movements with subdural and epidural field potentials (EFPs). Approach. We measured the accuracy of decoding continuous hand and finger kinematics during naturalistic grasping motions in five human subjects. We recorded subdural surface potentials (electrocorticography; ECoG) as well as with EFPs, with both standard- and high-resolution electrode arrays. Main results. In all five subjects, decoding of continuous kinematics significantly exceeded chance, using either EGoG or EFPs. ECoG decoding accuracy compared favorably with prior investigations of grasp kinematics (mean ± SD grasp aperture variance accounted for was 0.54 ± 0.05 across all subjects, 0.75 ± 0.09 for the best subject). In general, EFP decoding performed comparably to ECoG decoding. The 7-20 Hz and 70-115 Hz spectral bands contained the most information about grasp kinematics, with the 70-115 Hz band containing greater information about more subtle movements. Higher-resolution recording arrays provided clearly superior performance compared to standard-resolution arrays. Significance. To approach the fine motor control achieved by an intact brain-body system, it will be necessary to execute motor intent on a continuous basis with high accuracy. The current results demonstrate that this level of accuracy might be achievable not just with ECoG, but with EFPs as well. Epidural placement of electrodes is less invasive, and therefore may incur less risk of encephalitis or stroke than subdural placement of electrodes. Accurately decoding motor

  13. The relationship between fear of falling and human postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Justin R; Campbell, Adam D; Adkin, Allan L; Carpenter, Mark G

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to improve the understanding of how standing at elevated surface heights and the associated changes in the visual field affect human balance control. Healthy young adults stood at four different surface heights (ground, 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 m) under three different visual conditions (eyes open, eyes closed and eyes open with peripheral vision occluded). Mean position, Mean Power Frequency (MPF) and Root Mean Square (RMS) of centre of pressure (COP) displacements were calculated from 60s standing trials, and psychosocial and physiological measures of fear and anxiety were also collected. When standing at a height of 3.2 m, 10 of 36 participants reported an increase in anxiety and a robust fear response while the remaining 26 participants experienced only an increase in anxiety and no fear response. A between subjects analysis of the effect of surface height on postural control revealed that fearful and non-fearful participants adopted different postural control strategies with increased heights. Non-fearful participants demonstrated a postural response characterized by increased MPF and decreased RMS of COP displacements with increasing heights. In contrast, fearful participants demonstrated both increasing MPF and RMS of COP displacements with increasing heights. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct relationship between fear of falling and the strategies used for human postural control.

  14. Human cortical control of hand movements: parietofrontal networks for reaching, grasping, and pointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimon, Flavia

    2010-08-01

    In primates, control of the limb depends on many cortical areas. Whereas specialized parietofrontal circuits have been proposed for different movements in macaques, functional neuroimaging in humans has revealed widespread, overlapping activations for hand and eye movements and for movements such as reaching and grasping. This review examines the involvement of frontal and parietal areas in hand and arm movements in humans as revealed with functional neuroimaging. The degree of functional specialization, possible homologies with macaque cortical regions, and differences between frontal and posterior parietal areas are discussed, as well as a possible organization of hand movements with respect to different spatial reference frames. The available evidence supports a cortical organization along gradients of sensory (visual to somatosensory) and effector (eye to hand) preferences.

  15. A Computational Approach for Automated Posturing of a Human Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    following: obtaining source geometries in the posture being tested, a so- called posturing “by hand” where geometries are moved to what “looks correct ...ARL-MR-0934• JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory A Computational Approach for Automated Posturing of a Human Finite ElementModel by Justin McKee...Automated Posturing of a Human Finite ElementModel by Justin McKee Bennett Aerospace, Inc., Cary, NC Adam Sokolow Weapons and Materials Research

  16. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain.

  17. Do postures of distal effectors affect the control of actions of other distal effectors? Evidence for a system of interactions between hand and mouth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Gentilucci

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at determining whether, in healthy humans, postures assumed by distal effectors affect the control of the successive grasp executed with other distal effectors. In experiments 1 and 2, participants reached different objects with their head and grasped them with their mouth, after assuming different hand postures. The postures could be implicitly associated with interactions with large or small objects. The kinematics of lip shaping during grasp varied congruently with the hand posture, i.e. it was larger or smaller when it could be associated with the grasping of large or small objects, respectively. In experiments 3 and 4, participants reached and grasped different objects with their hand, after assuming the postures of mouth aperture or closure (experiment 3 and the postures of toe extension or flexion (experiment 4. The mouth postures affected the kinematics of finger shaping during grasp, that is larger finger shaping corresponded with opened mouth and smaller finger shaping with closed mouth. In contrast, the foot postures did not influence the hand grasp kinematics. Finally, in experiment 5 participants reached-grasped different objects with their hand while pronouncing opened and closed vowels, as verified by the analysis of their vocal spectra. Open and closed vowels induced larger and smaller finger shaping, respectively. In all experiments postures of the distal effectors induced no effect, or only unspecific effects on the kinematics of the reach proximal/axial component. The data from the present study support the hypothesis that there exists a system involved in establishing interactions between movements and postures of hand and mouth. This system might have been used to transfer a repertoire of hand gestures to mouth articulation postures during language evolution and, in modern humans, it may have evolved a system controlling the interactions existing between speech and gestures.

  18. Characterizing the human postural control system using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa Blázquez, M.; Anguiano, Marta; de Saavedra, Fernando Arias; Lallena, Antonio M.; Carpena, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis is used to study the behaviour of the time series of the position of the center of pressure, output from the activity of a human postural control system. The results suggest that these trajectories present a crossover in their scaling properties from persistent (for high frequencies, short-range time scale) to anti-persistent (for low frequencies, long-range time scale) behaviours. The values of the scaling exponent found for the persistent parts of the trajectories are very similar for all the cases analysed. The similarity of the results obtained for the measurements done with both eyes open and both eyes closed indicate either that the visual system may be disregarded by the postural control system, while maintaining quiet standing, or that the control mechanisms associated with each type of information (visual, vestibular and somatosensory) cannot be disentangled with this technique.

  19. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads.

  20. Hand posture classification using electrocorticography signals in the gamma band over human sensorimotor brain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Blabe, Christine H.; Foster, Brett L.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Parvizi, Josef; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interface systems translate recorded neural signals into command signals for assistive technology. In individuals with upper limb amputation or cervical spinal cord injury, the restoration of a useful hand grasp could significantly improve daily function. We sought to determine if electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain sufficient information to select among multiple hand postures for a prosthetic hand, orthotic, or functional electrical stimulation system.Approach. We recorded ECoG signals from subdural macro- and microelectrodes implanted in motor areas of three participants who were undergoing inpatient monitoring for diagnosis and treatment of intractable epilepsy. Participants performed five distinct isometric hand postures, as well as four distinct finger movements. Several control experiments were attempted in order to remove sensory information from the classification results. Online experiments were performed with two participants. Main results. Classification rates were 68%, 84% and 81% for correct identification of 5 isometric hand postures offline. Using 3 potential controls for removing sensory signals, error rates were approximately doubled on average (2.1×). A similar increase in errors (2.6×) was noted when the participant was asked to make simultaneous wrist movements along with the hand postures. In online experiments, fist versus rest was successfully classified on 97% of trials; the classification output drove a prosthetic hand. Online classification performance for a larger number of hand postures remained above chance, but substantially below offline performance. In addition, the long integration windows used would preclude the use of decoded signals for control of a BCI system. Significance. These results suggest that ECoG is a plausible source of command signals for prosthetic grasp selection. Overall, avenues remain for improvement through better electrode designs and placement, better participant training

  1. Limitations of surface EMG signals of extrinsic muscles in predicting postures of human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinjamuri, Ramana; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sclabassi, Robert; Sun, Mingui

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the limitations of sEMG (surface Electromyography) signals collected from the extrinsic muscles in the forearm in predicting the postures of human hand. Four subjects were asked to try ten extreme postures of hand which need high effort. Two of these four subjects were asked to try ten more normal postures which did not need effort During the experiments, muscle activity and static postures of the hand were measured. The data obtained were analyzed by principal component analysis. The results obtained revealed the limitations of sEMG signals of extrinsic muscles in reproducing the postures of the hand.

  2. Remarks on 3D human body posture reconstruction from multiple camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yusuke; Ohta, Takako; Mutsuji, Yukiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masafumi

    2007-12-01

    This paper proposes a human body posture estimation method based on back projection of human silhouette images extracted from multi-camera images. To achieve real-time 3D human body posture estimation, a server-client system is introduced into the multi-camera system, improvements of the background subtraction and back projection are investigated. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed method, 3D estimation experiments of human body posture are carried out. The experimental system with six CCD cameras is composed and the experimental results confirm both the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system in the 3D human body posture estimation in real-time. By using the 3D reconstruction of human body posture, the simple walk-through application of virtual reality system is demonstrated.

  3. Contraction of the human diaphragm during rapid postural adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, P W; Butler, J E; McKenzie, D K; Gandevia, S C

    1997-12-01

    1. The response of the diaphragm to the postural perturbation produced by rapid flexion of the shoulder to a visual stimulus was evaluated in standing subjects. Gastric, oesophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured together with intramuscular and oesophageal recordings of electromyographic activity (EMG) in the diaphragm. To assess the mechanics of contraction of the diaphragm, dynamic changes in the length of the diaphragm were measured with ultrasonography. 2. With rapid flexion of the shoulder in response to a visual stimulus, EMG activity in the costal and crural diaphragm occurred about 20 ms prior to the onset of deltoid EMG. This anticipatory contraction occurred irrespective of the phase of respiration in which arm movement began. The onset of diaphragm EMG coincided with that of transversus abdominis. 3. Gastric and transdiaphragmatic pressures increased in association with the rapid arm flexion by 13.8 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) and 13.5 +/- 1.8 cmH2O, respectively. The increases occurred 49 +/- 4 ms after the onset of diaphragm EMG, but preceded the onset of movement of the limb by 63 +/- 7 ms. 4. Ultrasonographic measurements revealed that the costal diaphragm shortened and then lengthened progressively during the increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure. 5. This study provides definitive evidence that the human diaphragm is involved in the control of postural stability during sudden voluntary movement of the limbs.

  4. Contraction of the human diaphragm during rapid postural adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, P W; Butler, J E; McKenzie, D K; Gandevia, S C

    1997-01-01

    1. The response of the diaphragm to the postural perturbation produced by rapid flexion of the shoulder to a visual stimulus was evaluated in standing subjects. Gastric, oesophageal and transdiaphragmatic pressures were measured together with intramuscular and oesophageal recordings of electromyographic activity (EMG) in the diaphragm. To assess the mechanics of contraction of the diaphragm, dynamic changes in the length of the diaphragm were measured with ultrasonography. 2. With rapid flexion of the shoulder in response to a visual stimulus, EMG activity in the costal and crural diaphragm occurred about 20 ms prior to the onset of deltoid EMG. This anticipatory contraction occurred irrespective of the phase of respiration in which arm movement began. The onset of diaphragm EMG coincided with that of transversus abdominis. 3. Gastric and transdiaphragmatic pressures increased in association with the rapid arm flexion by 13.8 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) and 13.5 +/- 1.8 cmH2O, respectively. The increases occurred 49 +/- 4 ms after the onset of diaphragm EMG, but preceded the onset of movement of the limb by 63 +/- 7 ms. 4. Ultrasonographic measurements revealed that the costal diaphragm shortened and then lengthened progressively during the increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure. 5. This study provides definitive evidence that the human diaphragm is involved in the control of postural stability during sudden voluntary movement of the limbs. Images Figure 1 PMID:9423192

  5. Multi-digit force control during unconstrained grasping in response to object perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Haschke, Robert; Ritter, Helge; Santello, Marco; Ernst, Marc O

    2017-02-22

    Because of the complex anatomy of the human hand, in the absence of external constraints a large number of postures and force combinations can be used to attain a stable grasp. Motor synergies provide a viable strategy to solve this problem of motor redundancy. In this study, we exploited the technical advantages of an innovative sensorized object to study unconstrained hand grasping within the theoretical framework of motor synergies. Participants were required to grasp, lift, and hold the sensorized object. During the holding phase, we repetitively applied external disturbance forces and torques and recorded the spatiotemporal distribution of grip forces produced by each digit. We found that the time to reach the maximum grip force during each perturbation was roughly equal across fingers, consistently with a synchronous, synergistic stiffening across digits. We further evaluated this hypothesis by comparing the force distribution of human grasping versus robotic grasping, where the control strategy was set by the experimenter. We controlled the global hand stiffness of the robotic hand and we found that this control algorithm produced a force pattern qualitatively similar to human grasping performance. Our results suggest that the nervous system uses a default whole-hand synergistic control to maintain a stable grasp regardless of the number of digits involved in the task, their position on the objects, and the type and frequency of external perturbations.

  6. Grasp Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    properties governing the mechanics of grasping and manipulation would also be preserved. For example, as we shall see later in this paper, if O is a...focus on the actual finger form. Dollar and Howe [6] survey 20 different designs of compliant and underactuated hands, and all employ cylindrical or...fundamental existence and uniqueness theorem for solutions of systems of differential equations [12]. 6 Alberto Rodriguez and Matthew T. Mason 3.2 General

  7. Human dorsomedial parieto-motor circuit specifies grasp during the planning of goal-directed hand actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesia, Michael; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Elahi, Behzad; Jegatheeswaran, Gaayathiri; Isayama, Reina; Neva, Jason L; Davare, Marco; Staines, W Richard; Culham, Jody C; Chen, Robert

    2017-07-01

    According to one influential view, two specialized parieto-frontal circuits control prehension: a dorsomedial stream for hand transport during reaching and a dorsolateral stream for preshaping the fingers during grasping. However, recent evidence argues that an area within the dorsomedial stream-macaque area V6A and, its putative human homolog, superior parietal occipital cortex (SPOC) - encodes both hand transport and grip formation. We tested whether planning varied hand actions modulates functional connectivity between left SPOC and ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) using a dual-site, paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation paradigm with two coils (dsTMS). Participants performed three different hand actions to a target object comprising a small cylinder atop a larger cylinder. These actions were: reaching-to-grasp the top (GT) using a precision grip, reaching-to-grasp the bottom (GB) using a whole-hand grip, or reaching-to-touch (Touch) the side of the target object without forming a grip. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from TMS to M1, with or without preceding TMS to SPOC, were recorded from first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) hand muscles in two experiments that varied timing parameters (the stimulus onset asynchrony, SOA, between the 'GO' cue and stimulation and interpulse interval, IPI, between SPOC and M1 stimulation). We found that preparatory response amplitudes in the SPOC-M1 circuit of different hand muscles were selectively modulated early in the motor plan for different types of grasps. First, based on SPOC-M1 interactions, across two experiments, the role of the ADM was facilitated during a whole-hand grasp of a large object (GB) relative to other conditions under certain timing parameters (SOA = 150 msec; IPI = 6 msec). Second, the role of the FDI was facilitated during hand action planning compared to rest. These findings suggest that the human dorsomedial parieto-motor stream plays a causal role in

  8. The personification of animals: coding of human and nonhuman body parts based on posture and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Timothy N; McDougall, Laura; Paulson, Stephanie

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the present research was to determine how humans represent the bodies and limbs of nonhuman mammals based on anatomical and functional properties. To this end, participants completed a series of body-part compatibility tasks in which they responded with a thumb or foot response to the color of a stimulus (red or blue, respectively) presented on different limbs of several animals. Across the studies, this compatibility task was conducted with images of human and nonhuman animals (bears, cows, and monkeys) in bipedal or quadrupedal postures. The results revealed that the coding of the limbs of nonhuman animals is strongly influenced by the posture of the body, but not the functional capacity of the limb. Specifically, body-part compatibility effects were present for both human and nonhuman animals when the figures were in a bipedal posture, but were not present when the animals were in a quadrupedal stance (Experiments 1a-c). Experiments 2a and 2b revealed that the posture-based body-part compatibility effects were not simply a vertical spatial compatibility effect or due to a mismatch between the posture of the body in the image and the participant. These data indicate that nonhuman animals in a bipedal posture are coded with respect to the "human" body representation, whereas nonhuman animals in a quadrupedal posture are not mapped to the human body representation. Overall, these studies provide new insight into the processes through which humans understand, mimic, and learn from the actions of nonhuman animals.

  9. Temporal parameter change of human postural control ability during upright swing using recursive least square method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Akifumi; Ishida, Mizuri; Sagawa, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to derive quantitative assessment indicators of the human postural control ability. An inverted pendulum is applied to standing human body and is controlled by ankle joint torque according to PD control method in sagittal plane. Torque control parameters (KP: proportional gain, KD: derivative gain) and pole placements of postural control system are estimated with time from inclination angle variation using fixed trace method as recursive least square method. Eight young healthy volunteers are participated in the experiment, in which volunteers are asked to incline forward as far as and as fast as possible 10 times over 10 [s] stationary intervals with their neck joint, hip joint and knee joint fixed, and then return to initial upright posture. The inclination angle is measured by an optical motion capture system. Three conditions are introduced to simulate unstable standing posture; 1) eyes-opened posture for healthy condition, 2) eyes-closed posture for visual impaired and 3) one-legged posture for lower-extremity muscle weakness. The estimated parameters Kp, KD and pole placements are applied to multiple comparison test among all stability conditions. The test results indicate that Kp, KD and real pole reflect effect of lower-extremity muscle weakness and KD also represents effect of visual impairment. It is suggested that the proposed method is valid for quantitative assessment of standing postural control ability.

  10. Human Balance out of Equilibrium: Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics in Posture Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauk, Michael; Chow, Carson C.; Pavlik, Ann E.; Collins, James J.

    1998-01-01

    During quiet standing, the human body sways in a stochastic manner. Here we show that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be applied to the human postural control system. That is, the dynamic response of the postural system to a weak mechanical perturbation can be predicted from the fluctuations exhibited by the system under quasistatic conditions. We also show that the estimated correlation and response functions can be described by a simple stochastic model consisting of a pinned polymer. These findings suggest that the postural control system utilizes the same control mechanisms under quiet-standing and dynamic conditions.

  11. LASER SCANNING APPLICATION FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN POSTURE DISTORTION DURING MASS EXAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Voinov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human posture distortion in the early stages is an important task, which makes it possible to adjust the onset of the disease with just exercise and without the use of drugs. Existing methods for monitoring of human posture assessment do not meet modern requirements for speed of data acquisition and processing. Real time evaluation of human posture distortion in static and dynamic modes is possible by using a laser scanner. The paper deals with a three-dimensional laser scanning method for determining human posture. The device designed on the basis of its examination gives the possibility for real-time static and dynamic modes. Characteristic feature of the laser scanner is the presence of automated servo rotatable measuring head in two planes (vertical and horizontal with a density of up to tens of measurement points per square centimeter.

  12. A New Interpretation of Spontaneous Sway Measures Based on a Simple Model of Human Postural Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maurer, Christoph; Peterka, Robert J

    ...) traces that closely resemble physiologically measured COP functions can be produced by an appropriate selection of model parameters in a simple feedback model of the human postural control system...

  13. Human Energy Expenditure and Postural Coordination on the Mechanical Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, Héloïse; Thouvarecq, Régis; Vérin, Eric; Tourny, Claire; Benguigui, Nicolas; Komar, John; Leroy, David

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated and compared the energy expenditure and postural coordination of two groups of healthy subjects on a mechanical horse at 4 increasing oscillation frequencies. Energy expenditure was assessed from the oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, and heart rate values, and postural coordination was characterized by relative phase computations between subjects (elbow, head, trunk) and horse. The results showed that the postural coordination of the riders was better adapted (i.e., maintenance of in-phase and antiphase) than that of the nonriders, but the energy expenditure remains the same. Likewise, we observed an energy system shifting only for nonriders (from aerobic to lactic anaerobic mode). Finally, cross-correlations showed a link between energy expenditure and postural coordination in the riders (i.e., effectiveness).

  14. Independent development of the Reach and the Grasp in spontaneous self-touching by human infants in the first six months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany L Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dual Visuomotor Channel Theory proposes that visually guided reaching is a composite of two movements, a Reach that advances the hand to contact the target and a Grasp that shapes the digits for target purchase. The theory is supported by biometric analyses of adult reaching, evolutionary contrasts, and differential developmental patterns for the Reach and the Grasp in visually guided reaching in human infants. The present ethological study asked whether there is evidence for a dissociated development for the Reach and the Grasp in nonvisual hand use in very early infancy. The study documents a rich array of spontaneous self-touching behavior in infants during the first six months of life and subjects the movements to analyses of body target, contact type, and Grasp. Video recordings were made of resting alert infants biweekly from birth to 6 months. In younger infants, self-touching targets included the head and trunk. As infants aged, targets became more caudal including the hips, legs, and feet. In younger infants hand contact was mainly made with the dorsum of the hand, but as infants aged contacts included palmar and eventually grasp and manipulatory contacts with the body and clothes. The relative incidence of caudal contacts and palmar contacts increased concurrently and were significantly correlated throughout the period of study. In contrast, developmental increases in self grasping emerged a few weeks after the increases observed in caudal and palmar contacts. The behavioral and temporal pattern of these spontaneous self-touching movements suggest that the Reach, in which the hand extends to make a palmar self-contact, and the Grasp, in which the digits close and make manipulatory movements, have partially independent developmental profiles. The results additionally suggest that self-touching behavior is an important developmental phase that allows for the coordination of the Reach and the Grasp prior to their use under visual

  15. Photographic analysis of human posture: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário, José Luís Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    The study of posture is not an easy task, mainly because postural assessment is still scientifically inaccurate. Photographs of bipedalism in the frontal and sagittal planes are one of the most widely used methods for this assessment. The aim of this literature review was to determine which anatomical markers authors of scientific papers have taken to minimize the chances of error in measurements. The Medline and Lilacs databases were searched for the period from 2002 to 2012, with the following keywords: "postura"; "posture" and "postural." A number of studies have shown a reasonable correlation between radiographic measurements and the placement of markers. It appears possible to use photography as a form of scientific assessment since the anatomical landmarks are well chosen. The markers that were suggested in this review: malleolus; posterior calcaneal tuberosity; fibular head; tibial tuberosity; greater trochanter of the femur; anterior angle and/or posterior lateral edge of the acromion; spinous processes (particularly C7); inferior angle of the scapula; sternum manubrium; mental protuberance; and the intertragic notch. Iliac spines, both anterior superior and posterior superior, should only be used with lean subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals the neural substrates of arm transport and grip formation in reach-to-grasp actions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Monaco, Simona; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; McAdam, Teresa D; Quinlan, Derek J; Goodale, Melvyn A; Culham, Jody C

    2010-08-01

    Picking up a cup requires transporting the arm to the cup (transport component) and preshaping the hand appropriately to grasp the handle (grip component). Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the human neural substrates of the transport component and its relationship with the grip component. Participants were shown three-dimensional objects placed either at a near location, adjacent to the hand, or at a far location, within reach but not adjacent to the hand. Participants performed three tasks at each location as follows: (1) touching the object with the knuckles of the right hand; (2) grasping the object with the right hand; or (3) passively viewing the object. The transport component was manipulated by positioning the object in the far versus the near location. The grip component was manipulated by asking participants to grasp the object versus touching it. For the first time, we have identified the neural substrates of the transport component, which include the superior parieto-occipital cortex and the rostral superior parietal lobule. Consistent with past studies, we found specialization for the grip component in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus and left ventral premotor cortex; now, however, we also find activity for the grasp even when no transport is involved. In addition to finding areas specialized for the transport and grip components in parietal cortex, we found an integration of the two components in dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor areas, two regions that may be important for the coordination of reach and grasp.

  17. Effect of intermittent feedback control on robustness of human-like postural control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2016-03-01

    Humans have to acquire postural robustness to maintain stability against internal and external perturbations. Human standing has been recently modelled using an intermittent feedback control. However, the causality inside of the closed-loop postural control system associated with the neural control strategy is still unknown. Here, we examined the effect of intermittent feedback control on postural robustness and of changes in active/passive components on joint coordinative structure. We implemented computer simulation of a quadruple inverted pendulum that is mechanically close to human tiptoe standing. We simulated three pairs of joint viscoelasticity and three choices of neural control strategies for each joint: intermittent, continuous, or passive control. We examined postural robustness for each parameter set by analysing the region of active feedback gain. We found intermittent control at the hip joint was necessary for model stabilisation and model parameters affected the robustness of the pendulum. Joint sways of the pendulum model were partially smaller than or similar to those of experimental data. In conclusion, intermittent feedback control was necessary for the stabilisation of the quadruple inverted pendulum. Also, postural robustness of human-like multi-link standing would be achieved by both passive joint viscoelasticity and neural joint control strategies.

  18. Specifying comfortable driving postures for ergonomic design and evaluation of the driver workspace using digital human models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Gyouhyung; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2009-08-01

    Specifying comfortable driving postures is essential for ergonomic design and evaluation of a driver workspace. The present study sought to enhance and expand upon several existing recommendations for such postures. Participants (n = 38) were involved in six driving sessions that differed by vehicle class (sedan and SUV), driving venue (laboratory-based and field) or seat (from vehicles ranked high and low by vehicle comfort). Sixteen joint angles were measured in preferred postures to more completely describe driving postures, as were corresponding perceptual responses. Driving postures were found to be bilaterally asymmetric and distinct between vehicle classes, venues, age groups and gender. A subset of preferred postural ranges was identified using a filtering mechanism that ensured desired levels of perceptual responses. Accurate ranges of joint angles for comfortable driving postures, and careful consideration of vehicle and driver factors, will facilitate ergonomic design and evaluation of a driver workspace, particularly when embedded in digital human models.

  19. Human Body Modeling and Posture Simulating Based on 3D Surface Scan Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马永有; 张辉; 任少云; 蒋寿伟

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for modeling the human body by considering the motion state and the shape of whole body. The body model consists of a skeleton kinematic model and a surface model. The former is used to determine the posture of the body,and the latter is used to generate the body shape according to the given posture. The body surface is reconstructed with multi-segment B-spline surfaces based on the 3D scan data from a real human body.Using only a few joints parameters and the original surface scan data, the various body postures and the shape can be generated easily. The model has a strong potential of being used for ergonomic design,garment design, virtual reality environment, as well as creating human animation, etc.

  20. Postural adjustments for online corrections of arm movements in standing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Julia A; Gritsenko, Valeriya; Ouckama, Ryan; Stapley, Paul J

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how humans correct ongoing arm movements while standing. Specifically, we sought to understand whether the postural adjustments in the legs required for online corrections of arm movements are predictive or rely on feedback from the moving limb. To answer this question we measured online corrections in arm and leg muscles during pointing movements while standing. Nine healthy right-handed subjects reached with their dominant arm to a visual target in front of them and aligned with their midline. In some trials, the position of the target would switch from the central target to one of the other targets located 15°, 30°, or 45° to the right of the central (midline) target. For each target correction, we measured the time at which arm kinematics, ground reaction forces, and arm and leg muscle electromyogram significantly changed in response to the target displacement. Results show that postural adjustments in the left leg preceded kinematic corrections in the limb. The corrective postural muscle activity in the left leg consistently preceded the corrective reaching muscle activity in the right arm. Our results demonstrate that corrections of arm movements in response to target displacement during stance are preceded by postural adjustments in the leg contralateral to the direction of target shift. Furthermore, postural adjustments preceded both the hand trajectory correction and the arm-muscle activity responsible for it, which suggests that the central nervous system does not depend on feedback from the moving arm to modify body posture during voluntary movement. Instead, postural adjustments lead the online correction in the arm the same way they lead the initiation of voluntary arm movements. This suggests that forward models for voluntary movements executed during stance incorporate commands for posture that are produced on the basis of the required task demands.

  1. A mathematical model for incorporating biofeedback into human postural control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersal Tulga

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofeedback of body motion can serve as a balance aid and rehabilitation tool. To date, mathematical models considering the integration of biofeedback into postural control have represented this integration as a sensory addition and limited their application to a single degree-of-freedom representation of the body. This study has two objectives: 1 to develop a scalable method for incorporating biofeedback into postural control that is independent of the model’s degrees of freedom, how it handles sensory integration, and the modeling of its postural controller; and 2 to validate this new model using multidirectional perturbation experimental results. Methods Biofeedback was modeled as an additional torque to the postural controller torque. For validation, this biofeedback modeling approach was applied to a vibrotactile biofeedback device and incorporated into a two-link multibody model with full-state-feedback control that represents the dynamics of bipedal stance. Average response trajectories of body sway and center of pressure (COP to multidirectional surface perturbations of subjects with vestibular deficits were used for model parameterization and validation in multiple perturbation directions and for multiple display resolutions. The quality of fit was quantified using average error and cross-correlation values. Results The mean of the average errors across all tactor configurations and perturbations was 0.24° for body sway and 0.39 cm for COP. The mean of the cross-correlation value was 0.97 for both body sway and COP. Conclusions The biofeedback model developed in this study is capable of capturing experimental response trajectory shapes with low average errors and high cross-correlation values in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions for all perturbation directions and spatial resolution display configurations considered. The results validate that biofeedback can be modeled as an additional

  2. Remarks on human body posture estimation from silhouette image based on heuristic rules and Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Naemura, Masahide

    2005-12-01

    This paper proposes a human body posture estimation method based on analysis of human silhouette and Kalman filter. The proposed method is based on both the heuristically extraction method of estimating the significant points of human body and the contour analysis of the human silhouette. The 2D coordinates of the human body's significant points, such as top of the head, and tips of feet, are located by applying the heuristically extraction method to the human silhouette, those of tips of hands are obtained by using the result of the contour analysis, and the joints of elbows and knees are estimated by introducing some heuristic rules to the contour image of the human silhouette. The estimated results are optimized and tracked by using Kalman filter. The proposed estimation method is implemented on a personal computer and runs in real-time. Experimental results show both the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed method for estimating human body postures.

  3. Postural Hand Synergies during Environmental Constraint Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Della Santina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to intuitively exploit the shape of an object and environmental constraints to achieve stable grasps and perform dexterous manipulations. In doing that, a vast range of kinematic strategies can be observed. However, in this work we formulate the hypothesis that such ability can be described in terms of a synergistic behavior in the generation of hand postures, i.e., using a reduced set of commonly used kinematic patterns. This is in analogy with previous studies showing the presence of such behavior in different tasks, such as grasping. We investigated this hypothesis in experiments performed by six subjects, who were asked to grasp objects from a flat surface. We quantitatively characterized hand posture behavior from a kinematic perspective, i.e., the hand joint angles, in both pre-shaping and during the interaction with the environment. To determine the role of tactile feedback, we repeated the same experiments but with subjects wearing a rigid shell on the fingertips to reduce cutaneous afferent inputs. Results show the persistence of at least two postural synergies in all the considered experimental conditions and phases. Tactile impairment does not alter significantly the first two synergies, and contact with the environment generates a change only for higher order Principal Components. A good match also arises between the first synergy found in our analysis and the first synergy of grasping as quantified by previous work. The present study is motivated by the interest of learning from the human example, extracting lessons that can be applied in robot design and control. Thus, we conclude with a discussion on implications for robotics of our findings.

  4. Human body area factors for radiation exchange analysis: standing and walking postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E

    2011-09-01

    Effective radiation area factors (f (eff)) and projected area factors (f (p)) of unclothed Caucasians' standing and walking postures used in estimating human radiation exchange with the surrounding environment were determined from a sample of adults in Canada. Several three-dimensional (3D) computer body models were created for standing and walking postures. Only small differences in f (eff) and f (p) values for standing posture were found between gender (male or female) and body type (normal- or over-weight). Differences between this study and previous studies were much larger: ≤0.173 in f (p) and ≤0.101 in f (eff). Directionless f (p) values for walking posture also had only minor differences between genders and positions in a stride. However, the differences of mean directional f (p) values of the positions dependent on azimuth angles were large enough, ≤0.072, to create important differences in modeled radiation receipt. Differences in f (eff) values were small: 0.02 between the normal-weight male and female models and up to 0.033 between positions in a stride. Variations of directional f (p) values depending on solar altitudes for walking posture were narrower than those for standing posture. When both standing and walking postures are considered, the mean f (eff) value, 0.836, of standing (0.826) and walking (0.846) could be used. However, f (p) values should be selected carefully because differences between directional and directionless f (p) values were large enough that they could influence the estimated level of human thermal sensation.

  5. Human posture experiments under water: ways of applying the findings to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirlich, Thomas

    For the design and layout human spacecraft interiors the Neutral Body Posture (NBP) in micro-gravity is of great importance. The NBP has been defined as the stable, replicable and nearly constant posture the body "automatically" assumes when a human relaxes in microgravity. Furthermore the NBP, as published, suggests that there is one standard neutral posture for all individuals. Published experiments from space, parabolic flights and under water on the other hand show strong inter-individual variations of neutral (relaxed) postures. This might originate from the quite small sample sizes of subjects analyzed or the different experiment conditions, e. g. space and under water. Since 2008 a collaborative research project focussing on human postures and motions in microgravity has been ongoing at the Technische Univer-sitüt München (TUM). This collaborative effort is undertaken by the Institute of Astronautics a (LRT) and the Institute of Ergonomics (LfE). Several test campaigns have been conducted in simulated microgravity under water using a specially designed standardized experiment setup. Stereo-metric HD video footage and anthropometric data from over 50 subjects (female and male) has been gathered in over 80 experiments. The video data is analyzed using PCMAN software, developed by the LfE, resulting in a 3D volumetric CAD-based model of each subject and posture. Preliminary and ongoing analysis of the data offer evidence for the existence of intra-individually constant neutral postures, as well as continuously recurring relaxation strate-gies. But as with the data published prior the TUM experiments show quite a large variation of inter-individual postures. These variation might be induced or influenced by the special environmental conditions in the underwater experiment. Thus in present paper ways of stan-dardizing data and applying the findings gathered under water to real microgravity are being discussed. The following influences stemming from the

  6. Does body posture influence hand preference in an ancestral primate model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leliveld Lisette

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of human handedness and its evolution in primates is presently under debate. Current hypotheses suggest that body posture (postural origin hypothesis and bipedalism hypothesis have an important impact on the evolution of handedness in primates. To gain insight into the origin of manual lateralization in primates, we studied gray mouse lemurs, suggested to represent the most ancestral primate condition. First, we investigated hand preference in a simple food grasping task to explore the importance of hand usage in a natural foraging situation. Second, we explored the influence of body posture by applying a forced food grasping task with varying postural demands (sit, biped, cling, triped. Results The tested mouse lemur population did not prefer to use their hands alone to grasp for food items. Instead, they preferred to pick them up using a mouth-hand combination or the mouth alone. If mouth usage was inhibited, they showed an individual but no population level handedness for all four postural forced food grasping tasks. Additionally, we found no influence of body posture on hand preference in gray mouse lemurs. Conclusion Our results do not support the current theories of primate handedness. Rather, they propose that ecological adaptation indicated by postural habit and body size of a given species has an important impact on hand preference in primates. Our findings suggest that small-bodied, quadrupedal primates, adapted to the fine branch niche of dense forests, prefer mouth retrieval of food and are less manually lateralized than large-bodied species which consume food in a more upright, and less stable body posture.

  7. Active Grasp Synthesis for Grasping Unknown Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çallı, B.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation is a key feature for robots which are designed to work in daily environments like homes, offices and streets. These robots do not often have manipulators that are specialized for specific tasks, but grippers that can grasp the target object. This makes grasping a crucial ability that

  8. The role of the human cerebellum in short- and long-term habituation of postural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Achim; Drepper, Johannes; Maschke, Matthias; Diener, Hans Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the human cerebellum in short-term (STH) and long-term habituation (LTH) of postural responses to repeated platform perturbations. Ten cerebellar patients and ten age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated. Twenty backward platform translations were applied on each of 5 consecutive days. Changes of postural response size within each day were assessed to determine STH and changes across days to determine LTH. Both controls and cerebellar patients showed a significant reduction of postural response size within each day (i.e. STH). No significant reduction of postural response size was observed across days (i.e. no LTH). Both controls and cerebellar patients, however, showed a tendency of response size to increase across days suggesting long-term sensitization. The amount of changes within and across days did not significantly differ between groups. The present findings suggest that changes of postural response size to repeated perturbations do not depend upon the integrity of the cerebellum.

  9. Postural And Eye-Positional Effects On Human Biting Force: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Tabancacı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle groups affected on biting force are called temporal muscle as a major and masseter muscle as a minor. According to the human posture stability, forces of these muscles vary with the force directions. In this case, experimental investigation is strictly important such that biting force under different postural and eye- positional situations is changed. In this study, seven-male and seven-female within the age-range of 17-24 are considered corresponding to having with restorated molar tooth and without that type of tooth. With the help of specially designed biting fork, different posture- and eye-positions are investigated for experimental biting force analysis. Changes in eye-positions are not indicated significant difference for all postural positions. On one hand, it is obtained that biting force of no-filling tooth in men becomes maximum if facial muscles give full effort to biting. On the other hand, effect of facial muscles for women is not clearly noticed depending on the postural differences.

  10. Learning Grasp Affordance Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Kroemer, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    We address the issue of learning and representing object grasp affordance models. We model grasp affordances with continuous probability density functions (grasp densities) which link object-relative grasp poses to their success probability. The underlying function representation is nonparametric...... and relies on kernel density estimation to provide a continuous model. Grasp densities are learned and refined from exploration, by letting a robot “play” with an object in a sequence of graspand-drop actions: The robot uses visual cues to generate a set of grasp hypotheses; it then executes...... these and records their outcomes. When a satisfactory number of grasp data is available, an importance-sampling algorithm turns these into a grasp density. We evaluate our method in a largely autonomous learning experiment run on three objects of distinct shapes. The experiment shows how learning increases success...

  11. Functional magnetic resonance adaptation reveals the involvement of the dorsomedial stream in hand orientation for grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Simona; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Sedda, Anna; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; Culham, Jody C

    2011-11-01

    Reach-to-grasp actions require coordination of different segments of the upper limbs. Previous studies have examined the neural substrates of arm transport and hand grip components of such actions; however, a third component has been largely neglected: the orientation of the wrist and hand appropriately for the object. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRA) to investigate human brain areas involved in processing hand orientation during grasping movements. Participants used the dominant right hand to grasp a rod with the four fingers opposing the thumb or to reach and touch the rod with the knuckles without visual feedback. In a control condition, participants passively viewed the rod. Trials in a slow event-related design consisted of two sequential stimuli in which the rod orientation changed (requiring a change in wrist posture while grasping but not reaching or looking) or remained the same. We found reduced activation, that is, adaptation, in superior parieto-occipital cortex (SPOC) when the object was repeatedly grasped with the same orientation. In contrast, there was no adaptation when reaching or looking at an object in the same orientation, suggesting that hand orientation, rather than object orientation, was the critical factor. These results agree with recent neurophysiological research showing that a parieto-occipital area of macaque (V6A) is modulated by hand orientation during reach-to-grasp movements. We suggest that the human dorsomedial stream, like that in the macaque, plays a key role in processing hand orientation in reach-to-grasp movements.

  12. The influence of gravity on regional lung blood flow in humans: SPECT in the upright and head-down posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ax, M; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Lindahl, S G E; Mure, M; Petersson, J

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that gravity has little influence on the distribution of lung blood flow while changing posture from supine to prone. This study aimed to evaluate the maximal influence of posture by comparison of regional lung blood flow in the upright and head-down posture in 8 healthy volunteers, using a tilt table. Regional lung blood flow was marked by intravenous injection of macroaggregates of human albumin labeled with (99m)Tc or (113m)In, in the upright and head-down posture, respectively, during tidal breathing. Both radiotracers remain fixed in the lung after administration. The distribution of radioactivity was mapped using quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) corrected for attenuation and scatter. All images were obtained supine during tidal breathing. A shift from upright to the head-down posture caused a clear redistribution of blood flow from basal to apical regions. We conclude that posture plays a role for the distribution of lung blood flow in upright humans, and that the influence of posture, and thereby gravity, is much greater in the upright and head-down posture than in horizontal postures. However, the results of the study demonstrate that lung structure is the main determinant of regional blood flow and gravity is a secondary contributor to the distribution of lung blood flow in the upright and head-down positions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using a dual-isotope quantitative SPECT method, we demonstrated that although a shift in posture redistributes blood flow in the direction of gravity, the results are also consistent with lung structure being a greater determinant of regional blood flow than gravity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use modern imaging methods to quantify the shift in regional lung blood flow in humans at a change between the upright and head-down postures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The design and implementation of virtual hand grasp behavior process in virtual assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cheng; FU Yi-li

    2010-01-01

    Virtual hand is an important medium for implementation of human-computer interaction in the process of virtual assembly.And the comparability between the action of virtual hand and real man-hand has always been regarded as one of the important criteria to judge whether the virtual environment has the property of immersion.On the basis of analyzing the relative position,posture,and motion behavior relationship between virtual hand and the object to be operated during virtual assembly,this paper proposed an implementation method of combining grasp index with collision detecting technology for identifying grasp action of virtual hand.The method is to identify grasp/quit using grasp index and to implement joint angle adjustment through simulation cyclic iteration and joint angle interpolation calculation.Although some traditional method identifying the grasp action on the basis of the shape of the object is operated,the simulation result getting from virtual environment created by EON STUDIO shows that it has good features of serviceability and fidelity to realize operation control of virtual hand.

  14. Posture-Dependent Human 3He Lung Imaging in an Open Access MRI System: Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, L L; Li, C -H; Rosen, M S; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2007-01-01

    The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive to orientation and posture, and debate continues as to the role of gravity and the surrounding anatomy in determining lung function and heterogeneity of perfusion and ventilation. However, study of these effects is difficult. The conventional high-field magnets used for most hyperpolarized 3He MRI of the human lung, and most other common radiological imaging modalities including PET and CT, restrict subjects to lying horizontally, minimizing most gravitational effects. In this paper, we briefly review the motivation for posture-dependent studies of human lung function, and present initial imaging results of human lungs in the supine and vertical body orientations using inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas and an open-access MRI instrument. The open geometry of this MRI system features a "walk-in" capability that permits subjects to be imaged in vertical and horizontal positions, and potentially allows for complete rotation of the orientation of the imaging su...

  15. Modeling of a seated human body exposed to vertical vibrations in various automotive postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cho-Chung; Chiang, Chi-Feng

    2008-04-01

    Although much research has been devoted to constructing specific models or to measuring the response characteristics of seated subjects, investigations on a mathematical human model on a seat with a backrest to evaluate vehicular riding comfort have not yet attracted the same level of attention. For the responses of a seated body to vertical vibrations, mathematical models of the mechanisms must be at least two-dimensional in the sagittal plane. In describing the motions of a seated body, two multibody models representative of the automotive postures found in the literature were investigated, one with and the other without a backrest support. Both models were modified to suitably represent the different automotive postures with and without backrest supports, and validated by various experimental data from the published literature pertaining to the same postural conditions. On the basis of the analytical study and the experimental validation, the fourteen-degrees-of-freedom model proposed in this research was found to be best fitted to the test results; therefore, this model is recommended for studying the biodynamic responses of a seated human body exposed to vertical vibrations in various automotive postures.

  16. The Contribution of Pre-impact Spine Posture on Human Body Model Response in Whole-body Side Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Donlon, John-Paul; Lessley, David J; Kim, Taewung; Park, Gwansik; Kent, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze independently the contribution of pre-impact spine posture on impact response by subjecting a finite element human body model (HBM) to whole-body, lateral impacts. Seven postured models were created from the original HBM: one matching the standard driving posture and six matching pre-impact posture measured for each of six subjects tested in previously published experiments. The same measurements as those obtained during the experiments were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation were established to compare the response of HBM to that of the cadavers. HBM responses showed good correlation with the subject response for the reaction forces, the rib strain (correlation score=0.8) and the overall kinematics. The pre-impact posture was found to greatly alter the reaction forces, deflections and the strain time histories mainly in terms of time delay. By modifying only the posture of HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments performed with cadavers with different anthropometries. The patterns observed in the responses of the postured HBM indicate that the inclination of the spine in the frontal plane plays a major role. The postured HBM sustained from 2 to 5 bone fractures, including the scapula in some cases, confirming that the pre-impact posture influences the injury outcome predicted by the simulation.

  17. Is "circling" behavior in humans related to postural asymmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Bestaven

    Full Text Available In attempting to walk rectilinearly in the absence of visual landmarks, persons will gradually turn in a circle to eventually become lost. The aim of the present study was to provide insights into the possible underlying mechanisms of this behavior. For each subject (N = 15 six trajectories were monitored during blindfolded walking in a large enclosed area to suppress external cues, and ground irregularities that may elicit unexpected changes in direction. There was a substantial variability from trial to trial for a given subject and between subjects who could either veer very early or relatively late. Of the total number of trials, 50% trajectories terminated on the left side, 39% on the right side and 11% were defined as "straight". For each subject, we established a "turning score" that reflected his/her preferential side of veering. The turning score was found to be unrelated to any evident biomechanical asymmetry or functional dominance (eye, hand.... Posturographic analysis, used to assess if there was a relationship between functional postural asymmetry and veering revealed that the mean position of the center of foot pressure during balance tests was correlated with the turning score. Finally, we established that the mean position of the center of pressure was correlated with perceived verticality assessed by a subjective verticality test. Together, our results suggest that veering is related to a "sense of straight ahead" that could be shaped by vestibular inputs.

  18. The role of haptic cues from rough and slippery surfaces in human postural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Haptic information is critically important in complex sensory-motor tasks such as manipulating objects. Its comparable importance in spatial orientation is only beginning to be recognized. We have shown that postural sway in humans is significantly reduced by lightly touching a stable surface with a fingertip at contact force levels far below those physically necessary to stabilize the body. To investigate further the functional relationship between contact forces at the hand and postural equilibrium, we had subjects stand in the tandem Romberg stance while being allowed physically supportive (force contact) and non-physically supportive (touch contact) amounts of index fingertip force on surfaces with different frictional characteristics. Mean sway amplitude (MSA) was reduced by over 50% with both touch and force contact of the fingertip, compared to standing without fingertip contact. No differences in MSA were observed when touching rough or slippery surfaces. The amplitude of EMG activity in the peroneal muscles and the timing relationships between fingertip forces, body sway and EMG activity suggested that with touch contact of the finger or with force contact on a slippery surface long-loop "reflexes" involving postural muscles were stabilizing sway. With force contact of the fingertip on a rough surface, MSA reduction was achieved primarily through physical support of the body. This pattern of results indicates that light touch contact cues from the fingertip in conjunction with proprioceptive signals about arm configuration are providing information about body sway that can be used to reduce MSA through postural muscle activation.

  19. The degrees of freedom problem in human standing posture: collective and component dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The experiment was setup to investigate the coordination and control of the degrees of freedom (DFs of human standing posture with particular reference to the identification of the collective and component variables. Subjects stood in 3 postural tasks: feet side by side, single left foot quiet stance and single left foot stance with body rocking at the ankle joint in the sagittal plane. All three postural tasks showed very high coherence (∼ 1 of center of pressure (COP--center of mass (COM in the low frequency range. The ankle and hip coherence was mid range (∼.5 with the tasks having different ankle/hip compensatory cophase patterns. The findings support the view that the in-phase relation of the low frequency components of the COP-COM dynamic is the collective variable in the postural tasks investigated. The motions of the individual joints (ankle, knee, hip, neck and couplings of pair wise joint synergies (e.g., ankle-hip provide a supporting cooperative role to the preservation of the collective variable in maintaining the COM within the stability region of the base of support (BOS and minimizing the amount of body motion consistent with the task constraint.

  20. Determining Underground Mining Work Postures Using Motion Capture and Digital Human Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Timothy J; DuCarme, Joseph P; Smith, Adam K; Ambrose, Dean

    2016-12-27

    According to Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) data, during 2008-2012 in the U.S., there were, on average, 65 lost-time accidents per year during routine mining and maintenance activities involving remote-controlled continuous mining machines (CMMs). To address this problem, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is currently investigating the implementation and integration of existing and emerging technologies in underground mines to provide automated, intelligent proximity detection (iPD) devices on CMMs. One research goal of NIOSH is to enhance the proximity detection system by improving its capability to track and determine identity, position, and posture of multiple workers, and to selectively disable machine functions to keep workers and machine operators safe. Posture of the miner can determine the safe working distance from a CMM by way of the variation in the proximity detection magnetic field. NIOSH collected and analyzed motion capture data and calculated joint angles of the back, hips, and knees from various postures on 12 human subjects. The results of the analysis suggests that lower body postures can be identified by observing the changes in joint angles of the right hip, left hip, right knee, and left knee.

  1. Grasping in Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Grasping in Robotics contains original contributions in the field of grasping in robotics with a broad multidisciplinary approach. This gives the possibility of addressing all the major issues related to robotized grasping, including milestones in grasping through the centuries, mechanical design issues, control issues, modelling achievements and issues, formulations and software for simulation purposes, sensors and vision integration, applications in industrial field and non-conventional applications (including service robotics and agriculture).   The contributors to this book are experts in their own diverse and wide ranging fields. This multidisciplinary approach can help make Grasping in Robotics of interest to a very wide audience. In particular, it can be a useful reference book for researchers, students and users in the wide field of grasping in robotics from many different disciplines including mechanical design, hardware design, control design, user interfaces, modelling, simulation, sensors and hum...

  2. GRASP: A multitasking tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRabouille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Vinke et al., 2011 (Giuliani et al., 2011;Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012, we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES. Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes.

  3. Fall prevention in the young old using an exoskeleton human body posturizer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrusio, W; Gianturco, V; Cacciafesta, M; Marigliano, V; Troisi, G; Ripani, M

    2017-04-01

    Fall risk in elderly has been related with physical decline, low quality of life and reduced survival. To evaluate the impact of exoskeleton human body posturizer (HBP) on the fall risk in the elderly. 150 subjects (mean age 64.85; 79 M/71 F) with mild fall risk were randomized into two groups: 75 for group treated with human body posturizer (HBP group) and 75 for physical training without HBP group (exercise group). The effects of interventions were assessed by differences in tests related to balance and falls. Medically eligible patients were screened with Tinetti balance and Gait evaluation scale, short physical performance battery and numeric pain rating scale to determine fall risk in elderly people. In the HBP group there was a significant improvement in short physical performance battery, Tinetti scale and Pain Numeric rating scale with a significant reduction in fall risk (p exoskeleton human body posturizer seems to be a new significant device for prevention of fall in elderly patients. Further research should be carried out to obtain more evidence on effects of robotic technology for fall prevention in the elderly.

  4. Low-cost human motion capture system for postural analysis onboard ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Erica; Ackermann, Sebastiano; Del Pizzo, Silvio; Menna, Fabio; Troisi, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    The study of human equilibrium, also known as postural stability, concerns different research sectors (medicine, kinesiology, biomechanics, robotics, sport) and is usually performed employing motion analysis techniques for recording human movements and posture. A wide range of techniques and methodologies has been developed, but the choice of instrumentations and sensors depends on the requirement of the specific application. Postural stability is a topic of great interest for the maritime community, since ship motions can make demanding and difficult the maintenance of the upright stance with hazardous consequences for the safety of people onboard. The need of capturing the motion of an individual standing on a ship during its daily service does not permit to employ optical systems commonly used for human motion analysis. These sensors are not designed for operating in disadvantageous environmental conditions (water, wetness, saltiness) and with not optimal lighting. The solution proposed in this study consists in a motion acquisition system that could be easily usable onboard ships. It makes use of two different methodologies: (I) motion capture with videogrammetry and (II) motion measurement with Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The developed image-based motion capture system, made up of three low-cost, light and compact video cameras, was validated against a commercial optical system and then used for testing the reliability of the inertial sensors. In this paper, the whole process of planning, designing, calibrating, and assessing the accuracy of the motion capture system is reported and discussed. Results from the laboratory tests and preliminary campaigns in the field are presented.

  5. A Review on Level of Specific Absorption Rate Due to High Power Transmission Lines: Analysis toward Human Position Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazali Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this project is the development of a homogeneous model of a man to presents the specific absorption rate (SAR due to high power transmission line. As a low frequency application under high power transmission line of 50 Hz in electrical engineering, to studies the influence of human’s posture on specific absorption rate. This project designs two types of human body which one design uses most cylinder block and another design use brick block where both blocks have a different value of mesh cells. For each design has four types of posture are standing, sitting, arms up and arms out by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST Studio Software. This analysis does toward for four types of the human position postures because each posture has different value of specific absorption rate (SAR based on the size of the mesh cells of the design. Based on two designs of the human body, the lowest of the mesh cells value will reduce time to simulate SAR. For each posture has different value of SAR for each part of the human body because the whole human body has different types of tissues. Therefore, the CST studio software uses extremely to simulate the SAR value toward human position posture due to high power transmission line.

  6. Study of the human postural control system during quiet standing using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa Blázquez, M.; Anguiano, Marta; de Saavedra, Fernando Arias; Lallena, Antonio M.; Carpena, Pedro

    2009-05-01

    The detrended fluctuation analysis is used to study the behavior of different time series obtained from the trajectory of the center of pressure, the output of the activity of the human postural control system. The results suggest that these trajectories present two different regimes in their scaling properties: persistent (for high frequencies, short-range time scale) to antipersistent (for low frequencies, long-range time scale) behaviors. The similitude between the results obtained for the measurements, done with both eyes open and eyes closed, indicate either that the visual system may be disregarded by the postural control system while maintaining the quiet standing, or that the control mechanisms associated with each type of information (visual, vestibular and somatosensory) cannot be disentangled with the type of analysis performed here.

  7. Age-related changes in human posture control: Sensory organization tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1989-01-01

    Postural control was measured in 214 human subjects ranging in age from 7 to 81 years. Sensory organization tests measured the magnitude of anterior-posterior body sway during six 21 s trials in which visual and somatosensory orientation cues were altered (by rotating the visual surround and support surface in proportion to the subject's sway) or vision eliminated (eyes closed) in various combinations. No age-related increase in postural sway was found for subjects standing on a fixed support surface with eyes open or closed. However, age-related increases in sway were found for conditions involving altered visual or somatosensory cues. Subjects older than about 55 years showed the largest sway increases. Subjects younger than about 15 years were also sensitive to alteration of sensory cues. On average, the older subjects were more affected by altered visual cues whereas younger subjects had more difficulty with altered somatosensory cues.

  8. Wearable human body joint and posture measuring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunias, P.; Gransier, R.; Jin, A.; Statham, A.; Willems, P.

    2011-01-01

    In many medical applications, especially the orthopaedic setting, ambulatory, monitoring of human joint angles could be of substantial value to improving rehabilitation strategies and unravelling the pathomechanics of many degenerative joint diseases (e.g. knee osteoarthritis). With the ageing of th

  9. Age-related differences in postural control in humans in response to a sudden deceleration generated by postural disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Hirakawa, K; Takada, Y; Kinoshita, H

    2001-07-01

    Age-related differences in postural control in response to a relatively large deceleration resulting from postural disturbance were investigated in eight normal elderly men (age range 67-72 years) and eight young men as controls (age range 19-22 years) using a moving platform. Data were obtained for the hip, knee and ankle angles, position of the centre of foot pressure (CFP), head acceleration, and muscle activity of the leg muscles. The elderly subjects had slower and larger ankle and hip joint movements, and CFP displacement in response to the disturbance compared to the young controls. The elderly subjects also had a delayed occurrence, and greater magnitude of peak acceleration of head rotation than did the young subjects. For the elderly subjects, the CFP was closely related to angular changes in the hip joint movement, but not to those of the ankle and knee joint movements. For the young subjects, on the other hand, the CFP was significantly correlated with angular change in the ankle joint. Cocontraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles was observed in the elderly subjects. The results indicated that a movement pattern for postural correction in the elderly adults was different from that of the young adults. The elderly relied more on hip movements while the young controls relied on ankle movements to control postural stability.

  10. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition for Human-Robot Interaction Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Belmonte, Uriel Haile; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2016-01-04

    In this work, we present a multiclass hand posture classifier useful for human-robot interaction tasks. The proposed system is based exclusively on visual sensors, and it achieves a real-time performance, whilst detecting and recognizing an alphabet of four hand postures. The proposed approach is based on the real-time deformable detector, a boosting trained classifier. We describe a methodology to design the ensemble of real-time deformable detectors (one for each hand posture that can be classified). Given the lack of standard procedures for performance evaluation, we also propose the use of full image evaluation for this purpose. Such an evaluation methodology provides us with a more realistic estimation of the performance of the method. We have measured the performance of the proposed system and compared it to the one obtained by using only the sampled window approach. We present detailed results of such tests using a benchmark dataset. Our results show that the system can operate in real time at about a 10-fps frame rate.

  11. Physics-based Simulation of Human Posture Using 3D Whole Body Scanning Technology for Astronaut Space Suit Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years high precision three-dimensional (3D) full body laser scanners have been developed to be used as a powerful anthropometry tool for quantification of the morphology of the human body. The full body scanner can quickly extract body characteristics in non-contact fashion. It is required for the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to have capabilities for kinematics simulation of a digital human at various postures whereas the laser scanner only allows capturing a single static posture at each time. During this summer fellowship period a theoretical study has been conducted to estimate an arbitrary posture with a series of example postures through finite element (FE) approximation and found that four-point isoparametric FE approximation would result in reasonable maximum position errors less than 5%. Subsequent pilot scan experiments demonstrated that a bead marker with a nominal size of 6 mm could be used as a marker for digitizing 3-D coordinates of anatomical landmarks for further kinematic analysis. Two sessions of human subject testing were conducted for reconstruction of an arbitrary postures from a set of example postures for each joint motion for the forearm/hand complex and the whole upper extremity.

  12. An optimal state estimation model of sensory integration in human postural balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Arthur D.

    2005-09-01

    We propose a model for human postural balance, combining state feedback control with optimal state estimation. State estimation uses an internal model of body and sensor dynamics to process sensor information and determine body orientation. Three sensory modalities are modeled: joint proprioception, vestibular organs in the inner ear, and vision. These are mated with a two degree-of-freedom model of body dynamics in the sagittal plane. Linear quadratic optimal control is used to design state feedback and estimation gains. Nine free parameters define the control objective and the signal-to-noise ratios of the sensors. The model predicts statistical properties of human sway in terms of covariance of ankle and hip motion. These predictions are compared with normal human responses to alterations in sensory conditions. With a single parameter set, the model successfully reproduces the general nature of postural motion as a function of sensory environment. Parameter variations reveal that the model is highly robust under normal sensory conditions, but not when two or more sensors are inaccurate. This behavior is similar to that of normal human subjects. We propose that age-related sensory changes may be modeled with decreased signal-to-noise ratios, and compare the model's behavior with degraded sensors against experimental measurements from older adults. We also examine removal of the model's vestibular sense, which leads to instability similar to that observed in bilateral vestibular loss subjects. The model may be useful for predicting which sensors are most critical for balance, and how much they can deteriorate before posture becomes unstable.

  13. Hemodynamic Response of the Supplementary Motor Area during Locomotor Tasks with Upright versus Horizontal Postures in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arito Yozu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand cortical mechanisms related to truncal posture control during human locomotion, we investigated hemodynamic responses in the supplementary motor area (SMA with quadrupedal and bipedal gaits using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in 10 healthy adults. The subjects performed three locomotor tasks where the degree of postural instability varied biomechanically, namely, hand-knee quadrupedal crawling (HKQuad task, upright quadrupedalism using bilateral Lofstrand crutches (UpQuad task, and typical upright bipedalism (UpBi task, on a treadmill. We measured the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb during the tasks. The oxy-Hb significantly decreased in the SMA during the HKQuad task, whereas it increased during the UpQuad task. No significant responses were observed during the UpBi task. Based on the degree of oxy-Hb responses, we ranked these locomotor tasks as UpQuad > UpBi > HKQuad. The order of the different tasks did not correspond with postural instability of the tasks. However, qualitative inspection of oxy-Hb time courses showed that oxy-Hb waveform patterns differed between upright posture tasks (peak-plateau-trough pattern for the UpQuad and UpBi tasks and horizontal posture task (downhill pattern for the HKQuad task. Thus, the SMA may contribute to the control of truncal posture accompanying locomotor movements in humans.

  14. Reach–to-grasp movements in macaca fascicularis monkeys: the Isochrony Principle at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa eSartori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans show a spontaneous tendency to increase the velocity of their movements depending on the linear extent of their trajectory in order to keep execution time approximately constant. Termed the isochrony principle, this compensatory mechanism refers to the observation that the velocity of voluntary movements increases proportionally with their linear extension. Although there is a wealth of psychophysical data regarding isochrony in humans, there is none regarding non-human primates. The present study attempts to fill that gap by investigating reach-to-grasp movement kinematics in free-ranging macaques. Video footage of monkeys grasping objects located at different distances was analyzed frame-by-frame using digitalization techniques. The amplitude of arm peak velocity was found to be correlated with the distance to be covered, and total movement duration remained invariant although target distances varied. Like in humans, the ‘isochrony principle’ seems to be operative as there is a gearing down/up of movement velocity that is proportional to the distance to be covered in order to allow for a relatively constant movement duration. Based on a centrally generated temporal template, this mode of motor programming could be functional in macaques given the high speed and great instability of posture and joint kinematics characterizing their actions. The data presented here take research in the field of comparative motor control a step forward as they are based on precise measurements of spontaneous grasping movements by animals living/acting in their natural environment.

  15. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  16. Evolution of human posture and bipedal locomotion within a provisional time frame of harsh climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbel, Sven; Rapan, Saša

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper several emerging issues related to development of human posture and locomotion are arranged in a provisional time frame. Accumulated evidences show that the Eurasian climate was often cold and arid with abundant dust in the atmosphere during the last 500 Ky. These dusty periods of cold, aridity and low insolation lasted from 360 to 340 Kya, 270 to 255 Kya, 170 to 130 Kya, 80 to 60 and finally 40 to 10 Kya. They coincide with migrations of Neanderthals a...

  17. Simulation results of the grasping analysis of an underactuated finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niola Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a number of simulations concerning the grasping analysis is presented. The grasping device consist in an under-actuated finger driven by un-extendible tendon that is one of the fingers of a mechanical prosthesis that was principally conceived as human prosthesis. The results, however, are useful for any similar finger to be used in grasping devices for industrial and agricultural applications, Aanalysis maps of the grasping were obtained which show the “robustness” of the socket. The method seems to be a suitable tool for the optimum design of such under-actuated fingers for grasping devices.

  18. Interlimb Transfer of Grasp Orientation is Asymmetrical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Frak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One the most fundamental aspects of the human motor system is the hemispheric asymmetry seen in behavioral specialization. Hemispheric dominance can be inferred by a contralateral hand preference in grasping. Few studies have considered grasp orientation in the context of manual lateralization and none has looked at grasp orientation with natural prehension. Thirty right-handed adults performed precision grasps of a cylinder using the thumb and index fingers, and the opposition axis (OA was defined as the line connecting these two contact points on the cylinder. Subjects made ten consecutive grasps with one hand (primary hand movements followed by ten grasps with the other hand (trailing movements. Differences between primary and trailing grasps revealed that each hemisphere is capable of programming the orientation of the OA and that primary movements with the right hand significantly influenced OA orientation of the trailing left hand. These results extend the hemispheric dominance of the left hemisphere to the final positions of fingers during prehension.

  19. Human Posture Recognition Based on Images Captured by the Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-June Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we combine several image processing techniques with the depth images captured by a Kinect sensor to successfully recognize the five distinct human postures of sitting, standing, stooping, kneeling, and lying. The proposed recognition procedure first uses background subtraction on the depth image to extract a silhouette contour of a human. Then, a horizontal projection of the silhouette contour is employed to ascertain whether or not the human is kneeling. If the figure is not kneeling, the star skeleton technique is applied to the silhouette contour to obtain its feature points. We can then use the feature points together with the centre of gravity to calculate the feature vectors and depth values of the body. Next, we input the feature vectors and the depth values into a pre-trained LVQ (learning vector quantization neural network; the outputs of this will determine the postures of sitting (or standing, stooping, and lying. Lastly, if an output indicates sitting or standing, one further, similar feature identification technique is needed to confirm this output. Based on the results of many experiments, using the proposed method, the rate of successful recognition is higher than 97% in the test data, even though the subjects of the experiments may not have been facing the Kinect sensor and may have had different statures. The proposed method can be called a “hybrid recognition method”, as many techniques are combined in order to achieve a very high recognition rate paired with a very short processing time.

  20. Grasp Densities for Grasp Refinement in Industrial Bin Picking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupfauf, Benedikt; Hahn, Heiko; Bodenhagen, Leon

    in terms of object-relative gripper pose, can be learned from empirical experience, and allow the automatic choice of optimal grasps in a given scene context (object pose, workspace constraints, etc.). We will show grasp densities extracted from empirical data in a real industrial bin picking context...... generated in industrial bin-picking for grasp learning. This aim is achieved by using the novel concept of grasp densities (Detry et al., 2010). Grasp densities can describe the full variety of grasps that apply to specific objects using specific grippers. They represent the likelihood of grasp success...

  1. Grasp Densities for Grasp Refinement in Industrial Bin Picking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupfauf, Benedikt; Hahn, Heiko; Bodenhagen, Leon

    Automatic picking of randomly distributed objects from a bin has been denoted the "Holy Grail" in the world of robot automation. A particular property of the bin-picking scenario (in contrast to most other industrial robot applications) is that grasp errors are allowed to occur: Usually bin...... generated in industrial bin-picking for grasp learning. This aim is achieved by using the novel concept of grasp densities (Detry et al., 2010). Grasp densities can describe the full variety of grasps that apply to specific objects using specific grippers. They represent the likelihood of grasp success...... in terms of object-relative gripper pose, can be learned from empirical experience, and allow the automatic choice of optimal grasps in a given scene context (object pose, workspace constraints, etc.). We will show grasp densities extracted from empirical data in a real industrial bin picking context...

  2. An impedance grasping strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz Arias, Mauricio; Scherpen, Jacqueline M.A.; Macchelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to an impedance grasping strategy for a class of standard mechanical systems in the port- Hamiltonian framework. The presented control strategy re- quires a set of coordinate transformations, since the impedance control in the port-Hamiltonian framework with structure preservati

  3. Using frequency analysis to improve the precision of human body posture algorithms based on Kalman filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Alberto; Górriz, J M; Ramírez, J; Olivares, G

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of miniaturized inertial sensors many systems have been developed within the last decade to study and analyze human motion and posture, specially in the medical field. Data measured by the sensors are usually processed by algorithms based on Kalman Filters in order to estimate the orientation of the body parts under study. These filters traditionally include fixed parameters, such as the process and observation noise variances, whose value has large influence in the overall performance. It has been demonstrated that the optimal value of these parameters differs considerably for different motion intensities. Therefore, in this work, we show that, by applying frequency analysis to determine motion intensity, and varying the formerly fixed parameters accordingly, the overall precision of orientation estimation algorithms can be improved, therefore providing physicians with reliable objective data they can use in their daily practice.

  4. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  5. Dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Kujala, Jan; Carlson, Synnöve; Hari, Riitta

    2012-01-01

    We read conspecifics' social cues effortlessly, but little is known about our abilities to understand social gestures of other species. To investigate the neural underpinnings of such skills, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the brain activity of experts and non-experts of dog behavior while they observed humans or dogs either interacting with, or facing away from a conspecific. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) of both subject groups dissociated humans facing toward each other from humans facing away, and in dog experts, a distinction also occurred for dogs facing toward vs. away in a bilateral area extending from the pSTS to the inferior temporo-occipital cortex: the dissociation of dog behavior was significantly stronger in expert than control group. Furthermore, the control group had stronger pSTS responses to humans than dogs facing toward a conspecific, whereas in dog experts, the responses were of similar magnitude. These findings suggest that dog experts' brains distinguish socially relevant body postures similarly in dogs and humans.

  6. Optimal prediction of human postural response under anterior-posterior platform tilting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, D.; Miripour Fard, B.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that human beings movements can be related to the problem of cost function minimization. But at the present time it is not clear that which objective function(s) and constraints are used by central nervous system (CNS) to produce optimal reactions under perturbations. Present study has been done experimentally and by numerical simulations to explore the stability constraints which should be used in combination with energy based cost function (weighted minimum torque) to estimate the motor planning criterion is used by CNS for disturbance rejections. The influence of three stability criterions (ZMP, extrapolated center of mass and a vertical force criterion) in combination with minimum torque model on the optimal trajectory formation is investigated. First, the response of 10 male healthy persons to platform oscillation was recorded by motion analysis system and the hip, knee and ankle angular trajectories were derived from recorded data. Second, the dynamic simulation of a four-segment, three actuated degrees of freedom mechanical model of the human body was performed using predictive dynamic method which leads to an optimization problem. The simulated trajectories were then compared to the experimental data. With comparison between experimental results, the weighting coefficients of the objective function were found to achieve best estimation. It was seen that the minimum torque objective function with weighting coefficients gives trajectories that are mostly matched with experimental observation. Moreover, the results showed that between stability criterions, the ZMP predictions are near to experimental results. Although by using vertical force criterion some nearness to experimental results are lost (in comparison with ZMP criterion) but a secured flat-foot posture for the model is obtained which this posture is more applicable than others in humanoid implementations.

  7. Stability Analysis of Grasps with a Robotic Multifingered Hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN An-hua

    2005-01-01

    Stability is a significant property for a robot hand grasp to perform complex tasks similar to human hands. The common method to investigate the stability of robotic multi-fingered grasp system is Lyapunov direct method, but usually it is rather difficult to construct a proper Lyapunov function. Avoiding the hard work of constructing a Lyapunov function, we propose the sufficient conditions for stability of the robotic grasp system.

  8. Neck posture and muscle activity are different when upside down: a human volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Robyn S; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Street, John; Cripton, Peter A; Siegmund, Gunter P

    2013-11-15

    Rollover crashes are dynamic and complex events in which head impacts with the roof can cause catastrophic neck injuries. Ex vivo and computational models are valuable in understanding, and ultimately preventing, these injuries. Although neck posture and muscle activity influence the resulting injury, there is currently no in vivo data describing these parameters immediately prior to a head-first impact. The specific objectives of this study were to determine the in vivo neck vertebral alignment and muscle activation levels when upside down, a condition that occurs during a rollover. Eleven human subjects (6F, 5M) were tested while seated upright and inverted in a custom-built apparatus. Vertebral alignment was measured using fluoroscopy and muscle activity was recorded using surface and indwelling electrodes in eight superficial and deep neck muscles. In vivo vertebral alignment and muscle activation levels differed between the upright and inverted conditions. When inverted and relaxed, the neck was more lordotic, C1 was aligned posterior to C7, the Frankfort plane was extended, and the activity of six muscles increased compared to upright and relaxed. When inverted subjects were asked to look forward to eliminate head extension, flexor muscle activity increased, C7 was more flexed, and C1 was aligned anterior to C7 versus upright and relaxed. Combined with the large inter-subject variability observed, these findings indicate that cadaveric or computational models designed to study injuries and prevention devices while inverted need to consider a variety of postures and muscle conditions to be relevant to the in vivo situation.

  9. Cervical Spine Muscle-Tendon Unit Length Differences Between Neutral and Forward Head Postures: Biomechanical Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatzadeh, Saeed; Kalmanson, Olivia A; Schuit, Dale; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Leonard I; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2017-07-01

    Forward head posture (FHP) may be associated with neck pain and poor health-related quality of life. Literature describes only qualitative muscle length changes associated with FHP. The purpose of this study was to quantify how muscle-tendon unit lengths are altered when human cadaveric specimens are placed in alignments representing different severities of FHP. This biomechanical study used 13 fresh-frozen cadaveric cervical spine specimens (Occiput-T1, 54±15 y). Specimens' postural changes simulating increasing FHP severity while maintaining horizontal gaze were assessed. Specimen-specific anatomic models derived from computed tomography-based anatomic data were combined with postural data and specimen-specific anatomy of muscle attachment points to estimate the muscle length changes associated with FHP. Forward head posture was associated with flexion of the mid-lower cervical spine and extension of the upper cervical (sub-occipital) spine. Muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as flexors (termed "cervical flexors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as extensors ("occipital extensors") shortened in FHP when compared to neutral posture. In contrast, muscles that insert on the cervical spine and function as extensors ("cervical extensors") as well as muscles that insert on the cranium and function as flexors ("occipital flexors") lengthened. The greatest shortening was seen in the major and minor rectus capitis posterior muscles. These muscles cross the Occiput-C2 segments, which exhibited extension to maintain horizontal gaze. The greatest lengthening was seen in posterior muscles crossing the C4-C6 segments, which exhibited the most flexion. This cadaver study did not incorporate the biomechanical influence of active musculature. This study offers a novel way to quantify postural alignment and muscle length changes associated with FHP. Model predictions are consistent with qualitative descriptions in the literature.

  10. Video Analysis of Human Gait and Posture to Determine Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the application of digital image processing techniques to the detection of neurological disorder. Visual information extracted from the postures and movements of a human gait cycle can be used by an experienced neurologist to determine the mental health of the person. However, the current visual assessment of diagnosing neurological disorder is based very much on subjective observation, and hence the accuracy of diagnosis heavily relies on experience. Other diagnostic techniques employed involve the use of imaging systems which can only be operated under highly constructed environment. A prototype has been developed in this work that is able to capture the subject's gait on video in a relatively simple setup, and from which to process the selected frames of the gait in a computer. Based on the static visual features such as swing distances and joint angles of human limbs, the system identifies patients with Parkinsonism from the test subjects. To our knowledge, it is the first time swing distances are utilized and identified as an effective means for characterizing human gait. The experimental results have shown a promising potential in medical application to assist the clinicians in diagnosing Parkinsonism.

  11. Grasping preparation enhances orientation change detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjerk P Gutteling

    Full Text Available Preparing a goal directed movement often requires detailed analysis of our environment. When picking up an object, its orientation, size and relative distance are relevant parameters when preparing a successful grasp. It would therefore be beneficial if the motor system is able to influence early perception such that information processing needs for action control are met at the earliest possible stage. However, only a few studies reported (indirect evidence for action-induced visual perception improvements. We therefore aimed to provide direct evidence for a feature-specific perceptual modulation during the planning phase of a grasping action. Human subjects were instructed to either grasp or point to a bar while simultaneously performing an orientation discrimination task. The bar could slightly change its orientation during grasping preparation. By analyzing discrimination response probabilities, we found increased perceptual sensitivity to orientation changes when subjects were instructed to grasp the bar, rather than point to it. As a control experiment, the same experiment was repeated using bar luminance changes, a feature that is not relevant for either grasping or pointing. Here, no differences in visual sensitivity between grasping and pointing were found. The present results constitute first direct evidence for increased perceptual sensitivity to a visual feature that is relevant for a certain skeletomotor act during the movement preparation phase. We speculate that such action-induced perception improvements are controlled by neuronal feedback mechanisms from cortical motor planning areas to early visual cortex, similar to what was recently established for spatial perception improvements shortly before eye movements.

  12. Neurophysiology of Grasping Actions: Evidence from ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Westerholz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We use our hands very frequently to interact with our environment. Neuropsychology together with lesion models and intracranial recordings and imaging work yielded important insights into the functional neuroanatomical correlates of grasping, one important function of our hands, pointing toward a functional parietofrontal brain network. Event-related potentials (ERPs) register directly electrical brain activity and are endowed with high temporal resolution but have long been assumed to be susceptible to movement artifacts. Recent work has shown that reliable ERPs can be obtained during movement execution. Here, we review the available ERP work on (uni) manual grasping actions. We discuss various ERP components and how they may be related to functional components of grasping according to traditional distinctions of manual actions such as planning and control phases. The ERP results are largely in line with the assumption of a parietofrontal network. But other questions remain, in particular regarding the temporal succession of frontal and parietal ERP effects. With the low number of ERP studies on grasping, not all ERP effects appear to be coherent with one another. Understanding the control of our hands may help to develop further neurocognitive theories of grasping and to make progress in prosthetics, rehabilitation or development of technical systems for support of human actions. PMID:28066310

  13. An Underactuated Multi-finger Grasping Device

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    Cesare Rossi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a mechanical model for an underactuated multi-finger grasping device is presented. The device has single-tendon, three-phalanx fingers, all moved by only one actuator. By means of the model, both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour of the finger itself can be studied. The finger is part of a more complex mechanical system that consists of a four-finger grasping device for robots or a five-finger human hand prosthesis. Some results of both the kinematic and dynamical behaviour are also presented.

  14. Measurement and Geometric Modelling of Human Spine Posture for Medical Rehabilitation Purposes Using a Wearable Monitoring System Based on Inertial Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Gheorghe-Daniel; Butnariu, Silviu; Mogan, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model that can be used to virtually reconstruct the posture of the human spine. By using orientation angles from a wearable monitoring system based on inertial sensors, the model calculates and represents the curvature of the spine. Several hypotheses are taken into consideration to increase the model precision. An estimation of the postures that can be calculated is also presented. A non-invasive solution to identify the human back shape can help reducing the time needed for medical rehabilitation sessions. Moreover, it prevents future problems caused by poor posture. PMID:28025480

  15. Measurement and Geometric Modelling of Human Spine Posture for Medical Rehabilitation Purposes Using a Wearable Monitoring System Based on Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Daniel Voinea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model that can be used to virtually reconstruct the posture of the human spine. By using orientation angles from a wearable monitoring system based on inertial sensors, the model calculates and represents the curvature of the spine. Several hypotheses are taken into consideration to increase the model precision. An estimation of the postures that can be calculated is also presented. A non-invasive solution to identify the human back shape can help reducing the time needed for medical rehabilitation sessions. Moreover, it prevents future problems caused by poor posture.

  16. Contribution of the posterior parietal cortex in reaching, grasping, and using objects and tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eVingerhoets

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological and neuroimaging data suggest a differential contribution of posterior parietal regions during the different components of a transitive gesture. Reaching requires the integration of object location and body position coordinates and reaching tasks elicit bilateral activation in different foci along the intraparietal sulcus. Grasping requires a visuomotor match between the object’s shape and the hand’s posture. Lesion studies and neuroimaging confirm the importance of the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus for human grasping. Reaching and grasping reveal bilateral activation that is generally more prominent on the side contralateral to the hand used or the hemifield stimulated. Purposeful behavior with objects and tools can be assessed in a variety of ways, including actual use, pantomimed use, and pure imagery of manipulation. All tasks have been shown to elicit robust activation over the left parietal cortex in neuroimaging, but lesion studies have not always confirmed these findings. Compared to pantomimed or imagined gestures, actual object and tool use typically produces activation over the left primary somatosensory region. Neuroimaging studies on pantomiming or imagery of tool use in healthy volunteers revealed neural responses in possibly separate foci in the left supramarginal gyrus. In sum, the parietal contribution of reaching and grasping of objects seems to depend on a bilateral network of intraparietal foci that appear organized along gradients of sensory and effector preferences. Dorsal and medial parietal cortex appears to contribute to the online monitoring/adjusting of the ongoing prehensile action, whereas the functional use of objects and tools seems to involve the inferior lateral parietal cortex. This functional input reveals a clear left lateralized activation pattern that may be tuned to the integration of acquired knowledge in the planning and guidance of the transitive movement.

  17. Contribution of the posterior parietal cortex in reaching, grasping, and using objects and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoets, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging data suggest a differential contribution of posterior parietal regions during the different components of a transitive gesture. Reaching requires the integration of object location and body position coordinates and reaching tasks elicit bilateral activation in different foci along the intraparietal sulcus. Grasping requires a visuomotor match between the object's shape and the hand's posture. Lesion studies and neuroimaging confirm the importance of the anterior part of the intraparietal sulcus for human grasping. Reaching and grasping reveal bilateral activation that is generally more prominent on the side contralateral to the hand used or the hemifield stimulated. Purposeful behavior with objects and tools can be assessed in a variety of ways, including actual use, pantomimed use, and pure imagery of manipulation. All tasks have been shown to elicit robust activation over the left parietal cortex in neuroimaging, but lesion studies have not always confirmed these findings. Compared to pantomimed or imagined gestures, actual object and tool use typically produces activation over the left primary somatosensory region. Neuroimaging studies on pantomiming or imagery of tool use in healthy volunteers revealed neural responses in possibly separate foci in the left supramarginal gyrus. In sum, the parietal contribution of reaching and grasping of objects seems to depend on a bilateral network of intraparietal foci that appear organized along gradients of sensory and effector preferences. Dorsal and medial parietal cortex appears to contribute to the online monitoring/adjusting of the ongoing prehensile action, whereas the functional use of objects and tools seems to involve the inferior lateral parietal cortex. This functional input reveals a clear left lateralized activation pattern that may be tuned to the integration of acquired knowledge in the planning and guidance of the transitive movement.

  18. Typical and atypical development of reaching and postural control in infancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2013-01-01

    Successful reaching requires postural control, either by active regulation or by postural support. The present paper reviews literature on typical and atypical development of reaching and postural control during infancy. Typically, reaching movements end in grasping around 4 months of age. Initially

  19. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  20. EMG analysis of human postural responses during parabolic flight microgravity episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1990-01-01

    Anticipatory postural activity in the trunk and legs precedes rapid shoulder flexion in unit gravity. The hypothesis that anticipatory activity is a component of a single neural command for arm movement was tested by monitoring the surface electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris, paraspinals, and deltoid muscles of three subjects during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight. If part of a single command, anticipatory postural activity would be expected to remain intact despite the absence of the body's center of gravity in a reduced gravity environment. However, in at least 75 percent of the microgravity trials anticipatory biceps femoris activity was absent, indicating a separation of postural and agonist muscle activity. Such a finding suggests that anticipatory postural biceps femoris activity may be initiated independently of agonist (deltoid) activity.

  1. Golgi GRASPs: moonlighting membrane tethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvela T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Jarvela, Adam D LinstedtDepartment of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The identification of mammalian Golgi reassembly stacking proteins (GRASPs 15 years ago was followed by experiments implicating them in diverse functions, including two differing structural roles in Golgi biogenesis and at least two distinct roles in the secretion of proteins. GRASP55 and GRASP65 are localized to cis and medial/trans Golgi cisternae, respectively. They are both required for stacking of Golgi membranes in a Golgi reassembly assay. Depletion of either GRASP from cultured cells prevents the linking of Golgi membranes into their normal ribbon-like network. While GRASPs are not required for transport of secretory cargo per se, they are required for ER-to-Golgi transport of certain specific cargo, such as those containing a C-terminal valine motif. Surprisingly, GRASPs also promote secretion of cargo by the so-called unconventional secretory pathway, which bypasses the Golgi apparatus where the GRASPs reside. Furthermore, regulation of GRASP activity is now recognized for its connections to cell cycle control, development, and disease. Underlying these diverse activities is the structurally conserved N-terminal GRASP domain whose crystal structure was recently determined. It consists of a tandem array of atypical PSD95–DlgA–Zo–1 (PDZ domains, which are well-known protein–protein interaction motifs. The GRASP PDZ domains are used to localize the proteins to the Golgi as well as GRASP-mediated membrane tethering and cargo interactions. These activities are regulated, in part, by phosphorylation of the large unstructured C-terminal domain.Keywords: GRASP, review, membrane, tether, PDZ domain, secretory chaperone, unconventional secretion

  2. Human postural sway results from frequent, ballistic bias impulses by soleus and gastrocnemius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, Ian D; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Lakie, Martin

    2005-04-01

    It has been widely assumed for nearly a century, that postural muscles operate in a spring-like manner and that muscle length signals joint angle (the mechano-reflex mechanism). Here we employ automated analysis of ultrasound images to resolve calf muscle (soleus and gastrocnemius) length changes as small as 10 mum in standing subjects. Previously, we have used balancing of a real inverted pendulum to make predictions about human standing. Here we test and confirm these predictions on 10 subjects standing quietly. We show that on average the calf muscles are actively adjusted 2.6 times per second and 2.8 times per unidirectional sway of the body centre of mass (CoM). These alternating, small (30-300 microm) movements provide impulsive, ballistic regulation of CoM movement. The timing and pattern of these adjustments are consistent with multisensory integration of all information regarding motion of the CoM, pattern recognition, prediction and planning using internal models and are not consistent with control solely by local reflexes. Because the system is unstable, errors in stabilization provide a perturbation which grows into a sway which has to be reacted to and corrected. Sagittal sway results from this impulsive control of calf muscle activity rather than internal sources (e.g. the heart, breathing). This process is quite unlike the mechano-reflex paradigm. We suggest that standing is a skilled, trial and error activity that improves with experience and is automated (possibly by the cerebellum). These results complement and extend our recent demonstration that paradoxical muscle movements are the norm in human standing.

  3. Grasps Recognition and Evaluation of Stroke Patients for Supporting Rehabilitation Therapy

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    Beatriz Leon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke survivors often suffer impairments on their wrist and hand. Robot-mediated rehabilitation techniques have been proposed as a way to enhance conventional therapy, based on intensive repeated movements. Amongst the set of activities of daily living, grasping is one of the most recurrent. Our aim is to incorporate the detection of grasps in the machine-mediated rehabilitation framework so that they can be incorporated into interactive therapeutic games. In this study, we developed and tested a method based on support vector machines for recognizing various grasp postures wearing a passive exoskeleton for hand and wrist rehabilitation after stroke. The experiment was conducted with ten healthy subjects and eight stroke patients performing the grasping gestures. The method was tested in terms of accuracy and robustness with respect to intersubjects’ variability and differences between different grasps. Our results show reliable recognition while also indicating that the recognition accuracy can be used to assess the patients’ ability to consistently repeat the gestures. Additionally, a grasp quality measure was proposed to measure the capabilities of the stroke patients to perform grasp postures in a similar way than healthy people. These two measures can be potentially used as complementary measures to other upper limb motion tests.

  4. Decoupling of stretch reflex and background muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Siddharth; Kearney, Robert E; Wagner, Ross; Stapley, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    We studied the evolution of stretch reflexes in relation to background electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle preceding the onset of voluntary arm raise movements. Our objective was to investigate if changes in reflex EMG and muscle activity occur simultaneously and are similarly scaled in amplitude. Ten human subjects stood with each foot on pedals able to exert short dorsiflexor pulses during stance. Subjects were asked to product consistent voluntary arm raise movements to a target upon a visual cue. In (1/4) of trials, no pulse perturbations were given, but in the remaining (3/4)'s of all trials pulses were given randomly during a 600-ms period, from 400 ms before until 200 ms after the onset of the movements. Perturbation trials were sorted into 20-ms bins post hoc, and the amplitude of the reflex EMG component was calculated and compared to the EMG activity obtained when no pulses were given. Results showed that despite exhibiting similar profiles over time, the background EMG consistently inhibited before the reflex EMG did. However, times of reactivation (rebound) were variable across subjects, with background EMG activating before reflex for some subjects and vice versa for others. The minimum values of inhibition, time of inhibition and time of rebound for background and reflex EMG measures did not show significant linear correlations when all subjects' data were considered. These results suggest that reflex and background EMG components of anticipatory postural adjustments evolve differently in time and amplitude. This has implications for the independent control of reflexes and voluntary muscle activity.

  5. Continuum robots and underactuated grasping

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    N. Giri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the capabilities of continuum (continuous backbone robot structures in the performance of under-actuated grasping. Continuum robots offer the potential of robust grasps over a wide variety of object classes, due to their ability to adapt their shape to interact with the environment via non-local continuum contact conditions. Furthermore, this capability can be achieved with simple, low degree of freedom hardware. However, there are practical issues which currently limit the application of continuum robots to grasping. We discuss these issues and illustrate via an experimental continuum grasping case study.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  6. Concatenation of observed grasp phases with observer's distal movements: a behavioural and TMS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa De Stefani

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at determining how actions executed by two conspecifics can be coordinated with each other, or more specifically, how the observation of different phases of a reaching-grasping action is temporary related to the execution of a movement of the observer. Participants observed postures of initial finger opening, maximal finger aperture, and final finger closing of grasp after observation of an initial hand posture. Then, they opened or closed their right thumb and index finger (experiments 1, 2 and 3. Response times decreased, whereas acceleration and velocity of actual finger movements increased when observing the two late phases of grasp. In addition, the results ruled out the possibility that this effect was due to salience of the visual stimulus when the hand was close to the target and confirmed an effect of even hand postures in addition to hand apparent motion due to the succession of initial hand posture and grasp phase. In experiments 4 and 5, the observation of grasp phases modulated even foot movements and pronunciation of syllables. Finally, in experiment 6, transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to primary motor cortex 300 ms post-stimulus induced an increase in hand motor evoked potentials of opponens pollicis muscle when observing the two late phases of grasp. These data suggest that the observation of grasp phases induced simulation which was stronger during observation of finger closing. This produced shorter response times, greater acceleration and velocity of the successive movement. In general, our data suggest best concatenation between two movements (one observed and the other executed when the observed (and simulated movement was to be accomplished. The mechanism joining the observation of a conspecific's action with our own movement may be precursor of social functions. It may be at the basis for interactions between conspecifics, and related to communication between individuals.

  7. Scaling-violation phenomena and fractality in the human posture control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thurner, S; Hanel, R; Ehrenberger, K

    2000-01-01

    By analyzing the movements of quiet standing persons by means of wavelet statistics, we observe multiple scaling regions in the underlying body dynamics. The use of the wavelet-variance function opens the possibility to relate scaling violations to different modes of posture control. We show that scaling behavior becomes close to perfect, when correctional movements are dominated by the vestibular system.

  8. Postural stability is altered by the stimulation of pain but not warm receptors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbeil Philippe

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now recognized that large diameter myelinated afferents provide the primary source of lower limb proprioceptive information for maintaining an upright standing position. Small diameter afferents transmitting noxious stimuli, however, can also influence motor behaviors. Despite the possible influence of pain on motor behaviors, the effects of pain on the postural control system have not been well documented. Methods Two cutaneous heat stimulations (experiment 1: non-noxious 40 degrees C; experiment 2: noxious 45 degrees C were applied bilaterally on the calves of the subject with two thermal grills to stimulate A delta and C warm receptors and nociceptors in order to examine their effects on postural stability. The non-noxious stimulation induced a gentle sensation of warmth and the noxious stimulation induced a perception of heat pain (visual analogue scores of 0 and 46 mm, respectively. For both experiments, ten healthy young adults were tested with and without heat stimulations of the lower limbs while standing upright on a force platform with eyes open, eyes closed and eyes closed with tendon co-vibration of tibialis anterior and triceps surae muscles. The center of pressure displacements were analyzed to examine how both stimulations affected the regulation of quiet standing and if the effects were exacerbated when vision was removed or ankle proprioception perturbed. Results The stimulation of the warm receptors (40 degrees C did not induce any postural deterioration. With pain (45 degrees C, subjects showed a significant increase in standard deviation, range and mean velocity of postural oscillations as well as standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity. The effects of heat pain were exacerbated when subjects had both their eyes closed and ankle tendons vibrated (increased standard deviation of the center of pressure velocity and mean velocity of the center of pressure. Conclusions A non

  9. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Thermal sensation during mild hyperthermia is modulated by acute postural change in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Ryosuke; Imai, Daiki; Suzuki, Akina; Ota, Akemi; Naghavi, Nooshin; Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Yokoyama, Hisayo; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Okazaki, Kazunobu

    2016-12-01

    Thermal sensation represents the primary stimulus for behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation. We assessed whether the sensation of skin and core temperatures for the driving force of behavioral thermoregulation was modified by postural change from the supine (Sup) to sitting (Sit) during mild hyperthermia. Seventeen healthy young men underwent measurements of noticeable increase and decrease (±0.1 °C/s) of skin temperature (thresholds of warm and cold sensation on the skin, 6.25 cm2 of area) at the forearm and chest and of the whole-body warm sensation in the Sup and Sit during normothermia (NT; esophageal temperature (Tes), ˜36.6 °C) and mild hyperthermia (HT; Tes, ˜37.2 °C; lower legs immersion in 42 °C of water). The threshold for cold sensation on the skin at chest was lower during HT than NT in the Sit ( P < 0.05) but not in Sup, and at the forearm was lower during HT than NT in the Sup and further in Sit (both, P < 0.05), with interactive effects of temperature (NT vs. HT) × posture (Sup vs. Sit) (chest, P = 0.08; forearm, P < 0.05). The threshold for warm sensation on the skin at both sites remained unchanged with changes in body posture or temperature. The whole-body warm sensation was higher during HT than NT in both postures and higher in the Sit than Sup during both NT and HT (all, P < 0.05). Thus, thermal sensation during mild hyperthermia is modulated by postural change from supine to sitting to sense lesser cold on the skin and more whole-body warmth.

  11. Factors influencing planning of a familiar grasp to an object: what it is to pick a cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounis, Elisabeth; Zhang, Zuo; Pizzamiglio, Gloria; Duta, Mihaela; Humphreys, Glyn

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the factors influencing the planning of actions required to manipulate one of two everyday objects with matching dimensions but openings at opposite ends: a cup and a vase. We found that, for cups, measures of movement preparation to reach and grasp the object were influenced by whether the grasp was made to the functional part of the object (wide opening) and whether the action would end in a supinated as opposed to a pronated grasp. These factors interacted such that effects of hand posture were found only when a less familiar grasp was made to the non-functional part of the cup (the base). These effects were not found with the vase, which has a less familiar location for grasping. We interpret the results in terms of a parallel model of action selection, modulated by both the familiarity of the grasp to a part of the object, likely to reflect object 'affordances' and the end state comfort of the action.

  12. A novel device for grasping assessment during functional tasks: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolinne Portela Rocha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology and first results obtained in a study with a novel device that allows the analysis of grasping quality. Such a device is able to acquire motion information of upper limbs allowing kinetic of manipulation analysis as well. A pilot experiment was carried out with six groups of typically developing children aged between 5 and 10 years old, with 7-8 children in each one. The device, designed to emulate a glass, has an optical system composed by one digital camera and a special convex mirror that together allow image acquisition of grasping hand posture when it is grasped and manipulated. It also carries an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that captures motion data as acceleration, orientation, and angular velocities. The novel instrumented object is used in our approach to evaluate functional tasks performance in quantitative terms. During tests each child was invited to grasp the cylindrical part of the device that was placed on the top of a table, simulating the task of drinking a glass of water. In the sequence the child was oriented to transport the device back to the starting position and release it. The task was repeated 3 times for each child. A grasping hand posture evaluation is presented as an example to evaluate grasping quality. Additionally, motion patterns obtained with the triasl performed with the different groups are presented and discussed. This device is attractive due to its portable characteristics, the small size and its ability to evaluate grasping form. The results may be also useful to analyze the evolution of the rehabilitation process through reach-to-grasping movement and the grasping images analysis.

  13. Postural stability is altered by the stimulation of pain but not warm receptors in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Corbeil Philippe; Blouin Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale Normand

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background It is now recognized that large diameter myelinated afferents provide the primary source of lower limb proprioceptive information for maintaining an upright standing position. Small diameter afferents transmitting noxious stimuli, however, can also influence motor behaviors. Despite the possible influence of pain on motor behaviors, the effects of pain on the postural control system have not been well documented. Methods Two cutaneous heat stimulations (experiment 1: non-n...

  14. Characterising postural sway fluctuations in humans using linear and nonlinear methods

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Postural control is a prerequisite to many everyday and sporting activities which requires the interaction of multiple sensorimotor processes. As long as we have no balance disorders, the maintenance of an erect standing position is taken for granted with automatic running control processes. It is well known that with increasing age or disease balance problems occur which often cause fall-related injuries. To assess balance performance, posturography is widely applied in which b...

  15. Study II: mechanoreceptive sensation is of increased importance for human postural control under alcohol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modig, F; Patel, M; Magnusson, M; Fransson, P A

    2012-03-01

    Standing postural stability relies on input from visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and mechanoreceptive sensors. When the information from any of these sensors is unavailable or disrupted, the central nervous system maintains postural stability by relying more on the contribution from the reliable sensors, termed sensory re-weighting. Alcohol intoxication is known to affect the integrity of the vestibular and visual systems. The aim was to assess how mechanoreceptive sensory information contributed to postural stability at 0.00% (i.e. sober), 0.06% and 0.10% blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in 25 healthy subjects (mean age 25.1 years). The subjects were assessed with eyes closed and eyes open under quiet standing and while standing was perturbed by repeated, random-length, vibratory stimulation of the calf muscles. Plantar cutaneous mechanoreceptive sensation was assessed for both receptor types: slowly adapting (tactile sensitivity) and rapidly adapting (vibration perception). The correlation between recorded torque variance and the sensation from both mechanoreceptor types was calculated. The recorded stability during alcohol intoxication was significantly influenced by both the tactile sensation and vibration perception of the subjects. Moreover, the study revealed a fluctuating association between the subjects' vibration perception and torque variance during balance perturbations, which was significantly influenced by the level of alcohol intoxication, vision and adaptation. Hence, one's ability to handle balance perturbations under the influence of alcohol is strongly dependent on accurate mechanoreceptive sensation and efficient sensory re-weighting.

  16. A pinned polymer model of posture control

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, C C; Chow, Carson C; Collins, J J

    1995-01-01

    A phenomenological model of human posture control is posited. The dynamics are modelled as an elastically pinned polymer under the influence of noise. The model accurately reproduces the two-point correlation functions of experimental posture data and makes predictions for the response function of the postural control system. The physiological and clinical significance of the model is discussed.

  17. Digital evaluation of sitting posture comfort in human-vehicle system under Industry 4.0 framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qing; Kang, Jinsheng; Sun, Wenlei; Li, Zhaobo; Huo, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Most of the previous studies on the vibration ride comfort of the human-vehicle system were focused only on one or two aspects of the investigation. A hybrid approach which integrates all kinds of investigation methods in real environment and virtual environment is described. The real experimental environment includes the WBV(whole body vibration) test, questionnaires for human subjective sensation and motion capture. The virtual experimental environment includes the theoretical calculation on simplified 5-DOF human body vibration model, the vibration simulation and analysis within ADAMS/VibrationTM module, and the digital human biomechanics and occupational health analysis in Jack software. While the real experimental environment provides realistic and accurate test results, it also serves as core and validation for the virtual experimental environment. The virtual experimental environment takes full advantages of current available vibration simulation and digital human modelling software, and makes it possible to evaluate the sitting posture comfort in a human-vehicle system with various human anthropometric parameters. How this digital evaluation system for car seat comfort design is fitted in the Industry 4.0 framework is also proposed.

  18. Power-law scaling for macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity: Evidence from human movement and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. Lee; Bodfish, James W.; Newell, Karl M.

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the relationship between macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity of the dynamics of body rocking and sitting still across adults with stereotyped movement disorder and mental retardation (profound and severe) against controls matched for age, height, and weight. This analysis was performed through the examination of center of pressure (COP) motion on the mediolateral (side-to-side) and anteroposterior (fore-aft) dimensions and the entropy of the relative phase between the two dimensions of motion. Intentional body rocking and stereotypical body rocking possessed similar slopes for their respective frequency spectra, but differences were revealed during maintenance of sitting postures. The dynamics of sitting in the control group produced lower spectral slopes and higher complexity (approximate entropy). In the controls, the higher complexity found on each dimension of motion was related to a weaker coupling between dimensions. Information entropy of the relative phase between the two dimensions of COP motion and irregularity (complexity) of their respective motions fitted a power-law function, revealing a relationship between macroscopic entropy and microscopic complexity across both groups and behaviors. This power-law relation affords the postulation that the organization of movement and posture dynamics occurs as a fractal process.

  19. Human papillomavirus vaccines, complex regional pain syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and autonomic dysfunction - a review of the regulatory evidence from the European Medicines Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jefferson, Tom; Jørgensen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Recent concerns about a possible association between exposure of young women to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and two "dysautonomic syndromes" (a collection of signs and symptoms thought to be caused by autoimmunity) - complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia...

  20. A soft-contact and wrench based approach to study grasp planning and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarkeshwar; Ambike, Satyajit

    2015-11-01

    Grasping research in robotics has made remarkable progress in the last three decades and sophisticated computational tools are now available for planning robotic grasping in complex environments. However, studying the neural control of prehension in humans is more complex than studying robotic grasping. The elaborate musculoskeletal geometries and complex neural inputs to the hand facilitate a symphonic interplay of power and precision that allows humans to grasp fragile objects in a stable way without either crushing or dropping them. Most prehension studies have focused on a planar simplification of prehension since planar analyses render the complex problem of prehension tractable with few variables. The caveat is that planar simplification allows researchers to ask only a limited set of questions. In fact, one of the problems with extending prehension studies to three dimensions is the lack of analytical tools for quantifying features of spatial prehension. The current paper provides a theoretical adaptation and a step-by-step implementation of a widely used soft-contact wrench model for spatial human prehension. We propose two indices, grasp caliber and grasp intensity, to quantitatively relate digit placement and digit forces to grasp stability. Grasp caliber is the smallest singular value of the grasp matrix and it indicates the proximity of the current grasp configuration to instability. Grasp intensity is the magnitude of the excessive wrench applied by the digits to counter perturbations. Apart from quantifying stability of spatial grasps, these indices can also be applied to investigate sensory-motor coupling and the role of perception in grasp planning.

  1. The granularity of grasping. Comment on "Grasping synergies: A motor-control approach to the mirror neuron mechanism" by A. D'Ausilio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Antonia F. de C.

    2015-03-01

    The idea that mirror neuron systems in the human and the macaque monkey could provide a link between perceiving an action and performing it has spurred intense research [1,2]. Hundreds of papers now examine if this link exists and what it might contribute to human behaviour. The review article from D'Ausilio et al. [3] highlights how relatively few papers have considered the granularity of coding with mirror neuron systems, and even fewer have directly tested different possibilities. Granularity refers to the critical question of what actually is encoded within the mirror system - are neurons selective for low level kinematic features such as joint angle, or for postural synergies, or for action goals? Focusing on studies of single neurons in macaques and on studies measuring the excitability of primary motor cortex with TMS, the review suggests that it is very hard to distinguish low-level kinematic from goal representations. Furthermore, these two levels are often highly correlated in real-life contexts - the kinematics needed to grasp an apple are defined by the shape of the goal (an apple tends to be a large sphere) and these kinematics differ for other possible goals (a pencil which is a narrow cylinder). In some cases, kinematics may be enough to define a goal [4]. The review suggests that it is therefore arbitrary to distinguish these levels, and that a synergy level might be a better way to understand the mirror system. Synergies are a form of coding based on commonly used hand-shapes or hand postures, which take into account the fact that some joint angles are more likely to co-occur than others. Evidence that different grasp shapes are represented separately in premotor cortex has been found [5]. These could provide an intermediate level of representation between muscle activity and goals. The review proposes that a synergy level of granularity provides the best way to consider both the motor system and the role of the mirror system in understanding

  2. Orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndrome as suspected adverse effects of vaccination against human papilloma virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise S; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    intolerance, headache, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and neuropathic pain starting in close relation to HPV vaccination. METHODS: Patients were referred for orthostatic intolerance following HPV vaccination. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction were quantified by standardised questionnaire. The diagnosis...... of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) rested on finding a sustained heart rate increment of >30min(-1) (>40min(-1) in adolescents) or to levels >120min(-1) during orthostatic challenge. RESULTS: 35 women aged 23.3±7.1 years participated. Twenty-five had a high level of physical activity before...... intolerance, 94% nausea, 82% chronic headache, 82% fatigue, 77% cognitive dysfunction, 72% segmental dystonia, 68% neuropathic pain. CONCLUSIONS: In a population referred for symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and other symptoms consistent with autonomic dysfunction that began in close temporal association...

  3. Sagittal jaw position in relation to body posture in adult humans – a rasterstereographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drerup Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlations between the sagittal jaw position and the cranio – cervical inclination are described in literature. Only few studies focus on the sagittal jaw position and the body posture using valid and objective orthopaedic examination methods. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with malocclusions reveal significant differences in body posture compared to those without (upper thoracic inclination, kyphotic angle, lordotic angle and lower lumbar inclination. Methods Eighty-four healthy adult patients (with a mean age = 25.6 years and ranging from 16.1 to 55.8 years were examined with informed consent. The orthodontic examination horizontal overjet (distance between upper and lower incisors was determined by using an orthodontic digital sliding calliper. The subjects were subdivided in respect of the overjet with the following results: 18 revealed a normal overjet (Class I, 38 had an increased overjet (Class II and 28 had an reversed overjet (Class III. Rasterstereography was used to carry out a three – dimensional back shape analysis. This method is based on photogrammetry. A three-dimensional shape was produced by analysing the distortion of parallel horizontal white light lines projected on the patient's back, followed by mathematical modelling. On the basis of the sagittal profile the upper thoracic inclination, the thoracic angle, the lordotic angle and the pelvic inclination were determined with a reported accuracy of 2.8° and the correlations to the sagittal jaw position were calculated by means of ANOVA, Scheffé and Kruskal-Wallis procedures. Results Between the different overjet groups, no statistically significant differences or correlations regarding the analysed back shape parameters could be obtained. However, comparing males and females there were statistically significant differences in view of the parameters 'lordotic angle' and 'pelvic inclination'. Conclusion No

  4. Spinal and supraspinal postural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliagina, T G; Beloozerova, I N; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N

    2008-01-01

    Different species maintain a particular body orientation in space (upright in humans, dorsal-side-up in quadrupeds, fish and lamprey) due to the activity of a closed-loop postural control system. We will discuss operation of spinal and supraspinal postural networks studied in a lower vertebrate (lamprey) and in two mammals (rabbit and cat). In the lamprey, the postural control system is driven by vestibular input. The key role in the postural network belongs to the reticulospinal (RS) neurons. Due to vestibular input, deviation from the stabilized body orientation in any (roll, pitch, yaw) plane leads to generation of RS commands, which are sent to the spinal cord and cause postural correction. For each of the planes, there are two groups of RS neurons responding to rotation in the opposite directions; they cause a turn opposite to the initial one. The command transmitted by an individual RS neuron causes the motor response, which contributes to the correction of posture. In each plane, the postural system stabilizes the orientation at which the antagonistic vestibular reflexes compensate for each other. Thus, in lamprey the supraspinal networks play a crucial role in stabilization of body orientation, and the function of the spinal networks is transformation of supraspinal commands into the motor pattern of postural corrections. In terrestrial quadrupeds, the postural system stabilizing the trunk orientation in the transversal plane was analyzed. It consists of two relatively independent sub-systems stabilizing orientation of the anterior and posterior parts of the trunk. They are driven by somatosensory input from limb mechanoreceptors. Each sub-system consists of two closed-loop mechanisms - spinal and spino-supraspinal. Operation of the supraspinal networks was studied by recording the posture-related activity of corticospinal neurons. The postural capacity of spinal networks was evaluated in animals with lesions to the spinal cord. Relative contribution of

  5. Grasping Pattern Recognition and Grasping Force Estimation For Prosthetic Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Bing-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human’s movement can be decoded by surface electromyography (EMG, and the prosthetic hand can be controlled freely through EMG signal. This paper proposes a grasping pattern and force synchronized decoding method for prosthetic hands. Considering pattern recognition and force estimation simultaneously, this paper analyzes whether different muscle contraction levels affect pattern recognition and whether different grasping modes have impact on force estimation, then proposes two schemes to complete EMG simultaneously decoding. Experiments compare the accuracy of the two methods. The results show that there is no much difference between two methods in force estimation, the former’s accuracy of pattern recognition is a little higher than the latter.

  6. Motor planning in different grasping tasks by capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Gloria; Meglio, Giusy; Truppa, Valentina

    2016-10-01

    Studies on motor planning and action selection in object use reveal that what we choose to do in the present moment depends on our next planned action. In particular, many studies have shown that adult humans initially adopt uncomfortable hand postures to accommodate later task demands (i.e., the end-state comfort effect). Recent studies on action planning in different non-human primates species have provided contrasting results. Here, we tested whether capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.), natural tool users, would show planning abilities in two tasks with varying complexity: (i) an object-retrieval task involving self-directed actions (Experiment 1) and (ii) a tool-using task involving actions directed toward an external target (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, six of 10 monkeys preferentially used a radial grip (i.e., with the thumb-side oriented towards the baited end) to grasp a horizontal dowel with either the left- or right-end baited and bring it to their mouth. In Experiment 2, all six tested capuchins preferentially used a radial grip (i.e., with the thumb-side oriented towards the center of the dowel) to grasp a dowel that was positioned horizontally at different orientations and to dislodge an out-of-reach food reward. Thus, we found that the capuchins showed second-order planning abilities in both tasks, but performance differences emerged in relation to hand preference and learning across sessions. Our findings support the idea that second-order motor planning occurred in an early stage of the primate lineage. Factors affecting the ability of nonhuman primates to estimate motor costs in action selection are discussed.

  7. Spinal mechanisms may provide a combination of intermittent and continuous control of human posture: predictions from a biologically based neuromusculoskeletal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Abdala Elias

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several models have been employed to study human postural control during upright quiet stance. Most have adopted an inverted pendulum approximation to the standing human and theoretical models to account for the neural feedback necessary to keep balance. The present study adds to the previous efforts in focusing more closely on modelling the physiological mechanisms of important elements associated with the control of human posture. This paper studies neuromuscular mechanisms behind upright stance control by means of a biologically based large-scale neuromusculoskeletal (NMS model. It encompasses: i conductance-based spinal neuron models (motor neurons and interneurons; ii muscle proprioceptor models (spindle and Golgi tendon organ providing sensory afferent feedback; iii Hill-type muscle models of the leg plantar and dorsiflexors; and iv an inverted pendulum model for the body biomechanics during upright stance. The motor neuron pools are driven by stochastic spike trains. Simulation results showed that the neuromechanical outputs generated by the NMS model resemble experimental data from subjects standing on a stable surface. Interesting findings were that: i an intermittent pattern of muscle activation emerged from this posture control model for two of the leg muscles (Medial and Lateral Gastrocnemius; and ii the Soleus muscle was mostly activated in a continuous manner. These results suggest that the spinal cord anatomy and neurophysiology (e.g., motor unit types, synaptic connectivities, ordered recruitment, along with the modulation of afferent activity, may account for the mixture of intermittent and continuous control that has been a subject of debate in recent studies on postural control. Another finding was the occurrence of the so-called "paradoxical" behaviour of muscle fibre lengths as a function of postural sway. The simulations confirmed previous conjectures that reciprocal inhibition is possibly contributing to this effect, but

  8. Spinal mechanisms may provide a combination of intermittent and continuous control of human posture: predictions from a biologically based neuromusculoskeletal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Leonardo Abdala; Watanabe, Renato Naville; Kohn, André Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Several models have been employed to study human postural control during upright quiet stance. Most have adopted an inverted pendulum approximation to the standing human and theoretical models to account for the neural feedback necessary to keep balance. The present study adds to the previous efforts in focusing more closely on modelling the physiological mechanisms of important elements associated with the control of human posture. This paper studies neuromuscular mechanisms behind upright stance control by means of a biologically based large-scale neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) model. It encompasses: i) conductance-based spinal neuron models (motor neurons and interneurons); ii) muscle proprioceptor models (spindle and Golgi tendon organ) providing sensory afferent feedback; iii) Hill-type muscle models of the leg plantar and dorsiflexors; and iv) an inverted pendulum model for the body biomechanics during upright stance. The motor neuron pools are driven by stochastic spike trains. Simulation results showed that the neuromechanical outputs generated by the NMS model resemble experimental data from subjects standing on a stable surface. Interesting findings were that: i) an intermittent pattern of muscle activation emerged from this posture control model for two of the leg muscles (Medial and Lateral Gastrocnemius); and ii) the Soleus muscle was mostly activated in a continuous manner. These results suggest that the spinal cord anatomy and neurophysiology (e.g., motor unit types, synaptic connectivities, ordered recruitment), along with the modulation of afferent activity, may account for the mixture of intermittent and continuous control that has been a subject of debate in recent studies on postural control. Another finding was the occurrence of the so-called "paradoxical" behaviour of muscle fibre lengths as a function of postural sway. The simulations confirmed previous conjectures that reciprocal inhibition is possibly contributing to this effect, but on the

  9. Recurrence quantification analysis of human postural fluctuations in older fallers and non-fallers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdani, Sofiane; Tallon, Guillaume; Bernard, Pierre Louis; Blain, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    We investigate postural sway data dynamics in older adult fallers and non-fallers. Center of pressure (COP) signals were recorded during quiet standing in 28 older adults. The subjects were divided in two groups: with and without history of falls. COP time series were analyzed using recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral (ML) directions. Classical stabilometric variables (path length and range) were also computed. The results showed that RQA outputs quantifying predictability of COP fluctuations and Shannon entropy of recurrence plot diagonal line length distribution, were significantly higher in fallers, only for ML direction. In addition, the range of ML COP signals was also significantly higher in fallers. This result is in accordance with some findings of the literature and could be interpreted as an increased hip strategy in fallers. The RQA results seem coherent with the theory of loss of complexity with aging and disease. Our results suggest that RQA is a promising approach for the investigation of COP fluctuations in a frail population.

  10. Planckian Power Spectral Densities from Human Calves during Posture Maintenance and Controlled Isometric Contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J E Lugo

    Full Text Available The relationship between muscle anatomy and physiology and its corresponding electromyography activity (EMGA is complex and not well understood. EMGA models may be broadly divided in stochastic and motor-unit-based models. For example, these models have successfully described many muscle physiological variables such as the value of the muscle fiber velocity and the linear relationship between median frequency and muscle fiber velocity. However they cannot explain the behavior of many of these variables with changes in intramuscular temperature, or muscle PH acidity, for instance. Here, we propose that the motor unit action potential can be treated as an electromagnetic resonant mode confined at thermal equilibrium inside the muscle. The motor units comprising the muscle form a system of standing waves or modes, where the energy of each mode is proportional to its frequency. Therefore, the power spectral density of the EMGA is well described and fit by Planck's law and from its distribution we developed theoretical relationships that explain the behavior of known physiological variables with changes in intramuscular temperature or muscle PH acidity, for instance.EMGA of the calf muscle was recorded during posture maintenance in seven participants and during controlled isometric contractions in two participants. The power spectral density of the EMGA was then fit with the Planckian distribution. Then, we inferred nine theoretical relationships from the distribution and compared the theoretically derived values with experimentally obtained values.The power spectral density of EMGA was fit by Planckian distributions and all the theoretical relationships were validated by experimental results.Only by considering the motor unit action potentials as electromagnetic resonant modes confined at thermal equilibrium inside the muscle suffices to predict known or new theoretical relationships for muscle physiological variables that other models have failed

  11. Cortical control of object-specific grasp relies on adjustments of both activity and effective connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tia, Banty; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Kosugi, Akito

    2017-01-01

    The cortical mechanisms of grasping have been extensively studied in macaques and humans. Here, we investigated whether common marmosets could rely on similar mechanisms despite striking differences in manual dexterity. Two common marmosets were trained to grasp-and-pull three objects eliciting d...

  12. Multijoint grasping movements; Simulated and observed effects of object location, object size, and initial aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Rosenbaum, D.A.; Jansen, C.; Vaughan, J.; Vogt, S.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of human prehension have revealed characteristic patterns of grasping kinematics. We sought to gain insight into the determinants of those patterns by means of a computer simulation and accompanying behavioral experiment concerning multijoint, planar grasping behavior. The simulation was bas

  13. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Systems Integration Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a Primitive motion capture library. The Library will be used by the human factors engineering in the future to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the Primitive models are being developed for the library the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the SLS and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the Motion Capture of unique ground systems activities are being used to verify the human factors analysis requirements for ground system used to process the STS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  14. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Factors Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a primitive motion capture library. The library will be used by human factors engineering analysts to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the primitive models are being developed for the library, the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the motion capture of unique ground systems activities is being used to verify the human factors engineering requirements for ground systems used to process the SLS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  15. What a successful grasp tells about the success chances of grasps in its vicinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodenhagen, Leon; Detry, Renaud; Piater, Justus;

    2011-01-01

    Infants gradually improve their grasping competences, both in terms of motor abilities as well as in terms of the internal shape grasp representations. Grasp densities provide a statistical model of such an internal learning process. In the concept of grasp densities, kernel density estimation...... probabilities representing grasp success in the neighborhood of a successful grasp. The anisotropy has been determined utilizing a simulation environment that allowed for evaluation of large scale experiments. The anisotropic kernel has been fitted to the conditional probabilities obtained from the experiments...

  16. FORCE OPTIMIZATION OF GRASPING BY ROBOTIC HANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It is important for robotic hands to obtain optimal grasping performance in the meanwhile balancing external forces and maintaining grasp stability.The problem of force optimization of grasping is solved in the space of joint torques.A measure of grasping performance is presented to protect joint actuators from working in heavy payloads.The joint torques are calculated for the optimal performance under the frictional constraints and the physical limits of motor outputs.By formulating the grasping forces into the explicit function of joint torques, the frictional constraints imposed on the grasping forces are transformed into the constraints on joint torques.Without further simplification, the nonlinear frictional constraints can be simply handled in the process of optimization.Two numerical examples demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of the approach.

  17. Using artificial neural networks for the transformation of human body postures based on landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, B.

    2005-01-01

    Designers, engineers and ergonomists are seeking to exploit the opportunities offered by the 3D anthropometric technologies. These technologies make 3D measurements possible and provide us with a more detailed description of human body in comparison with the traditional 1D or 2D data processing. In

  18. Grasping in One-Handed Catching in Relation to Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Cesqui

    Full Text Available Catching a flying ball involves bringing the hand to the aimed interception point at the right time, adjusting the hand posture to receive the incoming ball and to absorb the ball momentum, and closing the hand to ensure a stable grip. A small error in any of these actions can lead to a failure in catching the ball. Here we sought to gather new insights on what aspects of the catching movements affect the interceptive performance most. In particular, we wondered whether the errors occurred in bringing the hand to the interception point or in closing the fingers on the ball, and whether these two phases of interception differed between individuals. To this end, we characterized grasping and wrist movement kinematics of eleven participants attempting to catch a ball projected in space with different ball arrival heights and flight durations. The spatial position of the ball and of several markers placed on the participant's arm were recorded by a motion capture system, the hand joint angles were recorded with an instrumented glove, and several movement features were extracted. All participants were able to intercept the ball trajectory (i.e. to touch the ball in over 90% of cases, but they differed in the ability to grasp the ball (success rate varied between 2% and 85%. Similar temporal features were observed across individuals when they caught the ball. In particular, all participants adapted their wrist movements under varying temporal and arrival height constraints, they aligned the time of peak hand closing velocity to the time of hand-ball contact, and they maintained the same hand closing duration in the different experimental conditions. These movement features characterized successful trials, and hence allowed to evaluate the possible sources of errors underlying unsuccessful trials. Thus, inter-individual and inter-trial variability in the modulation of each kinematic feature were related to catching performance. We observed that

  19. Learning an intermittent control strategy for postural balancing using an EMG-based human-computer interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Asai

    Full Text Available It has been considered that the brain stabilizes unstable body dynamics by regulating co-activation levels of antagonist muscles. Here we critically reexamined this established theory of impedance control in a postural balancing task using a novel EMG-based human-computer interface, in which subjects were asked to balance a virtual inverted pendulum using visual feedback information on the pendulum's position. The pendulum was actuated by a pair of antagonist joint torques determined in real-time by activations of the corresponding pair of antagonist ankle muscles of subjects standing upright. This motor-task raises a frustrated environment; a large feedback time delay in the sensorimotor loop, as a source of instability, might favor adopting the non-reactive, preprogrammed impedance control, but the ankle muscles are relatively hard to co-activate, which hinders subjects from adopting the impedance control. This study aimed at discovering how experimental subjects resolved this frustrated environment through motor learning. One third of subjects adapted to the balancing task in a way of the impedance-like control. It was remarkable, however, that the majority of subjects did not adopt the impedance control. Instead, they acquired a smart and energetically efficient strategy, in which two muscles were inactivated simultaneously at a sequence of optimal timings, leading to intermittent appearance of periods of time during which the pendulum was not actively actuated. Characterizations of muscle inactivations and the pendulum¡Çs sway showed that the strategy adopted by those subjects was a type of intermittent control that utilizes a stable manifold of saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium that appeared in the state space of the pendulum when the active actuation was turned off.

  20. Learning an intermittent control strategy for postural balancing using an EMG-based human-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yoshiyuki; Tateyama, Shota; Nomura, Taishin

    2013-01-01

    It has been considered that the brain stabilizes unstable body dynamics by regulating co-activation levels of antagonist muscles. Here we critically reexamined this established theory of impedance control in a postural balancing task using a novel EMG-based human-computer interface, in which subjects were asked to balance a virtual inverted pendulum using visual feedback information on the pendulum's position. The pendulum was actuated by a pair of antagonist joint torques determined in real-time by activations of the corresponding pair of antagonist ankle muscles of subjects standing upright. This motor-task raises a frustrated environment; a large feedback time delay in the sensorimotor loop, as a source of instability, might favor adopting the non-reactive, preprogrammed impedance control, but the ankle muscles are relatively hard to co-activate, which hinders subjects from adopting the impedance control. This study aimed at discovering how experimental subjects resolved this frustrated environment through motor learning. One third of subjects adapted to the balancing task in a way of the impedance-like control. It was remarkable, however, that the majority of subjects did not adopt the impedance control. Instead, they acquired a smart and energetically efficient strategy, in which two muscles were inactivated simultaneously at a sequence of optimal timings, leading to intermittent appearance of periods of time during which the pendulum was not actively actuated. Characterizations of muscle inactivations and the pendulum¡Çs sway showed that the strategy adopted by those subjects was a type of intermittent control that utilizes a stable manifold of saddle-type unstable upright equilibrium that appeared in the state space of the pendulum when the active actuation was turned off.

  1. Norepinephrine transporter variant A457P knock-in mice display key features of human postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana K. Shirey-Rice

    2013-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is a common autonomic disorder of largely unknown etiology that presents with sustained tachycardia on standing, syncope and elevated norepinephrine spillover. Some individuals with POTS experience anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we identified a mutation, A457P, in the norepinephrine (NE; also known as noradrenaline transporter (NET; encoded by SLC6A2 in POTS patients. NET is expressed at presynaptic sites in NE neurons and plays a crucial role in regulating NE signaling and homeostasis through NE reuptake into noradrenergic nerve terminals. Our in vitro studies demonstrate that A457P reduces both NET surface trafficking and NE transport and exerts a dominant-negative impact on wild-type NET proteins. Here we report the generation and characterization of NET A457P mice, demonstrating the ability of A457P to drive the POTS phenotype and behaviors that are consistent with reported comorbidities. Mice carrying one A457P allele (NET+/P exhibited reduced brain and sympathetic NE transport levels compared with wild-type (NET+/+ mice, whereas transport activity in mice carrying two A457P alleles (NETP/P was nearly abolished. NET+/P and NETP/P mice exhibited elevations in plasma and urine NE levels, reduced 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, and reduced DHPG:NE ratios, consistent with a decrease in sympathetic nerve terminal NE reuptake. Radiotelemetry in unanesthetized mice revealed tachycardia in NET+/P mice without a change in blood pressure or baroreceptor sensitivity, consistent with studies of human NET A457P carriers. NET+/P mice also demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with CNS NET dysfunction. Our findings support that NET dysfunction is sufficient to produce a POTS phenotype and introduces the first genetic model suitable for more detailed mechanistic studies of the disorder and its comorbidities.

  2. Norepinephrine transporter variant A457P knock-in mice display key features of human postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey-Rice, Jana K; Klar, Rebecca; Fentress, Hugh M; Redmon, Sarah N; Sabb, Tiffany R; Krueger, Jessica J; Wallace, Nathan M; Appalsamy, Martin; Finney, Charlene; Lonce, Suzanna; Diedrich, André; Hahn, Maureen K

    2013-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a common autonomic disorder of largely unknown etiology that presents with sustained tachycardia on standing, syncope and elevated norepinephrine spillover. Some individuals with POTS experience anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we identified a mutation, A457P, in the norepinephrine (NE; also known as noradrenaline) transporter (NET; encoded by SLC6A2) in POTS patients. NET is expressed at presynaptic sites in NE neurons and plays a crucial role in regulating NE signaling and homeostasis through NE reuptake into noradrenergic nerve terminals. Our in vitro studies demonstrate that A457P reduces both NET surface trafficking and NE transport and exerts a dominant-negative impact on wild-type NET proteins. Here we report the generation and characterization of NET A457P mice, demonstrating the ability of A457P to drive the POTS phenotype and behaviors that are consistent with reported comorbidities. Mice carrying one A457P allele (NET(+/P)) exhibited reduced brain and sympathetic NE transport levels compared with wild-type (NET(+/+)) mice, whereas transport activity in mice carrying two A457P alleles (NET(P/P)) was nearly abolished. NET(+/P) and NET(P/P) mice exhibited elevations in plasma and urine NE levels, reduced 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and reduced DHPG:NE ratios, consistent with a decrease in sympathetic nerve terminal NE reuptake. Radiotelemetry in unanesthetized mice revealed tachycardia in NET(+/P) mice without a change in blood pressure or baroreceptor sensitivity, consistent with studies of human NET A457P carriers. NET(+/P) mice also demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with CNS NET dysfunction. Our findings support that NET dysfunction is sufficient to produce a POTS phenotype and introduces the first genetic model suitable for more detailed mechanistic studies of the disorder and its comorbidities.

  3. Dynamics and Stability of Blind Grasping of a 3-Dimensional Object under Non-holonomic Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suguru Arimoto; Morio Yoshida; Ji-Hun Bae

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model expressing the motion of a pair of multi-DOF robot fingers with hemi-spherical ends,grasping a 3-D rigid object with parallel flat surfaces, is derived, together with non-holonomic constraints. By referring to the fact that humans grasp an object in the form of precision prehension, dynamically and stably by opposable forces, between the thumb and another finger (index or middle finger), a simple control signal constructed from finger-thumb opposition is proposed, and shown to realize stable grasping in a dynamic sense without using object information or external sensing (this is called "blind grasp" in this paper). The stability of grasping with force/torque balance under non-holonomic constraints is analyzed on the basis of a new concept named "stability on a manifold". Preliminary simulation results are shown to verify the validity of the theoretical results.

  4. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Robert T.; Raz, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay. Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy). Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition.

  5. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Thibault

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay.Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition.

  6. Development of Postural Muscles and Their Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. IJkema-Paassen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of posture is a prerequisite for efficient motor performance. Posture depends on muscles capable of enduring contractions, whereas movements often require quick, forceful muscle actions. To serve these different goals, muscles contain fibers that meet these different tasks. Muscles with strong postural functions mainly consist of slow muscle fibers with a great resistance against fatigue. Flexor muscles in the leg and arm muscles are mainly composed of fast muscle fibers producing relatively large forces that are rapidly fatigable. Development of the neuromuscular system continues after birth. We discuss in the human baby and in animal experiments changes in muscle fiber properties, regression from polyneural into mononeural innervation, and developmental changes in the motoneurons of postural muscles during that period. The regression of poly-neural innervation in postural muscles and the development of dendrite bundles of their motoneurons seem to be linked to the transition from the immature into the adult-like patterns of moving and postural control.

  7. Automated tracking and grasping of a moving object with a robotic hand-eye system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P.K.; Timcenko, A.; Yoshimi, B.; Michelman, P. (Columbia Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-04-01

    Most robotic grasping tasks assume a stationary or fixed object. In this paper, the authors explore the requirements for tracking and grasping a moving object. The focus of the work is to achieve a high level of interaction between a real-time vision system capable of tracking moving objects in 3-D and a robot arm with gripper that can be used to pick up a moving object. There is an interest in exploring the interplay of hand--eye coordination for dynamic grasping takes such as grasping of parts on a moving conveyor system, assembly of articulated parts, or for grasping from a mobile robotic system. Coordination between an organisms sensing modalities and motor control system is a hallmark of intelligent behavior, and they are pursuing the goal of building an integrated sensing and actuation system that can operate in dynamic as opposed to static environments. The system they have built addresses three distinct problems in robotic hand--eye coordination for grasping moving objects: fast computation of 3-D motion parameters from vision, predictive control of a moving robotic arm to track a moving object, and interception and grasping. The system is able to operate at approximately human arm movement rates, and experimental results in which a moving model train is tracked is presented, stably grasped, and picked up by the system. The algorithms they have developed that relate sensing to actuation are quite general and applicable to a variety of complex robotic tasks that require visual feedback for arm and hand control.

  8. Refining Grasp Affordance Models by Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Buch, Anders Glent;

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for learning object grasp affordance models in 3D from experience, and demonstrate its applicability through extensive testing and evaluation on a realistic and largely autonomous platform. Grasp affordance refers here to relative object-gripper configurations that yield stabl...

  9. Visual Descriptor Learning for Predicting Grasping Affordances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mikkel Tang

    2016-01-01

    consisting of surface features was performed. Dimensions in the visual space were varied and the effects were evaluated with the task of grasping unknown object. The evaluation was performed using a novel probabilistic grasp prediction approach based on neighbourhood analysis. The resulting success...... by the task of grasping unknown objects given visual sensor information. The contributions from this thesis stem from three works that all relate to the task of grasping unknown objects but with particular focus on the visual representation part of the problem. First an investigation of a visual feature space...... a hierarchical representation of visual surface descriptors in SE(3). The mechanism provides a generic way of creating a hierarchical representation of N layers using pairs of descriptors. The created hierarchies were evaluated on the task of grasping unknown objects and the resulting best success-rate was 65...

  10. Determining postural stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Erez (Inventor); Forth, Katharine E. (Inventor); Paloski, William H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining postural stability of a person can include acquiring a plurality of pressure data points over a period of time from at least one pressure sensor. The method can also include the step of identifying a postural state for each pressure data point to generate a plurality of postural states. The method can include the step of determining a postural state of the person at a point in time based on at least the plurality of postural states.

  11. Learning to grasp and extract affordances: the Integrated Learning of Grasps and Affordances (ILGA) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuto, James; Arbib, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    The activity of certain parietal neurons has been interpreted as encoding affordances (directly perceivable opportunities) for grasping. Separate computational models have been developed for infant grasp learning and affordance learning, but no single model has yet combined these processes in a neurobiologically plausible way. We present the Integrated Learning of Grasps and Affordances (ILGA) model that simultaneously learns grasp affordances from visual object features and motor parameters for planning grasps using trial-and-error reinforcement learning. As in the Infant Learning to Grasp Model, we model a stage of infant development prior to the onset of sophisticated visual processing of hand-object relations, but we assume that certain premotor neurons activate neural populations in primary motor cortex that synergistically control different combinations of fingers. The ILGA model is able to extract affordance representations from visual object features, learn motor parameters for generating stable grasps, and generalize its learned representations to novel objects.

  12. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-02-15

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses.

  13. Grasp Algorithms For Optotactile Robotic Sample Acquisition Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Robotic sample acquisition is basically grasping. Multi-finger robot sample grasping devices are controlled to securely pick up samples. While optimal grasps for...

  14. Parametric Modeling of Visual Human Posture in DELMIA Based- on Database%基于数据库的DELMIA虚拟人姿势参数化建模

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁允伟; 乔玉炜; 陈品华

    2011-01-01

    数字虚拟人是DELMIA人机工程模块的重要组成部分.文章分析了DELMIA二次开发和DELMIA人体姿势的参数化建模的原理,研究了应用C#.NET编程语言在VS.NET开发环境下,基于数据库对DELMIA二次开发的关键技术和基本架构,最后给出了数字虚拟人姿势参数化建模的实例进行验证.%The digit visual human module is one of the important parts in DELMIA Ergonomics. This paper analyzed the principle of DELMIA secondary development and the parametric modeling of DELMIA human body posture, and put forward the framework that adopt VS. NET develop environment and C#. NET program language, according to DELMIA secondary development by database , and provided the example of the rapid parametric modeling of the body posture of digit visual human.

  15. Human-Machine Interface for the Control of Multi-Function Systems Based on Electrocutaneous Menu: Application to Multi-Grasp Prosthetic Hands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Gonzalez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Modern assistive devices are very sophisticated systems with multiple degrees of freedom. However, an effective and user-friendly control of these systems is still an open problem since conventional human-machine interfaces (HMI cannot easily accommodate the system's complexity. In HMIs, the user is responsible for generating unique patterns of command signals directly triggering the device functions. This approach can be difficult to implement when there are many functions (necessitating many command patterns and/or the user has a considerable impairment (limited number of available signal sources. In this study, we propose a novel concept for a general-purpose HMI where the controller and the user communicate bidirectionally to select the desired function. The system first presents possible choices to the user via electro-tactile stimulation; the user then acknowledges the desired choice by generating a single command signal. Therefore, the proposed approach simplifies the user communication interface (one signal to generate, decoding (one signal to recognize, and allows selecting from a number of options. To demonstrate the new concept the method was used in one particular application, namely, to implement the control of all the relevant functions in a state of the art commercial prosthetic hand without using any myoelectric channels. We performed experiments in healthy subjects and with one amputee to test the feasibility of the novel approach. The results showed that the performance of the novel HMI concept was comparable or, for some outcome measures, better than the classic myoelectric interfaces. The presented approach has a general applicability and the obtained results point out that it could be used to operate various assistive systems (e.g., prosthesis vs. wheelchair, or it could be integrated into other control schemes (e.g., myoelectric control, brain-machine interfaces in order to improve the usability of existing low

  16. Human-Machine Interface for the Control of Multi-Function Systems Based on Electrocutaneous Menu: Application to Multi-Grasp Prosthetic Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Dosen, Strahinja; Amsuess, Sebastian; Yu, Wenwei; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Modern assistive devices are very sophisticated systems with multiple degrees of freedom. However, an effective and user-friendly control of these systems is still an open problem since conventional human-machine interfaces (HMI) cannot easily accommodate the system's complexity. In HMIs, the user is responsible for generating unique patterns of command signals directly triggering the device functions. This approach can be difficult to implement when there are many functions (necessitating many command patterns) and/or the user has a considerable impairment (limited number of available signal sources). In this study, we propose a novel concept for a general-purpose HMI where the controller and the user communicate bidirectionally to select the desired function. The system first presents possible choices to the user via electro-tactile stimulation; the user then acknowledges the desired choice by generating a single command signal. Therefore, the proposed approach simplifies the user communication interface (one signal to generate), decoding (one signal to recognize), and allows selecting from a number of options. To demonstrate the new concept the method was used in one particular application, namely, to implement the control of all the relevant functions in a state of the art commercial prosthetic hand without using any myoelectric channels. We performed experiments in healthy subjects and with one amputee to test the feasibility of the novel approach. The results showed that the performance of the novel HMI concept was comparable or, for some outcome measures, better than the classic myoelectric interfaces. The presented approach has a general applicability and the obtained results point out that it could be used to operate various assistive systems (e.g., prosthesis vs. wheelchair), or it could be integrated into other control schemes (e.g., myoelectric control, brain-machine interfaces) in order to improve the usability of existing low-bandwidth HMIs.

  17. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part I: Posture and movement detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugade, Vipul; Fortune, Emma; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-02-01

    A robust method for identifying movement in the free-living environment is needed to objectively measure physical activity. The purpose of this study was to validate the identification of postural orientation and movement from acceleration data against visual inspection from video recordings. Using tri-axial accelerometers placed on the waist and thigh, static orientations of standing, sitting, and lying down, as well as dynamic movements of walking, jogging and transitions between postures were identified. Additionally, subjects walked and jogged at self-selected slow, comfortable, and fast speeds. Identification of tasks was performed using a combination of the signal magnitude area, continuous wavelet transforms and accelerometer orientations. Twelve healthy adults were studied in the laboratory, with two investigators identifying tasks during each second of video observation. The intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.95 for all activities except for transitions. Results demonstrated high validity, with sensitivity and positive predictive values of greater than 85% for sitting and lying, with walking and jogging identified at greater than 90%. The greatest disagreement in identification accuracy between the algorithm and video occurred when subjects were asked to fidget while standing or sitting. During variable speed tasks, gait was correctly identified for speeds between 0.1m/s and 4.8m/s. This study included a range of walking speeds and natural movements such as fidgeting during static postures, demonstrating that accelerometer data can be used to identify orientation and movement among the general population.

  18. Human young children as well as adults demonstrate 'superior' rapid snake detection when typical striking posture is displayed by the snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masataka, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-30

    Humans as well as some nonhuman primates have an evolved predisposition to associate snakes with fear by detecting their presence as fear-relevant stimuli more rapidly than fear-irrelevant ones. In the present experiment, a total of 74 of 3- to 4-year-old children and adults were asked to find a single target black-and-white photo of a snake among an array of eight black-and-white photos of flowers as distracters. As target stimuli, we prepared two groups of snake photos, one in which a typical striking posture was displayed by a snake and the other in which a resting snake was shown. When reaction time to find the snake photo was compared between these two types of the stimuli, its mean value was found to be significantly smaller for the photos of snakes displaying striking posture than for the photos of resting snakes in both the adults and children. These findings suggest the possibility that the human perceptual bias for snakes per se could be differentiated according to the difference of the degree to which their presence acts as a fear-relevant stimulus.

  19. GRASP with Path Relinking for the SumCut Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Sánchez-Oro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a GRASP algorithm combined with Path Relinking to solve the SumCut minimization problem. In the SumCut problem one is given a graph with n nodes and must label the nodes in a way that each node receives a unique label from the set{1,2,…,n}, in order to minimize the sum cut of the generated solution. The SumCut problem is really important in archeology (in seriation tasks and in genetics, helping in the Human Genome Project. This problem is equivalent to the Profile problem, because a solution for SumCut is reversal solution for Profile problem. Experimental results show that the GRASP and Path Relinking methods presented outperform in terms of average percentage deviation the results from the State of the Art using shorter CPU time.

  20. Evaluation of Grasping Motion Using a Virtual Prosthetic Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Osamu; Bu, Nan; Ueno, Naohiro

    Electromyogram (EMG) signals can be measured from human muscles and can be used to anticipate movements. In fact, many researchers have tried to use these signals as an interface tool for a prosthetic hand. However, most of these studies focused on the discrimination performance of the EMG signals, and only discussed the control method for the prosthetic hand. Evaluation of the operating performance was seldom reported. This paper proposes a virtual prosthetic control system and presents the analyses of a grasp motion under two different EMG control methods: on/off control and proportional control. The proportional control is able to proportionally control the grasping velocity based on the amplitude of the EMG signal. The on/off control controls the hand at a uniform rate while the amplitude of the EMG signal is greater than a predefined threshold. We conducted experiments with five subjects, and confirmed the usefulness of the developed system.

  1. Effective seat-to-head transmissibility in whole-body vibration: Effects of posture and arm position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatalla, Salam; DeShaw, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Seat-to-head transmissibility is a biomechanical measure that has been widely used for many decades to evaluate seat dynamics and human response to vibration. Traditionally, transmissibility has been used to correlate single-input or multiple-input with single-output motion; it has not been effectively used for multiple-input and multiple-output scenarios due to the complexity of dealing with the coupled motions caused by the cross-axis effect. This work presents a novel approach to use transmissibility effectively for single- and multiple-input and multiple-output whole-body vibrations. In this regard, the full transmissibility matrix is transformed into a single graph, such as those for single-input and single-output motions. Singular value decomposition and maximum distortion energy theory were used to achieve the latter goal. Seat-to-head transmissibility matrices for single-input/multiple-output in the fore-aft direction, single-input/multiple-output in the vertical direction, and multiple-input/multiple-output directions are investigated in this work. A total of ten subjects participated in this study. Discrete frequencies of 0.5-16 Hz were used for the fore-aft direction using supported and unsupported back postures. Random ride files from a dozer machine were used for the vertical and multiple-axis scenarios considering two arm postures: using the armrests or grasping the steering wheel. For single-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed method was very effective in showing the frequencies where the transmissibility is mostly sensitive for the two sitting postures and two arm positions. For multiple-input/multiple-output, the results showed that the proposed effective transmissibility indicated higher values for the armrest-supported posture than for the steering-wheel-supported posture.

  2. Electronic spinal posture detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thoné, Jef; Jourand, Philippe; Puers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A wearable automatic monitoring system for back posture has been developed and tested. Making use of only five accelerometers placed on strategic locations on the back, a stand alone system enables detection, logging and feedback of the patient’s posture. The system enables alerting the patient of a bad posture, or long-term data logging to analyze the patient’s posture over a prolonged period.

  3. [Risks of awkward posture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Capodaglio, E; Panigazzi, M; Prestifilippo, E; Vercesi, C

    2010-01-01

    For posture we mean the position of the body in the space and the relationship with its segments. The correct posture is determined by neurophysiological, biomechanical, emotional, psychological and relation factors, enabling us to perform daily and working activities with the lowest energy expenditure. When possible we suggest during posture variation, a preventive measure where there are prolonged fixed activities.

  4. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting "problems" to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant "tuning" of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, "passive" response to perturbations as well as the delayed, "active" responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach.

  5. Linear and nonlinear subspace analysis of hand movements during grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Phil Hengjun; Visell, Yon

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated nonlinear patterns of coordination, or synergies, underlying whole-hand grasping kinematics. Prior research has shed considerable light on roles played by such coordinated degrees-of-freedom (DOF), illuminating how motor control is facilitated by structural and functional specializations in the brain, peripheral nervous system, and musculoskeletal system. However, existing analyses suppose that the patterns of coordination can be captured by means of linear analyses, as linear combinations of nominally independent DOF. In contrast, hand kinematics is itself highly nonlinear in nature. To address this discrepancy, we sought to to determine whether nonlinear synergies might serve to more accurately and efficiently explain human grasping kinematics than is possible with linear analyses. We analyzed motion capture data acquired from the hands of individuals as they grasped an array of common objects, using four of the most widely used linear and nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithms. We compared the results using a recently developed algorithm-agnostic quality measure, which enabled us to assess the quality of the dimensional reductions that resulted by assessing the extent to which local neighborhood information in the data was preserved. Although qualitative inspection of this data suggested that nonlinear correlations between kinematic variables were present, we found that linear modeling, in the form of Principle Components Analysis, could perform better than any of the nonlinear techniques we applied.

  6. GRASPs in Golgi Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus is a central intracellular membrane organelle for trafficking and modification of proteins and lipids. Its basic structure is a stack of tightly aligned flat cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of stacks are concentrated in the pericentriolar region and laterally connected to form a ribbon. Despite extensive research in the last decades, how this unique structure is formed and why its formation is important for proper Golgi functioning remain largely unknown. The Golgi ReAssembly Stacking Proteins, GRASP65 and GRASP55, are so far the only proteins shown to function in Golgi stacking. They are peripheral membrane proteins on the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi cisternae that form trans-oligomers through their N-terminal GRASP domain, and thereby function as the glue to stick adjacent cisternae together into a stack and to link Golgi stacks into a ribbon. Depletion of GRASPs in cells disrupts the Golgi structure and results in accelerated protein trafficking and defective glycosylation. In this minireview we summarize our current knowledge on how GRASPs function in Golgi structure formation and discuss why Golgi structure formation is important for its function.

  7. Postural coordination during socio-motor improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gueugnon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation. Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively. Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and anti-phase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability. Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  8. Postural Coordination during Socio-motor Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Salesse, Robin N; Coste, Alexandre; Zhao, Zhong; Bardy, Benoît G; Marin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation). Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively). Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and antiphase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability) and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability). Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  9. Human-Like Movement of an Anthropomorphic Robot: Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    e Silva, E. Costa; Costa, M. F.; Bicho, E.; Erlhagen, W.

    2011-09-01

    Human-like movement is fundamental for natural human-robot interaction and collaboration. We have developed in a model for generating arm and hand movements an anthropomorphic robot. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human reaching and grasping movements. In this paper we present some changes to the model we have proposed in [4] and test and compare different nonlinear constrained optimization techniques for solving the large-scale nonlinear constrained optimization problem that rises from the discretization of our time-continuous model. Furthermore, we test different time discretization steps.

  10. The magic grasp: motor expertise in deception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Kuhn, Gustav; Ietswaart, Magdalena; Milner, A David

    2011-02-09

    Most of us are poor at faking actions. Kinematic studies have shown that when pretending to pick up imagined objects (pantomimed actions), we move and shape our hands quite differently from when grasping real ones. These differences between real and pantomimed actions have been linked to separate brain pathways specialized for different kinds of visuomotor guidance. Yet professional magicians regularly use pantomimed actions to deceive audiences. In this study, we tested whether, despite their skill, magicians might still show kinematic differences between grasping actions made toward real versus imagined objects. We found that their pantomimed actions in fact closely resembled real grasps when the object was visible (but displaced) (Experiment 1), but failed to do so when the object was absent (Experiment 2). We suggest that although the occipito-parietal visuomotor system in the dorsal stream is designed to guide goal-directed actions, prolonged practice may enable it to calibrate actions based on visual inputs displaced from the action.

  11. Development of autonomous grasping and navigating robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoh, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yasuichi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to find and grasp target items in an unknown environment is important for working robots. We developed an autonomous navigating and grasping robot. The operations are locating a requested item, moving to where the item is placed, finding the item on a shelf or table, and picking the item up from the shelf or the table. To achieve these operations, we designed the robot with three functions: an autonomous navigating function that generates a map and a route in an unknown environment, an item position recognizing function, and a grasping function. We tested this robot in an unknown environment. It achieved a series of operations: moving to a destination, recognizing the positions of items on a shelf, picking up an item, placing it on a cart with its hand, and returning to the starting location. The results of this experiment show the applicability of reducing the workforce with robots.

  12. Getting the right grasp on executive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia L R Gonzalez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Executive Function (EF refers to important socio-emotional and cognitive skills that are known to be highly correlated with both academic and life success. EF is a blanket term that is considered to include self-regulation, working memory, and planning. Recent studies have shown a relationship between EF and motor control. The emergence of motor control coincides with that of EF, hence understanding the relationship between these two domains could have significant implications for early detection and remediation of later EF deficits. The purpose of the current study was to investigate this relationship in young children. This study incorporated the Behavioural Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF and two motor assessments with a focus on precision grasping to test this hypothesis. The BRIEF is comprised of two indices of EF: 1 the Behavioral Regulation Index (BRI containing three subscales: Inhibit, Shift, and Emotional Control; 2 the Metacognition Index (MI containing five subscales: Initiate, Working Memory, Plan/Organize, Organization of Materials, and Monitor. A global executive composite (GEC is derived from the two indices. In this study, right-handed children aged 5-6 and 9-10 were asked to: grasp-to-construct (Lego® models; and grasp-to-place (wooden blocks, while their parents completed the BRIEF questionnaire. Analysis of results indicated significant correlations between the strength of right hand preference for grasping and numerous elements of the BRIEF including the BRI, MI, and GEC. Specifically, the more the right hand was used for grasping the better the EF ratings. In addition, patterns of space-use correlated with the GEC in several subscales of the BRIEF. Finally and remarkably, the results also showed a reciprocal relationship between hand and space use for grasping and EF. These findings are discussed with respect to: 1 the developmental overlap of motor and executive functions; 2 detection of EF deficits through

  13. Co-registering kinematics and evoked related potentials during visually guided reach-to-grasp movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa De Sanctis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In non-human primates grasp-related sensorimotor transformations are accomplished in a circuit involving the anterior intraparietal sulcus (area AIP and both the ventral and the dorsal sectors of the premotor cortex (vPMC and dPMC, respectively. Although a human homologue of such a circuit has been identified, the time course of activation of these cortical areas and how such activity relates to specific kinematic events has yet to be investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined kinematic and event-related potential techniques to explicitly test how activity within human grasping-related brain areas is modulated in time. Subjects were requested to reach towards and grasp either a small stimulus using a precision grip (i.e., the opposition of index finger and thumb or a large stimulus using a whole hand grasp (i.e., the flexion of all digits around the stimulus. Results revealed a time course of activation starting at the level of parietal regions and continuing at the level of premotor regions. More specifically, we show that activity within these regions was tuned for specific grasps well before movement onset and this early tuning was carried over--as evidenced by kinematic analysis--during the preshaping period of the task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data are discussed in terms of recent findings showing a marked differentiation across different grasps during premovement phases which was carried over into subsequent movement phases. These findings offer a substantial contribution to the current debate about the nature of the sensorimotor transformations underlying grasping. And provide new insights into the detailed movement information contained in the human preparatory activity for specific hand movements.

  14. Different Evolutionary Origins for the Reach and the Grasp: An Explanation for Dual Visuomotor Channels in Primate Parietofrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni M Karl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dual Visuomotor Channel Theory proposes that manual prehension consists of two temporally integrated movements, each subserved by distinct visuomotor pathways in occipitoparietofrontal cortex. The Reach is mediated by a dorsomedial pathway and transports the hand in relation to the target’s extrinsic properties (i.e., location and orientation. The Grasp is mediated by a dorsolateral pathway and opens, preshapes, and closes the hand in relation to the target’s intrinsic properties (i.e., size and shape. Here, neuropsychological, developmental, and comparative evidence is reviewed to show that the Reach and the Grasp have different evolutionary origins. First, the removal or degradation of vision causes prehension to decompose into its constituent Reach and Grasp components, which are then executed in sequence or isolation. Similar decomposition occurs in optic ataxic patients following cortical injury to the Reach and Grasp pathways and after corticospinal tract lesions in non-human primates. Second, early nonvisual PreReach and PreGrasp movements develop into mature Reach and Grasp movements but are only integrated under visual control after a prolonged developmental period. Third, comparative studies reveal many similarities between stepping movements and the Reach and between food handling movements and the Grasp, suggesting that the Reach and Grasp are derived from different evolutionary antecedents. The evidence is discussed in relation to the ideas that dual visuomotor channels in primate parietofrontal cortex emerged as a result of distinct evolutionary origins for the Reach and Grasp; that foveated vision in primates serves to integrate the Reach and Grasp into a single prehensile act; and, that flexible recombination of discrete Reach and Grasp movements under various forms of sensory and cognitive control can produce adaptive behavior.

  15. Reliability of the Ego-Grasping Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2012-04-01

    Research using Knoblauch and Falconer's Ego-Grasping Scale is reviewed. Using a sample of 695 undergraduate students, the scale had moderate reliability (Cronbach alpha, odd-even numbered items, and test-retest), but a principal-components analysis with a varimax rotation identified five components, indicating heterogeneity in the content of the items. Lower Ego-Grasping scores appear to be associated with better psychological health. The scale has been translated and used with Korean, Kuwaiti, and Turkish students, indicating that the scale can be useful in cross-cultural studies.

  16. Grasping Preparation Enhances Orientation Change Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutteling, T.P.; Kenemans, J.L.; Neggers, S.F.W.

    2011-01-01

    Preparing a goal directed movement often requires detailed analysis of our environment. When picking up an object, its orientation, size and relative distance are relevant parameters when preparing a successful grasp. It would therefore be beneficial if the motor system is able to influence early pe

  17. Grasping-related functional MRI brain responses in the macaque monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Koen; Vanduffel, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Research in recent decades has suggested the existence of a dedicated brain network devoted to the organization and execution of grasping, one of the most important and skilled movements of primates. Grasping an object requires the transformation of intrinsic object properties such as size, orientation and shape into an appropriate motor scheme shaping the hand. While electrophysiological recordings in the monkey model have proven invaluable for gaining insights into the neuronal substrate underlying this complex behavior, knowledge concerning the existence and organization of a similar system in the human brain is derived mainly from imaging studies. Here we present for the first time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain activity while macaque monkeys performed reaching and grasping movements in a 3 Tesla MR scanner. Grasping-in-the-dark (compared to reaching) yielded significant activations in anterior intraparietal area (AIP) and ventral premotor area F5, in addition to area PFG in the rostral inferior parietal lobule, somatosensory areas (SI, SII, area 5) and the hand field of F1. Whole-brain macaque fMRI motor studies will be instrumental in establishing possible homologies concerning grasping organization in the human and monkey brains, bridging the gap between human imaging and monkey electrophysiology. PMID:21632943

  18. Children's head movements and postural stability as a function of task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatters, Ian; Mushtaq, Faisal; Hill, Liam J B; Rossiter, Anna; Jarrett-Peet, Kate; Culmer, Pete; Holt, Ray; Wilkie, Richard M; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Manual dexterity and postural control develop throughout childhood, leading to changes in the synergistic relationships between head, hand and posture. But the postural developments that support complex manual task performance (i.e. beyond pointing and grasping) have not been examined in depth. We report two experiments in which we recorded head and posture data whilst participants simultaneously performed a visuomotor task. In Experiment 1, we explored the extent to which postural stability is affected by concurrently performing a visual and manual task whilst standing (a visual vs. manual-tracking task) in four age groups: 5-6 years (n = 8), 8-9 years (n = 10), 10-11 years (n = 7) and 19-21 years (n = 9). For visual tracking, the children's but not adult's postural movement increased relative to baseline with a larger effect for faster moving targets. In manual tracking, we found greater postural movement in children compared to adults. These data suggest predictive postural compensation mechanisms develop during childhood to improve stability whilst performing visuomotor tasks. Experiment 2 examined the extent to which posture is influenced by manual activity in three age groups of children [5-6 years (n = 14), 7-8 years (n = 25), and 9-10 years (n = 24)] when they were seated, given that many important tasks (e.g. handwriting) are learned and performed whilst seated. We found that postural stability varied in a principled manner as a function of task demands. Children exhibited increased stability when tracing a complex shape (which required less predictive postural adjustment) and decreased stability in an aiming task (which required movements that were more likely to perturb posture). These experiments shed light on the task-dependant relationships that exist between postural control mechanisms and the development of specific types of manual control.

  19. In-situ electric field in human body model in different postures for wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2015-01-07

    The in-situ electric field of an adult male model in different postures is evaluated for exposure to the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle. The transfer system is located below the centre of the vehicle body and the transferred power and frequency are 7 kW and 85 kHz, respectively. The in-situ electric field is evaluated for a human model (i) crouching near the vehicle, (ii) lying on the ground with or without his arm stretched, (iii) sitting in the driver's seat, and (iv) standing on a transmitting coil without a receiving coil. In each scenario, the maximum in-situ electric fields are lower than the allowable limit prescribed by international guidelines, although the local magnetic field strength in regions of the human body is higher than the allowable external magnetic field strength. The highest in-situ electric field is observed when the human body model is placed on the ground with his arm extended toward the coils, because of a higher magnetic field around the arm.

  20. Grasp Algorithms For Optotactile Robotic Sample Acquisition Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Robotic sample acquisition is essentially grasping. Multi-finger robot sample grasping devices are controlled to securely pick up samples. Equations have been...

  1. Measuring Regularity of Human Postural Sway Using Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Ligament laxity in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) patients can influence the intrinsic information about posture and movement and can have a negative effect on the appropriateness of postural reactions. Several measures have been proposed in literature to describe the planar migration of CoP over the base of support, and the…

  2. A method to model anticipatory postural control in driver braking events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osth, J.; Eliasson, E.; Happee, R.; Brolin, K.

    2014-01-01

    Human body models (HBMs) for vehicle occupant simulations have recently been extended with active muscles and postural control strategies. Feedback control has been used to model occupant responses to autonomous braking interventions. However, driver postural responses during driver initiated brakin

  3. Cardiovascular determinants of maximal oxygen consumption in upright and supine posture at the end of prolonged bed rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringard, Aurélien; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; De Roia, Gabriela; Lador, Frédéric; Lucini, Daniela; Pizzinelli, Paolo; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-06-30

    We tested the hypothesis that, after bed rest, maximal oxygen consumption ( VO₂max ) decreases more upright than supine, because of adequate cardiovascular response supine, but not upright. On 9 subjects, we determined VO₂max and maximal cardiac output (Q ) upright and supine, before and after (reambulation day upright, the following day supine) 35-day bed rest, by classical steady state protocol. Oxygen consumption, heart rate (f(H)) and stroke volume (Q(st)) were measured by a metabolic cart, electrocardiography and Modelflow from pulse pressure profiles, respectively. We computed Q as f(H) times Q(st), and systemic oxygen flow ( QaO₂) as Q. times arterial oxygen concentration, obtained after haemoglobin and arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Before bed rest, all parameters at maximal exercise were similar upright and supine. After bed rest, VO₂max was lower (pcardiovascular response (i) did not affect VO₂max supine, (ii) partially explained the VO₂max decrease upright, and (iii) caused the VO₂max differences between postures. We speculate that impaired peripheral oxygen transfer and/or utilisation may explain the VO₂max decrease supine and the fraction of VO₂max decrease upright unexplained by cardiovascular responses.

  4. Postural Control in Man: The Phylogenetic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gramsbergen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Erect posture in man is a recent affordance from an evolutionary perspective. About eight million years ago, the stock from which modern humans derived split off from the ape family, and from around sixty-thousand years ago, modern man developed. Upright gait and manipulations while standing pose intricate cybernetic problems for postural control. The trunk, having an older evolutionary history than the extremities, is innervated by medially descending motor systems and extremity muscles by the more recent, laterally descending systems. Movements obviously require concerted actions from both systems. Research in rats has demonstrated the interdependencies between postural control and the development of fluent walking. Only 15 days after birth, adult-like fluent locomotion emerges and is critically dependent upon postural development. Vesttibular deprivation induces a retardation in postural development and, consequently, a retarded development of adult-like locomotion. The cerebellum obviously has an important role in mutual adjustments in postural control and extremity movements, or, in coupling the phyiogenetic older and newer structures. In the human, the cerebellum develops partly after birth and therefore is vulnerable to adverse perinatal influences. Such vulnerability seems to justify focusing our scientific research efforts onto the development of this structure.

  5. To get the grasp: seven-month-olds encode and selectively reproduce goal-directed grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoermer, Claudia; Woodward, Amanda; Sodian, Beate; Perst, Hannah; Kristen, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    Infants need to analyze human behavior in terms of goal-directed actions in order to form expectations about agents' rationality. There is converging evidence for goal encoding during the first year of life from looking time as well as social learning paradigms using imitation procedures. However, conceptual interpretations of these abilities are challenged by low-level motor resonance accounts that propose task-specific lower level sensorimotor associations underlying looking time tasks rather than abstract conceptual knowledge. To test the differential predictions derived from the two accounts, we investigated within-child consistency of performance on different, but conceptually related, tasks requiring goal encoding. This study presented seven-month-old infants with a looking time task and an imitation task, both testing their ability to encode an action goal based on a reaching action, as well as a working memory task to control for the influence of general cognitive capacity. Results showed inter task convergence to be independent of working memory: infants who spent more time looking at goal change events in the looking time task were more likely to selectively reproduce the goal in the imitation task when the model had performed an intentional grasping action rather than a back-of-hand object contact. These findings support the view that low-level motor resonance mechanisms are not sufficient to explain the capacities of action understanding in infants.

  6. Homography-based grasp tracking for planar objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carloni, Raffaella; Recatala, Gabriel; Melchiorri, Claudio; Sanz, Pedro J.; Cervera, Enric

    The visual tracking of grasp points is an essential operation for the execution of an approaching movement of a robot arm to an object: the grasp points are used as features for the definition of the control law. This work describes a strategy for tracking grasps on planar objects based on the use

  7. On transferability and contexts when using simulated grasp databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jimmy Alison; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Kraft, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    It has become a common practice to use simulation to generate large databases of good grasps for grasp planning in robotics research. However, the existence of a generic simulation context that enables the generation of high quality grasps that can be used in several different contexts such as bi...

  8. Social Postural Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  9. Social Postural Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  10. Generating human-like movements on an anthropomorphic robot using an interior point method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa e Silva, E.; Araújo, J. P.; Machado, D.; Costa, M. F.; Erlhagen, W.; Bicho, E.

    2013-10-01

    In previous work we have presented a model for generating human-like arm and hand movements on an anthropomorphic robot involved in human-robot collaboration tasks. This model was inspired by the Posture-Based Motion-Planning Model of human movements. Numerical results and simulations for reach-to-grasp movements with two different grip types have been presented previously. In this paper we extend our model in order to address the generation of more complex movement sequences which are challenged by scenarios cluttered with obstacles. The numerical results were obtained using the IPOPT solver, which was integrated in our MATLAB simulator of an anthropomorphic robot.

  11. Virtual grasping: closed-loop force control using electrotactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgovanovic, Nikola; Dosen, Strahinja; Djozic, Damir J; Krajoski, Goran; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Closing the control loop by providing somatosensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is a well-known, long standing challenge in the field of prosthetics. Various approaches have been investigated for feedback restoration, ranging from direct neural stimulation to noninvasive sensory substitution methods. Although there are many studies presenting closed-loop systems, only a few of them objectively evaluated the closed-loop performance, mostly using vibrotactile stimulation. Importantly, the conclusions about the utility of the feedback were partly contradictory. The goal of the current study was to systematically investigate the capability of human subjects to control grasping force in closed loop using electrotactile feedback. We have developed a realistic experimental setup for virtual grasping, which operated in real time, included a set of real life objects, as well as a graphical and dynamical model of the prosthesis. We have used the setup to test 10 healthy, able bodied subjects to investigate the role of training, feedback and feedforward control, robustness of the closed loop, and the ability of the human subjects to generalize the control to previously "unseen" objects. Overall, the outcomes of this study are very optimistic with regard to the benefits of feedback and reveal various, practically relevant, aspects of closed-loop control.

  12. Grasping social dynamics of participatory innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sproedt, Henrik; Boer, Laurens

    2011-01-01

    The key element in participatory innovation is to understand innovation as a social problem solving process between different stakeholders. The social dynamics amongst stakeholders are fundamental to the participatory process and outcome, and it’s therefore beneficial for facilitators...... and stakeholders themselves to understand their relations and what it means to participate. We argue that we can grasp these social dynamics of participatory innovation through play. From a management perspective we study how playing games helps us to understand these dynamics, while from an interaction design......-opetition where individual and group goals are conflicting. Drawing on observations and video data of the game being played by the participants of the conference, we study how different group compositions deal with novelty. From here we explain how the process of play can help to grasp the social dynamics...

  13. Grasping social dynamics of participatory innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sproedt, Henrik; Boer, Laurens

    2011-01-01

    and stakeholders themselves to understand their relations and what it means to participate. We argue that we can grasp these social dynamics of participatory innovation through play. From a management perspective we study how playing games helps us to understand these dynamics, while from an interaction design...... perspective we study how a game that addresses these dynamics can be designed. We describe a case of a game, designed for the Participatory Innovation Conference of 2011 in Sønderborg, Denmark. The game was particularly designed around the themes of conflict and interdependence, captured by the dilemma of co......-opetition where individual and group goals are conflicting. Drawing on observations and video data of the game being played by the participants of the conference, we study how different group compositions deal with novelty. From here we explain how the process of play can help to grasp the social dynamics...

  14. Which Orbit for the GRASP Mission ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, A.; Coulot, D.; Zoulida, M.; Deleflie, F.; Biancale, R.; Mandea, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) mission was first proposed in 2011 by JPL in response to the NASA NNH11ZDA012O call for Earth Venture-2 mission. Recently, considering the recommendation of the Prospective Scientific Seminar, CNES expresses its interest and the possibility to participate in a next new JPL proposal. GRASP is a spacecraft system designed to build an enduring and stable Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) for accurately measuring and understanding changes in sea level, ice sheets and other elements of the dynamic Earth system. These objectives set the 1 mm accuracy and 0.1 mm/year stability (GGOS, Meeting the Requirements of a Global Society on a Changing Planet in 2020, Plag and Pearlman, 2009) as the goals for the TRF; goals which are an order of magnitude more accurate than the current performance of the TRF. For that, GRASP will carry very precise sensor systems for all the key geodetic techniques used to define and monitor the TRF: a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver, a Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) retroreflector, a Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) receiver, and a novel Very Large Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) beacon. To reach mission goals, the first step is to determine the optimal orbit of this satellite. In this study, we present an original approach for determining such orbits, using evolutionary algorithms. The method allows us to optimize orbits according to specific criteria such as the visibility of the satellite from ground stations and satellites; especially the visibility of GRASP by at least two VLBI stations, with the longest possible baseline, and by GNSS satellites.

  15. Postural instability detection: aging and the complexity of spatial-temporal distributional patterns for virtually contacting the stability boundary in human stance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Kilby

    Full Text Available Falls among the older population can severely restrict their functional mobility and even cause death. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms and conditions that cause falls, for which it is important to develop a predictive model of falls. One critical quantity for postural instability detection and prediction is the instantaneous stability of quiet upright stance based on motion data. However, well-established measures in the field of motor control that quantify overall postural stability using center-of-pressure (COP or center-of-mass (COM fluctuations are inadequate predictors of instantaneous stability. For this reason, 2D COP/COM virtual-time-to-contact (VTC is investigated to detect the postural stability deficits of healthy older people compared to young adults. VTC predicts the temporal safety margin to the functional stability boundary ( =  limits of the region of feasible COP or COM displacement and, therefore, provides an index of the risk of losing postural stability. The spatial directions with increased instability were also determined using quantities of VTC that have not previously been considered. Further, Lempel-Ziv-Complexity (LZC, a measure suitable for on-line monitoring of stability/instability, was applied to explore the temporal structure or complexity of VTC and the predictability of future postural instability based on previous behavior. These features were examined as a function of age, vision and different load weighting on the legs. The primary findings showed that for old adults the stability boundary was contracted and VTC reduced. Furthermore, the complexity decreased with aging and the direction with highest postural instability also changed in aging compared to the young adults. The findings reveal the sensitivity of the time dependent properties of 2D VTC to the detection of postural instability in aging, availability of visual information and postural stance and potential applicability as a

  16. Does observation of postural imbalance induce a postural reaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banty Tia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies bring evidence that action observation elicits contagious responses during social interactions. However automatic imitative tendencies are generally inhibited and it remains unclear in which conditions mere action observation triggers motor behaviours. In this study, we addressed the question of contagious postural responses when observing human imbalance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded participants' body sway while they observed a fixation cross (control condition, an upright point-light display of a gymnast balancing on a rope, and the same point-light display presented upside down. Our results showed that, when the upright stimulus was displayed prior to the inverted one, centre of pressure area and antero-posterior path length were significantly greater in the upright condition compared to the control and upside down conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate a contagious postural reaction suggesting a partial inefficiency of inhibitory processes. Further, kinematic information was sufficient to trigger this reaction. The difference recorded between the upright and upside down conditions indicates that the contagion effect was dependent on the integration of gravity constraints by body kinematics. Interestingly, the postural response was sensitive to habituation, and seemed to disappear when the observer was previously shown an inverted display. The motor contagion recorded here is consistent with previous work showing vegetative output during observation of an effortful movement and could indicate that lower level control facilitates contagion effects.

  17. Preparing to grasp emotionally laden stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Alice Santos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contemporary theories of motor control propose that motor planning involves the prediction of the consequences of actions. These predictions include the associated costs as well as the rewarding nature of movements' outcomes. Within the estimation of these costs and rewards would lie the valence, that is, the pleasantness or unpleasantness of a given stimulus with which one is about to interact. The aim of this study was to test if motor preparation encompasses valence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The readiness potential, an electrophysiological marker of motor preparation, was recorded before the grasping of pleasant, neutral and unpleasant stimuli. Items used were balanced in weight and placed inside transparent cylinders to prompt a similar grip among trials. Compared with neutral stimuli, the grasping of pleasant stimuli was preceded by a readiness potential of lower amplitude, whereas that of unpleasant stimuli was associated with a readiness potential of higher amplitude. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that the sensorimotor cortex activity preceding the grasping of a stimulus is affected by its valence. Smaller readiness potential amplitudes found for pleasant stimuli could imply in the recruitment of pre-set motor repertoires, whereas higher amplitudes found for unpleasant stimuli would emerge from a discrepancy between the required action and their aversiveness. Our results indicate that the prediction of action outcomes encompasses an estimate of the valence of a stimulus with which one is about to interact.

  18. Preparing to Grasp Emotionally Laden Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Laura Alice Santos; Imbiriba, Luís Aureliano; Russo, Maitê Mello; Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Rodrigues, Erika de C.; Pereira, Mirtes G.; Volchan, Eliane; Vargas, Cláudia Domingues

    2012-01-01

    Background Contemporary theories of motor control propose that motor planning involves the prediction of the consequences of actions. These predictions include the associated costs as well as the rewarding nature of movements’ outcomes. Within the estimation of these costs and rewards would lie the valence, that is, the pleasantness or unpleasantness of a given stimulus with which one is about to interact. The aim of this study was to test if motor preparation encompasses valence. Methodology/Principal Findings The readiness potential, an electrophysiological marker of motor preparation, was recorded before the grasping of pleasant, neutral and unpleasant stimuli. Items used were balanced in weight and placed inside transparent cylinders to prompt a similar grip among trials. Compared with neutral stimuli, the grasping of pleasant stimuli was preceded by a readiness potential of lower amplitude, whereas that of unpleasant stimuli was associated with a readiness potential of higher amplitude. Conclusions/Significance We show for the first time that the sensorimotor cortex activity preceding the grasping of a stimulus is affected by its valence. Smaller readiness potential amplitudes found for pleasant stimuli could imply in the recruitment of pre-set motor repertoires, whereas higher amplitudes found for unpleasant stimuli would emerge from a discrepancy between the required action and their aversiveness. Our results indicate that the prediction of action outcomes encompasses an estimate of the valence of a stimulus with which one is about to interact. PMID:23024811

  19. Prosthetic hand sensor placement: Analysis of touch perception during the grasp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans rely on their hands to perform everyday tasks. The hand is used as a tool, but also as the interface to “sense” the world. Current prosthetic hands are based on sophisticated multi-fingered structures, and include many sensors which counterpart natural proprioceptors and exteroceptors. The sensory information is used for control, but not sent to the user of the hand (amputee. Grasping without sensing is not good enough. This research is part of the development of the sensing interface for amputees, specifically addressing the analysis of human perception while grasping. The goal is to determine the small number of preferred positions of sensors on the prosthetic hand. This task has previously been approached by trying to replicate a natural sensory system characteristic for healthy humans, resulting in a multitude of redundant sensors and basic inability to make the patient aware of the sensor readings on the subconscious level. We based our artificial perception system on the reported sensations of humans when grasping various objects without seeing the objects (obstructed visual feedback. Subjects, with no known sensory deficits, were asked to report on the touch sensation while grasping. The analysis included objects of various sizes, weights, textures and temperatures. Based on this data we formed a map of the preferred positions for the sensors that is appropriate for five finger human-like robotic hand. The final map was intentionally minimized in size (number of sensors.

  20. Nothing magical: pantomimed grasping is controlled by the ventral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsma, Thijs; van der Kamp, John; Dicks, Matt; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2017-06-01

    In a recent amendment to the two-visual-system model, it has been proposed that actions must result in tactile contact with the goal object for the dorsal system to become engaged (Whitwell et al., Neuropsychologia 55:41-50, 2014). The present study tested this addition by assessing the use of allocentric information in normal and pantomime actions. To this end, magicians, and participants who were inexperienced in performing pantomime actions made normal and pantomime grasps toward objects embedded in the Müller-Lyer illusion. During pantomime grasping, a grasp was made next to an object that was in full view (i.e., a displaced pantomime grasping task). The results showed that pantomime grasps took longer, were slower, and had smaller hand apertures than normal grasping. Most importantly, hand apertures were affected by the illusion during pantomime grasping but not in normal grasping, indicating that displaced pantomime grasping is based on allocentric information. This was true for participants without experience in performing pantomime grasps as well as for magicians with experience in pantomiming. The finding that the illusory bias is limited to pantomime grasping and persists with experience supports the conjecture that the normal engagement of the dorsal system's contribution requires tactile contact with a goal object. If no tactile contact is made, then movement control shifts toward the ventral system.

  1. Grasping Strategy in Space Robot Capturing Floating Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Cheng; Liu Tianxi; Zhao Yang

    2010-01-01

    When the space robot captures a floating target,contact impact occurs inevitably and frequently between the manipulator hand and the target,which seriously impacts the position and attitude of the robot and grasping security."Dynamic grasping area"is introduced to describe the collision process of manipulator grasping target,and grasping area control equation is established.By analyzing the impact of grasping control parameters,base and target mass on the grasping process and combining the life experience,it is found that if the product of speed control parameter and dB adjustment parameter is close to but smaller than the minimum grasping speed,collision impact in the grasping process could be reduced greatly,and then an ideal grasping strategy is proposed.Simulation results indicate that during the same period,the strategy grasping is superior to the accelerating grasping,in that the amplitude of impact force is reduced to 20%,and the attitude control torque is reduced to 15%,and the impact on the robot is eliminated significantly.The results would have important academic value and engineering significance.

  2. Assessing Grasp Stability Based on Learning and Haptic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiroglu, Yasemin; Laaksonen, Janne; Jørgensen, Jimmy Alison

    2011-01-01

    data and machine-learning methods, including AdaBoost, support vector machines (SVMs), and hidden Markov models (HMMs). In particular, we study the effect of different sensory streams to grasp stability. This includes object information such as shape; grasp information such as approach vector; tactile...... measurements from fingertips; and joint configuration of the hand. Sensory knowledge affects the success of the grasping process both in the planning stage (before a grasp is executed) and during the execution of the grasp (closed-loop online control). In this paper, we study both of these aspects. We propose...... a probabilistic learning framework to assess grasp stability and demonstrate that knowledge about grasp stability can be inferred using information from tactile sensors. Experiments on both simulated and real data are shown. The results indicate that the idea to exploit the learning approach is applicable...

  3. Dynamical characteristics of surface EMG signals of hand grasps via recurrence plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Zhu, Xiangyang; Ju, Zhaojie; Liu, Honghai

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing human hand grasp movements through surface electromyogram (sEMG) is a challenging task. In this paper, we investigated nonlinear measures based on recurrence plot, as a tool to evaluate the hidden dynamical characteristics of sEMG during four different hand movements. A series of experimental tests in this study show that the dynamical characteristics of sEMG data with recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) can distinguish different hand grasp movements. Meanwhile, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is applied to evaluate the performance of the aforementioned measures to identify the grasp movements. The experimental results show that the recognition rate (99.1%) based on the combination of linear and nonlinear measures is much higher than those with only linear measures (93.4%) or nonlinear measures (88.1%). These results suggest that the RQA measures might be a potential tool to reveal the sEMG hidden characteristics of hand grasp movements and an effective supplement for the traditional linear grasp recognition methods.

  4. Evaluation of a graphic interface to control a robotic grasping arm: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, Isabelle; Biard, Nicolas; Chalubert, Gérard; Delahoche, Laurent; Marhic, Bruno; Boyer, François C; Leroux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    Laffont I, Biard N, Chalubert G, Delahoche L, Marhic B, Boyer FC, Leroux C. Evaluation of a graphic interface to control a robotic grasping arm: a multicenter study. Grasping robots are still difficult to use for persons with disabilities because of inadequate human-machine interfaces (HMIs). Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of a graphic interface enhanced by a panoramic camera to detect out-of-view objects and control a commercialized robotic grasping arm. Multicenter, open-label trial. Four French departments of physical and rehabilitation medicine. Control subjects (N=24; mean age, 33y) and 20 severely impaired patients (mean age, 44y; 5 with muscular dystrophies, 13 with traumatic tetraplegia, and 2 others) completed the study. None of these patients was able to grasp a 50-cL bottle without the robot. Participants were asked to grasp 6 objects scattered around their wheelchair using the robotic arm. They were able to select the desired object through the graphic interface available on their computer screen. Global success rate, time needed to select the object on the screen of the computer, number of clicks on the HMI, and satisfaction among users. We found a significantly lower success rate in patients (81.1% vs 88.7%; chi(2)P=.017). The duration of the task was significantly higher in patients (71.6s vs 39.1s; Probotic arms for disabled people, with numerous potential applications in daily life.

  5. Classic ballet dancers postural patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseani Paulini Neves Simas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate classic ballet practice and its influence on postural patterns and (a identify the most frequent postural changes; (b determine the postural pattern; (c verify the existence of association of practice time and postural changes. The investigation was carried out in two stages: one, description in which 106 dancers participated; the other, causal comparative in which 50 dancers participated; and (a questionnaire; (b a checkerboard; (c postural chart; (d measure tape; (e camera and (f pedoscope were used as instrument. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used for analysis. The results revealed the most frequent postural changes such as hyperlordosis, unleveled shoulders and pronated ankles. Ballet seems to have negative implications in the postural development , affecting especially the vertebral spine, trunk and feet. The practice time was not a parameter to indicate the increase in postural changes. In conclusion, ballet may be associated with postural changes and determining a characteristic postural pattern.

  6. Tactile Gloves for Autonomous Grasping With the NASA/DARPA Robonaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. B.; Ambrose, R. O.; Diftler, M. A.; Platt, R., Jr.; Butzer, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Tactile data from rugged gloves are providing the foundation for developing autonomous grasping skills for the NASA/DARPA Robonaut, a dexterous humanoid robot. These custom gloves compliment the human like dexterity available in the Robonaut hands. Multiple versions of the gloves are discussed, showing a progression in using advanced materials and construction techniques to enhance sensitivity and overall sensor coverage. The force data provided by the gloves can be used to improve dexterous, tool and power grasping primitives. Experiments with the latest gloves focus on the use of tools, specifically a power drill used to approximate an astronaut's torque tool.

  7. Bio-inspired grasp control in a robotic hand with massive sensorial input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, Luca; Bertocchi, Ulisse; Corradi, Paolo; Laschi, Cecilia; Dario, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    The capability of grasping and lifting an object in a suitable, stable and controlled way is an outstanding feature for a robot, and thus far, one of the major problems to be solved in robotics. No robotic tools able to perform an advanced control of the grasp as, for instance, the human hand does, have been demonstrated to date. Due to its capital importance in science and in many applications, namely from biomedics to manufacturing, the issue has been matter of deep scientific investigations in both the field of neurophysiology and robotics. While the former is contributing with a profound understanding of the dynamics of real-time control of the slippage and grasp force in the human hand, the latter tries more and more to reproduce, or take inspiration by, the nature's approach, by means of hardware and software technology. On this regard, one of the major constraints robotics has to overcome is the real-time processing of a large amounts of data generated by the tactile sensors while grasping, which poses serious problems to the available computational power. In this paper a bio-inspired approach to tactile data processing has been followed in order to design and test a hardware-software robotic architecture that works on the parallel processing of a large amount of tactile sensing signals. The working principle of the architecture bases on the cellular nonlinear/neural network (CNN) paradigm, while using both hand shape and spatial-temporal features obtained from an array of microfabricated force sensors, in order to control the sensory-motor coordination of the robotic system. Prototypical grasping tasks were selected to measure the system performances applied to a computer-interfaced robotic hand. Successful grasps of several objects, completely unknown to the robot, e.g. soft and deformable objects like plastic bottles, soft balls, and Japanese tofu, have been demonstrated.

  8. Postural challenge affects motor cortical activity in young and old adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papegaaij, Selma; Taube, Wolfgang; van Keeken, Helco G.; Otten, Egbert; Baudry, Stephane; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    When humans voluntarily activate a muscle, intracortical inhibition decreases. Such a decrease also occurs in the presence of a postural challenge and more so with increasing age. Here, we examined age-related changes in motor cortical activity during postural and non-postural contractions with vary

  9. Exercise and Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have Spondylitis? Treatment Information Medications Exercise & Posture Diet & Nutrition Medication & Diet Dietary Supplements Changing Your Diet The London AS / Low Starch Diet Complementary Treatments Possible Complications Iritis or Anterior Uveitis Fatigue in Spondylitis Pain in ...

  10. Improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments for balance control: effect of a single training session

    OpenAIRE

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans use anticipatory and compensatory postural strategies to maintain and restore balance when perturbed. Inefficient generation and utilization of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) is one of the reasons for postural instability. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session ...

  11. Posture recognition based on fuzzy logic for home monitoring of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulin, Damien; Benezeth, Yannick; Courtial, Estelle

    2012-09-01

    We propose in this paper a computer vision-based posture recognition method for home monitoring of the elderly. The proposed system performs human detection prior to the posture analysis; posture recognition is performed only on a human silhouette. The human detection approach has been designed to be robust to different environmental stimuli. Thus, posture is analyzed with simple and efficient features that are not designed to manage constraints related to the environment but only designed to describe human silhouettes. The posture recognition method, based on fuzzy logic, identifies four static postures and is robust to variation in the distance between the camera and the person, and to the person's morphology. With an accuracy of 74.29% of satisfactory posture recognition, this approach can detect emergency situations such as a fall within a health smart home.

  12. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil M; Bampouras, Theodoros M; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  13. Postural adjustments are modulated by manual task complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Augusto Teixeira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Daily life activities of humans are characterized by dual tasks, in which a manual task is performed concomitantly with a postural task. Based on the assumption that both manual and postural tasks require attentional resources, no consensus exists as to how the central nervous system modulates postural adjustments in dual tasks. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of a manual task requiring attentional resources on shoulder and ankle adjustments as a function of the direction and predictability of postural perturbation. The participants (n=6 were evaluated during the performance of a simple and a complex manual task, while the base of support was moved backward or forward. Latency of activation of the tibialis anterior and gastroc-nemius muscles and angular acceleration of the shoulder were analyzed. The results showed that execution of the complex manual task delayed postural adjustment. Moreover, this delay occurred differently depending on the direction of postural perturbation. The delay in postural adjustment occurred proximally in the case of anterior displacement of the platform, and distally in the case of posterior displacement. Postural adjustments were more affected by the attentional task than by the predictability of platform displacement. These results are consistent with the concept of an integrated control between manual actions and the maintenance of static posture.

  14. Thermal control of the GRASP detector section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, P. B.

    1988-12-01

    The necessity of keeping GRASP telescope (Gamma Ray Astronomy with Spectroscopy and Positioning) detectors at working temperatures within an adequate range (85 + or - 15 K for the germanium and 283 + or - 20 K for CsI) is discussed. Thermal control based in cryogenic liquid tanks is not considered the most suitable solution because of mass and lifetime considerations. Instead of this conventional solution, a concept using a combination of passive and active cooling systems was chosen. It combines the features of a corrugated radiator panel, thermal shields, MLI blankets, and an extra cooling system based on the Stirling cycle engine.

  15. Compensatory motor control after stroke: an alternative joint strategy for object-dependent shaping of hand posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Preeti; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M; Krakauer, John W

    2010-06-01

    Efficient grasping requires planned and accurate coordination of finger movements to approximate the shape of an object before contact. In healthy subjects, hand shaping is known to occur early in reach under predominantly feedforward control. In patients with hemiparesis after stroke, execution of coordinated digit motion during grasping is impaired as a result of damage to the corticospinal tract. The question addressed here is whether patients with hemiparesis are able to compensate for their execution deficit with a qualitatively different grasp strategy that still allows them to differentiate hand posture to object shape. Subjects grasped a rectangular, concave, and convex object while wearing an instrumented glove. Reach-to-grasp was divided into three phases based on wrist kinematics: reach acceleration (reach onset to peak horizontal wrist velocity), reach deceleration (peak horizontal wrist velocity to reach offset), and grasp (reach offset to lift-off). Patients showed reduced finger abduction, proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) flexion, and metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) extension at object grasp across all three shapes compared with controls; however, they were able to partially differentiate hand posture for the convex and concave shapes using a compensatory strategy that involved increased MCP flexion rather than the PIP flexion seen in controls. Interestingly, shape-specific hand postures did not unfold initially during reach acceleration as seen in controls, but instead evolved later during reach deceleration, which suggests increased reliance on sensory feedback. These results indicate that kinematic analysis can identify and quantify within-limb compensatory motor control strategies after stroke. From a clinical perspective, quantitative study of compensation is important to better understand the process of recovery from brain injury. From a motor control perspective, compensation can be considered a model for how joint redundancy is exploited

  16. Planning, Plumbing, or Posturing? Explaining the Weakness of Human Resource Development Structures and Policies in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Stephanie; Marock, Carmel; Ngcwangu, Siphelo

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, a national peak structure, the Human Resource Development Council, led by the Deputy President and consisting of key Cabinet Ministers, senior leaders from organised labour and business, community representatives, professional bodies and experts from research and higher education, was established to enable high-level coordination…

  17. Planning, Plumbing, or Posturing? Explaining the Weakness of Human Resource Development Structures and Policies in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Stephanie; Marock, Carmel; Ngcwangu, Siphelo

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, a national peak structure, the Human Resource Development Council, led by the Deputy President and consisting of key Cabinet Ministers, senior leaders from organised labour and business, community representatives, professional bodies and experts from research and higher education, was established to enable high-level coordination…

  18. An investigation of the neural circuits underlying reaching and reach-to-grasp movements: from planning to execution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eBegliomini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental evidence suggests the existence of a sophisticated brain circuit specifically dedicated to reach-to-grasp planning and execution, both in human and non human primates (Castiello, 2005. Studies accomplished by means of neuroimaging techniques suggest the hypothesis of a dichotomy between a reach-to-grasp circuit, involving the intraparietal area (AIP, the dorsal and ventral premotor cortices (PMd and PMv - Castiello and Begliomini, 2008; Filimon, 2010 and a reaching circuit involving the medial intraparietal area (mIP and the Superior Parieto-Occipital Cortex (SPOC (Culham et al., 2006. However, the time course characterizing the involvement of these regions during the planning and execution of these two types of movements has yet to be delineated. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study has been conducted, including reach-to grasp and reaching only movements, performed towards either a small or a large stimulus, and Finite Impulse Response model (FIR - Henson, 2003 was adopted to monitor activation patterns from stimulus onset for a time window of 10 seconds duration. Data analysis focused on brain regions belonging either to the reaching or to the grasping network, as suggested by Castiello & Begliomini (2008.Results suggest that reaching and grasping movements planning and execution might share a common brain network, providing further confirmation to the idea that the neural underpinnings of reaching and grasping may overlap in both spatial and temporal terms (Verhagen et al., 2013.

  19. Optimization by GRASP greedy randomized adaptive search procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Resende, Mauricio G C

    2016-01-01

    This is the first book to cover GRASP (Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedures), a metaheuristic that has enjoyed wide success in practice with a broad range of applications to real-world combinatorial optimization problems. The state-of-the-art coverage and carefully crafted pedagogical style lends this book highly accessible as an introductory text not only to GRASP, but also to combinatorial optimization, greedy algorithms, local search, and path-relinking, as well as to heuristics and metaheuristics, in general. The focus is on algorithmic and computational aspects of applied optimization with GRASP with emphasis given to the end-user, providing sufficient information on the broad spectrum of advances in applied optimization with GRASP. For the more advanced reader, chapters on hybridization with path-relinking and parallel and continuous GRASP present these topics in a clear and concise fashion. Additionally, the book offers a very complete annotated bibliography of GRASP and combinatorial optimizat...

  20. Managing distributed dynamic systems with spatial grasp technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sapaty, Peter Simon

    2017-01-01

    The book describes a novel ideology and supporting information technology for integral management of both civil and defence-orientated large, distributed dynamic systems. The approach is based on a high-level Spatial Grasp Language, SGL, expressing solutions in physical, virtual, executive and combined environments in the form of active self-evolving and self-propagating patterns spatially matching the systems to be created, modified and controlled. The communicating interpreters of SGL can be installed in key system points, which may be in large numbers (up to millions and billions) and represent equipped humans, robots, laptops, smartphones, smart sensors, etc. Operating under gestalt-inspired scenarios in SGL initially injected from any points, these systems can be effectively converted into goal-driven spatial machines (rather than computers as dealing with physical matter too) capable of responding to numerous challenges caused by growing world dynamics in the 21st century. Including numerous practical e...

  1. Grasping devices and methods in automated production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantoni, Gualtiero; Santochi, Marco; Dini, Gino

    2014-01-01

    In automated production processes grasping devices and methods play a crucial role in the handling of many parts, components and products. This keynote paper starts with a classification of grasping phases, describes how different principles are adopted at different scales in different applications...... and continues explaining different releasing strategies and principles. Then the paper classifies the numerous sensors used to monitor the effectiveness of grasping (part presence, exchanged force, stick-slip transitions, etc.). Later the grasping and releasing problems in different fields (from mechanical...

  2. Learning Grasp Strategies Composed of Contact Relative Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Of central importance to grasp synthesis algorithms are the assumptions made about the object to be grasped and the sensory information that is available. Many approaches avoid the issue of sensing entirely by assuming that complete information is available. In contrast, this paper proposes an approach to grasp synthesis expressed in terms of units of control that simultaneously change the contact configuration and sense information about the object and the relative manipulator-object pose. These units of control, known as contact relative motions (CRMs), allow the grasp synthesis problem to be recast as an optimal control problem where the goal is to find a strategy for executing CRMs that leads to a grasp in the shortest number of steps. An experiment is described that uses Robonaut, the NASA-JSC space humanoid, to show that CRMs are a viable means of synthesizing grasps. However, because of the limited amount of information that a single CRM can sense, the optimal control problem may be partially observable. This paper proposes expressing the problem as a k-order Markov Decision Process (MDP) and solving it using Reinforcement Learning. This approach is tested in a simulation of a two-contact manipulator that learns to grasp an object. Grasp strategies learned in simulation are tested on the physical Robonaut platform and found to lead to grasp configurations consistently.

  3. Evaluation of postural mechanisms under dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A stimulus delivery and data acquisition system for assessment of human posture was developed based on a digital computer and a translating platform. The movement of the platform acts to displace the subject's base of support while the computer tracks the corrections which are made by the subject to maintain balance. Various stimuli are used ranging from fast transients to sine waves.

  4. Effects of pressure-dependent segmental arterial compliance and postural changes on pulse wave transmission in an arterial model of the human upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P

    2011-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effect of postural changes on arterial blood pressure and vascular properties, it is important to understand effects of pressure-dependent arterial compliance. This study investigates effects of pressure-dependent compliance on pulse wave velocity (PWVar), pressure wave shape, and transmission characteristics in an arterial model of the human arm from heart to radial artery from supine to standing. Estimated central pressure waveform was used as the input for the model, calculated using a validated transfer function (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical) from recorded radial pulses in 10 healthy male subjects (53.8 ± 7.9 years) during 0, 30, 60 and 90 degree head-up tilt. A 5-segment linear model was optimized using estimated central and recorded radial arterial pulse; each segment represented by an equivalent inductance, resistance and capacitance (compliance (C)) Pressure-dependent compliance (C(P)=a · e(b · P) was added to develop a nonlinear model, and the radial pulse calculated. Comparison of the radial pulse calculated by the linear and nonlinear models showed no statistical difference in systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure in any position of tilt. However, waveform shape was increasingly divergent at higher angles of tilt (RMS error 2.3 ± 1.2 mmHg supine, 6.5 ± 3.0 mmHg standing) as was PWVar (0% increase from supine to standing in the linear model, 16.7% increase in nonlinear model). Fourier analysis demonstrated peak amplitude of transmission being at higher frequencies and phase delay being lower in the nonlinear model relative to the linear model. Pressure-dependent arterial compliance, whilst having no effect on peak values of pressure, has significant effects on waveform shape and transmission speed, especially with a more upright position.

  5. An optimal feedback control framework for grasping objects with position uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, Vassilios N; Schrater, Paul R

    2011-10-01

    As we move, the relative location between our hands and objects changes in uncertain ways due to noisy motor commands and imprecise and ambiguous sensory information. The impressive capabilities humans display for interacting and manipulating objects with position uncertainty suggest that our brain maintains representations of location uncertainty and builds compensation for uncertainty into its motor control strategies. Our previous work demonstrated that specific control strategies are used to compensate for location uncertainty. However, it is an open question whether compensation for position uncertainty in grasping is consistent with the stochastic optimal feedback control, mainly due to the difficulty of modeling natural tasks within this framework. In this study, we develop a stochastic optimal feedback control model to evaluate the optimality of human grasping strategies. We investigate the properties of the model through a series of simulation experiments and show that it explains key aspects of previously observed compensation strategies. It also provides a basis for individual differences in terms of differential control costs-the controller compensates only to the extent that performance benefits in terms of making stable grasps outweigh the additional control costs of compensation. These results suggest that stochastic optimal feedback control can be used to understand uncertainty compensation in complex natural tasks like grasping.

  6. Size-assortative mating and sexual size dimorphism are predictable from simple mechanics of mate-grasping behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonski Piotr G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in evolutionary biology is to understand the typically complex interactions between diverse counter-balancing factors of Darwinian selection for size assortative mating and sexual size dimorphism. It appears that rarely a simple mechanism could provide a major explanation of these phenomena. Mechanics of behaviors can predict animal morphology, such like adaptations to locomotion in animals from various of taxa, but its potential to predict size-assortative mating and its evolutionary consequences has been less explored. Mate-grasping by males, using specialized adaptive morphologies of their forelegs, midlegs or even antennae wrapped around female body at specific locations, is a general mating strategy of many animals, but the contribution of the mechanics of this wide-spread behavior to the evolution of mating behavior and sexual size dimorphism has been largely ignored. Results Here, we explore the consequences of a simple, and previously ignored, fact that in a grasping posture the position of the male's grasping appendages relative to the female's body is often a function of body size difference between the sexes. Using an approach taken from robot mechanics we model coercive grasping of females by water strider Gerris gracilicornis males during mating initiation struggles. We determine that the male optimal size (relative to the female size, which gives the males the highest grasping force, properly predicts the experimentally measured highest mating success. Through field sampling and simulation modeling of a natural population we determine that the simple mechanical model, which ignores most of the other hypothetical counter-balancing selection pressures on body size, is sufficient to account for size-assortative mating pattern as well as species-specific sexual dimorphism in body size of G. gracilicornis. Conclusion The results indicate how a simple and previously overlooked physical mechanism

  7. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  8. Can quiet standing posture predict compensatory postural adjustment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Bueno Lahóz Moya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze whether quiet standing posture is related to compensatory postural adjustment. INTRODUCTION: The latest data in clinical practice suggests that static posture may play a significant role in musculoskeletal function, even in dynamic activities. However, no evidence exists regarding whether static posture during quiet standing is related to postural adjustment. METHODS: Twenty healthy participants standing on a movable surface underwent unexpected, standardized backward and forward postural perturbations while kinematic data were acquired; ankle, knee, pelvis and trunk positions were then calculated. An initial and a final video frame representing quiet standing posture and the end of the postural perturbation were selected in such a way that postural adjustments had occurred between these frames. The positions of the body segments were calculated in these initial and final frames, together with the displacement of body segments during postural adjustments between the initial and final frames. The relationship between the positions of body segments in the initial and final frames and their displacements over this time period was analyzed using multiple regressions with a significance level of p < 0.05. RESULTS: We failed to identify a relationship between the position of the body segments in the initial and final frames and the associated displacement of the body segments. DISCUSSION: The motion pattern during compensatory postural adjustment is not related to quiet standing posture or to the final posture of compensatory postural adjustment. This fact should be considered when treating balance disturbances and musculoskeletal abnormalities. CONCLUSION: Static posture cannot predict how body segments will behave during compensatory postural adjustment.

  9. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mark W; Pettibon, Burl R; Schlappi, Heidi; Schlappi, Mark; Ireland, Trevor V

    2005-01-01

    Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or all of the postural reflexes

  10. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  11. 基于人体动作姿态识别的机器人仿人运动%Humanoid Motion of Manipulator that Based on Human-posture Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梅; 卢熙昌; 屠大维; 于远芳; 周华

    2016-01-01

    以关节式机器人为对象,进行机器人仿人运动研究。从人体动作姿态识别、人-机动作映射、机器人运动控制等方面,详细阐述机器人仿人运动算法。提出人体动作姿态识别方法,利用 Kinect 传感器捕获人体运作的关节点位置信息,在建立人体基准坐标系的基础上,为了得到描述肩、肘运动的动作信息,计算人体手臂动作的关节角度,实现人体动作姿态的识别。在分析人体肩、肘等关节和机器人机构差异性的基础上,建立人体手臂与四自由度机械手臂的人-机动作映射规则。针对机器人自由度较少,无法完全复现人体运动的情形,分析、比较不同控制策略的优缺点和适用性,寻求适合机器人操作的复现控制策略。关节式机器人接收运动控制指令,执行相应的关节运动,从而实现机器人仿人运动。相关试验验证了人体动作姿态识别和机器人仿人运动控制算法的有效性。研究成果对于提高机器人控制和操作的简单易用性、提高人机交互能力具有借鉴意义,对于扩展机器人应用领域具有实践意义。%Humanoid motion of manipulator is studied. The problem of human-posture recognition, human-robot motion mapping and humanoid motion control are summarized. A Kinect is used to capture the human body movement. In the coordinate system on the human body, the joint angles of the human arm are calculated to recognize the motion of shoulder joint and elbow joint. By analyzing the difference between the motion of a human arm and that of a four-degree manipulator, the human-robot motion mapping is developed. To deal with the problem of limitation in motion imitation, caused by robot lower-mobility, three method of humanoid control is comparatively analyzed. And the method to maximize the range of motion is selected to control the manipulator. The manipulator would execute the action, according to the

  12. Postural deformities in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, K.M.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Peralta, M.C.; Silveira-Moriyama, L.; Azulay, J.P.; Gershanik, O.S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Postural deformities are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. These deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Recognition of specific postural syndromes might have differential diagnostic value in patients prese

  13. Grasping without sight: insights from the congenitally blind.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla D Stone

    Full Text Available We reach for and grasp different sized objects numerous times per day. Most of these movements are visually-guided, but some are guided by the sense of touch (i.e. haptically-guided, such as reaching for your keys in a bag, or for an object in a dark room. A marked right-hand preference has been reported during visually-guided grasping, particularly for small objects. However, little is known about hand preference for haptically-guided grasping. Recently, a study has shown a reduction in right-hand use in blindfolded individuals, and an absence of hand preference if grasping was preceded by a short haptic experience. These results suggest that vision plays a major role in hand preference for grasping. If this were the case, then one might expect congenitally blind (CB individuals, who have never had a visual experience, to exhibit no hand preference. Two novel findings emerge from the current study: first, the results showed that contrary to our expectation, CB individuals used their right hand during haptically-guided grasping to the same extent as visually-unimpaired (VU individuals did during visually-guided grasping. And second, object size affected hand use in an opposite manner for haptically- versus visually-guided grasping. Big objects were more often picked up with the right hand during haptically-guided, but less often during visually-guided grasping. This result highlights the different demands that object features pose on the two sensory systems. Overall the results demonstrate that hand preference for grasping is independent of visual experience, and they suggest a left-hemisphere specialization for the control of grasping that goes beyond sensory modality.

  14. Postural ortostatisk takykardisyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...... in heart rate equal to or greater than 30 bpm or to levels higher than 120 bpm during a head-up tilt test is the main diagnostic criterion. Management includes both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment focusing on stress management, volume expansion and heart rate control....

  15. Working postures: prediction and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    To date, workstation designers cannot see the effects of a design on working posture before a mock-up/prototype is available. At that moment, usually the margin for creating the conditions required for adopting favourable working postures is still very limited. Posture prediction at an early design

  16. The Role of Object Contact in Pointing and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Biegstraten-Meeuws

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe grasp and lift objects many times a day. Most of us perform such a task without any difficulty. However even just grasping the packet of chocolate flakes at the breakfast table is in fact a complex task. Our brain has to – among others - coordinate and select multiple muscles, select

  17. Assessing Grasp Stability Based on Learning and Haptic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiroglu, Yasemin; Laaksonen, Janne; Jørgensen, Jimmy Alison

    2011-01-01

    data and machine-learning methods, including AdaBoost, support vector machines (SVMs), and hidden Markov models (HMMs). In particular, we study the effect of different sensory streams to grasp stability. This includes object information such as shape; grasp information such as approach vector; tactile...

  18. GRASP65 controls the cis Golgi integrity in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, T.; Jarvela, T.; Grieve, A.G.; van Es, J.H.; Linstedt, A.D.; Rabouille, C.

    2014-01-01

    GRASP65 and GRASP55 are peripheral Golgi proteins localized to cis and medial/trans cisternae, respectively. They are implicated in diverse aspects of protein transport and structure related to the Golgi complex, including the stacking of the Golgi stack and/or the linking of mammalian Golgi stacks

  19. The Role of Object Contact in Pointing and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Biegstraten-Meeuws

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe grasp and lift objects many times a day. Most of us perform such a task without any difficulty. However even just grasping the packet of chocolate flakes at the breakfast table is in fact a complex task. Our brain has to – among others - coordinate and select multiple muscles, select

  20. Differences in fixations between grasping and viewing objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Franz, V.H.; Gegenfurtner, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Where exactly do people look when they grasp an object? An object is usually contacted at two locations, whereas the gaze can only be at one location at the time. We investigated participants' fixation locations when they grasp objects with the contact positions of both index finger and thumb being

  1. Microsoft Kinect-Based Artificial Perception System for Control of Functional Electrical Stimulation Assisted Grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matija Štrbac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a computer vision algorithm that incorporates a heuristic model which mimics a biological control system for the estimation of control signals used in functional electrical stimulation (FES assisted grasping. The developed processing software acquires the data from Microsoft Kinect camera and implements real-time hand tracking and object analysis. This information can be used to identify temporal synchrony and spatial synergies modalities for FES control. Therefore, the algorithm acts as artificial perception which mimics human visual perception by identifying the position and shape of the object with respect to the position of the hand in real time during the planning phase of the grasp. This artificial perception used within the heuristically developed model allows selection of the appropriate grasp and prehension. The experiments demonstrate that correct grasp modality was selected in more than 90% of tested scenarios/objects. The system is portable, and the components are low in cost and robust; hence, it can be used for the FES in clinical or even home environment. The main application of the system is envisioned for functional electrical therapy, that is, intensive exercise assisted with FES.

  2. A computational model for aperture control in reach-to-grasp movement based on predictive variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro eTakemura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In human reach-to-grasp movement, visual occlusion of a target object leads to a larger peak grip aperture compared to conditions where online vision is available. However, no previous computational and neural network models for reach-to-grasp movement explain the mechanism of this effect. We simulated the effect of online vision on the reach-to-grasp movement by proposing a computational control model based on the hypothesis that the grip aperture is controlled to compensate for both motor variability and sensory uncertainty. In this model, the aperture is formed to achieve a target aperture size that is sufficiently large to accommodate the actual target; it also includes a margin to ensure proper grasping despite sensory and motor variability. To this end, the model considers: i the variability of the grip aperture, which is predicted by the Kalman filter, and ii the uncertainty of the object size, which is affected by visual noise. Using this model, we simulated experiments in which the effect of the duration of visual occlusion was investigated. The simulation replicated the experimental result wherein the peak grip aperture increased when the target object was occluded, especially in the early phase of the movement. Both predicted motor variability and sensory uncertainty play important roles in the online visuomotor process responsible for grip aperture control.

  3. Microsoft kinect-based artificial perception system for control of functional electrical stimulation assisted grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbac, Matija; Kočović, Slobodan; Marković, Marko; Popović, Dejan B

    2014-01-01

    We present a computer vision algorithm that incorporates a heuristic model which mimics a biological control system for the estimation of control signals used in functional electrical stimulation (FES) assisted grasping. The developed processing software acquires the data from Microsoft Kinect camera and implements real-time hand tracking and object analysis. This information can be used to identify temporal synchrony and spatial synergies modalities for FES control. Therefore, the algorithm acts as artificial perception which mimics human visual perception by identifying the position and shape of the object with respect to the position of the hand in real time during the planning phase of the grasp. This artificial perception used within the heuristically developed model allows selection of the appropriate grasp and prehension. The experiments demonstrate that correct grasp modality was selected in more than 90% of tested scenarios/objects. The system is portable, and the components are low in cost and robust; hence, it can be used for the FES in clinical or even home environment. The main application of the system is envisioned for functional electrical therapy, that is, intensive exercise assisted with FES.

  4. Fast Grasp Contact Computation for a Serial Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianying (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system includes a controller and a serial robot having links that are interconnected by a joint, wherein the robot can grasp a three-dimensional (3D) object in response to a commanded grasp pose. The controller receives input information, including the commanded grasp pose, a first set of information describing the kinematics of the robot, and a second set of information describing the position of the object to be grasped. The controller also calculates, in a two-dimensional (2D) plane, a set of contact points between the serial robot and a surface of the 3D object needed for the serial robot to achieve the commanded grasp pose. A required joint angle is then calculated in the 2D plane between the pair of links using the set of contact points. A control action is then executed with respect to the motion of the serial robot using the required joint angle.

  5. Automatic Grasp Generation and Improvement for Industrial Bin-Picking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Rytz, Jimmy Alison

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents work on automatic grasp generation and grasp learning for reducing the manual setup time and increase grasp success rates within bin-picking applications. We propose an approach that is able to generate good grasps automatically using a dynamic grasp simulator, a newly developed...... and achieve comparable results and that our learning approach can improve system performance significantly. Automatic bin-picking is an important industrial process that can lead to significant savings and potentially keep production in countries with high labour cost rather than outsourcing it. The presented...... work allows to minimize cycle time as well as setup cost, which are essential factors in automatic bin-picking. It therefore leads to a wider applicability of bin-picking in industry....

  6. Effect of object width on muscle and joint forces during thumb-index finger grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Domalain, Mathieu; Berton, Eric

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the impact of modifying the object width on muscle and joint forces while gripping objects. The experimental protocol consisted to maintain horizontally five objects of different widths (3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5 cm) with a thumb-index finger grip. Subjects were required to grasp spontaneously the object without any instruction regarding the grip force (GF) to apply. A biomechanical model of thumb-index finger pinch was developed to estimate muscle and joint forces. This model included electromyography, fingertip force, and kinematics data as inputs. The finger joint postures and the GF varied across the object widths. The estimated muscle forces also varied significantly according to the object width. Interestingly, we observed that the muscle force/GF ratios of major flexor muscles remain particularly stable with respect to the width whereas other muscle ratios differed largely. This may argue for a control strategy in which the actions of flexors were preserved in spite of change in joint postures. The estimated joint forces tended to increase with object width and increased in the distal-proximal sense. Overall, these results are of importance for the ergonomic design of handheld objects and for clinical applications.

  7. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A K; Garg, R; Ritch, A; Sarkar, P

    2007-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an autonomic disturbance which has become better understood in recent years. It is now thought to encompass a group of disorders that have similar clinical features, such as orthostatic intolerance, but individual distinguishing parameters--for example, blood pressure and pulse rate. The clinical picture, diagnosis, and management of POTS are discussed.

  8. Can Smartwatches Replace Smartphones for Posture Tracking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobak Mortazavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a human posture tracking platform to identify the human postures of sitting, standing or lying down, based on a smartwatch. This work develops such a system as a proof-of-concept study to investigate a smartwatch’s ability to be used in future remote health monitoring systems and applications. This work validates the smartwatches’ ability to track the posture of users accurately in a laboratory setting while reducing the sampling rate to potentially improve battery life, the first steps in verifying that such a system would work in future clinical settings. The algorithm developed classifies the transitions between three posture states of sitting, standing and lying down, by identifying these transition movements, as well as other movements that might be mistaken for these transitions. The system is trained and developed on a Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch, and the algorithm was validated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation of 20 subjects. The system can identify the appropriate transitions at only 10 Hz with an F-score of 0.930, indicating its ability to effectively replace smart phones, if needed.

  9. Can smartwatches replace smartphones for posture tracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bobak; Nemati, Ebrahim; VanderWall, Kristina; Flores-Rodriguez, Hector G; Cai, Jun Yu Jacinta; Lucier, Jessica; Naeim, Arash; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2015-10-22

    This paper introduces a human posture tracking platform to identify the human postures of sitting, standing or lying down, based on a smartwatch. This work develops such a system as a proof-of-concept study to investigate a smartwatch's ability to be used in future remote health monitoring systems and applications. This work validates the smartwatches' ability to track the posture of users accurately in a laboratory setting while reducing the sampling rate to potentially improve battery life, the first steps in verifying that such a system would work in future clinical settings. The algorithm developed classifies the transitions between three posture states of sitting, standing and lying down, by identifying these transition movements, as well as other movements that might be mistaken for these transitions. The system is trained and developed on a Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch, and the algorithm was validated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation of 20 subjects. The system can identify the appropriate transitions at only 10 Hz with an F-score of 0.930, indicating its ability to effectively replace smart phones, if needed.

  10. Regarding the quantification of peripheral microcirculation--Comparing responses evoked in the in vivo human lower limb by postural changes, suprasystolic occlusion and oxygen breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Henrique; Ferreira, Hugo; Bujan, Ma Julia; Rodrigues, Luis Monteiro

    2015-05-01

    The human skin is an interesting model to explore microcirculation, particularly if using noninvasive technologies such as LDF (Laser Doppler Flowmetry) and tc (transcutaneous) gasimetry and methods as near as possible from the normal physiological state. In this study, we combined those technologies with three classical approaches--leg raising from supine, suprasystolic occlusion (in the ankle), and normobaric oxygen breathing to explore distal peripheral circulation in the foot. These methods are often cited, but a comparative assessment has not been done. The goal of this study was to identify relevant flow related descriptors, method-related advantages and pitfalls, and eventually, to find the best experimental approach. Volunteers (both genders, 22.1 ± 3.7 years old) were subjected to these methods and variables registered during basal, challenge and stabilization phases. Descriptive and comparative statistics were obtained, adopting a 95% confidence level. All flow-related quantitative descriptors potentially useful for the analysis were identified and compared. As expected, male patients consistently showed higher LDF levels and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and lower tcpO2 values. However, lower results were recorded in the supine position, suggesting a postural dependence. Both leg raising and suprasystolic occlusion produced a hyperemic response after provocation, although different in magnitude, significantly reducing LDF and tcpO2 during provocation. The oxygen breathing method provided the most patient-friendly protocol, consistently reducing LDF (potentially by the inhibition of production of local vasodilators). TEWL increased during the provocation phase in all protocols, although not significantly. Baseline tcpO2 was found to correlate positively with the peak tcpO2 during oxygen breathing and basal LDF with peak flow during leg raising and suprasystolic occlusion. No statistical correlation between TEWL and LDF could be demonstrated under the

  11. [A case with apraxia of tool use: selective inability to form a hand posture for a tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yuko; Fujii, Toshikatsu; Yamadori, Atsushi; Meguro, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kyoko

    2015-03-01

    Impaired tool use is recognized as a symptom of ideational apraxia. While many studies have focused on difficulties in producing gestures as a whole, using tools involves several steps; these include forming hand postures appropriate for the use of certain tool, selecting objects or body parts to act on, and producing gestures. In previously reported cases, both producing and recognizing hand postures were impaired. Here we report the first case showing a selective impairment of forming hand postures appropriate for tools with preserved recognition of the required hand postures. A 24-year-old, right-handed man was admitted to hospital because of sensory impairment of the right side of the body, mild aphasia, and impaired tool use due to left parietal subcortical hemorrhage. His ability to make symbolic gestures, copy finger postures, and orient his hand to pass a slit was well preserved. Semantic knowledge for tools and hand postures was also intact. He could flawlessly select the correct hand postures in recognition tasks. He only demonstrated difficulties in forming a hand posture appropriate for a tool. Once he properly grasped a tool by trial and error, he could use it without hesitation. These observations suggest that each step of tool use should be thoroughly examined in patients with ideational apraxia.

  12. Three-dimensional finger joint angles by hand posture and object properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Sun; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify three-dimensional finger joint angles for various hand postures and object properties. Finger joint angles were measured using a VICON system for 10 participants while they pinched objects with two, three, four and five fingers and grasped them with five fingers. The objects were cylinders and square pillars with diameters of 2, 4, 6 and 8 cm and weights of 400, 800, 1400 and 1800 g. Hand posture and object size more significantly affected the joint flexion angles than did object shape and weight. Object shape affected only the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle of the index finger and the flexion angle of the MCP joint of the little finger. Larger flexion angles resulted when the hand posture was grasping with five fingers. The joint angle increased linearly as the object size decreased. This report provides fundamental information about the specific joint angles of the thumb and fingers. Practitioner Summary: Three-dimensional finger joint angles are of special interest in ergonomics because of their importance in handheld devices and musculoskeletal hand disorders. In this study, the finger joint angles corresponding to various hand postures and objects with different properties were determined.

  13. Emotional and movement-related body postures modulate visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhani, Khatereh; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Maier, Martin E; Avenanti, Alessio; Bertini, Caterina

    2015-08-01

    Human body postures convey useful information for understanding others' emotions and intentions. To investigate at which stage of visual processing emotional and movement-related information conveyed by bodies is discriminated, we examined event-related potentials elicited by laterally presented images of bodies with static postures and implied-motion body images with neutral, fearful or happy expressions. At the early stage of visual structural encoding (N190), we found a difference in the sensitivity of the two hemispheres to observed body postures. Specifically, the right hemisphere showed a N190 modulation both for the motion content (i.e. all the observed postures implying body movements elicited greater N190 amplitudes compared with static postures) and for the emotional content (i.e. fearful postures elicited the largest N190 amplitude), while the left hemisphere showed a modulation only for the motion content. In contrast, at a later stage of perceptual representation, reflecting selective attention to salient stimuli, an increased early posterior negativity was observed for fearful stimuli in both hemispheres, suggesting an enhanced processing of motivationally relevant stimuli. The observed modulations, both at the early stage of structural encoding and at the later processing stage, suggest the existence of a specialized perceptual mechanism tuned to emotion- and action-related information conveyed by human body postures. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Visual illusions, delayed grasping, and memory: no shift from dorsal to ventral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, V H; Hesse, C; Kollath, S

    2009-05-01

    We tested whether a delay between stimulus presentation and grasping leads to a shift from dorsal to ventral control of the movement, as suggested by the perception-action theory of Milner and Goodale (Milner, A.D., & Goodale, M.A. (1995). The visual brain in action. Oxford: Oxford University Press.). In this theory the dorsal cortical stream has a short memory, such that after a few seconds the dorsal information is decayed and the action is guided by the ventral stream. Accordingly, grasping should become responsive to certain visual illusions after a delay (because only the ventral stream is assumed to be deceived by these illusions). We used the Müller-Lyer illusion, the typical illusion in this area of research, and replicated the increase of the motor illusion after a delay. However, we found that this increase is not due to memory demands but to the availability of visual feedback during movement execution which leads to online corrections of the movement. Because such online corrections are to be expected if the movement is guided by one single representation of object size, we conclude that there is no evidence for a shift from dorsal to ventral control in delayed grasping of the Müller-Lyer illusion. We also performed the first empirical test of a critique Goodale (Goodale, M.A. (2006, October 27). Visual duplicity: Action without perception in the human visual system. The XIV. Kanizsa lecture, Triest, Italy.) raised against studies finding illusion effects in grasping: Goodale argued that these studies used methods that lead to unnatural grasping which is guided by the ventral stream. Therefore, these studies might never have measured the dorsal stream, but always the ventral stream. We found clear evidence against this conjecture.

  15. Correcting Working Postures in Water Pump AssemblyTasks using the OVAKO Work Analysis System (OWAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiya Kadhim Al-Zuheri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovako Working Postures Analyzing System (OWAS is a widely used method for studying awkward working postures in workplaces. This study with OWAS, analyzed working postures for manual material handling of laminations at stacking workstation for water pump assembly line in Electrical Industrial Company (EICO / Baghdad. A computer program, WinOWAS, was used for the study. In real life workstation was found that more than 26% of the working postures observed were classified as either AC2 (slightly harmful, AC3 (distinctly harmful. Postures that needed to be corrected soon (AC3 and corresponding tasks, were identified. The most stressful tasks observed were grasping, handling, and positioning of the laminations from workers. The construction of real life workstation is modified simultaneously by redesign suggestions in the values of location (positioning factors for stacking workstation. The simulation workstation executed by mean of parametric CAD software. That modifications lead to improvement in the percentage of harmful postures. It was therefore recommended the use of supplementary methods is required to identify ergonomic risk factors for handling work or other hand-intensive activities on industry sites.

  16. Typical and atypical development of reaching and postural control in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2013-11-01

    Successful reaching requires postural control, either by active regulation or by postural support. The present paper reviews literature on typical and atypical development of reaching and postural control during infancy. Typically, reaching movements end in grasping around 4 months of age. Initially, reaches are characterized by large variation, including many trajectory corrections. During the first year, the movements get increasingly straight and smooth. Reaching in low-risk preterm infants is initially characterized by advanced development, but minor impairments may emerge in the second half of infancy. In high-risk preterm infants, development of reaching is characterized by delay and non-optimal reaching performance. Typical development of postural adjustments is characterized by variation and an increasing ability to adapt the variable repertoire to the specifics of the situation. The latter is facilitated by an increasing role of anticipatory mechanisms in the second half of infancy. Atypically developing infants may have a reduced repertoire and usually have difficulties in adapting postural adjustments. In infancy, most reaching movements are performed during sitting. The postural challenge of sitting may interfere in particular with the development of reaching in atypically developing infants. The practical implications of this suggestion are discussed.

  17. Needle Grasp and Entry Port Selection for Automatic Execution of Suturing Tasks in Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2016-01-01

    challenges due to uncertainties in needle localization and grasping. This paper proposes two new performance metrics on selecting port locations from the perspective of autonomously performing surgical suturing, without direct involvement of the human user. The paper also presents preliminary experiments which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:27158248

  18. Tapping, grasping and aiming in ideomotor apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ietswaart, Magdalena; Carey, David P; Della Sala, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated sensorimotor control in apraxia using tasks that differ in movement complexity. Nevertheless, there is some evidence to suggest that spontaneous behaviour, although relatively preserved, can be rather clumsy or awkward, and that patients with ideomotor apraxia may have subtle kinematic abnormalities in movements made in the laboratory. It remains unclear whether patients with ideomotor apraxia perform normally on movements such as visually guided aiming, that may not depend on higher-order, more cognitive, processes and that are relatively unguided by overlearned contexts. In this study, three different sensorimotor tasks were given to the same sample of patients with quantified apraxic disturbance. Finger tapping, goal-directed grasping and aiming with and without visual feedback were examined in these patients. A clear dissociation was found between grossly impaired gesture imitation and intact motor programming of goal-directed movements with visual feedback. Apraxic patients were, however, impaired on aiming movements without visual feedback, suggesting that apraxia is associated with an increased reliance on integration of online visual information with feedforward/feedback somatosensory and motor signals. Furthermore, patients were impaired on single finger tapping which was a surprisingly good predictor of apraxia severity.

  19. The use of underactuation in prosthetic grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Kyberd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Underactuation as a method of driving prosthetic hands has a long history. The pragmatic requirements of such a device to be light enough to be worn and used regularly have meant that any multi degree of freedom prosthetic hand must have fewer actuators than the usable degrees of freedom. Aesthetics ensures that while the hand needs five fingers, five actuators have considerable mass, and only in recent years has it even been possible to construct a practical anthropomorphic hand with five motors. Thus there is an important trade off as to which fingers are driven, and which joints on which fingers are actuated, and how the forces are distributed to create a functional device. This paper outlines some of the historical solutions created for this problem and includes those designs of recent years that are now beginning to be used in the commercial environment.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  20. Learning Objects and Grasp Affordances through Autonomous Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas;

    2009-01-01

    We describe a system for autonomous learning of visual object representations and their grasp affordances on a robot-vision system. It segments objects by grasping and moving 3D scene features, and creates probabilistic visual representations for object detection, recognition and pose estimation...... image sequences as well as (3) a number of built-in behavioral modules on the one hand, and autonomous exploration on the other hand, the system is able to generate object and grasping knowledge through interaction with its environment....

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Grasping of Deformable Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl, Andreas Rune

    Automated robot solutions have for decades been increasing productivity around the world. They are attractive for being fast, accurate and able to work in dangerous and repetitive environments. In traditional applications the grasped object is kinematically attached to the Tool Center Point....... The purpose of this thesis is to address the modeling and simulation of deformable objects, as applied to robotic grasping and manipulation. The main contributions of this work are: An evaluation of 3D linear elasticity used for robot grasping as implemented by a Finite Difference Method supporting regular...

  2. Visual perception and grasping for the extravehicular activity robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an approach to the visual perception of object surface information using laser range data in support of robotic grasping is discussed. This is a very important problem area in that a robot such as the EVAR must be able to formulate a grasping strategy on the basis of its knowledge of the surface structure of the object. A description of the problem domain is given as well as a formulation of an algorithm which derives an object surface description adequate to support robotic grasping. The algorithm is based upon concepts of differential geometry namely, Gaussian and mean curvature.

  3. Learning Objects and Grasp Affordances through Autonomous Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    We describe a system for autonomous learning of visual object representations and their grasp affordances on a robot-vision system. It segments objects by grasping and moving 3D scene features, and creates probabilistic visual representations for object detection, recognition and pose estimation...... image sequences as well as (3) a number of built-in behavioral modules on the one hand, and autonomous exploration on the other hand, the system is able to generate object and grasping knowledge through interaction with its environment....

  4. Effects of EVA spacesuit glove on grasping and pinching tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendino, Silvia; Battezzato, Alessandro; Chen Chen, Fai; Favetto, Alain; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    The human hand has a wide range of degrees of freedom, allowing a great variety of movements, and is also one of the most sensitive parts of the human body. Due to these characteristics, it is the most important tool for astronauts to perform extravehicular activities (EVA). However, astronauts must wear mandatory EVA equipment to be protected from the harsh conditions in space and this strongly reduces hand performance, in particular as regards dexterity, tactile perception, mobility and fatigue. Several studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the EVA glove on manual capabilities, both in the past and more recently. This study presents experimental data regarding the performance decline occurring in terms of force and fatigue in the execution of grasping and pinching tasks when wearing an EVA glove, in pressurized and unpressurized conditions, compared with barehanded potential. Results show that wearing the unpressurized EVA glove hinders grip and lateral pinch performances, dropping exerted forces to about 50-70%, while it barely affects two- and three-finger pinch performances. On the other hand, wearing the pressurized glove worsens performances in all cases, reducing forces to about 10-30% of barehanded potential. The results are presented and compared with the previous literature.

  5. From grasp to language: embodied concepts and the challenge of abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons in the macaque monkey and the discovery of a homologous "mirror system for grasping" in Broca's area in the human brain has revived the gestural origins theory of the evolution of the human capability for language, enriching it with the suggestion that mirror neurons provide the neurological core for this evolution. However, this notion of "mirror neuron support for the transition from grasp to language" has been worked out in very different ways in the Mirror System Hypothesis model [Arbib, M.A., 2005a. From monkey-like action recognition to human language: an evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics (with commentaries and author's response). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28, 105-167; Rizzolatti, G., Arbib, M.A., 1998. Language within our grasp. Trends in Neuroscience 21(5), 188-194] and the Embodied Concept model [Gallese, V., Lakoff, G., 2005. The brain's concepts: the role of the sensory-motor system in reason and language. Cognitive Neuropsychology 22, 455-479]. The present paper provides a critique of the latter to enrich analysis of the former, developing the role of schema theory [Arbib, M.A., 1981. Perceptual structures and distributed motor control. In: Brooks, V.B. (Ed.), Handbook of Physiology--The Nervous System II. Motor Control. American Physiological Society, pp. 1449-1480].

  6. Objective Markers of Postural Instability in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    anterior-posterior (AP) and medio -lateral (ML) center-of-pressure (COP) time series from the force platform recordings. Procedure. Within-subjects...posterior (AP) and medio -lateral (ML) COP time series (measures of postural sway variability) and COP path length (a measure of the amount of...dynamics of posture and orientation . In: Newell KM, Corcos D (eds) Variability and motor control. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL, pp 317-357 Riley MA

  7. Grasping Unknown Objects in an Early Cognitive Vision System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, Mila

    2011-01-01

    objects can also be used in the search-and-rescue scenarios, planetary exploration, or for the handling of the nuclear material. When a robotic system is perceived as a developing cognitive agent, attaining physical control over objects is a precondition for starting a bootstrapping process in which...... presents a system for robotic grasping of unknown objects us- ing stereo vision. Grasps are defined based on contour and surface information provided by the Early Cognitive Vision System, that organizes visual informa- tion into a biologically motivated hierarchical representation. The contributions...... of the thesis are: the extension of the Early Cognitive Vision representation with a new type of feature hierarchy in the texture domain, the definition and evaluation of contour based grasping methods, the definition and evaluation of surface based grasping methods, the definition of a benchmark for testing...

  8. The contributions of vision and haptics to reaching and grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla Dawn Stone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide a comprehensive outlook on the sensory (visual and haptic contributions to reaching and grasping. The focus is on studies in developing children, normal and neuropsychological populations, and in sensory-deprived individuals. Studies have suggested a right-hand/left-hemisphere specialization for visually-guided grasping and a left-hand/right-hemisphere specialization for haptically-guided object recognition. This poses the interesting possibility that when vision is not available and grasping relies heavily on the haptic system, there is an advantage to use the left hand. We review the evidence for this possibility and dissect the unique contributions of the visual and haptic systems to grasping. We ultimately discuss how the integration of these two sensory modalities shape hand preference.

  9. The contributions of vision and haptics to reaching and grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kayla D; Gonzalez, Claudia L R

    2015-01-01

    This review aims to provide a comprehensive outlook on the sensory (visual and haptic) contributions to reaching and grasping. The focus is on studies in developing children, normal, and neuropsychological populations, and in sensory-deprived individuals. Studies have suggested a right-hand/left-hemisphere specialization for visually guided grasping and a left-hand/right-hemisphere specialization for haptically guided object recognition. This poses the interesting possibility that when vision is not available and grasping relies heavily on the haptic system, there is an advantage to use the left hand. We review the evidence for this possibility and dissect the unique contributions of the visual and haptic systems to grasping. We ultimately discuss how the integration of these two sensory modalities shape hand preference.

  10. Conformal grasping using feedback controlled bubble actuator array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Wei; Stein, Richard; Mittal, Manoj; Wijesundara, Muthu B. J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an implementation of a bubble actuator array (BAA) based active robotic skin, a modular system, onto existing low cost robotic end-effectors or prosthetic hands for conformal grasping of objects. The active skin is comprised of pneumatically controlled polyurethane rubber bubbles with overlaid sensors for feedback control. Sensor feedback allows the BAA based robotic skin to conformally grasp an object with an explicit uniform force distribution. The bubble actuator array reported here is capable of applying up to 4N of force at each point of contact and tested for conformally grasping objects with a radius of curvature up to 57.15mm. Once integrated onto a two-finger gripper with one degree of freedom (DOF), the active skin was shown to reduce point of contact forces of up to 50% for grasped objects.

  11. Modelling primate control of grasping for robotics applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleinhans, A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available -1 European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) Workshops, Zurich, Switzerland, 7 September 2014 Modelling primate control of grasping for robotics applications Ashley Kleinhans1, Serge Thill2, Benjamin Rosman1, Renaud Detry3 & Bryan Tripp4 1 CSIR..., South Africa 2 University of Skovde, Sweden3 University of Liege, Belgium 4 University of Waterloo, Canada Abstract The neural circuits that control grasping and perform related visual processing have been studied extensively in Macaque monkeys...

  12. Multiple parietal-frontal pathways mediate grasping in macaque monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbawie, Omar A.; Stepniewska, Iwona; Qi, Huixin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2011-01-01

    The nodes of a parietal-frontal pathway that mediates grasping in primates are in anterior intraparietal area (AIP) and ventral premotor cortex (PMv). Nevertheless, multiple somatosensory and motor representations of the hand, respectively in parietal and frontal cortex, suggest that additional pathways remain unrealized. We explored this possibility in macaque monkeys by injecting retrograde tracers into grasp zones identified in M1, PMv, and area 2 with long train electrical stimulation. The M1 grasp zone was densely connected with other frontal cortex motor regions. The remainder of the connections originated from somatosensory areas 3a and S2/PV, and from the medial bank and fundus of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). The PMv grasp zone was also densely connected with frontal cortex motor regions, albeit to a lesser extent than the M1 grasp zone. The remainder of the connections originated from areas S2/PV and aspects of the inferior parietal lobe such as PF, PFG, AIP, and the tip of the IPS. The area 2 grasp zone was densely connected with the hand representations of somatosensory areas 3b, 1, and S2/PV. The remainder of the connections was with areas 3a and 5 and the medial bank and fundus of the IPS. Connections with frontal cortex were relatively weak and concentrated in caudal M1. Thus, the three grasp zones may be nodes of parallel parietal-frontal pathways. Differential points of origin and termination of each pathway suggest varying functional specializations. Direct and indirect connections between those parietal-frontal pathways likely coordinate their respective functions into an accurate grasp. PMID:21832196

  13. Building an internal model of a myoelectric prosthesis via closed-loop control for consistent and routine grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Strahinja; Markovic, Marko; Wille, Nicola; Henkel, Markus; Koppe, Mario; Ninu, Andrei; Frömmel, Cornelius; Farina, Dario

    2015-06-01

    Prosthesis users usually agree that myoelectric prostheses should be equipped with somatosensory feedback. However, the exact role of feedback and potential benefits are still elusive. The current study investigates the nature of human control processes within a specific context of routine grasping. Although the latter includes a fast feedforward control of the grasping force, the assumption was that the feedback would still be useful; it would communicate the outcome of the grasping trial, which the subjects could use to learn an internal model of feedforward control. Nine able-bodied subjects produced repeatedly a desired level of grasping force using different control configurations: feedback versus no-feedback, virtual versus real prosthetic hand, and joystick versus myocontrol. The outcome measures were the median and dispersion of the relative force errors. The results demonstrated that the feedback was successful in limiting the variability of the routine grasping due to uncertainties in the system and/or the command interface. The internal models of feedforward control could be employed by the subjects to control the prosthesis without the loss of performance even after the force feedback was removed. The models were, however, unstable over time, especially with myocontrol. Overall, the study demonstrates that the prosthesis system can be learned by the subjects using feedback. The feedback is also essential to maintain the model, and it could be delivered intermittently. This approach has practical advantages, but the level to which this mechanism can be truly exploited in practice depends directly on the consistency of the prosthesis control interface.

  14. GRGS simulations for a GRASP-like satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulot, David; Pollet, Arnaud; Biancale, Richard; Zoulida, Myriam; Loyer, Sylvain; Perosanz, Félix; Marty, Jean-Charles; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Soudarin, Laurent; Capderou, Michel; Nahmani, Samuel; Deleflie, Florent; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-04-01

    GRASP (Geodetic Reference Antenna in SPace) is a spacecraft system designed to provide the needed data for an enduring and stable TRF (Terrestrial Reference Frame) for accurately measuring and understanding changes in global and regional sea levels, ice sheets and other elements of the dynamic Earth system. To reach the goals for the TRF realization of 1 mm accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr stability (GGOS, Meeting the Requirements of a Global Society on a Changing Planet in 2020, Plag and Pearlman, eds., 2009), GRASP would carry very precise sensor systems for all the key geodetic techniques used to define and monitor the TRF (DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI). In this study, we present the results obtained regarding the simulations carried out by the French GRGS (Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale) for a GRASP-like satellite. First, we searched for the optimal orbit for such a geodetic mission with Genetic Algorithms (stochastic optimization). Then, with the best found orbit, we simulated the measurements of the four geodetic techniques (DORIS and SLR measurements to GRASP, VLBI PPP or interferometric measurements to GRASP, and GNSS measurements received from ground stations and from GRASP) over three years, and we evaluated the expected accuracy and stability of the TRF obtained with the processing of these measurements. Finally, we also investigated the expected impact of the on-board instrument calibration on the quality of the TRF.

  15. Keeping Safe: Intra-individual Consistency in Obstacle Avoidance Behaviour Across Grasping and Locomotion Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Karina; Billino, Jutta; Hesse, Constanze

    2017-01-01

    Successful obstacle avoidance requires a close coordination of the visual and the motor systems. Visual information is essential for adjusting movements in order to avoid unwanted collisions. Yet, established obstacle avoidance paradigms have typically either focused on gaze strategies or on motor adjustments. Here we were interested in whether humans show similar visuomotor sensitivity to obstacles when gaze and motor behaviour are measured across different obstacle avoidance tasks. To this end, we measured participants' hand movement paths when grasping targets in the presence of obstacles as well as their gaze behaviour when walking through a cluttered hallway. We found that participants who showed more pronounced motor adjustments during grasping also spent more time looking at obstacles during locomotion. Furthermore, movement durations correlated positively in both tasks. Results suggest considerable intra-individual consistency in the strength of the avoidance response across different visuomotor measures potentially indicating an individual's tendency to perform safe actions.

  16. Configural processing in body posture recognition: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weidong; Sun, Hongjin

    2013-11-13

    The body inversion effect is the finding that inverted body posture pictures are more difficult to recognize than upright body posture pictures are. The present study reinvestigated the body inversion effect in human observers using behavioral and eye movement measures to explore whether the body inversion effect correlates with specific eye movement features. Results showed that body postures elicited a robust and stable body inversion effect in reaction time throughout the experimental sessions. Eye-tracking data showed that the body inversion effect was robust only in the first fixation duration, but not in the second fixation duration. The analysis of the regions of interest showed that most fixations were located in the upper body for both the upright and the inverted body postures. Compared with inverted body postures, the upright postures led to a shorter reaction time and a shorter first fixation duration, but a larger portion of time to fixate on the head region, suggesting that participants tended to use head as a reference point to process upright body postures. For both the behavioral and the eye movement measures, the body inversion effect was robust for biomechanically possible body postures. However, for biomechanically impossible body postures (with angular manipulation of two joints), the effect was mixed. Although the error rate failed to show the body inversion effect, the reaction time measure and most eye movement measures, however, showed a body inversion effect. Overall, these results suggested that upright body postures are processed in expertise recognition and are processed configurally by human observers.

  17. Characterization of a multifunctional inositol phosphate kinase from rice and barley belonging to the ATP-grasp superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, L.; Bohn, L.; Sørensen, M.B.;

    2007-01-01

    OsIpk and HvIk, inositol phosphate kinases, were cloned from rice (Oryza sativa L. var. indica, IR64) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) respectively.. IP Sequence alignment showed that they belong to the ATP-grasp family, which includes inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6-kinase from humans and Arabidops...

  18. "Stand up straight": notes toward a history of posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-03-01

    The essay presents a set of interlinked claims about posture in modern culture. Over the past two centuries it has come to define a wide range of assumptions in the West from what makes human beings human (from Lamarck to Darwin and beyond) to the efficacy of the body in warfare (from Dutch drill manuals in the 17th century to German military medical studies of soldiers in the 19th century). Dance and sport both are forms of posture training in terms of their own claims. Posture separates 'primitive' from 'advanced' peoples and the 'ill' from the 'healthy.' Indeed an entire medical sub-specialty developed in which gymnastics defined and recuperated the body. But all of these claims were also part of a Western attempt to use posture (and the means of altering it) as the litmus test for the healthy modern body of the perfect citizen. Focusing on the centrality of posture in two oddly linked moments of modern thought--modern Zionist thought and Nationalism in early 20th century China--in terms of bodily reform, we show how "posture" brings all of the earlier debates together to reform the body.

  19. Posture-dependent control of stimulation in standing neuroprosthesis: Simulation feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Musa L. Audu, PhD; Steven J. Gartman, MS; Raviraj Nataraj, PhD; Ronald J. Triolo, PhD

    2014-01-01

    We used a three-dimensional biomechanical model of human standing to test the feasibility of feed-forward control systems that vary stimulation to paralyzed muscles based on the user’s posture and desire to effect a postural change. The controllers examined were (1) constant baseline stimulation, which represented muscle activation required to maintain erect standing, and (2) posture follower, which varied muscle activation as a function of the location of the projection of whole-body center ...

  20. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min af

  1. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments in sitting in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigongiari, Aline; de Andrade e Souza, Flávia; Franciulli, Patrícia Martins; Neto, Semaan El Razi; Araujo, Rubens Correa; Mochizuki, Luis

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine postural control in children with cerebral palsy performing a bilateral shoulder flexion to grasp a ball from a sitting posture. The participants were 12 typically developing children (control) without cerebral palsy and 12 children with cerebral palsy (CP). We analyzed the effect of ball mass (1 kg and 0.18 kg), postural adjustment (anticipatory, APA, and compensatory, CPA), and groups (control and CP) on the electrical activity of shoulder and trunk muscles with surface electromyography (EMG). Greater mean iEMG was seen in CPA, with heavy ball, and for posterior trunk muscles (pchildren with CP presented the highest EMG and level of co-activation (pcontrol group, whereas that relationship was negative for participants with CP. We suggest that the main postural control strategy in children is based on corrections after the beginning of the movement. The linear relationship between EMG and aging suggests that postural control development is affected by central nervous disease which may lead to an increase in muscle co-activation.

  2. Toward autonomous avian-inspired grasping for micro aerial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; Loianno, Giuseppe; Polin, Joseph; Sreenath, Koushil; Kumar, Vijay

    2014-06-01

    Micro aerial vehicles, particularly quadrotors, have been used in a wide range of applications. However, the literature on aerial manipulation and grasping is limited and the work is based on quasi-static models. In this paper, we draw inspiration from agile, fast-moving birds such as raptors, that are able to capture moving prey on the ground or in water, and develop similar capabilities for quadrotors. We address dynamic grasping, an approach to prehensile grasping in which the dynamics of the robot and its gripper are significant and must be explicitly modeled and controlled for successful execution. Dynamic grasping is relevant for fast pick-and-place operations, transportation and delivery of objects, and placing or retrieving sensors. We show how this capability can be realized (a) using a motion capture system and (b) without external sensors relying only on onboard sensors. In both cases we describe the dynamic model, and trajectory planning and control algorithms. In particular, we present a methodology for flying and grasping a cylindrical object using feedback from a monocular camera and an inertial measurement unit onboard the aerial robot. This is accomplished by mapping the dynamics of the quadrotor to a level virtual image plane, which in turn enables dynamically-feasible trajectory planning for image features in the image space, and a vision-based controller with guaranteed convergence properties. We also present experimental results obtained with a quadrotor equipped with an articulated gripper to illustrate both approaches.

  3. Grasp movement decoding from premotor and parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Benjamin R; Subasi, Erk; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2011-10-05

    Despite recent advances in harnessing cortical motor-related activity to control computer cursors and robotic devices, the ability to decode and execute different grasping patterns remains a major obstacle. Here we demonstrate a simple Bayesian decoder for real-time classification of grip type and wrist orientation in macaque monkeys that uses higher-order planning signals from anterior intraparietal cortex (AIP) and ventral premotor cortex (area F5). Real-time decoding was based on multiunit signals, which had similar tuning properties to cells in previous single-unit recording studies. Maximum decoding accuracy for two grasp types (power and precision grip) and five wrist orientations was 63% (chance level, 10%). Analysis of decoder performance showed that grip type decoding was highly accurate (90.6%), with most errors occurring during orientation classification. In a subsequent off-line analysis, we found small but significant performance improvements (mean, 6.25 percentage points) when using an optimized spike-sorting method (superparamagnetic clustering). Furthermore, we observed significant differences in the contributions of F5 and AIP for grasp decoding, with F5 being better suited for classification of the grip type and AIP contributing more toward decoding of object orientation. However, optimum decoding performance was maximal when using neural activity simultaneously from both areas. Overall, these results highlight quantitative differences in the functional representation of grasp movements in AIP and F5 and represent a first step toward using these signals for developing functional neural interfaces for hand grasping.

  4. A constrained optimization framework for compliant underactuated grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ciocarlie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the design and analysis of underactuated robotic hands that use tendons and compliant joints to enable passive mechanical adaptation during grasping tasks. We use a quasistatic equilibrium formulation to predict the stability of a given grasp. This method is then used as the inner loop of an optimization algorithm that can find a set of actuation mechanism parameters that optimize the stability measure for an entire set of grasps. We discuss two possible approaches to design optimization using this framework, one using exhaustive search over the parameter space, and the other using a simplified gripper construction to cast the problem to a form that is directly solvable using well-established optimization methods. Computations are performed in 3-D, allow arbitrary geometry of the grasped objects and take into account frictional constraints.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  5. Toward a functional account of the human mirror system. Comment on "Grasping synergies: A motor-control approach to the mirror neuron mechanism" by A. D'Ausilio et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G.

    2015-03-01

    It has been more than 20 years since the first reports of macaque "mirror neurons" appeared in the literature [1], and a large number of studies have since established an analogous system in the human brain [2]. Despite a raft of studies using various methodological approaches, we appear to be moving further away from any form of consensus, particularly concerning what this mirror system actually "mirrors" (e.g., low-level motor representation, goal or intention coding), and the functional significance (if any) of this mechanism [3]. The conceptual issues discussed by D'Ausilio et al. [4] are indeed critical to the advancement of this field; interestingly, they suggest that examining kinematic vs. goal coding aspects of the mirror system might be redundant, and propose instead a new approach that examines the recruitment of motor synergies within the context of the mirror system.

  6. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  7. "Postural first" principle when balance is challenged in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Alexis; Spada, Rosario S; Bosser, Gilles; Gauchard, Gérome C; Anello, Guido; Bosco, Paolo; Calabrese, Santa; Iero, Antonella; Stella, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Perrin, Philippe P

    2014-08-01

    Human cognitive processing limits can lead to difficulties in performing two tasks simultaneously. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cognitive load on both simple and complex postural tasks. Postural control was evaluated in 128 noninstitutionalized elderly people (mean age = 73.6 ± 5.6 years) using a force platform on a firm support in control condition (CC) and mental counting condition (MCC) with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Then, the same tests were performed on a foam support. Sway path traveled and area covered by the center of foot pressure were recorded, low values indicating efficient balance. On firm support, sway path was higher in MCC than in CC both in EO and EC conditions (p balance control in a simple postural task (i.e. on firm support), which is highlighted by an increase of energetic expenditure (i.e. increase of the sway path covered) to balance. Awareness may not be increased and the attentional demand may be shared between balance and mental task. Conversely, cognitive load does not perturb the realization of a new complex postural task. This result showed that postural control is prioritized ("postural first" principle) when seriously challenged.

  8. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition Using a Range Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahamy, Herve

    The basic goal of human computer interaction is to improve the interaction between users and computers by making computers more usable and receptive to the user's needs. Within this context, the use of hand postures in replacement of traditional devices such as keyboards, mice and joysticks is being explored by many researchers. The goal is to interpret human postures via mathematical algorithms. Hand posture recognition has gained popularity in recent years, and could become the future tool for humans to interact with computers or virtual environments. An exhaustive description of the frequently used methods available in literature for hand posture recognition is provided. It focuses on the different types of sensors and data used, the segmentation and tracking methods, the features used to represent the hand postures as well as the classifiers considered in the recognition process. Those methods are usually presented as highly robust with a recognition rate close to 100%. However, a couple of critical points necessary for a successful real-time hand posture recognition system require major improvement. Those points include the features used to represent the hand segment, the number of postures simultaneously recognizable, the invariance of the features with respect to rotation, translation and scale and also the behavior of the classifiers against non-perfect hand segments for example segments including part of the arm or missing part of the palm. A 3D time-of-flight camera named SR4000 has been chosen to develop a new methodology because of its capability to provide in real-time and at high frame rate 3D information on the scene imaged. This sensor has been described and evaluated for its capability for capturing in real-time a moving hand. A new recognition method that uses the 3D information provided by the range camera to recognize hand postures has been proposed. The different steps of this methodology including the segmentation, the tracking, the hand

  9. Application of a sensor fusion algorithm for improving grasping stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyeon; Yoon, Hyun Suck; Moon, Hyung Pil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo Ja Choon [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A robot hand normally employees various sensors that are packaged in small form factor, perform with delicately accurate, and cost mostly very expensive. Grasping operation of the hand relies especially on accuracy of those sensors. Even with a set of advanced sensory systems embedded in a robot hand, securing a stable grasping is still challenging task. The present work makes an attempt to improve force sensor accuracy by applying sensor fusion method. An optimal weight value sensor fusion method formulated with Kalman filters is presented and tested in the work. Using a set of inexpensive sensors, the work achieves a reliable force sensing and applies the enhanced sensor stability to an object pinch grasping.

  10. POSTUR PADA WANITA HAMIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paryono .

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction: Pregnancy effects in changes on all body systems leading to a new balance women and maternal adaptation.Weight gain in pregnant women from both the uterus and breast development generally occurs at the front of the body, butwhen standing they were still able to maintain a posture that does not face. The purpose of this article is to examine thereasons why pregnant women do not fall to front and how the good attitude of the pregnant woman's body.Materials and Methods: Material of this article are literatures related to pregnancy and the pregnant woman's bodyp o s t u r e , a n d t h e y w e r e c o l l e c t e d b y l i t e r a t u r e ' s s t u d y a n d l i t e r a r y s t u d y .Discussion: Increased abdominal distension that makes tilting the pelvis forward, decreased abdominal muscle tone andincrease weight gain in late pregnancy requires a readjustment spinal curvature. Woman's center of gravity shifts forward.Lumbosakrum normal curve should be more curved and the curvature of the servikodorsal be formed to maintain balance.Assessment of anterior view, lateral and posterior body should include an understanding of the physical structures such asjoints and muscles as well as how the meridian pathways. To compensate for the anterior position of the enlarged uterus,lordosis shifting center of gravity to the back of the lower limbs. There is an increased sacroiliac joint mobility,sakrokoksigeal, and pubic joints during pregnancy, possibly due to hormonal changes. Individual assessments will berequired to determine the pattern of muscle for every person, especially for those who have musculoskeletal problems.Conclusions and Recommendations: The size of the stomach in a pregnant woman, then the gravity of the body changes.Body to be biased toward the rear, but this position makes your back hurt. Advice for pregnant women in order to maintainyour posture as follows: head upKeyword : Posture, Pregnancy, Women.

  11. Grasping convergent evolution in syngnathids: a unique tale of tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutens, C; Adriaens, D; Christiaens, J; De Kegel, B; Dierick, M; Boistel, R; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2014-06-01

    Seahorses and pipehorses both possess a prehensile tail, a unique characteristic among teleost fishes, allowing them to grasp and hold onto substrates such as sea grasses. Although studies have focused on tail grasping, the pattern of evolutionary transformations that made this possible is poorly understood. Recent phylogenetic studies show that the prehensile tail evolved independently in different syngnathid lineages, including seahorses, Haliichthys taeniophorus and several types of so-called pipehorses. This study explores the pattern that characterizes this convergent evolution towards a prehensile tail, by comparing the caudal musculoskeletal organization, as well as passive bending capacities in pipefish (representing the ancestral state), pipehorse, seahorse and H. taeniophorus. To study the complex musculoskeletal morphology, histological sectioning, μCT-scanning and phase contrast synchrotron scanning were combined with virtual 3D-reconstructions. Results suggest that the independent evolution towards tail grasping in syngnathids reflects at least two quite different strategies in which the ancestral condition of a heavy plated and rigid system became modified into a highly flexible one. Intermediate skeletal morphologies (between the ancestral condition and seahorses) could be found in the pygmy pipehorses and H. taeniophorus, which are phylogenetically closely affiliated with seahorses. This study suggests that the characteristic parallel myoseptal organization as already described in seahorse (compared with a conical organization in pipefish and pipehorse) may not be a necessity for grasping, but represents an apomorphy for seahorses, as this pattern is not found in other syngnathid species possessing a prehensile tail. One could suggest that the functionality of grasping evolved before the specialized, parallel myoseptal organization seen in seahorses. However, as the grasping system in pipehorses is a totally different one, this cannot be

  12. The role of vision in perching and grasping for MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; Loianno, Giuseppe; Daniilidis, Kostas; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we provide an overview of vision-based control for perching and grasping for Micro Aerial Vehicles. We investigate perching on at, inclined, or vertical surfaces as well as visual servoing techniques for quadrotors to enable autonomous perching by hanging from cylindrical structures using only a monocular camera and an appropriate gripper. The challenges of visual servoing are discussed, and we focus on the problems of relative pose estimation, control, and trajectory planning for maneuvering a robot with respect to an object of interest. Finally, we discuss future challenges to achieve fully autonomous perching and grasping in more realistic scenarios.

  13. Software engineering capability for Ada (GRASP/Ada Tool)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, James H., II

    1995-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) has successfully created and prototyped a new algorithmic level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis has been on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada PDL or source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada Source code. A new Motif compliant graphical user interface has been developed for the GRASP/Ada prototype.

  14. Stabilizing posture through imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Eleonora; Manzoni, Diego; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the general population, suppression of vision modulates body sway by increasing the center of pressure (CoP) velocity, while a light fingertip touch reduces the area of the CoP displacement in blindfolded subjects. This study assessed whether imagined fixation and fingertip touch differentially stabilize posture in subjects with high (highs) and low (lows) hypnotizability. Visual and tactile imageries were ineffective in lows. In highs, the effects of visual imagery could not be evaluated because the real information was ineffective; real tactile stimulation was effective only on velocity, but the imagery effects could not be definitely assessed owing to low effect size. The highs' larger variability could account for this and represents the most important finding.

  15. The effect of asymmetry of posture on anticipatory postural adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruin, Alexander S

    2006-06-19

    The study investigates the effect of body asymmetry on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed a task involving a standard load release induced by a shoulder abduction movement while standing symmetrically or in an asymmetrical stance with either their right or left leg in 45 degrees of external rotation. EMG activities of trunk and leg muscles were recorded during the postural perturbation and were quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were observed in all experimental conditions. It was found that asymmetrical body positioning was associated with significant asymmetrical patterns of APAs seen in the right and left distal muscles. These APA asymmetries were dependant upon the side in which the body asymmetry was induced: reduced APAs were observed in the leg muscles on the side of leg rotation, while increased APAs were seen in the muscles on the contralateral side. These findings stress the important role that body asymmetries play in the control of upright posture.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5365 - Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posture chair for cardiac or pulmonary treatment. 868.5365 Section 868.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5365 Posture...

  17. Body posture and postural stability of people practicing qigong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Correct and stable posture is essential for the implementation of the majority of voluntary movements and locomotion. The study of postural stability is an element of clinical trials evaluating physical activity in order to determine the optimal therapeutic procedures. Qigong exercises are not only a form of prevention, helpful in maintaining wellbeing, but also a means of therapy in many diseases, including disorders of postural stability. Aim of the research: To analyse the association between the quality of posture and postural stability of people practicing qigong. Material and methods : The study involved 32 people. The mean age of those tested was 54 years. Posture study used optoelectronic method Diers formetric III 4D. Postural stability was tested on the platform Biodex Balance System. The studies were performed at the Posture Laboratory of the Institute of Physiotherapy at Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. Results and conclusions : Spearman rank order correlation showed a positive correlation of relative rotation of the spine area with a general indicator of stability (p = 0.0206 at an average level (R = 0.4075 and with the index of the stability A/P (p = 0.0310, although at a lower level (R = 0.3819. With the increase in the relative rotation of the spine area the overall stability indicator and stability indicator A/P also increased. Significant positive correlations were also seen for the surface rotation (+max and a general indication of the stability and the stability index A/P. With the increase of surface rotation (+max of the spine the overall stability indicator and stability indicator A/P also increased.

  18. The organization of anticipatory postural adjustments

    OpenAIRE

    Aruin Alexander S.

    2002-01-01

    Central control of posture is expressed through anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments. Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) precede planned postural perturbations and minimize them with anticipatory corrections, while compensatory postural adjustments deal with actual perturbations of balance that occur as a result of suboptimal efficiency of anticipatory corrections. The process of generation of APAs is affected by three major factors: expected magnitude and direction of the...

  19. Cervical vertebral realignment when voluntarily adopting a protective neck posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Robyn S; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Street, John; Cripton, Peter A

    2014-07-01

    In vivo human volunteer study of the intervertebral postural changes and muscle activity levels while tensing the neck muscles. To determine if actively tensing the neck muscles changes the posture of the cervical spine and, because axial impact neck injury often occurs while inverted, whether these changes exist both upright and upside down. Rollover accidents are dynamic and complex events in which head contacts with the vehicle interior can cause catastrophic neck injuries. Computational modeling has suggested that active neck muscles may increase the risk of cervical spine fracture in a rollover crash. Cadaver testing has also demonstrated that overall neck alignment and curvature are key to understanding and preventing catastrophic neck injuries. Although muscle activity and neck posture affects the resulting injury, there are currently no in vivo data describing how tensing the neck muscles influences intervertebral posture. Eleven human subjects (6 females, 5 males) actively tensed their neck muscles while seated upright and inverted. Vertebral alignment was measured using fluoroscopy and muscle activity was recorded using surface and indwelling electrodes in 8 neck muscles. On average, tensed muscles increased cervical spine curvature and anterior motion of the cervical vertebrae relative to the torso. These changes, which were magnified by inversion, indicate that cervical intervertebral posture differs considerably between the relaxed and tensed states. Active muscle contraction can change the vertebral alignment in upright and inverted postures. This change in posture may alter the load path and injury mechanics during an axial head impact and may help explain the disparity between the neck injuries observed in real-world rollover accidents and ex vivo cadaver experiments. N/A.

  20. Discrimination of fearful and happy body postures in 8-month-old infants: An event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela eMissana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Responding to others’ emotional body expressions is an essential social skill in humans. Adults readily detect emotions from body postures, but it is unclear whether infants are sensitive to emotional body postures. We examined 8-month-old infants’ brain responses to emotional body postures by measuring event-related potentials (ERPs to happy and fearful bodies. Our results revealed two emotion-sensitive ERP components: body postures evoked an early N290 at occipital electrodes and a later Nc at fronto-central electrodes that were enhanced in response to fearful (relative to happy expressions. These findings demonstrate that, (a 8-month-old infants discriminate between static emotional body postures, and (b similar to infant emotional face perception, the sensitivity to emotional body postures is reflected in early perceptual (N290 and later attentional (Nc neural processes. This provides evidence for an early developmental emergence of the neural processes involved in the discrimination of emotional body postures.

  1. Improvement and Neuroplasticity after Combined Rehabilitation to Forced Grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Arima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The grasp reflex is a distressing symptom but the need to treat or suppress it has rarely been discussed in the literature. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who had suffered cerebral infarction of the right putamen and temporal lobe 10 years previously. Forced grasping of the hemiparetic left upper limb was improved after a unique combined treatment. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A was first injected into the left biceps, wrist flexor muscles, and finger flexor muscles. Forced grasping was reduced along with spasticity of the upper limb. In addition, repetitive facilitative exercise and object-related training were performed under low-amplitude continuous neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Since this 2-week treatment improved upper limb function, we compared brain activities, as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy during finger pinching, before and after the combined treatment. Brain activities in the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex (SMC and medial frontal cortex (MFC during pinching under electrical stimulation after treatment were greater than those before. The results suggest that training under electrical stimulation after BTX-A treatment may modulate the activities of the ipsilesional SMC and MFC and lead to functional improvement of the affected upper limb with forced grasping.

  2. The influence of material cues on early grasping force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to see whether differences in texture influence grip force in the very early phase of grasping an object. Subjects were asked to pick up objects with different textures either blindfolded or sighted, while grip force was measured. Maximum force was found to be adjusted t

  3. Development of Object and Grasping Knowledge by Robot Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas;

    2010-01-01

    We describe a bootstrapping cognitive robot system that—mainly based on pure exploration—acquires rich object representations and associated object-specific grasp affordances. Such bootstrapping becomes possible by combining innate competences and behaviours by which the system gradually enriches...

  4. Cortical dynamics of sensorimotor integration during grasp planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.; Dijkerman, H.C.; Medendorp, W.P.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Our sensorimotor interactions with objects are guided by their current spatial and perceptual features, as well as by learned object knowledge. Afresh red tomato is grasped differently than a soft overripe tomato, even when those objects possess the same spatial metrics of size and shape. Objects' s

  5. Improvement and Neuroplasticity after Combined Rehabilitation to Forced Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Atsuko; Kawahira, Kazumi; Shimodozono, Megumi

    2017-01-01

    The grasp reflex is a distressing symptom but the need to treat or suppress it has rarely been discussed in the literature. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who had suffered cerebral infarction of the right putamen and temporal lobe 10 years previously. Forced grasping of the hemiparetic left upper limb was improved after a unique combined treatment. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) was first injected into the left biceps, wrist flexor muscles, and finger flexor muscles. Forced grasping was reduced along with spasticity of the upper limb. In addition, repetitive facilitative exercise and object-related training were performed under low-amplitude continuous neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Since this 2-week treatment improved upper limb function, we compared brain activities, as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy during finger pinching, before and after the combined treatment. Brain activities in the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex (SMC) and medial frontal cortex (MFC) during pinching under electrical stimulation after treatment were greater than those before. The results suggest that training under electrical stimulation after BTX-A treatment may modulate the activities of the ipsilesional SMC and MFC and lead to functional improvement of the affected upper limb with forced grasping. PMID:28265475

  6. Priming of Reach and Grasp Actions by Handled Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Bub, Daniel N.; Breuer, Andreas T.

    2011-01-01

    Pictures of handled objects such as a beer mug or frying pan are shown to prime speeded reach and grasp actions that are compatible with the object. To determine whether the evocation of motor affordances implied by this result is driven merely by the physical orientation of the object's handle as opposed to higher-level properties of the object,…

  7. Unmanned Systems: A Lab-Based Robotic Arm for Grasping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A LAB-BASED ROBOTIC ARM FOR GRASPING by Arturo Jacinto II June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Richard M. Harkins Second Reader: Peter Crooker......learning opportunities for various student experiments including the initial selection, startup and development of the Robotic arm and glove controller

  8. Development of prosthesis grasp control systems on a robotic testbed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerdeman, Bart; Fabrizi, Ugo; Palli, Gianluca; Melchiorri, Claudio; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    Modern myoelectric hand prostheses continue to increase in functionality, while their control is constrained by the limits of myoelectric input. This paper covers the development and testing of grasp control systems for multifunctional myoelectric prosthetic hands. The functionality of modern hand p

  9. Gaze, goals and growing up: Effects on imitative grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Sonja P; Roberts, Kim P; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2013-09-01

    Developmental differences in the use of social-attention cues to imitation were examined among children aged 3 and 6 years old (n = 58) and adults (n = 29). In each of 20 trials, participants watched a model grasp two objects simultaneously and move them together. On every trial, the model directed her gaze towards only one of the objects. Some object pairs were related and had a clear functional relationship (e.g., flower, vase), while others were functionally unrelated (e.g., cardboard square, ladybug). Owing to attentional effects of eye gaze, it was expected that all participants would more faithfully imitate the grasp on the gazed-at object than the object not gazed-at. Children were expected to imitate less faithfully on trials with functionally related objects than those without, due to goal-hierarchy effects. Results support effects of eye gaze on imitation of grasping. Children's grasping accuracy on functionally related and functionally unrelated trials was similar, but they were more likely to only use one hand on trials where the object pairs were functionally related than unrelated. Implications for theories of imitation are discussed. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Hand Preference for Precision Grasping Predicts Language Lateralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Claudia L. R.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether or not there is a relationship between hand preference for grasping and hemispheric dominance for language--and how each of these is related to other traditional measures of handedness. To do this we asked right- and left-handed participants to put together two different sets of 3D puzzles made out of big or very small…

  11. Grasping what is graspable: evidence from visual form agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert D; Dijkerman, H Chris; Mon-Williams, Mark; Milner, A David

    2004-01-01

    Patient DF has profound visual form agnosia. Despite this, she has no problem adjusting her finger-thumb grip aperture to the width of objects when reaching to grasp them. In a previous study, however, she was found to have great difficulty in scaling her grip aperture when attempting to grasp a transparent disc through two holes cut into it. This problem was attributed to a putative difference between the visual processing of size and distance in the brain, whereby DF retained the capacity for processing object size but not the separation between distinct elements such as holes. In the present study we have tested this idea more directly, and found no evidence to support such a distinction. Nonetheless, we replicated our earlier finding that DF is unable to produce normal prehension movements when attempting to grasp transparent stimuli by placing her digits into holes. We suggest that, whilst some simple objects offer themselves directly to the dorsal stream for grasping, an intact ventral stream is required to respond appropriately to more complex stimuli.

  12. Electromyographic analysis of goal-directed grasping behavior in the American lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomina, Yusuke; Takahata, Masakazu

    2014-10-15

    Animals spontaneously initiate goal-directed behavior including foraging action based on their appetitive motivation. The American lobster Homarus americanus exhibits grasping behavior with its crusher claw as feeding behavior that can be initiated after appropriate operant conditioning. In order to quantitatively characterize the goal-directed grasping behavior with a time resolution fine enough for neurophysiological analysis of its initiation and control mechanisms, we made simultaneous electromyographic (EMG) recording from grasping- and reaching-related muscles of the crusher claw while animals initiated grasping behavior. We developed an in vivo extracellular recording chamber that allowed the animal under a semi-restrained condition to perform operant reward learning of claw grasping. Three muscles in the crusher claw (propodite-dactyl closer/opener and coxal protractor) were found to be closely associated with spontaneous grasping behavior. In spontaneous grasping, the activation of those muscles consistently preceded the grasping onset time and exhibited different activity patterns from the grasp induced by a mechanical stimulus. Furthermore, we found that the timing of coxal protractor activation was closer to the grasp onset and its activity was briefer for goal-directed grasping behavior in trained and hungry animals than for non-goal-directed spontaneous grasping behavior in naive or satiated animals. It is suggested that the goal-directed grasping behavior of lobster is characterized, at least partly, by experience-dependent briefer activity of specific muscles involved in reaching action.

  13. Enhancing digital driver models: identification of distinct postural strategies used by drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Gyouhyung; Nussbaum, Maury A; Babski-Reeves, Kari L

    2010-03-01

    Driver workspace design and evaluation is, in part, based on assumed driving postures of users and determines several ergonomic aspects of a vehicle, such as reach, visibility and postural comfort. Accurately predicting and specifying standard driving postures, hence, are necessary to improve the ergonomic quality of the driver workspace. In this study, a statistical clustering approach was employed to reduce driving posture simulation/prediction errors, assuming that drivers use several distinct postural strategies when interacting with automobiles. 2-D driving postures, described by 16 joint angles, were obtained from 38 participants with diverse demographics (age, gender) and anthropometrics (stature, body mass) and in two vehicle classes (sedans and SUVs). Based on the proximity of joint angle sets, cluster analysis yielded three predominant postural strategies in each vehicle class (i.e. 'lower limb flexed', 'upper limb flexed' and 'extended'). Mean angular differences between clusters ranged from 3.8 to 52.4 degrees for the majority of joints, supporting the practical relevance of the distinct clusters. The existence of such postural strategies should be considered when utilising digital human models (DHMs) to enhance and evaluate driver workspace design ergonomically and proactively. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study identified drivers' distinct postural strategies, based on actual drivers' behaviours. Such strategies can facilitate accurate positioning of DHMs and hence help design ergonomic driver workspaces.

  14. Effect of object width on precision grip force and finger posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalain, M; Vigouroux, L; Danion, F; Sevrez, V; Berton, E

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to define the effect of object width on spontaneous grasp. Participants held objects of various masses (0.75 to 2.25 kg) and widths (3.5 to 9.5 cm) between thumb and index finger. Grip force, maximal grip force and corresponding finger postures were recorded using an embedded force sensor and an optoelectronic system, respectively. Results showed that index finger joints varied to accommodate the object width, whereas thumb posture remained constant across conditions. For a given object mass, grip force increased as a function of object width, although this result is not dictated by the laws of mechanics. Because maximal grip force also increased with object width, we hypothesise that participants maintain a constant ratio between grip force and their maximal grip force at each given width. Altogether we conclude that when the task consists in manipulating objects/tools, the optimal width is different than when maximal force exertions are required.

  15. Sequential phosphorylation of GRASP65 during mitotic Golgi disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danming Tang

    2012-09-01

    GRASP65 phosphorylation during mitosis and dephosphorylation after mitosis are required for Golgi disassembly and reassembly during the cell cycle. At least eight phosphorylation sites on GRASP65 have been identified, but whether they are modified in a coordinated fashion during mitosis is so far unknown. In this study, we raised phospho-specific antibodies that recognize phosphorylated T220/T224, S277 and S376 residues of GRASP65, respectively. Biochemical analysis showed that cdc2 phosphorylates all three sites, while plk1 enhances the phosphorylation. Microscopic studies using these antibodies for double and triple labeling demonstrate sequential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the cell cycle. S277 and S376 are phosphorylated from late G2 phase through metaphase until telophase when the new Golgi is reassembled. T220/224 is not modified until prophase, but is highly modified from prometaphase to anaphase. In metaphase, phospho-T220/224 signal localizes on both Golgi haze and mitotic Golgi clusters that represent dispersed Golgi vesicles and Golgi remnants, respectively, while phospho-S277 and S376 labeling is more concentrated on mitotic Golgi clusters. Expression of a phosphorylation-resistant GRASP65 mutant T220A/T224A inhibited mitotic Golgi fragmentation to a much larger extent than the expression of the S277A and S376A mutants. In cytokinesis, T220/224 dephosphorylation occurs prior to that of S277, but after S376. This study provides evidence that GRASP65 is sequentially phosphorylated and dephosphorylated during mitosis at different sites to orchestrate Golgi disassembly and reassembly during cell division, with phosphorylation of the T220/224 site being most critical in the process.

  16. One month of contemporary dance modulates fractal posture in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier A. Coubard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the human aging of postural control and how physical or motor activity improves balance and gait is challenging for both clinicians and researchers. Previous studies have evidenced that physical and sporting activity focusing on cardiovascular and strength conditioning help older adults develop their balance and gait and/or decrease their frequency of falls. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning has also been put forward as an alternative to develop balance and/or prevent falls in aging. Specifically dance has been advocated as a promising program to boost motor control. In this study, we examined the effects of contemporary dance (CD on postural control of older adults. Upright stance posturography was performed in 38 participants aged 54-89 years before and after the intervention period, during which one half of the randomly assigned participants was trained to CD and the other half was not trained at all (no dance, ND. CD training lasted 4 weeks, 3 times a week. We performed classical statistic scores of postural signal and dynamic analyses, namely signal diffusion analysis (SDA, recurrence quantification analysis (RQA and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA. CD modulated postural control in older trainees, as revealed in the eyes closed condition by a decrease in fractal dimension and an increase in DFA alpha component in the mediolateral plane. The ND group showed an increase in length and mean velocity of postural signal, and the eyes open a decrease in RQA maximal diagonal line in the anteroposterior plane and an increase in DFA alpha component in the mediolateral plane. No change was found in SDA in either group. We suggest that such a massed practice of CD reduced the quantity of exchanges between the subject and the environment by increasing their postural confidence. Since CD has low-physical but high-motor impact, we conclude that it may be recommended as a useful program to rehabilitate posture in aging.

  17. One month of contemporary dance modulates fractal posture in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubard, Olivier A; Ferrufino, Lena; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Zelada, Oscar; Bril, Blandine; Dietrich, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the human aging of postural control and how physical or motor activity improves balance and gait is challenging for both clinicians and researchers. Previous studies have evidenced that physical and sporting activity focusing on cardiovascular and strength conditioning help older adults develop their balance and gait and/or decrease their frequency of falls. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning has also been put forward as an alternative to develop balance and/or prevent falls in aging. Specifically dance has been advocated as a promising program to boost motor control. In this study, we examined the effects of contemporary dance (CD) on postural control of older adults. Upright stance posturography was performed in 38 participants aged 54-89 years before and after the intervention period, during which one half of the randomly assigned participants was trained to CD and the other half was not trained at all (no dance, ND). CD training lasted 4 weeks, 3 times a week. We performed classical statistic scores of postural signal and dynamic analyses, namely signal diffusion analysis (SDA), recurrence quantification analysis (RQA), and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). CD modulated postural control in older trainees, as revealed in the eyes closed condition by a decrease in fractal dimension and an increase in DFA alpha component in the mediolateral plane. The ND group showed an increase in length and mean velocity of postural signal, and the eyes open a decrease in RQA maximal diagonal line in the anteroposterior plane and an increase in DFA alpha component in the mediolateral plane. No change was found in SDA in either group. We suggest that such a massed practice of CD reduced the quantity of exchange between the subject and the environment by increasing their postural confidence. Since CD has low-physical but high-motor impact, we conclude that it may be recommended as a useful program to rehabilitate posture in aging.

  18. Postural threat influences conscious perception of postural sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-05-04

    This study examined how changes in threat influenced conscious perceptions of postural sway. Young healthy adults stood on a forceplate mounted to a hydraulic lift placed at two heights (0.8m and 3.2m). At each height, subjects stood quietly with eyes open and eyes closed for 60s. Subjects were instructed to either stand normal, or stand normal and track their perceived sway in the antero-posterior plane by rotating a hand-held potentiometer. Participants reported an increased level of fear, anxiety, arousal and a decreased level of balance confidence when standing at height. In addition, postural sway amplitude decreased and frequency increased at height. However, there were no effects of height on perceived sway. When standing under conditions of increased postural threat, sway amplitude is reduced, while sway perception appears to remain unchanged. Therefore, when threat is increased, sensory gain may be increased to compensate for postural strategies that reduce sway (i.e. stiffening strategy), thereby ensuring sufficient afferent information is available to maintain, or even increase the conscious perception of postural sway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of different sitting postures on head/neck posture and muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneiro, Joao Paulo; O'Sullivan, Peter; Burnett, Angus; Barach, Avi; O'Neil, David; Tveit, Orjan; Olafsdottir, Karolina

    2010-02-01

    To date the influence that specific sitting posture has on the head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity has been insufficiently investigated. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether three different thoraco-lumbar sitting postures affect head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity. Twenty (10 men, 10 women) asymptomatic subjects were placed in 3 standardized thoraco-lumbar sitting postures (lumbo-pelvic, thoracic upright and slump) to investigate their influence on cervico-thoracic muscle activity and head/neck posture. There were significant differences in lumbar and thoracic curvatures in the 3 different sitting postures (Ppostures (P=0.015). Upper trapezius (UT) demonstrated no significant difference in muscle activation in the 3 sitting postures (Ppostures affect head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity. It highlights the potential importance of thoraco-lumbar spine postural adjustment when training head/neck posture.

  20. Common postural defects among music students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Piñeiro, Patricia; Díaz-Pereira, M Pino; Martínez, Aurora

    2015-07-01

    Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors.

  1. ESTIMATION OF GRASPING TORQUE USING ROBUST REACTION TORQUE OBSERVER FOR ROBOTIC FORCEPS

    OpenAIRE

    塚本, 祐介; Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Abstract— In this paper, the estimation of the grasping torque of robotic forceps without the use of a force/torque sensor is discussed. To estimate the grasping torque when the robotic forceps driven by a rotary motor with a reduction gear grasps an object, a novel robust reaction torque observer is proposed. In the case where a conventional reaction force/torque observer is applied, the estimated torque includes not only the grasping torque, namely the reaction torque, but also t...

  2. 不同体位短臂离心机暴露时心血管及前庭功能的改变%Effects of short-arm centrifuge exposure on human cardiovascular and vestibular functions with different postures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉; 杨长斌; 任虎君; 王雷; 王永春; 孙喜庆

    2010-01-01

    目的 通过观察和比较不同体位下短臂离心机暴露所引起的心血管及前庭功能反应,进一步明确短臂离心机暴露下体位因素对心血管和前庭功能的影响. 方法 10名健康男性,依次进行75°、45°、15°后倾体位的短臂离心机暴露,且每体位先后进行2 G、3 G(足水平)人工重力暴露;采用便携式无创逐跳血压监测仪(Portapres)全程监测,并记录受试者血压、心率,通过Beatscope分析软件计算心脏泵血功能和总外周阻力;同时进行前庭功能评价,比较不同体位短臂离心机暴露对心血管、前庭系统的影响. 结果 2 G、3 G短臂离心机分别暴露时,15°体位下6名受试者出现严重运动病症状被迫终止试验;75°和45°两种体位下受试者血压、心率较基础值增高(F=2.79~16.44,P<0.05);心输出量则无显著变化.3 G暴露75°和45°两种体位时,每搏量显著降低(F=2.25、8.35,P<0.05).3 G暴露45°体位时总外周阻力较基础值增高(F=2.61,P<0.05);相同G值短臂离心机暴露时,75°体位下心血管功能变化较45°体位差异无统计学意义,而前庭功能评分则随着体位角度的减小而逐渐增高,15°体位下评分较45°和75°体位增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 短臂离心机暴露时,45°和75°两种体位对心血管功能的影响无统计学意义,但不同体位对前庭功能的影响却差异较大.暴露体位越趋近于坐位,引起的运动病程度越重.%Objective To investigate the changes of human cardiovascular and vestibular functions when exposed to the artificiaI gravity generated by short-arm centrifuge with different body positions.Methods Ten healthy male volunteers were exposed to the artificial gravity at three different body positions:foot towards to the radial direction off the rotation center respectively with 75°,45°and 15°back tilting.Each position underwent on short-arm centrifuge with two sessions that were at 2 G and 3 G (at

  3. Differentiation of hand posture to object shape in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Aviva L; Raghavan, Preeti; Kaminski, Terry; Hillstrom, Howard J; Gordon, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying hand-shaping in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP) is the first step in understanding hand posture differentiation. To quantify this ability and determine how hand posture evolves during reach toward various object shapes in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP), 2 groups of children (10 typically developing, and 10 USCP, ages 6-13) were studied in a single-session cross-sectional study. Subjects grasped rectangular, concave, and convex objects with each hand. Metacarpal and proximal interphalangeal joint finger flexion and finger abduction angles were calculated. The extent to which hand posture reflects object shape was calculated using a "visuomotor efficiency (VME) index" (a score of 100 reflects perfect discrimination between objects). A mixed design ANOVA with repeated measures on time was used to compare the VME between groups. Children with USCP demonstrated a lower VME than controls in the affected hand, indicating less effective hand-shaping; pchildren with USCP differentiated their hand posture to objects of different shapes, but demonstrated deficits in the timing and magnitude of hand-shaping isolated to the affected side. The present study suggests it may be important to consider the quality of hand activity using quantitative approaches such as VME analyses. Rehabilitation approaches that target these deficits to improve joint mobility and motor control are worth testing.

  4. A statistical model including age to predict passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jangwoon; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P; Hallman, Jason J

    2016-06-01

    Few statistical models of rear seat passenger posture have been published, and none has taken into account the effects of occupant age. This study developed new statistical models for predicting passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles. Postures of 89 adults with a wide range of age and body size were measured in a laboratory mock-up in seven seat configurations. Posture-prediction models for female and male passengers were separately developed by stepwise regression using age, body dimensions, seat configurations and two-way interactions as potential predictors. Passenger posture was significantly associated with age and the effects of other two-way interaction variables depended on age. A set of posture-prediction models are presented for women and men, and the prediction results are compared with previously published models. This study is the first study of passenger posture to include a large cohort of older passengers and the first to report a significant effect of age for adults. The presented models can be used to position computational and physical human models for vehicle design and assessment. Practitioner Summary: The significant effects of age, body dimensions and seat configuration on rear seat passenger posture were identified. The models can be used to accurately position computational human models or crash test dummies for older passengers in known rear seat configurations.

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Adaptation Reveals the Cortical Networks for Processing Grasp-Relevant Object Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaco, S.; Chen, Y.; Medendorp, W.P.; Crawford, J.D.; Fiehler, K.; Henriques, D.Y.P.

    2014-01-01

    Grasping behaviors require the selection of grasp-relevant object dimensions, independent of overall object size. Previous neuroimaging studies found that the intraparietal cortex processes object size, but it is unknown whether the graspable dimension (i.e., grasp axis between selected points on th

  6. Intrinsic hand muscle function, part 1: creating a functional grasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnet, Ursina; Muzykewicz, David A; Fridén, Jan; Lieber, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Regaining hand function has been identified as the highest priority for persons with tetraplegia. In many patients, finger flexion can be restored with a tendon transfer of extensor carpi radialis longus to flexor digitorum profundus (FDP). In the absence of intrinsic function, this results in a roll-up finger movement, which tends to push large objects out of grasp. To enable patients to grasp objects of varying sizes, a functional grasp is required that has a larger excursion of fingertip-to-palm distance than can be supplied without intrinsic function. The aim of this study was to quantify the role of intrinsic muscle force in creating a functional grasp. Finger kinematics during grasp were measured on 5 cadaveric hands. To simulate finger flexion, the FDP was activated by a motor and intrinsic muscles were loaded at various levels (0, 125, 250, 375, or 500 g). Finger movement was characterized by the order of metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joint flexion and by the maximal fingertip-to-palm distance during finger closure. Without any intrinsic muscle contribution (0-g load), FDP activation resulted in flexion of all 3 joints, whereby flexion began at the proximal interphalangeal joint, followed by the distal interphalangeal joint, and then the metacarpophalangeal joint. With increasing intrinsic muscle load, finger flexion was initiated at the metacarpophalangeal joint, followed by the proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. This altered joint flexion order resulted in a larger maximal fingertip-to-palm distance during finger flexion. The difference between the 2 extreme conditions (0 g vs 500 g of intrinsic muscle load) was 19 mm. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous activation of the FDP and the intrinsic muscles results in an apparently more functional hand closing compared with FDP activation alone because of altered kinematics and larger fingertip-to-palm distances. These findings

  7. Grasping actions and social interaction: neural bases and anatomical circuitry in the monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Stefano; Coudé, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The study of the neural mechanisms underlying grasping actions showed that cognitive functions are deeply embedded in motor organization. In the first part of this review, we describe the anatomical structure of the motor cortex in the monkey and the cortical and sub-cortical connections of the different motor areas. In the second part, we review the neurophysiological literature showing that motor neurons are not only involved in movement execution, but also in the transformation of object physical features into motor programs appropriate to grasp them (through visuo-motor transformations). We also discuss evidence indicating that motor neurons can encode the goal of motor acts and the intention behind action execution. Then, we describe one of the mechanisms—the mirror mechanism—considered to be at the basis of action understanding and intention reading, and describe the anatomo-functional pathways through which information about the social context can reach the areas containing mirror neurons. Finally, we briefly show that a clear similarity exists between monkey and human in the organization of the motor and mirror systems. Based on monkey and human literature, we conclude that the mirror mechanism relies on a more extended network than previously thought, and possibly subserves basic social functions. We propose that this mechanism is also involved in preparing appropriate complementary response to observed actions, allowing two individuals to become attuned and cooperate in joint actions. PMID:26236258

  8. Anticipatory planning and control of grasp positions and forces for dexterous two-digit manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiushi; Zhang, Wei; Santello, Marco

    2010-07-07

    Dexterous object manipulation requires anticipatory control of digit positions and forces. Despite extensive studies on sensorimotor learning of digit forces, how humans learn to coordinate digit positions and forces has never been addressed. Furthermore, the functional role of anticipatory modulation of digit placement to object properties remains to be investigated. We addressed these questions by asking human subjects (12 females, 12 males) to grasp and lift an inverted T-shaped object using precision grip at constrained or self-chosen locations. The task requirement was to minimize object roll during lift. When digit position was not constrained, subjects could have implemented many equally valid digit position-force coordination patterns. However, choice of digit placement might also have resulted in large trial-to-trial variability of digit position, hence challenging the extent to which the CNS could have relied on sensorimotor memories for anticipatory control of digit forces. We hypothesized that subjects would modulate digit placement for optimal force distribution and digit forces as a function of variable digit positions. All subjects learned to minimize object roll within the first three trials, and the unconstrained device was associated with significantly smaller grip forces but larger variability of digit positions. Importantly, however, digit load force modulation compensated for position variability, thus ensuring consistent object roll minimization on each trial. This indicates that subjects learned object manipulation by integrating sensorimotor memories with sensory feedback about digit positions. These results are discussed in the context of motor equivalence and sensorimotor integration of grasp kinematics and kinetics.

  9. Grasping actions and social interaction: neural bases and anatomical circuitry in the monkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eRozzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the neural mechanisms underlying grasping actions showed that cognitive functions are deeply embedded in motor organization. In the first part of this review, we describe the anatomical structure of the motor cortex in the monkey and the cortical and sub-cortical connections of the different motor areas. In the second part, we review the neurophysiological literature showing that motor neurons are not only involved in movement execution, but also in the transformation of object physical features into motor programs appropriate to grasp them (through visuo-motor transformations. We also discuss evidence indicating that motor neurons can encode the goal of motor acts and the intention behind action execution. Then, we describe one of the mechanisms – the mirror mechanism – considered to be at the basis of action understanding and intention reading, and describe the anatomo-functional pathways through which information about the social context can reach the areas containing mirror neurons. Finally, we briefly show that a clear similarity exists between monkey and human in the organization of the motor and mirror systems. Based on monkey and human literature, we conclude that the mirror mechanism relies on a more extended network than previously thought, and possibly subserves basic social functions. We propose that this mechanism is also involved in preparing appropriate complementary response to observed actions, allowing two individuals to become attuned and cooperate in joint actions.

  10. Body posture measurement in a context of example-based teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Eric; Perrin, Stephane; Coquin, Didier

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a measurement process of body postures operated in a context of humanoid robot learning. The basic measured quantities are the angle joints of a human skeleton and the angle joints of a humanoid robot. Due to the differences between the two mechanical structures, the measurement results are expressed into a common representation space by the way of fuzzy scales. This paper shows how the common representation space can be defined, and presents a method to match weakly defined postures with uncertain measurements of a human posture.

  11. A contact stress model for multifingered grasps of rough objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pramath Raj; Abel, Jacob M.

    1990-01-01

    The model developed utilizes a contact-stress analysis of an arbitrarily shaped object in a multifingered grasp. The fingers and the object are all treated as elastic bodies, and the region of contact is modeled as a deformable surface patch. The relationship between the friction and normal forces is nonlocal and nonlinear in nature and departs from the Coulomb approximation. The nature of the constraints arising out of conditions for compatibility and static equilibrium motivated the formulation of the model as a nonlinear constrained minimization problem. The model is able to predict the magnitude of the inwardly directed normal forces and both the magnitude and direction of the tangential (friction) forces at each finger-object interface for grasped objects in static equilibrium.

  12. Modeling the shape hierarchy for visually guided grasping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rezai, O

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available of object features Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience www.frontiersin.org October 2014 | Volume 8 | Article 132 | 1 COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE Rezai et al. Shape hierarchy for visually guided grasping (Borra et al., 2008). AIP also contains other... of depth and its first and second spatial derivatives. CIP has been proposed to encode these variables (Orban et al., 2006), and they have been the basis for several experimental studies of CIP responses (Sakata et al., Frontiers in Computational...

  13. The Synthesis of Force Closure Grasps in the Plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    TASK U Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA A WORK UN IT "NMUIERS ~( 545 Technology Square Cambridge, MA 02139 SI. CONTROLLING OFICE NAME ANO... ARTIFICIAL INThLLIX’ ENCE LABORATORY A. 1. Memo 861 September, 1985 The Synthesis of Force-Closure Grasps In the Plane DTIC ’VeL% ,#ECTE 1 VnDcNguyenU Abstract... Artificial In- telligenmcc Liabomatory of thle Massachuset Is hInsttute of Teclhnolog3 . Support for the Lahoratot * s Artificial Intelligence research is

  14. Dynamic Control of Posture Across Locomotor Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Earhart, Gammon M.

    2013-01-01

    Successful locomotion depends on postural control to establish and maintain appropriate postural orientation of body segments relative to one another and to the environment, and to ensure dynamic stability of the moving body. This paper provides a framework for considering dynamic postural control, highlighting the importance of coordination, consistency, and challenges to postural control posed by various locomotor tasks such as turning and backward walking. The impacts of aging and various ...

  15. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    OpenAIRE

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending p...

  16. Postural discomfort and perceived exertion in standardized box-holding postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendorf, M R; Drury, C G

    2001-12-15

    To help in the design or redesign of workplaces it would be helpful to know in advance the postural stress consequences of a wide range of body postures. This experiment evaluated 168 postures chosen to represent those in the Ovako Working-posture Analysing System (OWAS) using Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE) and Body Part Discomfort (BPD) measures. The postures comprised all combinations of three arm postures, four back postures, seven leg postures and two forces (weights of held boxes). Twelve male subjects held each posture for a fixed duration (20 s) before providing RPE and BPD ratings. Analysis of the ratings gave highly significant main effects, with the major driver being the object weight. As each factor was varied, the largest effect was on the body region corresponding to that factor. A simple main-effects-only additive model explained 91% of the variance of RPE means for the postures.

  17. Simulation of rear end impact with a full body human model with a detailed neck: role of passive muscle properties and initial seating posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Horst, M.J. van der; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.; Kingma, H.

    2001-01-01

    To study the mechanics of the neck during rear end impact, in this paper an existing global human body model and an existing detailed submodel of the neck were combined into a new model. The combined model is validated with responses of volunteers and post mortem human subjects (PMHSs) subjected to

  18. Measuring Postural Sway in Sitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Hansen, Lisbeth; Luun, Malene

    2015-01-01

    group appeared to result from an equally stable trunk supported on a less stable pelvis. Mediolateral marker sway and intersegmental angular sway showed a clearer age dependency. Trunk postural control does not appear to differ between children older and younger than 10 years old, but sagittal plane...... and younger than 10 years old, participated in this study. The children sat unsupported for 30 s while their posture and sway were quantified using stereophotogrammetry. The tendency in both age groups was to sit with a backward tilted pelvis and a kyphotic trunk. The sitting position was most varied...

  19. Postural ortostatisk takykardi-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...... in heart rate equal to or greater than 30 bpm or to levels higher than 120 bpm during a head-up tilt test is the main diagnostic criterion. Management includes both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment focusing on stress management, volume expansion and heart rate control....

  20. Postural Control in Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen-Raz, Reuven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Postural control was evaluated in 91 autistic, 166 normal, and 18 mentally retarded children using a computerized posturographic procedure. In comparison to normal children, the autistic subjects were less likely to exhibit age-related changes in postural performance, and postures were more variable and less stable. (Author/JDD)

  1. Poor shape perception is the reason reaches-to-grasp are visually guided online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Lim; Crabtree, Charles E; Norman, J Farley; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2008-08-01

    Both judgment studies and studies of feedforward reaching have shown that the visual perception of object distance, size, and shape are inaccurate. However, feedback has been shown to calibrate feedfoward reaches-to-grasp to make them accurate with respect to object distance and size. We now investigate whether shape perception (in particular, the aspect ratio of object depth to width) can be calibrated in the context of reaches-to-grasp. We used cylindrical objects with elliptical cross-sections of varying eccentricity. Our participants reached to grasp the width or the depth of these objects with the index finger and thumb. The maximum grasp aperture and the terminal grasp aperture were used to evaluate perception. Both occur before the hand has contacted an object. In Experiments 1 and 2, we investigated whether perceived shape is recalibrated by distorted haptic feedback. Although somewhat equivocal, the results suggest that it is not. In Experiment 3, we tested the accuracy of feedforward grasping with respect to shape with haptic feedback to allow calibration. Grasping was inaccurate in ways comparable to findings in shape perception judgment studies. In Experiment 4, we hypothesized that online guidance is needed for accurate grasping. Participants reached to grasp either with or without vision of the hand. The result was that the former was accurate, whereas the latter was not. We conclude that shape perception is not calibrated by feedback from reaches-to-grasp and that online visual guidance is required for accurate grasping because shape perception is poor.

  2. Physiological complexity and system adaptability: evidence from postural control dynamics of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Brad; Costa, Madalena D; Hu, Kun; Newton, Elizabeth; Starobinets, Olga; Kang, Hyun Gu; Peng, C K; Novak, Vera; Lipsitz, Lewis A

    2010-12-01

    The degree of multiscale complexity in human behavioral regulation, such as that required for postural control, appears to decrease with advanced aging or disease. To help delineate causes and functional consequences of complexity loss, we examined the effects of visual and somatosensory impairment on the complexity of postural sway during quiet standing and its relationship to postural adaptation to cognitive dual tasking. Participants of the MOBILIZE Boston Study were classified into mutually exclusive groups: controls [intact vision and foot somatosensation, n = 299, 76 ± 5 (SD) yr old], visual impairment only (Postural sway (i.e., center-of-pressure) dynamics were assessed during quiet standing and cognitive dual tasking, and a complexity index was quantified using multiscale entropy analysis. Postural sway speed and area, which did not correlate with complexity, were also computed. During quiet standing, the complexity index (mean ± SD) was highest in controls (9.5 ± 1.2) and successively lower in the visual (9.1 ± 1.1), somatosensory (8.6 ± 1.6), and combined (7.8 ± 1.3) impairment groups (P = 0.001). Dual tasking resulted in increased sway speed and area but reduced complexity (P postural sway speed from quiet standing to dual-tasking conditions. Sensory impairments contributed to decreased postural sway complexity, which reflected reduced adaptive capacity of the postural control system. Relatively low baseline complexity may, therefore, indicate control systems that are more vulnerable to cognitive and other stressors.

  3. ERK regulates Golgi and centrosome orientation towards the leading edge through GRASP65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Blaine; Wang, Yanzhuang; Wei, Jen-Hsuan; Xiang, Yi; Tang, Danming; Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Yoshimura, Shin-ichiro; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Seemann, Joachim

    2008-09-08

    Directed cell migration requires the orientation of the Golgi and centrosome toward the leading edge. We show that stimulation of interphase cells with the mitogens epidermal growth factor or lysophosphatidic acid activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which phosphorylates the Golgi structural protein GRASP65 at serine 277. Expression of a GRASP65 Ser277 to alanine mutant or a GRASP65 1-201 truncation mutant, neither of which can be phosphorylated by ERK, prevents Golgi orientation to the leading edge in a wound assay. We show that phosphorylation of GRASP65 with recombinant ERK leads to the loss of GRASP65 oligomerization and causes Golgi cisternal unstacking. Furthermore, preventing Golgi polarization by expressing mutated GRASP65 inhibits centrosome orientation, which is rescued upon disassembly of the Golgi structure by brefeldin A. We conclude that Golgi remodeling, mediated by phosphorylation of GRASP65 by ERK, is critical for the establishment of cell polarity in migrating cells.

  4. Optimal Needle Grasp Selection for Automatic Execution of Suturing Tasks in Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents algorithms for optimal selection of needle grasp, for autonomous robotic execution of the minimally invasive surgical suturing task. In order to minimize the tissue trauma during the suturing motion, the best practices of needle path planning that are used by surgeons are applied for autonomous robotic surgical suturing tasks. Once an optimal needle trajectory in a well-defined suturing scenario is chosen, another critical issue for suturing is the choice of needle grasp for the robotic system. Inappropriate needle grasp increases operating time requiring multiple re-grasps to complete the desired task. The proposed methods use manipulability, dexterity and torque metrics for needle grasp selection. A simulation demonstrates the proposed methods and recommends a variety of grasps. Then a realistic demonstration compares the performances of the manipulator using different grasps.

  5. Evaluation of Neutral Body Posture on Shuttle Mission STS-57 (SPACEHAB-1). Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Frances E.; Whitmore, Mihriban; Stealey, Sheryl L.

    2003-01-01

    Research has shown that the space environment induces physiological changes in the human body, such as fluid shifts in the upper body and chest cavity, spinal lengthening, muscular atrophy, space motion sickness, cardiopulmonary deconditioning, and bone mass loss, as well as some changes in visual perception. These require a period of adaptation and can substantially affect both crew member performance and posture. These physiological effects, when work activities are conducted, have been known to impact the body's center of gravity, reach, flexibility, and dexterity. All these aspects of posture must be considered to safely and efficiently design space systems and hardware. NASA has documented its microgravity body posture in the Man-Systems Integration Standards (MSIS); the space community uses the MSIS posture to design workstations and tools for space application. However, the microgravity body posture should be further investigated for several reasons, including small sample size in previous studies, possible imprecision, and lack of detail. JSC undertook this study to investigate human body posture exhibited under microgravity conditions. STS-57 crew members were instructed to assume a relaxed posture that was not oriented to any work area or task. Crew members were asked to don shorts and tank tops and to be blindfolded while data were recorded. Video data were acquired once during the mission from each of the six crew members. No one crew member exhibited the typical NBP called out in the MSIS; one composite posture is not adequate. A range of postures may be more constructive for design purposes. Future evaluations should define precise posture requirements for workstation, glove box, maintenance, foot-restraint, and handhold activities.

  6. Detection, Location and Grasping Objects Using a Stereo Sensor on UAV in Outdoor Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon Soria, Pablo; Arrue, Begoña C; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-01-07

    The article presents a vision system for the autonomous grasping of objects with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in real time. Giving UAVs the capability to manipulate objects vastly extends their applications, as they are capable of accessing places that are difficult to reach or even unreachable for human beings. This work is focused on the grasping of known objects based on feature models. The system runs in an on-board computer on a UAV equipped with a stereo camera and a robotic arm. The algorithm learns a feature-based model in an offline stage, then it is used online for detection of the targeted object and estimation of its position. This feature-based model was proved to be robust to both occlusions and the presence of outliers. The use of stereo cameras improves the learning stage, providing 3D information and helping to filter features in the online stage. An experimental system was derived using a rotary-wing UAV and a small manipulator for final proof of concept. The robotic arm is designed with three degrees of freedom and is lightweight due to payload limitations of the UAV. The system has been validated with different objects, both indoors and outdoors.

  7. Affordance effects in grasping actions for graspable objects: electromyographic reaction time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Takagi, Mineko; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2012-12-01

    It is unclear whether affordance effects shorten the reaction time in the interaction between objects and actions. This study investigated affordance effects based on compatibility between perception of graspable objects and the act of grasping. The electromyographic reaction time (EMG-RT) was used as the response, and Go/NoGo (Experiment 1) and choice (Experiment 2) reaction-time tasks were performed using combinations of two types of stimulus image (tools and animals) and two types of response task (flexion and extension of all fingers). In Experiment 1, no interaction of stimulus images and response tasks occurred, but the EMG-RT for tools was statistically significantly delayed longer than that for animals. In Experiment 2, the EMG-RT of flexion of all fingers for tools was statistically significantly delayed compared with that for animals, showing interaction. Affordance effects based on compatibility of objects and actions are the basis on human-tool interaction. This interaction induces a goal-directed act and prolongs motor execution of grasping actions for them.

  8. Detection, Location and Grasping Objects Using a Stereo Sensor on UAV in Outdoor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon Soria, Pablo; Arrue, Begoña C.; Ollero, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a vision system for the autonomous grasping of objects with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in real time. Giving UAVs the capability to manipulate objects vastly extends their applications, as they are capable of accessing places that are difficult to reach or even unreachable for human beings. This work is focused on the grasping of known objects based on feature models. The system runs in an on-board computer on a UAV equipped with a stereo camera and a robotic arm. The algorithm learns a feature-based model in an offline stage, then it is used online for detection of the targeted object and estimation of its position. This feature-based model was proved to be robust to both occlusions and the presence of outliers. The use of stereo cameras improves the learning stage, providing 3D information and helping to filter features in the online stage. An experimental system was derived using a rotary-wing UAV and a small manipulator for final proof of concept. The robotic arm is designed with three degrees of freedom and is lightweight due to payload limitations of the UAV. The system has been validated with different objects, both indoors and outdoors. PMID:28067851

  9. Classification of upper arm EMG signals during object-specific grasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelloni, C; Carpaneto, J; Micera, S

    2008-01-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) signals can represent an interesting solution to control artificial hands because they are easy to record and can allow the user to control different robotic systems. However, after limb amputation the 'homologous' muscles are no more available to control the prosthetic device and for this reason complex pattern recognition approaches have to be developed to extract the voluntary commands by the user. This makes the control strategy less natural and acceptable and asks for alternative approaches. At the same time, it has been recently shown that (in monkeys) it is possible to discriminate grasping tasks just analyzing the activation onset/offset of upper limb muscles during the reaching phase. This kind of information can be very interesting because it can allow the development of a natural EMG-based control strategy based on the natural muscular activities selected by the central nervous system. In this paper, preliminary experiments have been carried out in order to verify whether these results can be confirmed also in human beings. In particular, a support vector machine (SVM) based pattern recognition algorithm has been developed and used for the prediction of grip types from the EMG recorded from proximal and distal muscles during reach to grasp movements of three able bodied subjects.

  10. Detection, Location and Grasping Objects Using a Stereo Sensor on UAV in Outdoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Ramon Soria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a vision system for the autonomous grasping of objects with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs in real time. Giving UAVs the capability to manipulate objects vastly extends their applications, as they are capable of accessing places that are difficult to reach or even unreachable for human beings. This work is focused on the grasping of known objects based on feature models. The system runs in an on-board computer on a UAV equipped with a stereo camera and a robotic arm. The algorithm learns a feature-based model in an offline stage, then it is used online for detection of the targeted object and estimation of its position. This feature-based model was proved to be robust to both occlusions and the presence of outliers. The use of stereo cameras improves the learning stage, providing 3D information and helping to filter features in the online stage. An experimental system was derived using a rotary-wing UAV and a small manipulator for final proof of concept. The robotic arm is designed with three degrees of freedom and is lightweight due to payload limitations of the UAV. The system has been validated with different objects, both indoors and outdoors.

  11. Source Localization of Brain States Associated with Canonical Neuroimaging Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Michael; Thibault, Robert T; Roth, Raquel R; Raz, Amir

    2017-02-14

    Cognitive neuroscientists rarely consider the influence that body position exerts on brain activity; yet, postural variation holds important implications for the acquisition and interpretation of neuroimaging data. Whereas participants in most behavioral and EEG experiments sit upright, many prominent brain imaging techniques (e.g., fMRI) require participants to lie supine. Here we demonstrate that physical comportment profoundly alters baseline brain activity as measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG)-an imaging modality that permits multipostural acquisition. We collected resting-state MEG data from 12 healthy participants in three postures (lying supine, reclining at 45°, and sitting upright). Source-modeling analysis revealed a broadly distributed influence of posture on resting brain function. Sitting upright versus lying supine was associated with greater high-frequency (i.e., beta and gamma) activity in widespread parieto-occipital cortex. Moreover, sitting upright and reclined postures correlated with dampened activity in prefrontal regions across a range of bandwidths (i.e., from alpha to low gamma). The observed effects were large, with a mean Cohen's d of 0.95 (SD = 0.23). In addition to neural activity, physiological parameters such as muscle tension and eye blinks may have contributed to these posture-dependent changes in brain signal. Regardless of the underlying mechanisms, however, the present results have important implications for the acquisition and interpretation of multimodal imaging data (e.g., studies combining fMRI or PET with EEG or MEG). More broadly, our findings indicate that generalizing results-from supine neuroimaging measurements to erect positions typical of ecological human behavior-would call for considering the influence that posture wields on brain dynamics.

  12. Characteristic of bio-geometric profile of students’ posture and physical fitness in process of physical education

    OpenAIRE

    Dudko M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to determine specific features of bio-geometric profile of posture and physical fitness of students in process of physical education. Material: 250 students were tested. Video-recording and analysis of bio-geometric profile of human posture were fulfilled. Program Torso was used for this purpose. Results: it was found out that only 15.2% of students had correct posture. The most quantity of posture abnormalities was detected in 36.4% of the tested. In sagittal plane we observed the f...

  13. Gait, posture and cognition in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferreira Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Gait disorders and postural instability are the leading causes of falls and disability in Parkinson's disease (PD. Cognition plays an important role in postural control and may interfere with gait and posture assessment and treatment. It is important to recognize gait, posture and balance dysfunctions by choosing proper assessment tools for PD. Patients at higher risk of falling must be referred for rehabilitation as early as possible, because antiparkinsonian drugs and surgery do not improve gait and posture in PD.

  14. Visual Vection does not Perturb Squatting Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gilles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vision contributes fundamentally to the control of the standing posture. The illusion of self motion falsely perceived (vection increases postural sway while standing. In this paper we examine the effect of vection on both standing and deep squatting with the hypothesis that the squatting posture should not be disturbed by the conflict of sensory information due to vection. The results show that standing posture only was affected by the visual stimuli. The widespread use of squatting for work as well as rest could be due in part to this lack of effect of sensory perturbation on postural stability.

  15. Postural analysis of nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hignett, S

    1996-06-01

    Back pain in the nursing profession is an acknowledged wide spread occupational hazard. This study used OWAS (Ovako Working posture Analysis System) to measure the severity of the working postures adopted by nurses on Care of the Elderly wards when carrying out manual handling operations for animate and inanimate loads. Twenty-six nurses were observed on 31 occasions to obtain 4299 observations, these data were collected and processed using the OWASCO and OWASAN programs, and then analysed by grouping the results into defined patient (animate) handling and non-patient (inanimate) handling tasks. A statistical comparison was made between the two groups using the percentage of action categories two, three and four, to the total number of action categories. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was found, demonstrating that the percentage of harmful postures adopted during patient handling tasks was significantly higher than during non-patient handling tasks. This high level of postural stress and the poor track record of risk management within the Health Care Industry leads to the recommendation that an attitudinal change is needed to successfully address and reduce the manual handling burden which is currently being carried by the nursing staff.

  16. Self versus environment motion in postural control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dokka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To stabilize our position in space we use visual information as well as non-visual physical motion cues. However, visual cues can be ambiguous: visually perceived motion may be caused by self-movement, movement of the environment, or both. The nervous system must combine the ambiguous visual cues with noisy physical motion cues to resolve this ambiguity and control our body posture. Here we have developed a Bayesian model that formalizes how the nervous system could solve this problem. In this model, the nervous system combines the sensory cues to estimate the movement of the body. We analytically demonstrate that, as long as visual stimulation is fast in comparison to the uncertainty in our perception of body movement, the optimal strategy is to weight visually perceived movement velocities proportional to a power law. We find that this model accounts for the nonlinear influence of experimentally induced visual motion on human postural behavior both in our data and in previously published results.

  17. A Methodology for Investigating Adaptive Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, P. V.; Riccio, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    Our research on postural control and human-environment interactions provides an appropriate scientific foundation for understanding the skill of mass handling by astronauts in weightless conditions (e.g., extravehicular activity or EVA). We conducted an investigation of such skills in NASA's principal mass-handling simulator, the Precision Air-Bearing Floor, at the Johnson Space Center. We have studied skilled movement-body within a multidisciplinary context that draws on concepts and methods from biological and behavioral sciences (e.g., psychology, kinesiology and neurophysiology) as well as bioengineering. Our multidisciplinary research has led to the development of measures, for manual interactions between individuals and the substantial environment, that plausibly are observable by human sensory systems. We consider these methods to be the most important general contribution of our EVA investigation. We describe our perspective as control theoretic because it draws more on fundamental concepts about control systems in engineering than it does on working constructs from the subdisciplines of biomechanics and motor control in the bio-behavioral sciences. At the same time, we have attempted to identify the theoretical underpinnings of control-systems engineering that are most relevant to control by human beings. We believe that these underpinnings are implicit in the assumptions that cut across diverse methods in control-systems engineering, especially the various methods associated with "nonlinear control", "fuzzy control," and "adaptive control" in engineering. Our methods are based on these theoretical foundations rather than on the mathematical formalisms that are associated with particular methods in control-systems engineering. The most important aspects of the human-environment interaction in our investigation of mass handling are the functional consequences that body configuration and stability have for the pick up of information or the achievement of

  18. A Methodology for Investigating Adaptive Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, P. V.; Riccio, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    Our research on postural control and human-environment interactions provides an appropriate scientific foundation for understanding the skill of mass handling by astronauts in weightless conditions (e.g., extravehicular activity or EVA). We conducted an investigation of such skills in NASA's principal mass-handling simulator, the Precision Air-Bearing Floor, at the Johnson Space Center. We have studied skilled movement-body within a multidisciplinary context that draws on concepts and methods from biological and behavioral sciences (e.g., psychology, kinesiology and neurophysiology) as well as bioengineering. Our multidisciplinary research has led to the development of measures, for manual interactions between individuals and the substantial environment, that plausibly are observable by human sensory systems. We consider these methods to be the most important general contribution of our EVA investigation. We describe our perspective as control theoretic because it draws more on fundamental concepts about control systems in engineering than it does on working constructs from the subdisciplines of biomechanics and motor control in the bio-behavioral sciences. At the same time, we have attempted to identify the theoretical underpinnings of control-systems engineering that are most relevant to control by human beings. We believe that these underpinnings are implicit in the assumptions that cut across diverse methods in control-systems engineering, especially the various methods associated with "nonlinear control", "fuzzy control," and "adaptive control" in engineering. Our methods are based on these theoretical foundations rather than on the mathematical formalisms that are associated with particular methods in control-systems engineering. The most important aspects of the human-environment interaction in our investigation of mass handling are the functional consequences that body configuration and stability have for the pick up of information or the achievement of

  19. Sensorization of Robotic Hand Using Optical Three-Axis Tactile Sensor: Evaluation with Grasping and Twisting Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafiah Yussof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sensitization of robot hand is still remaining as crucial issue since most of robot hand systems nowadays are only capable to grasp a predefined specific object. It is still difficult for robot hand system to realize human-like tactile sensation. Some common problems in robot hand system are low accuracy sensing device, sensors are not robust enough for long time work and heavy duties, inconsistence tactile sensing detection and difficulties in control of sensing fusion with robot trajectory. These problems are apparently drawback the progress to commercializing robot hands as real consumer products. Approach: This study presented the application of optical three-axis tactile sensor to robot hand to improve sensitization quality in robotic hand system. The proposed tactile sensor system was designed with compliance modules to communicate with robot hand control system. The sensing principle used in this tactile sensor comparatively provides better sensing accuracy to detect contact phenomena from acquisition of three axial directions of forces. Methodology of force and slippage detection in the tactile sensor system was presented. Accordingly, the optimization of robot hand control algorithm to comply with the tactile sensor system was presented and verified in experiment of grasping and twisting. Results: The tactile sensor presented in this study is capable of detecting normal and shear force simultaneously. The proposed methodology was verified in experiment with paper cup and water, in which the result shows the robot control system managed to respond to the proposed object stiffness distinction parameters and effectively respond to sudden change of object weight during grasping. An experiment of grasping and twisting motions was conducted using a bottle cap. In order to perform simultaneous grasping and twisting tasks, optimization of the control algorithm was conducted with additional parameters to satisfy the desired

  20. It’s Out of My Hands! Grasping Capacity May Not Influence Perceived Object Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Linkenauger, Witt, and Proffitt (2011) found that the perceived size of graspable objects was scaled by perceived grasping capacity. However, it is possible that this effect occurred because object size was estimated on the same trial as grasping capacity. This may have led to a conflation of estimates of perceived action capacity and spatial properties. In 5 experiments, we tested Linkenauger et al.’s claim that right-handed observers overestimate the grasping capacity of their right hand relative to their left hand, and that this, in turn, leads them to underestimate the size of objects to-be-grasped in their right hand relative to their left hand. We replicated the finding that right handers overestimate the size and grasping capacity of their right hand relative to their left hand. However, when estimates of object size and grasping capacity were made in separate tasks, objects grasped in the right hand were not underestimated relative to those grasped in the left hand. Further, when grasping capacity was physically restricted, observers appropriately recalibrated their perception of their maximum grasp but estimates of object size were unaffected. Our results suggest that changes in action capacity may not influence perceived object size if sources of conflation are controlled for. PMID:28191987

  1. It's Out of My Hands! Grasping Capacity May Not Influence Perceived Object Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Elizabeth S; Lawson, Rebecca

    2017-02-13

    Linkenauger, Witt, and Proffitt (2011) found that the perceived size of graspable objects was scaled by perceived grasping capacity. However, it is possible that this effect occurred because object size was estimated on the same trial as grasping capacity. This may have led to a conflation of estimates of perceived action capacity and spatial properties. In 5 experiments, we tested Linkenauger et al.'s claim that right-handed observers overestimate the grasping capacity of their right hand relative to their left hand, and that this, in turn, leads them to underestimate the size of objects to-be-grasped in their right hand relative to their left hand. We replicated the finding that right handers overestimate the size and grasping capacity of their right hand relative to their left hand. However, when estimates of object size and grasping capacity were made in separate tasks, objects grasped in the right hand were not underestimated relative to those grasped in the left hand. Further, when grasping capacity was physically restricted, observers appropriately recalibrated their perception of their maximum grasp but estimates of object size were unaffected. Our results suggest that changes in action capacity may not influence perceived object size if sources of conflation are controlled for. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia in pantomimed grasping: removing haptic feedback induces a switch from natural to pantomime-like grasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Leslie Whitwell

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. When patient DF, who suffers from visual form agnosia, performs natural grasps, her in-flight hand aperture is scaled to the widths of targets ('grip scaling' that she cannot discriminate amongst. In contrast, when DF's pantomime grasps are based on a memory of a previewed object, her grip scaling is very poor. Her failure on this task has been interpreted as additional support for the dissociation between the use of object vision for action and object vision for perception. Curiously, however, when DF directs her pantomimed grasps towards a displaced imagined copy of a visible object where her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling does not appear to be particularly poor. In the first of two experiments, we revisit this previous work and show that her grip scaling in this real-time pantomime grasping task does not differ from controls, suggesting that terminal tactile feedback from a proxy of the target can maintain DF's grip scaling. In a second experiment with healthy participants, we tested a recent variant of a grasping task in which no tactile feedback is available (i.e. no haptic feedback by comparing the kinematics of target-directed grasps with and without haptic feedback to those of real-time pantomime grasps without haptic feedback. Compared to natural grasps, removing haptic feedback increased RT, slowed the velocity of the reach, reduced grip aperture, sharpened the slopes relating grip aperture to target width, and reduced the final grip aperture. All of these effects were also observed in the pantomime grasping task. Taken together, these results provide compelling support for the view that removing haptic feedback induces a switch from real-time visual control to one that depends more on visual perception and cognitive supervision.

  3. Postural control and cognitive task performance in healthy participants while balancing on different support-surface configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dault, MC; Mulder, TW; Duysens, J

    2001-01-01

    Postural control during normal upright stance in humans is a well-learned task. Hence, it has often been argued that it requires very little attention. However, many studies have recently shown that postural control is modified when a cognitive task is executed simultaneously especially in the elder

  4. Postural adjustments and reaching in 4-and 6-month-old infants : an EMG and kinematical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf-Peters, Victorine B.; Bakker, Hanneke; van Eykern, Leo A.; Otten, Bert; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    Adequate postural control is a prerequisite for daily activities such as reaching for an object. However, knowledge on the relationship between postural adjustments and the quality of reaching movements during human ontogeny is scarce. Therefore we evaluated the development of the relationship betwe

  5. Visual Field Preferences of Object Analysis for Grasping with One Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada eLe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When we grasp an object using one hand, the opposite hemisphere predominantly guides the motor control of grasp movements (Davare et al. 2007; Rice et al. 2007. However, it is unclear whether visual object analysis for grasp control relies more on inputs (a from the contralateral than the ipsilateral visual field, (b from one dominant visual field regardless of the grasping hand, or (c from both visual fields equally. For bimanual grasping of a single object we have recently demonstrated a visual field preference for the left visual field (Le and Niemeier 2013a, 2013b, consistent with a general right-hemisphere dominance for sensorimotor control of bimanual grasps (Le et al., 2013. But visual field differences have never been tested for unimanual grasping. Therefore, here we asked right-handed participants to fixate to the left or right of an object and then grasp the object either with their right or left hand using a precision grip. We found that participants grasping with their right hand performed better with objects in the right visual field: maximum grip apertures (MGAs were more closely matched to the object width and were smaller than for objects in the left visual field. In contrast, when people grasped with their left hand, preferences switched to the left visual field. What is more, MGA scaling showed greater visual field differences compared to right-hand grasping. Our data suggest that, visual object analysis for unimanual grasping shows a preference for visual information from the ipsilateral visual field, and that the left hemisphere is better equipped to control grasps in both visual fields.

  6. Visual field preferences of object analysis for grasping with one hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Ada; Niemeier, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    When we grasp an object using one hand, the opposite hemisphere predominantly guides the motor control of grasp movements (Davare et al., 2007; Rice et al., 2007). However, it is unclear whether visual object analysis for grasp control relies more on inputs (a) from the contralateral than the ipsilateral visual field, (b) from one dominant visual field regardless of the grasping hand, or (c) from both visual fields equally. For bimanual grasping of a single object we have recently demonstrated a visual field preference for the left visual field (Le and Niemeier, 2013a,b), consistent with a general right-hemisphere dominance for sensorimotor control of bimanual grasps (Le et al., 2014). But visual field differences have never been tested for unimanual grasping. Therefore, here we asked right-handed participants to fixate to the left or right of an object and then grasp the object either with their right or left hand using a precision grip. We found that participants grasping with their right hand performed better with objects in the right visual field: maximum grip apertures (MGAs) were more closely matched to the object width and were smaller than for objects in the left visual field. In contrast, when people grasped with their left hand, preferences switched to the left visual field. What is more, MGA scaling with the left hand showed greater visual field differences compared to right-hand grasping. Our data suggest that, visual object analysis for unimanual grasping shows a preference for visual information from the ipsilateral visual field, and that the left hemisphere is better equipped to control grasps in both visual fields.

  7. Mirror activity in the human brain while observing hand movements: a comparison between EEG desynchronization in the mu-range and previous fMRI results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo

    2009-07-28

    Mu (mu) rhythms are EEG oscillations between 8-13 Hz distinguished from alpha by having more anterior distribution and being desynchronized by motor rather than visual activity. Evidence accumulating during the last decade suggests that the desynchronization of mu rhythms (mu suppression) might be also a manifestation of a human Mirror Neuron System (MNS). To further explore this hypothesis we used a paradigm that, in a previous fMRI study, successfully activated this putative MNS in humans. Our direct goal was to provide further support for a link between modulation of mu rhythms and the MNS, by finding parallels between the reported patterns of fMRI activations and patterns of mu suppression. The EEG power in the mu range has been recorded while participants passively observed either a left or a right hand, reaching to and grasping objects, and compared it with that recorded while participants observed the movement of a ball, and while observing static grasping scenes or still objects. Mirroring fMRI results (Shmuelof, L., Zohary, E., 2005. Dissociation between ventral and dorsal fMRI activation during object and action recognition. Neuron 47, 457-470), mu suppression was larger in the hemisphere contra-lateral to the moving hand and larger when the hands grasped different objects in different ways than when the movement was repetitive. No suppression was found while participants observed still objects but mu suppression was also found while seeing static grasping postures. These data are discussed in light of similar parallels between modulations of alpha waves and fMRI while recording EEG in the magnet. The present data support a link between mu suppression and a human MNS.

  8. SEOM's Sentinel-3/OLCI' project CAWA: advanced GRASP aerosol retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovik, Oleg; litvinov, Pavel; Huang, Xin; Aspetsberger, Michael; Fuertes, David; Brockmann, Carsten; Fischer, Jürgen; Bojkov, Bojan

    2016-04-01

    The CAWA "Advanced Clouds, Aerosols and WAter vapour products for Sentinel-3/OLCI" ESA-SEOM project aims on the development of advanced atmospheric retrieval algorithms for the Sentinel-3/OLCI mission, and is prepared using Envisat/MERIS and Aqua/MODIS datasets. This presentation discusses mainly CAWA aerosol product developments and results. CAWA aerosol retrieval uses recently developed GRASP algorithm (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm described by Dubovik et al. (2014). GRASP derives extended set of atmospheric parameters using multi-pixel concept - a simultaneous fitting of a large group of pixels under additional a priori constraints limiting the time variability of surface properties and spatial variability of aerosol properties. Over land GRASP simultaneously retrieves properties of both aerosol and underlying surface even over bright surfaces. GRAPS doesn't use traditional look-up-tables and performs retrieval as search in continuous space of solution. All radiative transfer calculations are performed as part of the retrieval. The results of comprehensive sensitivity tests, as well as results obtained from real Envisat/MERIS data will be presented. The tests analyze various aspects of aerosol and surface reflectance retrieval accuracy. In addition, the possibilities of retrieval improvement by means of implementing synergetic inversion of a combination of OLCI data with observations by SLSTR are explored. Both the results of numerical tests, as well as the results of processing several years of Envisat/MERIS data illustrate demonstrate reliable retrieval of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and surface BRDF. Observed retrieval issues and advancements will be discussed. For example, for some situations we illustrate possibilities of retrieving aerosol absorption - property that hardly accessible from satellite observations with no multi-angular and polarimetric capabilities.

  9. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  10. The MICROSTAR electrostatic accelerometer for the GRASP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Francoise; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Perrot, Eddy

    2015-04-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept dedicated to the enhancement of all the space geodetic techniques, and promising revolutionary improvements to the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The integration of an ultra sensitive accelerometer at the Center of mass of the satellite can provide not only improvement of the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by the accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the surface of the satellite but also by the possibility to calibrate with an accuracy better than 100 µm the change in the position of the Satellite Center of Mass as it is performed in the GRACE mission and to determine the precise motion of the antennas assuming some rigid structure between them and the accelerometer as it is done between the star sensor, the optical cube assembly of satellite laser ranging system and the accelerometer in the GRACE-Follow On mission. The proposed accelerometer is miniaturized version of the electrostatic accelerometers developed for the Earth gravity missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and GRACE-FO. He has 3 sensitive axes thanks to a cubic proof-mass and provides the 3 linear accelerations and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes. He is called MICROSTAR and its foreseen performance is a linear acceleration noise lower than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz.

  11. Two-Fingered Grasp of Cylindrical Objects in Planar Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    from the dot product of the contact force, el, with the unit tangential vector, filt: I i = 01 ,, = AcosO + C, sinO (B.1o) Similarly, the magnitude...the tangential contact force at fingertip 2, C2ht, is shown in the negative direction. From Figure B.5 we can say Cl, = AsinO (B.38) Cith = AcosO (B...39) C 2, = AsinO (B.40) C2th = - AcosO (B.41) B-10 ! a x Figure B.5. Vector diagram of the homogeneous solution contact force components for the grasp

  12. Aircraft Route Recovery Based on An Improved GRASP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircrafts maintenance, temporary airport closures are common factors that disrupt normal flight schedule. The aircraft route recovery aims to recover original schedules by some strategies, including flights swaps, and cancellations, which is a NP-hard problem. This paper proposes an improved heuristic procedure based on Greedy Random Adaptive Search Procedure (GRASP to solve this problem. The effectiveness and high global optimization capability of the heuristic is illustrated through experiments based on large-scale problems. Compared to the original one, it is shown that the improved procedure can find feasible flight recovered schedules with lower cost in a short time.

  13. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  14. The Synthesis of Stable Grasps in the Plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    ft-AIG5 903 THE SYNTHESIS OF STABLE GRASPS IN THE PLANE(U) / MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB V NGUYEN OCT 85 AI-M...assembly operations become easier and less sensitive to errors. -4 ’I MASSACIIUSI’TS INST’I’TI,’ O1 ’IINOIOGY ARTIIFICIAL IN’i’II(I’N(’I AI)ItA’i’ORY...Acknowledgments: This report describes research done at the General Mo- tors Research Laboratories and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Mas

  15. A Neural Dynamic Architecture for Reaching and Grasping Integrates Perception and Movement Generation and Enables On-Line Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Guido; Zibner, Stephan K. U.; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Reaching for objects and grasping them is a fundamental skill for any autonomous robot that interacts with its environment. Although this skill seems trivial to adults, who effortlessly pick up even objects they have never seen before, it is hard for other animals, for human infants, and for most autonomous robots. Any time during movement preparation and execution, human reaching movement are updated if the visual scene changes (with a delay of about 100 ms). The capability for online updating highlights how tightly perception, movement planning, and movement generation are integrated in humans. Here, we report on an effort to reproduce this tight integration in a neural dynamic process model of reaching and grasping that covers the complete path from visual perception to movement generation within a unified modeling framework, Dynamic Field Theory. All requisite processes are realized as time-continuous dynamical systems that model the evolution in time of neural population activation. Population level neural processes bring about the attentional selection of objects, the estimation of object shape and pose, and the mapping of pose parameters to suitable movement parameters. Once a target object has been selected, its pose parameters couple into the neural dynamics of movement generation so that changes of pose are propagated through the architecture to update the performed movement online. Implementing the neural architecture on an anthropomorphic robot arm equipped with a Kinect sensor, we evaluate the model by grasping wooden objects. Their size, shape, and pose are estimated from a neural model of scene perception that is based on feature fields. The sequential organization of a reach and grasp act emerges from a sequence of dynamic instabilities within a neural dynamics of behavioral organization, that effectively switches the neural controllers from one phase of the action to the next. Trajectory formation itself is driven by a dynamical systems version of

  16. A Neural Dynamic Architecture for Reaching and Grasping Integrates Perception and Movement Generation and Enables On-Line Updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Guido; Zibner, Stephan K U; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Reaching for objects and grasping them is a fundamental skill for any autonomous robot that interacts with its environment. Although this skill seems trivial to adults, who effortlessly pick up even objects they have never seen before, it is hard for other animals, for human infants, and for most autonomous robots. Any time during movement preparation and execution, human reaching movement are updated if the visual scene changes (with a delay of about 100 ms). The capability for online updating highlights how tightly perception, movement planning, and movement generation are integrated in humans. Here, we report on an effort to reproduce this tight integration in a neural dynamic process model of reaching and grasping that covers the complete path from visual perception to movement generation within a unified modeling framework, Dynamic Field Theory. All requisite processes are realized as time-continuous dynamical systems that model the evolution in time of neural population activation. Population level neural processes bring about the attentional selection of objects, the estimation of object shape and pose, and the mapping of pose parameters to suitable movement parameters. Once a target object has been selected, its pose parameters couple into the neural dynamics of movement generation so that changes of pose are propagated through the architecture to update the performed movement online. Implementing the neural architecture on an anthropomorphic robot arm equipped with a Kinect sensor, we evaluate the model by grasping wooden objects. Their size, shape, and pose are estimated from a neural model of scene perception that is based on feature fields. The sequential organization of a reach and grasp act emerges from a sequence of dynamic instabilities within a neural dynamics of behavioral organization, that effectively switches the neural controllers from one phase of the action to the next. Trajectory formation itself is driven by a dynamical systems version of

  17. Flexible Sensing Arrays Fabricated with Carbon Nanofiber Composite Thin Films for Posture Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fuh-Yu; Wang, Ruoh-Huey; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Tse-Min; Lee, Yueh-Feng; Huang, Shu-Jiuan; Liu, Chia-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Faulty posture increases joint stress and causes postural pain syndrome. In this paper, we present a portable strain sensing system with flexible sensor arrays to warn patients to correct inappropriate posture. A 3×3 flexible strain sensing array system was fabricated using patterned surface treatment and the tilted-drop process with carbon nanofiber composite solutions on polyimide substrates. Atmospheric plasma was used to enhance or reduce the surface energy in specific areas for patterned surface treatment. A scanning circuit was also developed to capture the signal from the flexible sensing array. The developed system has been used to measure the bent angle of the human neck from 15 to 60°. The results indicate that human posture can be successfully captured by analyzing the measured strains from a flexible strain sensing array.

  18. A learning scheme for reach to grasp movements: on EMG-based interfaces using task specific motion decoding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarokapis, Minas V; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Kyriakopoulos, Kostas J; Manolakos, Elias S

    2013-09-01

    A learning scheme based on random forests is used to discriminate between different reach to grasp movements in 3-D space, based on the myoelectric activity of human muscles of the upper-arm and the forearm. Task specificity for motion decoding is introduced in two different levels: Subspace to move toward and object to be grasped. The discrimination between the different reach to grasp strategies is accomplished with machine learning techniques for classification. The classification decision is then used in order to trigger an EMG-based task-specific motion decoding model. Task specific models manage to outperform "general" models providing better estimation accuracy. Thus, the proposed scheme takes advantage of a framework incorporating both a classifier and a regressor that cooperate advantageously in order to split the task space. The proposed learning scheme can be easily used to a series of EMG-based interfaces that must operate in real time, providing data-driven capabilities for multiclass problems, that occur in everyday life complex environments.

  19. Postural risk assessment of mechanised firewood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Raffaele; Aminti, Giovanni; De Francesco, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    The study assessed the postural risk of mechanised firewood processing with eight machines, representing the main technology solutions available on the market. Assessment was conducted with the Ovako Working posture Analysis System (OWAS) on 1000 still frames randomly extracted from videotaped work samples. The postural risk associated with firewood processing was variable and associated with technology type. Simple, manually operated new machines incurred a higher postural risk compared with semi- or fully automatic machines. In contrast, new semi-automatic and automatic machines were generally free from postural risk. In all cases, attention should be paid to postural risk that may occur during blockage resolution. The study did not cover the postural risk of firewood processing sites as a whole. The study provided useful information for selecting firewood processing machinery and for improving firewood machinery design, as part of a more articulate strategy aimed at enhancing the safety of firewood processing work sites. Practitioner Summary: The postural risk associated with mechanised firewood processing (eg cutting and splitting) depends on the type of equipment. Postural risk is highest (OWAS Action Category 2) with new in-line machines, designed for operation by a single worker. Fully automatic machines present minimum postural risk, except during blockage resolution.

  20. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Forbes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3. This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz. In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  1. Postural Synergies and Their Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Latash

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments of a particular approach to analyzing motor synergies based on the principle of motor abundance has allowed a quantitative assessment of multieffector coordination in motor tasks involving anticipatory adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations and in voluntary posturalsway. This approach, the uncontrolled manifold (UCM hypothesis, is based on an assumption that the central nervous system organizes covariation of elemental variables to stabilize important performance variables in a task-specific manner. In particular, this approach has been used to demonstrate and to assess the emergence of synergies and their modification with motor practice in typical persons and persons with Down syndrome. The framework of the UCM hypothesis allows the formulation of testable hypotheses with respect to developing postural synergies in typically and atypically developing persons.

  2. Postural control in blind subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinicius Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze postural control in acquired and congenitally blind adults. Methods: A total of 40 visually impaired adults participated in the research, divided into 2 groups, 20 with acquired blindness and 20 with congenital blindness - 21 males and 19 females, mean age 35.8 ± 10.8. The Brazilian version of Berg Balance Scale and the motor domain of functional independence measure were utilized. Results: On Berg Balance Scale the mean for acquired blindness was 54.0 ± 2.4 and 54.4 ± 2.5 for congenitally blind subjects; on functional independence measure the mean for acquired blind group was 87.1 ± 4.8 and 87.3 ± 2.3 for congenitally blind group. Conclusion: Based upon the scale used the results suggest the ability to control posture can be developed by compensatory mechanisms and it is not affected by visual loss in congenitally and acquired blindness.

  3. Distinct neural patterns enable grasp types decoding in monkey dorsal premotor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yaoyao; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Controzzi, Marco; Cipriani, Christian; Li, Yue; Li, Juncheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Wang, Yiwen; Chen, Weidong; Chiara Carrozza, Maria; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recent studies have shown that dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), a cortical area in the dorsomedial grasp pathway, is involved in grasp movements. However, the neural ensemble firing property of PMd during grasp movements and the extent to which it can be used for grasp decoding are still unclear. Approach. To address these issues, we used multielectrode arrays to record both spike and local field potential (LFP) signals in PMd in macaque monkeys performing reaching and grasping of one of four differently shaped objects. Main results. Single and population neuronal activity showed distinct patterns during execution of different grip types. Cluster analysis of neural ensemble signals indicated that the grasp related patterns emerged soon (200-300 ms) after the go cue signal, and faded away during the hold period. The timing and duration of the patterns varied depending on the behaviors of individual monkey. Application of support vector machine model to stable activity patterns revealed classification accuracies of 94% and 89% for each of the two monkeys, indicating a robust, decodable grasp pattern encoded in the PMd. Grasp decoding using LFPs, especially the high-frequency bands, also produced high decoding accuracies. Significance. This study is the first to specify the neuronal population encoding of grasp during the time course of grasp. We demonstrate high grasp decoding performance in PMd. These findings, combined with previous evidence for reach related modulation studies, suggest that PMd may play an important role in generation and maintenance of grasp action and may be a suitable locus for brain-machine interface applications.

  4. A Novel Synthesis of Computational Approaches Enables Optimization of Grasp Quality of Tendon-Driven Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Kutch, Jason J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a complete methodology to find the full set of feasible grasp wrenches and the corresponding wrench-direction-independent grasp quality for a tendon-driven hand with arbitrary design parameters. Monte Carlo simulations on two representative designs combined with multiple linear regression identified the parameters with the greatest potential to increase this grasp metric. This synthesis of computational approaches now enables the systematic design, evaluation, and optimization of tendon-driven hands. PMID:23335864

  5. The Yeast GRASP Grh1 Colocalizes with COPII and Is Dispensable for Organizing the Secretory Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Stephanie K.; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Strack, Rita L.; Austin, Jotham R; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2010-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the “Golgi Reassembly and Stacking Protein” (GRASP) family has been implicated in Golgi stacking, but the broader functions of GRASP proteins are still unclear. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a single nonessential GRASP homolog called Grh1. However, Golgi cisternae in S. cerevisiae are not organized into stacks, so a possible structural role for Grh1 has been difficult to test. Here we examined the localization and function of Grh1 in S. cerevisiae and in the ...

  6. Depth Perception and Grasp in Central Field Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Preeti; Tyson, Terence L; Ghahghaei, Saeideh; Fletcher, Donald C

    2016-03-01

    We set out to determine whether individuals with central field loss benefit from using two eyes to perform a grasping task. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that this advantage is correlated with coarse stereopsis, in addition to binocular summation indices of visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and binocular visual field. Sixteen participants with macular degeneration and nine age-matched controls placed pegs on a pegboard, while their eye and hand movements were recorded. Importantly, the pegboard was placed near eye height, to minimize the contribution of monocular cues to peg position. All participants performed this task binocularly and monocularly. Before the experiment, we performed microperimetry to determine the profile of field loss in each eye and the locations of eccentric fixation (if applicable). In addition, we measured both acuity and contrast sensitivity monocularly and binocularly, and stereopsis by using both a RanDot test and a custom stereo test. Peg-placement time was significantly shorter and participants made significantly fewer errors with binocular than with monocular viewing in both the patient and control groups. Among participants with measurable stereopsis, binocular advantage in peg-placement time was significantly correlated with stereoacuity (ρ = -0.78; P = 0.003). In patients without measurable stereopsis, the binocular advantage was related significantly to the overlap in the scotoma between the two eyes (ρ = -0.81; P = 0.032). The high correlation between grasp performance and stereoacuity indicates that coarse stereopsis may benefit tasks of daily living for individuals with central field loss.

  7. NEUROMUSCULAR DETERMINANTS OF FORCE COORDINATION DURING MULTIDIGIT GRASPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. A.; Winges, S. A.; Santello, M.

    2007-01-01

    The biomechanical structure of the hand and its underlying neurophysiology contribute to the coordination of the kinematics and kinetics necessary for multidigit grasping. We recently examined the neural organization of inputs to different extrinsic finger flexors during multi‐digit object hold and found moderate to strong motor unit short‐term synchrony. This suggests a common neural input to the motoneurons innervating these different hand muscles/muscle compartments, which may in turn influence the coordination of grip forces. To further characterize this common input to the hand muscles during multidigit grasping, we used the frequency‐based measure of coherence. Motor unit coherence provides information with regards to the oscillatory frequency of a common input, as well as the coupling of the discharges of a motor unit pair at both short and long latencies. Preliminary results indicate that a large proportion of trials are characterized by significant coherence in the 1–12 Hz frequency range, which is more pronounced in the within‐ than between‐muscle/muscle compartment analysis. This indicates a differential organization of common oscillatory inputs to pairs of motoneurons innervating the same vs. different muscles/ muscle compartments. The functional role of the 1–12 Hz oscillatory modulation of motor unit behavior is currently being investigated. PMID:17271343

  8. Tangential finger forces use mechanical advantage during static grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-02-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, the central controller utilizes the mechanical advantage of the normal forces of the fingers for torque production. Whether the same is valid for tangential forces is unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of finger tangential forces and the use of mechanical advantage as a control mechanism when dealing with objects of nonuniform finger positioning. A complementary goal was to explore the interaction of mechanical advantage (moment arm) and the role a finger has as a torque agonist/antagonist with respect to external torques (±0.4 N m). Five 6-df force/torque transducers measured finger forces while subjects held a prism handle (6 cm width × 9 cm height) with and without a single finger displaced 2 cm (handle width). The effect of increasing the tangential moment arm was significant (p forces (in >70% of trials) and hence creating greater moments. Thus, the data provides evidence that the grasping system as a rule utilizes mechanical advantage for generating tangential forces. The increase in tangential force was independent of whether the finger was acting as a torque agonist or antagonist, revealing their effects to be additive.

  9. Garner-Interference in left-handed awkward grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloka, Owino; Feuerhake, Felix; Janczyk, Markus; Franz, Volker H

    2015-07-01

    The Perception-Action Model (PAM) claims to provide a coherent interpretation of data from all areas of the visual neurosciences, most notably data from neuropsychological patients and from behavioral experiments in healthy people. Here, we tested two claims that are part of the core version of the PAM: (a) certain actions (natural, highly practiced, and right-handed) are controlled by the dorsal vision for action pathway, while other actions (awkward, unpracticed, or left-handed) are controlled by the ventral vision for perception pathway. (b) Only the dorsal pathway operates in an analytical fashion, being able to selectively focus on the task-relevant dimension of an object (Ganel and Goodale, Nature 426(6967):664-667, 2003). We show that one of these claims must be wrong: using the same test for analytical processing as Ganel and Goodale (2003), we found that even an action that should clearly be ventral (left-handed awkward grasping) shows analytical processing just as a dorsal task does (right-handed natural precision grasping). These results are at odds with the PAM and point to an inconsistency of the model.

  10. Press to grasp: how action dynamics shape object categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberti, Stefano; Repetto, Claudia; Costantini, Marcello; Riva, Giuseppe; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2016-03-01

    Action and object are deeply linked to each other. Not only can viewing an object influence an ongoing action, but motor representations of action can also influence visual categorization of objects. It is tempting to assume that this influence is effector-specific. However, there is indirect evidence suggesting that this influence may be related to the action goal and not just to the effector involved in achieving it. This paper aimed, for the first time, to tackle this issue directly. Participants were asked to categorize different objects in terms of the effector (e.g. hand or foot) typically used to act upon them. The task was delivered before and after a training session in which participants were instructed either just to press a pedal with their foot or to perform the same foot action with the goal of guiding an avatar's hand to grasp a small ball. Results showed that pressing a pedal to grasp a ball influenced how participants correctly identified graspable objects as hand-related ones, making their responses more uncertain than before the training. Just pressing a pedal did not have any similar effect. This is evidence that the influence of action on object categorization can be goal-related rather than effector-specific.

  11. Locomotion and Grasping impairment in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fulceri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate expressiveness of motor impairment in autism spectrum disorder (ASD and its correlation with developmental and clinical features of ASD. Method: Thirty-five male preschoolers with ASD completed the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2 (PDMS-2; Folio and Fewell, 2000 and underwent a multidisciplinary assessment including medical examination, standardized assessment of cognitive abilities, administration of Autism_Diagnostic_Observation_Schedule (ADOS and a parent interview about adaptive skills. Results: Results revealed a substantial impairment in locomotion and grasping skills. Both fine and gross motor skills were significantly correlated with non verbal IQ and adaptive behaviours (p<0.01 but not with chronological age or ADOS scores. Children with weaker motor skills have greater cognitive and adaptive behaviours deficits. Conclusions: Motor development in ASD can be detected at preschool age and locomotion and grasping skills are substantially the most impaired area. These findings support the need to assess motor skills in preschoolers with ASD in addition to other developmental skill areas. Along with the increasingly acknowledged importance of motor skills for subsequent social, cognitive, and communicative development our findings support the need to consider motor intervention as a key area in therapeutic program to improve outcome in preschoolers with ASD.

  12. Individual differences in brainstem and basal ganglia structure predict postural control and balance loss in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Cheval, Boris; Chalavi, Sima; van Ruitenbeek, Peter; Leunissen, Inge; Levin, Oron; Nieuwboer, Alice; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2017-02-01

    It remains unclear which specific brain regions are the most critical for human postural control and balance, and whether they mediate the effect of age. Here, associations between postural performance and corticosubcortical brain regions were examined in young and older adults using multiple structural imaging and linear mixed models. Results showed that of the regions involved in posture, the brainstem was the strongest predictor of postural control and balance: lower brainstem volume predicted larger center of pressure deviation and higher odds of balance loss. Analyses of white and gray matter in the brainstem showed that the pedunculopontine nucleus area appeared to be critical for postural control in both young and older adults. In addition, the brainstem mediated the effect of age on postural control, underscoring the brainstem's fundamental role in aging. Conversely, lower basal ganglia volume predicted better postural performance, suggesting an association between greater neural resources in the basal ganglia and greater movement vigor, resulting in exaggerated postural adjustments. Finally, results showed that practice, shorter height and heavier weight (i.e., higher body mass index), higher total physical activity, and larger ankle active (but not passive) range of motion were predictive of more stable posture, irrespective of age.

  13. Characterizing Postural Sway during Quiet Stance Based on the Intermittent Control Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Taishin; Nakamura, Toru; Fukada, Kei; Sakoda, Saburo

    2007-07-01

    This article illustrates a signal processing methodology for the time series of postural sway and accompanied electromyographs from the lower limb muscles during quiet stance. It was shown that the proposed methodology was capable of identifying the underlying postural control mechanisms. A preliminary application of the methodology provided evidence that supports the intermittent control hypothesis alternative to the conventional stiffness control hypothesis during human quiet upright stance.

  14. Rôle de la convergence oculomotrice dans le contrôle de la posture

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The present thesis concerns human orthostatic postural balance in the young and in the elderly. Several sensory modalities are used in order to maintain postural stability (somatosensory, proprioceptive, vestibular and visual information). The objective of the thesis is to demonstrate the role of convergence of the eyes (angle of the visual axes) which varies with the distance. Study 1 shows that an increased angle of convergence, for instance when fixating at near distance or when fixating t...

  15. The muscle-mechanical compromise framework: Implications for the scaling of gait and posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usherwood James Richard (Jim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of animal and human gait and posture cannot be predicted from purely mechanical work minimization or entirely based on optimizing muscle efficiency. Here, the Muscle-Mechanical Compromise Framework is introduced as a conceptual paradigm for considering the interactions and compromises between these two objectives. Current assumptions in implementing the Framework are presented. Implications of the compromise are discussed and related to the scaling of running mechanics and animal posture.

  16. Computerized Determination of Optimal Postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, J. F.; Gueneau, P.; Bonjour, N.

    1986-07-01

    An intelligent system for automatic research of optimal postures in ergonomics has been developed at the Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Appliquee. A dynamic programming algorithm allows the automatic graphic research for an eight degrees of freedom bidimensional model. The different range of motions and acceptable ergonomic intervals are used for each articulation. This method is going to be integrated in the C.A.D. system of ERGODATA.

  17. Postural Control in Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  18. Diurnal changes in postural control in normal children: Computerized static and dynamic assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourelle, Sophie; Taiar, Redha; Berge, Benoit; Gautheron, Vincent; Cottalorda, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) causes postural control deficits and accordingly comparison of aberrant postural control against normal postural control may help diagnose mTBI. However, in the current literature, little is known regarding the normal pattern of postural control in young children. This study was therefore conducted as an effort to fill this knowledge gap. Eight normal school-aged children participated. Posture assessment was conducted before (7-8 a.m. in the morning) and after (4-7 p.m. in the afternoon) school on regular school days using the Balance Master® evaluation system composed of 3 static tests and 2 dynamic balance tests. A significant difference in the weight-bearing squats was detected between morning hours and afternoon hours (P control of the lateral rhythmic weight shifts was observed at the end of the afternoon than at morning hours (P posture control in humans. On a regular school day, the capacity of postural control and laterality or medio-lateral balance in children varies between morning and afternoon hours. We suggest that posturographic assessment in children, either in normal (e.g., physical education and sports training) or in abnormal conditions (e.g., mTBI-associated balance disorders), be better performed late in the afternoon.

  19. Marker-less systems for tracking working postures--results from two experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzke, S; Kopp, L

    2001-10-01

    Two experiments are performed to examine the usability of different marker-less approaches in image analysis and computer vision for automatic registration of OWAS (Ovako working posture analysing system) postures from video film. In experiment 1, a parametric method based on image analysis routines is developed both for separating the subject from its background and for relating the shapes of the extracted subject to OWAS postures. All 12 analysed images were correctly classified by the method. In experiment 2 a computer neural network is taught to relate postures of a subject to OWAS postures. When the network was trained with 53 images the rest of the set of 138 images was correctly classified. The experiments described in this paper show promising results regarding the use of image analysis and computer vision for tracking and assessing working postures. However, further research is needed including tests of different human models, neural networks, and template matching for making the OWAS method more useful in identifying and evaluating potentially harmful working postures.

  20. Improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments for balance control: effect of a single training session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2015-04-01

    Humans use anticipatory and compensatory postural strategies to maintain and restore balance when perturbed. Inefficient generation and utilization of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) is one of the reasons for postural instability. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session consisting of catches of a medicine ball thrown at the shoulder level. 3-D body kinematics, EMG activity of thirteen trunk and lower limb muscles, and ground reaction forces were recorded before and immediately after a single training session. Muscle onsets, EMG integrals, center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The effect of a single training session was seen as significantly early muscle onsets and larger anticipatory COP displacements. As a result, significantly smaller peak COM displacements were observed after the perturbation indicating greater postural stability. The outcome of this study provides a background for examining the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on postural stability in individuals in need.

  1. Real-Time Optimal Reach-Posture Prediction in a New Interactive Virtual Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingzhou Yang; R. Timothy Marler; Steven Beck; Karim Abdel-Malek; Joo Kim

    2006-01-01

    Human posture prediction is a key factor for the design and evaluation of workspaces, in a virtual environment using virtual humans. This work presents a new interface and virtual environment for the direct human optimized posture prediction (D-HOPP) approach to predicting realistic reach postures of digital humans, where reach postures entail the use of the torso, arms, and neck. D-HOPP is based on the contention where depending on what type of task is being completed, and human posture is governed by different human performance measures. A human performance measure is a physics-based metric, such as energy or discomfort, and serves as an objective function in an optimization formulation. The problem is formulated as a single-objective optimization (SOO) problem with a single performance measure and as multiobjective-optimization (MOO) problem with multiple combined performance measures. We use joint displacement, change in potential energy, and musculoskeletal discomfort as performance measures. D-HOPP is equipped with an extensive yet intuitive user-interface, and the results are presented in an interactive virtual environment.

  2. Detecting altered postural control after cerebral concussion in athletes with normal postural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanaugh, J; Guskiewicz, K.; Giuliani, C.; Marshall, S.; Mercer, V; Stergiou, N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine if approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from non-linear dynamics, could detect changes in postural control during quiet standing in athletes with normal postural stability after cerebral concussion.

  3. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  4. Perinatal Development of the Motor Systems Involved in Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Vinay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood—e.g, deficits in motor coordination—might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  5. Perinatal development of the motor systems involved in postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Laurent; Ben-Mabrouk, Faïza; Brocard, Frédéric; Clarac, François; Jean-Xavier, Céline; Pearlstein, Edouard; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    Motor behaviors of some species, such as the rat and the human baby, are quite immature at birth. Here we review recent data on some of the mechanisms underlying the postnatal maturation of posture in the rat, in particular the development of pathways descending from the brain stem and projecting onto the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. A short-lasting depletion in serotonin affects both posture and the excitability of motoneurons. Here we try to extrapolate to human development and suggest that the abnormalities in motor control observed in childhood--e.g. deficits in motor coordination--might have their roots in the prenatal period, in particular serotonin depletion due to exposure to several environmental and toxicological factors during pregnancy.

  6. Design and Validation of a Low-Cost Portable Device to Quantify Postural Stability †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) is an important tool used in biomechanics to assess postural stability and human balance. The goal of this research was to design and validate a low-cost portable device that can offer a quick indication of the state of postural stability and human balance related conditions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) values reflecting the amount of irregularity hiding in COP oscillations were used to calculate the index. The prototype adopted a portable design using the measurements of the load cells located at the four corners of a low-cost force platform. The test subject was asked to stand on the device in a quiet, normal, upright stance for 30 s with eyes open and subsequently for 30 s with eyes closed. Based on the COP displacement signals, the ApEn values were calculated. The results indicated that the prototype device was capable of capturing the increase in regularity of postural control in the visual-deprivation conditions. It was also able to decipher the subtle postural control differences along anterior–posterior and medial–lateral directions. The data analysis demonstrated that the prototype would enable the quantification of postural stability and thus provide a low-cost portable device to assess many conditions related to postural stability and human balance such as aging and pathologies. PMID:28335461

  7. Design and Validation of a Low-Cost Portable Device to Quantify Postural Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP is an important tool used in biomechanics to assess postural stability and human balance. The goal of this research was to design and validate a low-cost portable device that can offer a quick indication of the state of postural stability and human balance related conditions. Approximate entropy (ApEn values reflecting the amount of irregularity hiding in COP oscillations were used to calculate the index. The prototype adopted a portable design using the measurements of the load cells located at the four corners of a low-cost force platform. The test subject was asked to stand on the device in a quiet, normal, upright stance for 30 s with eyes open and subsequently for 30 s with eyes closed. Based on the COP displacement signals, the ApEn values were calculated. The results indicated that the prototype device was capable of capturing the increase in regularity of postural control in the visual-deprivation conditions. It was also able to decipher the subtle postural control differences along anterior–posterior and medial–lateral directions. The data analysis demonstrated that the prototype would enable the quantification of postural stability and thus provide a low-cost portable device to assess many conditions related to postural stability and human balance such as aging and pathologies.

  8. Objective measurement of posture and posture transitions in the pre-school child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gwyneth; Reilly, John J; Paton, James Y

    2012-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that between-individual variation in posture and posture transitions may have important health consequences in adults. The early life development of between-individual variation in posture and posture transitions has not been studied, and the physiological consequences of such variations in childhood are unknown, largely because of the absence of objective methods for measuring posture and posture transitions in young children. This study aimed to examine the objective measurement of posture transitions in pre-school children with the activPAL™ monitor (PAL Technologies, Glasgow). Single-unit activity monitors such as the activPAL™ have a limited output, with data categorized as 'sit/lie', 'stand' or 'walk' and the consequences of this for measurement of posture transitions in young children are unknown. Thirty children (mean age 4.1 years) were videoed for 1 h in nursery while wearing an activPAL™. Video was analysed on a second-by-second basis, with all postures categorized. From direct observation, time spent was sit/lie 46%; stand 35%; walk/run 16%; 3% was spent in heterogeneous non-sit/lie/upright postures (crawl, crouch, and kneel up). Despite these 'non-standard' postures being responsible for a low proportion of time, posture transitions involving them contributed to 34% of total transitions. There was a significant rank-order correlation (r = 0.79, p posture transitions measured by activPAL™ and by direct observation. 'Non-standard' postures in young children are probably not a problem if the aim is to measure total time sedentary or active, and the activPAL™ may measure between-individual variation in transitions adequately in young children. However, non-standard postures may present problems for the detailed characterization of posture transitions in early childhood.

  9. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    OpenAIRE

    Han Suk Lee; Hyung Kuk Chung; Sun Wook Park

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation...

  10. State-based decoding of hand and finger kinematics using neuronal ensemble and LFP activity during dexterous reach-to-grasp movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vikram; Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Davidson, Adam G; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-06-01

    The performance of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that continuously control upper limb neuroprostheses may benefit from distinguishing periods of posture and movement so as to prevent inappropriate movement of the prosthesis. Few studies, however, have investigated how decoding behavioral states and detecting the transitions between posture and movement could be used autonomously to trigger a kinematic decoder. We recorded simultaneous neuronal ensemble and local field potential (LFP) activity from microelectrode arrays in primary motor cortex (M1) and dorsal (PMd) and ventral (PMv) premotor areas of two male rhesus monkeys performing a center-out reach-and-grasp task, while upper limb kinematics were tracked with a motion capture system with markers on the dorsal aspect of the forearm, hand, and fingers. A state decoder was trained to distinguish four behavioral states (baseline, reaction, movement, hold), while a kinematic decoder was trained to continuously decode hand end point position and 18 joint angles of the wrist and fingers. LFP amplitude most accurately predicted transition into the reaction (62%) and movement (73%) states, while spikes most accurately decoded arm, hand, and finger kinematics during movement. Using an LFP-based state decoder to trigger a spike-based kinematic decoder [r = 0.72, root mean squared error (RMSE) = 0.15] significantly improved decoding of reach-to-grasp movements from baseline to final hold, compared with either a spike-based state decoder combined with a spike-based kinematic decoder (r = 0.70, RMSE = 0.17) or a spike-based kinematic decoder alone (r = 0.67, RMSE = 0.17). Combining LFP-based state decoding with spike-based kinematic decoding may be a valuable step toward the realization of BMI control of a multifingered neuroprosthesis performing dexterous manipulation.

  11. The dentist's operating posture - ergonomic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pîrvu, C; Pătraşcu, I; Pîrvu, D; Ionescu, C

    2014-06-15

    The practice of dentistry involves laborious high finesse dental preparations, precision and control in executions that require a particular attention, concentration and patience of the dentist and finally the dentist's physical and mental resistance. The optimal therapeutic approach and the success of practice involve special working conditions for the dentist and his team in an ergonomic environment. The meaning of the posture in ergonomics is the manner in which different parts of the body are located and thus the reports are established between them in order to allow a special task execution. This article discusses the posture adopted by dentists when they work, beginning with the balanced posture and going to different variants of posture. The ideal posture of a dentist gives him, on the one hand the optimal working conditions (access, visibility and control in the mouth) and on the other hand, physical and psychological comfort throughout the execution of the clinical acts. Although the theme of dentist posture is treated with great care and often presented in the undergraduate courses and the continuing education courses on ergonomics in dentistry, many dentists do not know the subject well enough nor the theoretical issues and therefore nor the practical applicability. The risk and perspective of the musculoskeletal disorders related to unbalanced postures should determine the dentists take postural corrective actions and compensation measures in order to limit the negative effects of working in a bad posture.

  12. Dynamic control of posture across locomotor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earhart, Gammon M

    2013-09-15

    Successful locomotion depends on postural control to establish and maintain appropriate postural orientation of body segments relative to one another and to the environment and to ensure dynamic stability of the moving body. This article provides a framework for considering dynamic postural control, highlighting the importance of coordination, consistency, and challenges to postural control posed by various locomotor tasks, such as turning and backward walking. The impacts of aging and various movement disorders on postural control are discussed broadly in an effort to provide a general overview of the field and recommendations for assessment of dynamic postural control across different populations in both clinical and research settings. Suggestions for future research on dynamic postural control during locomotion also are provided and include discussion of opportunities afforded by new and developing technologies, the need for long-term monitoring of locomotor performance in everyday activities, gaps in our knowledge of how targeted intervention approaches modify dynamic postural control, and the relative paucity of literature regarding dynamic postural control in movement disorder populations other than Parkinson's disease.

  13. Education and the Prevention of Postural Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olchowska-Kotala Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine: whether and at what stage of education is proper body posture learned, the intention of young adults to participate in activities teaching proper posture, and the effects of factors related with the said intention. Methods. The study involved 430 university students aged 18-24 years. Anthropometric data was collected. Participants completed questionnaires assessing physical activity level (IPAQ and their intention to participate in extracurricular activities teaching proper posture while sitting or walking, proper running technique, corrective gymnastics, or weight loss exercises. A self-assessment of posture, physical fitness, attractiveness, and body satisfaction was also completed. Results. Lower back pain was experienced by 41% of the respondents. Most were taught proper posture-related habits in primary school, followed by secondary school, and then at university. Many students expressed their intention to participate in the extracurricular activities. None of the questionnaire variables were associated with the intention to learn proper walking posture or proper running technique. The intention to participate in classes teaching proper sitting posture was associated with lower back pain in women and low physical activity level in men. In women, a relationship was found between the intention to participate in weight loss exercises and body dissatisfaction, high BMI, and poor self-evaluations of posture and attractiveness. In men, this activity was associated with body dissatisfaction. Conclusions. There is a need for further education on the development of proper postural habits at the university level.

  14. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  15. Use of self-selected postures to regulate multi-joint stiffness during unconstrained tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy D Trumbower

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human motor system is highly redundant, having more kinematic degrees of freedom than necessary to complete a given task. Understanding how kinematic redundancies are utilized in different tasks remains a fundamental question in motor control. One possibility is that they can be used to tune the mechanical properties of a limb to the specific requirements of a task. For example, many tasks such as tool usage compromise arm stability along specific directions. These tasks only can be completed if the nervous system adapts the mechanical properties of the arm such that the arm, coupled to the tool, remains stable. The purpose of this study was to determine if posture selection is a critical component of endpoint stiffness regulation during unconstrained tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three-dimensional (3D estimates of endpoint stiffness were used to quantify limb mechanics. Most previous studies examining endpoint stiffness adaptation were completed in 2D using constrained postures to maintain a non-redundant mapping between joint angles and hand location. Our hypothesis was that during unconstrained conditions, subjects would select arm postures that matched endpoint stiffness to the functional requirements of the task. The hypothesis was tested during endpoint tracking tasks in which subjects interacted with unstable haptic environments, simulated using a 3D robotic manipulator. We found that arm posture had a significant effect on endpoint tracking accuracy and that subjects selected postures that improved tracking performance. For environments in which arm posture had a large effect on tracking accuracy, the self-selected postures oriented the direction of maximal endpoint stiffness towards the direction of the unstable haptic environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate how changes in arm posture can have a dramatic effect on task performance and suggest that postural selection is a fundamental

  16. Postural control in sitting children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogren, E; Hadders-Algra, M; Forssberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) display postural problems, largely interfering with daily life activities. Clarification of neural mechanisms controlling posture in these children could serve as a base for more successful intervention. Studies on postural adjustments following horizontal forward a

  17. Postural control in sitting children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogren, E; Hadders-Algra, M; Forssberg, H

    1998-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) display postural problems, largely interfering with daily life activities. Clarification of neural mechanisms controlling posture in these children could serve as a base for more successful intervention. Studies on postural adjustments following horizontal forward a

  18. Hemodynamic response to the upright posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J J; Porth, C M; Erickson, M

    1994-05-01

    The authors' objective was to review previous studies of immediate (first 30 seconds) and stabilized (30 seconds to 20 minutes) hemodynamic responses of healthy adults to the head-up posture, with particular reference to alteration of such responses in the elderly and the usefulness of such data in the diagnosis of orthostatic hypotension. The immediate response in healthy young adults is characterized by a prompt rise in heart rate, which peaks at about 8 to 15 seconds and then tapers; the arterial pressure and total vascular resistance decrease sharply at 5 to 10 seconds, followed by a rapid rebound and overshoot. Over the first 30 seconds there is a steady parallel decline of thoracic blood volume and stroke volume; there is also an initial surge of cardiac output followed by a steady decrease. During the stabilized response (30 seconds to 20 minutes), the hemodynamic variables are relatively steady, showing average increases in heart rate of about 15 to 30%, in diastolic pressure of 10 to 15%, and in total vascular resistance of 30 to 40%; during the 5th to 20th minutes there are also decreases in thoracic blood volume averaging about 25 to 30%, in cardiac output 15 to 30%, and in pulse pressure about 5 to 10%. It is evident that in normal human subjects, assumption of the upright posture results in profound hemodynamic changes, most of them occurring during the first 30 seconds. In elderly subjects (aged 60-69 years), there are, in the upright posture, lesser increments of heart rate and diastolic pressure, but no significant differences from younger age groups in the response of thoracic blood volume, cardiac output or total vascular resistance. However, beginning at about age 75, there is an increasing incidence of orthostatic hypotension, which averages about 14 to 20% at age 75 and older. The tendency toward orthostatic hypotension in the elderly is due (1) to the structural and functional changes in the circulation itself, (2) to a decline in autonomic

  19. A GRASP for Next Generation Sapphire Image Acquisition Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an image acquisition scheduling problem for a Canadian surveillance-of-space satellite named Sapphire that takes images of deep space Earth-orbiting objects. For a set of resident space objects (RSOs that needs to be imaged within the time horizon of one day, the Sapphire image acquisition scheduling (SIAS problem is to find a schedule that maximizes the “Figure of Merit” of all the scheduled RSO images. To address the problem, we propose an effective GRASP heuristic that alternates between a randomized greedy constructive procedure and a local search procedure. Experimental comparisons with the currently used greedy algorithm are presented to demonstrate the merit of the proposed algorithm in handling the SIAS problem.

  20. Stereovision system for estimation of the grasp type for electrotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štrbac Matija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents hardware and software for scene analysis that are designed for the system used in treatment of post stroke hemiplegic patients using electrical stimulation. New hardware includes two cameras and a laser pointer, while new software is given as a Matlab program that performs real-time estimate of size and shape of targeted object. Based on heuristic contemplation the system makes a decision grasp type and necessary actions for the purpose of hand opening and closing. The system was tested on 13 objects and in 95% of cases it worked according to demands, i.e. corresponding to choices of healthy subjects when they wanted to grab that same object.

  1. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  2. Grounded Object and Grasp Representations in a Cognitive Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk

    for example unknown objects, we need to establish that something is an object (and not, an obstacle). One of the initial steps there is to see if we can manipulate the object. We therefore present work that describes how to achieve physical control over an object. This work uses a feature-action relationship...... developed. This work presents a system that is able to learn autonomously about objects and applicable grasps in an unknown environment through exploratory manipulation and to then use this grounded knowledge in a planning setup to address complex tasks. A set of different subsystems is needed to achieve....... We also explain how the feature-action relationship can be improved through learning from a set of experiences. Once physical control is achieved, we can move the object in such a way that we can gather visual information from different viewpoints. We describe how this information can be integrated...

  3. Grounded Object and Grasp Representations in a Cognitive Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk

    . We also explain how the feature-action relationship can be improved through learning from a set of experiences. Once physical control is achieved, we can move the object in such a way that we can gather visual information from different viewpoints. We describe how this information can be integrated......Robotic systems are today still mostly unable to perform complex tasks in unknown environments. While there have been many approaches to cope with unknown environments, for example in mobile robot navigation, the work done when it comes to more complex tasks, for example object handling are, less...... developed. This work presents a system that is able to learn autonomously about objects and applicable grasps in an unknown environment through exploratory manipulation and to then use this grounded knowledge in a planning setup to address complex tasks. A set of different subsystems is needed to achieve...

  4. Vision-based posture recognition using an ensemble classifier and a vote filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Wu, Changcheng; Xu, Xiaonong; Song, Aiguo; Li, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    Posture recognition is a very important Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) way. To segment effective posture from an image, we propose an improved region grow algorithm which combining with the Single Gauss Color Model. The experiment shows that the improved region grow algorithm can get the complete and accurate posture than traditional Single Gauss Model and region grow algorithm, and it can eliminate the similar region from the background at the same time. In the posture recognition part, and in order to improve the recognition rate, we propose a CNN ensemble classifier, and in order to reduce the misjudgments during a continuous gesture control, a vote filter is proposed and applied to the sequence of recognition results. Comparing with CNN classifier, the CNN ensemble classifier we proposed can yield a 96.27% recognition rate, which is better than that of CNN classifier, and the proposed vote filter can improve the recognition result and reduce the misjudgments during the consecutive gesture switch.

  5. Properties of the grasp stiffness matrix and conservative control strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, I.; Ngo, C. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the authors present fundamental properties of stiffness matrices as applied in analysis of grasping and dexterous manipulation in configuration spaces and linear Euclidean R{sup 3x3} space without rotational components. A conservative-stiffness matrix in such spaces needs to satisfy both symmetric and exact differential criteria. Two types of stiffness matrices are discussed: constant and configuration-dependent matrices are discussed: constant and configuration-dependent matrices. The symmetric part of a constant-stiffness matrix can be derived from a conservative quadratic potential function in the Hermitian form; while the skew-symmetric part is a function of the nonconservative curl vector field of the grasp. A configuration-dependent stiffness matrix needs to be symmetric and must simultaneously satisfy the exact differential condition to be conservative. The theory is most relevant to the Cartesian stiffness control, where the stiffness of the end effector is usually constant, such as that in RCC wrists. Conservative control strategies are proposed for a configuration-dependent stiffness matrix. One of the most important results of this paper is the nonconservative congruence mapping of stiffness between the joint and Cartesian spaces. In general, the congruence transformation (or its inverse transformation), K{sub {theta}} = J{sub {theta}}{sup T}K{sub p}J{sub {theta}}, is a nonconservative mapping over finite paths for a configuration-dependent Jacobian. Thus, to obtain a conservative system with respect to the Cartesian space, one has to either find the corresponding K{sub {theta}} at every configuration due to the constant and symmetric Cartesian stiffness matrix, or determine symmetric yet configuration-varying K{sub {theta}} at every configuration due to the constant and symmetric Cartesian stiffness matrix, or determine the symmetric yet configuration-varying K{sub {theta}} which makes the resulting configuration-dependent K{sub p

  6. Shaping of Reach-to-Grasp Kinematics by Intentions: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Ida; Køppe, Simo

    2017-01-01

    is primarily associated with transporting the hand to the object (i.e., extrinsic object properties), the decelerating part of the reach is used as a preparation for object manipulation (i.e., prepare the grasp or the subsequent action), and the grasp is associated with manipulating the object’s intrinsic...

  7. Vibrotactile grasping force and hand aperture feedback for myoelectric forearm prosthesis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Heidi J.B.; Rietman, Hans S.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: User feedback about grasping force and hand aperture is very important in object handling with myoelectric forearm prostheses but is lacking in current prostheses. Vibrotactile feedback increases the performance of healthy subjects in virtual grasping tasks, but no extensive validation o

  8. VisGraB: A Benchmark for Vision-Based Grasping. Paladyn Journal of Behavioral Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kootstra, Gert; Popovic, Mila; Jørgensen, Jimmy Alison

    2012-01-01

    that a large number of grasps can be executed and evaluated while dealing with dynamics and the noise and uncertainty present in the real world images. VisGraB enables a fair comparison among different grasping methods. The user furthermore does not need to deal with robot hardware, focusing on the vision...

  9. The Role of Motor Experience in Understanding Action Function: The Case of the Precision Grasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Jeff; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests adults and infants selectively attend to features of action, such as how a hand contacts an object. The current research investigated whether this bias stems from infants' processing of the functional consequences of grasps: understanding that different grasps afford different future actions. A habituation paradigm…

  10. Responses of mirror neurons in area F5 to hand and tool grasping observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Magali J; Caruana, Fausto; Jezzini, Ahmad; Escola, Ludovic; Intskirveli, Irakli; Grammont, Franck; Gallese, Vittorio; Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra

    2010-08-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that discharge both during the execution of a motor act and during observation of the same or similar motor act performed by another individual. However, the extent to which mirror neurons coding a motor act with a specific goal (e.g., grasping) might also respond to the observation of a motor act having the same goal, but achieved with artificial effectors, is not yet established. In the present study, we addressed this issue by recording mirror neurons from the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) of two monkeys trained to grasp objects with pliers. Neuron activity was recorded during the observation and execution of grasping performed with the hand, with pliers and during observation of an experimenter spearing food with a stick. The results showed that virtually all neurons responding to the observation of hand grasping also responded to the observation of grasping with pliers and, many of them to the observation of spearing with a stick. However, the intensity and pattern of the response differed among conditions. Hand grasping observation determined the earliest and the strongest discharge, while pliers grasping and spearing observation triggered weaker responses at longer latencies. We conclude that F5 grasping mirror neurons respond to the observation of a family of stimuli leading to the same goal. However, the response pattern depends upon the similarity between the observed motor act and the one executed by the hand, the natural motor template.

  11. Playing With Nonverbal Communication: Using Grasp and Facial Direction to Create Adaptive Interaction in a Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ditte Hvas; Bærentsen, Klaus B.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the use of automatic adaptation to the user’s grasp and facial direction in interaction with a game. Two experimental studies were conducted. The first experiment identified patterns in grasp and facial direction that can be used as objective indicators of intentions and attention. The...

  12. Movements of Individual Digits in Bimanual Prehension Are Coupled into a Grasping Component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2014-01-01

    The classic understanding of prehension is that of coordinated reaching and grasping. An alternative view is that the grasping in prehension emerges from independently controlled individual digit movements (the double-pointing model). The current study tested this latter model in bimanual prehension

  13. Fixation Biases towards the Index Finger in Almost-Natural Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voudouris, D.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Brenner, E.

    2016-01-01

    We use visual information to guide our grasping movements. When grasping an object with a precision grip, the two digits need to reach two different positions more or less simultaneously, but the eyes can only be directed to one position at a time. Several studies that have examined eye movements in

  14. The neuroscience of vision-based grasping: a functional review for computational modeling and bio-inspired robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinellato, Eris; Del Pobil, Angel P

    2009-06-01

    The topic of vision-based grasping is being widely studied in humans and in other primates using various techniques and with different goals. The fundamental related findings are reviewed in this paper, with the aim of providing researchers from different fields, including intelligent robotics and neural computation, a comprehensive but accessible view on the subject. A detailed description of the principal sensorimotor processes and the brain areas involved is provided following a functional perspective, in order to make this survey especially useful for computational modeling and bio-inspired robotic applications.

  15. [Postural examination in daily occlusodontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serviere, F

    1989-03-01

    According to the osteopathic and chiropractic concepts, facing a TMJ problem, the practitioner has to determine if the trouble observed in the stomatognatic apparatus is the cause or the effect of the structural problems present anywhere else in the body. The postural examination allows to answer this question. Tow techniques can be used. First a static and dynamic posture test proposed by Bricot. The level of the cranium, the eyes, the shoulders, the wrists, the pelvis and the ankles is analysed, from a front view; from the side, the gravity line is inspected: vertex, auditory meatus, shoulder, hip joint, anterior side of the tibia, ankle joint. The vertical posture can be studied from the front: the arms are held straight and the antero-posterior length between the fingers is measured. From the back, one notes the recoil of the buttocks on one side. An ocular convergence test is performed. Then one uses a Romberg test (oscillation of the body when the eyes are closed), and a Fukuda stepping test. The patient is then asked to bite on a compress, and the same exams are redone. If no change occurs, we are dealing with an ascending problem: the origin of the problem is not the stomatognathic system. The second technique is the Meerssemann test that needs the practice of Applied Kinesiology muscle testing. The patient is lying supine and one tests: the dental occlusion, the two TMJs, the temporal muscles, masseters, pterygoids, sterno-cleido-mastoids, upper tapezius, left and right sacro-iliac joints, psoas muscles bilaterally.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Theory of Point Contact Restraint and Qualitative Analysis of Robot Grasping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊有伦

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a geometrical representation of robot grasping and a definition of "relative form closure" of point contact restraint based on the concepts of positive linear combination,affine combination,convex combination,etc.in the screw space.The dual equivalence theorem,topological equivalence theorem and algebraic equivalence theorem are derived from the defined restraint cone and freedom cone in the dual screw spaces.A J0-function method of computer-aided grasp planning is implemented more efficiently than other proposed methods.The states of restraint and instantaneous motion of a rigid body grasped by a set of point contacts are specified by the unisense degrees of freedom and unisense degrees of restraint.Finally,a quality measure of robot grasping is provided for the synthesis procedure of relatively form-closed grasp.

  17. Cooperative Control Based on Absolute Positional Information of Grasped Object in Multiple Mobile Manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Toshiharu; Murakami, Toshiyuki

    This paper describes a control strategy to realize grasping and cooperative motion in multiple mobile manipulators. In the general approach, the stable grasping motion is well realized, but the emergent motion such as the obstacle avoidance motion and the collision avoidance motion among the robots are not taken into account in the cooperative motion of multiple mobile manipulators. In the practical application, however, the above issue is important to realize an adaptive and sophisticated motion. The proposed approach introduces the null space motion based on the grasping matrix and the absolute position of target object in the grasping motion of the manipulator. In this case, each motion of mobile manipulator is given independently of the grasping and the cooperative motion, and the emergent motion is determined arbitrary. This is one of the remarkable features of the proposed strategy. Several numerical and experimental results show the validity of the proposed approach.

  18. Performance measurement of autonomous grasping software in a simulated orbital environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsworthy, Robert S.

    1993-12-01

    The EVAHR (extravehicular activity helper/retriever) robot is being developed to perform a variety of navigation and manipulation tasks under astronaut supervision. The EVAHR is equipped with a manipulator and dexterous end-effector for capture and a laser range imager with pan/tilt for target perception. Perception software has been developed to perform target pose estimation, tracking, and motion estimation for rigid, freely rotating, polyhedral objects. Manipulator grasp planning and trajectory control software has also been developed to grasp targets while avoiding collisions. A software simulation of the EVAHR hardware, orbital dynamics, collision detection, and grasp impact dynamics has been developed to test and measure the performance of the integrated software. Performance measurements include grasp success/failure % and time-to-grasp for a variety of targets, initial target states, and simulated pose estimation computing resources.

  19. Virtual Control of Prosthetic Hand Based on Grasping Patterns and Estimated Force from Semg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoelectric prosthetic hands aim to serve upper limb amputees. The myoelectric control of the hand grasp action is a kind of real-time or online method. Thus it is of great necessity to carry on a study of online prosthetic hand electrical control. In this paper, the strategy of simultaneous EMG decoding of grasping patterns and grasping force was realized by controlling a virtual multi-degree-freedom prosthetic hand and a real one-degree-freedom prosthetic hand simultaneously. The former realized the grasping patterns from the recognition of the sEMG pattern. The other implemented the grasping force from sEMG force decoding. The results show that the control method is effective and feasible.

  20. Multi-Objective Optimisation Method for Posture Prediction and Analysis with Consideration of Fatigue Effect and its Application Case

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Chablat, Damien; Bennis, Fouad; Guillaume, François; 10.1016/j.cie.2009.06.003

    2009-01-01

    Automation technique has been widely used in manufacturing industry, but there are still manual handling operations required in assembly and maintenance work in industry. Inappropriate posture and physical fatigue might result in musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in such physical jobs. In ergonomics and occupational biomechanics, virtual human modelling techniques have been employed to design and optimize the manual operations in design stage so as to avoid or decrease potential MSD risks. In these methods, physical fatigue is only considered as minimizing the muscle or joint stress, and the fatigue effect along time for the posture is not considered enough. In this study, based on the existing methods and multiple objective optimisation method (MOO), a new posture prediction and analysis method is proposed for predicting the optimal posture and evaluating the physical fatigue in the manual handling operation. The posture prediction and analysis problem is mathematically described and a special application cas...

  1. Evaluation of head and neck postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the literature and two experiments on the evaluation of head and neck postures. It is concluded that health and safety professiona1s and ergonomists during posture evaluation should consider neck flexion/extension (head vs. trunk), besides the traditionally used inclination of t

  2. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  3. Postural Variables in Girls Practicing Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabara, Malgorzata; Hadzik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess body posture of young female volleyball players in relation to their untrained mates. Material and methods: A group of 42 volleyball players and another of 43 untrained girls, all aged 13-16 years were studied with respect to their body posture indices by using computer posturography. Spinal angles and curvatures were…

  4. Compromising Postural Balance in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling D.; Uebelhart, Daniel; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Additional tasks that are assumed to disturb standing postural control can be divided in added motor or added cognitive tasks. It is unknown which type of task causes the most disturbances of postural control in elderly. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether the dual

  5. Compromising Postural Balance in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling D.; Uebelhart, Daniel; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Additional tasks that are assumed to disturb standing postural control can be divided in added motor or added cognitive tasks. It is unknown which type of task causes the most disturbances of postural control in elderly. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether the dual

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  7. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Takakusaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture- gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture- gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  8. Current World Geostrategic Posture and Its Prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Limin

    2004-01-01

    @@ Being affected by Iraq war, the Korean nuclear crisis, the readjustment of the U.S. military strategy and in-depth development of terrorism and anti-terrorist struggles, the world geostrategic posture has undergone great changes. To observe and analyze these new changes will help us better understand the future trends of the world geostrategic posture.

  9. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling. PMID:28122432

  10. Evaluation of head and neck postures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the literature and two experiments on the evaluation of head and neck postures. It is concluded that health and safety professiona1s and ergonomists during posture evaluation should consider neck flexion/extension (head vs. trunk), besides the traditionally used inclination of

  11. Spinal lordosis optimizes the requirements for a stable erect posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Liebetrau, Anne; Schinowski, David; Wulf, Thomas; de Lussanet, Marc H E

    2012-04-16

    Lordosis is the bending of the lumbar spine that gives the vertebral column of humans its characteristic ventrally convex curvature. Infants develop lordosis around the time when they acquire bipedal locomotion. Even macaques develop a lordosis when they are trained to walk bipedally. The aim of this study was to investigate why humans and some animals develop a lumbar lordosis while learning to walk bipedally. We developed a musculoskeletal model of the lumbar spine, that includes an asymmetric, dorsally shifted location of the spinal column in the body, realistic moment arms, and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSA) of the muscles as well as realistic force-length and force-velocity relationships. The model was used to analyze the stability of an upright body posture. According to our results, lordosis reduces the local joint torques necessary for an equilibrium of the vertebral column during an erect posture. At the same time lordosis increases the demands on the global muscles to provide stability. We conclude that the development of a spinal lordosis is a compromise between the stability requirements of an erect posture and the necessity of torque equilibria at each spinal segment.

  12. Craniomandibular System and Postural Balance after 3-Day Dry Immersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Treffel

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the influence of simulated microgravity by exposure to dry immersion on the craniomandibular system. Twelve healthy male volunteers participated in a 3-day dry immersion study. Before and immediately after exposure we measured maximal bite force using piezoresistive sensors. The mechanical properties of the jaw and cervical muscles were evaluated before, during, and after dry immersion using MyotonPRO. Because recent studies reported the effects of jaw motor activity on the postural stability of humans, stabilometric measurements of center of pressure were performed before and after dry immersion in two mandibular positions: rest position without jaw clenching, and intercuspidal position during voluntary teeth clenching. Results revealed no significant changes of maximal bite force after dry immersion. All postural parameters were significantly altered by dry immersion. There were however no significant differences in stabilometric data according to mandibular position. Moreover the masseter tonicity increased immediately after the end of dry immersion period. Dry immersion could be used as a valid model for studying the effects of microgravity on human subjects. However, 3 days appear insufficient in duration to evaluate the effects of weightlessness on maximal bite force. Our research suggests a link between postural disturbance after dry immersion and masseter tonicity.

  13. Spinal lordosis optimizes the requirements for a stable erect posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Heiko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lordosis is the bending of the lumbar spine that gives the vertebral column of humans its characteristic ventrally convex curvature. Infants develop lordosis around the time when they acquire bipedal locomotion. Even macaques develop a lordosis when they are trained to walk bipedally. The aim of this study was to investigate why humans and some animals develop a lumbar lordosis while learning to walk bipedally. Results We developed a musculoskeletal model of the lumbar spine, that includes an asymmetric, dorsally shifted location of the spinal column in the body, realistic moment arms, and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSA of the muscles as well as realistic force-length and force-velocity relationships. The model was used to analyze the stability of an upright body posture. According to our results, lordosis reduces the local joint torques necessary for an equilibrium of the vertebral column during an erect posture. At the same time lordosis increases the demands on the global muscles to provide stability. Conclusions We conclude that the development of a spinal lordosis is a compromise between the stability requirements of an erect posture and the necessity of torque equilibria at each spinal segment.

  14. Decoding Grasping Movements from the Parieto-Frontal Reaching Circuit in the Nonhuman Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Koen; Fiave, Prosper Agbesi; Vanduffel, Wim

    2017-02-18

    Prehension movements typically include a reaching phase, guiding the hand toward the object, and a grip phase, shaping the hand around it. The dominant view posits that these components rely upon largely independent parieto-frontal circuits: a dorso-medial circuit involved in reaching and a dorso-lateral circuit involved in grasping. However, mounting evidence suggests a more complex arrangement, with dorso-medial areas contributing to both reaching and grasping. To investigate the role of the dorso-medial reaching circuit in grasping, we trained monkeys to reach-and-grasp different objects in the dark and determined if hand configurations could be decoded from functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) responses obtained from the reaching and grasping circuits. Indicative of their established role in grasping, object-specific grasp decoding was found in anterior intraparietal (AIP) area, inferior parietal lobule area PFG and ventral premotor region F5 of the lateral grasping circuit, and primary motor cortex. Importantly, the medial reaching circuit also conveyed robust grasp-specific information, as evidenced by significant decoding in parietal reach regions (particular V6A) and dorsal premotor region F2. These data support the proposed role of dorso-medial "reach" regions in controlling aspects of grasping and demonstrate the value of complementing univariate with more sensitive multivariate analyses of functional MRI (fMRI) data in uncovering information coding in the brain. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Haptic feedback attenuates illusory bias in pantomime-grasping: evidence for a visuo-haptic calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jillian; Heath, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Relative visual information has been shown to mediate grasping responses directed to an area previously occupied by a target object (i.e., pantomime-grasping) and is an information type functionally distinct from the absolute visual information supporting naturalistic grasping (i.e., grasping a physical target). Pantomime- and naturalistic grasps differ not only in terms of their visual properties, but also because the former lacks physical interaction with a target object (i.e., no-haptic feedback). The absence of haptic feedback may represent a reason why pantomime- and naturalistic grasps differ. To address this issue, participants completed pantomime-grasps to objects embedded in fins-in and fins-out configurations of the Müller-Lyer (ML) illusion following a 2000-ms visual delay when haptic feedback was unavailable (H- condition), and when experimentally induced (H+ condition). In particular, in the H+ condition the experimenter placed a physical target object between participants' thumb and forefinger after they completed their grasping response. H- and H+ conditions were performed when online vision was available (i.e., Experiment 1) and when withdrawn (i.e., Experiment 2). If haptic feedback influences grasping, then the absolute information afforded from physically touching a target object (i.e., the H+ condition) should result in aperture metrics that are refractory-or attenuated-to the relative properties of the ML figures. Grip apertures in H- and H+ conditions were "tricked" in a direction consistent with the perceptual effects of the ML illusion; however, Experiment 2 showed that illusory effects were attenuated in the H+ condition. In other words, responses without online vision showed evidence of a visuo-haptic calibration. These results provide convergent evidence that haptic and visual feedback play a salient role in considering the extant literature's documented report of kinematic differences between pantomime- and naturalistic grasps.

  16. Postural balance in Alzheimer's disease patients undergoing sensory pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunna Berton

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite consensus regarding the interference of cognitive processes on the human balance, the impact that different sensory stimuli have on the stabilometric measures remains unclear. Here, we investigated changes in the postural balance of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD and in healthy controls undergoing different proprioceptive and somesthetic pitfalls. We included 17 subjects submitted to eight sensorimotor dynamics with differences in the support bases, contact surfaces, and visual clues. The measurements used to assess participants balance were as follows: position of the body in space, range of instability, area of the support base, and velocity of postural control. From a total of 56 cross-sectional analyses, 21.42% pointed out differences between groups. Longitudinal analyses showed that tasks with proprioceptive and somesthetic pitfalls similarly impact imbalance in both groups. The current results suggest that AD subjects and healthy controls had different patterns submitted to balance, but suffered similar interference when undergoing proprioceptive and somesthetic challenges.

  17. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a "natural" grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. "Natural" prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object ("haptics-based object information") once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets ("grip scaling") when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF's grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an "unnatural" grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our laboratory in the

  18. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a “natural” grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. “Natural” prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (“haptics-based object information”) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets (“grip scaling”) when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF’s grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an “unnatural” grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our

  19. Noninvasive Electroencephalogram Based Control of a Robotic Arm for Reach and Grasp Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Shuying; Bekyo, Angeliki; Olsoe, Jaron; Baxter, Bryan; He, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies aim to provide a bridge between the human brain and external devices. Prior research using non-invasive BCI to control virtual objects, such as computer cursors and virtual helicopters, and real-world objects, such as wheelchairs and quadcopters, has demonstrated the promise of BCI technologies. However, controlling a robotic arm to complete reach-and-grasp tasks efficiently using non-invasive BCI has yet to be shown. In this study, we found that a group of 13 human subjects could willingly modulate brain activity to control a robotic arm with high accuracy for performing tasks requiring multiple degrees of freedom by combination of two sequential low dimensional controls. Subjects were able to effectively control reaching of the robotic arm through modulation of their brain rhythms within the span of only a few training sessions and maintained the ability to control the robotic arm over multiple months. Our results demonstrate the viability of human operation of prosthetic limbs using non-invasive BCI technology.

  20. Neuronal Correlates of Functional Coupling between Reach- and Grasp-Related Components of Muscle Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geed, Shashwati; McCurdy, Martha L.; van Kan, Peter L. E.

    2017-01-01

    Coordinated reach-to-grasp movements require precise spatiotemporal synchrony between proximal forelimb muscles (shoulder, elbow) that transport the hand toward a target during reach, and distal muscles (wrist, digit) that simultaneously preshape and orient the hand for grasp. The precise mechanisms through which the redundant neuromuscular circuitry coordinates reach with grasp, however, remain unclear. Recently, Geed and Van Kan (2016) demonstrated, using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), that limited numbers of global, template-like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components underlie the complexity and variability of intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) of up to 21 distal and proximal muscles recorded while monkeys performed reach-to-grasp tasks. Importantly, transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components showed invariant spatiotemporal coupling, which provides a potential mechanism for coordinating forelimb muscles during reach-to-grasp movements. In the present study, we tested whether ensemble discharges of forelimb neurons in the cerebellar nucleus interpositus (NI) and its target, the magnocellular red nucleus (RNm), a source of rubrospinal fibers, function as neuronal correlates of the transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components we identified. EFA applied to single-unit discharges of populations of NI and RNm neurons recorded while the same monkeys that were used previously performed the same reach-to-grasp tasks, revealed neuronal components in the ensemble discharges of both NI and RNm neuronal populations with characteristics broadly similar to muscle components. Subsets of NI and RNm neuronal components were strongly and significantly crosscorrelated with subsets of muscle components, suggesting that similar functional units of reach-to-grasp behavior are expressed by NI and RNm neuronal populations and forelimb muscles. Importantly, like transport/preshape- and grasp-related muscle components, their NI and RNm

  1. Determining the optimal size for posture categories used in video-based posture assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Paula M; Weir, Patricia L; Andrews, David M; Fiedler, Krysia M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2009-08-01

    Currently, there are no standards for the development of posture classification systems used in observation-based ergonomic posture assessment methods. This study was conducted to determine if an optimal posture category size for different body segments and posture views could be established by examining the trade-off between magnitude of error and the number of posture category misclassification errors made. Three groups (trunk flexion/extension and lateral bend; shoulder flexion/extension and adduction/abduction; elbow flexion/extension) of 30 participants each selected postures they perceived to correctly represent the video image shown on a computer screen. For each view, 10 images were presented for five different posture category sizes, three times each. The optimal posture category sizes established were 30 degrees for trunk, shoulder and elbow flexion/extension, 30 degrees for shoulder adduction/abduction and 15 degrees for trunk lateral bend, suggesting that posture category size should be based on the body segment and view of the image being assessed. Across all conditions, the posture category sizes were comparable to those used in published ergonomic tools.

  2. Cardiovascular and Postural Control Interactions during Hypergravity: Effects on Cerebral Autoregulation in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Blaber, Andrew; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Avan, Paul; Bruner, Michelle; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance remains a problem upon return to Earth from the microgravity environment of spaceflight. A variety of conditions including hypovolemia, cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebral or peripheral vascular disease, or cardiac arrhythmias may result in syncope if the person remains upright. Current research indicates that there is a greater dependence on visual and somatosensory information at the beginning of space flight with a decreased otolith gain during prolonged space flight (Herault et al., 2002). The goal of the research is to further our understanding of the fundamental adaptive homeostatic mechanisms involved in gravity related changes in cardiovascular and postural function. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and postural sensory motor control systems in male and female participants before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of hyper-G were investigated. Hypotheses: 1) Activation of skeletal muscle pump will be directly related to the degree of orthostatic stress. 2) Simultaneous measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and postural sway will predict cardio-postural stability. Blood pressure and heart rate (means and variability), postural sway, center of pressure (COP), baroreflex function, calf blood flow, middle cerebral artery blood flow, non-invasive intracranial pressure measurements, and two-breath CO2 were measured. Results from the study will be used to provide an integrated insight into mechanisms of cardio-postural control and cerebral autoregulation, which are important aspects of human health in flights to Moon, Mars and distant planets.

  3. A method to model anticipatory postural control in driver braking events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östh, Jonas; Eliasson, Erik; Happee, Riender; Brolin, Karin

    2014-09-01

    Human body models (HBMs) for vehicle occupant simulations have recently been extended with active muscles and postural control strategies. Feedback control has been used to model occupant responses to autonomous braking interventions. However, driver postural responses during driver initiated braking differ greatly from autonomous braking. In the present study, an anticipatory postural response was hypothesized, modelled in a whole-body HBM with feedback controlled muscles, and validated using existing volunteer data. The anticipatory response was modelled as a time dependent change in the reference value for the feedback controllers, which generates correcting moments to counteract the braking deceleration. The results showed that, in 11 m/s(2) driver braking simulations, including the anticipatory postural response reduced the peak forward displacement of the head by 100mm, of the shoulder by 30 mm, while the peak head flexion rotation was reduced by 18°. The HBM kinematic response was within a one standard deviation corridor of corresponding test data from volunteers performing maximum braking. It was concluded that the hypothesized anticipatory responses can be modelled by changing the reference positions of the individual joint feedback controllers that regulate muscle activation levels. The addition of anticipatory postural control muscle activations appears to explain the difference in occupant kinematics between driver and autonomous braking. This method of modelling postural reactions can be applied to the simulation of other driver voluntary actions, such as emergency avoidance by steering.

  4. Geometric morphometrics as a tool for improving the comparative study of behavioural postures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fureix, Carole; Hausberger, Martine; Seneque, Emilie; Morisset, Stéphane; Baylac, Michel; Cornette, Raphaël; Biquand, Véronique; Deleporte, Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Describing postures has always been a central concern when studying behaviour. However, attempts to compare postures objectively at phylogenetical, populational, inter- or intra-individual levels generally either rely upon a few key elements or remain highly subjective. Here, we propose a novel approach, based on well-established geometric morphometrics, to describe and to analyse postures globally (i.e. considering the animal's body posture in its entirety rather than focusing only on a few salient elements, such as head or tail position). Geometric morphometrics is concerned with describing and comparing variation and changes in the form (size and shape) of organisms using the coordinates of a series of homologous landmarks (i.e. positioned in relation to skeletal or muscular cues that are the same for different species for every variety of form and function and that have derived from a common ancestor, i.e. they have a common evolutionary ancestry, e.g. neck, wings, flipper/hand). We applied this approach to horses, using global postures (1) to characterise behaviours that correspond to different arousal levels, (2) to test potential impact of environmental changes on postures. Our application of geometric morphometrics to horse postures showed that this method can be used to characterise behavioural categories, to evaluate the impact of environmental factors (here human actions) and to compare individuals and groups. Beyond its application to horses, this promising approach could be applied to all questions involving the analysis of postures (evolution of displays, expression of emotions, stress and welfare, behavioural repertoires…) and could lead to a whole new line of research.

  5. Functional synergies underlying control of upright posture during changes in head orientation.

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    Eunse Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of human upright posture typically have stressed the need to control ankle and hip joints to achieve postural stability. Recent studies, however, suggest that postural stability involves multi degree-of-freedom (DOF coordination, especially when performing supra-postural tasks. This study investigated kinematic synergies related to control of the body's position in space (two, four and six DOF models and changes in the head's orientation (six DOF model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects either tracked a vertically moving target with a head-mounted laser pointer or fixated a stationary point during 4-min trials. Uncontrolled manifold (UCM analysis was performed across tracking cycles at each point in time to determine the structure of joint configuration variance related to postural stability or tracking consistency. The effect of simulated removal of covariance among joints on that structure was investigated to further determine the role of multijoint coordination. Results indicated that cervical joint motion was poorly coordinated with other joints to stabilize the position of the body center of mass (CM. However, cervical joints were coordinated in a flexible manner with more caudal joints to achieve consistent changes in head orientation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An understanding of multijoint coordination requires reference to the stability/control of important performance variables. The nature of that coordination differs depending on the reference variable. Stability of upright posture primarily involved multijoint coordination of lower extremity and lower trunk joints. Consistent changes in the orientation of the head, however, required flexible coordination of those joints with motion of the cervical spine. A two-segment model of postural control was unable to account for the observed stability of the CM position during the tracking task, further supporting the need to consider multijoint coordination to

  6. The development of infant upright posture: sway less or sway differently?

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    Chen, Li-Chiou; Metcalfe, Jason S; Chang, Tzu-Yun; Jeka, John J; Clark, Jane E

    2008-03-01

    Postural control is an important factor for early motor development; however, compared with adults, little is known about how infants control their unperturbed upright posture. This lack of knowledge, particularly with respect to spatial and temporal characteristics of infants' unperturbed independent standing, represents a significant gap in the understanding of human postural control and its development. Therefore, our first analysis offers a thorough longitudinal characterization of infants' quiet stance through the 9 months following the onset of independent walking. Second, we examined the influence of sensory-mechanical context, light touch contact, on infants' postural control. Nine typically developing infants were tested monthly as they stood on a small pedestal either independently or with the right hand lightly touching a stationary contact surface. In addition to the longitudinal study design, an age-constant sample was analyzed to verify the influence of walking experience in infant postural development without the confounding effect of chronological age. Center of pressure excursions were recorded and characterized by distance-related, velocity, and frequency domain measures. The results indicated that, with increasing experience in the upright, as indexed by walk age, infants' postural sway exhibited shifts in rate-related characteristics toward lower frequency and slower, less variable velocity oscillations without changing the spatial characteristics of sway. Additional touch contact stabilized infants' postural sway as revealed by decrease in sway position variance, amplitude, and area as well as lower frequency and velocity. These results were confirmed by the age-constant analysis. Taken together, our findings suggest that instead of progressively reducing the sway magnitude, infants sway differently with increasing upright experience or with additional somatosensory information. These differences suggest that early development of upright stance

  7. Emotions affect the recognition of hand postures

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    Carmelo Mario Vicario

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The body is closely tied to the processing of social and emotional information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship between emotions and social attitudes conveyed through gestures exists. Thus we tested the effect of pro-social (i.e. happy face and anti-social (i.e. angry face emotional primes on the ability to detect socially relevant handpostures (i.e. pictures depicting an open/closed hand. In particular, participants were required to establish, as quickly as possible, if the test stimulus (i.e. a hand posture was the same or different, compared to the reference stimulus (i.e. a hand posture previously displayed in the computer screen. Results show that facial primes, displayed between the reference and the test stimuli, influence the recognition of hand postures, according to the social attitude implicitly related to the stimulus. We found that perception of pro-social (i.e. happy face primes resulted in slower RTs in detecting the open hand posture as compared to the closed hand posture. Vice-versa, perception of the anti-social (i.e. angry face prime resulted in slower RTs in detecting the closed hand posture compared to the open hand posture. These results suggest that the social attitude implicitly suggested by the displayed stimuli might represent the conceptual link between emotions and gestures.

  8. Mechanisms for the acquisition of habitual bipedality: are there biomechanical reasons for the acquisition of upright bipedal posture?

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    Preuschoft, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Morphology and biomechanics are linked by causal morphogenesis (‘Wolff's law’) and the interplay of mutations and selection (Darwin's ‘survival of the fittest’). Thus shape-based selective pressures can be determined. In both cases we need to know which biomechanical factors lead to skeletal adaptation, and which ones exert selective pressures on body shape. Each bone must be able to sustain the greatest regularly occurring loads. Smaller loads are unlikely to lead to adaptation of morphology. The highest loads occur primarily in posture and locomotion, simply because of the effect of body weight (or its multiple). In the skull, however, it is biting and chewing that result in the greatest loads. Body shape adapted for an arboreal lifestyle also smooths the way towards bipedality. Hindlimb dominance, length of the limbs in relation to the axial skeleton, grasping hands and feet, mass distribution (especially of the limb segments), thoracic shape, rib curvatures, and the position of the centre of gravity are the adaptations to arboreality that also pre-adapt for bipedality. Five divergent locomotor/morphological types have evolved from this base: arm-swinging in gibbons, forelimb-dominated slow climbing in orang-utans, quadrupedalism/climbing in the African apes, an unknown mix of climbing and bipedal walking in australopithecines, and the remarkably endurant bipedal walking of humans. All other apes are also facultative bipeds, but it is the biomechanical characteristics of bipedalism in orang-utans, the most arboreal great ape, which is closest to that in humans. If not evolutionary accident, what selective factor can explain why two forms adopted bipedality? Most authors tend to connect bipedal locomotion with some aspect of progressively increasing distance between trees because of climatic changes. More precise factors, in accordance with biomechanical requirements, include stone-throwing, thermoregulation or wading in shallow water. Once bipedality has

  9. Predicting others' actions via grasp and gaze: evidence for distinct brain networks.

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    Ramsey, Richard; Cross, Emily S; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2012-07-01

    During social interactions, how do we predict what other people are going to do next? One view is that we use our own motor experience to simulate and predict other people's actions. For example, when we see Sally look at a coffee cup or grasp a hammer, our own motor system provides a signal that anticipates her next action. Previous research has typically examined such gaze and grasp-based simulation processes separately, and it is not known whether similar cognitive and brain systems underpin the perception of object-directed gaze and grasp. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine to what extent gaze- and grasp-perception rely on common or distinct brain networks. Using a 'peeping window' protocol, we controlled what an observed actor could see and grasp. The actor could peep through one window to see if an object was present and reach through a different window to grasp the object. However, the actor could not peep and grasp at the same time. We compared gaze and grasp conditions where an object was present with matched conditions where the object was absent. When participants observed another person gaze at an object, left anterior inferior parietal lobule (aIPL) and parietal operculum showed a greater response than when the object was absent. In contrast, when participants observed the actor grasp an object, premotor, posterior parietal, fusiform and middle occipital brain regions showed a greater response than when the object was absent. These results point towards a division in the neural substrates for different types of motor simulation. We suggest that left aIPL and parietal operculum are involved in a predictive process that signals a future hand interaction with an object based on another person's eye gaze, whereas a broader set of brain areas, including parts of the action observation network, are engaged during observation of an ongoing object-directed hand action.

  10. Static Stability Analysis of a Planar Object Grasped by Multifingers with Three Joints

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    Takayoshi Yamada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses static stability of a planar object grasped by multifingers with three joints. Each individual joint (prismatic joint or revolute joint is modeled as a linear spring stiffness. The object mass and the link masses are also included. We consider not only pure rolling contact but also frictionless sliding contact. The grasp stability is investigated using the potential energy method. This paper makes the following contributions: (i Grasp wrench vectors and grasp stiffness matrices are analytically derived not only for the rolling contact but also for the sliding contact; (ii It is shown in detail that the vectors and the matrices are given by functions of grasp parameters such as the contact conditions (rolling contact and sliding contact, the contact position, the contact force, the local curvature, the link shape, the object mass, the link masses, and so on; (iii By using positive definiteness of the difference matrix of the grasp stiffness matrices, it is analytically proved that the rolling contact grasp is more stable than the sliding contact grasp. The displacement direction affected by the contact condition deviation is derived; (iv By using positive definiteness of the differential matrix with respect to the local curvatures, it is analytically proved that the grasp stability increases when the local curvatures decrease. The displacement direction affected by the local curvature deviation is also derived; (v Effects of the object mass and the joint positions are discussed using numerical examples. The numerical results are reinforced by analytical explanations. The effect of the link masses is also investigated.

  11. Depth-cue integration in grasp programming: no evidence for a binocular specialism.

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    Keefe, Bruce D; Hibbard, Paul B; Watt, Simon J

    2011-04-01

    When we grasp with one eye covered, the finger and thumb are typically opened wider than for binocularly guided grasps, as if to build a margin-for-error into the movement. Also, patients with visual form agnosia can have profound deficits in their (otherwise relatively normal) grasping when binocular information is removed. One interpretation of these findings is that there is a functional specialism for binocular vision in the control of grasping. Alternatively, cue-integration theory suggests that binocular and monocular depth cues are combined in the control of grasping, and so impaired performance reflects not the loss of 'critical' binocular cues, but increased uncertainty per se. Unfortunately, removing binocular information confounds removing particular (binocular) depth cues with an overall reduction in the available information, and so such experiments cannot distinguish between these alternatives. We measured the effects on visually open-loop grasping of selectively removing monocular (texture) or binocular depth cues. To allow meaningful comparisons, we made psychophysical measurements of the uncertainty in size estimates in each case, so that the informativeness of binocular and monocular cues was known in each condition. Consistent with cue-integration theory, removing either binocular or monocular cues resulted in similar increases in grip apertures. In a separate experiment, we also confirmed that changes in uncertainty per se (keeping the same depth cues available) resulted in larger grip apertures. Overall, changes in the margin-for-error in grasping movements were determined by the uncertainty in size estimates and not by the presence or absence of particular depth cues. Our data therefore argue against a binocular specialism for grasp programming. Instead, grip apertures were smaller when binocular and monocular cues were available than with either cue alone, providing strong evidence that the visuo-motor system exploits the redundancy available

  12. The grasp2K relativistic atomic structure package

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    Jönsson, P.; He, X.; Froese Fischer, C.; Grant, I. P.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes grasp2K, a general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package. It is a modification and extension of the GRASP92 package by [F.A. Parpia, C. Froese Fischer, I.P. Grant, Comput. Phys. Comm. 94 (1996) 249]. For the sake of continuity, two versions are included. Version 1 retains the GRASP92 formats for wave functions and expansion coefficients, but no longer requires preprocessing and more default options have been introduced. Modifications have eliminated some errors, improved the stability, and simplified interactive use. The transition code has been extended to cases where the initial and final states have different orbital sets. Several utility programs have been added. Whereas Version 1 constructs a single interaction matrix for all the J's and parities, Version 2 treats each J and parity as a separate matrix. This block structure results in a reduction of memory use and considerably shorter eigenvectors. Additional tools have been developed for this format. The CPU intensive parts of Version 2 have been parallelized using MPI. The package includes a "make" facility that relies on environment variables. These make it easier to port the application to different platforms. The present version supports the 32-bit Linux and ibmSP environments where the former is compatible with many Unix systems. Descriptions of the features and the program/data flow of the package will be given in some detail in this report. Program summaryProgram title: grasp2K Catalogue identifier: ADZL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 524 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 328 588 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran and C Computer: Intel

  13. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

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    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement.

  14. The Contribution of Pre-impact Posture on Restrained Occupant Finite Element Model Response in Frontal Impact.

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    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Nie, Bingbing; Donlon, John-Paul; Kent, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of the pre-impact posture to the response of a finite element human body model (HBM) in frontal impacts. This study uses previously published cadaveric tests (PMHS), which measured six realistic pre-impact postures. Seven postured models were created from the THUMS occupant model (v4.0): one matching the standard UMTRI driving posture as it was the target posture in the experiments, and six matching the measured pre-impact postures. The same measurements as those obtained during the cadaveric tests were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation (CORA) were established to compare the response of the seven models to the experiments. The HBM responses showed good agreement with the PMHS responses for the reaction forces (CORA = 0.80 ± 0.05) and the kinematics of the lower part of the torso but only fair correlation was found with the head, the upper spine, rib strains (CORA= 0.50 ± 0.05) and chest deflections (CORA = 0.67 ± 0.08). All models sustained rib fractures, sternal fracture and clavicle fracture. The average number of rib fractures for all the models was 5.3 ± 1.0, lower than in the experiments (10.8 ± 9.0). Variation in pre-impact posture greatly altered the time histories of the reaction forces, deflections and the rib strains, mainly in terms of time delay, but no definite improvement in HBM response or injury prediction was observed. By modifying only the posture of the HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments. The postured HBM sustained from 4 to 8 rib fractures, confirming that the pre-impact posture influenced the injury outcome predicted by the simulation. This study tries to answer an important question: what is the effect of occupant posture on kinematics and kinetics. Significant differences in kinematics observed between HBM and PMHS suggesting more coupling between the pelvis

  15. Optimization of the examination posture in spinal curvature assessment

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    Krejci Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To decrease the influence of postural sway during spinal measurements, an instrumented fixation posture (called G was proposed and tested in comparison with the free standing posture (A using the DTP-3 system in a group of 70 healthy volunteers. The measurement was performed 5 times on each subject and each position was tested by a newly developed device for non-invasive spinal measurements called DTP-3 system. Changes in postural stability of the spinous processes for each subject/the whole group were evaluated by employing standard statistical tools. Posture G, when compared to posture A, reduced postural sway significantly in all spinous processes from C3 to L5 in both the mediolateral and anterioposterior directions. Posture G also significantly reduced postural sway in the vertical direction in 18 out of 22 spinous processes. Importantly, posture G did not significantly influence the spinal curvature.

  16. Optimization of the examination posture in spinal curvature assessment.

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    Krejci, Jakub; Gallo, Jiri; Stepanik, Petr; Salinger, Jiri

    2012-04-30

    To decrease the influence of postural sway during spinal measurements, an instrumented fixation posture (called G) was proposed and tested in comparison with the free standing posture (A) using the DTP-3 system in a group of 70 healthy volunteers. The measurement was performed 5 times on each subject and each position was tested by a newly developed device for non-invasive spinal measurements called DTP-3 system. Changes in postural stability of the spinous processes for each subject/the whole group were evaluated by employing standard statistical tools. Posture G, when compared to posture A, reduced postural sway significantly in all spinous processes from C3 to L5 in both the mediolateral and anterioposterior directions. Posture G also significantly reduced postural sway in the vertical direction in 18 out of 22 spinous processes. Importantly, posture G did not significantly influence the spinal curvature.

  17. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

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    Sidhu, Bharat; Obiechina, Nonyelum; Rattu, Noman; Mitra, Shanta

    2013-09-16

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous group of conditions characterised by autonomic dysfunction and an exaggerated sympathetic response to assuming an upright position. Up till recently, it was largely under-recognised as a clinical entity. There is now consensus about the definition of POTS as a greater than 30/min heart rate increase on standing from a supine position (greater than 40/min increase in 12-19-year-old patients) or an absolute heart rate of greater than 120/min within 10 min of standing from a supine position and in the absence of hypotension, arrhythmias, sympathomimetic drugs or other conditions that cause tachycardia. We present two cases of POTS, followed by a discussion of its pathogenesis, pathophysiology, epidemiology and management.

  18. Reversible postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

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    Abdulla, Aza; Rajeevan, Thirumagal

    2015-07-16

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a relatively rare syndrome recognised since 1940. It is a heterogenous condition with orthostatic intolerance due to dysautonomia and is characterised by rise in heart rate above 30 bpm from base line or to more than 120 bpm within 5-10 min of standing with or without change in blood pressure which returns to base line on resuming supine position. This condition present with various disabling symptoms such as light headedness, near syncope, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, tremor, palpitations and mental clouding, etc. However there are no identifiable signs on clinical examination and patients are often diagnosed to have anxiety disorder. The condition predominantly affects young female between the ages of 15-50 but is rarely described in older people. We describe an older patient who developed POTS which recovered over 12 mo. Recognising this condition is important as there are treatment options available to alleviate the disabling symptoms.

  19. Postural Adaptations To Supra-postural Tasks in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

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    Wade Michael G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of varying memory (cognitive demands, and visual (perceptual demands on postural motion. Sixty four children (32 DCD, 32 TDC, 9-to-10 years were volunteers. Each performed separate memory and visual tasks at two levels of difficulty; easy (LD and hard (HD while recording their postural motion. For the memory task, both groups reduced postural sway in the HD condition. For the visual task only the TDC group reduced postural sway in the HD condition; DCD children did not. The DCD group did not reduce postural motion but, in fact, increased motion. We also found several group  task interactions on sway. Our data suggest a weakening of the action linkage between both cognitive and perceptual tasks in children diagnosed with movement difficulties. The data are discussed in the context of limitations in the embodied relationship between posture and both perceptual and cognitive activity.

  20. Does increased postural threat lead to more conscious control of posture?

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    Huffman, J L; Horslen, B C; Carpenter, M G; Adkin, A L

    2009-11-01

    Although it is well established that postural threat modifies postural control, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for these changes. It is possible that changes in postural control under conditions of elevated postural threat result from a shift to a more conscious control of posture. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of elevated postural threat on conscious control of posture and to determine the relationship between conscious control and postural control measures. Forty-eight healthy young adults stood on a force plate at two different surface heights: ground level (LOW) and 3.2-m above ground level (HIGH). Centre of pressure measures calculated in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction were mean position (AP-MP), root mean square (AP-RMS) and mean power frequency (AP-MPF). A modified state-specific version of the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale was used to measure conscious motor processing (CMP) and movement self-consciousness (MSC). Balance confidence, fear of falling, perceived stability, and perceived and actual anxiety indicators were also collected. A significant effect of postural threat was found for movement reinvestment as participants reported more conscious control and a greater concern about their posture at the HIGH height. Significant correlations between CMP and MSC with AP-MP were observed as participants who consciously controlled and were more concerned for their posture leaned further away from the platform edge. It is possible that changes in movement reinvestment can influence specific aspects of posture (leaning) but other aspects may be immune to these changes (amplitude and frequency).