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Sample records for human geography classes

  1. The Geography of the Beatles Approaching Concepts of Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robert J., II

    2004-01-01

    Human geography can be taught by focusing on popular culture contexts with which undergraduate students may already be familiar such as rock music. The Geography of the Beatles introduced undergraduate students to concepts of "new" cultural geography such as space, place, representation, geopolitics, social space, and tourism-pilgrimage…

  2. Using Cocoa and Chocolate to Teach Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Heike C.

    2010-01-01

    Food topics are uniquely suited to increase students' interest in human geography. A highly processed food like chocolate can be studied in a variety of different ways, making it possible to include chocolate examples and activities at various points in a human geography class. The goals of this article are to provide sufficient background…

  3. Using Cocoa and Chocolate to Teach Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Heike C.

    2010-01-01

    Food topics are uniquely suited to increase students' interest in human geography. A highly processed food like chocolate can be studied in a variety of different ways, making it possible to include chocolate examples and activities at various points in a human geography class. The goals of this article are to provide sufficient background…

  4. Mobile Learning in a Human Geography Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Claire; Tate, Nicholas; Dickie, Jennifer; Brown, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on reusable mobile digital learning resources designed to assist human geography undergraduate students in exploring the geographies of life in Dublin. Developing active learning that goes beyond data collection to encourage observation and thinking in the field is important. Achieving this in the context of large class sizes…

  5. Perspectives on Population in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Max; Keller, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    A study of human geography begins with the human population. In fact, demographic topics frequently relate to other units in the AP Human Geography course. The three main concepts elaborated upon in this article are (1) the demographic transition model, (2) Malthusian theory and its critics, and (3) pronatalist and antinatalist policies that might…

  6. Humanizing the Writing in Cultural Geography Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimore, Ann E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses how cultural geography textbooks can be written to improve the portrayal of people and cultures. Author's criticism is based on a study of cultural and human geography textbooks current in 1976 which revealed a predominance of male images and an abstract style of presentation. (Author/AV)

  7. THE ANALYSIS OF ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE FOURTH CLASS GEOGRAPHY TEXTBOOKS

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    IOANA CHIRCEV

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the analysis of the illustrations found in five different Geography textbooks in Romania. The analysis is based on several criteria: number, size, clarity, pedagogical usefulness. The following conclusions have been drawn: the illustrations are numerous; most of the illustrations are too small and unclear to be efficiently used in the teaching activity; the purpose of some materials is purely illustrative; some illustrations are overcharged with details, which prevent children from understanding them. Authors and publishing houses are advised to choose the illustrations in the fourth class Geography textbooks more carefully.

  8. Politics: critical essays in human geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnew, J.; Mamadouh, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the breadth or narrowness of the understanding of politics and the political, 'politics' in human geography is defined as either the operation of power in all social relations or the workings of power directed to or by the state. This volume avoids the two extremes by acknowledging the

  9. Perspectives on Political Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Jonathan; Smothers-Marcello, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Two trends have remade the field of political geography over the past quarter-century. First, a revision of taken-for-granted concepts that amounted to "spatial determinism." Second, pioneering many new and emerging concepts such as political ecology. Both trends are important contributions to the evolving section of the AP Human…

  10. Perspectives on Cultural Geography in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christopher; Johnston-Anumonwo, Ibipo

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected current concerns in cultural geography and the way it is taught. It includes coverage of cultural convergence and divergence, race and gender as culturally defined topics, and best teaching practices, including those related to analyzing controversial issues. Two important geographical models are laid…

  11. Perspectives on Urban Geography in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton-Short, Lisa; Monk, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    "Perspectives on Urban Geography" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. In this article, urban core revitalization and rising suburban poverty are considered as two challenges facing cities in developed countries; and industrialization and the growth of megacities as two challenges facing cities in developing…

  12. The Nature of Geography and Its Perspectives in AP® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alexander B.; Hare, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    AP Human Geography students need to develop an understanding of what it means to examine the world around them from a geographic perspective. Focusing attention on geography's concern with spatial relationships, place characteristics, and geographic context helps student appreciate the nature of the discipline and the insights it offers. These…

  13. Placing Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Its Role in U.S. Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP HG) in the context of its place in efforts to reform geography education. It presents a critical analysis of the AP program and its curriculum, asserting that it represents "powerful knowledge" as conceptualized by Young. It concludes with a call for research in AP HG aligned…

  14. Human geography in the French Institute: new discipline or missed opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staum, M S

    1987-10-01

    The geography section of the Class of Moral and Political Sciences of the French National Institute, which was in existence from December 1795 to January 1803, responded inadequately to the theoretical challenges of Montesquieu, the hygienists, Volney, and Degérando to study thoroughly native peoples to determine the effects of physical geographic conditions on the body and mind. Most geographers had no interest in human geography, and even statistical geography received only superficial discussion. Despite the emergence of the scientific journal, only a few authors partly transcended the stereotypes of the noble-ignoble savage. The only expedition partly planned by the Institute in this period had an ambitious exploration program that precluded a linguistically sophisticated study of native peoples. Bonaparte's dissolution of the Class hindered further opportunities for studying human geography during the Empire.

  15. METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE IMAGES IN GEOGRAPHY CLASSES: a didactic possibility

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    Diego Correia Maia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The satellite images are still largely unexplored as didactic resource in geography classes, particularly about meteorology. This article aims to contribute to the development of new methodologies of interpretation and understanding, beyond the construction of pedagogical practices involving meteorological satellite images, concepts and issues related to climate issues. The aim of this paper is to present possibilities for the use of meteorological satellite images in the Teaching of Geography, aiming the promoting and the understanding of contents of air masses and fronts and climatic factors. RESUMO: As imagens de satélite ainda são pouco exploradas como recurso didático nas aulas de Geografia, principalmente aquelas relativas à meteorologia. Este artigo visa contribuir com o desenvolvimento de novas metodologias de interpretação e compreensão, além da construção de práticas pedagógicas envolvendo imagens de satélite meteorológico, conceitos e temas ligados às questões climáticas. Seu objetivo é apresentar possibilidades de utilização das imagens de satélite meteorológico no Ensino de Geografia, visando à promoção e ao entendimento dos conteúdos de massas de ar e frentes e de elementos climáticos. Palavras chave

  16. TEACHING AND ASSESSING SKILLS IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY IN A BILINGUAL CLASS

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    FLORINA PĂUNESCU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents my experience in bilingual teaching, an integrated programme for geography and English language learning for upper secondary students. General geographical aspects are connected to the geography of Great Britain and that of the USA, with an attitude of raising students’ awareness on environmental issues. The topics are a framework for the development of (environmental geography-related knowledge and skills, cognitive skills and language aspects. Therefore, the paper presents various methods of teaching and assessing environmental issues in four distinct structured texts, which combine typical geographical skills (like completing a sketch or a mind map with methods used in English classes (like true/false questions. A special accent is on both the use of specific environmental vocabulary – synonyms, false friends, also anticipated grammar mistakes – as well as on discussions in class, based on cause-effect relationships between processes and phenomena.

  17. Human Geography Trains Diverse Perspectives on Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Education for equity in global development and cultural diversity calls for professional capacity building to perceive diverse perspectives on complex procedures of globalisation. The discipline of human geography is such a "provider of perspectives". The purpose of this paper is to propose a historic series of how theories of geography…

  18. Human Geography Trains Diverse Perspectives on Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Education for equity in global development and cultural diversity calls for professional capacity building to perceive diverse perspectives on complex procedures of globalisation. The discipline of human geography is such a "provider of perspectives". The purpose of this paper is to propose a historic series of how theories of geography…

  19. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

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    Charlotte González-Abraham

    Full Text Available Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  20. The human footprint in Mexico: physical geography and historical legacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abraham, Charlotte; Ezcurra, Exequiel; Garcillán, Pedro P; Ortega-Rubio, Alfredo; Kolb, Melanie; Bezaury Creel, Juan E

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data on land use and transportation corridors we calculated the human footprint index for the whole of Mexico to identify large-scale spatial patterns in the anthropogenic transformation of the land surface. We developed a map of the human footprint for the whole country and identified the ecological regions that have most transformed by human action. Additionally, we analyzed the extent to which (a) physical geography, expressed spatially in the form of biomes and ecoregions, compared to (b) historical geography, expressed as the spatial distribution of past human settlements, have driven the patterns of human modification of the land. Overall Mexico still has 56% of its land surface with low impact from human activities, but these areas are not evenly distributed. The lowest values are on the arid north and northwest, and the tropical southeast, while the highest values run along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and from there inland along an east-to-west corridor that follows the Mexican transversal volcanic ranges and the associated upland plateau. The distribution of low- and high footprint areas within ecoregions forms a complex mosaic: the generally well-conserved Mexican deserts have some highly transformed agro-industrial areas, while many well-conserved, low footprint areas still persist in the highly-transformed ecoregions of central Mexico. We conclude that the spatial spread of the human footprint in Mexico is both the result of the limitations imposed by physical geography to human development at the biome level, and, within different biomes, of a complex history of past civilizations and technologies, including the 20th Century demographic explosion but also the spatial pattern of ancient settlements that were occupied by the Spanish Colony.

  1. What Can Human Geography Offer Climate Change Modelling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of Geography may be one of the most prominent and oldest disciplines in the conceptualization of human–environment interactions that integrates elements from both natural and social sciences. Yet, much research on society–environment interactions on climate change reduces human...... conceptual modelling of climate change adaption and mitigation. In other words, geographical representations do matter. In the following we will first reflect upon what I shall call spatio-temporal tides and waves of the human environment theme to examine the methodological grounds on which climate change...

  2. The role of geography in human adaptation.

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    Graham Coop

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Various observations argue for a role of adaptation in recent human evolution, including results from genome-wide studies and analyses of selection signals at candidate genes. Here, we use genome-wide SNP data from the HapMap and CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel samples to study the geographic distributions of putatively selected alleles at a range of geographic scales. We find that the average allele frequency divergence is highly predictive of the most extreme F(ST values across the whole genome. On a broad scale, the geographic distribution of putatively selected alleles almost invariably conforms to population clusters identified using randomly chosen genetic markers. Given this structure, there are surprisingly few fixed or nearly fixed differences between human populations. Among the nearly fixed differences that do exist, nearly all are due to fixation events that occurred outside of Africa, and most appear in East Asia. These patterns suggest that selection is often weak enough that neutral processes -- especially population history, migration, and drift -- exert powerful influences over the fate and geographic distribution of selected alleles.

  3. The role of geography in human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Graham; Pickrell, Joseph K; Novembre, John; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Li, Jun; Absher, Devin; Myers, Richard M; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi Luca; Feldman, Marcus W; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-06-01

    Various observations argue for a role of adaptation in recent human evolution, including results from genome-wide studies and analyses of selection signals at candidate genes. Here, we use genome-wide SNP data from the HapMap and CEPH-Human Genome Diversity Panel samples to study the geographic distributions of putatively selected alleles at a range of geographic scales. We find that the average allele frequency divergence is highly predictive of the most extreme F(ST) values across the whole genome. On a broad scale, the geographic distribution of putatively selected alleles almost invariably conforms to population clusters identified using randomly chosen genetic markers. Given this structure, there are surprisingly few fixed or nearly fixed differences between human populations. Among the nearly fixed differences that do exist, nearly all are due to fixation events that occurred outside of Africa, and most appear in East Asia. These patterns suggest that selection is often weak enough that neutral processes -- especially population history, migration, and drift -- exert powerful influences over the fate and geographic distribution of selected alleles.

  4. Progress in the human geography of the Maghreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, K; Lawless, R I

    1987-03-01

    Sutton and Lawless review a selection of the prolific literature on the Maghreb's human geography published from the late 1970s onward. The pedigree of the discipline in Maghreb was established by several notable geographers who lived, researched, and wrote there. Augustin Bernard's writings on rural settlement, his atlas, and study of Algeria are still cited. Jean Despois's regional study with Raynal and his work on Tunisia, together with the detailed rural research of Jean Poncet, provides a particularly rich coverage for that country. Jean Dresch's early work on Morocco exemplified an early critique of the contemporaneous uncritical colonial human geography. The Sahara's fascination also inspired pioneering studies by Robert Capot-Rey. The work of these notables and others provided a solid background of geographical literature on the Maghreb to be supplemented, criticized, and challenged by more recent researchers, sometimes pupils of the above individuals, and increasingly North African by birth. The tradition of general texts on the Maghreb has continued, though increasingly with systematic approaches replacing regional appraisals. The geography of the decolonization of the Maghreb by Isnard has been replaced by a study summarizing recent collaborative work by a team of French geographers. The Saharan extensions of the Maghreb states have often been linked in general works, sometimes being juxtaposed against the Maghreb as in the essays offered to Jean Despois. Lawless and Findlay's collaborative study juxtaposes geographical studies of each country's economic development with political scientists' evaluations of their sociopolitical development. This review limits itself largely to geographers and geographical journals, only occasionally including significant works from other subject areas, and to 1977-1978 publications, with a few notable exceptions. The spatial juxtaposition of contrasting approaches to economic development, liberal market economy

  5. A Critical Approach to Discipline of Human Geography as an Apparatus for State Hegemony in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Nurettin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the hegemony of political power on the discipline of human geography in Turkey. Throughout the history of the country, human geography curricula have been aligned with the nationalist and hegemonic power politics of state authorities instead of being guided by universal norms, thus ignoring Turkey's sociopolitical and cultural…

  6. A Critical Approach to Discipline of Human Geography as an Apparatus for State Hegemony in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Nurettin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the hegemony of political power on the discipline of human geography in Turkey. Throughout the history of the country, human geography curricula have been aligned with the nationalist and hegemonic power politics of state authorities instead of being guided by universal norms, thus ignoring Turkey's sociopolitical and cultural…

  7. Advanced Placement® Human Geography: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanegran, David A.; Zeigler, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, AP Human Geography has grown in numbers and spread to almost every state. This article synopsizes the early history of the subject, summarizes the course and the exam, highlights positive impacts on the discipline of geography, and focuses on the following three issues: teachers who come to the course having majored in…

  8. Perspectives on the Development and Future of Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrant, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography faced a number of hurdles that nearly derailed the course before it launched in 2000-2001. A dedicated cadre of geography professionals and high school teachers rose to the challenge and the course remains one of the fastest growing AP courses currently offered by College Board. Seventeen readers and leaders…

  9. Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use in Advanced Placement® Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, William G.; Watson, Nancy H.

    2016-01-01

    ''Agriculture, Food, and Rural Land Use" constitutes a major part of the AP Human Geography course outline. This article explores challenging topics to teach, emerging research trends in agricultural geography, and sample teaching approaches for concretizing abstract topics. It addresses content identified as "essential knowledge"…

  10. Developing Fieldwork in Social and Cultural Geography: Illustrations from a Residential Field Class in Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jon

    1999-01-01

    Argues that fieldwork develops student understanding of various concerns in social and cultural geography. Recommends using a new approach that focuses on the role of fieldwork in the research process and illustrates this approach by describing an account of a residential field class to Los Angeles (California) and Las Vegas (Nevada). (CMK)

  11. Seeing the Forest of Information for the Trees of Papers: An Information Literacy Case Study in a Geography/Geology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Linda; Warner, Tim

    2011-01-01

    After receiving a mini-grant for developing integrated information literacy programs, a Geography/Geology Department faculty member worked with the Science Librarian to embed information literacy in a cross-listed geology and geography course, Geog/Geol 455, Introduction to Remote Sensing. Planning for the revisions to the class started with…

  12. Seeing the Forest of Information for the Trees of Papers: An Information Literacy Case Study in a Geography/Geology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Linda; Warner, Tim

    2011-01-01

    After receiving a mini-grant for developing integrated information literacy programs, a Geography/Geology Department faculty member worked with the Science Librarian to embed information literacy in a cross-listed geology and geography course, Geog/Geol 455, Introduction to Remote Sensing. Planning for the revisions to the class started with…

  13. Using Web-Based GIS in Introductory Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songer, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Advocates for using a geographic information system (GIS) in education assert that GIS improves student learning. However, studies to clarify the relationship between learning and using GIS are still needed. This study examines the effects of using Web-based GIS maps in place of paper maps on students' geography content knowledge and motivation…

  14. Field-based, research-focused experiential learning in undergraduate geoscience and physical geography classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A. J.; Ackerman, A.; Flynn, M.; Mclain, J.; Moller, C.; Clements, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    Field-based experiential learning in undergraduate courses in geosciences or physical geography is essential for cementing theoretical understanding through observation, illustrating the complexity of natural systems, understanding uncertainty in observational records and providing students with tools to teach themselves beyond the instructor and the classroom. In addition, it helps stimulate interest in pursuing graduate studies and associated research in many important bio-geophysical topics. There is a real challenge to provide this type of learning opportunity to large numbers of students and to students currently under-represented in the geosciences. The learning experience in this case was focused around experimental deployment of a sophisticated atmospheric profiling system over a weekend field trip involving 50 students from three classes in two campuses; San Francisco State University and San Jose State University. Students were involved in experimental design, instrument calibration and field deployment, manual measurements and data analysis phases of field-based experimental research. The results of student work is presented as well as specific student responses to the field experience that highlight the pedagogical values provided as well as challenges to improve the learning opportunity.

  15. GeoHumanities, GIScience and Smart City Lifeworld approaches to geography and the new human condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Charles

    2017-09-01

    The New Human Condition (NHC) is perhaps the largest cognitive challenge in history to human intelligence and agency and concerns our species' ability to cope with the consequences and responsibilities of being the major driver of planetary change in the twenty-first century (Pálsson et al., 2013; Holm et al., 2015). But despite long held assumptions about intra-disciplinary engagements between its "human" and "physical" branches, geography's weakness as a discipline is that it has yet to gather sufficient momentum to collectively shape and implement practical and sustainable climate change policies and actions (Castree, 2014a). However, by considering together the heuristic values of the concepts of the Anthropocene and Planetary Boundaries, the Anglo-American sphere of geography recognizes in either ironic, or unconscious manners that a new strand of environmental determinism (discredited by geographical thought and practice in the early twentieth century) has re-emerged to elide the role of human agency and broadly dominate the discussion of climate change. Mike Hulme (2011, 247) states that "climate determinism" is "a form of analysis and prediction in which climate is first extracted from the matrix of interdependencies that shape human life within the physical world". Within this discourse it is often the biophysical sphere that is employed to explain the course of human behavior; consequently, this dominating perspective threatens to skew our predictions and understandings of future societies, cultures, climates and destinies. Climate change will certainly constrain human agency, but it also creates the potential for geography to play to its intra and inter disciplinary strengths and begin discussing and addressing human-environmental dilemmas in practical and realistic ways; and secondly, seize the climate change crisis as an opportunity to study where, why and for whom global environmental change matters. Firstly, this paper considers a theoretical

  16. LANDSCAPE, PLACE AND REGION: THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR ONE HUMAN GEOGRAPHY OF LIVED SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Serpa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It intends to discuss the different theoretical and methodological perspectives for human Geography starting from the work with landscape, place and region concepts pointing to the constitution/consolidation of one human Geography of lived spaces. There will be presented, so preliminary, the different approaches for the concepts of landscape, place and region in human Geography with the priority of the discussion about the possibility of the work with these concepts on also dialectic and phenomenological bases. Landscape, place and region will be presented as epistemological and methodological ways for a geographical approach focused on spatial practices, on spaces of representation and on the representations of space (LEFEBVRE, 2000, what points for the importance of space representations as intrinsic element of space production processes in contemporarily times. It will also search to present the bases of a human Geography of lived spaces presenting it as a cognitive Geography of social and spatial representations that contemplates the complex structures of society representation connecting this discussion with the work with the presented concepts (landscape, place and region.

  17. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  18. Reframing Photographic Research Methods in Human Geography: A Long-Term Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a long-term reflection on the introduction of a photographic research project into a third-year undergraduate Human Geography module. The findings indicate that, whilst the students valued the project, it did impact on their overall performance, their evaluation of the module and the ways in which they spoke about it. The paper…

  19. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  20. Reframing Photographic Research Methods in Human Geography: A Long-Term Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a long-term reflection on the introduction of a photographic research project into a third-year undergraduate Human Geography module. The findings indicate that, whilst the students valued the project, it did impact on their overall performance, their evaluation of the module and the ways in which they spoke about it. The paper…

  1. Teaching across the Divide: Physical and Human Geographies of Hurricane Katrina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveson, Kurt; Neave, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This article critically reflects on our effort to "teach across the divide", by integrating physical and human geography in a new first-year course. We achieved this integration by structuring our course around a series of key events, in order to draw out the interaction of "natural" and "social" forces. After setting…

  2. From The Human-Environment Theme Towards Sustainability – Danish Geography and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2013-01-01

    Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions. In this ar......Research on geography in relation to education for sustainable development (ESD), has only recently climbed the research agenda. The geopolitics of intended learning outcomes in the ESD debate, carries policy that produce dilemmas and challenges confronted with disciplinary traditions...... and climate change and how geographers articulate their role and function as knowledge on human-environment interactions changes. The analysis of the geographical education reveal that geographers’ find their discipline contribute considerably to ESD, and thus the human environment theme seems...

  3. Remapping Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan M.; Norwine, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Little that occurs in contemporary academic geography will surprise members of the National Association of Scholars, for a large part of the field has joined the other humanities and social sciences in the bawdy saloon of progressive politics, cultural nihilism, and subjective epistemology. That geographers are in there roistering with the…

  4. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  5. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  6. A quantitative comparison of the similarity between genes and geography in worldwide human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaolong; Zöllner, Sebastian; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2012-08-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) have been widely used to summarize the structure of human genetic variation, often in easily visualized two-dimensional maps. Many recent studies have reported similarity between geographic maps of population locations and MDS or PCA maps of genetic variation inferred from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, this similarity has been evident primarily in a qualitative sense; and, because different multivariate techniques and marker sets have been used in different studies, it has not been possible to formally compare genetic variation datasets in terms of their levels of similarity with geography. In this study, using genome-wide SNP data from 128 populations worldwide, we perform a systematic analysis to quantitatively evaluate the similarity of genes and geography in different geographic regions. For each of a series of regions, we apply a Procrustes analysis approach to find an optimal transformation that maximizes the similarity between PCA maps of genetic variation and geographic maps of population locations. We consider examples in Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, East Asia, and Central/South Asia, as well as in a worldwide sample, finding that significant similarity between genes and geography exists in general at different geographic levels. The similarity is highest in our examples for Asia and, once highly distinctive populations have been removed, Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results provide a quantitative assessment of the geographic structure of human genetic variation worldwide, supporting the view that geography plays a strong role in giving rise to human population structure.

  7. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut microbial communities represent one source of human genetic and metabolic diversity. To examine how gut microbiomes differ among human populations, we characterized bacterial species in fecal samples from 531 individuals, plus the gene content of 110 of them. The cohort encompassed healthy child...

  8. An Analytical Research on the Permanence of Knowledge and the Factors Affecting Success in the Cyprus Geography Classes in Middle Schools of Cyprus Turkish Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akengin, Hamza

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the permanence of knowledge in the Cyprus Geography classes in middle schools of Cyprus' Turkish Society in quality and quantity and to analyse the factors, which are influential in the permanence of this knowledge. In order to be able to understand the problems that the residents of Cyprus' Turkish Society…

  9. World Cultural Geography without Maps, How Can We Find Our Way? An Assessment of Implementing Map Use in Senior High School World Cultural Geography Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This article is designed to illustrate the critical importance of utilizing cartographic representations, i.e., maps in aiding in the increase of academic scores in regards to World Geography at the 10th grade level. The issue of using maps to better a student's comprehension of various world cultures is essential. It is my contention that the…

  10. Cultural Geography and Videogames

    OpenAIRE

    Ash, James; Gallacher, Lesley Anne

    2011-01-01

    While videogames have been a popular form of entertainment practice for a number of decades, it is only recently that they have been paid much attention by academics. Although there is a burgeoning body of scholarship that deals with videogames in new media and games studies, human geography is only just beginning to offer its own take on the medium and the practices associated with it. This essay outlines ways in which scholars (both within geography and beyond) have traced out the geographi...

  11. Geographies of Production II: Political Economic Geographies: A pluralist direction?

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A

    2016-01-01

    Within economic geography, it has been argued that political economy approaches have diminished in both prevalence and influence to the detriment of both the sub-discipline and to human geography as a whole. This report challenges such a perspective, arguing that political economic geographies remains very much vibrant and engaging in contemporary economic geography and in the way in which economic geographers engages with the nature of the contemporary global economy. It argues that the perc...

  12. Teaching Feminist Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Linda; Bowlby, Sophia

    1983-01-01

    Adopting a feminist perspective on geography should lead to changes in the content and organization of undergraduate courses and teaching methods, particularly in assessing the role of gender relations in human geography and in challenging the male-dominated world of academic research and teaching where women have remained largely invisible.…

  13. A Lesson Plan for Advanced Placement Human Geography®: A Site Location Exercise for New Businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleski, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The lesson described in this article meets several needs for Advanced Placement Human Geography (APHG®) teachers. In the interest of preserving time in the classroom, this lesson is intended to be a capstone assignment, allowing students to synthesize several concepts of the APHG® curriculum, such as demography, economic development, and cultural…

  14. Physical geography and the study of human vulnerability due to natural and other hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Natek

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical geography in Slovenia has achieved a significant level of knowledge on natural and other hazards, after studying these phenomena since 1950s. These extremely complex features are clearly showing the interconnections between the nature and man and the increasing vulnerability of modern societies. The article is based on geographical approach to hazards, which does not consider them as casual events, but as constituent parts of the environment, including very different ways of human adaptation. The rapid development of science and technology have even increased our vulnerability and direct exposure to hazards, what is considered as new challenge to physical geographers in looking for new approaches to increase the possibilities of sustainable 'co-existence' with natural and other hazards.

  15. Crop domestication, global human-mediated migration, and the unresolved role of geography in pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda H. Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ecological pest management seeks to improve pest control through the manipulation of ecological processes that promote natural enemies and suppress pests. These approaches can involve cultural practices such as reduced tillage, increased use of non-crop plants that provide food and shelter for natural enemies, and intercropping to enhance the abundance and diversity of natural enemies. A major assumption of ecological pest management is that these activities can be equally effective for all insect herbivores. Here, I propose that these strategies may only be effective for a subset of pests and geographic regions because most insect pests have complex evolutionary histories that make them difficult to manage. I discuss how crop domestication and human-mediated migration are major evolutionary events that shape the geography of interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. Insect herbivores can evolve to be pests through three major modes: 1 herbivores associated with the crop wild ancestor may shift onto the domesticated crop, 2 herbivores may host-shift from native host plants onto an introduced crop, or 3 human-mediated migration can introduce insect pests into new cropping regions. The resulting geographic structure can influence the success of pest management by altering ecological factors such as: species distributions, patterns of biodiversity, community structure, and natural enemy attack rates. I discuss how the different modes of insect pest evolution structure a set of relevant questions and approaches for ecological pest management. By acknowledging how agricultural history and geography shape the ecology and evolution of insect pests, we may collectively develop a better capacity to identify where and how ecological pest management approaches can be most broadly effective.

  16. Analysis of the Possibilities for Discussing Questions of Global Justice in Geography Classes on the Use of Methods of Empirical Social Research When Analyzing the Teaching of Geography in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applis, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This study examines students' orientations with regard to questions on the implementation of justice in production structures of the global textile industry. The students worked with the Mystery Method from the Thinking Through Geography approach by David Leat and with Lawrence Kohlberg's Method of Dilemma Discussion. During this process, the…

  17. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod K; Paul, Sandip; Dutta, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats-Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT). The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution-a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota-the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome-nature or nurture, host genetics or his environment. Some of

  18. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats—Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT. The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution—a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota—the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome—nature or nurture, host genetics

  19. Geography, Ethnicity or Subsistence-Specific Variations in Human Microbiome Composition and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinod K.; Paul, Sandip; Dutta, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    One of the fundamental issues in the microbiome research is characterization of the healthy human microbiota. Recent studies have elucidated substantial divergences in the microbiome structure between healthy individuals from different race and ethnicity. This review provides a comprehensive account of such geography, ethnicity or life-style-specific variations in healthy microbiome at five major body habitats—Gut, Oral-cavity, Respiratory Tract, Skin, and Urogenital Tract (UGT). The review focuses on the general trend in the human microbiome evolution—a gradual transition in the gross compositional structure along with a continual decrease in diversity of the microbiome, especially of the gut microbiome, as the human populations passed through three stages of subsistence like foraging, rural farming and industrialized urban western life. In general, gut microbiome of the hunter-gatherer populations is highly abundant with Prevotella, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Clostridiales, Ruminobacter etc., while those of the urban communities are often enriched in Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, and Firmicutes. The oral and skin microbiome are the next most diverse among different populations, while respiratory tract and UGT microbiome show lesser variations. Higher microbiome diversity is observed for oral-cavity in hunter-gatherer group with higher prevalence of Haemophilus than agricultural group. In case of skin microbiome, rural and urban Chinese populations show variation in abundance of Trabulsiella and Propionibacterium. On the basis of published data, we have characterized the core microbiota—the set of genera commonly found in all populations, irrespective of their geographic locations, ethnicity or mode of subsistence. We have also identified the major factors responsible for geography-based alterations in microbiota; though it is not yet clear which factor plays a dominant role in shaping the microbiome—nature or nurture, host genetics or his environment

  20. Interactive-GIS-Tutor (IGIST) Integration: Creating a Digital Space Gateway within a Textbook-Bound South African Geography Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, E. M-L.; van der Westhuizen, C. P.; Cilliers, D.

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is a global drive among political and educational institutions to implement geographic information system (GIS) practice in secondary schools. However, Geography teachers worldwide, including in South Africa, face significant practical challenges in this regard. Lack of curriculum aligned GIS resources, funds and teacher GIS…

  1. Effects of an Introductory Geography Course on Student Perceptions of Geography at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlick, Forrest J.; Kolden, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography courses…

  2. Lived spaces in history: a study in human geography in the context of Sangam texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K N

    2010-01-01

    There has been considerable research work on early South India, particularly early Tamilakam, using archaeological, epigraphical and literary sources. Earlier, studies on early Tamilakam was almost exclusively based on the early Tamil texts, called as heroic or bardic poetry. However, a wealth of material has been generated by archaeological exploration, that have unearthed a mass of material from paleolithic, mesolithic, neolithic and the iron age megalithic, bordering on the early historic ages. A number of Tamil Brahmi label inscriptions have also been discovered. However, the largest number of archaeological finds have been megalithic burial sites and habitation sites are only in the process of being discovered. There are also difficulties in corroborating archaeological and epigraphic material with the enormous corpus of early Tamil texts. As a result, there is a tendency to dismiss the early Tamil texts as not conducive to historical analysis. The present article argues that we will still be able to use the material of the early Tamil texts using the tools provided by human geography, and suggests a methodology for making use of the literary material for further explorations in the early history of Tamilakam.

  3. The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesler, Wilbert M.

    1987-01-01

    This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

  4. Geography in High School in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohe; Bradbury, Ian K.

    1993-01-01

    Maintains that geography occupies a prominent position in the Chinese secondary curriculum. Describes the current course content, which includes both physical and human geography. Concludes by discussing barriers to further development, including lack of qualified staff and poor textbooks. (CFR)

  5. Geography in Higher Education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Fen; Tang, Jianzhong

    1982-01-01

    Chinese geography expanded rapidly after liberation in 1949. Since 1976 there has been a vigorous effort to improve geographical teaching and research. The major problems being tackled include the separation of physical and human geography, the neglect of human geography, a lack of breadth in geographical training, and the low status of geography…

  6. How Are Non-Geography Majors Motivated in a Large Introductory World Geography Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Won; Huynh, Niem Tu

    2015-01-01

    University students who do not declare geography as their major are at risk of poor motivation to learn in an introductory geography class. However, research exploring the role of non-majors' motivation is lacking. This study examines motivational factors impacting non-geography students' engagement and performance. The findings suggest that…

  7. Double-Play: Using Minor League Baseball to Apply Themes and Standards in Human Geography Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Growing student interest in sports provides geography teachers with a special opportunity to make connections between it and fundamental concepts in the discipline. This article examines the structure, arrangement, relationships, and distinctions among minor league baseball franchise locations, stadia, and team names, and presents examples of…

  8. Quantification of phospholipids classes in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Flück, Brigitte; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Thakkar, Sagar K; Destaillats, Frédéric; Braun, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    Phospholipids are integral constituents of the milk fat globule membranes and they play a central role in infants' immune and inflammatory responses. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detector has been optimized and validated to quantify the major phospholipids classes in human milk. Phospholipids were extracted using chloroform and methanol and separated on C18 column. Repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, and recovery values were calculated and a large sample set of human milk analyzed. In human milk, phospholipid classes were quantified at concentrations of 0.6 mg/100 g for phosphatidylinositol; 4.2 mg/100 g for phosphatidylethanolamine, 0.4 mg/100 g for phosphatidylserine, 2.8 mg/100 g for phosphatidylcholine, and 4.6 mg/100 g for sphingomyelin. Their relative standard deviation of repeatability and intermediate reproducibility values ranging between 0.8 and 13.4 % and between 2.4 and 25.7 %, respectively. The recovery values ranged between 67 and 112 %. Finally, the validated method was used to quantify phospholipid classes in human milk collected from 50 volunteers 4 weeks postpartum providing absolute content of these lipids in a relatively large cohort. The average content of total phospholipids was 23.8 mg/100 g that corresponds to an estimated mean intake of 140 mg phospholipids/day in a 4-week old infant when exclusively breast-fed.

  9. Effects of an Introductory Geography Course on Student Perceptions of Geography at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlick, Forrest J.; Kolden, Crystal A.

    2013-01-01

    This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography…

  10. 如何构建和谐高效的地理课堂%On How to Construct Harmonious and Efficient Geogra-phy Classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚艳红

    2014-01-01

    本文主旨在于探究和谐高效地理课堂的构建,为使课堂教学处于“高效、和谐、民主、平等、愉快”的教学气氛之中的几种途径。本文通过总结和反思自己教学的经历和经验,从四个方面进行阐述院爱是前提;幽默是催化剂;有效提问是动力;激励性评价是手段。%The aim of this paper is to explore the construction of harmonious and efficient geography classes, as well as several approaches of making classroom teaching in an "efficient, har-mo-nious,democratic,equal and happy" teaching atmosphere. Through concluding and reflecting the writer's own teaching ex-periences, this paper elaborated from four aspects: love is the premise;humor is the activator;effective questioning is the moti-vation;incentive and evaluation is the means.

  11. Teaching Development Geography: Observations from the Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellings, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Approaches to teaching the dynamics of development at South Africa's National University of Lesotho are criticized. Teaching development geography, which focuses on articulation and class formation and which rejects the spatial approach, is detrimental to the geography department. The objective should be to provide technical skills unavailable…

  12. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  13. Application of Psychology in the History of Human Geography Teaching%心理学在历史人文地理教学中的应用探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚红

    2012-01-01

    历史人文地理学主要研究历史时期人文地理现象分布、演变及其发展规律,具有较强的学科交叉性,其成熟发展必须注重吸收和借鉴相关学科的研究方法和研究手段。本文通过心理学在历史人文地理教学中的民族地理、社会地理两大领域的应用,尝试探析心理学研究方法在研究和教授历史人文地理学中是一种有效手段。%The historical anthropogeography mainly studies on historical period of human geography phenomenon distribution,evolution and the law of development has a strong interdisciplinary the mature development must pay attention to absorb and learn from related disciplines of research methods and research tools.In this paper,the application of psychology in the history of human geography teaching in the two major areas of the national geography,social geography,try the exploration psychology research method is an effective tool in the study and professor of history anthropogeography.

  14. 地图制图学在人文地理学中的应用及不足%Cartography inHuman Geography and Deficiencies in the Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜斌; 张谦舵; 郭映泽

    2014-01-01

    National Natural Science Foundation and the National Social Science Fund project , thematic maps , I get some experiences , combined with the analysis of the development of human geography in recent years , combined with the development of modern cartog-raphy, as well as modern cartography in the humanities geography in the application , said:cartography in geography application defi-ciencies.Cartography and Geography for the better development of science provide a theoretical basis .%参与国家自然科学基金项目和国家社会科学基金项目,在绘制专题图时,得到了些心得体会,结合分析近些年人文地理学的发展,并结合现代制图学的发展,以及现代制图学在人文地理学中的应用,指出地图制图学在人文地理应用中的不足。为地图制图学和人文地理学更好的发展提供理论依据。

  15. Geography Teachers' Concepts of Working with Thinking through Geography Strategies--Results of an Empirical Reconstructive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applis, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The educational standards in geography in the German-speaking world separately refer to the areas of competence of judgment and evaluation and thus attach outstanding importance to reflective value orientation in geography classes. The tasks and challenges that arise from that for geography teachers will be investigated in a…

  16. The diversification of research approaches in human geography in Chinese Mainland%我国人文地理学研究方法多样化问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤茂林

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with the problems facing the Chinese geographical academia from a re-view paper on the issues of the progress and retrospect in geography in Chinese mainland,the paper reviews the related research results, and guides the readers to the methodologi-cal issues of human geography research. Through the retrospect of the development of hu-man geography approaches and philosophies in the Anglophone world, the author comes to a conclusion that the research paradigm and methodology has been diversified since the 1970s. Through the period from the 1970s to the present, geography was in a state of tur-moil. Although Chinese human geographers need not dance to the pipe of the Anglophone counterparts, the diversification of approaches in the Anglophone world can be used as a reference point. Just because of the realization of the limitations of positivist paradigm and reaction,structurism (including Marxism), humanism, feminism, and post-modernism (including poststructurism) appeared and exerted much effect on the research methodologies and par-adigms of human geography in Anglophone world. During this course of methodological diversification, geography lost its traditional core but now has a strong periphery.China, as a giant transitional developing country, has a complex geographical pattern of human activities. This complexity is attributed not only to its long history and giant in-ternal inequality, physically and economically, but also to the market-based social and eco-nomic reforms. The result is that the postmodern issue parallels the modern problem.This situation gives Chinese human geographers an unprecedented opportunity. The relat-ed researches by Chinese human geographers are dominated by empiricism, particularly positivism, and the attention that the researchers paid to the human aspects is not enough.So it is badly needed to diversify the research methodology and approach in order to deepen the researches. The paper discusses the necessity, and gives

  17. Philosophy and science in geography, XVI-XXI centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Capel

    2016-03-01

    Without losing the critical contributions that the discipline had in the last half century, and the ones that they have been made in various branches of human geography, from the historical to cultural geography.

  18. Teaching the Six Essential Elements of Geography with Quality Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author describes how she teaches third and sixth grade classes about the six essential elements of geography at the beginning of each school year. The six elements organize the eighteen national standards and include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and…

  19. Effect of the blended learning environment and the application of virtual class upon the achievement and the attitude against the geography course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Dikmenli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study involves the elucidation of the effect of the virtual classroom application and blended learning medium upon the academic achievement of the students and their attitudes against the geography curse compared to the face to face expository (traditional method. The study was carried out according to pre-test - post-test experimental design with control group. The group was constituted by 73, 9th year students. The experimental groups have been subjected to the blended learning approach throughout the study. The topic was also given to the first experimental group with the face to face expository method where the teacher explained the subject while the second experimental group was subjected to virtual classroom application. The course was given to the control group with the traditional face to face learning method. The data of the study were collected by the use of by the use of the geography achievement test (Kr-20=0.77 and the attitude scale towards the geography course (α=0,918 . The data collected were one factor variance and co variance analyses. The results showed that the blended teaching media and virtual classroom practices had a statistically significant contribution on the achievement of the students in geography and their attitudes towards the geography course compared to the face to face expository method. However since the attitudes of the students towards the geography course in both control and experimental groups at the beginning and the end of the experiment were high the methods used did not made a significant contribution to it.

  20. Cultural Analysis in Geography: A Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, W.

    1981-01-01

    The article offers a description of a one semester college-level course in cultural geography. The outline is based on six themes--cultural analysis in geography, cultural universals, perception of the cultural environment, cultural diffusion, folk culture and popular culture, and humans and the land. (DB)

  1. 中国人文地理学研究进展与展望%Updated Progress and Perspectives of the Discipline of Human Geography in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方创琳; 周尚意; 柴彦威; 陆玉麒; 朱竑; 冯健; 刘云刚

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the status quo, progress and future development prospects of human geogra- phy, particularly on its crucial and newly emerged subgroups including the theory of human-environment in- teractions, cultural geography, behavioral geography, social geography, and political geography. After compar- ing intensive literature review of both China and English-world scholars, we strongly believe that human geog- raphy in China has achieved fruitful results on its theoretical innovation, research methodology, technological innovation and practical application. Some conclusions can be drawn as follows. (1) By virtue of geographical thinking, the position and content of the theory of human-environment interactions has been greatly enhanced. (2) The scope of cultural geography has broadened, whose study direction is turning to New Cultural Geogra- phy. (3) Behavioral geography has aroused attention and generated many crucial results. (4) To meet the needs of geopolitical strategy, political geography resurges in the research and policy analysis circles. (5) Along with the construction of harmonious society, social geography is emerging as an important field. The general trendsof Chinese human geography in future has to keep pace with Chinese social and economic development, be ori- ented to the national strategic needs, aimed at establishing a scientific development viewpoint with harmonious human-environment interactions, and solving new problems in national development with full strength. Mean- while, it should deepen studies on the theory and research methods of human-environment interactions, strength- en the research on the regulation mechanism, process, pattern, rhythm, and the demonstration and application of the man-land system, and strengthen the research on systematical management and monitoring, dynamic simula- tion, and technique support system, and enhance the research on global problems, global change and its regional

  2. Perspectives in geography of culture and civilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grčić Мirko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of relevant methodological essence of "traditional" and "new" cultural geography. In the introduction is given an explanation of philosophic concepts of space, environment, place and the region in cultural geography. In second section is analyzed the meaning of civilization and the genesis of geography of civilization (géographie de civilisation. Special attention is on features of geographical posibilism as methodological paradigm, and the concept of cultural landscape as the essence of classical geography of culture and civilization. After this part are researched specific characteristics of certain academic schools and methodological perspectives in cultural geography. Postmodern paradigm and essence of "new" cultural geography are in the main focus. Postmodernism is changing the meaning of the basic concepts in cultural geography, which are analyzed in the introduction, such as space, culture, cultural region, cultural landscape and others. "New" cultural geography reassessed social and moral issues associated with the characteristics of the postmodern era. In this regard, methodological paradigm must be changed. This ascertainment is based on the interpretation of humanistic geography, where the emphasis is on the interpretation of cultural symbols, causal link and the "spirit of place" (Spiritus Loci. In accordance with modern conceptions of human in psychological notion, there are at least three theoretical directions, which find resonance in the appropriate cultural geography: behaviorism, psychoanalytic concept and cognitive concept - gestaltism and geography of perception. In conclusion is emphasized the need of finding a dialectical unity in "classical" and "new" cultural geography. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176017

  3. Replacing positivism in medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David

    2005-06-01

    Revisiting debates about philosophical approaches in medical geography suggests that logical positivism may have been prematurely discarded. An analysis of authoritative texts in medical geography and their sources in human geography shows that logical positivism has been conflated with Comtean positivism, science, empiricism, quantification, science politics, scientism and so on, to produce the "standard version" of the all-purpose pejorative "positivism", which it is easy to dismiss as an evil. It is argued that the standard version fails to do justice to logical positivism, being constructed on sources which are at some distance from the logical positivist movement itself. An alternative approach is then developed, an historically and geographically situated interpretation of logical positivism as a deliberately and knowingly constructed oppositional epistemology within an oppressive and anti-scientific culture predicated on idealist intuitionism. Contrasting the standard version with this alternative reading of logical positivism suggests that much may have been lost in human, and thus, medical geography, by throwing out the logical positivist baby with the "positivism" bath water. It is concluded that continuing to unpack the standard version of logical positivism may identify benefits from a more nuanced appreciation of logical positivism, but it is premature to take these to the level of detailed impacts on the kinds of medical geographies that could be done or the ways of doing them.

  4. The Geography of Need: Identifying Human Service Needs in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Colleen; Miller, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county…

  5. The Geography of Need: Identifying Human Service Needs in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Colleen; Miller, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county…

  6. I Persevered with my Geography

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this personal reflection, I trace some of the interconnections between Stuart Hall’s work and the ‘new’ cultural geography. In the context of my own intellectual biography, and indebted to Hall and those geographers whose work has been influenced by him, I am interested in ‘routes’ rather than ‘roots’, and in the traffic between cultural studies and ‘critical’ human geography. Drawing on a selection of Hall’s work and a number of published interviews, I reflect on several moments of traffi...

  7. Differences between physical and human process simulation in geography:Empirical analysis of two cases%自然过程与人文过程模拟之差异比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhipeng; ZHANG Jin; LIU Weidong; WU Hong

    2012-01-01

    @@%Physical geography and human geography are the principal branches of the geographical sciences.Physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography are both quantitative methods used to recover past events and even to forecast events based on precisely determined parameters.There are four differences between physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography,which we summarize with two specific cases,one of which is about a typhoon's development and its precipitation,and the other of which is regarding the evolution of three industrial structures in China.The differences focus on four aspects:the main factors of the research framework; the knowledge background of the systematic analysis framework; the simulation data sources and quantitative method; and the core of the study object and the method of forecast application.As the human-land relationship is the key ideology of the man-land system,the relationship between the physical and human factors is becoming increasingly close at present.Physical process simulation and human process simulation in geography will exhibit crossing and blending in the future to reflect the various geographical phenomena better.

  8. Toward a new history and geography of human genes informed by ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Joseph K; Reich, David

    2014-09-01

    Genetic information contains a record of the history of our species, and technological advances have transformed our ability to access this record. Many studies have used genome-wide data from populations today to learn about the peopling of the globe and subsequent adaptation to local conditions. Implicit in this research is the assumption that the geographic locations of people today are informative about the geographic locations of their ancestors in the distant past. However, it is now clear that long-range migration, admixture, and population replacement subsequent to the initial out-of-Africa expansion have altered the genetic structure of most of the world's human populations. In light of this we argue that it is time to critically reevaluate current models of the peopling of the globe, as well as the importance of natural selection in determining the geographic distribution of phenotypes. We specifically highlight the transformative potential of ancient DNA. By accessing the genetic make-up of populations living at archaeologically known times and places, ancient DNA makes it possible to directly track migrations and responses to natural selection.

  9. Gender, race + geography = jeopardy: marginalized women, human rights and HIV in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Susana T; Kelly, Brook

    2011-11-01

    Across the United States, laws, policies, and practices put women living with HIV in jeopardy. In particular, the dignity, health, and well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV as well as the health and well-being of their families and communities is hampered by punitive laws and policies. Laws and policies that do not meet, or worse, criminalize women's sexual and reproductive rights result in the economic, social and political deprivation of marginalized women and girls-and especially those living with and at risk of HIV. These laws and policies exacerbate an already outsized HIV epidemic in underserved communities, and communities of color in the United States. This article draws from and builds on a human rights workshop that took place as part of the forum "Bringing Gender Home: Implementing Gender Responsive HIV/AIDS Programming for US Women and Girls," sponsored by the Office of Women's Health. It focuses on the damaging impact of laws, policies, and practices that criminalize women's sexuality. These laws significantly impact the well-being of women living with and at risk for HIV, and have an impact on the capacity of poor women of color in the United States to fully exercise their rights. When laws that purport to protect public health have the result of limiting women's reproductive choices, or have a disproportionate impact on marginalized groups such as sex workers, fundamental breaches of women's rights occur.

  10. Blogging Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Cecile; Mather, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This paper responds to the call for research on the use of new information technologies in higher education contexts. This was done through a case study on the use of blogs in an advanced seminar class. The paper argues that the use of blogs provided a way of gauging how students were coming to terms with the course material and how they were…

  11. Blogging Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Cecile; Mather, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This paper responds to the call for research on the use of new information technologies in higher education contexts. This was done through a case study on the use of blogs in an advanced seminar class. The paper argues that the use of blogs provided a way of gauging how students were coming to terms with the course material and how they were…

  12. Analysis of Human Geography Articles Published on the Three Chinese Authoritative Geography Journals in Recent 30 Years%30年来中国地理学综合学术期刊中人文地理学论文载文分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓斌; 曹雪; 周寅康; 黄贤金; 高怡

    2012-01-01

    20世纪80年代以来,中国人文地理学实现了全面复兴。采用文献计量学分析方法,对1980~2010年《地理学报》、《地理科学》和《地理研究》3个中国地理学综合学术期刊所刊载的文献进行统计,以人文地理学论文为对象,分别从载文的时空特点、研究领域、研究方法、研究机构等方面进行综合分析,梳理了中国人文地理学的发展脉络和研究热点,并对后期人文地理学的发展趋势进行了展望。%As is well-known,ever since the 1980s,Human Geography in China has achieved comprehensive rehabilitation and it maintains an extraordinary growth speed.Bibliometrics methods is used in this paper to collect statistics of literature which have been published on the three Chinese authoritative geographical journals "Acta Geographica Sinica","Scientia Geographica Sinica " and"Geographical Research"from 1980 to 2010.With the object of the articles in Human geography,features of the articles and authors which include the space-time characteristics,research field,methods,and institutes are all analyzed comprehensively.This paper combines the development process and the research hotspot of Human Geography in China and prospects the trend of human geography development in the later period.Results show that Chinese Human Geography emphasizes on the practical applicability and has intensive exchanges as well as intersects with other subjects.What’s more,a mature system of Human Geography authors of the three journals is taking shape.However,there are several shortcomings during the fast improvement,such as the disequilibrium in the development of sub-subjects and distribution of researchers,and lack of guidance theories and innovative methods and models.Only by solving these problems can China’s Human Geography keep a rapid and sound development.

  13. 人文地理国情综合统计分析指标体系初探%Human Geography Conditions Comprehensive Statistical Analysis of Index System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国; 张晶

    2015-01-01

    The geographical situation of statistical analysis is an important part of geographic condition monitoring, at present only in the basic statistical analysis stage, comprehensive statistical analysis and the corresponding index system and there is no corresponding standard.Therefore, this paper related human geography conditions comprehensive statistical analysis index system for construction, the establishment of index system of evaluation of comprehensive statistical analysis of the classification of human geography condition factor has the practicability and applicability, to lay a solid foundation for later statistical analysis.%地理国情统计分析是地理国情监测的重要组成部分,目前的研究仅限于基本统计分析阶段,综合统计分析及其相应的指标体系尚无相应的标准。因此,本文对相关人文地理国情综合统计分析指标体系进行构建,建立具有实用性与适用性的人文地理国情要素综合统计分析评价的分类指标体系,为后期的统计分析奠定基础。

  14. Lecture Classes in Human Anatomy: The Students’ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of...

  15. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiang; Ole Lund; Jinquan Tan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITHI database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections.

  16. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJiang; OleLund; JinquanTan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITH! database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005; 2(1):49-56.

  17. Czech Student Attitudes towards Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Janko, Tomas; Mrazkova, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates 540 Czech lower secondary students' attitudes towards geography. It examined the general influence of gender and grade level on attitudes towards geography with an emphasis on four specific areas in particular: geography as a school subject; geography and the environment; the importance of geography; and the relevance of…

  18. Teaching Physical Geography with Toys, Household Items, and Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Laura; Pankratz, Mary Jo; Alberts, Heike

    2014-01-01

    While many college physical geography instructors already use a wide variety of creative teaching approaches in their classes, others have not yet been exposed to teaching with toys, household items, or food. The goal in this article is to present some ideas for teaching college-level physical geography (weather/climate and geomorphology) for…

  19. Lecture classes in human anatomy: the students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of the course, to provide the students with an effective knowledge of the gross anatomy, histology, embryology and the clinical anatomy. On the other hand, the students' feedback regarding the lecture methods and the teaching environment is crucial in judging the efficacy of the present curriculum. To obtain the students' feedback about the environment of the lecture classes, as regards the venue, the teaching and learning aids which are used, the lecture class schedule of the university (the number of classes per week, the durations of the lecture classes, etc.) and the existing departmental practices (display of the class routine in advance, synchronization between the lecture and the practical classes), so that their suggestions could help the faculty in planning the most effective teaching procedures. A semi structured questionnaire was supplied to the students to get their feedback. Most of the students found the air conditioned seminar room's environment to be more comfortable and they supported the existing durations of the lecture hours with the combined use of chalk and a board and overhead projectors (OHPs). The perceptions of the learners helped in modifying the departmental practice in the desired way.

  20. Are the classical historical geography of the Byzantine world and Gis technology a contradiction? On the usage of contemporary technologies in the humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović St. Mihailo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the latest developments in the field of Digital Humanities. It indicates in which ways these technologies are already used in the historical and geographical science throughout the world and how they could be integrated systematically into Byzantine Studies. In the first part of the article international projects, which are based on GIS (Geographic Information Systems, and their links in the World Wide Web are presented. In the second part the author shows on the basis of his scholarly results on the historical geography of Byzantine Macedonia, how medieval written sources can be transferred into digital format in order to achieve a higher level of spatial data analysis. The neglect of this important and recent scholarly approach in the 21st century could lead to the marginalisation of Byzantine Studies in general, and of the historical geography of the Byzantine Empire in particular. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177015: Hrišćanska kultura na Balkanu u srednjem veku: Vizantijsko carstvo, Srbi i Bugari od 9. do 15. veka

  1. 洛杉矶学派及其对人文地理学的影响%Los Angeles School and Its Impacts on Disciplines of Human Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙斌栋; 魏旭红; 王婷

    2015-01-01

    Emerging at the end of 1980s, urban theorists, cultural critics and social commentators have devoted a tremendous amount of attention to the study of Los Angeles. This attention derives from the complex theoreti-cal and practical urban issues in Los Angeles, and also from the continuous competition among the power of globalization, which obviously influenced the general economic order all over the world. Los Angeles School (LA School) is constructed by a group of geography scholars, such as Edward W. Soja, Allen J. Scott, Michael J. Dear, Mike Davis et al., to generalize their systematic academic points of view. This article aims to make a de-tailed and systematic introduction to the LA school, and tries to sort out its impacts on many disciplines in the field of human geography. According to the summarization, this article supports that the LA school is based on Soja’s social-spatial dialectics theory. This theory strongly suggests that spatiality also plays a big role in the formation of social relations when the basic production mode in the era and keeps unchanged. Under this theo-retical framework, we can see that crisis and reconstruction are just the dialectic’s projection in reality, which means that crisis tends to cause urban reconstruction, and the reconstruction may lead to some new urban crisis at the same time. Los Angeles metropolitan area has provided a vivid interpretation and reasonably exemplified LA school’s basic academic points of view, as well gives us an accurate demonstration of the circulation be-tween urban crisis and reconstruction. Many views of LA School have already made an important influence on the branches of human geography, such as economic geography, urban geography and social geography, provid-ing a lot of important academic hypothesis and ideas for follow-up researches. The main contribution that the LA school has made includes the significant enrichment on the core and traditional idea of the relationship be

  2. Changing Horizons in Geography Education

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Changing Horizons in Geography Education considers and develops aspects of the Bologna Process through the three pillars of operation. These were Europeanisation, Professional Development and Exciting Geography.

  3. Geography Makes a Comeback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPike, Elizabeth; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents two lesson plans exemplifying analytical geography. The first lesson shows how medical geography can be used to track the silent route of cholera. The second lesson about the Bermuda Triangle is an exercise in fundamental mapping skills and teaches children a valuable lesson in double-checking facts. (RLC)

  4. The Practices of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham

    2016-01-01

    Sarah Bednarz begins by thanking Rebecca Theobald for the invitation to contrubute to this issue of "The Geography Teacher"("TGT"). As a member of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) Publications Committee and coeditor of the "Journal of Geography," Bednarz confesses that she was not favorably…

  5. Let's Sell Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, R. E.; Gritzner, C. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This 1963 article, reprinted from the "Journal of Geography" lamented the lack of geographic education. Urged geographers to promote the subject and ensure its place in the curriculum. Claimed school administrators failed to understand geography's vital role. Discussed current status of the field and mentioned poor student test scores. (NL)

  6. Lafayette Geography Institute, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis. Geography Educators' Network of Indiana.

    This document contains 7 geography lesson plans: (1) "Can You Give Me Directions to the Game?" by Tim Robison (uses Geographic Information Systems to establish directions to a place; grades 6-8); (2) "Crossing China by Sampan" by Marcie Ritchie (examines the role of geography in communication throughout China; grade 6); (3) "Indiana Tornado…

  7. Multimedia Technology and Students' Achievement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Edmar Bernardes; Kvasnak, Robb Neil

    2012-01-01

    In this study done at a community college in South Florida, the achievements of students who spoke English as their second language who had attended their K-12 education outside the United States in their home countries, in a U.S. college course on world geography are compared with the achievements of students in the same classes who spoke English…

  8. Development of population geography from antropogeography to spatial-analitical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Spasovski Milena; Šantić Danica

    2013-01-01

    Population geography is a subdiscipline of Human geography and studies the distribution, concentration and density of population over the terestrial surface, as well as differences in population size, changes and characteristics, like structures, migrations, activity etc, among some places present compared to others. Population geography has had a perscientific stage as long as human history. First modern scientific treatis of population in geography was th...

  9. Travessias da aula em campo na geografia escolar: a necessidade convertida para além da fábula The excursions of the class in the field in school geography: the need converted beyond the fable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dennys Monteiro de Oliveira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O ensino de geografia cultiva um vínculo de identidade com o mundo exterior: a aula em campo. Os desafios para investigação escolar das instituições, localidades e relações são enormes. Esse exercício didático é o alvo do presente texto, cujo objetivo é mostrar a preocupação e o avanço, de alguns estudiosos, na construção de uma 'teoria' das aulas de campo, aqui denominadas aulas em campo. A proposta corresponde à apresentação e discussão de certas abordagens específicas para esse tipo de aula. No entanto, esse cultivo não se realiza de forma contínua nem está no centro do planejamento da geografia escolar. Ele aparece como uma exceção contra a qual os autores aqui citados reagem, caracterizam limites e potencialidades e direcionam soluções. Para tanto, propõem seu resgate nas diversas formas de atividades externas ao espaço escolar: excursões, visitas, estudos do meio, turismo. A força pedagógica da aula em campo encontra-se, todavia, na capacidade da interação professor-aluno em apreender com o lugar-mundo e planejar-se no improviso, o que, na conclusão do artigo, aparece como defesa de uma postura estratégica da gestão do retorno à sala de aula. Chamada de autobiografia coletiva da aula anterior, o texto propõe ampliar a relevância das discussões sobre a experiência do campo para potencializar os conteúdos e métodos de aprendizagem, lembrando que a aula em campo é, tal qual inspiração artística, um vetor insubstituível de compreensão do espaço em nível escolar.The teaching of geography cultivates a link of identity with the exterior world: the field class. The challenges to the school investigation of institutions, localities and relations are huge. That didactic exercise is the subject of the present text, whose purpose is to show the concerns and progresses by some scholars in the construction of a " theory" of field classes, here denominated classes in the field. The proposal consists

  10. Human Behavior Classification Using Multi-Class Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogameena, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In computer vision and robotics, one of the typical tasks is to identify specific objects in an image and to determine each object’s position and orientation relative to coordinate system. This study presented a Multi-class Relevance Vector machine (RVM classification algorithm which classifies different human poses from a single stationary camera for video surveillance applications. Approach: First the foreground blobs and their edges are obtained. Then the relevance vector machine classification scheme classified the normal and abnormal behavior. Results: The performance proposed by our method was compared with Support Vector Machine (SVM and multi-class support vector machine. Experimental results showed the effectiveness of the method. Conclusion: It is evident that RVM has good accuracy and lesser computational than SVM.

  11. Geography: Key to World Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Delineates the nature of applied geography, asserting that geography links the natural and social sciences. Underscores geography's role in data analysis and problem solving on a global scale. Traces the discipline's history. Maps geography's status in higher education institutions. Discusses new technologies used by geographers. Summarizes career…

  12. Geography and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, L

    1989-05-01

    Most people in Britain today work in jobs dominated very markedly by either women or men. Sex-typing occurs in many other activities. For example, child care and domestic work, whether paid or unpaid, are generally considered to be tasks for women. However, with the exception of domestic work and child care, the allocation of activities to women or men varies between societies. For example, in much of sub-Saharan Africa, women work in fields, growing basic subsistence crops for their families, whereas in much of Latin America, women's agricultural work is confined to tending animals and food processing. Inequality arises because the role of women is generally associated with inferior status, socially, politically and/or economically. When mapping the geography of gender, an example shows that female life expectancy at birth is highest in the developed countries and lowest in the poorest countries of the Third World. Regarding the relationship between gender divisions and various aspects of spatial organization within societies most attention has focused on differences in ethnic group, social class, and stage in the life cycle. In mid-19th century Britain large-scale factory production precipitated a spatial separation between home and work and created the possibility of separate spheres of life for women and men. A particular social form, namely a nuclear family with a dependent wife, can operate as a factor contributing to changes in the spatial organization of urban areas in the form of suburban growth. After decades of outward movement by affluent social groups, a return to small pockets within inner-urban areas is now evident. This process is known as gentrification. An additional factor of significance in connection with gentrification is the increasing success of middle-class women in obtaining well-paid career jobs.

  13. Responsible geographies and geographies of response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses and resp......This dissertation engages with Danish University geographers at work and their explication of the role of geography in shaping socio-environmental debates in an era of the anthropocene. Situating sustainability concepts in a historygeographical context the dissertation examines responses...... in higher education literature. The methodological framework is based on the social nature approach that tangles these quite distinct epistemological communities by consulting the socio-natures produced. It is concluded that though geographers find sustainability themes important to geography......, sustainability is more often implicit than it is explicit. This produces a number of dilemmas and contradictions since geographers both seek to distance themselves from produced politics while at the same time elucidating them. Geographies of response and responsibilities address the battleground over...

  14. MODERN MILITARY GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Bezuidenhout

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern Military Geography is a new text that explores the relationship between geography and military conflict. As such, it covers many different scenarios and operational theatres and brings perspective to the link between local topography, hydrographical settings, climate, coastal conditions and military operations. The text goes further by examining the influence of secondary factors, which include, biological, health and environmental issues on military operations. The unique interaction between physical conditions and the geopolitical realities of different geographical settings are well illustrated. This book is therefore an excellent addition to the fields of military geography and military history, as well as other related military disciplines.

  15. Geography and Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Corna Pellegrini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests that Tourism and Geography are closely intertwined, because tourists are in search of experience and geographer has as its main purpose the pursuit of knowledge. Models and hypotheses need always to be verified in theterritorial context of daily fieldwork, geographical interpretation and travel experience, were Geography and Tourism entwined in reciprocal relationship of personal attitude, nature, and field research. Environmental responsibility is another and common field were Geography can change and develop Tourism in the same mutual support in a continuous and mutual way. The case studies support it fully.

  16. Multiple Cultures of Doing Geography Facilitate Global Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to explain why geography is a prime discipline for analysing globalisation and a multicultural view of Global Studies. The generic approach of human geography to first select an appropriate methodology is taken as a key approach. Design/methodology/approach: Concepts from aggregate disciplines such as history, economics,…

  17. "Publish or Perish" as citation metrics used to analyze scientific output in the humanities: International case studies in economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneyx, Audrey

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, the most commonly used source of bibliometric data is the Thomson ISI Web of Knowledge, in particular the (Social) Science Citation Index and the Journal Citation Reports, which provide the yearly Journal Impact Factors. This database used for the evaluation of researchers is not advantageous in the humanities, mainly because books, conference papers, and non-English journals, which are an important part of scientific activity, are not (well) covered. This paper presents the use of an alternative source of data, Google Scholar, and its benefits in calculating citation metrics in the humanities. Because of its broader range of data sources, the use of Google Scholar generally results in more comprehensive citation coverage in the humanities. This presentation compares and analyzes some international case studies with ISI Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar. The fields of economics, geography, social sciences, philosophy, and history are focused on to illustrate the differences of results between these two databases. To search for relevant publications in the Google Scholar database, the use of "Publish or Perish" and of CleanPoP, which the author developed to clean the results, are compared.

  18. Saussure and Linguistic Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roy

    1993-01-01

    Discusses Saussures's "Cours de linguistique generale," which was published in 1916, and devotes specific attention to the significance of Part VI, which is devoted to linguistic geography. (16 references) (Author/VWL)

  19. "Lesbian Migrants in the Gentrified Valley" and "Other" Geographies of Rural Gentrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darren P.; Holt, Louise

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the migration and cultural consumption practices of lesbian households within processes of rural change. Taking forward Phillips' (2004. Progress in Human Geography 28, 5-30) discussion of neglected geographies of rural gentrification, and building upon Halfacree's (2001. International Journal of Population Geography 7,…

  20. Human activities and microbial geographies. An anthropological approach to the risk of infections in West African hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessandro, Eugénie

    2015-07-01

    In hospital care, management of the risk of infection represents a crucial issue. Nevertheless, this question remains a neglected area in anthropological research, especially in African countries. To shed new light on this question, we conducted an anthropological investigation in the infectious disease department of a hospital in Niger. Daily observation of the work of the hospital staff for a total period of 6 months was spread out over 2008 and 2009. During our prolonged stay, we also collected 64 in-depth interviews of health care workers and attendants in the department. This study method made it possible to describe many of the practices and discourses related to the issues of medical and personal care and hospital hygiene and to compare the practices observed to standard principles for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Our ethnographic attention to the behavior of the actors showed the absence of formal spatial segmentations between different activities. The care provided by the untrained relatives serving as personal attendants introduced territorial enclaves governed by home hygiene standards into the interior of technical spaces. At the same time, privatizing equipment and space for their diverse activities, the medical staff disrupted technical chains and generated the recurrent crossing of microbial geographies. These results allow us to offer two principal guidelines for improving the quality of care and the management of risks of infection in hospitals in West Africa: (1) the essential role of the attendants in the care provided to hospital inpatients must be officially taken into account, especially by including them in the organization of medical hygiene procedures; (2) the different overlapping technical activities and social activities in the work space must be limited by their geographic and architectural segmentation.

  1. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were…

  2. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were sought in…

  3. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Casagrandi, Renato; Sokolow, Susanne H; De Leo, Giulio A; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Froehlich, Jean-Marc; Sou, Mariam; Karambiri, Harouna; Yacouba, Hamma; Maiga, Amadou; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  4. A Theoretical Analysis of the Geography of Schistosomiasis in Burkina Faso Highlights the Roles of Human Mobility and Water Resources Development in Disease Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Perez-Saez

    Full Text Available We study the geography of schistosomiasis across Burkina Faso by means of a spatially explicit model of water-based disease dynamics. The model quantitatively addresses the geographic stratification of disease burden in a novel framework by explicitly accounting for drivers and controls of the disease, including spatial information on the distributions of population and infrastructure, jointly with a general description of human mobility and climatic/ecological drivers. Spatial patterns of disease are analysed by the extraction and the mapping of suitable eigenvectors of the Jacobian matrix subsuming the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The relevance of the work lies in the novel mapping of disease burden, a byproduct of the parametrization induced by regional upscaling, by model-guided field validations and in the predictive scenarios allowed by exploiting the range of possible parameters and processes. Human mobility is found to be a primary control at regional scales both for pathogen invasion success and the overall distribution of disease burden. The effects of water resources development highlighted by systematic reviews are accounted for by the average distances of human settlements from water bodies that are habitats for the parasite's intermediate host. Our results confirm the empirical findings about the role of water resources development on disease spread into regions previously nearly disease-free also by inspection of empirical prevalence patterns. We conclude that while the model still needs refinements based on field and epidemiological evidence, the proposed framework provides a powerful tool for large-scale public health planning and schistosomiasis management.

  5. Volunteered Geographic Information and Computational Geography: New Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), one of the most important types of user-generated web content, has been emerging as a new phenomenon. VGI is contributed by numerous volunteers and supported by web 2.0 technologies. This chapter discusses how VGI provides new perspectives for computational geography, a transformed geography based on the use of data-intensive computing and simulations to uncover the underlying mechanisms behind geographic forms and processes. We provide several exemplars of computational geography using OpenStreetMap data and GPS traces to investigate the scaling of geographic space and its implications for human mobility patterns. We illustrate that the field of geography is experiencing a dramatic change and that geoinformatics and computational geography deserve to be clearly distinguished, with the former being a study of engineering and the latter being a science. Keywords geoinformatics, openstreetmap, scaling of geographic space, spatial heterogeneity

  6. The Information Revolution in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikunov, Vladimir S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a number of topics in geography that are effected by the multimedia information revolution. These include research in political geography, finance, and the geography of tourism and medicine. Considers new technologies assisting spatial modeling and visualization of data and their effects on these fields. (MJP)

  7. Danish geography teachers' perceptions of their own teaching professionalism according to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel

    2015-01-01

    and natural science are more familiar to teach the sub-subject of weather formation in connection to climatic change, than Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Human Geography and social science. The teachers orientated against Human Geography put emphasis on the more problem......This paper reports from research examining eight Geography teachers’ own perceptions of their teaching professionalism, understood as Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), in relation to the topic of climate change. Apparently, Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography......-oriented/discursive aspects of teaching climate change, some of them neglecting parts of the curriculum focused on weather formation. Most of the interviewed Geography teachers emphasize the collegial cooperation with science colleagues e.g. during professional development activities, when reflecting on their own teaching...

  8. Geography teachers PCK according to climate change - match between beliefs and reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Søren Witzel; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    with a strong academic profile in Physical Geography and natural science are more familiar to teach about weather formation in connection to teaching climate change, than Geography teachers with a strong academic profile in Human Geography and social science. The teachers orientated against Human Geography put......The aim of this study is to uncover differences or similarities between Geography teachers’ own perception of their Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) in relation to teaching weather formation and climate change and how they actually perform “in-action” in the lower secondary school. The concept...... of Pedagogical Content Knowledge is understood as an amalgam of Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK), Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) and Knowledge of Context (KofC). There will be presented results from interviews and observations from eight lower secondary Geography teachers and from a questionnaire send to Geography...

  9. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  10. Geography and Orienteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    Orienteering is a rapidly growing sport, developed in Sweden, which has great possibilities for education in geography. It can be conceived as an organizing device for outdoor work and as a basis for developing map skills and for map construction. (Author)

  11. The Revenge of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ia. Belokrenitsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This author discussed the prominent book of American journalist and expert Robert D. Kaplan in the light of the recent publication of its Russian translation: [Kaplan R. Mest’ geografi i (The revenge of geography / Transl. by M. Kotov. Moscow: Ko-Libri, 2015. P.277].

  12. Geographies of health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwan, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    This fourth annual special issue of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers focuses on the geographies of health, disease, and well-being. The call for abstracts was issued in early 2010, and review of full papers and revised submissions lasted from December 2010 to March 2012.

  13. Genetics: A New Landscape for Medical Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Emch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of human pathogens resistant to medical treatment will present a challenge to the international public health community in the coming decades. Geography is uniquely positioned to examine the progressive evolution of pathogens across space and through time, and to link molecular change to interactions between population and environmental drivers. Landscape as an organizing principle for the integration of natural and cultural forces has a long history in geography, and, more specifically, in medical geography. Here, we explore the role of landscape in medical geography, the emergent field of landscape genetics, and the great potential that exists in the combination of these two disciplines. We argue that landscape genetics can enhance medical geographic studies of local-level disease environments with quantitative tests of how human-environment interactions influence pathogenic characteristics. In turn, such analyses can expand theories of disease diffusion to the molecular scale and distinguish the important factors in ecologies of disease that drive genetic change of pathogens.

  14. Transformation of Geography as an Interdisciplinary Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afrakhteh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geography as a science of the spatial analysis of phenomena is based on three main objectives: studying spatial structures, examining the locational-spatial order of socio-economic activities, and searching spatial relationships and functions through hierarchical leveling of rural and urban settlements. The applied form of geography or “spatial planning” addresses the modification of spatial structures, the locational-spatial order of activities, and the organization of spatial relationships and functions. There are mutual interactions between structure and function in this spatial order. Science has developed a complex structure through the electronic revolution, which is called “third wave science”; also specialized studies have developed. Specialized studies result in a very deep understanding of subjects, but this deep understanding always remains just in a “spot” and its applications could be traumatic, which is because it is not regulated in combination with other dimensions of human life. This kind of science cannot be beneficial in human life or solve some important problems. The main aim of this article, which is based on qualitative content analysis, is to analyze geography as an interdisciplinary science. The findings of the study show that geographical research has interdisciplinary characteristics; otherwise it cannot explain today’s complex problems. Geography can both use the findings of other sciences, including statistics, mathematics, economics, sociology, history and psychology, and provide them with services and help.

  15. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human Theta class glutathione transferase (GSTT1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Vaska, V. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Goggan, M.; Board, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Two loci encoding Theta class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been identified in humans. In situ hybridization studies have localized the GSTT1 gene to 22q11.2. This is the same band to which we previously localized the GSTT2 gene. This finding confirms the trend for human GST genes to be found in class-specific clusters. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Effects of Infographics on Students Achievement and Attitude towards Geography Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Geography is a very comprehensive field of study with many subjects to study topics. Using a wide range of materials in the teaching of this course can this lesson be made effective and permanent because we do not have chances to observe natural phenomena. Therefore, in geography education materials natural environment is to be brought to class by…

  17. Human Herpesvirus 7 U21 Tetramerizes To Associate with Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nathan A.; Wang, Qiuhong; Balbo, Andrea; Konrad, Sheryl L.; Buchli, Rico; Hildebrand, William H.; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The U21 gene product from human herpesvirus 7 binds to and redirects class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to a lysosomal compartment. The molecular mechanism by which U21 reroutes class I MHC molecules to lysosomes is not known. Here, we have reconstituted the interaction between purified soluble U21 and class I MHC molecules, suggesting that U21 does not require additional cellular proteins to interact with class I MHC molecules. Our results demonstrate that U21, itself predicted to contain an MHC class I-like protein fold, interacts tightly with class I MHC molecules as a tetramer, in a 4:2 stoichiometry. These observations have helped to elucidate a refined model describing the mechanism by which U21 escorts class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. IMPORTANCE In this report, we show that the human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) immunoevasin U21, itself a class I MHC-like protein, binds with high affinity to class I MHC molecules as a tetramer and escorts them to lysosomes, where they are degraded. While many class I MHC-like molecules have been described in detail, this unusual viral class I-like protein functions as a tetramer, associating with class I MHC molecules in a 4:2 ratio, illuminating a functional significance of homooligomerization of a class I MHC-like protein. PMID:24390327

  18. Practice and Economic Geography

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, A; Murphy, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    Economic geography has over the last decade become increasingly interested in the role of practice, conceptualised as the regularised or stabilised social actions through which economic agents organize or coordinate production, marketing, service provision, exchange and/or innovation activities. Interest in practice is most clearly manifest in a growing body of research concerned to conceptualise how the regularized social relations and interactions linking economic actors (e.g. entrepreneurs...

  19. Geography Markup Language

    OpenAIRE

    Burggraf, David S

    2006-01-01

    Geography Markup Language (GML) is an XML application that provides a standard way to represent geographic information. GML is developed and maintained by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), which is an international consortium consisting of more than 250 members from industry, government, and university departments. Many of the conceptual models described in the ISO 19100 series of geomatics standards have been implemented in GML, and it is itself en route to becoming an ISO Standard (TC/2...

  20. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  1. Bap31 enhances the ER export and quality control of human class I MHC molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ladasky, John J.; Boyle, Sarah; Seth, Malini; Li, Hewang; Pentcheva, Tsvetelina; ABE, FUMIYOSHI; Steinberg, Steven J.; Edidin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of class I MHC molecules and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum is governed by chaperones and accessory proteins. We present evidence that the putative cargo receptor protein Bap31 participates in the transport and the quality control of human class I molecules. Transfection of the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa with YFP-Bap31 chimeras increased surface levels of class I in a dose-dependent manner, by as much as 3.7-fold. The increase in surface class I resulted fro...

  2. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  3. A review on the application of actor network theory to human geography%行动者网络理论在人文地理领域应用研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宣; 王小依

    2013-01-01

    行动者网络理论以一种结构化的方式来构建行为主体之间的关系,并将要素流动和网络化互动形态纳入分析范畴,为各学科研究提供了全新的视角,在人文地理领域的应用也日渐增多.本文在总结行动者网络理论主要内容的基础上,分类归纳评述了行动者网络理论在不同分支研究领域的应用主题和方式,并就研究的深度、广度、影响力进行国内外对比.研究表明,行动者网络理论对人与非人行动者的一致看待及其通过转译过程解析网络关系的研究模式,除强化了经济地理等领域的理论建构之外,也为乡村地理、城市地理、经济地理、旅游地理等领域的地方发展、政策实践研究提供了一种有效的分析方法.引入该理论的人文地理研究引用频次高,有较大的学术影响.目前国内研究多停留在行动者网络理论分析框架的直接套用,极少涉及分析框架改进和理论思考,在广度和深度上与国际研究仍有差距.%Recently,the actor-network theory (ANT) was widely applied to the field of human geography.ANT approach provides a new perspective by allowing researchers to take into consideration the flow of factors and network interaction.After a brief introduction of ANT,this paper summarizes the progress of ANT applications to human geography by summing up the application topics and methods in different branches,and compares the gap between international and domestic researches.This paper reveals that ANT promotes the progress of human geography in both theory and application.Most theoretic explorations happened in the field of economic geography:the relational economic geography based on ANT provides new angle for the reconstruction of "postmodernism" economic geography theory system.In application,analytical framework of ANT applied to the field of human geography emphasizes actors,translation process,and the result,with special attention to the spatial

  4. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    of investigating human environment interactions. In this paper we aim to contribute to this particular field of knowledge by providing an empirical analysis of ESD in Danish University Geography. In this paper it is examined how programs in Geography in higher education have taken different approaches......Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its tradition...... approaches to be able to understand the dynamics, complexity and interactions in various scales. Third, geographers find their discipline provides an integrative knowledge platform between the natural and social sciences....

  5. The Way I See It ... History and Geography Should Be Scrapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Paul F.

    1980-01-01

    Proposes discarding conventional history and geography classes and including community involvement and social studies courses that speak to the personal needs of students and assist them in grappling with contemporary political and economic problems. (Author/MLF)

  6. Italian information geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paradiso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A range of papers focusing on Italian cases of ICTs use and changes in society are presented here in this NETCOM issue. A national research group on Geography of Information Society was founded in 2007 and hosted by the Italian Geographical Society later evolved in a specialty group within AgeI, the Association of Italian Geographers. This issue brings together papers from members of the Italian specialty group along the general theme of Internet mediation in everyday life. A pre...

  7. Geography Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Burggraf

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Geography Markup Language (GML is an XML application that provides a standard way to represent geographic information. GML is developed and maintained by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC, which is an international consortium consisting of more than 250 members from industry, government, and university departments. Many of the conceptual models described in the ISO 19100 series of geomatics standards have been implemented in GML, and it is itself en route to becoming an ISO Standard (TC/211 CD 19136. An overview of GML together with its implications for the geospatial web is given in this paper.

  8. AP Geography, Environmental Science Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    Geography may not be particularly known as a hot topic among today's students--even some advocates suggest it suffers from an image problem--but by at least one measure, the subject is starting to come into its own. Across more than 30 topics covered in the Advanced Placement (AP) program, participation in geography is rising faster than any…

  9. Integrating Geography into American History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Geography faces stiff curricular competition from the continuing emphasis of policy makers on the three R's and science. In many places, this competition seems to have squeezed out any systematic attention to geography or the other social studies, particularly in elementary school. What's more, it doesn't look like things are going to turn around…

  10. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught geography…

  11. Learning through Literature: Geography, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Mary Ellen

    This resource book provides specific strategies and activities for integrating the intermediate geography curriculum with related children's literature selections. The book includes the following sections: (1) "World Geography Overview"; (2) "Oceans"; (3) "Polar Regions"; (4) "Islands"; (5) "Rain Forests"; (6) "Mountains"; (7) "Forests"; (8)…

  12. AP Geography, Environmental Science Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    Geography may not be particularly known as a hot topic among today's students--even some advocates suggest it suffers from an image problem--but by at least one measure, the subject is starting to come into its own. Across more than 30 topics covered in the Advanced Placement (AP) program, participation in geography is rising faster than any…

  13. Geography Resources for Elementary Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, David M., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Highlights geography resources available from the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC). Provides a brief description of five resources. Articles deal with teaching geography through the use of unique images of China, the integration of tactile and visual learning, the Gall-Peters map projection, a map game, and geographic literacy. (KO)

  14. From Geography Action to Civic Engagement: The Mesa Grande Ruins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Carol C.

    2012-01-01

    Geography Action Week 2000 was fast approaching and the author was trying to decide on a way for her fourth grade class to actively participate in the theme for the year. The theme "Here Today--Here Tomorrow: A Geographic Focus on Conservation" centered on sustainable use, preservation, and restoration of our natural and cultural…

  15. Bap31 enhances the endoplasmic reticulum export and quality control of human class I MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladasky, John J; Boyle, Sarah; Seth, Malini; Li, Hewang; Pentcheva, Tsvetelina; Abe, Fumiyoshi; Steinberg, Steven J; Edidin, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The assembly of class I MHC molecules and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is governed by chaperones and accessory proteins. We present evidence that the putative cargo receptor protein Bap31 participates in the transport and the quality control of human class I molecules. Transfection of the human adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa with yellow fluorescent protein-Bap31 chimeras increased surface levels of class I in a dose-dependent manner, by as much as 3.7-fold. The increase in surface class I resulted from an increase in the rate of export of newly synthesized class I molecules to the cell surface and from an increase in the stability of the exported molecules. We propose that Bap31 performs quality control on class I molecules in two distinct phases: first, by exporting peptide-loaded class I molecules to the ER/Golgi intermediate compartment, and second, by retrieving class I molecules that have lost peptides in the acidic post-ER environment. This function of Bap31 is conditional or redundant, because we find that Bap31 deficiency does not reduce surface class I levels. Overexpression of the Bap31 homolog, Bap29, decreases surface class levels in HeLa, indicating that it does not substitute for Bap31.

  16. Human Rights: Lesson Plan for SDAIE (Sheltered) Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Michael D.

    This lesson plan on human rights uses the Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) methodology used in California to teach academic content to intermediate, threshold level limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. It sets forth three educational goals for students to reach; asks students to examine definitions of human rights…

  17. A Road Map for Improving Geography Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Jill A.; Edelson, Daniel C.; Hildebrant, Barbara; Hinde, Elizabeth; Kenney, Marianne; Kolvoord, Robert; Lanegran, David; Marcello, Jody Smothers; Morrill, Robert; Ruiz-Primo, Maria; Seixas, Peter; Shavelson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In late 2012, both the second edition of the "Geography for Life: National Geography Standards" and the National Science Foundation-funded "Road Map for Geography Education Project" reports were released; the former document describes the conceptual goals for K-12 geography education, and the latter, a route to coordinating reform efforts to…

  18. Geography Standards for China: New Dimensions for Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya-nam, Zhang

    1996-01-01

    Briefly explains the 10 standard objective statements that characterize geography curriculum reform in China. The standards reflect a rigorous and scientific orientation incorporating mathematics, physics, geology, and demographics. No social education component is present. (MJP)

  19. Geography From Another Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The GEODESY software program is intended to promote geographical awareness among students with its remote sensing capabilities to observe the Earth's surface from distant vantage points. Students and teachers using GEODESY learn to interpret and analyze geographical data pertaining to the physical attributes of their community. For example, the program provides a digital environment of physical features, such as mountains and bodies of water, as well as man-made features, such as roads and parks, using aerial photography, satellite imagery, and geographic information systems data in accordance with National Geography Standards. The main goal is to have the students and teachers gain a better understanding of the unique forces that drive their coexistence. GEODESY was developed with technical assistance and financial support from Stennis Space Center's Commercial Remote Sensing Program Office, now known as the Earth Science Applications Directorate.

  20. VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop Experimentation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    including a Work Organization Analysis, a Cognitive Transformations Analysis (CogTA) and a Strategies Analysis ( Chalmers , 2010, 2011). These analyses...spatial layout of the display ( Chalmers , 2011). The intent of EID is to support the demands of the human instead of just presenting data. Following... Chalmers , 2011). It was hypothesized that the IID would improve the warfighting capabilities of the CO and the WL in such a way that it would

  1. HLA class I homologous transcripts in the human embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke de Wit, T F; Struyk, L; Vloemans, S; Glazebrook, J; Boyle, J M; Stern, P L; van den Elsen, P J

    1990-01-01

    We have used the human teratocarcinoma-derived embryonal carcinoma cell line Tera-2 cl. 13 to explore the putative expression of novel HLA class I(-like) genes. Serological analyses revealed that Tera-2 cells do not express polymorphic HLA class I (-A, -B, -C) specificities, but do express HLA class I-like antigens. These phenotypic properties parallel those of certain mouse embryonal carcinoma cells. To study the expression of HLA class I(-like) genes in the Tera-2 cells two different approaches were used. Screening of a Tera-2 cDNA library with a full-length HLA class I cDNA probe under conditions that would allow for the identification of relatively distinct HLA class I-like sequences yielded 27 positive clones, all of which were of the regular HLA-A, -B, -C type. Reverse northern hybridizations of the restriction enzyme-digested Tlab region comprising cosmids with Tera-2 cDNA as the probe resulted in the identification of several putative human genes whose equivalents map within the mouse Tla region. However, none of these genes appeared to be structurally related to HLA class I. A putative H3.3 histone gene was identified in the proximal Tla region of the C57BL/10 mouse. It is concluded that no structural homologues of mouse Qa/Tla genes are expressed in the human developmental cell line Tera-2.

  2. MHC class II expression in human basophils: induction and lack of functional significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid L Voskamp

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting abilities of basophils and their role in initiating a Th2 phenotype is a topic of current controversy. We aimed to determine whether human basophils can be induced to express MHC Class II and act as antigen presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Isolated human basophils were exposed to a panel of cytokines and TLR-ligands and assessed for MHC Class II expression. MHC Class II was expressed in up to 17% of isolated basophils following incubation with a combination of IL-3, IFN-γ and GM-CSF for 72 hours. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86 were expressed at very low levels after stimulation. Gene expression analysis of MHC Class II-positive basophils confirmed up-regulation of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, CD74 and Cathepsin S. However, MHC Class II expressing basophils were incapable of inducing antigen-specific T cell activation or proliferation. This is the first report of significant cytokine-induced MHC Class II up-regulation, at both RNA and protein level, in isolated human basophils. By testing stimulation with relevant T cell epitope peptide as well as whole antigen, the failure of MHC Class II expressing basophils to induce T cell response was shown not to be solely due to inefficient antigen uptake and/or processing.

  3. 翻转课堂在高校地理教学中的应用初探及学生反馈%A Preliminary Exploration on the Application of Flipped Class to College Geography Teaching and Student Feed-back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仕超

    2015-01-01

    With the impelling of the in-depth integration of infor-mation technology and education, the traditional"chalk and talk"teaching mode of colleges and universities has been disintegrated by new teaching modes based on integrated learning, such as mi-cro-lesson, flipped class and MOOC, which may initiate a"learning revolution", namely, teaching mode reform, in colleges and universities. Based on the four factors of flipped class and the relationship of the factors, combined with the three stages of classroom teaching, that is, pre-class, in-class and after-class, this paper designs a college geography teaching mode based on flipped class and applies it to the undergraduate teaching practice of geography, and pays attention to student feedback and sum-marizes teaching experience, hoping to provide references for college education and teaching reform.%随着信息技术与教育教学深度融合的推进,高校传统灌输式教学模式的藩篱正被微课、翻转课堂和慕课等混合式学习的新型教学模式所冲破,或将引发高校“学习的革命”,意味着教学模式的变革。本文基于翻转课堂的四要素及其关系,结合课前、课中和课后三个课堂教学阶段,设计翻转课堂的高校地理教学模式,并将其应用于地理科学专业的本科教学实践中,通过差异教学模式的学生反馈,总结经验,以期为高校教育教学改革提供参考。

  4. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents.

  5. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  6. Geography of European Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitin Dmitry V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the role of international migration has increased dramatically in most European countries. The growth in migration has made some authors proclaim the beginning of a second Migration Period that could transform the social and cultural identity of Europe. The article presents an analysis of international migration geography in Europe in the last twenty-five years. The authors identify the main trends in migration, provide migration profiles of European countries, and propose a classification based on the recent changes in the migrant stock. Changes in the migrant stock (total emigration and immigration reflect the level of involvement in international and global processes. They can serve as an indicator of a country’s attractiveness for both foreigners and the country’s citizens. The study shows that European countries are increasingly split into ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ states. The authors describe spatial patterns of migration. The volume and localisation of migration flows in Europe are affected not only by cultural and historical circumstance, such as a colonial past or a common language. The scale of immigrant influx often does not depend on a donor country’s demographic potential or the level of its socio-economic development. The links between the place of origin and destination are often more complex than it might initially seem. The authors stress the importance of a differentiated immigration policy taking into account ethnic and cultural features of host societies.

  7. Kilowatt-Class Fission Power Systems for Science and Human Precursor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.; Gibson, Marc Andrew; Poston, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power provides an enabling capability for NASA missions that might otherwise be constrained by power availability, mission duration, or operational robustness. NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing fission power technology to serve a wide range of future space uses. Advantages include lower mass, longer life, and greater mission flexibility than competing power system options. Kilowatt-class fission systems, designated "Kilopower," were conceived to address the need for systems to fill the gap above the current 100-W-class radioisotope power systems being developed for science missions and below the typical 100-k We-class reactor power systems being developed for human exploration missions. This paper reviews the current fission technology project and examines some Kilopower concepts that could be used to support future science missions or human precursors.

  8. Adding geography to the new economic geography : bridging the gap between theory and empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Brakman, S.; Garretsen, J.H.; Schramm, M.

    2010-01-01

    For reasons of analytical tractability, new economic geography (NEG) models treat geography in a very simple way, focusing on stylized 'unidimensional' geography structures (e.g. an equidistant or line economy). All the well-known NEG results are based on these simple geography structures. When doin

  9. Assessing Sustainability Teaching and Learning in Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Jeffrey M.; Gliedt, Travis; Tziganuk, Ashlee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to understand if geographers, who teach in a new sustainability program, are conveying new knowledge, understanding, skills and competence about the integrated and holistic concept of "sustainability", rather than individual human-environmental issues to the students. In other words, are geography professors…

  10. Nazi biopolitics and the dark geographies of the selva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giaccaria, P.; Minca, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the spatialities of Nazi genocidial practices. It does so by engaging with the concepts of selva and città, as inspired by Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben and drawing upon a broader tradition in human geography. Although the historical events that we recall have been extens

  11. The Romance of China: The Geography of Fascination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Christopher L.

    1987-01-01

    Shows how geography instructors can capitalize on student interest in China and its unique images in teaching basic geographic themes. Demonstrates how China can illustrate these five themes (which are absolute and relative location; physical and cultural place; human-environment interaction; movement; and region) in a way that will capture…

  12. Improving Wellness on Campus: Service Learning in a Human Nutrition Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bonnie

    2003-01-01

    In a human nutrition class, students are paired with university faculty or staff volunteer participants. Students teach their service learning partners how to record their food consumption and physical activity during a typical 7-day period. Using these data, students complete nutritional assessments of their partners. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Improving Wellness on Campus: Service Learning in a Human Nutrition Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bonnie

    2003-01-01

    In a human nutrition class, students are paired with university faculty or staff volunteer participants. Students teach their service learning partners how to record their food consumption and physical activity during a typical 7-day period. Using these data, students complete nutritional assessments of their partners. (Contains 2 figures.)

  14. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  15. The Human Relations Class at Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Katherine J.

    Human Relations was a program offered to Grade 10 students at Churchill Secondary School during the 1971-72 school year in lieu of four courses. The emphasis of the program was on the development of students as people who were more aware of themselves, of other people, and of the environment. The class took part in a variety of activities during…

  16. Human monoclonal HLA antibodies reveal interspecies crossreactive swine MHC class I epitopes relevant for xenotransplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; Kardol, M.J.; Arn, J.S.; Eijsink, C.; Franke, M.E.; Schreuder, G.M.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Doxiadis, I.I.; Sachs, D.H.; Smith, D.M.; Claas, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Crossreactivity of anti-HLA antibodies with SLA alleles may limit the use of pig xenografts in some highly sensitized patients. An understanding of the molecular basis for this crossreactivity may allow better selection of xenograft donors. We have tested 68 human monoclonal HLA class I antibodies (

  17. Biohorizons: An eConference to Assess Human Biology in Large, First-Year Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors detail the design, implementation and evaluation of an eConference entitled "Biohorizons," using a presage-process-product model to describe the development of an eLearning community. Biohorizons was a summative learning and assessment task aiming to introduce large classes of first-year Human Biology students to the practices of…

  18. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  19. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyurt, Secil

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth investigation of Turkish primary school students' perceptions of geography. Gender differences in students' perceptions of geography were investigated, including definitions of geography and its field of study. The findings showed that "landforms," "our geographical regions/Turkey,"…

  20. Fieldwork Lesson based on" the International Geography Olympiad" (iGeo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    Japanese social studies consist of three fields. That's geography, history and civics. About geographical studies in Japan, it has a lot of contents of human geography and has little contents of natural geography. I think that Japanese social studies teachers should teach more natural geography contents for ESD.   There is a fieldwork lesson in geographical studies in Japan. This is the educational activity by which body and head were used. But in fact, fieldwork lessons are not performed in many Japanese junior high schools. I was a leader of iGeo2012 (in Germany). iGeo is held by three tests; Multimedia tests, Writing tests and Fieldwork tests. The test is included of a lot of contents of natural geography. And there are two skills that students acquire through the fieldwork test in iGeo. One is a map making skill, the other is decision making skill. Japanese students need more knowledge of natural geography. And those are not enough skills for Japanese students. So I did a fieldwork lesson based on iGeo's fieldwork test. The fieldwork lesson was performed around the school. It was also performed under the point of natural geography. After the lessons, students could improve map making skill. Because a lot of maps made by students in this lesson got prize of map contest in Japan. Some maps were included the view of natural geography.

  1. Building Geography's New Frontier: Implementing the Australian Curriculum Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Geography as a compulsory learning area from Foundation year, such as Kindergarten, to Year 8 in Australia provides new opportunities for learning and teaching. Opportunities, in part, will be driven by challenges associated with the introduction of this learning area. Key challenges are about variability: in take-up of the…

  2. Everyday Geography: 365 Reflections on Why Geography Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Last year, beginning on New Year's Day, as president of the National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE), the author wrote one tweet every day beginning with "What is Geography? 1 of 365" and posted them to his Twitter page. His goals in the series were several. He sought to point out as organization president how the NCGE serves the geography…

  3. The Geology of Haiti: An Annotated Bibliography of Haiti’s Geology, Geography and Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    sciences, ecology, geomechanics , human geography, and oceanography. The database provides current coverage of almost 2,000 international journals...Geological Abstracts, Ecological Abstracts, International Development Abstracts and Oceanographic Literature Review, Geomechanics Abstracts. See

  4. Japan: Geography, Cuisine, and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Karen

    These materials are designed as four modules: geography, foods, the kitchen, and culture and are to be used singly or jointly as a unit on Japanese food and culture. Common ingredients of Japanese food, nutritional information, methods of preparation, and illustrations of utensils and eating implements are given in conjunction with cultural…

  5. Towards a Geography of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of the discipline of geography to the field of education is complex since they have both been dependent upon the contributions of other social science disciplines, particularly those in the mainstream of social sciences (economics, sociology and political science). Indeed, the number of researchers who would consider themselves as…

  6. Teaching Energy Geographies via Videography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    In our digital age of information acquisition, multimedia information streams are constant, constantly changing and often contain multiple messages about topics important to everyday life, such as energy geographies. Recognizing that college students are prime consumers of digital information, it seems that crafting of academic engagement for and…

  7. Geography in the International Baccalaureate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Stuart; Dawson, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) is doing much to promote the teaching of geography in schools. Since its establishment in 1968 to provide a common curriculum and university entrance credential for children of a geographically mobile international community, it has evolved and now includes schools in national systems all over the…

  8. The geography of Chinese science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, David Emanual; Gunessee, Saileshsingh; Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann;

    2014-01-01

    . The geography of Chinese science is thus not only monocentric as regards overall scientific output, but also exhibits unusually hierarchical collaboration patterns. Unlike in Europe and North America, national and regional capitals are becoming ever more important as scientific coordination centers....

  9. Arena Symposium: Dearing and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Brian; Quigley, George; Toyne, Peter; Johnston, Ron; Butlin, Robin A.; Beer, Andrew; Cutler, Cecile

    1998-01-01

    Presents eight papers delivered at a symposium on the impact of the Dearing Report on geography instruction in the United Kingdom. The Dearing Report reviews higher education and charts the course of curriculum and instruction for the next 20 years. The papers address standards, regional applications, and criticisms. (MJP)

  10. Geography of the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, B. H.

    1978-01-01

    The CSM classification serves as the starting point on the geography of the asteroid belt. Raw data on asteroid types are corrected for observational biases (against dark objects, for instance) to derive the distribution of types throughout the belt. Recent work on family members indicates that dynamical families have a true physical relationship, presumably indicating common origin in the breakup of a parent asteroid.

  11. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  12. Deconstruction Geography: A STEM Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhar, Adam M.; Duffield, Stacy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article will define the engineering design process used to create an integrated curriculum at STEM Center Middle School, and it features the planning, implementation, and revision of the Deconstruction Geography unit. The Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Center opened in the fall of 2009 as a way to relieve overcrowding at the…

  13. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  14. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  15. 班级管理的人文性%Humanity of Class Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立林

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage is a complex of spiritual motivation to promote the healthy development of a person for a long time. To explore ways to improve humanistic class management and realize the highly expression of humanism is a powerful complement to overall class management as well as a powerful support for the healthy and harmonious development of the class.%人文底蕴是促进一个人的长久、健康发展的精神动力、精神支柱的综合体。探索提高班级管理人文性的途径,实现班级管理人文性的高度体现,既是对班级全局管理的有力补充,又是班级健康和谐发展的有力支撑。

  16. Geography Geo-Wiki in the Classroom: Using Crowdsourcing to Enhance Geographical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Perger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool used to derive information, based on satellite imagery, to validate and enhance global land cover. Around 5000 users are registered, who contribute to different campaigns to collect data across various domains (e.g., agriculture, biomass, human impact, etc.. However, seeing the Earth’s surface from above does not provide all of the necessary information for understanding what is happening on the ground. Instead, we need to enhance this experience with local knowledge or with additional information, such as geo-located photographs of surface features with annotation. The latest development in enhancing Geo-Wiki in this context has been achieved through collaboration with the University of Waterloo to set up a separate branch called Geography Geo-Wiki for use in undergraduate teaching. We provide the pedagogical objectives for this branch and describe two modules that we have introduced in first and third year Physical Geography classes. The majority of the feedback was positive and in, many cases, was part of what the student liked best about the course. Future plans include the development of additional assignments for the study of environmental processes using Geo-Wiki that would engage students in a manner that is very different from that of conventional teaching.

  17. Lipooligosaccharide locus classes and putative virulence genes among chicken and human Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, Patrik; Hansson, Ingrid; Nilsson, Anna; Rautelin, Hilpi; Olsson Engvall, Eva

    2016-11-21

    Campylobacter cause morbidity and considerable economic loss due to hospitalization and post infectious sequelae such as reactive arthritis, Guillain Barré- and Miller Fischer syndromes. Such sequelae have been linked to C. jejuni harboring sialic acid structures in their lipooligosaccharide (LOS) layer of the cell wall. Poultry is an important source of human Campylobacter infections but little is known about the prevalence of sialylated C. jejuni isolates and the extent of transmission of such isolates to humans. Genotypes of C. jejuni isolates from enteritis patients were compared with those of broiler chicken with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), to study the patterns of LOS biosynthesis genes and other virulence associated genes and to what extent these occur among Campylobacter genotypes found both in humans and chickens. Chicken and human isolates generally had similar distributions of the putative virulence genes and LOS locus classes studied. However, there were significant differences regarding LOS locus class of PFGE types that were overlapping between chicken and human isolates and those that were distinct to each source. The study highlights the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Campylobacter isolates from humans and chickens and suggests possible patterns of transmission between the two species.

  18. Geography, demography, and economic growth in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, D E; Sachs, J D

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of climate, topography, and natural ecology on public health, nutrition, demographics, technological diffusion, international trade and other determinants of economic development in Africa. The goal of this paper is to emphasize the need for intensified research on the issues at the intersection of ecology and human society. Geography was given emphasis because of three reasons: the minimal gain from another recitation of the damage caused by statism, protectionism and corruption to African economic performance; negligence of the role of natural forces in shaping economic performance; and tailoring of policies to geographical realities. The paper also discusses the general problems of tropical development and the focus of Africa's problems in worldwide tropical perspectives; demographic trends in Africa; use of standard cross-country growth equations with demographic and geographic variables, to account for the relative roles of geography; and the future growth strategies and the need for urban-based export growth in manufacturing and services. Lastly, the authors provide a summary of conclusions and discuss the agenda for future research.

  19. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the ADH7 gene encoding human class IV ({sigma}) ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Baraona, E.; Lieber, C.S. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1996-01-15

    The ADH7 gene encoding human Class IV ({sigma}) alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was cloned from a Caucasian genomic DNA library and characterized. It has nine exons and eight introns that span about 22 kb, and its intron insertion is identical to that of the other ADH genes (ADH1 to ADH5). The nucleotide sequences of the exons encoding 374 amino acids are identical to the previously reported cDNA sequence of {sigma} ADH. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ADH7 is located on human chromosome 4q23-q24, close to the ADH cluster locus (4q21-q25). These data are consistent with the view that Class IV ADH is a member of the ADH family and is phylogenetically close to the other ADHs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Improving Student Writing Abilities in Geography: Examining the Benefits of Criterion-Based Assessment and Detailed Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; Wilson, Kathi; Boyd, Cleo

    2014-01-01

    Poor quality writing skills among undergraduate geography students is a significant concern among university instructors. This article reports on a multipronged strategy aimed at improving student writing in a large, first-year human geography course. The strategy emphasized ways to provide effective feedback through teaching assistant training,…

  1. Population structure and cultural geography of a folktale in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert M; Greenhill, Simon J; Atkinson, Quentin D

    2013-04-07

    Despite a burgeoning science of cultural evolution, relatively little work has focused on the population structure of human cultural variation. By contrast, studies in human population genetics use a suite of tools to quantify and analyse spatial and temporal patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Human genetic diversity can be explained largely as a result of migration and drift giving rise to gradual genetic clines, together with some discontinuities arising from geographical and cultural barriers to gene flow. Here, we adapt theory and methods from population genetics to quantify the influence of geography and ethnolinguistic boundaries on the distribution of 700 variants of a folktale in 31 European ethnolinguistic populations. We find that geographical distance and ethnolinguistic affiliation exert significant independent effects on folktale diversity and that variation between populations supports a clustering concordant with European geography. This pattern of geographical clines and clusters parallels the pattern of human genetic diversity in Europe, although the effects of geographical distance and ethnolinguistic boundaries are stronger for folktales than genes. Our findings highlight the importance of geography and population boundaries in models of human cultural variation and point to key similarities and differences between evolutionary processes operating on human genes and culture.

  2. Improving the Awareness of the Influence of Geography Upon Historical Events in Ancient Mesopotamia and in Ancient Egypt in Ninth Grade World History Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Henry

    This practicum was designed to incorporate the study of geography into a ninth grade world history class with the aim of improving student awareness of the influence of geography upon the historical development of ancient Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. By means of a questionnaire and map tests it was determined that ninth grade world history…

  3. Quantitative and selective polymerase chain reaction analysis of highly similar human alpha-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Emilia; Mannervik, Bengt; Raffalli-Mathieu, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Alpha-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) found expressed in human tissues constitute a family of four homologous enzymes with contrasting enzyme activities. In particular, GST A3-3 has been shown to contribute to the biosynthesis of steroid hormones in human cells and is selectively expressed in steroidogenic tissues. The more ubiquitous GST A1-1, GST A2-2, and GST A4-4 appear to be primarily involved in detoxification processes and are expressed at higher levels than GST A3-3. We are interested in studying the cell and tissue expression of the GST A3-3 gene, yet the existence of highly expressed sequence-similar homologs and of several splice variants is a serious challenge for the specific detection of unique transcript species. We found that published polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for GST A3-3 lack the specificity required for reliable quantitative analysis. Therefore, we designed quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers with greatly increased discrimination power for the human GSTA3 full-length transcript. The improved primers allow accurate discrimination between GST A3-3 and the other alpha-class GSTs and so are of great value to studies of the expression of the GSTA3 gene. The novel primers were used to quantify GSTA3 transcripts in human embryonic liver and steroidogenic cell lines.

  4. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  5. Geographies of High Frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the geographies of high frequency trading. Today shares shift hands within micro seconds, giving rise to a form of financial geographies termed algorithmic capitalism. This notion refers to the different spatio-temporalities produced by high frequency trading, under...... the valuation of time. As high frequency trading accelerates financial markets, the paper examines the spatio-temporalities of automated trading by the ways in which the speed of knowledge exploitation in financial markets is not only of interest, but also the expansion between different temporalities....... The paper demonstrates how the intensification of time-space compression produces radical new dynamics in the financial market and develops information rent in HFT as convertible to a time rent and a spatio-temporal rent. The final section discusses whether high frequency trading only responds to crises...

  6. Persistence of hepatitis C virus in a white population: associations with human leukocyte antigen class 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aim of this study was to define novel associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class 1 alleles and persistence or clearance of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a white population. All individuals in the study were seropositive for anti-HCV antibodies. Viral status was determined by the Roche HCV Amplicor test. HLA-A, -B, -C allelic group profile was molecularly defined by reverse line probe hybridization. The strongest individual allelic group associations with persistent HCV infection were HLA A*11 (p = 0.044) and Cw*04 (p = 0.006). However, only the HLA C*04 association survived correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of alleles in linkage with HLA Cw*04 revealed that the haplotype HLA A*11, Cw*04 was present in 11 individuals, 10 of whom were viremic (p = 0.05). No gene dosage effect was observed. No association between HLA class 1 allelic groups and aviremia and virus load was evident in this white population. HLA B*44 is associated with low virus load in human immunodeficiency virus disease, but this association was not evident in this HCV-infected population. Novel HLA class 1 alleles associated with persistence of HCV have been identified.

  7. Helping Your Child Learn Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1996-01-01

    By the year 2000, all students will leave grades 4, 8, and 12 having demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter including English, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography, and every school in America will ensure that all students learn to use their minds well, so they may be prepared for responsible citizenship, further learning, and productive employment in our Nation's modern economy.

  8. A Study on the Improvement of the Lesson Analysis Ability and its Effects by the Pre-servise Teachers : A Case Study of the Students Who Take the Class of "Teaching Method of Geography and History Education"

    OpenAIRE

    岡田, 了祐; 草原, 和博

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the improvement and its effect of the lesson analysis ability in the teacher training program of social studies. In this papar, we analyze the interviews with the 3 students who have finished the teaching method class. As a result, it became clear that the factors which improve the lesson analysis ability are as follows: 1) the feedback of the students' outstanding analysis report, 2) the demonstration of the instructors' analysis model, and 3) the assi...

  9. Geography Education: Applying Spatial Aspects to Everyday Life: American Association of Geographers Geography Education Specialty Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessell, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his career teaching geography, Johnathan Wessell has always stressed to his students that they already knew a lot about geography before they entered his classroom. He writes in this article that once he convinces his students of this, they begin to realize that geography is all around them, and that they, in turn, begin to shift their…

  10. Does the High School Geography Experience Influence Enrollment in University Geography Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; McLaughlin, Christina; Wilson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that owing to profound difficulties with high school geography curricula, teachers play a vital role in stimulating student interest and in providing a platform for continuation in the study of geography at university. Yet, with little empirical evidence offered in support, it is unclear why students select geography at…

  11. Reconciling Discourse about Geography and Teaching Geography: The Case of Singapore Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon a Foucauldian notion of discourse to explore how four pre-service geography teachers in Singapore made decisions about what geography is and how to enact their understandings of geography in their classrooms. This analysis of discursive power is particularly relevant to Singapore because of the high level of state control…

  12. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  13. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G.; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  14. Planetary Landscape Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.

    the landscape. Unique or common landscape forms: Depending on the given planet, one feature can have special value (or can be of different scientific importance): on Io, a impact crater would be more important, than on the Moon, etc. Current processes: Naturally, "living" landscapes (with active volcanoes, geysers, dust devils or active weather processes) are more valuable than "dead" ones. Cultural landscape values. Human presence on a extraterrestrial body is of high impor- tance. Human landing sites with footprints or landing sites with spacecraft "debris" or scientific devices makes any - otherwise unimportant - landscape valuable for us. Even the proper names of surface features will change their physical value: for a Hungarian, for example, a crater named after a Hungarian scientist will have a special value and will attract more interest than other craters. These factors are comparable with our tourist value categories. Economical landscape values. As on Earth, it makes an area more valuable if it has economically usable and profitable raw materials: minerals, rocks (impactites and other materials formed in special conditions or a long time ago). Aesthetic landscape values. We, humans, consider this as an other important factor since the German painter A. Altdorfer in the 16th century has first chosen certain land- 2 scapes that he considered to be of artistic value even without human figures present in the landscape. Parts of aesthetic landscape values are not part of the surface or local environment but of the planet or planetary system: the color of lack of the atmosphere, clouds, the characteristics of the visible moons. The abiogenic surface elements of this category are for example sand dunes, relief forms with order in their shape or distri- bution, or extreme landforms: extensive smooth plains or deep canyons. "Human presence (or life) - friendliness" values. Conditions for longer human pres- ence will be one of the most important factors when we start

  15. Mapping and characterization of non-HLA multigene assemblages in the human MHC class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.; Geraghty, D.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region has been shown to be associated with a variety of immune and nonimmune disorders. In an effort to initiate steps designed to identify the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the authors have cloned and mapped two expressed messages using probes from the HLA-H subregion that lie immediately distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint. Although the cDNA clones identify distinct multifragment families that are dispersed throughout the MHC, the gene sequences from which the two cDNA clones derive map centromeric to the HLA-B locus and are absent from the genomes of higher nonhuman primates. This suggests that a syntenic coding segment arose within a highly polymorphic region (TNF to HLA-B interval) as the result of an insertion event following the emergence of Homo sapiens. An additional syntenic cluster exists within a peak of linkage disequilibrium with the HFE gene and may define coding sequences that underlie the defect in genetic iron overload. These data generally support the concept that the class I region is potentially gene-rich and further highlight the possibility that these new coding sequences may play a role in the development of a variety of HLA-linked diseases. The observations presented suggest that interlocus exchanges have played a structural role in the genesis of the human class I region. 46 refs., 6 refs.

  16. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  17. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants.

  18. Enhancing the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Chong, E.

    2011-12-01

    Singapore has a long tradition of geography education at the secondary and Junior College levels (ages 12-18). Although most geography teachers teach both human and physical geography, many of them have received more extensive university training in human geography. The Earth Obervatory of Singapore (EOS), a newly established research institute at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), is building an education and outreach program to integrate its research across formal and informal education. We are collaborating with the Singapore Ministry of Education to enhance the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore classrooms. EOS is providing input to national curriculum, textbook materials, and teaching resources, as well as providing inquiry-based field seminars and workshops for inservice teachers. An upcoming 5-year "Our Dynamic Earth" exhibit at the Science Centre Singapore will be a centerpoint of outreach to younger students, their teachers and parents, and to the community at large. On a longer time scale, the upcoming undergraduate program in earth science at NTU, the first of its kind in Singapore, will provide a stream of earth scientists into the geography teaching workforce. Developing ties between EOS and the National Institute of Education will further enhance teacher training. With a highly centralized curriculum, small land area, high-performing student population, and key stakeholders eager to collaborate with EOS, Singapore presents an unusual opportunity to impact classrooms on a national scale.

  19. THEORETICAL CONCEPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHY TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Montes Galbán

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to determine the current theoretical concepts handled by third stage basic education geography teachers. A non experimental descriptive study was made. Data was collected through a semi structured questionnaire. The population was conformed by the teachers who work at the National schools placed in the parishes Raul Leoni and Cacique Mara of Maracaibo city, Zulia State. There is not clarity in regard to the correct handling of the different geographic currents, and the slight notion teachers have leans towards a traditional, descriptive, retrospective memory based conception.

  20. Migrations in Slovenian geography textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Senegačnik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Slovenia, the migrations are treated in almost all geographical textbooks for different levels of education. In the textbooks for the elementary school from the sixth to ninth grade, students acquire knowledge of the migrations by the inductive approach. Difficulty level of treatment and quantity of information are increasing by the age level. In the grammar school program a trail of gaining knowledge on migration is deductive. Most attention is dedicated to migrations in general geography textbooks. The textbooks for vocational and technical school programs deal with migrations to a lesser extent and with different approaches.

  1. Economic development and the geography of institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    To explain cross-country income differences, research has recently focused on the so-called deep determinants of economic development, notably institutions and geography. This article shows that it is not only absolute geography, in terms of for instance climate or being landlocked, but also relativ

  2. Teaching geography yesterday, today and tommorow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Kunaver

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the professional education in teaching geography in Slovene language has an age of about one hundred ycars, without intermission. The author expresses the opinion that the nowadays theoretical and praetical didactics of geography should be better linked with the research vvork and should also faster follow the results from abroad.

  3. Omani Students' Definitions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nofli, Mohammed Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on students' definitions of geography. The purpose of the present study was to add to the existing literature by exploring Omani students' definitions of geography. Participants were 477 students of grade 6 (ages 11-12) and grade 10 (ages 15-16) in one school district in Oman. They had been taught…

  4. Geography and Technology in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George A.

    1994-01-01

    Multimedia instruction, which combines visual images, video clips, music, voice, and text, is a compelling way to engage students' interest in geography. The computer, telecommunications, and multimedia are tools that today's students will use in their adult working lives. The National Geographic Society can enhance geography instruction with two…

  5. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopherson, Robert, W.; Birkeland, Ginger

    Among the most highly regarded in physical geography, Robert Christopherson’s best-selling texts are known for their meticulous attention to detail, currency, accuracy, and rich integration of climate change science. Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography,Ninth Edition is uniquely orga...

  6. Trade costs in empirical New Economic Geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, E.M.; Garretsen, J.H.

    Trade costs are a crucial element of New Economic Geography (NEG) models. Without trade costs there is no role for geography. In empirical NEG studies the unavailability of direct trade cost data calls for the need to approximate these trade costs by introducing a trade cost function. In doing so,

  7. Beyond Science and Math: Integrating Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael E.; Grubbs, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the status of World Geography Education and the importance of these concepts in developing 21st century students. Moreover, the authors also showcase how World Geography concepts can be intentionally taught through a technological/engineering, design-based learning challenge that requires students to solve a global housing…

  8. Teaching Geography through an Animated Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Waters, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Geography is a fun and exciting discipline involving the interrogation of place and space. Film is a powerful and meaningful tool, which also transmits perceptions of place and space. Therefore, this article builds a rationale for utilizing film in the teaching of geography, particularly animated film. Next, it discusses two classroom-tested…

  9. Geography at QUT: Evolution of a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Iraphne R. W.; Hastings, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the constraints encountered in developing and introducing a geography discipline programme, with a distinctive regional focus, within a university of technology. Through a case study approach, the analysis relates the development of geography at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) to changes in geographical education in…

  10. Experiencing the New Geography in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Uli; Burpee, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Considers the difficulties experienced by the East German School system adjusting to a more progressive educational philosophy. Specifically, contrasts the traditional East German geography instruction (focused solely on physical geography) with the West German emphasis on social issues and problem solving. Many East German instructors distrust…

  11. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  12. [Seed geography: its concept and basic scientific issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shun-Li; Wang, Zong-Shuai; Zeren, Wangmu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new concept 'seed geography' was provided, and its definition, research contents, and scientific issues were put forward. Seed geography is a newly developed interdisciplinary science from plant geography, seed ecology, and phytosociology, which studies the geographic variation patterns of seed biological traits as well as their relationships with environmental factors from macroscopic to microscopic, and the seed formation, development, and change trends. The main research contents would include geography of seed mass, geography of seed chemical components, geography of seed morphology, geography of seed cell biological characteristics, geography of seed physiological characteristics, geography of seed genetic characteristics, and geography of flower and fruit. To explore the scientific issues in seed geography would help us to better understand the long-term adaptation and evolution of seed characteristics to natural environments.

  13. Using Location-Aware Technology for Learning Geography in a Real Digital Space outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Pamela; Butler, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The use of new mobile technologies is still in its infancy in many secondary schools and there is limited evidence of the educational and pedagogical benefits on pupils' learning in the formal school context. This qualitative study focuses on the use of handheld devices to teach a topic in geography to an examination class. Action research…

  14. Teaching World Geography to Late-Arrival Immigrant Students: Highlighting Practice and Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Cinthia; Franquiz, Maria E.; Reidel, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    In this case study, the work of an exemplary high school social studies teacher is highlighted. In her class, late-arrival immigrant students participated in oral, writing, and demonstration activities as they learned the physical, cultural, and historical traditions of geography education. As newcomers to the English language, the students'…

  15. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  16. Strengthening the ties between university and school - Bilingual geography is the future for our multifarious subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikel, F.

    2003-04-01

    An incessantly growing interaction between numerous fields of human activity asks for an open-minded approach and interdisciplinarity. No subject matches geography when it comes to bridging the gaps between different aspects of human life. Geography does not only describe, analyse and explain the "natural" state of the world we live in, it does also connect the disciplines within the physical branch of the subject with disciplines in the human or anthropogenic part, which describes the state of the world "as is". Geography is, therefore, in itself multi-disciplinary. Considering the immense importance of geography as the subject dealing with our environment and facing the fact that it is this environment which is already endangered by the multiple forms of human interference, geography and its multi-disciplinary character deserve even increased attention. The growth of the world's population, future climatic change and shortages of natural resources add to the importance of geography as the one subject in school dealing with these problems. In our societies, which are constantly growing together in political and economic issues, the structures of communication additionally mainly rely on an easily accessible and widely spread language like English to serve the needs of modern international contact. In Bavaria, the signs of the times have been recognized quite early. Nearly 8000 pupils at more than 80 high-level secondary schools ("Gymnasien") attend bilingual teaching, a large part of which is performed in geography. The Adolf-Weber-Gymnasium serves as an example, since it has the largest group of pupils instructed in bilingual geography in Munich. Next term, more than 150 boys and girls from five grades will be taught geography in English. Our goal is, in contrast to concepts of bilingual teaching in some other German states, not only to improve the language capability of our pupils. It is more an investment in scientific propaedeutics. It strenghtens the ties

  17. Assessing the Biohazard Potential of Putative Martian Organisms for Exploration Class Human Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmflash, David; Larios-Sanz, Maia; Jones, Jeffrey; Fox, George E.; McKay, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Exploration Class missions to Mars will require precautions against potential contamination by any native microorganisms that may be incidentally pathogenic to humans. While the results of NASA's Viking biology experiments of 1976 have been generally interpreted as inconclusive for surface organisms, the possibility of native surface life has never been ruled out and more recent studies suggest that the case for biological interpretation of the Viking Labeled Release data may now be stronger than it was when the experiments were originally conducted. It is possible that, prior to the first human landing on Mars, robotic craft and sample return missions will provide enough data to know with certainty whether or not future human landing sites harbor extant life forms. However, if native life is confirmed, it will be problematic to determine whether any of its species may present a medical risk to astronauts. Therefore, it will become necessary to assess empirically the risk that the planet contains pathogens based on terrestrial examples of pathogenicity and to take a reasonably cautious approach to bio-hazard protection. A survey of terrestrial pathogens was conducted with special emphasis on those pathogens whose evolution has not depended on the presence of animal hosts. The history of the development and implementation of Apollo anticontamination protocol and recent recommendations of the NRC Space Studies Board regarding Mars were reviewed. Organisms can emerge in nature in the absence of indigenous animal hosts and both infectious and non-infectious human pathogens are theoretically possible on Mars. The prospect of Martian surface life, together with the existence of a diversity of routes by which pathogenicity has emerged on Earth, suggests that the possibility of human pathogens on Mars, while low, is not zero. Since the discovery and study of Martian life can have long-term benefits for humanity, the risk that Martian life might include pathogens should not

  18. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  19. The Human Space Life Sciences Critical Path Roadmap Project: A Strategy for Human Space Flight through Exploration-Class Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    The product of the critical path roadmap project is an integrated strategy for mitigating the risks associated with human exploration class missions. It is an evolving process that will assure the ability to communicate the integrated critical path roadmap. Unlike previous reports, this one will not sit on a shelf - it has the full support of the JSC Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SA) and is already being used as a decision making tool (e.g., budget and investigation planning for Shuttle and Space Station mission). Utility of this product depends on many efforts, namely: providing the required information (completed risk data sheets, critical question information, technology data). It is essential to communicate the results of the critical path roadmap to the scientific community - this meeting is a good opportunity to do so. The web site envisioned for the critical path roadmap will provide the capability to communicate to a broader community and to track and update the system routinely.

  20. Technology and educational innovation. The thirty-year history of a learning unit in quantitative geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Chiappini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a project in computer-mediated educational innovation for the teaching of geography which has been carried out at the Don Milani Experimental Middle School in Genoa. The project concerns a learning unit in quantitative geography that has helped to change the way this discipline is taught in the school. Given its special features and durability over time (28 years, this experience represents a benchmark for studying (a the way in which a technology-mediated educational innovation project can germinate and grow to involve all school classes, and (b the conditions that ensure sustainability over time.

  1. Origins and relatedness of human leukocyte antigen class I allele supertypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles can be classified into supertypes based on the epitope specificity of their peptide binding grooves. The evolutionary origin of these supertypes has been the topic of prior research and remains an important question because of the increasing interest in HLA supertypes in the contexts of infection and cancer epidemiology and vaccine development. Here I re-examine the origins of HLA class I supertypes using the nucleotide sequences of 88 HLA-A alleles and 117 HLA-B alleles. Phylogenetic trees with ancestral character state reconstruction show that the HLA-A02, A03, and A24 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestral origin while HLA-A01 shows multiple independent origins all from HLA-A03 ancestors. HLA-B supertypes show multiple origins for the B07, B08, and B27 supertypes, while the B44, B58, and B62 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestor. Supertypes arising multiple times show different amino acid substitutions in each clade. These findings suggest that convergent evolution has occurred in only a few HLA allele supertypes and may indicate different evolutionary pressures shaping certain supertypes.

  2. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    2014-01-01

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is eas

  3. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is

  4. Geography Teachers' Stories of Sustainability: An Introduction to Narrative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Geography teacher recruitment and retention is an important issue for the future of geography education. This Special Issue of "International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education" ("IRGEE") tackles this issue head on by focusing on geography teachers' narratives about their experiences of teaching geography, and…

  5. Information Geography: A Bridge between Engineering and the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the metaphor of engineering and the social sciences located on either side of a chasm and connected by the bridge of information geography. Information geography is not an integral part of engineering and is a new field within geography, a social science discipline. The specialty of information geography is one of the newest in…

  6. Barriers to Teaching Introductory Physical Geography Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. RITTER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning geography online is becoming an option for more students but not without controversy. Issues of faculty resources, logistics, professional recognition, and pedagogical concerns are cited as barriers to teaching online. Offering introductory physical geography online presents special challenges. As a general education course, an introductory physical geography course has a diverse population of students with disparate educational needs and goals that impacts its ability to be delivered online. Online learning is further complicated when lab courses require specialized laboratory equipment and fieldwork. A survey of geography departments in the United States was conducted to determine barriers to the deployment of introductory physical geography lab courses. Lack of faculty interest, faculty resources, and pedagogical concerns were found to be the most important barriers to deploying online physical geography lab courses. Knowing the challenges faced by geography departments offering online courses provides insight into where valuable support services and resources can best be used to address them. Recent advances in blogging, podcasting, lecture capture, web conferencing, and augmented reality are offered as solutions to the concerns expressed by survey respondents.

  7. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  8. Insight into the Mechanism of Human Herpesvirus 7 U21-mediated Diversion of Class I MHC Molecules to Lysosomes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosson, Nicole L.; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Schneider, Christine L.; Ristow, Laura C.; Wang, Qiuhong; Hudson, Amy W.

    2010-01-01

    The U21 open reading frame from human herpesvirus-7 encodes a membrane protein that associates with and redirects class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. The mechanism by which U21 accomplishes this trafficking excursion is unknown. Here we have examined the contribution of localization, glycosylation, domain structure, and the absence of substrate class I MHC molecules on the ability of U21 to traffic to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a cellular protein necessary for U21-mediated rerouting of class I MHC molecules. PMID:20833720

  9. 浅谈快乐地理教学%Introduction to Happy Geography Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小珍

    2014-01-01

    The geography teaching happy in order to improve the teaching efficiency, promote the students happy to learn, there is also con-ducive to the transmission of knowledge. Mainly from these aspects:talk about the experience of happiness regulations;happy geography class-room;happy geography exam.%快乐的地理教学有利于提高教学效率,促进学生快乐学习,也有利于知识的进一步传输。主要从这几方面谈谈体会:快乐的规章制度;快乐的地理课堂;快乐的地理考试。

  10. Big Data in Transport Geography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Agerholm, Niels; Lahrmann, Harry Spaabæk

    The emergence of new tracking technologies and Big Data has caused a transformation of the transport geography field in recent years. One new datatype, which is starting to play a significant role in public transport, is smart card data. Despite the growing focus on smart card data, there is a need...... for studies that explicitly compare the quality of this new type of data to traditional data sources. With the current focus on Big Data in the transport field, public transport planners are increasingly looking towards smart card data to analyze and optimize flows of passengers. However, in many cases...... it is not all public transport passengers in a city, region or country with a smart card system that uses the system, and in such cases, it is important to know what biases smart card data has in relation to giving a complete view upon passenger flows. This paper therefore analyses the quality and biases...

  11. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  12. Imagined Transcultural Histories and Geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Winter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a globalised world, an assumption prevails that the nation has somehow lost its power to regulate our lives, being undermined by other forces, either top-down through the impact of global capitalism or bottom-up through migrations, transnational religious, ethnic or social movement communities or other transversal politics. A related idea is that ‘culture’ is now irrevocably hybridised and border-zoned, that we no longer live in a world of discrete, located, identifiable and historically grounded cultures but in some unstable and for-the-moment insterstitiality, a sort of cultural interlanguage that sits outside well-mapped structures of power. Yet, just as the nation and the boundaries it sets around culture are being conceptually chased from our maps of the world, they come galloping back to reassert themselves. They do so politically, economically, legally, symbolically. Amidst all the noise of our transnationalisms, hybridities and interstitialities, the idea of what it is to be ‘Australian’ or ‘French’ or ‘Filipino’ or ‘Asian’ reaffirms itself, in mental geographies and constructed histories, as our ‘imagined community’ (to use Benedict Anderson’s famous term [Anderson 1983], or indeed, ‘imagined Other’, even if it is an imagined ‘Other’ that we would somehow wish to incorporate into our newly hybridised Self. Using the notion of transcultural mappings, the articles in this special issue investigate this apparent paradox. They look at how the Self and Other have been mapped through imagined links between geography, history and cultural location. They interrogate the tension between the persistence of mappings of the world based on discrete national or cultural identities on one hand, and, on the other hand, the push to move beyond these carefully guarded borders and problematise precise notions of identity and belonging.

  13. Assessing Tsunami Vulnerabilities of Geographies with Shallow Water Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2012-01-01

    Tsunami preparedness is crucial for saving human lives in case of disasters that involve massive water movement. In this work, we develop a framework for visual assessment of tsunami preparedness of geographies. Shallow water equations (also called Saint Venant equations) are a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations that are derived by depth-integrating the Navier-Stokes equations and provide a great abstraction of water masses that have lower depths compared to their free surface area. Our specific contribution in this study is to use Microsoft's XNA Game Studio to import underwater and shore line geographies, create different tsunami scenarios, and visualize the propagation of the waves and their impact on the shore line geography. Most importantly, we utilized the computational power of graphical processing units (GPUs) as HLSL based shader files and delegated all of the heavy computations to the GPU. Finally, we also conducted a validation study, in which we have tested our model against a controlled shallow water experiment. We believe that such a framework with an easy to use interface that is based on readily available software libraries, which are widely available and easily distributable, would encourage not only researchers, but also educators to showcase ideas.

  14. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  15. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-07-30

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 semaphorins, and their receptors; plexins and neuropilins within human NP tissue and their regulation by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Importantly this determined whether semaphorin expression was associated with the presence of nerves and blood vessels in tissues from human intervertebral discs. The study demonstrated that semaphorin3A, 3C, 3D, 3E and 3F and their receptors were expressed by native NP cells and further demonstrated their expression was regulated by IL-1β but to a lesser extent by IL-6 and TNFα. This is the first study to identify sema3C, sema3D and their receptors within the nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Immunopositivity shows significant increases in semaphorin3C, 3D and their receptor neuropilin-2 in degenerate samples which were shown to contain nerves and blood vessels, compared to non-degenerate samples without nerves and blood vessels. Therefore data presented here suggests that semaphorin3C may have a role in promoting innervation and vascularisation during degeneration, which may go on to cause low back pain.

  16. Spatial dependence of genetic data related to human health and livestock disease resistance: a role for geography to support the One Health approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Joost

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial dependence of located health and/or genetic data can be used to detect clusters likely to reveal disease prevalence or signatures of adaptation possibly associated with characteristics of the local environment (high temperatures, air or water pollution, be it in humans or animals (Murtaugh et al. 2017. Most often, geographic maps are produced to represent health data. Medical information is transmitted through thematic choropleth maps. For instance administrative units are colored according to the variable of interest. But it is key to analyse health and/or genetic data by explicitly including geographic characteristics (distances, co-location and also the potential and power of spatial statistics to detect specific patterns in the geographic distribution of disease occurrences (“make visible the invisible”. A classic example using clusters is the map produced by John Snow (Snow 1855 showing the number of deaths caused by a cholera outbreak in London. Looking at a detail of Snow's original map, it is possible to realize how he graphically represented the number of deaths, with short bold lines representing death occurrences (frequencies forming a kind of histogram placed on the street at the addresses where it happened - what we currently name georeferencing. A cluster of death people is an effect observed on the territory, and the existence of such a cluster depends on an infected water pump located at the same place (the cause. How can this spatial dependence be detected and measured? It is possible to identify spatial patterns in the geographic space by means of spatial statistics. We need to determine whether the variable of interest is randomly distributed or spatially dependent, and to check if the patterns observed are robust to random permutations. We also need to explore the data, to find out what is the range of influence of this spatial dependence. Here we focus on the functioning of one among several measures of

  17. Human Activity Recognition from Smart-Phone Sensor Data using a Multi-Class Ensemble Learning in Home Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Karunanithi, Mohan; Dowling, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Home monitoring of chronically ill or elderly patient can reduce frequent hospitalisations and hence provide improved quality of care at a reduced cost to the community, therefore reducing the burden on the healthcare system. Activity recognition of such patients is of high importance in such a design. In this work, a system for automatic human physical activity recognition from smart-phone inertial sensors data is proposed. An ensemble of decision trees framework is adopted to train and predict the multi-class human activity system. A comparison of our proposed method with a multi-class traditional support vector machine shows significant improvement in activity recognition accuracies.

  18. Development of population geography from antropogeography to spatial-analitical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasovski Milena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Population geography is a subdiscipline of Human geography and studies the distribution, concentration and density of population over the terestrial surface, as well as differences in population size, changes and characteristics, like structures, migrations, activity etc, among some places present compared to others. Population geography has had a perscientific stage as long as human history. First modern scientific treatis of population in geography was the F. Ratzels book Antropogeography in 1882. During the first half of the XX century, French geographer Vidal de la Blanche gave a capital importance of population studies in his work Principes de Geographie Humaine. In interwar years, various aspects of population were studied. After The Second World War started the renovating movement of geography and new tendencies appear in human geography and, consequently in population geography. Attempts were made to define population geography as a separate sub-discipline. The world wide trend of treating population geography as separate discipline was expressed by publishing monographs, bibliographies and textbooks. The most significant authors who worked on defining population geography were French geographers P. George (1951, 1959, Beaujen-Garnier (1965, 1966; North-american geographers: G. Trewarta (1953, 1969, W. Bunge (1962, J. Clance (1965, 1971, W. Zelinski (1966; in Great Britain: J.I. Clarke (1965; in USSR: Ju.G. Sauškin i D.N. Anučin (1950, V.V. Pokšiševskij (1966, D.I. Valentej (1973; in Poland V. Ormotski (1931, L. Kosinski (1967 A. Jagelski (1980. Those authors and their works had the significant influence on the development of population science in the world and also in Serbia. Although the development of population geography was different in different countries and scientific research centers, we can clearly defined four stages. First stage lasted untill 1960s and was characterised by works of G.Trewarta, H. Doerres Ju.G. Sauškin, D

  19. Department of Geography and Environmental Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-02

    Sep 2, 2016 ... Department of Geography and Planning, University of Jos, Nigeria. Abstract. This study assessed ... climates (global, regional, and local) have never been static. ..... Synthesis of its Nature, causes,. Effects and Management ...

  20. Geography and glocal scale - generational conversion/Geografia i skala glokalna - przemiana generacyjna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirveli, Marika; Lewczuk, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    The proposed text presents a conceptual change in the scope of some of the key concepts in the light of the two dictionaries (Britannica and Human Geography Dictionary) and Anglo-Saxon publications about the future of geography. Then, it combines the concept of references to the ongoing interdisciplinary studies included in the structure of the University of the Second and Third Generation. Applications built this way are of two types: (1) referring to a fundamental change in the process within the human perception of the environment for generations X and Y, and (2) referring to the process of glocalization, glocal scale and premises of the University of the Third Generation (3GU)

  1. The creation and circulation of public geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Linehan, Denis; O'Callaghan, Cian; Lawton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In response to the commentaries, we discuss further how social media disrupts and remakes the creation and circulation of geographical knowledges and potentially reconfigures the moral economy of the social sciences. In particular, we examine questions of what is meant by public geography, the publics which such geographies serve, alternative and complementary approaches to social media, the politics of authorship within collective blogs, the politics and mechanisms of knowledge c...

  2. The impacts of Walter Isard on geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Randall W.

    In the course of preparing this paper, which initially focused solely on identifying the impacts of input-output analysis on geography, a much broader perspective on the impacts of Walter Isard on geography ultimately emerged. In the tradition of input-output analysis, these impacts are grouped into direct, indirect, and induced effects, and summarized under the heading of influence. Walter Isard touched the lives of many through personal relationships, books and articles, and an energetic devotion to and enthusiasm for the creation of a regional science association. The Regional Science Association and its publications supported something of a greenhouse environment in which the seedlings of GIS and scientific geography could take root, until they were well enough established to enter mainstream geography. While clearly not limited to geography, the fruits of Walter Isard's labors continue to populate the discipline through his contemporaries, their students, students' students, and so on. The formative years of both regional science and scientific geography left an indelible mark on the nature of geographic inquiry.

  3. Human immune responses to H. pylori HLA Class II epitopes identified by immunoinformatic methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Zhang

    Full Text Available H. pylori persists in the human stomach over decades and promotes several adverse clinical sequelae including gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer that are linked to the induction and subsequent evasion of chronic gastric inflammation. Emerging evidence indicates that H. pylori infection may also protect against asthma and some other immune-mediated conditions through regulatory T cell effects outside the stomach. To characterize the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response generated during H. pylori infection, computational methods were previously used to generate a panel of 90 predicted epitopes conserved among H. pylori genomes that broadly cover HLA Class II diversity for maximum population coverage. Here, these sequences were tested individually for their ability to induce in vitro responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by interferon-γ ELISpot assay. The average number of spot-forming cells/million PBMCs was significantly elevated in H. pylori-infected subjects over uninfected persons. Ten of the 90 peptides stimulated IFN-γ secretion in the H. pylori-infected group only, whereas two out of the 90 peptides elicited a detectable IFN-γ response in the H. pylori-uninfected subjects but no response in the H. pylori-infected group. Cytokine ELISA measurements performed using in vitro PBMC culture supernatants demonstrated significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β1 in the H. pylori-infected subjects, whereas IL-17A expression was not related to the subjects H. pylori-infection status. Our results indicate that the human T cell responses to these 90 peptides are generally increased in actively H. pylori-infected, compared with H. pylori-naïve, subjects. This information will improve understanding of the complex immune response to H. pylori, aiding rational epitope-driven vaccine design as well as helping identify other H. pylori epitopes with potentially immunoregulatory effects.

  4. High specificity of human secretory class II phospholipase A2 for phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Yoon, E T; Cho, W

    1997-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent lipid second messenger which stimulates platelet aggregation, cell proliferation and smooth-muscle contraction. The phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-catalysed hydrolysis of phosphatidic acid (PA) is thought to be a primary synthetic route for LPA. Of the multiple forms of PLA2 present in human tissues, human secretory class-II PLA2 (hs-PLA2) has been implicated in the production of LPA from platelets and whole blood cells challenged with inflammatory stimuli. To explore further the possibility that hs-PLA2 is involved in the production of LPA, we rigorously measured the phospholipid head group specificity of hs-PLA2 by a novel PLA2 kinetic system using polymerized mixed liposomes. Kinetic analysis of recombinant hs-PLA2 demonstrates that hs-PLA2 strongly prefers PA as substrate over other phospholipids found in the mammalian plasma membrane including phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The order of preference is PA > PE approximately PS > PC. To identify amino acid residues of hs-PLA2 that are involved in its unique substrate specificity, we mutated two residues, Glu-56 and Lys-69, which were shown to interact with the phospholipid head group in the X-ray-crystallographic structure of the hs-PLA2-transition-state-analogue complex. The K69Y mutant showed selective inactivation toward PA whereas the E56K mutant displayed a most pronounced inactivation to PE. Thus it appears that Lys-69 is at least partially involved in the PA specificity of hs-PLA2 and Glu-56 in the distinction between PE and PC. In conjunction with a recent cell study [Fourcade, Simon, Viode, Rugani, Leballe, Ragab, Fournie, Sarda and Chap (1995) Cell 80, 919-927], these studies suggest that hs-PLA2 can rapidly hydrolyse PA molecules exposed to the outer layer of cell-derived microvesicles and thereby produce LPA.

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...

  6. Two-Year Community: Human Anatomy Software Use in Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyatt, Brian L.; Baker, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of human anatomy software in face-to-face and online anatomy laboratory classes. Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor perceived learning was measured for students using Pearson Education's Practice Anatomy Laboratory 2.0 software. This study determined that student-perceived learning was significantly…

  7. Academic Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes: A 2-Yr Study of Academic Motivation and Grade Expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic…

  8. Academic Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes: A 2-Yr Study of Academic Motivation and Grade Expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic…

  9. Fieldwork in Geography Education: Defining or Declining? The State of Fieldwork in Canadian Undergraduate Geography Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; Leydon, Joseph; Wincentak, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the prevalence of fieldwork in undergraduate Geography programs in Canada. It examines the presence of fieldwork, provided through both field courses and courses that include fieldwork components, by reviewing program requirements and course offerings in undergraduate geography programs. The research explores the extent to…

  10. Sprint mechanics in world-class athletes: a new insight into the limits of human locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabita, G; Dorel, S; Slawinski, J; Sàez-de-Villarreal, E; Couturier, A; Samozino, P; Morin, J-B

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanics of maximal running sprint acceleration in high-level athletes. Four elite (100-m best time 9.95-10.29 s) and five sub-elite (10.40-10.60 s) sprinters performed seven sprints in overground conditions. A single virtual 40-m sprint was reconstructed and kinetics parameters were calculated for each step using a force platform system and video analyses. Anteroposterior force (FY), power (PY), and the ratio of the horizontal force component to the resultant (total) force (RF, which reflects the orientation of the resultant ground reaction force for each support phase) were computed as a function of velocity (V). FY-V, RF-V, and PY-V relationships were well described by significant linear (mean R(2) of 0.892 ± 0.049 and 0.950 ± 0.023) and quadratic (mean R(2) = 0.732 ± 0.114) models, respectively. The current study allows a better understanding of the mechanics of the sprint acceleration notably by modeling the relationships between the forward velocity and the main mechanical key variables of the sprint. As these findings partly concern world-class sprinters tested in overground conditions, they give new insights into some aspects of the biomechanical limits of human locomotion.

  11. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S;

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) knockout mice transgenic for human (h) beta 2m (C57BL/10 m beta 2m-/h beta 2m+) were compared with normal mice for their binding to exogenously added h beta 2m, binding to a H-2Db peptide and for functional activity in a one-way allogenic MLC....... Based on data from cellular binding studies, Scatchard analyses and flow cytometry, it is concluded that exogenous h beta 2m does not bind to hybrid MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules composed of mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m molecules expressed on lymphocytes of transgenic mice. Immunoprecipitation and SDS...... binds radiolabelled peptide in the absence of exogenous added h beta 2m suggesting that a stable fraction of hybrid H-2Db molecules is empty or contain peptides with very low affinity. In a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture, transgenic splenocytes were found to be far less stimulatory than...

  12. Progress in Human Geography in a century:A bibliometric review of 73 SSCI journals%百年SSCI看国际人文地理学的发展特点与规律--基于73种人文地理类期刊的文献计量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟赛香; 袁甜; 苏香燕; 胡鹏; 薛熙明

    2015-01-01

    从文献总量、文献类型、成长趋势、关键词、作者、国家与机构等方面,对1900-2012年SSCI收录的73种人文地理期刊的144719条文献记录,进行了较为全面的文献计量分析,包括:构建作者评价指标体系以分析作者对人文地理研究的学术贡献,利用网络图分析各阶段作者、国家与机构之间合作的网络关系等。研究表明:①百年来,人文地理发文量总体呈快速上升趋势,但占SSCI发文总量的比重却呈下降趋势;②英美一直引领全球人文地理研究及其发展;③人文地理学有明显研究热点主题,包括地方性、迁移、性别、旅游、规划等,研究注重地理与政治的结合,以及对GIS和RS为代表的地理信息技术的采借;研究热点区域集中在英、美两国,尤以其特大城市为重点,中国的部分城市近十年来也受到较多关注;④人文地理学作者分布有明显阶段性特征,并形成了以Johnston R J、Thrift N、Sayer A、Jackson P、Harvey D等为中心的学术高产核心作者群。本研究对揭示人文地理学发展的特征和趋势有较好的参考借鉴。%On the basis of 144719 document records from 73 Human Geography journals from SSCI database during 1900-2012, the paper conducted an integrated bibliometric analysis in respect to characteristics of document types, document outputs, keywords, authors, countries and institutions. Meanwhile, an indicator system was established to examine the features and trends of Human Geography development through comprehensive assessment towards authors worldwide. Our analysis focused on the scientific outputs, subject categories, international collaboration and geographic distribution. A multi- criteria assessment system was built to measure the contributions of 387 authors in four periods within 1900-2012. Then network phase analysis supported by Matlab and Netdraw was used to reveal the network relationships

  13. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  14. Human HDAC7 Harbors a Class IIa Histone Deacetylase-specific Zinc Binding Motif and Cryptic Deacetylase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Anja; Min, Jinrong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Schapira, Matthieu; Shuen, Michael; Loppnau, Peter; Mazitschek, Ralph; Kwiatkowski, Nick P.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; McLean, Thomas H.; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. (MIT); (Toronto)

    2010-10-18

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are protein deacetylases that play a role in repression of gene transcription and are emerging targets in cancer therapy. Here, we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain of human HDAC7 (cdHDAC7). Although HDAC7 normally exists as part of a multiprotein complex, we show that cdHDAC7 has a low level of deacetylase activity which can be inhibited by known HDAC inhibitors. The crystal structures of human cdHDAC7 and its complexes with two hydroxamate inhibitors are the first structures of the catalytic domain of class IIa HDACs and demonstrate significant differences with previously reported class I and class IIb-like HDAC structures. We show that cdHDAC7 has an additional class IIa HDAC-specific zinc binding motif adjacent to the active site which is likely to participate in substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction and may provide a site for modulation of activity. Furthermore, a different active site topology results in modified catalytic properties and in an enlarged active site pocket. Our studies provide mechanistic insights into class IIa HDACs and facilitate the design of specific modulators.

  15. A Comparison of Student Outcomes and Student Satisfaction in Three MBA Human Resource Management Classes Based on Traditional vs. Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2008-01-01

    The author taught three MBA Human Resource Management classes in the spring term of 2007 at a large private university in Florida. Two of the classes were taught in a 100% online format while the third was taught off campus in a university-owned building in Orlando where students met in a face-to-face, weekend setting. This traditional class was…

  16. How did variable NK-cell receptors and MHC class I ligands influence immunity, reproduction and human evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Preface Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, where they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of MHC-C in hominids drove the evolution of a system of MHC-C receptors that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. In contrast, the human system appears to have been subject to different and competing selection pressures that have acted on its immunological and reproductive functions. We suggest that this compromise facilitated development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out-of-Africa and populate other continents. PMID:23334245

  17. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J;

    2009-01-01

    .0, a method that generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-MHC class I interaction. NetMHCpan-2.0 has been trained on the hitherto largest set of quantitative MHC binding data available, covering HLA-A and HLA-B, as well as chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, gorilla, and mouse MHC class I...

  18. Alloantibodies to human platelet glycoprotein antigens (HPA) and HLA class 1 in a cross section of Nigerian antenatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Atiegoba, Anne Ifeanyi; Mgbere, Osaro

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to human platelet antigens (HPA) and human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class 1 antigens among Nigerian pregnant women has not been reported in our country. This study was therefore aimed at screening the obstetric population for evidence of alloimmunization due to human platelet and HLA class 1 antigens. One hundred and forty four (144) pregnant women attending the obstetric clinic of Military Hospital, Port Harcourt, participated in the study. Their sera were tested for antibodies to HPA and HLA class 1 antigens using GTI PakPlus solid phase ELISA Kit. The total prevalence rate of antibody production was 60.5% (87 out of 144). Among the positive samples, 60 had platelet glycoprotein specific antibodies (41.7%) and 27 had HLA class 1 antibodies (18.8%). In 39.6% of the pregnant women, both platelet specific antibodies and HLA class 1 antibodies appeared. The prevalence of platelet specific glycoprotein antibodies were obtained as follows: GP 11b/111a 12 (8.3%), GP 1a/11a 35 (20.8%), GP Ib/IX 18 (12.5%) and GP IV 9 (6.3%). The prevalence of each platelet antibody subgroup was obtained as follows: anti-HPA-1a,-3a,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-1b,-3b,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-30 5a and anti-GP Ib/IX (12.5% each), anti-HPA-5b (8.3%) and anti-GP IV (6.3%). A high prevalence rate of human platelet arid cytotoxic antibodies has been observed in our obstetric population. There is need to establish platelet serology laboratory for the proper antenatal and postnatal management of pregnant mothers in this region.

  19. The analysis of statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic agression in Russia [2005-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М М Yusupov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Xenophobia is one of significant challenges to social and national security of Russia. In some regions of the country the crimes pertaining to xenophobia show a persistent upward trend. However, the lack of official information on statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic crimes blocks the elaboration of regional measures designed to cope with the challenge of xenophobia. The results of the investigations of the survey papers of the Moscow Office for Human Rights over the period of 2005-2007 conducted to analyze the statistics, geography and dynamics of xenophobic aggression in federal districts of Russia are presented in the article.

  20. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  1. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  2. Introduction of Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    1.1 General information Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography (XIEG), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), was established on 7 July, 1998, by merging of two previously exist- ing institutes of CAS, namely Institute of Geography

  3. Between East and West: Geography in Higher Education in Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frank

    1980-01-01

    Traces the evolution of the geography curriculum in higher education in Yugoslavia. From the 19th century geography instruction has survived the trauma of foreign domination, a royalist kingdom, and the advent of a socialist state. (Author/KC)

  4. Demographic Trends (1970-2010) for Coastal Geographies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Demographic Trends (1970-2010) were derived from Census Block Group Data for 13 different coastal geographies. For a full listing of the geographies available,...

  5. Teaching Young Children Basic Concepts of Geography: A Literature-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Mary Anne Zeitler; Vasiliev, Ren; Lin, Qiuyun

    2002-01-01

    This article advocates a literature-based instructional approach as a way of promoting geographic awareness in early childhood classrooms. Instruction focuses on basic geography concepts of location, place, human- environment interaction, movement, and region. Examples of children's picture books are included to show what early childhood teachers…

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of a Cognitive Architecture for the Cultural Geography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) proposed by Ajzen (1991). TPB postulates three key factors that determine an individual’s intention, leading to a...BLANK 123 LIST OF REFERENCES Ajzen , I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179–211...GEOGRAPHY MODEL ........................................................13 1. Theory of Planned Behavior

  7. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with severe Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeer, Ali H; Balkhy, Hanan; Johani, Sameera; Yousef, Mohammed Z; Arabi, Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract and is characterized by high mortality. It is caused by a beta coronavirus (CoV) referred to as MERS-CoV. Majority of MERS-CoV cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. We investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II alleles in patients with severe MERS who were admitted in our Intensive Care Unit. A total of 23 Saudi patients with severe MERS-CoV infection were typed for HLA class II, results were compared with those of 161 healthy controls. Two HLA class II alleles were associated with the disease; HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02, but not with the disease outcome. Our results suggest that the HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02 may be associated with susceptibility to MERS.

  8. BRICS: an explanation in critical geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendra Meena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BRICS, an abbreviation for Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, a group of five influential and emerging economies successfully completed its fifth annual summit in Durban during March 26-27, 2013. A significantly unique feature of the group is its geographical spread as evident from the location of these five constituent states which are situated in four continents. The paper seeks to explain the phenomenon of the disparate group BRICS through literature in Critical Geography as it is understood that the recent phase of globalization has created spatial patterns which were hitherto not experienced and therefore not clearly recognized in the literature on International Relations and traditional geography. Such spatially variegated groupings like the BRICS could be analyzed and interpreted in Critical Geography and Critical Geopolitics literature through three important concepts: a Space b Geographical and Geopolitical Imaginations and c Region. The paper seeks to explain BRICS through these conceptual tools.

  9. Teachers envisioning future geography education at their schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their curriculum-makin

  10. Teachers envisioning future geography education at their schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their

  11. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyurt, Secil

    2014-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth investigation of Turkish primary school students' perceptions of geography. Gender differences in students' perceptions of geography were investigated, including definitions of geography and its field of study. The findings showed that "landforms," "our geographical regions/Turkey,"…

  12. Rethinking Postgraduate Geography Education in the USA: Issues and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth; Bednarz, Sarah; Monk, Janice; Solem, Michael; Stoltman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate geography education in the USA is growing and changing. In recent years, the number of postgraduate programs has increased at both the doctoral and master's levels. Interest in improving and reforming doctoral education has increased dramatically both inside and outside geography, and geography has been involved in these reforms.…

  13. Teachers Envisioning Future Geography Education at Their Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béneker, Tine; Palings, Hans; Krause, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges of a geography teacher education program is preparing teachers for their leading roles in keeping geography education relevant for the young people of today. It is important to allow teachers to think about geography education and the future and to foster their curriculum-making competences. In a master course at Fontys…

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Geography Education: International Samples and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2010-01-01

    In today's world, the developments being experienced in geography education are focusing on issues like the following: integrating technology into geography courses, placing a comprehensive and integrative perspective regarding geography into the curriculum, stressing independent learning and team-learning simultaneously, educating students to…

  15. Development of Geography in Higher Education in China since 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojian; Kong, Yunfeng; Peng, Baoyu

    2007-01-01

    China is one of the largest countries in terms of geography student enrolment in higher education. This study draws on an extensive collection of data as well as the authors' own surveys of 20 geography schools/departments, to elaborate on the development features of China's geography in higher education (GHE) against its unique background since…

  16. The China National Geography Competition for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wang; Dongying, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Four Chinese middle school students represented China during the third International Geography Olympiad (IGEO) held in 2000 in Korea and that was the first time for China to participate in the IGEO. In 2005 the China Society of Geography and the Beijing Normal University decided to co-organise the China National Geography Competition (CNGC) for…

  17. Saliva vs. plasma bioequivalence of metformin in humans: validation of class II drugs of the salivary excretion classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N; Arafat, T

    2014-11-01

    To study saliva and plasma bioequivalence of metformin in humans, and to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as surrogate for bioequivalence of class II drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS).Plasma and saliva samples were collected for 12 h after 500 mg oral dosing of metformin to 16 healthy humans. Plasma and saliva pharmacokinetic parameters, 90% confidence intervals and intra-subject variability values were calculated using Kinetica V5. Descriptive statistics and dimensional analysis were calculated by Excel. SimCYP program V13 was used for estimation of effective intestinal permeability.Metformin was subjected to salivary excretion since it falls into class II (Low permeability/High fraction unbound to plasma proteins), with correlation coefficients of 0.95-0.99 between plasma and saliva concentrations. Saliva/plasma concentration ratios were 0.29-0.39. The 90% confidence limits of all parameters failed in both saliva and plasma. Intra-subject variability values in saliva were higher than plasma leading to need for higher number of subjects to be used in saliva.Saliva instead of plasma can be used as surrogate for bioequivalence of class II drugs according to SECS when adequate sample size is used. Future work is planned to demonstrate SECS robustness in drugs that fall into class III.

  18. Possible assortment of a1 and a2 region gene segments in human MHC class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G; Wu, T T

    1998-06-01

    Using pair-wise comparison of aligned nucleotide sequences of distinct and complete human MHC class I molecules, we have constructed triangular tables to study the similarities and differences of various a1 (exon 2) and a2 (exon 3) region sequences. There are two HLA-A (A*6901 and A*6601) and 13 HLA-B (B*4201, B*8101, B*4102, B*4801, B*4007, B*4001, B*4802, Dw53, B*4406, B*4402, B*3901, B*1514 and B*3702) sequences that have identical a1 sequences with other known MHC class I molecules, while their a2 sequences are the same as those of different ones. Of these 15, A*6901, B*4001 and B*4802 have previously been suggested as the results of recombination between A*6801 and A*0201, B*4101 and B*8101, and B*4801 and B*3501, respectively. However, many other sequences can also be used to generate them by recombination. Furthermore, their reciprocal products have never been identified. Thus, gene conversion has subsequently been suggested as an alternative. Another possible genetic mechanism for generating these nucleotide sequence similarities can be assortment, or that some gene segments can be duplicated or multiplicated to be used in different human MHC class I molecules. Interestingly, this genetic mechanism is probably absent for the generation of different mouse MHC class I molecules.

  19. Conceptualizing violence for health and medical geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVerteuil, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Despite the fact that violence is a major threat to public health, the term itself is rarely considered as a phenomenon unto itself, and rarely figures explicitly in work by health and medical geographers. In response, I propose a definitionally and conceptually more robust approach to violence using a tripartite frame (interpersonal violence, structural violence, mass intentional violence) and suggest critical interventions through which to apply this more explicit and conceptually more robust approach: violence and embodiment via substance abuse in health geography, and structural violence via mental illness in medical geography.

  20. [Advances on research of human exposure to triclosan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chenye; Chen, Yiming; Zhang, Peiqi; Xiong, Zhezhen; Wang, Caifeng; Tian, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Triclosan, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, was reported to have been widely detected in various human biological samples such as urine, blood and human milk among foreign populations. In China, limited reports have been found on human exposure to triclosan, and the reported urinary triclosan concentrations were significantly lower than that of American populations. Besides, the potential influencing factors still remain unclear regarding human exposure to triclosan, but evidences suggest that those in middle age and with higher household income and higher social class tend to have higher urinary triclosan concentrations. Furthermore, triclosan exposure tend to differ by sex, geography, heredity, metabolism and life style.

  1. The biogenesis of the MHC class II compartment in human I-cell disease B lymphoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The localization and intracellular transport of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules nd lysosomal hydrolases were studied in I-Cell Disease (ICD) B lymphoblasts, which possess a mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-independent targeting pathway for lysosomal enzymes. In the trans-Golgi network (TGN), MHC class II- invariant chain complexes colocalized with the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D in buds and vesicles that lacked markers of clathrin-coated vesicle-mediated transport. ...

  2. Makiguchi Tsunesaburo and Language, Value-Creative Composition Instruction, and the Geography of Identity in Community Studies: A Response to Politicized Imagining and Ineffective Critical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulah, Jason

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author examines Makiguchi Tsunesaburo's philosophy and practice of human geography ("jinsei chirigaku"), community studies ("kyodoka"), and composition instruction based on "value-creating pedagogy" ("soka kyoikugaku") for thinking through and responding to two competing trends…

  3. Middle Eastern Geographies of World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    retain.131 Soon after the fall of Basra, Sir Percy Cox, Chief Political Officer to the campaign, and Lord Hardinge, the Viceroy of India, both made...34Why Geography Matters ... But So Little is Learned." Orbis 47, no. 2 (Spring 2003): 217- 233. McFate, Montgomery, and Andrea Jackson . "An

  4. Internationalizing Geography Education: A Focus on India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Michael; Balachandran, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    The Association of American Geographers (AAG), through its Center for Global Geography Education (CGGE) project, recently published a collection of online educational resources examining important geographic issues affecting people, places, and environments in India. The resources were created by a delegation of high school teachers and academic…

  5. Capstone Portfolios and Geography Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing demands regarding student learning outcomes and accreditation, a capstone portfolio was added to assess critical thinking and communication skills of geography majors at a large public university in the USA. The portfolio guidelines were designed to be adaptable to a flexible curriculum where about half of the requirements within…

  6. Teaching Gender and Geography in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ramon, Maria-Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of gender themes into university teaching in geography in Spain in 1989, significant gains have been made but challenges remain in relation to placing gender into undergraduate curricula and developing teaching resources in local languages. Geographers in Spain have to meet those challenges in the near future in order to…

  7. Geography Education for "An Attainable Global Perspective"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Phil; Pawson, Eric; Solem, Michael; Ray, Waverly

    2014-01-01

    This article considers approaches to promoting global perspectives as both cognitive and affective learning outcomes within geography education. Particular attention is paid to the work of Robert Hanvey, who proposed "An Attainable Global Perspective" in the 1970s, which explicitly ties to the content and perspectives embedded in…

  8. Applying Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Judy; Ming, Kavin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a social studies teacher and a literacy teacher describe a vision for social studies that highlights reading practices that foster disciplinary literacy in elementary geography. Their purpose is to share a practical approach for enriching elementary social studies lessons and activities with a geographic lens. During the…

  9. The National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project is an inservice teacher education success story. Describes the origins, objectives, and development of the project. Summarizes the impact of the project and contends that its success is the result of the workshop format and guided practice in instructional strategies. (CFR)

  10. Financial Geographies and Emerging Markets in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Karreman (Bas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study examines the contemporary financial geographies in Central and Eastern Europe and argues how these may affect the established European finacial centre network in the future. As the development of the financial sector in Europe’s emerging markets is largely dependent on foreign

  11. Toward Securing a Future for Geography Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Geography graduates face an uncertain future. To help students think and practice as a geographer, we must teach disciplinary knowledge--particularly threshold concepts--as well as skills and attributes. We must role model and articulate our geographical reasoning using signature pedagogies and promote high-impact and signature learning…

  12. Sustainability in the Australian Curriculum: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    "Sustainability" is one of the seven major concepts in the geography curriculum. It is also one of the three cross-curriculum priorities in the Australian curriculum, together with Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. This paper describes how the concept is explained…

  13. The National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockenhauer, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that the National Geographic Society's Teaching Geography Project is an inservice teacher education success story. Describes the origins, objectives, and development of the project. Summarizes the impact of the project and contends that its success is the result of the workshop format and guided practice in instructional strategies. (CFR)

  14. Geography and Geographical Information Science: Interdisciplinary Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To understand how Geography and Geographical Information Science (GIS) can contribute to Interdisciplinary Research (IDR), it is relevant to articulate the differences between the different types of such research. "Multidisciplinary" researchers work in a "parallel play" mode, completing work in their disciplinary work streams…

  15. A futures perspective in Dutch geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, Iris; Béneker, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Geography education offers many possibilities for futures education. In The Netherlands, a future perspective is obvious in the vision behind the curriculum for secondary education, but this perspective becomes thinner and less open when elaborated in the syllabus, textbooks and examinations. From

  16. Lightning Talk: Biopython (bio) Geography Module

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas J. Matzke

    2010-01-01

    For Google Summer of Code 2009/NESCENT Phyloinformatics Summer of Code 2009, I built a Geography module for Biopython. The purpose of the module is to search, download, and process biogeographical data from GBIF, much as Biopython currently accesses Genbank. Application of the tool to a historical biogeography study on bivalves will be illustrated.

  17. Marine Geography of the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-01-01

    Reconnaissance Geography of Japan," University of Wisconsin Studies in the Social Sciences and History, No. 22, 283 pp., 1934. , "Japan, A Physical...Vol. 2. pp 2 Inlleiol dMoine Obsetvotory0 Kobe, (&r, Japone ’). RESTRICTED 3 Ref erences: Korea, Fishery Experimental Station, "Report on the Drift

  18. Community Engagement for Student Learning in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Chalkley, Brian; Fletcher, Stephen; Hay, Iain; Le Heron, Erena; Mohan, Audrey; Trafford, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role and purpose of community engagement as a learning and teaching strategy within higher education geography. It explores different interpretations of the concept of community engagement and illustrates different examples of this kind of learning through six case studies drawn from Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and…

  19. Nationalism in Geography Classrooms: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Kolson; White, George; Leib, Jonathan; Dalby, Simon; Algeo, Katie; Jansson, David; Zimmerman, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    This set of essays is based on a panel session convened at the 2009 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, which sought to explore the many challenges and pitfalls involved with teaching nationalism as a topic in geography classrooms. The authors offer different but complementary insights into the practical difficulties and potential…

  20. A futures perspective in Dutch geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, Iris; Béneker, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Geography education offers many possibilities for futures education. In The Netherlands, a future perspective is obvious in the vision behind the curriculum for secondary education, but this perspective becomes thinner and less open when elaborated in the syllabus, textbooks and examinations. From a

  1. Teaching Historical Geographies of American Film Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The geographies of Hollywood are multiple, contradictory, ephemeral and tangible. Our preconceived conceptions of space and place play a dynamic role in what elements we tend to focus on when discussing the cultural industry of American cinema. This essay uses Hollywood as a metaphor for the American film production industry and a historical…

  2. A Geography of Uruguay for Elementary Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzhugh, William P.

    This paper is part of a larger study, conducted as part of a Christa McAuliffe Fellowship research project, "A Comparative Geography of Three Ecologically Similar Regions." The study compared the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland with the Murray River region of South Australia and the Rio de la Plata region of Uruguay. The project was…

  3. Global Health, Geographical Contingency, and Contingent Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Health geography has emerged from under the “shadow of the medical” to become one of the most vibrant of all the subdisciplines. Yet, this success has also meant that health research has become increasingly siloed within this subdisciplinary domain. As this article explores, this represents a potential lost opportunity with regard to the study of global health, which has instead come to be dominated by anthropology and political science. Chief among the former's concerns are exploring the gap between the programmatic intentions of global health and the unintended or unanticipated consequences of their deployment. This article asserts that recent work on contingency within geography offers significant conceptual potential for examining this gap. It therefore uses the example of alcohol taxation in Botswana, an emergent global health target and tool, to explore how geographical contingency and the emergent, contingent geographies that result might help counter the prevailing tendency for geography to be side-stepped within critical studies of global health. At the very least, then, this intervention aims to encourage reflection by geographers on how to make explicit the all-too-often implicit links between their research and global health debates located outside the discipline. PMID:27611662

  4. Economic development, growth, institutions and geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhupatiraju, S.; Verspagen, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we test the Rodrik et al (2004) framework to explain differences in development levels across countries by using a broader set of definitions for institutions, geography and economic variables. We use a multi-faceted database to measure institutions in an attempt to go beyond the sing

  5. Environmental Concerns in the Geography Curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for implementing EE and ESD through the geography curriculum in the South ... three concepts; environmental education, sustainable development and ... education has changed with time depending on how people conceived of the ... Di Chiro makes it clear that conceptually we view the environment as interactions taking.

  6. Implementation Challenges of the New Geography Diploma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation Challenges of the New Geography Diploma Syllabus in Tanzania: A Case Study of Korogwe and ... Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ... The study used Korogwe and Dakawa Teachers' Training Colleges as a case.

  7. Possibilities for an International Assessment in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Rod; Bourke, Terri

    2017-01-01

    A recent editorial in International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education (IRGEE) highlighted an opportunity for the inclusion of geography as a subject in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) tests. At present, TIMSS tests only encompass mathematics and physical sciences. The IRGEE editors encouraged…

  8. Geography, GIS and Employability in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although higher education in Turkey does not have especially well-advanced systems and resources for addressing graduate employability, two developments are making it particularly important for Turkish geography departments to give increased priority to this agenda. One is the country's new Higher Education Qualifications Framework and the other…

  9. Commission on College Geography. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounsbury, John F.

    This 1974 report describes the history of the Commission on College Geography, which was supported by the National Science Foundation. There are four major parts to the paper. Part I deals with the objectives of the commission. It was established in 1963 as an outgrowth of the work of the Liberal Education Committee appointed by the Council of the…

  10. Food's cultural geographies: texture, creativity, and publics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Cook; P. Jackson; A. Hayes-Conroy; S. Abrahamsson; R. Sandover; M. Sheller; H. Henderson; L. Hallett; S. Imai; D. Maye; A. Hill

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about emerging cultural geographies of food. It is the result of a collaborative blog-to-paper process that led to an experimental, fragmented, dialogic text. Food is often researched precisely because it can help to vividly animate tensions between the small and intimate realms of e

  11. Teaching Cultural Geography with "The Amazing Race"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    The reality show "The Amazing Race" serves as a useful text for the cultural geography classroom. As competitors travel the world, they complete challenging tasks designed to be both educational and entertaining. Audiences see actual images from destinations around the world and learn about the unique cultures of these places. They also…

  12. Population Education in Geography: Some Sample Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This booklet contains sample lessons and learning materials from the countries of Asia and Oceania for teaching population education in geography courses. The booklet is one of a series of six, each of which brings out population education concepts as part of a particular subject area. The subject areas treated in the other booklets are home…

  13. The geography teacher's set of appliances - `GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' - Self improved school equipment used in teaching geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The multimedia application and the use of Internet are becoming more and more common at schools and at homes due to the widespread of computers. The multimedia programs offer a great help for geography teachers because with their use all the visual aids are not needed in the classroom. They mix the advantages of blacboards, slides, displays, overhead projectors and VCR-s. At the same time offering other opportunities which could not be provided by the aids mentioned above because of their limits. Using a projector connected to a computer students can see the visual aids prepared by the teacher projected. Their use is justified because student's books cannot contain all the increasing amount of knowledge. Success is guaranteed because students are sensitive to new approaches. Digitalizing the material and finding it on the internet that way preparing a colourful, varied geography lesson is a time-consuming process. Being the methodologist and didactic information technologist at the Geography Department of Eszterházy Károly College I have been working for years on facilitating the work of my students, colleagues and my own activity using varied visual aids and types of equipment as preparation for the geography lesson. I have created an electronic set of appliances using the Dreamweaver MX program (‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT', from the 1st September 2006 on the Internet), it can be a real help for the teacher in each teaching situation. The ‘GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT' is a multimedia, Internet service which can be loaded free, the teacher gets into a virtual office clicking to the different pieces (drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, Tv set etc.) the teacher can continue with the necessary school equipment. Such equipment like: lesson plans for the lessons using digital technology, photos, video clips, animation, illustrations, pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database, diagrams, charts, bibliography, student's books, geography lexicons, magazines

  14. Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanacek-Schubert, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Geography - Changing Faces of the Earth In Austria there are currently some major reforms concerning high school education underway. At our school, the Bundesgymnasium and Bundesrealgymnasium Draschestrasse, a school belonging to the Vienna Bilingual Schooling branch, we have developed a course system in which pupils can select courses and determine individually which areas of study they want to focus on. Specially devised courses have been developed which fit within the framework of natural and applied sciences but go beyond the basic curriculum in geography. At the same time the structure of the basic courses, compulsory for all pupils, was altered in order to allow for topics that are currently in the news to be dealt with sufficiently. In the basic courses of geography exogenic and endogenic forces are dealt with extensively. The main idea is to make children aware of the powers that make landscapes look the way the do now - and what their appearance may have been thousands or millions of years ago. A piece of rubble, a depression in the landscape or the way a tree may bend may serve as the key to what lies underneath earth's surface. These tell-tale signs are worth investigating, they can open up our eyes and change our perception of the world. A great focus, in particular in the 7th grade, is placed on glaciers and karst, most notably in the Alps and the Mediterranean region, whereas the 6th grade emphasizes weathering, erosion and endogenic forces in the geography curriculum. The newly installed whiteboards at our school allow for excellent visualization of subject-related aspects concerning the aforementioned topics and issues. In addition to the geography basic-course we have devised a special course entitled „Dante's Peak" which deals specifically with the endogenic forces that help shape the appearance of the earth, in particular plate tectonics, vulcanism, earthquakes.

  15. Differential recognition of MHC class I molecules of xeno-/allo-endothelial cells by human NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) as target cells, human peripheral blood NK cells (PBNK) and NK92 cells as effector cells, the differential cytotoxicities of NK cells to allo- and xeno-endothelial cells were studied. The influence of MHC class I molecules on the cytotoxicity of human NK cells was assayed using acid treatment, and blockades of MHC class I antigens, CD94 and KIR (NKB1). The results indicated that the killing of PAEC by the two kinds of NK cells is higher than that of HUVEC. After acid- treatment, the cytotoxicity of the two kinds of NK cells to PAEC and HUVEC is significantly enhanced, but the magnitude of the enhancement is different. The enhancement of NK killing to acid treated HUVEC is much greater than that to PAEC. Blockade of CD94 mAb did not alter the NK cytotoxicity, while blockade of NKB1 mAb enhanced the cytotoxicity of PBNK to HUVEC and PAEC by 95% and 29% respectively. The results above suggested that the differential recognition of MHC I molecules of xeno-endothelial cells by human NK cells could be the major reason for higher NK cytotoxicity to PAEC. KIR might be the primary molecule that transduced inhibitory signals when endothelial cells were injured by NK cells.

  16. Academic performance in human anatomy and physiology classes: a 2-yr study of academic motivation and grade expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic motivation scale for HAP based on self-determination theory was administered in class during the first 3 wk of each semester. Students with higher grade point averages, who studied for longer hours and reported to be more motivated to succeed, did better academically in these classes. There was a significant relationship between students' scores on the adapted academic motivation scale and performance. Students were more extrinsically motivated to succeed in HAP courses than intrinsically motivated to succeed, and the analyses revealed that the most significant predictor of final grade was within the extrinsic scale (introjected and external types). Students' motivations remained stable throughout the course sequence. The data showed a significant relationship between HAP students' expected grade and their final grade in class. Finally, 65.5% of students overestimated their final grade, with 29% of students overestimating by two to four letter grades.

  17. SNP variants associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) correlate with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Lik-Chin; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Tai, Mei-Chee; Chin, Edmund Fui-Min; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Suthandiram, Sujatha; Chang, Kian-Meng; Ong, Tee-Chuan; Bee, Ping-Chong; Mohamed, Zahurin; Gan, Gin-Gin; Ng, Ching-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Large consortia efforts and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have linked a number of genetic variants within the 6p21 chromosomal region to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Complementing these efforts, we genotyped previously reported SNPs in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (rs6457327) and class II (rs9271100, rs2647012 and rs10484561) regions in a total of 1,145 subjects (567 NHL cases and 578 healthy controls) from two major ethnic groups in Malaysia, the Malays and the Chinese. We identified a NHL-associated (PNHL_add = 0.0008; ORNHL_add = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.37–0.77) and B-cell associated (PBcell_add = 0.0007; ORBcell_add = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.35–0.76) SNP rs2647012 in the Malaysian Malays. In silico cis-eQTL analysis of rs2647012 suggests potential regulatory function of nearby HLA class II molecules. Minor allele rs2647012-T is linked to higher expression of HLA-DQB1, rendering a protective effect to NHL risk. Our findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays an important role in NHL etiology. PMID:28139690

  18. Human leucocyte antigen class Ib molecules in pregnancy success and early pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2013-01-01

    AND CONCLUSIONS The HLA class Ib molecules seem to induce suppression of the maternal immune system, but are not necessarily fundamental factors for pregnancy success. However, evidence points towards low expression of these proteins, especially HLA-G, being associated with reduced fertility. To clarify...

  19. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    % of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation...

  20. The Humanity of Movement or "It's Not Just a Gym Class."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that transitioning from physical education to kinesiology involved developing the kinesiological sciences such that the discipline has become dominated by a scientific outlook, thus marginalizing the humanistic features of movement. Gym classes are being weeded out of many university programs, with the claim that they must be retained and…

  1. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J

    2009-01-01

    immunologists in interpreting cellular immune responses in large out-bred populations is demonstrated. Further, we used NetMHCpan-2.0 to predict potential binding peptides for the pig MHC class I molecule SLA-1*0401. Ninety-three percent of the predicted peptides were demonstrated to bind stronger than 500 n...

  2. Class 3 semaphorins expression and association with innervation and angiogenesis within the degenerate human intervertebral disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binch, Abbie L A; Cole, Ashley A; Breakwell, Lee M; Michael, Anthony L R; Chiverton, Neil; Creemers, Laura B; Cross, Alison K; Le Maitre, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Nerve and blood vessel ingrowth during intervertebral disc degeneration, is thought to be a major cause of low back pain, however the regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the expression and regulation of a subclass of axonal guidance molecules known as the class 3 s

  3. A clinical evaluation of a bioresorbable membrane and porous hydroxyapatite in the treatment of human molar class II furcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gita Malathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is predictable regeneration of a functional attachment apparatus destroyed as a result of periodontitis. Reconstructive procedures have been used with varying success during the past decades to accomplish this goal. Aim: To evaluate whether the use of porous hydroxyapatite alone or a bioresorbable membrane alone would enhance the clinical results in the treatment of class II furcation defects in human lower molars. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with chronic periodontitis, aged between 39 and 49 years, with a pair of similar bilateral class II furcation defects (classification of Hamp et al. in mandibular first molars were selected. A split-mouth design was incorporated and the selected 30 furcation defects were assigned to one of the two treatment groups, i.e., Group I treated with a bioresorbable membrane from bovine-derived collagen guided tissue regeneration membrane and Group II treated using porous hydroxyapatite bone graft material on the contralateral sides. Evaluation of clinical parameters, probing depths and attachment levels, and radiographs was done preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Both the groups showed statistically significant mean reduction in probing depths and gain in clinical attachment levels and linear bone fill. Comparison between Group I and Group II showed insignificant difference. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, both the treatment modalities are beneficial for the treatment of human mandibular class II furcation defects.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of immune activation in human T and B cells reveals distinct classes of alternatively spliced genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy A Grigoryev

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a mechanism that increases the protein diversity of a single gene by differential exon inclusion/exclusion during post-transcriptional processing. While alternative splicing is established to occur during lymphocyte activation, little is known about the role it plays during the immune response. Our study is among the first reports of a systematic genome-wide analysis of activated human T and B lymphocytes using whole exon DNA microarrays integrating alternative splicing and differential gene expression. Purified human CD2(+ T or CD19(+ B cells were activated using protocols to model the early events in post-transplant allograft immunity and sampled as a function of time during the process of immune activation. Here we show that 3 distinct classes of alternatively spliced and/or differentially expressed genes change in an ordered manner as a function of immune activation. We mapped our results to function-based canonical pathways and demonstrated that some are populated by only one class of genes, like integrin signaling, while other pathways, such as purine metabolism and T cell receptor signaling, are populated by all three classes of genes. Our studies augment the current view of T and B cell activation in immunity that has been based exclusively upon differential gene expression by providing evidence for a large number of molecular networks populated as a function of time and activation by alternatively spliced genes, many of which are constitutively expressed.

  5. Derivatives of human complement component C3 for therapeutic complement depletion: a novel class of therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzinger, David C; Hew, Brian E; Lee, June Q; Newhouse, James; Alam, Maqsudul; Ciallella, John R; Bowers, Mallory; Gorsuch, William B; Guikema, Benjamin J; Stahl, Gregory L; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    To obtain proteins with the complement-depleting activity of Cobra Venom Factor (CVF), but with less immunogenicity, we have prepared human C3/CVF hybrid proteins, in which the C-terminus of the alpha-chain of human C3 is exchanged with homologous regions of the C-terminus of the beta-chain of CVF. We show that these hybrid proteins are able to deplete complement, both in vitro and in vivo. One hybrid protein, HC3-1496, is shown to be effective in reducing complement-mediated damage in two disease models in mice, collagen-induced arthritis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Human C3/CVF hybrid proteins represent a novel class ofbiologicals as potential therapeutic agents in many diseases where complement is involved in the pathogenesis.

  6. Expression of class Ⅰ MHC molecule, HSP70 and TAP in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ling Deng; Wei Chen; Mei-Ying Cai; Da-Peng Wei

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate whether class Ⅰ MHC molecule,transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), and heat-shock proteion70 (HSP70) expressed in liver cancer cells before the design and construction of CTL vaccine against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: We studied 30 HCC specimens by labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB) method of immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The results showed that the majority of HCC cells investigated naturally expressed class Ⅰ MHC and TAP,which were different from other tumor cells. Furthermore,we found that HSP70 expressed not only in cellular cytoplasm, but also on the cell surface in HCC.CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that our understanding about immune escape mechanisms employed by HCC cells may be further improved. It is important to design and construct CTL vaccine against HCC.

  7. Selective changes in expression of HLA class I polymorphic determinants in human solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, P.G.; Nicotra, M.R.; Bigotti, A.; Venturo, I.; Giacomini, P. (Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)); Marcenaro, L.; Russo, C. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of surgical biopsies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to framework determinants of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens has shown that malignant transformation is frequently associated with a marked loss of these cell surface molecules. The present study sought to determine whether more selective losses of major histocompatibility complex class I expression occur. Multiple specimens from 13 different types of primary and metastatic tumors were tested utilizing mAb BB7.2, which recognizes a polymorphic HLA-A2 epitope. In each case, expression of HLA-A,B,C molecules was determined by testing with mAb W6/32 directed to a framework HLA class I determinant. The authors have found that in HLA-A2-positive patients, HLA-A2 products are not detectable or are reduced in their expression in 70-80% of endometrial, colorectal, mammary, and renal tumors; in 40-60% of soft-tissue, skin, ovary, urinary bladder, prostate, and stomach tumors; and in 25-30% of melanomas and lung carcinomas tested. All tumors expressed the framework HLA-A,B.C determinant. The HLA-A2 epitope recognized by mAb BB7.2 is located in a portion of the HLA-A2 molecule postulated to react with the T-cell receptor. The selective loss of an HLA class I polymorphic epitope shown in this study may explain the mechanism by which tumor cells escape both T-cell recognition and natural killer cell surveillance.

  8. Differential recognition of MHC class I molecules of xeno-/allo-endothelial cells by human NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯志民; 张晓峰; 王宏芳; 丰美福

    2000-01-01

    Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) as target cells, human peripheral blood NK cells (PBNK) and NK92 cells as effector cells, the differential cytotoxicities of NK cells to allo- and xeno-endothelial cells were studied. The influence of MHC class I molecules on the cytotoxicity of human NK cells was assayed using acid treatment, and blockades of MHC class I antigens, CD94 and KIR (NKB1). The results indicated that the killing of PAEC by the two kinds of NK cells is higher than that of HUVEC. After acid-treatment, the cytotoxicity of the two kinds of NK cells to PAEC and HUVEC is significantly enhanced, but the magnitude of the enhancement is different. The enhancement of NK killing to acid treated HUVEC is much greater than that to PAEC. Blockade of CD94 mAb did not alter the NK cytotoxicity, while blockade of NKB1 mAb enhanced the cytotoxicity of PBNK to HUVEC and PAEC by 95% and 29% respectively. The results above suggested that the different

  9. Ligation of MHC class I and class II molecules can lead to heterologous desensitization of signal transduction pathways that regulate homotypic adhesion in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N; Engel, P; Vega, M; Tedder, T F

    1994-06-01

    Engagement of lymphocyte MHC class I and class II Ags activates an array of intracellular signal transduction pathways that up-regulates the activity of cell-surface adhesion receptors, resulting in homotypic cell-cell aggregation. In this study, engagement of MHC class I and class II molecules with specific mAbs was shown to also inhibit lymphocyte homotypic adhesion. Two mAbs reactive with class II Ag, homotypic adhesion blocking mAb (HAB)-2, and HAB-3, and one mAb reactive with class I Ag, HAB-4, were generated that inhibited homotypic adhesion of activated lymphocytes and B and T cell lines at concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Binding of these mAbs resulted in heterologous desensitization of other surface signal transduction molecules as homotypic adhesion induced through class I, class II, CD19, CD20, CD39, CD40, Leu-13, and PMA was also inhibited. The spontaneous adhesion exhibited by some cell lines was also abrogated by binding of these mAbs. Abs that either induced, blocked, or had no effect on adhesion bound to distinct epitopes on class I, whereas the anti-class II mAbs recognized either distinct or overlapping epitopes. Thus, engagement of distinct epitopes on MHC molecules can result in homologous or heterologous desensitization of cell-surface signaling molecules. The induction or inhibition of homotypic adhesion through class I molecules did not require the presence of the cytoplasmic domain, as deletion of this portion of the class I molecule had no effect. In contrast, the transmembrane region was essential for signal transduction as the mAbs binding to a chimeric molecule in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of class I were exchanged with those of the HB15 molecule did not induce or inhibit homotypic adhesion. Although this report is the first demonstration that homotypic adhesion can be influenced in a negative manner through MHC molecules, these findings demonstrate a considerable level of cross-talk between MHC molecules

  10. Saliva versus plasma bioequivalence of rusovastatin in humans: validation of class III drugs of the salivary excretion classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, Nasir; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2015-03-01

    Bioequivalence of rusovastatin in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected for 72 h after oral administration of rusovastatin 40 mg to 12 healthy humans. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. Analysis of variance, 90 % confidence intervals, and intra-subject and inter-subject variability values of pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was also calculated by SimCYP program V13. Rusovastatin falls into class III (high permeability/low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A correlation coefficient of 0.99 between saliva and plasma concentrations, and a saliva/plasma concentration ratio of 0.175 were observed. The 90 % confidence limits of area under the curve (AUClast) and maximum concentration (C max) showed similar trends in both saliva and plasma. On the other hand, inter- and intra-subject variability values in saliva were higher than in plasma, leading to the need for a slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies. Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of the invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioequivalence of SECS class III drugs when an adequate sample size is used.

  11. Integrating Hydrology and Historical Geography in an Interdisciplinary Environmental Masters Program in Northern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Kirsten; James, April

    2016-04-01

    Research in hydrology and other sciences are increasingly calling for new collaborations that "…simultaneously explore the biogeophysical, social and economic forces that shape an increasingly human-dominated global hydrologic system…" (Vorosmarty et al. 2015, p.104). With many environmental programs designed to help students tackle environmental problems, these initiatives are not without fundamental challenges (for example, they are often developed around a single epistemology of positivism). Many environmental graduate programs provide narrow interdisciplinary training (within the sciences, or bridging to the social sciences) but do not necessarily engage with the humanities. Geography however, has a long tradition and history of bridging the geophysical, social sciences, and humanities. In this paper, we reflect on new programming in an Interdisciplinary Master's program in Northern Ontario, Canada, inspired by the rich tradition of geography. As Canada Research Chairs trained in different geographical traditions (historical geography and hydrology), we aim to bring together approaches in the humanities and geophysical sciences to understand hydrological and environmental change over time. We are teaching in a small, predominantly undergraduate University located in Northern Ontario, Canada, a region shaped significantly by colonial histories and resource development. The Masters of Environmental Studies/Masters of Environmental Sciences (MES/MESc) program was conceived from a decade of interdisciplinary dialogue across three undergraduate departments (Geography, Biology and Chemistry, History) to promote an understanding of both humanistic and scientific approaches to environmental issues. In the fall of 2015, as part of our 2015-2020 Canada Research Chair mandates, we introduced new initiatives to further address the integration of humanities and sciences to our graduate program. We believe the new generation of environmental scientists and practioners

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Region Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Associated with Leprosy Susceptibility in Vietnam and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Singh, Meenakshi; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Katoch, Kiran; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thai, Vu Hong; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Carrington, Mary; Abel, Laurent; Mehra, Narinder; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggested the existence of unidentified leprosy susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. To identify such genetic risk factors, a high-density association scan of a 1.9-mega-base (Mb) region in the HLA complex was performed. Among 682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 59 were associated with leprosy (P leprosy families. Genotyping of these SNPs in an independent sample of 292 Vietnamese single-case leprosy families replicated the association of 12 SNPs (P leprosy and 371 control subjects from North India. These results implicated class I alleles in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:21459816

  13. The Human Cytomegalovirus MHC Class I Homolog UL18 Inhibits LIR-1+ but Activates LIR-1− NK Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Prod’Homme, Virginie; Griffin, Cora; Rebecca J. Aicheler; Wang, Eddie C.Y.; McSharry, Brian P.; Rickards, Carole R.; Stanton, Richard J; Borysiewicz, Leszek K.; López-Botet, Miguel; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.; Tomasec, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The inhibitory leukocyte Ig-like receptor 1 (LIR-1, also known as ILT2, CD85j, or LILRB1) was identified by its high affinity for the human CMV (HCMV) MHC class I homolog gpUL18. The role of this LIR-1-gpUL18 interaction in modulating NK recognition during HCMV infection has previously not been clearly defined. In this study, LIR-1+ NKL cell-mediated cytotoxicity was shown to be inhibited by transduction of targets with a replication-deficient adenovirus vector encoding UL18 (RAd-UL18). Fibro...

  14. GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT to study geography: the homepage and reflections from the users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajtok-Tari, I.

    2009-04-01

    The main objective of the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT is to convey structured information to teachers and pupils, as well as, professors and students of geography. This learning aid is a homepage, first published in Hungarian still in 2006 (http://netszkozkeszlet.ektf.hu), to help in orientation among the rapidly growing information on the Internet, to provide extra digitalized professional materials that are not yet available digitally and to share experiences of the teachers and professors working in the same area of interest and language environment. At present, its English version is already prepared and partly available at the same address. The GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT can be used free after registration, at present the homepage counts 2807 registered users. The interested user first enters a virtual office where the entries of the Menu can be opened by clicking at the drawer, shelf, wall map, globe, laptop, TV-set, etc. These entries are professional lesson plans using digital technology, photos, video clips, animations on physical and social geography. The homepage also mirrors pieces of music, maps, collection of minerals, database links, diagrams, bibliography, lecture notes, dictionaries, scientific and popular journals, geography games, web pages, etc. The whole set of appliances is based on Dreamweaver MX program. During the past 2.5 years some experience has been gained about the GEOGRAPHY nEtQUIPMENT in use, mainly from teachers of geography, who downloaded and responded to the questionnaire. Another source of information is the group of students in the College, where future teachers of geography are trained in a one-semester course on application of the Info-Communication Technology. From the first group, i.e. 59 active teachers of geography, 54 % use the Internet "always" or "frequently" in the classroom, whereas 75 % of them rely on it for preparation to the lessons. Before trying the homepage, these numbers were 25 % and 54 %, only. From among the listed

  15. THE ROLE OF GEOGRAPHY IN STARTING TEACHER TRAINING FOR INFANT AND PRIMARY EDUCATION IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA GUARAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, in order to practice teaching in pre-school and primary school, it is compulsory to have a specific degree in the Science of primary education. It is a five-year course that qualifies you for teaching in both cases and it is subdivided in three main steps: traditional disciplinary courses, laboratories connected to their corresponding courses (for instance, the course of Geography didactics includes the corresponding laboratory, and training activities. These latter ones are subdivided as well in indirect training that is coordinated by the supervisors of the internship and direct training, which is carried out within schools. The teaching of Geography, even if it is underestimated in terms of hours of class as compared to other disciplinary fields, turns out to be essential, since spatial and geographical education is part of the obligatory educational offer for education in pre-school and in primary school.

  16. The Cultural Geography on the III Millennium: epistemic-methodological and educational perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Correia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article puts in evidence the Cultural and Humanistic Geography and its new shapes of working with the knowledge. For such thing, it reflects about the geographic knowledge on the third millennium and the new humanistic perspectives of this lore. So that it points out the feeling and the emotion starting from the subjectivism and from the relation people have with their own living and realized space. These reflections are treated as a general and a geographical knowledge, but more particularly in a geographical sight, pointing out in this last, the categories which envolve the daily life of the local citizens, the more evident and substantials to the grasp in the positioned geographical science, as well, for the teaching of this subject. Reflects also about the position of the contemporary knowledge, as well as pointing out the possible contribution Geography may bring to the efectiveness of those. For that reason, it points some metodologic and pedagogical questions of the actual geography, reaching fenomenological grounds of the social representations, for the elaboration of one more human lore, particularly inside the geographical science, which could contribute to the project of the society at all. For this, the fenomenological vision of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty it is put in evidence, like the Moscovici’s theory of social plays. These theories go towards one humanistic geography to be built and reflected in an academic, educational and pedagogical environment.

  17. The spaces of urban economic geographies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsø Hansen, Høgni; Winther, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The paper focuses on the transformation of the industrial structure and the location dynamics on the edge of the metropolitan region of Copenhagen with the aim of explaining the rise of new spaces in the urban economic geography. The main concern of the paper is the role the transformation...... of Copenhagen. The recent changes in the economic geographies of the outer city of Copenhagen are used as a launch pad for discussing the theoretical and analytical challenges in understanding the industrial change in new urban forms....... of the outer city plays in the urban economy of Copenhagen. The centre of attention is on the changing industrial structure, the progressively higher complexity of firm location, and the division of labour that have emerged in the past decade of growth as a result of the resurgence of the metropolitan region...

  18. The Geography of Film Viewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barratt, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While many cognitive scientists assume that the fundamental nature of human cognitive faculties is universal, recent research suggests that cognitive differences exist between Westerners and East Asians. The goal of the proposed paper is to assess the potential implications of this research for t...

  19. Invariant chain as a vehicle to load antigenic peptides on human MHC class I for cytotoxic T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälchli, Sébastien; Kumari, Shraddha; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Sand, Kine M K; Yang, Weiwen; Landsverk, Ole J B; Bakke, Oddmund; Olweus, Johanna; Gregers, Tone F

    2014-03-01

    Protective T-cell responses depend on efficient presentation of antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) and class II (MHCII) molecules. Invariant chain (Ii) serves as a chaperone for MHCII molecules and mediates trafficking to the endosomal pathway. The genetic exchange of the class II-associated Ii peptide (CLIP) with antigenic peptides has proven efficient for loading of MHCII and activation of specific CD4(+) T cells. Here, we investigated if Ii could similarly activate human CD8(+) T cells when used as a vehicle for cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) epitopes. The results show that wild type Ii, and Ii in which CLIP was replaced by known CTL epitopes from the cancer targets MART-1 or CD20, coprecipitated with HLA-A*02:01 and mediated colocalization in the endosomal pathway. Furthermore, HLA-A*02:01-positive cells expressing CLIP-replaced Ii efficiently activated Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells in a TAP- and proteasome-independent manner. Finally, dendritic cells transfected with mRNA encoding IiMART-1 or IiCD20 primed naïve CD8(+) T cells. The results show that Ii carrying antigenic peptides in the CLIP region can promote efficient presentation of the epitopes to CTLs independently of the classical MHCI peptide loading machinery, facilitating novel vaccination strategies against cancer.

  20. The emerging geographies of climate justice

    OpenAIRE

    Susannah Fisher

    2012-01-01

    Climate justice is a well-used concept within the international climate debate yet it has often remained little more than a static ideal. This paper brings together literatures on environmental justice, development processes, and the politics of scale to argue that we need to be more attentive to the emerging geographies of climate justice, particularly in the global South where climate change provokes questions of uneven development processes as well as environmental concerns. Through an ana...

  1. Geography, institutions, and compared development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Luis Vaz

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a significant improvement in the economic performance of some African countries. The resulting increased dispersion in income levels across Africa, combined with the pertinence of detecting regional role models renders an intra-African analysis more attractive. In this paper I estimate the respective contribution of institutions, geography, and policies in determining income levels in sub-Saharan Africa. I find that income per capita in this region can be explained to a...

  2. Algorithms for reengineering 1991 census geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, S; Rao, L

    1995-03-01

    "The availability of GIS [geographic information systems] technology and digital boundaries of census output areas now makes it possible for users to design their own census geography. Three algorithms are described that can be used for this purpose. An Arc/Info implementation is briefly outlined and case studies presented to demonstrate some of the results of explicitly designing zoning systems for use with 1991 [U.K.] census data."

  3. For a social geography of emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury, Antoine; Houssay-Holzschuch, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    New economic world order, new geographies of development, new powers… A whole range of expressions has appeared in the past three decades to coin the major and multi-dimensional changes that have affected global political economics. More specifically, those expressions refer to a transition towards a multi-polar world: the domination of the West and later the Triade is now counterbalanced by the economic and perhaps political power of countries that were once called under-developed - China be...

  4. Kay Warren on Gender, Class, and the Unwilling Victims of Human Trafficking Law

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenberg, Janell

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, human trafficking has emerged as a legal category of prosecutable criminal behavior. The 2000 Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, created international guidelines for the identification and prosecution of human trafficking under the auspices of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime. More than 110 UN member states are signatories to this protocol while actual attempts to translate it into practice con...

  5. Latent classes of polydrug and polyroute use and associations with human immunodeficiency virus risk behaviours and overdose among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Meredith C; Roesch, Scott C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Lindsay, Suzanne; Gonzalez-Zuniga, Patricia; Gaines, Tommi L

    2017-03-24

    Patterns of polydrug use among people who inject drugs (PWID) may be differentially associated with overdose and unique human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk factors. Subgroups of PWID in Tijuana, Mexico, were identified based on substances used, route of administration, frequency of use and co-injection indicators. Participants were PWID residing in Tijuana age ≥18 years sampled from 2011 to 2012 who reported injecting an illicit substance in the past month (n = 735). Latent class analysis identified discrete classes of polydrug use characterised by 11 indicators of past 6 months substance use. Multinomial logistic regression examined class membership association with HIV risk behaviours, overdose and other covariates using an automated three-step procedure in mplus to account for classification error. Participants were classified into five subgroups. Two polydrug and polyroute classes were defined by use of multiple substances through several routes of administration and were primarily distinguished from each other by cocaine use (class 1: 5%) or no cocaine use (class 2: 29%). The other classes consisted primarily of injectors: cocaine, methamphetamine and heroin injection (class 3: 4%); methamphetamine and heroin injection (class 4: 10%); and heroin injection (class 5: 52%). Compared with the heroin-only injection class, memberships in the two polydrug and polyroute use classes were independently associated with both HIV injection and sexual risk behaviours. Substance use patterns among PWID in Tijuana are highly heterogeneous, and polydrug and polyroute users are a high-risk subgroup who may require more tailored prevention and treatment interventions. [Meacham MC, Roesch SC, Strathdee SA, Lindsay S, Gonzalez-Zuniga P, Gaines TL. Latent classes of polydrug and polyroute use and associations with human immunodeficiency virus risk behaviours and overdose among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017

  6. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  7. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  8. Genomic analysis identifies class II mismatches in serologically DR-compatible human renal allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, A; Wood, K J; Morris, P J

    1988-11-01

    Many studies, including those from our own center, have shown that matching the donor and recipient for HLA-DR antigens has a beneficial effect on the outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation. However, cases of irreversible graft rejection are sometimes seen in patients who have received an HLA-DR-compatible kidney, suggesting that serologic compatibility for HLA-DR may not always ensure reduced alloreactivity toward the graft. We have examined a number of recipients and their serologically DR-compatible cadaveric donors by Southern blotting and hybridization with locus specific HLA class II probes in order to determine whether in these patients there were class II mismatches that had been undetected by serology. The results show that the analysis of DR beta restriction fragment patterns does little more than complement and confirm the serologic identification of HLA-DR. Hybridization with DQ alpha and DQ beta probes, however, significantly extends the number of DQ specificities that can be detected and suggests that DQ mismatches in DR-compatible donor-recipient pairs may be more common than previously supposed, although it is not possible to draw any conclusions on the influence of DQ incompatibilities in the presence of DR compatibility on graft outcome.

  9. De novo germinal mutations and other classes of non-traditional inheritance in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Genetic diseases provide a unique resource for the study of the molecular basis for biologically relevant, inherited variation. Review of variants at a series of disease loci suggest significant differences among loci in the relative frequency of classes of variants. Common mechanistic features are observed within each class of variant. The spectrum of events identified is a reflection of both the gene structure and the selective pressure necessary to generate a disease phenotype. This locus specificity has significant potential to compromise estimates of both background and induced germinal gene mutation rates. Aberrant inheritance has been the classical definition of a de novo germinal mutation. Recent studies have identified mosaicism as an alternative explanation for the non-traditional pattern of inheritance. Mosaicism is of unique concern for studies of induced mutation rates because this event would reflect exposure of grandparent(s) of the proband to genotoxic agents. This is in contrast to the {open_quotes}normal expectation{close_quotes} that induced mutations are the result of parental exposure. The observations on the frequency of mosaicism, in conjunction with the problems of incomplete ascertainment of alterations in DNA structure, increase the complexity of efforts to estimate induced germinal mutation rates in populations exposed to potentially genotoxic agents.

  10. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kärre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1), indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  11. REVIEW OF GEOGRAPHY DISTANCE LEARNING STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS THE THEMATIC COURSES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur Yazıcı

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine Department of Geography Distance Learning students’ approaches towards the thematic courses in Physical Geography field in academic year 2014-2015 Spring semester. 4 Open-ended questions were asked to the students to designate the difficulties and the problems encountered when implementing the online courses. The study which was participated in 66 distance learning students was performed through qualitative analysis technique. The data were analyzed by using descriptive analysis method. At the end of the research, deficiency of map skill development and field work practices were directly related to the Physical Geography field among the problems that the students’ come face to face. Alongside of overcoming these issues, students stated that they demanded to improve communication with each other and especially the lecturers.

  12. Models in geography ? A sense to research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Brunet

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Ideas on models and modelling made a conspicuous entry into geography in the 1960s. They have since evolved, through practice and under the influence of—partly justified—criticism. No serious research can dispense with modelling as a means to reach the essential and to evaluate the divergence between singular geographical objects and the models that assist their interpretation. On two conditions, which merit further definition and exploration : models must have meaning in and through the practices, objectives and intentions of human action ; and we must know how to use models—whether tried and tested or new—to understand the structure and dynamics of singular geographical objects, and not just to infer general mechanisms from them, even though they will certainly enhance our understanding of the nature and scope of general mechanisms.

  13. Economic Geography and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Bosker, E. Maarten; Garretsen, Harry

    2008-01-01

    The physical or absolute geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is often blamed for its poor economic performance. A country's location however not only determines its absolute geography, it also pins down its relative position on the globe vis-à-vis other countries. This paper assesses the importance of relative geography, and access to foreign markets in particular, in explaining the substantial income differences between SSA countries. We base our empirical analysis on a new economic geogra...

  14. Genes mirror geography within Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novembre, John; Johnson, Toby; Bryc, Katarzyna; Kutalik, Zoltán; Boyko, Adam R; Auton, Adam; Indap, Amit; King, Karen S; Bergmann, Sven; Nelson, Matthew R; Stephens, Matthew; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2008-11-06

    Understanding the genetic structure of human populations is of fundamental interest to medical, forensic and anthropological sciences. Advances in high-throughput genotyping technology have markedly improved our understanding of global patterns of human genetic variation and suggest the potential to use large samples to uncover variation among closely spaced populations. Here we characterize genetic variation in a sample of 3,000 European individuals genotyped at over half a million variable DNA sites in the human genome. Despite low average levels of genetic differentiation among Europeans, we find a close correspondence between genetic and geographic distances; indeed, a geographical map of Europe arises naturally as an efficient two-dimensional summary of genetic variation in Europeans. The results emphasize that when mapping the genetic basis of a disease phenotype, spurious associations can arise if genetic structure is not properly accounted for. In addition, the results are relevant to the prospects of genetic ancestry testing; an individual's DNA can be used to infer their geographic origin with surprising accuracy-often to within a few hundred kilometres.

  15. A prototype nonpeptidyl, hydrazone class, thrombopoietin receptor agonist, SB-559457, is toxic to primary human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-01-07

    Biologic characterization of SB-559457 (SB), a nonpeptidyl hydrazone class of thrombopoietin receptor (Mpl) agonist, revealed toxicity toward human leukemia cells. Antiproliferative effects followed by significant, nonapoptotic, cell death within 72 hours occurred in 24 of 26 acute myeloid leukemia, 0 of 6 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 3 of 6 chronic myeloid leukemia patient samples exposed to SB, but not recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTpo), in liquid suspension culture. Further investigation revealed increased phosphorylation of p70S6/S6 kinases in SB-, but not in rhTpo-, treated cells. Expression profiling of cells exposed to SB versus rhTpo revealed statistically significant, more than 2-fold changes in GAPDH and REDD1 gene expression, confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction. These genes, induced in energy or hypoxia stressed cells, have been implicated in cell death pathways, and may provide important clues to the mechanism of SB-induced, leukemic cell death. These results suggest that nonpeptidyl, hydrazone class Mpl agonists may be clinically useful antileukemic agents by virtue of their combined thrombopoietic and antileukemic effects.

  16. Saliva versus Plasma Relative Bioavailability of Tolterodine in Humans: Validation of Class III Drugs of the Salivary Excretion Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N; Najib, N; Salem, I I; Najib, O

    2016-06-01

    Relative bioavailability study of tolterodine in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected up to 16 h after 2 mg oral dose. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non compartmental analysis using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was optimized by SimCYP program V13. Tolterodine falls into class III (High permeability/Low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A high pearsons correlation coefficient of 0.97 between mean saliva and plasma concentrations, and saliva/plasma concentrations ratio of 0.33 were observed. In addition, correlation coefficients and saliva/plasma ratios of area under curve and maximum concentration were 0.98, 0.95 and 0.42, 0.34 respectively. On the other hand, time to reach maximum concentration was higher in saliva by 2.37 fold. In addition, inter subject variability values in saliva were slightly higher than plasma leading to need for slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies (55 vs. 48 subjects). Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioavailability and bioequivalence of SECS class I drugs when adequate sample size is used. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The development of physical geography at the University of Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Lovrenčak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an attempt to present the development of physical geography at the Department of Geography at the Ljubljanaćs Faculty of Arts. The last two decades, from 1989 to 2009, are discussed, trying to include all its branches,forming the Chair of physical geography during this period. The presentation of physical geographers, who worked as researchers and teachers in particular branches of physical geography, should demonstrate the way and degree of studying physical-geographical characteristics of, mainly, Slovenian landscapes.

  18. Transportation geography: The influence of Walter Isard and regional science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Stephanie E.

    . This paper explores the influence of Walter Isard, his work, and the field of regional science generally on transportation geography. It argues that Isard's impact was both subtle and significant. Regional science greatly influenced the emergence of modern transportation geography in the 1950s. Transportation themes and methods from Isard's own work provided early building blocks for transportation geography. Moreover, Isard and regional science contributed importantly to the development of the intellectual network of persons, places, and institutions that early on defined the subfield. Regional science and transportation geography have diverged in recent decades, but opportunities exist for renewed interaction.

  19. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib

    2014-01-01

    treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells......In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were...... (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar5100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range...

  20. Class-I human leukocyte alleles in leprosy patients from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Santana Alessio Franceschi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study was designed to investigate a possible role of HLA (histocompatibility leucocyte antigen class-I alleles (HLA-A, -B, and -C in leprosy patients from Southern Brazil. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-five patients with leprosy and 450 individuals for the control group were involved in this research. HLA genotyping was performed through PCR-SSO protocols (One Lambda, USA; the frequency of these alleles was calculated in each group by direct counting, and the frequencies were then compared. RESULTS: There was an association between HLA-A*11 (6.9% vs 4.1%, p=0.0345, OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.05-2.81, HLA-B*38 (2.7% vs. 1.1%, p=0.0402, OR=2.44, 95% CI=1.05-5.69, HLA-C*12 (9.4% vs. 5.4%, p=0.01, OR=1.82, 95% CI=1.17-2.82, and HLA-C*16 (3.1% vs. 6.5%, p=0.0124, OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.26-0.85 and leprosy per se. In addition, HLA-B*35, HLA-C*04, and HLA-C*07 frequencies were different between lepromatous (LL and tuberculoid (TT patients. However, after adjusting for the number of alleles compared, Pc values became nonsignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results do not support the previous findings that HLA class-I alleles play a role in leprosy pathogenesis, we suggest new studies because of the importance of the association between the HLA and KIR in the innate immune response to leprosy.

  1. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  2. Managing human resources in healthcare: learning from world class practices--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper, which is presented in two parts, is intended to demonstrate that practices related to the area of human resources management, adopted by model organisations that have dominated their markets consistently, can lend themselves very well to the healthcare sector, which is primarily a "people-oriented" sector. As change in a modern business context is set to continue in an unrelenting way, most organisations will be presented with the challenge of developing the necessary skills and areas of expertise to enable them to cope with the demands on them, master technological opportunities at their disposal, learn how to exploit modern management concepts and optimise value to all the stakeholders they intend to serve. This paper draws from best practices using the experiences of quality recognised organisations and many admired names through pioneering human resource policies and practices and through clear demonstrations on the benefits of relying on people as the major "asset". Part I of this article addresses the importance of human resources as revealed through models of management for organisational excellence. In particular, the paper refers to the criteria for excellence in relation to people management using the following prestigious and integrative management models: Deming Prize (Japan); European Quality Award Model (Europe); and Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (USA). In addition, this paper illustrates several case studies using organisations known for their pioneering approaches to people management and which led them to win very prestigious quality awards and various international accolades. The paper concludes by reinforcing the point that human resource management in a healthcare context has to be viewed as an integrated set of processes and practices which need to be adhered to from an integrated perspective in order to optimise individuals' performance levels and so that the human potential can be exploited fully.

  3. GIS IN THE CLOUD: USING WEBGIS FOR TEACHING SECONDARY GEOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Milson

    Full Text Available RESUMEN:There is no doubt among most geography educators that GIS is an important tool for teaching and learning, but its use has been slowed by issues such as the cost of the software and the management of large spatial data files. The move to cloud computing is one trend that is promising for GIS in education. The "cloud" refers to a virtual network that provides many users with access to files, services, and applications. In this article I argue that cloud computing and WebGIS have the potential to transform geography education. I will describe three case studies that make use of these emerging tools in classrooms in the US, and discuss the lessons that we can learn from these cases. PALABRAS CLAVE WEBSIG; SIG; enseñanza de la geografía; la nube de Internet; ArcGIS Online; ArcGIS Explorer Desktop (AGX. ABSTRACT There is no doubt among most geography educators that GIS is an important tool for teaching and learning, but its use has been slowed by issues such as the cost of the software and the management of large spatial data files. The move to cloud computingis one trend that is promising for GIS in education. The "cloud" refers to a virtual network that provides many users with access to files, services, and applications. In this article I argue that cloud computing and WebGIS have the potential to transform geography education. I will describe three case studies that make use of these emerging tools in classrooms in the US, and discuss the lessons that we can learn from these cases. KEY WORDS WEBGIS; GIS; cloud computing; ArcGIS Online; ArcGIS Explorer Desktop (AGX. RÉSUMÉ Il n'ya aucun doute parmi les éducateurs les plus géographie que le SIG est un outil important pour l'enseignement et l'apprentissage, mais son utilisation a été ralentie par des problèmes tels que le coût du logiciel et la gestion des grands fichiers de données spatiales. Le passage au nuage de l'internet est une tendance qui est prometteur pour les SIG dans l

  4. ABCC4与人类肿瘤%ATP-binding cassette transporter family class C4 and human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石妮; 赵晓航

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter family class C4 (ABCC4) is known as a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter super-family, involved in the active transport of endogenous anions and xenobiotic, which is not normally produced or expected to be present in human, such as antibiotics. Recently it has been found that the copy number variations of Abcc4 gene and overexpression of ABCC4 protein in many kinds of human cancers, which might involved in tumorigenesis, progress and chemotherapeutic response. This review will focus on the ectopic expression of Abcc4 in human cancer and the potential role of ABCC4 in tumorigenesis and progress.%ABCC4(ATP-binding cassette transporter family class C4,ABCC4)是ABC蛋白家族成员,主要参与转运机体物质代谢中产生的有机阴离子和一些异型生物质等生物学功能.近年研究发现某些人类肿瘤存在Abcc4基因的拷贝数变异,主要表现为Abcc4基因拷贝数增加和ABCC4蛋白过表达,这些改变与肿瘤发生发展、耐药,以及治疗疗效具有相关性.该文综述了Abcc4基因的拷贝数变异和异常表达与肿瘤生物学特性的关系,探讨ABCC4在肿瘤发生发展中的作用机制.

  5. Analysis of Class II human leucocyte antigens in Italian and Spanish systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Rueda, Blanca; Marchini, Maurizio; Santaniello, Alessandro; Simeón, Carmen P; Fonollosa, Vicente; Caronni, Monica; Rios-Fernandez, Raquel; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Moreno, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel A; Escalera, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria F; Martin, Javier; Scorza, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of Class II HLAs in SSc patients from Italy and Spain and in SSc patients of Caucasian ancestry. Nine hundred and forty-four SSc patients (Italy 392 patients; Spain 452 patients) and 1320 ethnically matched healthy controls (Italy 398 patients; Spain 922 patients) were genotyped up to the fourth digit by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotides for HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Patients included 390 ACA-positive and 254 anti-topo I-positive subjects. Associations between SSc or SSc-specific antibodies and HLA alleles or HLA haplotypes were sought via the chi-square test after 10 000-fold permutation testing. A meta-analysis including this study cohort and other Caucasoids samples was also conducted. In both the cohorts, the strongest association was observed between the HLA-DRB1*1104 allele and SSc or anti-topo I antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*1104 -DQA1*0501 -DQB1*0301 haplotype was overrepresented in Italian [odds ratio (OR) = 2.069, 95% asymptotic CIs (CI(95)) 1.486, 2.881; P < 0.001] and in Spanish patients (OR = 6.707, CI(95) 3.974, 11.319; P < 0.001) as well as in anti-topo-positive patients: Italy (OR = 2.642, CI(95) 1.78, 3.924; P < 0.001) and Spain (OR = 20.625, CI(95) 11.536, 36.876; P < 0.001). In both the populations we also identified an additional risk allele (HLA-DQB1*03) and a protective allele (HLA-DQB1*0501) in anti-topo-positive patients. The meta-analysis showed different statistically significant associations, the most interesting being the differential association between HLA-DRB1*01 alleles and ACAs (OR = 1.724, CI(95) 1.482, 2.005; P < 0.001) or topo I antibodies (OR = 0.5, CI(95) 0.384, 0.651; P < 0.001). We describe multiple robust associations between SSc and HLA Class II antigens in Caucasoids that may help to understand the genetic architecture of SSc.

  6. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV...... antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays the ground for risk stratification for PML and development of therapy and prevention....... mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate...

  7. Substituted 2-phenylimidazopyridines: a new class of drug leads for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatipaka, Hari Babu; Gillespie, J Robert; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Norcross, Neil R; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Nagendar, Pendem; Creason, Sharon A; McQueen, Joshua; Duster, Nicole A; Nagle, Advait; Supek, Frantisek; Molteni, Valentina; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Glynne, Richard; Buckner, Frederick S; Gelb, Michael H

    2014-02-13

    A phenotypic screen of a compound library for antiparasitic activity on Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, led to the identification of substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)oxazolopyridines as a starting point for hit-to-lead medicinal chemistry. A total of 110 analogues were prepared, which led to the identification of 64, a substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)imidazopyridine. This compound showed antiparasitic activity in vitro with an EC50 of 2 nM and displayed reasonable druglike properties when tested in a number of in vitro assays. The compound was orally bioavailable and displayed good plasma and brain exposure in mice. Compound 64 cured mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei when dosed orally down to 2.5 mg/kg. Given its potent antiparasitic properties and its ease of synthesis, compound 64 represents a new lead for the development of drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis.

  8. New class of gene-termini-associated human RNAs suggests a novel RNA copying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Philipp; Ozsolak, Fatih; Kim, Sang Woo; Foissac, Sylvain; Lipson, Doron; Hart, Chris; Roels, Steve; Borel, Christelle; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-07-29

    Small (<200 nucleotide) RNA (sRNA) profiling of human cells using various technologies demonstrates unexpected complexity of sRNAs with hundreds of thousands of sRNA species present. Genetic and in vitro studies show that these RNAs are not merely degradation products of longer transcripts but could indeed have a function. Furthermore, profiling of RNAs, including the sRNAs, can reveal not only novel transcripts, but also make clear predictions about the existence and properties of novel biochemical pathways operating in a cell. For example, sRNA profiling in human cells indicated the existence of an unknown capping mechanism operating on cleaved RNA, a biochemical component of which was later identified. Here we show that human cells contain a novel type of sRNA that has non-genomically encoded 5' poly(U) tails. The presence of these RNAs at the termini of genes, specifically at the very 3' ends of known mRNAs, strongly argues for the presence of a yet uncharacterized endogenous biochemical pathway in cells that can copy RNA. We show that this pathway can operate on multiple genes, with specific enrichment towards transcript-encoding components of the translational machinery. Finally, we show that genes are also flanked by sense, 3' polyadenylated sRNAs that are likely to be capped.

  9. Data Acquisition and Preprocessing in Studies on Humans: What Is Not Taught in Statistics Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yeyi; Hernandez, Ladia M; Mueller, Peter; Dong, Yongquan; Forman, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to address issues in research that may be missing from statistics classes and important for (bio-)statistics students. In the context of a case study, we discuss data acquisition and preprocessing steps that fill the gap between research questions posed by subject matter scientists and statistical methodology for formal inference. Issues include participant recruitment, data collection training and standardization, variable coding, data review and verification, data cleaning and editing, and documentation. Despite the critical importance of these details in research, most of these issues are rarely discussed in an applied statistics program. One reason for the lack of more formal training is the difficulty in addressing the many challenges that can possibly arise in the course of a study in a systematic way. This article can help to bridge this gap between research questions and formal statistical inference by using an illustrative case study for a discussion. We hope that reading and discussing this paper and practicing data preprocessing exercises will sensitize statistics students to these important issues and achieve optimal conduct, quality control, analysis, and interpretation of a study.

  10. Antifilarial activity of Zoanthus species (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthzoa) against human lymphatic filaria, Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V; Saxena, A; Pandey, K; Bajpai, Preeti; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2004-07-01

    The chloroform methanol (1:1) extract of an unidentified green zoanthus (Phylum Coelenterata, Class Anthozoa) showed promising in vitro adulticidal activity with a lethal concentration of 125 microg/ml on Brugia malayi. This extract brought about a 52.2% reduction in circulating microfilariae of B. malayi when administered to infected Mastomys coucha at 250 mg/kg, orally for 5 consecutive days. Further fractionation of the extract led to the recovery of four fractions, which were evaluated simultaneously in both in vitro and in vivo systems against B. malayi. The chloroform fraction at 250 mg/kg orally for 5 days exhibited the highest macrofilaricidal action (42.5%), closely followed by the insoluble n-butanol fraction (34.3%), the soluble hexane fraction (32.4%), and the soluble n-butanol fraction (20.4%). In addition, the hexane soluble fraction caused 44.3% sterilization of the surviving female parasites. Two compounds isolated were found devoid of antifilarial activity.

  11. Several Theoretical Issues on Innovation Geography%创新地理学研究的几个理论问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕拉昌; 黄茹; 廖倩

    2016-01-01

    In the 1920s, Schumpeter proposed the theory of Innovation, but this theory did not arouse the atten-tion by mainstream economists until 1950s-1960s. Though the space research of innovation had also aroused the concern of the geographers during that period, it failed to be the main areas of geography study. Since the 1980s, with "spatial turn" of human geography and emerging of knowledge economy, innovation geography has emerged as an important research area of geography, however, the research on the basic theory of innova-tion geography is still very limited, and that whether innovation geography as an independent subject is still un-der debating, therefore, those important issues concerned the discipline of innovation geography, such as the re-search object, discipline nature and tasks need to be examined further. This article argues that:Innovation Ge-ography is an independent subject studying relationship between human's innovation activities and geographi-cal environment. The innovation activities of human beings as the most important aspect of human activities have great significances to establishing the intelligent human-earth relationship system. As a branch subject of human geography, innovation geography has cross-discipline nature, because it has close relationship with the branch subject of human geography and other subjects such as political science, management science, econom-ics, policy science, urban planning and so on. We conclude the main tasks of innovation geography as follows:1) The basic theory of innovation geography;2) the regional distribution and combination of innovation ele-ments such as talents, capital, technology, etc.;3) the examination and evaluation of Innovation Milieu and in-novation ecology and evaluation;4) the survey of innovation geography and the study of the space pattern and regional effect of innovation;5) the study of innovation links, innovation networks and innovation cluster;6) the study of multi-scale innovation

  12. Preparation of Geography Teaching Materials through the Utilization of Geographic Information Systems (GIS Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İSKENDER DÖLEK

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present a model through a sample implementation the intention of which is to teach Geography teachers how to develop learning materials by using the Arc GIS rather than instructing them about material development of all sorts. Within this context different phases of material development such as maps, landforms and settlements are explained step by step along with the digitizing process of screen maps. A great number of geographical materials can be enhanced by teachers of Geography if they follow the steps illustrated by the Arc GIS programme. The materials prepared by Geography teachers and three dimensional images can be enlarged or zoomed out on the screen to figure out the effect of the scale on the map. The fact that our eyesight becomes narrow and details disappeare as we gain height can be concretized through this example. Besides teachers can explain visually how physical features are shown by using contour lines. For instance, it is observed on three dimensional images that the slope increases where the contour lines become more frequent in areas like hillsides,or vice versa. The appearance of contour lines or other landforms can be highlighted by these images as well. In a class at which topics like river valleys, plains, plateaus, etc. are supposed to be explained, these can be presenented with the help of visuals. Furthermore the relation between settlements and landforms can be made clear and easy to grasp through already developed materials.Geography teachers can develop materials or process certain data with various techniques (satellite images, air photographs as they improve their skills of using the GIS. They can even digitize the images of Google Earth, an increasingly popular internet device and turn them into an easy-to-examine datum by means of the GIS. In this manner they provide acquired information and developed materials to their students and help them use an advantegous device in the long and tiring

  13. Chaperonin genes on the rise: new divergent classes and intense duplication in human and other vertebrate genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Alberto JL

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperonin proteins are well known for the critical role they play in protein folding and in disease. However, the recent identification of three diverged chaperonin paralogs associated with the human Bardet-Biedl and McKusick-Kaufman Syndromes (BBS and MKKS, respectively indicates that the eukaryotic chaperonin-gene family is larger and more differentiated than previously thought. The availability of complete genome sequences makes possible a definitive characterization of the complete set of chaperonin sequences in human and other species. Results We identified fifty-four chaperonin-like sequences in the human genome and similar numbers in the genomes of the model organisms mouse and rat. In mammal genomes we identified, besides the well-known CCT chaperonin genes and the three genes associated with the MKKS and BBS pathological conditions, a newly-defined class of chaperonin genes named CCT8L, represented in human by the two sequences CCT8L1 and CCT8L2. Comparative analyses from several vertebrate genomes established the monophyletic origin of chaperonin-like MKKS and BBS genes from the CCT8 lineage. The CCT8L gene originated from a later duplication also in the CCT8 lineage at the onset of mammal evolution and duplicated in primate genomes. The functionality of CCT8L genes in different species was confirmed by evolutionary analyses and in human by expression data. Detailed sequence analysis and structural predictions of MKKS, BBS and CCT8L proteins strongly suggested that they conserve a typical chaperonin-like core structure but that they are unlikely to form a CCT-like oligomeric complex. The characterization of many newly-discovered chaperonin pseudogenes uncovered the intense duplication activity of eukaryotic chaperonin genes. Conclusions In vertebrates, chaperonin genes, driven by intense duplication processes, have diversified into multiple classes and functionalities that extend beyond their well-known protein

  14. Geo-Bibliometric Mapping of French Geography: An Examination of Geography Dissertations Produced in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herubel, Jean-Pierre V. M.

    2005-01-01

    French geography dissertations for the years 1985-2002 were examined for their salient characteristics in terms of degree production, dissertation type, institutional affiliation, and geographical reach. These dissertations offer a rich base of research conducted in a country known for its innovative geographical research and tradition. Particular…

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718 were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914 when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR correction (p = 0.024. Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920, and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024. In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966 and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921. Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population.

  16. Human leukocyte antigen class II transgenic mouse model unmasks the significant extrahepatic pathology in toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Marietta, Eric V; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2011-06-01

    Among the exotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the superantigens (SAgs) are the most potent T-cell activators known to date. SAgs are implicated in several serious diseases including toxic shock syndrome (TSS), Kawasaki disease, and sepsis. However, the immunopathogenesis of TSS and other diseases involving SAgs are still not completely understood. The commonly used conventional laboratory mouse strains do not respond robustly to SAgs in vivo. Therefore, they must be artificially rendered susceptible to TSS by using sensitizing agents such as d-galactosamine (d-galN), which skews the disease exclusively to the liver and, hence, is not representative of the disease in humans. SAg-induced TSS was characterized using transgenic mice expressing HLA class II molecules that are extremely susceptible to TSS without d-galN. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice recapitulated TSS in humans with extensive multiple-organ inflammation affecting the lung, liver, kidneys, heart, and small intestines. Heavy infiltration with T lymphocytes (both CD4(+) and CD8+), neutrophils, and macrophages was noted. In particular, the pathologic changes in the small intestines were extensive and accompanied by significantly altered absorptive functions of the enterocytes. In contrast to massive liver failure alone in the d-galN sensitization model of TSS, findings of the present study suggest that gut dysfunction might be a key pathogenic event that leads to high morbidity and mortality in humans with TSS.

  17. A Class of Selenocentric Retrograde Orbits With Innovative Applications to Human Lunar Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Lester, Daniel F.; Thronson, Harley A.; Barbee, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Selenocentric distant retrograde orbits with radii from approx. 12,500 km to approx. 25,000 km are assessed for stability and for suitability as crewed command and control infrastructure locations in support of telerobotic lunar surface operations and interplanetary human transport. Such orbits enable consistent transits to and from Earth at virtually any time if they are coplanar with the Moon's geocentric orbit. They possess multiple attributes and applications distinct from NASA's proposed destination orbit for a redirected asteroid about 70,000 km from the Moon.

  18. Secondary School Geography Teachers’ Ability of Using Teaching Methods and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağrı ÖZTÜRK

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, it has been studied to identify what the opions of teachers and students in abilty of using methods and techiniques in geography education. The universe of research is consisted of secondary school geography teacher who are working in Kırşehir and the students who are in these teachers’ eleventh grade class.The research has been applied to secondary education geography teachers and their students with a teacher and student questionarie which was prepared by the research and whose reliability was checked.The data which were obtained with data collection method have been analysed using frequency (f, percent (%, arithmetic average ( Χ , standart to resort (SS and t- test, suitable for the purposes. The results of analysis have been commented by getting use of SPSS ( Statistical Package for Social Sciences .The data which were obtained with data collection method have been analysed using frequency (f, percent (%, arithmetic average ( Χ , standart to resort ( SS and t- test, suitable for the purposes. The results of analysis have been commented by getting use of SPSS ( Statistical Peckage for Social Siciences .

  19. Presence of erm gene classes in Gram-positive bacteria of animal and human origin in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Frimodt-Moller, N.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    A classification of the different erm gene classes based on published sequences was performed, and specific primers to detect some of these classes designed. The presence of ermA (Tn554), ermB (class IV) and ermC (class VI) was determined by PCR in a total of 113 enterococcal, 77 streptococcal...

  20. Educational Measures to Promote the Level of Human Resource Development Skill for Manager Class Embedded Software Development Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Unagami, Tomoaki; Shioya, Atsuko; Mori, Takao; Takada, Hiroaki

    The present paper reports the development of three education courses for manager class embedded software development engineers. The authors first summarized several issues arising in the contemporary Japanese embedded software industry into three categories ; a) engineers are required to compose software development documents, b) the documents are treated as the intermediate product and c) the growing number of mental problems among engineers. To provide knowledge to encounter the above problems, the authors then prepared three education courses; “document review” , “management skill focusing on product quality” , and “management skill focusing on human resource development” . The three courses were designed to reflect the true state of the embedded software industry, and the participants showed high levels of satisfaction after attending the lecture.

  1. Geography program, design, structure and operational strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The geography program is designed to move systematically toward a capability to increase remote sensing data into operational systems for monitoring land use and related environmental change. The problems of environmental imbalance arising from rapid urbanization and other dramatic changes in land use are considered. These overall problems translate into working level problems of establishing the validity of various sensor-data combinations that will best obtain the regional land use and environmental information. The goal, to better understand, predict, and assist policy makers to regulate urban and regional land use changes resulting from population growth and technological advancement, is put forth.

  2. Geography influences microsatellite polymorphism diversity in Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlrausch, Fabiana B; Callegari-Jacques, Sidia M; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Petzl-Erler, M Luiza; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Salzano, Francisco M; Hutz, Mara H

    2005-04-01

    Data related to 15 short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are reported for four South American Indian populations, and integrated with previous Brazilian Indian results. Overall heterozygosities varied significantly among groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.002). The lowest levels of heterozygosity were observed in the Ache, Ayoreo, and Surui, an expected finding considering their isolation and ethnohistory. Genetic distance and gene diversity analyses suggested that geography was a good predictor of genetic affinity among these Native Americans. New evidence from this study supports the hypothesis that the Ache population descends from a Ge group that preceded the Guarani colonization of Paraguay.

  3. Towards a geography of emotional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2016-09-01

    This article is a forum response to a research article on self-reporting methods when studying discrete emotions in science education environments. Studying emotions in natural settings is a difficult task because of the complexity of deciphering verbal and non-verbal communication. In my response I present three main points that build on insights mainly from philosophy and anthropology. The three points are: first, the significance of connecting the visible and measurable with the invisible and intangible; second, what it means to think about the practices of knowing; and third, an argument to map out a geography of analysis that takes also into account who or what emotions are directed at.

  4. Polish electoral geography and its methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Rykiel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the understanding of electoral geography between social sciences are discussed in the article. Main fields and spatial scales of Polish electoral geography are identified. Main methods of multidimensional statistics are discussed. A necessity of a proper choice, based on theories of voting behaviour, of explaning variables to statistical models are emphasised. Regression analysis indicates only a formal usefulness in electoral geography, for quantitative relationships between variables in the model can be evidenced, which may be meaningless not only essentially, but even statistically. The application of canonical analysis in electoral geography brought a methodological turning-point to the statistical approach. This method allowed to combine: (1 the foundation of the selection of input variables on theories of voting behaviour; (2 the analysis of dependence of the electoral results on socio-economic characteristics of areas; (3 an identification of electoral options; (4 a quantification of the role of the historical heritage in the contemporary voting behaviour; and (5 the analysis of the stability of the electoral space. A well grounded opinion was weakened about the general competitiveness of right- and left-wing parties in Poland’s political space. Parties with similar rather than different programmes compete in given areas. It was indicated that elections have only formal influence on the structure of Parliament while the electoral system is decisive. Electoral, including territorial, manipulations also play their part. The empirical analysis indicated that Poland’s political space is polarised between the right-wing-oriented areas of the south-eastern half of the country and the left-wing-oriented areas of the north-western half. The political competition between the left and the right operates merely on the national scale, while it is not reflected territorially.The quantification of the influence of the nineteenth

  5. Geographical Values, the Values of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The debates of the twenty-first century render extremely topical the questions that the discipline of geography was asking at the time of its emergence as a scientific curiosity—but by reversing them:  from the theory of the effects of climate on the psychology of peoples at the time of Montesquieu, we have moved to the anthropogenic construction of the greenhouse effect and of global warming, from development according to the proximity of  differences in region, landscape and culture, we sli...

  6. Music Regions and Mental Maps: Teaching Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Hunter; Banis, David

    2010-01-01

    Music informs understandings of place and is an excellent vehicle for teaching cultural geography. A study was developed of geography students' perception of where music genres predominate in the United States. Its approach, involving mental map exercises, reveals the usefulness and importance of maps as an iterative process in teaching cultural…

  7. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  8. Teaching Critical Thinking in World Regional Geography through Stakeholder Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziarto, Kristin M.; McCarthy, Linda; Padilla, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a stakeholder debate based on a real-world case of regional construction--that of Turkey's application to join the European Union--improved students' critical thinking in an introductory world regional geography course. Such courses are a staple offering among US geography departments, and often the only exposure of non-majors to geographic…

  9. Population and Pedagogy: The Geography Classroom after Malthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Argues that introductory texts in population geography overlook many important issues and current debates. Suggests that teaching population geography would benefit from reading and discussing Malthus' actual words; examining fertility dynamics and influences on reproductive choice; and considering gender issues. Presents a classroom activity to…

  10. A Possibilist Analysis of the Geography National Curriculum in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Hopkin, John

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the national curriculum for geography as it has evolved in England since its inception in 1991 following the Education Reform Act of 1988. Whilst the main contents of our original analysis are provided by way of a table, enabling the reader ready access to the broad trends we identify in how geography has been…

  11. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  12. The Pedagogical Implications of a Futures Program in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Robert

    The intent of this paper is to provide geography educators and researchers with insights into creating a "geography of the future." Among the insights of major interest to geographers (including students, teachers, researchers, and other professional geographers) are that altered states of consciousness (such as often brought on by hallucinogens)…

  13. Bridging Geography and Education for Sustainable Development: A Korean Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Douglas R.; Tschapka, Johannes M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an apparent disconnect between geography and education for sustainable development (ESD), with geography underrepresented in publications and curricula related to sustainability though the discipline embraces the need to foment positive change. To bridge this schism, this article introduces advances in education for sustainable…

  14. Factors Strengthening School Geography's Curricular Position in the Nineteenth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Zachary A.; Boehm, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the evolution of geography in the United States' K-12 education system throughout the Nineteenth Century to understand the causes of variations, shifts in focus, and relative importance placed on geography. A broad theoretical framework, based on the work of sociologists of education and education…

  15. Australia in German Geography Textbooks for Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Berta

    2007-01-01

    German Geography textbooks are structured using the principle of "Systematic Geography based on a regional example" that is predominant in Germany. Compared to other macroregions such as Europe, North America, Africa, or Asia, however, Australia is presented less frequently in school textbooks. Those textbooks which deal with Australia…

  16. Australia in German Geography Textbooks for Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Berta

    2007-01-01

    German Geography textbooks are structured using the principle of "Systematic Geography based on a regional example" that is predominant in Germany. Compared to other macroregions such as Europe, North America, Africa, or Asia, however, Australia is presented less frequently in school textbooks. Those textbooks which deal with Australia…

  17. Geography Teachers and Curriculum Making in "Changing Times"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the controls and influences over geography teachers' curriculum making. A tension is identified between the teacher's agency to "make" a geography curriculum and a controlling social-economic climate of accountability, performance pressure and technological change which limits the teacher's agency. The paper argues…

  18. Some Thoughts about a New International Geography Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Joop; Notte, Henk; Zwartjes, Luc

    2010-01-01

    An important question for geography teachers all over the world is how to define, stimulate and test geographic literacy. Although modern technology is no guarantee of quality, it offers new possibilities for teaching and testing, as can be seen in contemporary geography learning/teaching units using digital maps and interactive tests. Tests such…

  19. Some Perceptions of English Geography Textbook Authors on Writing Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Catling, Simon

    2016-01-01

    There has been much research into the nature and uses of school geography textbooks as teaching resources, yet the perceptions of their authors have been neglected. This study investigated the perspectives of a sample of authors of English primary and secondary school geography textbooks on their experiences as textbook authors. It enquired into…

  20. Experiencing Cultural Geography in the Birthplace of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John

    2014-01-01

    Over time, fewer and fewer geography scholars have the opportunity to actually engage in fieldwork. This article summarizes a field experience shared by a group of geography faculty and students who traveled through the Mississippi Delta endeavoring to study the dynamic nature of the region's blues music and culture. This endeavor entailed…

  1. The New Era of Geography Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shuichi

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the recent changes in the highly centralized national geography curriculum in Japan. Prominent reforms include the implementation of environmental studies in the elementary schools and a broader emphasis, across the curriculum, on world geography. In teacher education, emphasis is now placed on teaching skills rather than subject…

  2. Introduction of Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1.1 General information Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography(XIEG),Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS),was established on 7 July,1998,by merging of two previously existing institutes of CAS,namely Institute of Geography (IOG,established in 1961)and Institute of Biology,Pedology and Desert Research(IBPDR,established in 1965).

  3. The Matter of Geography in Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2015-01-01

    Geographical imaginations are absolutely vital to make sense of sustainability challenges. Yet, a number of studies reveal that geography education has been slow in integrating issues of sustainability into curricula. Geography is particularly interesting in the context of ESD, due to its traditi...

  4. Australian Primary In-Service Teachers' Conceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Lou

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the second part of a two pronged qualitative investigation that examines the ways in which Australian primary teachers conceptualise geography and geography teaching. In the first part of the project, 47 pre-service primary teachers were surveyed. In this paper, I draw on interviews with six in-service primary teachers to…

  5. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  6. Influence of the geographical curriculum on competences of geography teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Resnik Planinc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the influence of geographical curriculum on competences of geography teacher. It is focused on complex and symbiotic relation between curriculum and achieved and recommended competences of geography teacher and their importance for geographical education. The competences should therefore be derived from the theories, concerning values, knowledge, curriculum and whole educational process, which underpin good pedagogical practice.

  7. The Geography Teacher. Volume 6, Number 2, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geography Teacher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Geography Teacher" provides hands-on reference and educative material for K-12 Geography teachers. The journal also pioneers innovative ideas for contemporary teaching methods, including lesson plans. This issue contains the following: (1) Census in Schools Program (census.gov); (2) Ask Dr. de Blij (Dr. Harm de Blij); (3) Eritrea:…

  8. The Geography Teacher. Volume 5, Number 1, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geography Teacher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "The Geography Teacher" provides hands-on reference and educative material for K-12 Geography teachers. The journal also pioneers innovative ideas for contemporary teaching methods, including lesson plans. This issue contains the following: (1) Ask Dr. de Blij (Dr. Harm de Blij); (2) Around the World in Eighty Days (Donald P. Albert);…

  9. Geography and Creativity: Developing Joyful and Imaginative Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffham, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is a complex and contested notion but is now widely recognised as a feature of learning across the curriculum. This article explores how primary geography teaching can be enriched by creative practice. It goes beyond simply suggesting imaginative ways to devise geography lessons, to outline a pedagogy which places children at the heart…

  10. Geography Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Yurdal; Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    This study scrutinizes geography teachers' attitude and belief levels regarding classroom management. As a matter of fact, classroom management is one of the prominent areas emphasized by all educators. Descriptive correlational survey model was used in the study. Study group includes 58 geography teachers working in Sivas province during the…

  11. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  12. Experiencing Cultural Geography in the Birthplace of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John

    2014-01-01

    Over time, fewer and fewer geography scholars have the opportunity to actually engage in fieldwork. This article summarizes a field experience shared by a group of geography faculty and students who traveled through the Mississippi Delta endeavoring to study the dynamic nature of the region's blues music and culture. This endeavor entailed the…

  13. Music Regions and Mental Maps: Teaching Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobe, Hunter; Banis, David

    2010-01-01

    Music informs understandings of place and is an excellent vehicle for teaching cultural geography. A study was developed of geography students' perception of where music genres predominate in the United States. Its approach, involving mental map exercises, reveals the usefulness and importance of maps as an iterative process in teaching cultural…

  14. Bridging Geography and Education for Sustainable Development: A Korean Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Douglas R.; Tschapka, Johannes M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an apparent disconnect between geography and education for sustainable development (ESD), with geography underrepresented in publications and curricula related to sustainability though the discipline embraces the need to foment positive change. To bridge this schism, this article introduces advances in education for sustainable…

  15. Relaxing Hukou : Increased labor mobility and China's economic geography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Maarten; Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, Harry; Schramm, Marc

    2012-01-01

    China's Hukou system poses severe restrictions on labor mobility. This paper assesses the possible consequences of relaxing these restrictions for China's internal economic geography. We base our analysis on a new economic geography (NEG) model. First, we estimate the important model parameters usin

  16. Class II integrase mutants with changes in putative nuclear localization signals are primarily blocked at a postnuclear entry step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Richard; Limón, Ana; Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan

    2004-12-01

    Integrase has been implicated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import. Integrase analyses, however, can be complicated by the pleiotropic nature of mutations: whereas class I mutants are integration defective, class II mutants display additional assembly and/or reverse transcription defects. We previously determined that HIV-1(V165A), originally reported as defective for nuclear import, was a class II mutant. Here we analyzed mutants containing changes in other putative nuclear localization signals, including (186)KRK(188)/(211)KELQKQITK(219) and Cys-130. Previous work established HIV-1(K186Q), HIV-1(Q214L/Q216L), and HIV-1(C130G) as replication defective, but phenotypic classification was unclear and nuclear import in nondividing cells was not addressed. Consistent with previous reports, most of the bipartite mutants studied here were replication defective. These mutants as well as HIV-1(V165A) synthesized reduced cDNA levels, but a normal fraction of mutant cDNA localized to dividing and nondividing cell nuclei. Somewhat surprisingly, recombinant class II mutant proteins were catalytically active, and class II Vpr-integrase fusion proteins efficiently complemented class I mutant virus. Since a class I Vpr-integrase mutant efficiently complemented class II mutant viruses under conditions in which class II Vpr-integrases failed to function, we conclude that classes I and II define two distinct complementation groups and suggest that class II mutants are primarily defective at a postnuclear entry step of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1(C130G) was also defective for reverse transcription, but Vpr-integrase(C130G) did not efficiently complement class I mutant HIV-1. Since HIV-1(C130A) grew like the wild type, we conclude that Cys-130 is not essential for replication and speculate that perturbation of integrase structure contributed to the pleiotropic HIV-1(C130G) phenotype.

  17. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun

    2015-01-01

    machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use...... underlying BRCA1’s function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis....... of long microhomologies was found at recombination junctions derived from E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RNF168-deficient, Fanconi anemia group J protein (FACJ, BRIP1)-deficient, or DNA endonuclease RBBP8 (CtIP)-compromised cells, whereas an increased frequency of S-region inversions was observed in breast...

  18. Modulation of ongoing EMG by different classes of low-threshold mechanoreceptors in the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, P A; Macefield, V G

    2001-12-15

    1. We have previously demonstrated that the input from single FA I and SA II cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the glabrous skin of the human hand is sufficiently strong to modulate ongoing EMG of muscles acting on the digits. Some unresolved issues have now been addressed. 2. Single cutaneous (n = 60), joint (n = 2) and muscle spindle (n = 34) afferents were recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist. Spike-triggered averaging was used to investigate synaptic coupling between these afferents and muscles acting on the digits. The activity of 37 % of FA I (7/19), 20 % of FA II (1/5) and 52 % of SA II afferents (11/21) evoked a reflex response. The discharge from muscle spindles, 15 SA I and two joint afferents did not modulate EMG activity. 3. Two types of reflex responses were encountered: a single excitatory response produced by irregularly firing afferents, or a cyclic modulation evoked by regularly discharging afferents. Rhythmic stimulation of one FA I afferent generated regularly occurring bursts which corresponded to the associated cyclic EMG response. 4. Selectively triggering from the first or last spike of each burst of one FA I afferent altered the averaged EMG profile, suggesting that afferent input modulates the associated EMG and not vice versa. 5. The discharge from single FA I, FA II and SA II afferents can modify ongoing voluntary EMG in muscles of the human hand, presumably via a spinally mediated oligosynaptic pathway. Conversely, we saw no evidence of such modulation by SA I, muscle spindle or joint afferents.

  19. IL-10-Engineered Human CD4(+) Tr1 Cells Eliminate Myeloid Leukemia in an HLA Class I-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locafaro, Grazia; Andolfi, Grazia; Russo, Fabio; Cesana, Luca; Spinelli, Antonello; Camisa, Barbara; Ciceri, Fabio; Lombardo, Angelo; Bondanza, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2017-07-05

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) play a key role in modulating T cell responses. Clinical trials showed that Tregs modulate graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). However, their ability to mediate anti-leukemic activity (graft-versus-leukemia [GvL]) is largely unknown. Enforced interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression converts human CD4(+) T cells into T regulatory type 1 (Tr1)-like (CD4(IL-10)) cells that suppress effector T cells in vitro and xenoGvHD in humanized mouse models. In the present study, we show that CD4(IL-10) cells mediate anti-leukemic effects in vitro and in vivo in a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-dependent but antigen-independent manner. The cytotoxicity mediated by CD4(IL-10) cells is granzyme B (GzB) dependent, is specific for CD13(+) target cells, and requires CD54 and CD112 expression on primary leukemic target blasts. CD4(IL-10) cells adoptively transferred in humanized mouse models directly mediate anti-tumor and anti-leukemic effects. In addition, when co-transferred with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD4(IL-10) cells contribute to the GvL activity but suppress xenoGvHD mediated by the PBMCs. These findings provide for the first time a strong rationale for CD4(IL-10) cell immunotherapy to prevent GvHD and promote GvL in allo-HSCT for myeloid malignancies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The Turkish Geography Teaching Program (2005) and Technology Use in Geography Courses: An Overview of High School Teachers' Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, Suleyman

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the importance and use of technology in geography courses, what the 2005 geography teaching program changed in terms of technology and some of the factors preventing the effective use of technology from teachers' perspectives. The research outcomes suggested that, despite the fact that there is a common consensus among…

  1. Payload mass improvements of supersonic retropropulsive flight for human class missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagin, Maxwell H.

    Supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is the use of retrorockets to decelerate during atmospheric flight while the vehicle is still traveling in the supersonic/hypersonic flight regime. In the context of Mars exploration, subsonic retropropulsion has a robust flight heritage for terminal landing guidance and control, but all supersonic deceleration has, to date, been performed by non-propulsive (i.e. purely aerodynamic) methods, such as aeroshells and parachutes. Extending the use of retropropulsion from the subsonic to the supersonic regime has been identified as an enabling technology for high mass humans-to-Mars architectures. However, supersonic retropropulsion still poses significant design and control challenges, stemming mainly from the complex interactions between the hypersonic engine plumes, the oncoming air flow, and the vehicle's exterior surface. These interactions lead to flow fields that are difficult to model and produce counter intuitive behaviors that are not present in purely propulsive or purely aerodynamic flight. This study will provide an overview of the work done in the design of SRP systems. Optimal throttle laws for certain trajectories will be derived that leverage aero/propulsive effects to decrease propellant requirements and increase total useful landing mass. A study of the mass savings will be made for a 10 mT reference vehicle based on a propulsive version of the Orion capsule, followed by the 100 mT ellipsoid vehicle assumed by NASA's Mars Design Reference Architecture.

  2. Visualizing Multiple Variables Across Scale and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Sarah; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay

    2016-01-01

    Comparing multiple variables to select those that effectively characterize complex entities is important in a wide variety of domains - geodemographics for example. Identifying variables that correlate is a common practice to remove redundancy, but correlation varies across space, with scale and over time, and the frequently used global statistics hide potentially important differentiating local variation. For more comprehensive and robust insights into multivariate relations, these local correlations need to be assessed through various means of defining locality. We explore the geography of this issue, and use novel interactive visualization to identify interdependencies in multivariate data sets to support geographically informed multivariate analysis. We offer terminology for considering scale and locality, visual techniques for establishing the effects of scale on correlation and a theoretical framework through which variation in geographic correlation with scale and locality are addressed explicitly. Prototype software demonstrates how these contributions act together. These techniques enable multiple variables and their geographic characteristics to be considered concurrently as we extend visual parameter space analysis (vPSA) to the spatial domain. We find variable correlations to be sensitive to scale and geography to varying degrees in the context of energy-based geodemographics. This sensitivity depends upon the calculation of locality as well as the geographical and statistical structure of the variable.

  3. African diversity from the HLA point of view: influence of genetic drift, geography, linguistics, and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2001-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of different evolutionary factors on the patterns of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genetic diversity within sub-Saharan Africa, and between Africa, Europe, and East Asia. This is done by comparing the significance of several statistics computed on equivalent population data sets tested for two HLA class II loci, DRB1 and DPB1, which strongly differ from each other by the shape of their allelic distributions. Similar results are found for the two loci concerning highly significant correlations between geographic and genetic distances at the world scale, high levels of genetic diversity within sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, and low within Europe, and low genetic differentiations among the three broad continental areas, with no special divergence of Africa. On the other hand, DPB1 behaves as a neutral polymorphism, although a significant excess of heterozygotes is often observed for DRB1. Whereas the pattern observed for DPB1 is explained by geographic differentiations and genetic drift in isolated populations, balancing selection is likely to have prevented genetic differentiations among populations at the DRB1 locus. However, this selective effect did not disrupt the high correlation found between DRB1 and geography at the world scale, nor between DRB1 and linguistic differentiations at the African level.

  4. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  5. Meeting the Challenge of Systemic Change in Geography Education: Lucy Sprague Mitchell's Young Geographers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    The history of K-12 geography education has been characterized by recurrent high hopes and dashed expectations. There have, however, been moments when the trajectory of geography education might have changed to offer students the opportunity to develop a thorough working knowledge of geography. Lucy Sprague Mitchell's geography program developed…

  6. Direct activation of human dendritic cells by particle-bound but not soluble MHC class II ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato B Baleeiro

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the expression of co-stimulatory cell surface molecules and cytokines. Maturation of DCs is induced by microbial factors via pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory cytokines or cognate interaction with CD4(+ T cells. Here we show that, unexpectedly, the PanDR helper T cell epitope PADRE, a generic T helper cell antigen presented by a large fraction of HLA-DR alleles, when delivered in particle-bound form induced maturation of human DCs. The DCs that received the particle-bound PADRE displayed all features of fully mature DCs, such as high expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, CD83, the MHC-II molecule HLA-DR, secretion of high levels of the biologically active IL-12 (IL-12p70 and induction of vigorous proliferation of naïve CD4(+ T cells. Furthermore, the maturation of DCs induced by particle-bound PADRE was shown to involve sphingosine kinase, calcium signaling from internal sources and downstream signaling through the MAP kinase and the p72syk pathways, and finally activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Based on our findings, we propose that particle-bound PADRE may be used as a DC activator in DC-based vaccines.

  7. Quantitative Profiling of Major Neutral Lipid Classes in Human Meibum by Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Green, Kari B.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to better understand lipid composition in human meibum. Methods. Intact lipids in meibum samples were detected by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis in positive detection mode using sodium iodide (NaI) as an additive. The peak intensities of all major types of lipid species, that is, wax esters (WEs), cholesteryl esters (CEs), and diesters (DEs) were corrected for peak overlapping and isotopic distribution; an additional ionization efficiency correction was performed for WEs and CEs, which was simplified by the observation that the corresponding ionization efficiency was primarily dependent on the specific lipid class and saturation degree of the lipids while independent of the carbon chain length. A set of WE and CE standards was spiked in meibum samples for ionization efficiency determination and absolute quantitation. Results. The absolute amount (μmol/mg) for each of 51 WEs and 31 CEs in meibum samples was determined. The summed masses for 51 WEs and 31 CEs accounted for 48 ± 4% and 40 ± 2%, respectively, of the total meibum lipids. The mass percentages of saturated and unsaturated species were determined to be 75 ± 2% and 25 ± 1% for CEs and 14 ± 1% and 86 ± 1% for WEs. The profiles for two types of DEs were also obtained, which include 42 α,ω Type II DEs, and 21 ω Type I-St DEs. Conclusions. Major neutral lipid classes in meibum samples were quantitatively profiled by ESI-MS analysis with NaI additive. PMID:23847307

  8. A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates' conceptions of geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Brian D.

    A phenomenographic analysis of elementary teacher candidates attending a large university in north Texas was conducted during the Spring and Fall of 2007. The research study was conducted in two phases with a total of 150 participants. Analysis of the data sought to describe the diversity of conceptions of geography as well as the diversity of conceptions of learning geography held by this participant group. Three conceptions of geography emerged from the data analysis. Two of the three conceptions represent a surface (or shallow) conception of geography and one conception was interpreted to be relational in nature. Four conceptions of learning of geography were found. One of these conceptions of learning geography represents the highest level of phenomenographic categorization: "growing or changing as a person or teacher." Overall the data suggests that the participants of the study have a more advanced understanding of pedagogy than of the content of geography. This apparent disconnect between the conceptions of the content of a subject and the conceptions of learning that subject has not been previously reported in the academic literature.

  9. Antiviral CD8(+) T Cells Restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Exist during Natural HIV Infection and Exhibit Clonal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lamothe, Pedro A; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kazer, Samuel W; Cole, Michael B; Shalek, Alex K; Yosef, Nir; Jones, R Brad; Donaghey, Faith; Nwonu, Chioma; Jani, Priya; Clayton, Gina M; Crawford, Frances; White, Janice; Montoya, Alana; Power, Karen; Allen, Todd M; Streeck, Hendrik; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Picker, Louis J; Kappler, John W; Walker, Bruce D

    2016-10-18

    CD8(+) T cell recognition of virus-infected cells is characteristically restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, although rare examples of MHC class II restriction have been reported in Cd4-deficient mice and a macaque SIV vaccine trial using a recombinant cytomegalovirus vector. Here, we demonstrate the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses with antiviral properties in a small subset of HIV-infected individuals. In these individuals, T cell receptor β (TCRβ) analysis revealed that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cells underwent clonal expansion and mediated killing of HIV-infected cells. In one case, these cells comprised 12% of circulating CD8(+) T cells, and TCRα analysis revealed two distinct co-expressed TCRα chains, with only one contributing to binding of the class II HLA-peptide complex. These data indicate that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses can exist in a chronic human viral infection, and may contribute to immune control. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Saliva Versus Plasma Bioequivalence of Azithromycin in Humans: Validation of Class I Drugs of the Salivary Excretion Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, Nasir; Arafat, Tawfiq; Hamadi, Hazim; Hamadi, Salim; Al-Adham, Ibrahim

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare human pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence metrics in saliva versus plasma for azithromycin as a model class I drug of the Salivary Excretion Classification System (SECS). A pilot, open-label, two-way crossover bioequivalence study was done, and involved a single 500-mg oral dose of azithromycin given to eight healthy subjects under fasting conditions, followed by a 3-week washout period. Blood and unstimulated saliva samples were collected over 72 h and deep frozen until analysis by a validated liquid chromatography with mass spectroscopy method. The pharmacokinetic parameters and bioequivalence metrics of azithromycin were calculated by non-compartment analysis using WinNonlin V5.2. Descriptive statistics and dimensional analysis of the pharmacokinetic parameters of azithromycin were performed using Microsoft Excel. PK-Sim V5.6 was used to estimate the effective intestinal permeability of azithromycin. No statistical differences were shown in area under the concentration curves to 72 h (AUC0-72), maximum measured concentration (C max) and time to maximum concentration (T max) between test and reference azithromycin products (P > 0.05) in the saliva matrix and in the plasma matrix. Due to the high intra-subject variability and low sample size of this pilot study, the 90% confidence intervals of AUC0-72 and C max did not fall within the acceptance range (80-125%). However, saliva levels were higher than that of plasma, with a longer salivary T max. The mean saliva/plasma concentration of test and reference were 2.29 and 2.33, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation ratios of saliva/plasma of AUC0-72, C max and T max for test were 2.65 ± 1.59, 1.51 ± 0.49 and 1.85 ± 1.4, while for the reference product they were 3.37 ± 2.20, 1.57 ± 0.77 and 2.6 ± 1.27, respectively. A good correlation of R = 0.87 between plasma and saliva concentrations for both test and reference products was also observed

  11. Google Earth in the middle school geography classroom: Its impact on spatial literacy and place geography understanding of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Kerri S. W.

    Success in today's globalized, multi-dimensional, and connected world requires individuals to have a variety of skill sets -- i.e. oracy, numeracy, literacy, as well as the ability to think spatially. Student's spatial literacy, based on various national and international assessment results, indicates that even though there have been gains in U.S. scores over the past decade, overall performance, including those specific to spatial skills, are still below proficiency. Existing studies focused on the potential of virtual learning environment technology to reach students in a variety of academic areas, but a need still exists to study specifically the phenomenon of using Google Earth as a potentially more useful pedagogical tool to develop spatial literacy than the currently employed methods. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which graphicacy achievement scores of students who were immersed in a Google Earth environment were different from students who were provided with only two-dimensional instruction for developing spatial skills. Situated learning theory and the work of Piaget and Inhelder's Child's Conception of Space provided the theoretical grounding from which this study evolved. The National Research Council's call to develop spatial literacy, as seen in Learning to Think Spatially , provided the impetus to begin research. The target population (N = 84) for this study consisted of eighth grade geography students at an upper Midwest Jr. High School during the 2009-2010 academic year. Students were assigned to the control or experimental group based on when they had geography class. Control group students ( n = 44) used two-dimensional PowerPoint images to complete activities, while experimental group students (n = 40) were immersed in the three-dimensional Google Earth world for activity completion. Research data was then compiled and statistically analyzed to answer five research questions developed for this study. One-way ANOVAs were

  12. Essential maths skills for AS/A-level geography

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Don't let your students miss out on easy marks; help them improve their skills and feel confident about the maths they need for AS/A-level Geography with this essential guide. If your students struggle with student t-test or Spearman rank correlation, this is the book for them. This textbook companion will improve students' essential maths skills for geography, whichever awarding body specification you're following. You can use it throughout the course, whenever you feel your students need some extra help. - Develop understanding of both maths and geography using worked examples and

  13. (Hardly anyone listening? Writing silent geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Boyd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1984, J. Douglas Porteous challenged the geography world to silence. True geographical appreciation cannot be expressed in prose; the logical conclusion is for geographers to be silent. Given that they cannot be silent, Porteous advocated nontraditional writing, such as poetry. In 1994, Paul Cloke illustrated the power of reflective narrative for a geographer grappling to understand the world. In 1998, I started writing geographic poetry. In 2012, I draw these strands together in this reflective essay, drawing on a poetic journey over a decade old now. Can I reflect a sense of place or place-making that transcends traditional geographical expression? Did Porteous truly open a geographic window otherwise closed to me? I conclude the poetry does create geographical sense and sensibility, but more as constructed possibilities than as objective realities. The poetry provides glimpses into the experiences of geographical displacement encountered by many New Australians, and thus may best be considered as metageographical expressions.

  14. STUDY ON GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS’ INTERNET USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ELIZA DULAMĂ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the behavior of a sample of 30 third-year students of various majors of the Faculty of Geography, “Babeş-Bolyai” University of ClujNapoca, Romania, regarding the Internet use. We applied a questionnaire containing 15 items related to: Internet activities performed; length of time students spend on the Internet; devices used to access the Internet; types of materials that students downloaded, read, viewed, forwarded or posted on the Internet; types of applications used. Taking into account the time students spent daily on the Internet and correlated with other responses we concluded that their concerns were closely related to the Internet, whether it was about communication, career, or personal life.

  15. Shakespearian Biography and the Geography of Collaboration

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    Katherine Scheil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The essay looks at the possibilities for reconciling two vibrant strands of Shakespeare studies. Many scholars have persuasively argued that Shakespeare’s plays were created within the collaborative environment of the London playhouses, involving a variety of influences within the performance network of early modern London. Conversely, recent archaeological work at New Place, Shakespeare’s home in Stratford, convincingly maintains that Shakespeare would have spent the majority of his time here, and not in London. Could Shakespeare have collaborated if he was not based in London? And if his primary residence was in Stratford, how could he have contributed as a collaborator with other playwrights? Resolving the contradictions between these two divergent models is particularly urgent for biographers, who have to chart a geography of Shakespeare’s writing career amid his two locales.

  16. Activation of human T cells by major histocompatability complex class II expressing neutrophils: proliferation in the presence of superantigen, but not tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Liu, C; Guyre, P M; Wardwell, K; O'Neil, J; Guo, T L; Christian, T P; Mudzinski, S P; Gosselin, E J

    1997-06-01

    The primary function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in the immune response appears to be acute phagocytic clearance of foreign pathogens and release of inflammatory mediators. Consistent with their assumed lack of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, PMN have not been considered to play a role in antigen presentation and T-cell activation. However, recent reports have shown that human PMN can express MHC class II molecules both in vitro and in vivo after stimulation with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Thus, under appropriate conditions, PMN could play a significant role in immune regulation, including T-cell activation. In this report, we demonstrate that human class II-expressing PMN can serve as accessory cells in superantigen (SAg)-mediated T-cell activation. This accessory activity for SAg presentation was present only after induction of MHC class II expression, and was especially pronounced following culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma, which acted synergistically to induce MHC class II molecules on PMN. Moreover, the level of MHC class II expression and the magnitude of SAg-induced T-cell responses were found to be highly correlated and distinctly donor dependent, with PMN from some donors repeatedly showing fivefold higher responses than PMN from other donors. On the other hand, culture of PMN with GM-CSF plus IFN-gamma under conditions that resulted in optimal MHC class II expression did not enable them to function as antigen-presenting cells for either intact tetanus toxoid (TT) or for a TT peptide. These results delineate a new pathway for T-cell activation by SAg that may play an important role in the severity of SAg-induced inflammatory responses. They also identify a donor-specific polymorphism for induction of PMN MHC class II expression which may be of significance for therapies involving GM-CSF and IFN-gamma.

  17. A Fractal Perspective on Scale in Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scale is a fundamental concept that has attracted persistent attention in geography literature over the past several decades. However, it creates enormous confusion and frustration, particularly in the context of geographic information science, because of scale-related issues such as image resolution and the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP. This paper argues that the confusion and frustration arise from traditional Euclidean geometric thinking, in which locations, directions, and sizes are considered absolute, and it is now time to revise this conventional thinking. Hence, we review fractal geometry, together with its underlying way of thinking, and compare it to Euclidean geometry. Under the paradigm of Euclidean geometry, everything is measurable, no matter how big or small. However, most geographic features, due to their fractal nature, are essentially unmeasurable or their sizes depend on scale. For example, the length of a coastline, the area of a lake, and the slope of a topographic surface are all scale-dependent. Seen from the perspective of fractal geometry, many scale issues, such as the MAUP, are inevitable. They appear unsolvable, but can be dealt with. To effectively deal with scale-related issues, we present topological and scaling analyses illustrated by street-related concepts such as natural streets, street blocks, and natural cities. We further contend that one of the two spatial properties, spatial heterogeneity, is de facto the fractal nature of geographic features, and it should be considered the first effect among the two, because it is global and universal across all scales, which should receive more attention from practitioners of geography.

  18. Framework for the Analysis of Geography of Transnational Corporations Investments Abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexey V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a methodology for studying the geography of companies — an area of human geography that remains understudied in Russia. The authors refer to foreign direct investment (FDI studies to stress the importance of analysing individual transnational corporations. Special attention is paid to FDI statistics, including international statistics provided by IMF, OECD, and UNCTAD, the official data of central banks on FDI destinations, and information on companies’ assets by geographical segments. The article emphasises limitations of classical localisation concepts (e. g. A. Lösch’s theory and key concepts of transnationalisation (e. g. J. H. Dunning’s ‘eclectic paradigm’, R. Vernon’s ‘product life cycle’, and the ‘flying geese paradigm’ developed by Japanese authors. Dynamic localisation concepts (e. g. the Uppsala model and hierarchical/wave diffusion models are considered an important contribution to the existing theoretical framework for studying FDI geography. Various patterns of spatial d istribution of FDI are examined taking Russian transboundary investments, including those distorted by the ‘neighbourhood effect’ as an example.

  19. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Kasper

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6 mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  20. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  1. Assessment of three classes of DNA adducts in human placentas from smoking and non-snoking women in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three classes of DNA damage were assessed in human placentas collected (2000-2004) from 51 women living in the Teplice region of the Czech Republic, a mining area considered to have some of the worst environmental pollution in Europe in the 1980s. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ...

  2. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between th

  3. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  4. The Use of Project Work in Undergraduate Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, John; Bowlby, Sophia

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of optional group projects for third-year college-level geography students. The authors conclude that this format, besides being intellectually rewarding, teaches students valuable research, problem solving, and social skills. (AM)

  5. Rethinking postgraduate education in geography: The case of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Droogleever Fortuijn

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses reforms in postgraduate education in geography in the Netherlands in the context of Europeanization and globalization. Europeanization and globalization have resulted in challenges as well as opportunities for students and universities. In terms of internationalization, European

  6. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  7. The Use of Project Work in Undergraduate Geography Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, John; Bowlby, Sophia

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of optional group projects for third-year college-level geography students. The authors conclude that this format, besides being intellectually rewarding, teaches students valuable research, problem solving, and social skills. (AM)

  8. Geography students learn more about risk and vulnerability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murambadoro, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the outreach programme the South African Risk and Vulnerability Atlas (SARVA) was introduced to geography students of the Society of South African Geographers Students. The students were attending their annual conference hosted...

  9. Russian Socio-Economic Geography: Status, Challenges, Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov Vasilii

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The socio-economic geography studies the processes, characteristics and patterns of spatial development. In the recent decades, however, this area of scientific investigation has failed its promise, which happened for a number of external and internal reasons. The main external reason is the development of "consumer society", which does not require the search of new space and therefore ignores the "spatial" science, geography. Internal reason is the blurring of socio-economic geography along the variety of new lines of research. The discipline was, in many ways, redundant, and unselective in the application of theoretical and methodological tools liberally borrowed from other branches of both geography and economics. The only way this discipline can return to its former glory is by going all the way back to doing proper spatial research.

  10. An Elaboration of the Fundamental Themes in Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Richard G.; Petersen, James F.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the 1984 publication of the Joint Committee on Geographic Education's "Guidelines for Geographic Education: Elementary and Secondary Schools" was a landmark in the national reform movement in geography education. (CFR)

  11. Family Migration History: A Project in Introductory Cultural Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrich, Barbara E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an activity intended to heighten teaching effectiveness and student interest in college-level introductory cultural geography. By tracing their family's migration history, students experience a sense of time, place, and cultural heritage. (Author)

  12. Improving Secondary School Geography Students' Positive Attitude Towards Map Reading Through Computer Simulation Instructional Package in Bida, Niger State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.C. Falode

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated effectiveness of computer simulation instruction on the attitude of geography students towards map reading in Bida, Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students attitude. The research was a quazi-experimental design. Intact classes of 160 senior secondary school class two students were drawn from two purposively selected secondary schools within Bida and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group (82 students was exposed to computer simulation instructional package (CSIP while their counterparts in the control group (78 students was taught the same concept of map reading using lecture method. Attitude questionnaire named QGSAMR was used for data collection. The releaibility coefficient of 0.83 was obtained using Cronbach alpha formula. The QGSAMR was administered to students as pretest and post‐test. The students pretest and posttest attitude scores were analyzed using t‐test statistics. The results indicated that there was significant difference between the attitude scores of the two groups in favour of students exposed to computer simulation instructional package. The result however indicated that there was no significant difference between the attitude of male and female students exposed to the package. It was therefore recommended among others, that, computer simulation instructional package should be adopted in teaching and learning of geography as the package would help to improve students attitude towards geography and in turn leads to improved performance.

  13. Humanizing π-class glutathione S-transferase regulation in a mouse model alters liver toxicity in response to acetaminophen overdose.

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    Matthew P Vaughn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Yet despite high protein sequence homology, expression of π-class GSTs, the most abundant of the enzymes, varies significantly between species. In mouse liver, hepatocytes exhibit high mGstp expression, while in human liver, hepatocytes contain little or no hGSTP1 mRNA or hGSTP1 protein. π-class GSTs are known to be critical determinants of liver responses to drugs and toxins: when treated with high doses of acetaminophen, mGstp1/2+/+ mice suffer marked liver damage, while mGstp1/2-/- mice escape liver injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more faithfully model the contribution of π-class GSTs to human liver toxicology, we introduced hGSTP1, with its exons, introns, and flanking sequences, into the germline of mice carrying disrupted mGstp genes. In the resultant hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- strain, π-class GSTs were regulated differently than in wild-type mice. In the liver, enzyme expression was restricted to bile duct cells, Kupffer cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells, reminiscent of human liver, while in the prostate, enzyme production was limited to basal epithelial cells, reminiscent of human prostate. The human patterns of hGSTP1 transgene regulation were accompanied by human patterns of DNA methylation, with bisulfite genomic sequencing revealing establishment of an unmethylated CpG island sequence encompassing the gene promoter. Unlike wild-type or mGstp1/2-/- mice, when hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice were overdosed with acetaminophen, liver tissues showed limited centrilobular necrosis, suggesting that π-class GSTs may be critical determinants of toxin-induced hepatocyte injury even when not expressed by hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By recapitulating human π-class GST expression, hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice may better model human drug and xenobiotic toxicology.

  14. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

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    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  15. Signaling via class IA Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K in human, breast-derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Juvin

    Full Text Available We have addressed the differential roles of class I Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K in human breast-derived MCF10a (and iso-genetic derivatives and MDA-MB 231 and 468 cells. Class I PI3Ks are heterodimers of p110 catalytic (α, β, δ and γ and p50-101 regulatory subunits and make the signaling lipid, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5P3 that can activate effectors, eg protein kinase B (PKB, and responses, eg migration. The PtdIns(3,4,5P3-3-phosphatase and tumour-suppressor, PTEN inhibits this pathway. p110α, but not other p110s, has a number of onco-mutant variants that are commonly found in cancers. mRNA-seq data shows that MCF10a cells express p110β>>α>δ with undetectable p110γ. Despite this, EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB depended upon p110α-, but not β- or δ- activity. EGF-stimulated chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, was also dependent upon p110α, but not β- or δ- activity. In the presence of single, endogenous alleles of onco-mutant p110α (H1047R or E545K, basal, but not EGF-stimulated, phosphorylation of PKB was increased and the effect of EGF was fully reversed by p110α inhibitors. Cells expressing either onco-mutant displayed higher basal motility and EGF-stimulated chemokinesis.This latter effect was, however, only partially-sensitive to PI3K inhibitors. In PTEN(-/- cells, basal and EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB was substantially increased, but the p110-dependency was variable between cell types. In MDA-MB 468s phosphorylation of PKB was significantly dependent on p110β, but not α- or δ- activity; in PTEN(-/- MCF10a it remained, like the parental cells, p110α-dependent. Surprisingly, loss of PTEN suppressed basal motility and EGF-stimulated chemokinesis. These results indicate that; p110α is required for EGF signaling to PKB and chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis; onco-mutant alleles of p110α augment signaling in the absence of EGF and may increase motility, in part, via acutely

  16. Down-regulation of human leukocyte antigens class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells from subjects in region of high-incidence gastrointestinal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-mian; LI Ying-jie; GUAN Xiao; YANG Xiao-yun; GAO Xi-mei; YANG Xiao-jing; WANG Li-shui; ZOU Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Background Many types of human tumors can suppress the immune system to enhance their survival. Loss or down-regulation of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class I on tumors is considered to be a major mechanism of tumor immune escape. Our previous studies found that HLA class I on peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was significantly lower in gastric cancer patients. The present study made an analysis of HLA class I expression on peripheral-blood T lymphocytes and NK cells from subjects of Lijiadian village, a village with high-incidence gastrointestinal tumor. Methods A total of 181 villagers from Lijiadian village and 153 normal controls from the Department of Health Examination Center were enrolled in this study. Using a multi-tumor markers detection system, these villagers were divided into two groups: high-risk group (tumor markers positive group) and low-risk group (tumor markers negative group). The percentage of T lymphocytes and NK cells and levels of HLA class I on their surface were determined in these subjects by flow cytometry.Results Percentages of T lymphocytes and NK cells in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells did not vary with age. The expression level of HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells was not affected by age or gender, but was significantly down-regulated in Lijiadian villagers (P<0.05), especially on the surface of NK cells (P<0.01). Compared with the low-risk group, there was a significant reduction of HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes (P <0.05) and NK cells (P <0.05) in the high-risk group.Conclusions HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells may be involved in tumorigenesis and development of gastrointestinal tumor, and understanding their changes in expression may provide new insights into the mechanism of tumor immunity.

  17. A Comparison of Content in Syllabus-Based Senior Geography Textbooks and Standards-Based Senior Geography Textbooks in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu

    2011-01-01

    As a result of China's geography education reform, the Geography Standards for Senior Secondary Schools was released in 2003. Being the first kind over the past seven decades, the Standards put forward some changes for senior geography education. For the textbooks' crucial role in Chinese educational system, the changes in geographical education…

  18. Natural selection on female life-history traits in relation to socio-economic class in pre-industrial human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni E Pettay

    Full Text Available Life-history theory predicts that resource scarcity constrains individual optimal reproductive strategies and shapes the evolution of life-history traits. In species where the inherited structure of social class may lead to consistent resource differences among family lines, between-class variation in resource availability should select for divergence in optimal reproductive strategies. Evaluating this prediction requires information on the phenotypic selection and quantitative genetics of life-history trait variation in relation to individual lifetime access to resources. Here, we show using path analysis how resource availability, measured as the wealth class of the family, affected the opportunity and intensity of phenotypic selection on the key life-history traits of women living in pre-industrial Finland during the 1800s and 1900s. We found the highest opportunity for total selection and the strongest selection on earlier age at first reproduction in women of the poorest wealth class, whereas selection favoured older age at reproductive cessation in mothers of the wealthier classes. We also found clear differences in female life-history traits across wealth classes: the poorest women had the lowest age-specific survival throughout their lives, they started reproduction later, delivered fewer offspring during their lifetime, ceased reproduction younger, had poorer offspring survival to adulthood and, hence, had lower fitness compared to the wealthier women. Our results show that the amount of wealth affected the selection pressure on female life-history in a pre-industrial human population.

  19. THE USE OF LAPTOP COMPUTERS, TABLETS AND GOOGLE EARTH/GOOGLE MAPS APPLICATIONS DURING GEOGRAPHY CLUB SEMINARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIN GALBIN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we aim to investigate the use of Google Earth and Google Maps Applications on tablet and laptop computers. The research was carried out during the Geography Club seminars organized at “Radu Petrescu” High School in the 2013-2014 school year. The research involved 13 students in various gymnasium and high school grades. The activities included: navigation with Google Earth/Maps, image capturing techniques, virtual tours, measuring distances or river lengths, identifying relief forms, and locating geographical components of the environment. In order to retrieve students’ opinions regarding the use of tablets and laptop computers with these two applications, they were asked to respond to a questionnaire after the activities took place. Conclusions revealed that students enjoyed using these applications with laptops and tablets and that the learning process during Geography classes became more interesting.

  20. The summary of educational materials on geography lessons with suggestopedic education technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вікторія Салімон

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes how a generalization principle in educational material can be applied on geography classes with suggestopedic training technology as one of the best ways to remember the information. The author has analyzed the use of a global approach in education, including geography classes. The suggestopedic learning is increasingly gaining momentum due to the intensification of the educational process. Suggestopedia is known as a pedagogical concept of the effective knowledge transfer through unobtrusive intervention into the subconscious in positive and joyful way. Such training allows learners to take a large amount of the information, improving the mental state of learners. Their mental activity is exacerbated in these conditions. Globalization is a special kind of the educational material generalization on the basis of certain patterns of the specific discipline, which involves combining a few topics in one lesson. After analyzing innovative teaching methods, including globalization of the educational material on the lessons of geography with suggestopedic technology training the results of these methods study have been presented, the essence of the use and application of the globalization of educational material on suggestopedic lessons as well as the feasibility of using it in the classroom have been revealed. The article pays attention to the generalization of educational topics from the major psychological patterns of the information perception using globalization of educational material on the lessons of geography with suggestopedic training technology, which in turn makes it possible not only to maintain, but also to develop children’s worldview integrity. The globalization of educational material not only leads to being able to think globally, but also to a global lifestyle, reveals the spare capacity in training and improves memorization and understanding of the studied material. Guidelines for the

  1. The Geography Curriculum and Its Contents: Preparing for the Twenty-First Century in Argentina Geography Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Gloria Z. de

    1996-01-01

    Considers the various educational philosophies governing geography instruction in Argentina and places them in historical perspective. Contrasts the positivist and historicist approaches and discusses the current curriculum. Includes summaries of proposed changes in the curriculum emphasizing social education. (MJP)

  2. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  3. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A;

    1993-01-01

    tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II-induced proliferation...

  4. The role of the ubiquitin system in human cytomegalovirus-mediated degradation of MHC class I heavy chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Gerrit Cornelis

    2006-01-01

    One of the mechanisms used by HCMV to downregulate cell surface expression of the MHC class I complex involves the dislocation of newly synthesized class I heavy chains into the cytosol, where they are degraded by the proteasome. Misfolded ER proteins have been found to be degraded via the same rout

  5. Direct Activation of Human Dendritic Cells by Particle-Bound but Not Soluble MHC Class II Ligand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Baleeiro (Renato); K.H. Wiesmüller (Karl Heinz); L. Dähne (Lars); J. Lademann (Jürgen); J.A. Barbuto (José); P. Walden (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) are key activators of cellular immune responses through their capacity to induce naïve T cells and sustained effector T cell responses. This capacity is a function of their superior efficiency of antigen presentation via MHC class I and class II molecules, and the e

  6. 中国地理学期刊编辑出版研究的综述%Review on Editing and Publishing Research of Geography Journals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵歆

    2015-01-01

    通过全面收集和系统整理中国地理学类期刊编辑发表的编辑出版研究成果,总结分析中国地理期刊在期刊发展方面的特点,包括地理期刊的总体发展、主要期刊的发展历程、英文期刊的发展、中外期刊发展对比等。概括分析了中国主要地理期刊载文、人文地理学科刊文、主要期刊引文分析等方面的统计结果。最后,对中国地理期刊编辑在期刊与学科发展关系、期刊选题和办刊思路、提高期刊编辑质量、防止稿件重复发表、电脑与网络使用方法等5方面的研究做出了全面总结。%Based on the literature of editing and publishing research of geography journals, this article firstly presents the characteristics of China’s journal development, including development of geography journal groups, core journals and English journals, as well as comparisons of geography journals at home and abroad. Then we make a statistical analysis of the papers published in major geography journals, papers related to hu-man geography, and papers cited in core journals. Finally, we summarize what the Chinese geography editors have done in some aspects such as journal and geographical development, manuscript topic and idea creation, editing quality enhancement, plagiarism and duplication prevention, and computer and network application to editing and publishing. Some conclusions can be drawn in this study:Chinese geographers, especially editors, have done much research on the development and comparison of geography journals of China and other coun-tries. In recent years, the number of papers focusing on the development of geography journals has been in-creasing. The geography journal editors not only are engaged in word editing, but also record the achievements obtained in Chinese geographical research. Meanwhile, they have been tracking the international trend of disci-plinary development. Hence, in the past decades, the Chinese geography

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Class I Down-Regulation by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Negative Factor (HIV-1 Nef: What Might We Learn From Natural Sequence Variants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mwimanzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 causes a chronic infection in humans that is characterized by high plasma viremia, progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and severe immunodeficiency resulting in opportunistic disease and AIDS. Viral persistence is mediated in part by the ability of the Nef protein to down-regulate HLA molecules on the infected cell surface, thereby allowing HIV-1 to evade recognition by antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes. Extensive research has been conducted on Nef to determine protein domains that are required for its immune evasion activities and to identify critical cellular co-factors, and our mechanistic understanding of this process is becoming more complete. This review highlights our current knowledge of Nef-mediated HLA class I down-regulation and places this work in the context of naturally occurring sequence variation in this protein. We argue that efforts to fully understand the critical role of Nef for HIV-1 pathogenesis will require greater analysis of patient-derived sequences to elucidate subtle differences in immune evasion activity that may alter clinical outcome.

  8. 历史地理类教育游戏化学习环境的构建--以“郑和下西洋”为例%Construction of Learning Environment with Educational Games in History and Geography Class---taking“ Zheng He’ s Expedition” as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王霞; 黄瑛

    2015-01-01

    教育游戏的合理开展能激发学生的学习兴趣并提高教学效果。根据历史地理类学科和学生的特点,从虚拟空间、信息空间、现实空间三维度构建游戏化学习环境。对于知道、理解、应用层面的低阶思维能力的培养,通过设计开发虚拟空间,让学生在计算机模拟游戏创设的情境中轻松完成知识学习;对于分析、综合、评价层面的高阶思维能力的培养,让学生在教室的现实空间进行角色扮演活动,通过协作学习分析问题和解决问题,体验历史人物的所作所为,并能给予直接的评价。同时,信息空间为虚拟和现实游戏化学习环境提供知识支持。%Reasonable educational games can stimulate students’ interest in learning and improve teaching effectiveness .According to history and geography knowledge and student characteristics ,the learning environment with a three -dimensional game can be built from the virtual space ,information space and real space .Students’ lower-level thinking skills of knowing ,understanding and application can be easily obtained from knowledge learning in virtual space of computer game situations .Students’ high -level thinking skills of analysis ,synthesis and evaluation can be perfected through collaborative learning of analyzing problems and solving problems in classroom .Whether it is to create a virtual space or reality space ,you need to be supported by the knowledge of infor-mation space .

  9. Residential mobility of urban middle classes in the field of parenthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterman, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    There is common understanding that gentrifiers and new middle classes more generally share an urban orientation and may share a ‘metropolitan habitus’. The urban geography of Western metropolises and the formation and reproduction of specific middle-class groups are intrinsically connected. The

  10. High-risk human papillomavirus E7 expression reduces cell-surface MHC class I molecules and increases susceptibility to natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottley, G; Watherston, O G; Hiew, Y-L

    2007-01-01

    a role for E7 in tumour immune evasion. We show that knockdown of E7 expression in HPV16- and HPV18-transformed cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I at the cell surface and reduced susceptibility of these cells to natural...... killer (NK) cells. Tetracycline-regulated induction of HPV16 E7 resulted in reduced expression of cell surface MHC class I molecules and increased NK cell killing. Our results suggest that, for HPV-associated malignancies, reduced MHC class I expression is the result of an active immune evasion strategy......High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major causative agent of cervical cancer and the E6 and E7 genes encode the major HPV oncoproteins. The E7 protein from high-risk HPV types alters cell cycle progression and represses genes encoding components of the antigen-presentation pathway, suggesting...

  11. 自然地理学研究前沿%The Research Forefront of Physical Geography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡运龙; 李双成; 方修琦

    2009-01-01

    The forefront of physical geography research is driven by social needs. The global concern on resources and environment issues and major issues facing sustainable development of China has a series of demands for physical geography. International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, International Human Dimensions Program of Global Environmental Change, World Climate Research Program, Biological Diversity Program and Earth System Science Partnership contain the forefront of physical geography research. China's State Key Basic Research Program, the priority area of development of Earth Sciences Department of National Natural Science Foundation of China, State Science and Technology Support Program etc. have conducted a series of cutting-edge physical geography research. A number of new methods and techniques for physical geography research have emerged in data collection, model simulation, laboratory analysis, studies on physical geographical processes and environmental change and global physical geographical research.%自然地理学的研究前沿是在学科发展和社会需求的共同驱动下形成的.对资源环境问题的全球性关注和我国可持续发展面临的重大问题对自然地理学提出了一系列需求.国际地圈生物圈计划、全球环境变化人文因素计划、世界气候研究计划、生物多样性计划以及地球系统科学联盟中的许多领域包含着自然地理学的研究前沿,我国国家重点基础研究发展计划、国家自然科学基金委员会地球科学部优先发展领域、科技支撑计划等也提出了一系列自然地理学的研究前沿.若干自然地理学的新方法和技术已被应用于数据采集、模型模拟、实验室分析、自然地理过程研究、环境变化研究、全球自然地理学研究.本文概括了所有这些前沿领域和论题.

  12. Anmerkungen zum Konzept einer Sprachengeographie = Annotations to a concept of language geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jordan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Language is without any doubt a societal phenomenon, which is in many more ways related to space. While francophone, anglophone and Spanish geography have developed a kind of language geography or geolinguistics as a subdiscipline of geography, geographers in German-speaking countries pay some attention to this fact only within ethnic geography. The paper highlights some more important spatial aspects of language and proposes to regard language geography as a subdiscipline of cultural geography which has to co-operate closely with linguistics and history.

  13. Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Rankin, P S

    2016-10-01

    We used linear and multivariate models to examine the associations between geography, biodiversity, per capita economic output, national spending on conservation, governance, and cultural traits in 55 countries. Cultural traits and social metrics of modernization correlated positively with national spending on conservation. The global distribution of this spending culture was poorly aligned with the distribution of biodiversity. Specifically, biodiversity was greater in the tropics where cultures tended to spend relatively less on conservation and tended to have higher collectivism, formalized and hierarchical leadership, and weaker governance. Consequently, nations lacking social traits frequently associated with modernization, environmentalism, and conservation spending have the largest component of Earth's biodiversity. This has significant implications for setting policies and priorities for resource management given that biological diversity is rapidly disappearing and cultural traits change slowly. Therefore, we suggest natural resource management adapt to and use characteristics of existing social organization rather than wait for or promote social values associated with conservation spending. Supporting biocultural traditions, engaging leaders to increase conservation commitments, cross-national efforts that complement attributes of cultures, and avoiding interference with nature may work best to conserve nature in collective and hierarchical societies. Spending in modernized nations may be a symbolic response to a symptom of economic development and environmental degradation, and here conservation actions need to ensure that biodiversity is not being lost. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. Scientific values and research innovations of Human-economic Geography in construction of ecological civilization%人文—经济地理学在生态文明建设中的学科价值与学术创新

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊杰; 周侃; 孙威; 陈东

    2013-01-01

    The achievements in the forward-looking human-economic geographic studies on the interactions between natural sphere and human sphere as well as the distribution and evolution mechanism of human living and production activities on the earth' s surface have been playing a prominent role in guiding the scientific decision-making and promoting the orderly territorial development. The Eighteenth National Congress of the Communist Party of China has put the optimization of spatial development pattern as the primary task of ecological civilization; this provides an unprecedented opportunity of development and huge demand for human-economic geography. Based on the analyses of the microscopic differentiation and humanizing tendency caused by the emphasis on mechanism and process studies, and the requirements of multidisciplinary supporting system for the construction of ecological civilization, this paper discusses the comprehensive values of human-economic geography as a research field, and re-recognizes the basic categories of the subject from the aspects of factors and mechanisms, interface and process, functions and structure, scale and its conversion. Specifically, this paper discusses the topics such as: (1) the Equilibrium Model for the balance between comprehensive benefits of economy, ecology and society and the stereo system of production, distribution and consumption; (2) carrying capacity evaluation method, oriented toward the interaction between human system and natural system; (3) the theory for the emergence of territorial functions and the identification method; (4) the research innovation by which the planar space of territorial functions is incorporated into the theoretical framework of spatial structures. Finally, in response to the challenges from the replacements among different subjects, four aspects of disciplinary development path are put forward for the future, including: paying equal attention to academic and ideological contents, making

  15. The Geology of Burma (Myanmar): An Annotated Bibliography of Burma’s Geology, Geography and Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    ecology, geomechanics , human geography, and oceanography. The database provides current coverage of almost 2,000 international journals, including...Oceanographic Literature Review, Geomechanics Abstracts. See: www.elsevier.com GeoRef: see: American Geological Institute, Alexandria, VA, listed above...International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Science & Geomechanics Abstracts. 2. Volume 23, Issue 1, Pages A27-A27. ISSN: 0020-7624. OCLC

  16. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  17. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters

  18. New Geographies of Work: A Case Study from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brita Hermelin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and analyses the geography of work, i.e., the spatial patterns in where paid work is done. The geography of work may diverge from the geography of employment when paid work is done at the premises of client organizations, during commuting, on business trips, on external meetings, at home or at other places. The particular patterns in the geography of work depend on a number of factors, possibilities and constraints. The paper takes its point of departure from the debate about how structural economic changes resulting from evolving service industries and the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT entail new forms for the organization of paid work. Flexibility, reflexivity, flows and places are key concepts. The paper presents a case study from Stockholm that takes a workplace perspective and looks at knowledge-intensive work in a public sector organization. The empirical study analyses data from interviews, time diaries and a questionnaire. We analyse how the geography of work is the result of negotiations between different parties and in different arenas, and how this spatial pattern is the result of the character of work tasks and accessibility of ICT support. The discussion illustrates a complex picture of the coexistence of spatial fix and spatial flexibility, and how this may cause tensions but also convenient solutions for organizing and conducting paid work.

  19. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters

  20. RESEARCH ON GEOGRAPHY TEACHING AND TEACHER EDUCATION IN PORTUGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELSA PACHECO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to contribute to the debate on the significance of geographical education as part of the development of a society in which discussion on how Geography is taught at international scale, and then addresses the intersection between research produced in the reports on t he introduction to professional practice and related study plans, c concerning the 2nd cycle of the teaching of History and Geography, in force since 2010 in Portugal. Based on the outcomes of the discussion, we will consider the research trends and whether or not they are suited to the latest recommendations on geographical education, in particular the training of Geography teachers, according to the assessed proposals which were submitted following the new law regulating the training of Geography teachers in Portugal. Among the main outcomes, we highlighted the diversity of topics addressed in the internship reports and the growing attention to new technologies in the cycle of studies under analysis, which suggests the adequacy of the future Masters in the Teaching of Geography at the University of Porto (starting in 2015/16 to the European recommendations on these matters